WorldWideScience

Sample records for animal tissue samples

  1. Radionuclides in animal tissue samples from various regions of Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the concentration of radioactive substances in animal species from various regions of Austria has been carried out. For bone and liver of deer, radionuclide concentrations typical for central Europe were found. The content of 90Sr were higher in gasteropod shells than in deer bone. Similar concentrations of 90Sr were found in isopods as in snail shells related to fresh weight, but related to Ca content the values in isopods were higher than in all other animals. Based on these results, a study of snail shells and of isopods as bioindicators for 90Sr content in environmental control is indicated. In tissue samples of the same species, but from different regions of Austria, the fallout radionuclide concentrations were found to be related to altitude (90Sr) and to the amount of precipitation (137Cs). These correlation differences could point to a different deposition behaviours of 90Sr and 137Cs, the former being deposited mainly with solid precipitation. This seems plausible since aerosols carried over continental distances show a high sulfate content and alkaline earth metal sulfates are less soluble than alkali sulfates. Examination of absolute concentration values related to fresh tissue weight show high fallout radionuclide concentrations, as compared to natural radionuclide concentration, especially in hard tissues. These fallout levels constitute a significant radioactive load on the biosphere. Due to the long physical half-life of 90Sr and 137Cs, this situation will remain virtually unchanged during the next decades, even if no further nuclear weapons tests are carried out. (G.G.)

  2. Analytical procedure for mapping the distribution of 10B and 99Tc markers in cryo-sections of animal tissue samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a complete, standard analytical procedure for a quantitative use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to map the distribution in animal tissues of exogenous isotopes presents difficulties inherently related to sample preparation and preservation, as well as to the specific application being considered. We have tested in two very different cases a procedure based on the cryo-preparation of samples and calibration standards. The applications under investigation were the mapping of 10B in mouse brain tissue, with relevance to the boron neutron capture therapy, and of the perfusion tracer 99Tc in mouse heart tissue, with relevance to the study of microcirculation and cardiovascular pathologies. Scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled mass spectrometry analysis were used as reference techniques for secondary ion mass spectrometry images and analyte measurements, respectively. Cryo-preparation of tissue sections for ion microscopy proved to be simple and efficient (in terms of structural and chemical integrity) for both brain and heart samples derived from fresh organs. This technique, however, turned out to be reliable only on the brain tissue when applied to the preparation of standards, which required chemical fixation of portions of organs. Brain and heart tissues showed a totally different response to chemical fixation, from both a structural and an analytical point of view. On the one hand, we were able to estimate a relative sensitivity factor for 10B in the cryo-sectioned brain matrix; on the other hand, even without the possibility of an absolute quantification of the 99Tc signal and notwithstanding the presence of an isobaric interference, secondary ion mass spectrometry mapping however proved to be capable to resolve the specific response of the cardiac tissue to the perfusion mechanism.

  3. Analytical procedure for mapping the distribution of 10B and 99Tc markers in cryo-sections of animal tissue samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Ilaria; Menichetti, Luca; Kusmic, Claudia; de las Heras, Laura Aldave; Salvadori, Piero; Fuoco, Roger; Belloni, Fabio; L'Abbate, Antonio; Betti, Maria

    2009-09-01

    The development of a complete, standard analytical procedure for a quantitative use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to map the distribution in animal tissues of exogenous isotopes presents difficulties inherently related to sample preparation and preservation, as well as to the specific application being considered. We have tested in two very different cases a procedure based on the cryo-preparation of samples and calibration standards. The applications under investigation were the mapping of 10B in mouse brain tissue, with relevance to the boron neutron capture therapy, and of the perfusion tracer 99Tc in mouse heart tissue, with relevance to the study of microcirculation and cardiovascular pathologies. Scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled mass spectrometry analysis were used as reference techniques for secondary ion mass spectrometry images and analyte measurements, respectively. Cryo-preparation of tissue sections for ion microscopy proved to be simple and efficient (in terms of structural and chemical integrity) for both brain and heart samples derived from fresh organs. This technique, however, turned out to be reliable only on the brain tissue when applied to the preparation of standards, which required chemical fixation of portions of organs. Brain and heart tissues showed a totally different response to chemical fixation, from both a structural and an analytical point of view. On the one hand, we were able to estimate a relative sensitivity factor for 10B in the cryo-sectioned brain matrix; on the other hand, even without the possibility of an absolute quantification of the 99Tc signal and notwithstanding the presence of an isobaric interference, secondary ion mass spectrometry mapping however proved to be capable to resolve the specific response of the cardiac tissue to the perfusion mechanism.

  4. Analytical procedure for mapping the distribution of {sup 10}B and {sup 99}Tc markers in cryo-sections of animal tissue samples by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Ilaria [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Menichetti, Luca [National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, via G. Moruzzi, 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: luca.m@ifc.cnr.it; Kusmic, Claudia [National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, via G. Moruzzi, 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Aldave de las Heras, Laura [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Salvadori, Piero [National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, via G. Moruzzi, 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fuoco, Roger [University of Pisa, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, via Risorgimento, 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Belloni, Fabio [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: fabio.belloni@ec.europa.eu; L' Abbate, Antonio [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, P.zza Martiri della Liberta, 33, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Betti, Maria [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA-MEL Laboratories, MC 98000 Montecarlo, Principality of Monaco (Monaco)

    2009-09-15

    The development of a complete, standard analytical procedure for a quantitative use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to map the distribution in animal tissues of exogenous isotopes presents difficulties inherently related to sample preparation and preservation, as well as to the specific application being considered. We have tested in two very different cases a procedure based on the cryo-preparation of samples and calibration standards. The applications under investigation were the mapping of {sup 10}B in mouse brain tissue, with relevance to the boron neutron capture therapy, and of the perfusion tracer {sup 99}Tc in mouse heart tissue, with relevance to the study of microcirculation and cardiovascular pathologies. Scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled mass spectrometry analysis were used as reference techniques for secondary ion mass spectrometry images and analyte measurements, respectively. Cryo-preparation of tissue sections for ion microscopy proved to be simple and efficient (in terms of structural and chemical integrity) for both brain and heart samples derived from fresh organs. This technique, however, turned out to be reliable only on the brain tissue when applied to the preparation of standards, which required chemical fixation of portions of organs. Brain and heart tissues showed a totally different response to chemical fixation, from both a structural and an analytical point of view. On the one hand, we were able to estimate a relative sensitivity factor for {sup 10}B in the cryo-sectioned brain matrix; on the other hand, even without the possibility of an absolute quantification of the {sup 99}Tc signal and notwithstanding the presence of an isobaric interference, secondary ion mass spectrometry mapping however proved to be capable to resolve the specific response of the cardiac tissue to the perfusion mechanism.

  5. Ultrasensitive and rapid screening of mercury(II) ions by dual labeling colorimetric method in aqueous samples and applications in mercury-poisoned animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rapid and ultrasensitive screening of mercury ions are achieved by using gold nanoparticles based colorimetric method. • Dual labeling strategy is adopted for sensing signal amplification. • The proposed method is successfully used for analysis of mercury-poisoned animal tissues. - Abstract: Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of trace heavy metal mercury(II) ions (Hg2+) are of significant importance due to the induced serious risks for environment and human health. This presented article reports the gold nanoparticle-based dual labeling colorimetric method (Dual-COLO) for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Hg2+ using the specific thymine–Hg2+–thymine (T–Hg2+–T) as recognition system and the dual labeling strategy for signal amplification. Both qualitative and quantitative detections of Hg2+ are achieved successfully in aqueous samples. More importantly, the achieved detection limit of 0.005 ng mL−1 (0.025 nM) without any instruments is very competitive to other rapid detection methods even ICP-MS based methods. This Dual-COLO method is also applied directly for real water sample monitoring and, more importantly, applied in analysis of mercury poisoned animal tissues and body fluidic samples, indicating a potentially powerful and promising tool for environmental monitoring and food safety control

  6. Ultrasensitive and rapid screening of mercury(II) ions by dual labeling colorimetric method in aqueous samples and applications in mercury-poisoned animal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi; Wang, Xin; Xue, Feng [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zheng, Lei [School of Medical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Liu, Jian [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Yan, Feng [Applied Physics Department, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Xia, Fan, E-mail: xiafan@hust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Wei, E-mail: chenweishnu@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2015-04-08

    Highlights: • Rapid and ultrasensitive screening of mercury ions are achieved by using gold nanoparticles based colorimetric method. • Dual labeling strategy is adopted for sensing signal amplification. • The proposed method is successfully used for analysis of mercury-poisoned animal tissues. - Abstract: Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of trace heavy metal mercury(II) ions (Hg{sup 2+}) are of significant importance due to the induced serious risks for environment and human health. This presented article reports the gold nanoparticle-based dual labeling colorimetric method (Dual-COLO) for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Hg{sup 2+} using the specific thymine–Hg{sup 2+}–thymine (T–Hg{sup 2+}–T) as recognition system and the dual labeling strategy for signal amplification. Both qualitative and quantitative detections of Hg{sup 2+} are achieved successfully in aqueous samples. More importantly, the achieved detection limit of 0.005 ng mL{sup −1} (0.025 nM) without any instruments is very competitive to other rapid detection methods even ICP-MS based methods. This Dual-COLO method is also applied directly for real water sample monitoring and, more importantly, applied in analysis of mercury poisoned animal tissues and body fluidic samples, indicating a potentially powerful and promising tool for environmental monitoring and food safety control.

  7. Evaluation of postmortem tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection and radiochemical analysis of postmortem tissue samples (lung, liver, bone and tracheobronchial lymph nodes) from individuals formerly residing in the vicinity of the Hanford project continued during the past year. Postmortem tissue samples and blood samples were also analyzed for the U. S. Transuranium Registry (USTR). During the year commencing November 1, 1974, 85 analyses for plutonium-238 and plutonium-239+240 were performed on samples from the Hanford locality, and 41 analyses for plutonium-238 and plutonium-239+240 on samples obtained from the USTR. Plutonium-242 is the tracer of choice for yield determination in the alpha energy analysis of tissues for 238Pu and 239Pu

  8. The Adipose Tissue in Farm Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauerwein, Helga; Bendixen, Emoke; Restelli, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    and immune cells. The scientific interest in adipose tissue is largely based on the worldwide increasing prevalence of obesity in humans; in contrast, obesity is hardly an issue for farmed animals that are fed according to their well-defined needs. Adipose tissue is nevertheless of major importance...... in these animals, as the adipose percentage of the bodyweight is a major determinant for the efficiency of transferring nutrients from feed into food products and thus for the economic value from meat producing animals. In dairy animals, the importance of adipose tissue is based on its function as stromal...... and metabolic disorders. We herein provide a general overview of adipose tissue functions and its importance in farm animals. This review will summarize recent achievements in farm animal adipose tissue proteomics, mainly in cattle and pigs, but also in poultry, i.e. chicken and in farmed fish. Proteomics...

  9. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results. PMID:26883152

  10. Use of alkaline or enzymatic sample pretreatment prior to characterization of gold nanoparticles in animal tissue by single-particle ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löschner, Katrin; Brabrand, Myung Suk Jung; Sloth, Jens Jørgen;

    2014-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in single-particle mode (spICPMS) is a promising method for the detection of metal-containing nanoparticles (NPs) and the quantification of their size and number concentration. Whereas existing studies mainly focus on NPs suspended in aqueous matrices......, not much is known about the applicability of spICPMS for determination of NPs in complex matrices such as biological tissues. In the present study, alkaline and enzymatic treatments were applied to solubilize spleen samples from rats, which had been administered 60-nm gold nanoparticles (Au......NPs) intravenously. The results showed that similar size distributions of AuNPs were obtained independent of the sample preparation method used. Furthermore, the quantitative results for AuNP mass concentration obtained with spICPMS following alkaline sample pretreatment coincided with results for total gold...

  11. DETECTION OF GIARDIA MURIS AND GIARDIA LAMBLIA CYSTS BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE IN ANIMAL TISSUES AND FECAL SAMPLES SUBJECTED TO CYCLES OF FREEZING AND THAWING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of freezing and thawing on the detection of selected Giardia spp. cysts were investigated using immunofluorescence, bright field microscopy, and low voltage scanning electron microscopy (SEM). iardia muris cysts were obtained from either animal carcasses, fecal pellet...

  12. Rehearsal: Sample Canister in Cleanroom (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Rehearsal: Sample Canister in Cleanroom animation This movie shows rehearsal of the initial processing of the sample return capsule when it is taken to a temporary cleanroom at Utah's Test and Training Range.

  13. Connective tissue disorders in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Jaroslava

    2014-01-01

    Though soft tissue disorders have been recognized and described to some detail in several types of domestic animals and small mammals for some years, not much progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical basis and pathogenesis of these diseases in animals. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome described in dogs already in 1943 and later in cats affects mainly skin in these animals. The involved skin is thin and hyperextensible with easily inflicted injuries resulting in hemorrhagic wounds and atrophic scars. Joint laxity and dislocation common in people are less frequently found in dogs. No systemic complications, such as organ rupture or cardiovascular problems which have devastating consequences in people have been described in cats and dogs. The diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and on light or electron microscopic features of disorganized and fragmented collagen fibrils. Several cases of bovine and ovine dermatosparaxis analogous to human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC were found to be caused by mutations in the procollagen I N-proteinase (pnPI) or ADAMTS2 gene, though mutations in other sites are likely responsible for other types of dermatosparaxis. Cattle suffering from a form of Marfan syndrome were described to have aortic dilatation and aneurysm together with ocular abnormalities and skeletal involvement. As in people mutations at different sites of bovine FBN1 may be responsible for Marfan phenotype. Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), or hyperelastosis cutis, has been recognized in several horse breeds as affecting primarily skin, and, occasionally, tendons. A mutation in cyclophilin B, a chaperon involved in proper folding of collagens, has been identified in some cases. Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis (DSLD) affects primarily tendons and ligaments of certain horse breeds. New data from our laboratory showed excessive accumulation of proteoglycans in organs with high content of connective tissues. We have

  14. TEGA Sample Delivery and Analysis (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows NASA's Phoenix Lander's Robotic Arm scoop delivering a sample to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and how samples are analyzed within the instrument. TEGA has eight tiny ovens for measuring constituents in the atmosphere and in the soil, including possible organic constituents and the melting point of ice. The scoop drops soil onto a fine mesh screen between TEGA's open doors. Some soil passes through the screen, which vibrates, into the throat of a funnel, where a spinning device called the 'whirligig' aids delivery into one half of a tiny oven. The soil sample is represented here by the white chip. The filled oven half then rotates and mates with the other oven half, closing the complete oven so sample heating can begin. The purple coil in this animation is the spring that moves the oven halves together. Heating occurs at successively higher temperatures over several days. The energy required to heat the sample is measured to discover its thermal properties. Gases driven off during sample heating pass through tubing to the mass spectrometer for analysis. Note that the exterior doors above the screen never close after sample delivery. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Animation of TEGA Sample Delivery and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image to view the animation This animation shows NASA's Phoenix Lander's Robotic Arm scoop delivering a sample to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and how samples are analyzed within the instrument. TEGA has eight tiny ovens for measuring constituents in the atmosphere and in the soil, including possible organic constituents and the melting point of ice. The scoop drops soil onto a fine mesh screen between TEGA's open doors. Some soil passes through the screen, which vibrates, into the throat of a funnel, where a spinning device called the 'whirligig' aids delivery into one half of a tiny oven. The soil sample is represented here by the white chip. The filled oven half then rotates and mates with the other oven half, closing the complete oven so sample heating can begin. The purple coil in this animation is the spring that moves the oven halves together. Heating occurs at successively higher temperatures over several days. The energy required to heat the sample is measured to discover its thermal properties. Gases driven off during sample heating pass through tubing to the mass spectrometer for analysis. Note that the exterior doors above the screen never close after sample delivery. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Chloroplasts as functional organelles in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trench, R K; Greene, R W; Bystrom, B G

    1969-08-01

    The marine gastropod molluscs Tridachia crispata, Tridachiella diomedea, and Placobranchus ianthobapsus (Sacoglossa, Opisthobranchia) possess free functional chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive diverticula, as determined by observations on ultrastructure, pigment analyses, and experiments on photosynthetic capacity. In the light, the chloroplasts incorporate H(14)CO(3) (-)in situ. Reduced radiocarbon is translocated to various chloroplast-free tissues in the animals. The slugs feed on siphonaceous algae from which the chloroplasts are derived. Pigments from the slugs and from known siphonaceous algae, when separated chromatographically and compared, showed similar components. Absorption spectra of extracts of slugs and algae were very similar. The larvae of the slugs are pigment-free up to the post-veliger stage, suggesting that chloroplasts are acquired de novo. with each new generation. PMID:5792329

  17. Animal Models for Vascular Tissue-Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Due to rise in cardiovascular disease throughout the world, there is increasing demand for small diameter blood vessels as replacement grafts. The present review focuses on the animal models that have been used to test small-diameter TEVs with emphasis on the attributes of each model. Small animal models are used to test short-term patency and address mechanistic hypotheses; and large, pre-clinical animal models are employed to test long-term patency, remodeling and function in an environment...

  18. Human Cell Line and Tissue Sample Authentication

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, Margaret M.; McLaren, Robert S.; Hebble, Kathryn D.; Ready, Kim; Storts, Douglas R.; Hooper, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Background: Short Tandem Repeat (STR) genotyping analysis is a proven technology for uniquely identifying virtually all human samples. STR genotyping was adopted as the preferred technology for identification of human tissue culture cell lines by the ATCC Standards Development Organization (ASN-0002: Authentication of Human Cell Lines: Standardization of STR Profiling). We developed new automation-compatible protocols/systems for generating STR profiles from human cell lines or tissue samples...

  19. [Animal experiments concerning the autoimplantation of splenic tissue (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhles, H; Willital, G H; Krebs, C; Kaduk, B; Herzog, K H

    1981-09-01

    15 male rabbits were divided into three groups. The animals in group 1 were splenectomized. In group 2 pulpa tissue from the cut surface of the spleen was left in the abdominal cavity. Group 3 was sham operated. After 15 months all animals from group 2 showed particles of histologically intact splenic tissue mainly on the parietal peritoneum of the abdominal wall. The implications of the autoimplantation of splenic tissue during splenectomy are discussed. PMID:7314957

  20. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  1. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm{sup 3} blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  2. Degenerate polygonal tilings in simple animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, Primoz; Hocevar, Ana

    2009-03-01

    We study 2D polygonal tilings as models of the en-face structure of single-layer biological tissues. Using numerical simulations, we explore the phase diagram of equilibrium tilings of equal-area, equal-perimeter convex polygons whose energy is independent of their shape. We identify 3 distinct phases, which are all observed in simple epithelial tissues: The disordered phase of polygons with 4-9 sides, the hexatic phase, and the hexagonal phase with perfect 6-fold coordination. We quantify their structure using Edwards' statistical mechanics of cellular systems.

  3. Cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry of Se (IV)-3,3'-Diaminobenzidine for the estimation of trace amounts of Se (IV) and Se (VI) in environmental water samples and total selenium in animal blood and fish tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method based on the cloud point extraction for the separation and preconcentration of Se (IV) and Se (VI) in environmental water samples as well as total selenium in animal blood and tissue samples. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) is a selective and sensitive reagent and is known to form an intense yellow compound piazselenol with selenium (IV). When a system consisting of sample, DAB and surfactant Triton X-114 is warmed above the cloud point of the surfactant, it was seen that the DAB-Se (IV) complex gets extracted into the surfactant rich phase while the Se (VI) remains in the aqueous phase. Se (VI) in the sample was reduced to Se (IV) by microwave heating of solution in 4 mol L-1 HCl and total Se was estimated by carrying out the CPE. The quantification of selenium was carried out using ETAAS. The analytical parameters for the quantitative cloud point extraction of the Se-DAB complex were investigated and optimized. The proposed procedure was validated by applying it to the determination of the content of Se in Certified Reference Material BND 701-02. (NPL, India). The detection limit of selenium in environmental water samples was 0.0025 μg L-1 with an enrichment factor of 100. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for ten replicate measurements of 5 μg L-1 was 3.6%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of selenium (IV), (VI) in environmental water samples and determination of total selenium in human blood, SRM-IAEA-A-13 animal blood and SRM-IAEA-407 fish tissue.

  4. Tissue protein metabolism in parasitized animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection of mammals, particularly of the small intestine of the sheep, on protein metabolism of skeletal muscle, liver, the gastrointestinal tract and wool are described. These changes have been integrated to explain poor growth and production in the sheep heavily infected with Trichostrongylus colubriformis. The rates of both synthesis and catabolism of muscle protein are depressed, but nitrogen is lost from this tissue because the depression of synthesis exceeds that of catabolism. Anorexia is the major cause of these changes. Although the effect on liver protein synthesis is unclear, it is probable that the leakage of plasma proteins into the gastrointestinal tract stimulates an early increase in the rate of synthesis of these proteins, but this eventually declines and is insufficient to correct developing hypoalbuminaemia. Changes in the intestinal tract are complex. Exogenous nitrogen is reduced by anorexia, but the flow of nitrogen through the tract from abomasum to faeces is above normal because of the increase of endogenous protein from leakage of plasma protein and, presumably, from exfoliated epithelial cells. There is evidence that protein metabolism of intestinal tissue, particularly in the uninfected distal two-thirds, is increased. Synthesis of wool protein is decreased. As the result of anorexia, intestinal loss of endogenous protein and an increased rate of intestinal protein metabolism there is a net movement of amino nitrogen from muscle, liver and possibly skin to the intestine of the heavily infected sheep. Thus, the availability of amino nitrogen for growth and wool production is reduced. (author)

  5. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. PMID:26475721

  6. Genotyping of plant and animal samples without prior DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, Pak Y; Haimes, Josh D; André, Chas P; Kuusisto, Pia K; Kelley, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    The Direct PCR approach facilitates PCR amplification directly from small amounts of unpurified samples, and is demonstrated here for several plant and animal tissues (Figure 1). Direct PCR is based on specially engineered Thermo Scientific Phusion and Phire DNA Polymerases, which include a double-stranded DNA binding domain that gives them unique properties such as high tolerance of inhibitors. PCR-based target DNA detection has numerous applications in plant research, including plant genotype analysis and verification of transgenes. PCR from plant tissues traditionally involves an initial DNA isolation step, which may require expensive or toxic reagents. The process is time consuming and increases the risk of cross contamination. Conversely, by using Thermo Scientific Phire Plant Direct PCR Kit the target DNA can be easily detected, without prior DNA extraction. In the model demonstrated here, an example of derived cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence analysis (dCAPS) is performed directly from Arabidopsis plant leaves. dCAPS genotyping assays can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by SNP allele-specific restriction endonuclease digestion. Some plant samples tend to be more challenging when using Direct PCR methods as they contain components that interfere with PCR, such as phenolic compounds. In these cases, an additional step to remove the compounds is traditionally required. Here, this problem is overcome by using a quick and easy dilution protocol followed by Direct PCR amplification (Figure 1). Fifteen year-old oak leaves are used as a model for challenging plants as the specimen contains high amounts of phenolic compounds including tannins. Gene transfer into mice is broadly used to study the roles of genes in development, physiology and human disease. The use of these animals requires screening for the presence of the transgene, usually with PCR. Traditionally, this involves a time consuming DNA isolation step, during which DNA

  7. Comparison of sampling methods for animal manure

    OpenAIRE

    Derikx, P. J. L.; Ogink, N.W.M.; Hoeksma, P.

    1997-01-01

    Currently available and recently developed sampling methods for slurry and solid manure were tested for bias and reproducibility in the determination of total phosphorus and nitrogen content of samples. Sampling methods were based on techniques in which samples were taken either during loading from the hose or from the transport vehicle after loading. Most methods were unbiased. New sampling methods for slurry from the hose were substantially more reproducible than existing methods. For pract...

  8. Detection of Bacillus anthracis in the air, soil and animal tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Kušar D.; Pate M.; Hubad B.; Avberšek J.; Logar K.; Lapanje A.; Zrimec A.; Ocepek M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish effective and rapid diagnostic methods for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, a highly virulent zoonotic pathogen, in the air, soil and animal (or human) tissue samples. Liquid culture of B. anthracis was aerosolized and four air sampling procedures were employed. Detection of B. anthracis in the air samples was successful with RCS High Flow sampler (culturebased detection) and when sampling through the a...

  9. OBT analysis method using polyethylene beads for limited quantities of animal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a polyethylene beads method for OBT determination in animal tissues and animal products for cases where the amount of water recovered by combustion is limited by sample size or quantity. In the method, the amount of water recovered after combustion is enhanced by adding tritium-free polyethylene beads to the sample prior to combustion in an oxygen bomb. The method reduces process time by allowing the combustion water to be easily collected with a pipette. Sufficient water recovery was achieved using the polyethylene beads method when 2 g of dry animal tissue or animal product were combusted with 2 g of polyethylene beads. Correction factors, which account for the dilution due to the combustion water of the beads, are provided for beef, chicken, pork, fish and clams, as well as egg, milk and cheese. The method was tested by comparing its OBT results with those of the conventional method using animal samples collected on the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. The results determined that the polyethylene beads method added no more than 25% uncertainty when appropriate correction factors are used. - Highlights: • Polyethylene beads method for OBT determination in animal tissues and animal products were determined. • The method reduces process time. • The polyethylene beads method added no more than 25% uncertainty when appropriate correction factors are used

  10. Diagnostic Necropsy and Selected Tissue and Sample Collection in Rats and Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, Christina M.; O'Brien, Alexandra; Albers, Theresa M.; Simon, Meredith A.; Clifford, Charles B.; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen R

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple sample types that may be collected from a euthanized animal in order to help diagnose or discover infectious agents in an animal colony. Proper collection of tissues for further histological processing can impact the quality of testing results. This article describes the conduct of a basic gross examination including identification of heart, liver, lungs, kidneys, and spleen, as well as how to collect those organs. Additionally four of the more difficult tissue/sample co...

  11. How to calculate sample size in animal studies?

    OpenAIRE

    Jaykaran Charan; N D Kantharia

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of sample size is one of the important component of design of any research including animal studies. If a researcher select less number of animals it may lead to missing of any significant difference even if it exist in population and if more number of animals selected then it may lead to unnecessary wastage of resources and may lead to ethical issues. In this article, on the basis of review of literature done by us we suggested few methods of sample size calculations for animal s...

  12. Multiparametric Data Collection of Animal Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcon, P.; Bartušek, Karel

    Praha : IEEE, 2012, s. 566-569. ISBN 978-1-4673-1116-8. [International conference on telecommunications and signal processing /35./. Praha (CZ), 03.07.2012-04.07.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/11/0318; GA ČR GAP102/12/1104 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : animal tissues * magnetic resonance imaging * multiparametric data Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  13. A quantum dot-based immunoassay for screening of tylosin and tilmicosin in edible animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tao; Zhu, Liqian; Yang, Xian

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, indirect competitive fluorescence-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-FLISA) based on quantum dots (QDs) as the fluorescent marker was developed for the detection of tylosin and tilmicosin in edible animal tissues. The end point fluorescent detection system was carried out using QDs conjugated with goat anti-mouse secondary antibody. The limits of detection (LODs) for the determination of tylosin and tilmicosin were 0.02 and 0.04 μg kg(-1), respectively. This detection method was used to analyse spiked samples and the recoveries ranged from 83.5% to 98.7% for tylosin and from 81.8% to 98.2% for tilmicosin. In real porcine tissue sample analysis, the results of ic-FLISA were similar to those obtained from an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) to an HPLC method indicating its potential for tylosin and tilmicosin screening in edible animal tissues. PMID:25822697

  14. Diatom extraction with HCl from animal tissues: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiancamillo, Alessia; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Identification of diatoms from human or animal tissue may be affected by factors concerning techniques of extraction and analysis which cause fragmentation or loss of diatoms. In this brief technical note a novel efficient method of extraction of diatoms from animal tissues is presented. The authors have tested an H(2)O(2) plus HCl and HCl method to detect diatoms in several tissues from pig immersed in water rich in diatoms; they have also compared this method to other methods of extraction including enzymatic ones. The experiment showed that all siliceous frustules of fresh water diatoms are resistant to the treatment proposed and are still recognizable after the digestion. Among the different tests, treatment by 20% HCl (T1) proved to be more simple and time-saving, and seems to be a valuable diagnostic tool for routine forensic procedures in the extraction and detection of diatoms. The positive results obtained in all cases should lead to further studies in order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed methods also from a quantitative point of view. PMID:21683642

  15. Graph animals, subgraph sampling and motif search in large networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baskerville, Kim; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2007-01-01

    We generalize a sampling algorithm for lattice animals (connected clusters on a regular lattice) to a Monte Carlo algorithm for `graph animals', i.e. connected subgraphs in arbitrary networks. As with the algorithm in [N. Kashtan et al., Bioinformatics 20, 1746 (2004)], it provides a weighted sample, but the computation of the weights is much faster (linear in the size of subgraphs, instead of super-exponential). This allows subgraphs with up to ten or more nodes to be sampled with very high ...

  16. Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurement of the Cd content in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) measurements were performed on thin samples prepared from different rabbit tissues, using 3 MeV proton beam for inducing x-rays from the animal tissues. This method is very sensitive and very small amounts of trace elements can be detected. Cadmium, one of the most toxic elements which can be concentrated in animal and human tissues due to environmental pollution, was detected with a limit of 0.7 ppm. The trace element concentrations obtained by PIXE were compared to those measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. PIXE method is proposed for routine analysis at the Veterinary and Food Investigating Service, Budapest, Hungary. (D.Gy.) 6 refs.; 3 figs

  17. Multidisciplinary approach to thoracic tissue sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Quint, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract When choosing the best method to undertake a biopsy of a lesion in the lung or mediastinum, it is important to consider the entire range of possible options, such as surgical, bronchoscopic/endoscopic, and radiologic techniques. Features to be considered include the anatomic location of the lesion, the amount of tissue needed, cost, availability of specific techniques, safety and risks, and expected diagnostic yield/accuracy.

  18. Fast filtration for metabolome sampling of suspended animal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Volmer, Martin; Northoff, Stefan; Scholz, Sebastian; Thüte, Tobias; Büntemeyer, Heino; Noll, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new method for sampling suspended animal cells by fast filtration is presented that allows rapid quenching of cellular metabolism and efficient separation of the cells from culture medium. Compared to sampling with a microstructure heat exchanger or centrifugation without prior quenching, the adenylate energy charge and the measured concentrations especially of metabolites with a high turnover rate or of metabolites early in metabolic pathways were substantially higher. ...

  19. Sequential sampling: a novel method in farm animal welfare assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, C A E; Main, D C J; Mullan, S; Haskell, M J; Browne, W J

    2016-02-01

    Lameness in dairy cows is an important welfare issue. As part of a welfare assessment, herd level lameness prevalence can be estimated from scoring a sample of animals, where higher levels of accuracy are associated with larger sample sizes. As the financial cost is related to the number of cows sampled, smaller samples are preferred. Sequential sampling schemes have been used for informing decision making in clinical trials. Sequential sampling involves taking samples in stages, where sampling can stop early depending on the estimated lameness prevalence. When welfare assessment is used for a pass/fail decision, a similar approach could be applied to reduce the overall sample size. The sampling schemes proposed here apply the principles of sequential sampling within a diagnostic testing framework. This study develops three sequential sampling schemes of increasing complexity to classify 80 fully assessed UK dairy farms, each with known lameness prevalence. Using the Welfare Quality herd-size-based sampling scheme, the first 'basic' scheme involves two sampling events. At the first sampling event half the Welfare Quality sample size is drawn, and then depending on the outcome, sampling either stops or is continued and the same number of animals is sampled again. In the second 'cautious' scheme, an adaptation is made to ensure that correctly classifying a farm as 'bad' is done with greater certainty. The third scheme is the only scheme to go beyond lameness as a binary measure and investigates the potential for increasing accuracy by incorporating the number of severely lame cows into the decision. The three schemes are evaluated with respect to accuracy and average sample size by running 100 000 simulations for each scheme, and a comparison is made with the fixed size Welfare Quality herd-size-based sampling scheme. All three schemes performed almost as well as the fixed size scheme but with much smaller average sample sizes. For the third scheme, an overall

  20. Measurements of optical parameters of phantom solution and bulk animal tissues ex vivo at 650 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    Optical parameters of biological tissues, including absorption coefficient (μa), reduced scattering coefficient (μs') or scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g) and refractive index (n) are investigated extensively and systemically at wavelength of 650 nm. Intralipid solution was selected to be the tissue phantom in order to test the validity of measurements. Considering the factors of fiber orientation and haemoglobin content, we chose some fresh bulk animal tissues in vitro which were bovine adipose, bovine muscle, porcine adipose, porcine muscle, porcine kidney, porcine liver, mutton and chicken breast. The basic assumption is that in vitro samples are a reasonable representation of the in vivo situation. We have gained numbers of experimental data of Intralipid and some tissues. Particularly, we have set up the close relationships among six optical parameters involving μa, μs', μs, g, n and μt. The experimental results show that for animal tissues, μa, μs' or μs and n rely deeply on muscle fiber orientations. Both of μs and μt range from 10mm-1 to 20mm-1. μa ranges from 10-2 mm-1 to 10-3 mm-1 and g from 0.95 to 0.99. The results of this study will be helpful in further understanding of optical properties of tissues.

  1. Leaf tissue sampling and DNA extraction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semagn, Kassa

    2014-01-01

    Taxonomists must be familiar with a number of issues in collecting and transporting samples using freezing methods (liquid nitrogen and dry ice), desiccants (silica gel and blotter paper), and preservatives (CTAB, ethanol, and isopropanol), with each method having its own merits and limitations. For most molecular studies, a reasonably good quality and quantity of DNA is required, which can only be obtained using standard DNA extraction protocols. There are many DNA extraction protocols that vary from simple and quick ones that yield low-quality DNA but good enough for routine analyses to the laborious and time-consuming standard methods that usually produce high quality and quantities of DNA. The protocol to be chosen will depend on the quality and quantity of DNA needed, the nature of samples, and the presence of natural substances that may interfere with the extraction and subsequent analysis. The protocol described in this chapter has been tested for extracting DNA from eight species and provided very good quality and quantity of DNA for different applications, including those genotyping methods that use restriction enzymes. PMID:24415469

  2. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veverková, Lenka [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Hradilová, Šárka [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Milde, David, E-mail: david.mlde@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Panáček, Aleš [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Skopalová, Jana [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kvítek, Libor [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Petrželová, Kamila [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17.listopadu 12, CZ 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); National Reference Laboratory for Chemical Elements, Department of Residues in Kroměříž, State Veterinary Institute Olomouc, Hulínská 2286, CZ 767 60 Kroměříž (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO{sub 3} and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl{sub 2}{sup −} and AgCl{sub 3}{sup 2−} for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results. - Highlights: • We performed detailed optimization of microwave assisted digestion procedure of animal tissue used prior to Ag determination by ICP-MS. • We provide basic equilibrium calculations to give theoretical explanation of results from optimization of tested mineralization mixtures. • Results from method validation that was done by analysis of several matrix CRMs are presented.

  3. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2− and AgCl32− for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results. - Highlights: • We performed detailed optimization of microwave assisted digestion procedure of animal tissue used prior to Ag determination by ICP-MS. • We provide basic equilibrium calculations to give theoretical explanation of results from optimization of tested mineralization mixtures. • Results from method validation that was done by analysis of several matrix CRMs are presented

  4. Optical spectroscopic studies of animal skin used in modeling of human cutaneous tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Sianoudis, J. A.

    2007-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and in particular laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), provide excellent possibilities for real-time, noninvasive diagnosis of different skin tissue pathologies. However, the introduction of optical spectroscopy in routine medical practice demands a statistically important data collection, independent from the laser sources and detectors used. The scientists collect databases either from patients, in vivo, or they study different animal models to obtain objective information for the optical properties of various types of normal and diseased tissue. In the present work, the optical properties (fluorescence and reflectance) of two animal skin models are investigated. The aim of using animal models in optical spectroscopy investigations is to examine the statistics of the light induced effects firstly on animals, before any extrapolation effort to humans. A nitrogen laser (λ=337.1 nm) was used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements, while a tungsten-halogen lamp was used for the reflectance measurements. Samples of chicken and pig skin were measured in vitro and were compared with results obtained from measurements of normal human skin in vivo. The specific features of the measured reflectance and fluorescence spectra are discussed, while the limits of data extrapolation for each skin type are also depicted.

  5. Graph animals, subgraph sampling and motif search in large networks

    CERN Document Server

    Baskerville, Kim; Paczuski, Maya

    2007-01-01

    We generalize a sampling algorithm for lattice animals (connected clusters on a regular lattice) to a Monte Carlo algorithm for `graph animals', i.e. connected subgraphs in arbitrary networks. As with the algorithm in [N. Kashtan et al., Bioinformatics 20, 1746 (2004)], it provides a weighted sample, but the computation of the weights is much faster (linear in the size of subgraphs, instead of super-exponential). This allows subgraphs with up to ten or more nodes to be sampled with very high statistics, from arbitrarily large networks. Using this together with a heuristic algorithm for rapidly classifying isomorphic graphs, we present results for two protein interaction networks obtained using the TAP high throughput method: one of Escherichia coli with 230 nodes and 695 links, and one for yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with roughly ten times more nodes and links. We find in both cases that most connected subgraphs are strong motifs (Z-scores >10) or anti-motifs (Z-scores <-10) when the null model is the...

  6. Solid sampling in analysis of animal organs by two-jet plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of high-power two-jet plasma capabilities for the direct multi-elemental analysis of animal organs was undertaken. The experimental conditions chosen allow the direct analysis of different animal organs after drying and grinding to powder (particle size 20–200 μm). It was found that evaporation efficiency of the samples depends on the particle size and thermal stability of tissues and can be improved by reduction of a carrier gas flow. Calibration samples based on graphite powder and a tenfold dilution of powdered samples with buffer (graphite powder containing 15% NaCl) were used. 5–10 mg of the sample was quite enough to get the detection limits of elements at the level of 0.1–10 μg g−1. A prior carbonization procedure (not ashing) makes it possible to decrease the detection limits of elements by an order of magnitude. The validation of the techniques was confirmed by the analysis of certified reference materials NIST 8414, BCR 278R and NCS ZC 81001 as well as by using different sample preparation procedures. - Highlights: ► A two-jet plasma was used for direct analysis of powdered animal organs. ► The analysis of powders with particles 20–200 μm in size was possible. ► Calibration samples based on graphite powder were used. ► Carbonization of the sample allows decreasing detection limits of elements.

  7. Specimen Sample Preservation for Cell and Tissue Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Gabrielle; Ronzana, Karolyn; Schibner, Karen; Evans, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The era of the International Space Station with its longer duration missions will pose unique challenges to microgravity life sciences research. The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is responsible for addressing these challenges and defining the science requirements necessary to conduct life science research on-board the International Space Station. Space Station will support a wide range of cell and tissue culture experiments for durations of 1 to 30 days. Space Shuttle flights to bring experimental samples back to Earth for analyses will only occur every 90 days. Therefore, samples may have to be retained for periods up to 60 days. This presents a new challenge in fresh specimen sample storage for cell biology. Fresh specimen samples are defined as samples that are preserved by means other than fixation and cryopreservation. The challenge of long-term storage of fresh specimen samples includes the need to suspend or inhibit proliferation and metabolism pending return to Earth-based laboratories. With this challenge being unique to space research, there have not been any ground based studies performed to address this issue. It was decided hy SSBRP that experiment support studies to address the following issues were needed: Fixative Solution Management; Media Storage Conditions; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Mammalian Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Plant Cell/Tissue Cultures; Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Aquatic Cell/Tissue Cultures; and Fresh Specimen Sample Storage of Microbial Cell/Tissue Cultures. The objective of these studies was to derive a set of conditions and recommendations that can be used in a long duration microgravity environment such as Space Station that will permit extended storage of cell and tissue culture specimens in a state consistent with zero or minimal growth, while at the same time maintaining their stability and viability.

  8. Th, U, Ra and rare earth element distributions in farm animal tissues from an elevated natural radiation background environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field study was conducted in an area of elevated natural background radioactivity (the Pocos de Caldas plateau, Brazil) to assess tissue concentrations and the comparative bioavailability of isotopic Th (IV), U (IV, VI), Ra (II) and light rare earth elements (REE), i.e. La (III) and Ce (III, IV) in adult steers, pigs and chickens. The assessment of comparative bioavailability was aided by normalizing tissue concentrations to local soil concentrations, i.e. by calculating soil-to-tissue concentration ratios (CRs). Mean CRs (for muscle/soil) in these animals were very similar for U, La and Th which, as a group, decreased among the farm animals sampled as (all x 10-4): chicken (1) ≥ steer (0.7) ≥ pig (0.4). For 226Ra, CRs in muscle decreased in the same order among animals although mean values were 3-5 times greater than those quoted. Much greater values and greater differences among the elements are noted for bone/soil CRs, which for all animals decreased as: Ra >> U > La=Th, indicating the order of elemental bioavailability (assuming bone to be the major retention compartment). Isotopic ratios in farm animal tissue are shown to resemble closely those in soils over which the animals forage, with few exceptions, indicating the importance of the soil component in the transfer of these elements to tissues. (author)

  9. In-air micro-pixe analysis of tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-PIXE is capable of providing spatial distributions of elements in the micro-meter scale and its application to biology is useful to elucidate the cellular metabolism. Since, in this method, a sample target is usually irradiated with proton or α-particle beams in vacuum, beam heating results in evaporation of volatile elements an shrinking of the sample. In order to avoid these side effects, we previously developed a technique of in-air micro-PIXE analysis for samples of cultured cells. In addition to these, analysis of exposed tissue samples from living subjects is highly desirable in biological and medical research. Here, we describe a technique of in-air micro-PIXE analysis of such tissue samples. The target samples of exposed tissue slices from a Donryu rat, in which a tumor had been transplanted, were analyzed with proton micro-beams of 2.6 MeV. We report that the shape of cells and the distribution of volatile elements in the tissue sample remain uncharged when using a target preparation based on a freeze-drying method. (author)

  10. Graph animals, subgraph sampling, and motif search in large networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, Kim; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2007-09-01

    We generalize a sampling algorithm for lattice animals (connected clusters on a regular lattice) to a Monte Carlo algorithm for “graph animals,” i.e., connected subgraphs in arbitrary networks. As with the algorithm in [N. Kashtan , Bioinformatics 20, 1746 (2004)], it provides a weighted sample, but the computation of the weights is much faster (linear in the size of subgraphs, instead of superexponential). This allows subgraphs with up to ten or more nodes to be sampled with very high statistics, from arbitrarily large networks. Using this together with a heuristic algorithm for rapidly classifying isomorphic graphs, we present results for two protein interaction networks obtained using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) method: one of Escherichia coli with 230 nodes and 695 links, and one for yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with roughly ten times more nodes and links. We find in both cases that most connected subgraphs are strong motifs ( Z scores >10 ) or antimotifs ( Z scores <-10 ) when the null model is the ensemble of networks with fixed degree sequence. Strong differences appear between the two networks, with dominant motifs in E. coli being (nearly) bipartite graphs and having many pairs of nodes that connect to the same neighbors, while dominant motifs in yeast tend towards completeness or contain large cliques. We also explore a number of methods that do not rely on measurements of Z scores or comparisons with null models. For instance, we discuss the influence of specific complexes like the 26S proteasome in yeast, where a small number of complexes dominate the k cores with large k and have a decisive effect on the strongest motifs with 6-8 nodes. We also present Zipf plots of counts versus rank. They show broad distributions that are not power laws, in contrast to the case when disconnected subgraphs are included.

  11. Light-induced autofluorescence of animal skin used in tissue optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Bliznakova, I.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy provides many possibilities for medical diagnostics needs for differentiation of tissue pathologies including cancer. For the needs of clinical practice scientists collect spectral data from patients in vivo or they study different tumor models to obtain objective information for fluorescent properties of every kind of normal and diseased tissue. Therefore it is very important to find the most appropriate and close to the human skin samples from the point of view of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which will give the possibility for easier transfer of data obtained in animal models to spectroscopic medical diagnostics in humans. In this study are presented some results for in vitro detection of the autofluorescence signals of the animal skin (pig and chicken) with using of LEDs as excitation sources (maximum emission at 365, 375, 385 and 400 nm). The autofluorescence signals from in vivo human skin were also detected for comparison with the models' results. Specific features of the spectra measured are discussed and there are proposed some of the origins of the fluorescence signals obtained. Fluorescence maxima detected are addressed to the typical fluorophores existing in the cutaneous tissues. Influence of main skin absorbers, namely melanin and hemoglobin, is also discussed.

  12. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  13. Workflow for large-scale analysis of melanoma tissue samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Yakovleva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to create an optimal workflow for analysing a large cohort of malignant melanoma tissue samples. Samples were lysed with urea and enzymatically digested with trypsin or trypsin/Lys C. Buffer exchange or dilution was used to reduce urea concentration prior to digestion. The tissue digests were analysed directly or following strong cation exchange (SCX fractionation by nano LC–MS/MS. The approach which resulted in the largest number of protein IDs involved a buffer exchange step before enzymatic digestion with trypsin and chromatographic separation in 120 min gradient followed by SCX–RP separation of peptides.

  14. Tissue engineering in animal models for urinary diversion: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Marije Sloff; Rob de Vries; Paul Geutjes; Joanna IntHout; Merel Ritskes-Hoitinga; Egbert Oosterwijk; Wout Feitz

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) approaches may provide alternatives for gastrointestinal tissue in urinary diversion. To continue to clinically translatable studies, TERM alternatives need to be evaluated in (large) controlled and standardized animal studies. Here, we investigated all evidence for the efficacy of tissue engineered constructs in animal models for urinary diversion. Studies investigating this subject were identified through a systematic search of three diffe...

  15. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedeković Tomislav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One of those methods is immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue is a routine technique in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle from ear notch tissue samples. However, such technique is inappropriate due to complicated tissue fixation process and it requires more days for preparation. On the contrary, immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue was usually applied on organs from dead animals. In this paper, for the first time, the imunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples was described. Findings Seventeen ear notch tissue samples were obtained during the period 2008-2009 from persistently infected cattle. Samples were fixed in liquid nitrogen and stored on -20°C until testing. Ear notch tissue samples from all persistently infected cattle showed positive results with good section quality and possibility to determinate type of infected cells. Conclusions Although the number of samples was limited, this study indicated that immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue can be successfully replaced with immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle.

  16. Immunoassay for the Detection of Animal Central Nervous Tissue in Processed Meat and Feed Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Richt, Juergen A; Hsieh, Yun-Hwa Peggy

    2016-05-11

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) based on the detection of the thermal-stable central nervous tissue (CNT) marker protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), was developed to detect animal CNT in processed meat and feedstuffs. Two meat samples (cooked at 100 °C for 30 min and autoclaved at 133 °C for 20 min) of bovine brain in beef and two feed samples (bovine brain meal in beef meal and in soybean meal) were prepared at levels of 0.0008, 0.0031, 0.0063, 0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6%. An anti-MBP monoclonal antibody (mAb3E3) was produced using the hybridoma technique and characterized using Western blot. The optimized icELISA was CNT-specific without cross-reactivity with either meat (beef and pork) or soybean meal samples and had low intra-assay (%CV ≤ 3.5) and interassay variability (%CV ≤ 3.3), with low detection limits for bovine MBP (6.4 ppb) and bovine CNT spiked in both meat (0.05%) and feed (0.0125%) samples. This assay is therefore suitable for the quantitative detection of trace amounts of contaminated animal CNT in processed food and feed products. PMID:27109117

  17. Development on traceability based on changes of stable isotopes in animal tissues and organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope analysis is a new method in food traceability, which can be used to trace animals' geographical origin and life history. This paper reviews the recent progress of researches on characteristics of stable isotopes and turnover time in different animal tissues and organs, as well as their influence caused by feed, drinking water, geographical origin, storing and processing. The aim of this paper is to provide theoretical reference for studies on the traceability of animal derived food and animals' life history. (authors)

  18. Reliability of non-invasive tissue sampling methods for DNA extraction in rabbits (Oryctolagus Cuniculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Manel Ben Larbi; Tircazes, A.; K. Feve; TUDELA, F.; Bolet, G

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) can be extracted from different tissue sources. The most common is blood, but in some situations it can be easier to take a biopsy. In some cases when it is difficult to capture animals, especially in wild populations, faeces and hairs can be considered as a source of DNA. This paper presents a pilot study conducted to compare the applicability of invasive and non-invasive sampling methods for extracting DNA for use in genetic studies of rabbits (Oryctolagus cunicu...

  19. On the Feasibility of Depth Profiling of Animal Tissue by Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Melvin, Blaze M.T.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the feasibility of MS depth profiling of animal tissue by ~75 fs, 800 nm laser pulses to expose underlying layers of tissue for subsequent MS analysis. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze phospholipids and proteins from both intact bovine eye lens tissue and tissue ablated by ultrashort laser pulses. Laser desorption postionization (LDPI-MS) with 10.5 eV single photon ionization was also used to ana...

  20. Microbiological studies of tissue bank samples for radiation sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue bank samples such as femoral head, amnion membrane and bone dust received for radiation sterilization when analyzed for pre-sterilization microbial count. One type of fungal strain and two types of bacterial strains were isolated. The bacterial strains resemble the characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus but surprisingly shows no growth on Pca even after 48 hrs. of incubation at 37degC but grows well on SCD agar. Thus these bacterial strains seem to be fastidious organisms having some special nutritional requirements and may be having some pathological significance in tissue processing. The fungal strain isolated was found to be Aspergillus spp. (author)

  1. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José; Gromova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, ...... translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens....

  2. Electric pulse-mediated gene delivery to various animal tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mir, Lluis M; Moller, Pernille H; André, Franck;

    2005-01-01

    Electroporation designates the use of electric pulses to transiently permeabilize the cell membrane. It has been shown that DNA can be transferred to cells through a combined effect of electric pulses causing (1) permeabilization of the cell membrane and (2) an electrophoretic effect on DNA, lead...... in methodology to updated results concerning the electrotransfer of reporter and therapeutic genes to different tissues....

  3. Characterisation of new monoclonal antibodies reacting with prions from both human and animal brain tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordes, H.; Bergstrom, A.L.; Ohm, J.;

    2008-01-01

    P(C) and capable of reacting with PrP(Sc)in situ (immunohistochemistry on nervous tissue sections) or with the unfolded form of the protein (western and paraffin embedded tissue (PET) blotting). Here, high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 1.5D7, 1.6F4) were produced against synthetic PrP peptides in...... that the specificity of 6H4 is not defined completely by PrP153-165. The two antibodies performed similarly to 6H4 in western blotting with human samples, but showed less reactivity and enhanced background staining with animal samples in this method. In immunohistochemistry 1.5D7 and 1.6F4 performed...... of undenatured PrP(Sc) (IHC) while the binding site of 6H4 is at least partly inaccessible. In techniques incorporating a denaturing and/or disaggregating step 6H4 showed good binding indicating increased accessibility of the binding site. An exception to this is human samples in PET...

  4. Characterisation of new monoclonal antibodies reacting with prions from both human and animal brain tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Ohm, Jakob;

    2008-01-01

    capable of reacting with PrpSc in situ (immunohistochemistry on nervous tissue sections) or with the unfolded form of the protein (western and paraffin embedded tissue (PET) blotting). Here, high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 1.5D7, 1.6F4) were produced against synthetic PrP peptides in wild...... specificity of 6H4 is not defined completely by PrP153 - 165. The two antibodies performed similarly to 6H4 in western blotting with human samples, but showed less reactivity and enhanced background staining with animal samples in this method. In immunohistochemistry 1.5D7 and 1.6F4 performed better than 6H4......PSc (IHC) while the binding site of 6H4 is at least partly inaccessible. In techniques incorporating a denaturing and/or disaggregating step 6H4 showed good binding indicating increased accessibility of the binding site. An exception to this is human samples in PET-blotting suggesting that huPrPRES might...

  5. PCBs and PCDD/Fs distribution in tissues and organs of marine animals in Russian Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirova, Z.; Kruglov, E.; Loshkina, E.; Khalilov, R. [Environmental Research and Protection Centre, Ufa (Russian Federation); Melnikov, S.; Vlasov, S. [Regional Centre Monitoring of the Arctic, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-09-15

    Studies of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Russian Arctic were conducted recently by a Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) project. This project developed new data on the POPs pollution levels in the environment and biosphere, including PCBs and PCDD/Fs, in arctic regions of Russia. Transboundary transport and biomagnification within food chains in arctic regions result in POPs accumulation in tissues of fish and marine animals. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of indicator PCBs, co-planar PCBs and PCDD/Fs in different tissues and organs of seals, walruses and whales caught near the seashore of Chukotski Peninsula (settlement of Lavrenty), Russia, to determine the background level of arctic biota pollution and to study distribution of toxicants in organisms of marine animals. Sampling was made in the course of the 1{sup st} and the 2{sup nd} stages of the 4{sup th} phase of Raipon/AMAP/GEF project ''Persistent Toxic Substances (PTS), Food Security and Indigenous Peoples of the Russian North'' in 2002 by researchers of the Regional Center for Monitoring of the Arctic (RCMA), St. Petersburg, Russia.

  6. Tissue and Animal Models of Sudden Cardiac Death

    OpenAIRE

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T.; Steven R. Houser; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with SCD. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology including ion channel expressi...

  7. Assuring consumer safety without animals: Applications for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Westmoreland, Carl; Holmes, Anthony M

    2009-01-01

    Humans are exposed to a variety of chemicals in their everyday lives through interactions with the environment and through the use of consumer products. It is a basic requirement that these products are tested to assure they are safe under normal and reasonably foreseeable conditions of use. Within the European Union, the majority of tests used for generating toxicological data rely on animals. However recent changes in legislation (e.g., 7th amendment of the Cosmetics Directive and REACH) ar...

  8. The potential of tissue engineering for developing alternatives to animal experiments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B M; Leenaars, Marlies; Tra, Joppe; Huijbregtse, Robbertjan; Bongers, Erik; Jansen, John A; Gordijn, Bert; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2015-07-01

    An underexposed ethical issue raised by tissue engineering is the use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research. Even though this research results in suffering and loss of life in animals, tissue engineering also has great potential for the development of alternatives to animal experiments. With the objective of promoting a joint effort of tissue engineers and alternative experts to fully realise this potential, this study provides the first comprehensive overview of the possibilities of using tissue-engineered constructs as a replacement of laboratory animals. Through searches in two large biomedical databases (PubMed, Embase) and several specialised 3R databases, 244 relevant primary scientific articles, published between 1991 and 2011, were identified. By far most articles reviewed related to the use of tissue-engineered skin/epidermis for toxicological applications such as testing for skin irritation. This review article demonstrates, however, that the potential for the development of alternatives also extends to other tissues such as other epithelia and the liver, as well as to other fields of application such as drug screening and basic physiology. This review discusses which impediments need to be overcome to maximise the contributions that the field of tissue engineering can make, through the development of alternative methods, to the reduction of the use and suffering of laboratory animals. PMID:23554402

  9. Delivery and detection of dietary plant-based miRNAs in animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been proposed that genetic material, namely microRNAs (miRNAs), consumed in plant-based diets can affect animal gene expression. Though deep sequencing reveals the low-level presence of plant miRNAs in animal tissues, many groups have been thus far unable to replicate the finding that a rice ...

  10. Evaluation of RT-PCR Assay for Routine Laboratory Diagnosis of Rabies in Post Mortem Brain Samples from Different Species of Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Aravindh Babu, R. P.; Manoharan, S.; Ramadass, P.; Chandran, N.D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Rabies in domestic and wild animals continues to be a major public health threat in India. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of rabies in animals is therefore of utmost importance as the individuals who were in contact with the rabid animals are at a greater risk. A significant amount of diagnostic tissue samples submitted to our laboratory are often autolysed and the WHO recommended direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for rabies diagnosis cannot be used in such samples. In this pilot study we ...

  11. Evaluation of tissue oxygen measurements for flap monitoring in an animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian; Elberg, Jens; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue oxygen tension (p(ti)O(2)) measurements are common in neurosurgery but uncommon in plastic surgery. We examined this technique as a monitoring method with probe placement in the subcutaneous tissue and addressed the importance of probe placement. Myocutaneous flaps were raised in an animal...

  12. DNA damage in preserved specimens and tissue samples: a molecular assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantin Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extraction of genetic information from preserved tissue samples or museum specimens is a fundamental component of many fields of research, including the Barcode of Life initiative, forensic investigations, biological studies using scat sample analysis, and cancer research utilizing formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Efforts to obtain genetic information from these sources are often hampered by an inability to amplify the desired DNA as a consequence of DNA damage. Previous studies have described techniques for improved DNA extraction from such samples or focused on the effect of damaging agents – such as light, oxygen or formaldehyde – on free nucleotides. We present ongoing work to characterize lesions in DNA samples extracted from preserved specimens. The extracted DNA is digested to single nucleosides with a combination of DNase I, Snake Venom Phosphodiesterase, and Antarctic Phosphatase and then analyzed by HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. We present data for moth specimens that were preserved dried and pinned with no additional preservative and for frog tissue samples that were preserved in either ethanol, or formaldehyde, or fixed in formaldehyde and then preserved in ethanol. These preservation methods represent the most common methods of preserving animal specimens in museum collections. We observe changes in the nucleoside content of these samples over time, especially a loss of deoxyguanosine. We characterize the fragmentation state of the DNA and aim to identify abundant nucleoside lesions. Finally, simple models are introduced to describe the DNA fragmentation based on nicks and double-strand breaks.

  13. Effect of cadmium on bone tissue in growing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juliana; Mandalunis, Patricia Mónica

    2016-08-01

    Accumulation of cadmium (Cd), an extremely toxic metal, can cause renal failure, decreased vitamin D synthesis, and consequently osteoporosis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cd on two types of bone in growing Wistar rats. Sixteen 21-day-old male Wistar rats were assigned to one of two groups. The Cd group subcutaneously received 0.5mg/kg of CdCl2 5 times weekly for 3 months. The control group similarly received bidistilled water. Following euthanasia, the mandibles and tibiae were resected, fixed, decalcified and processed histologically to obtain sections for H&E and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Photomicrographs were used to determine bone volume (BV/TV%), total growth cartilage width (GPC.Wi) hypertrophic cartilage width (HpZ.Wi), percentage of yellow bone marrow (%YBM), megakaryocyte number (N.Mks/mm(2)), and TRAP+osteoclast number (N.TRAP+Ocl/mm(2)). Results were statistically analyzed using Student's t test. Cd exposed animals showed a significant decrease in subchondral bone volume and a significant increase in TRAP+ osteoclast number and percentage of yellow bone marrow in the tibia, and an increase in megakaryocyte number in mandibular interradicular bone. No significant differences were observed in the remaining parameters. The results obtained with this experimental design show that Cd would seemingly have a different effect on subchondral and interradicular bone. The decrease in bone volume and increase in tibial yellow bone marrow suggest that cadmium inhibits differentiation of mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts, favoring differentiation into adipocytes. The different effects of Cd on interradicular bone might be due to the protective effect of the mastication forces. PMID:27312893

  14. Theory of sampling and its application in tissue based diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayser Gian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A general theory of sampling and its application in tissue based diagnosis is presented. Sampling is defined as extraction of information from certain limited spaces and its transformation into a statement or measure that is valid for the entire (reference space. The procedure should be reproducible in time and space, i.e. give the same results when applied under similar circumstances. Sampling includes two different aspects, the procedure of sample selection and the efficiency of its performance. The practical performance of sample selection focuses on search for localization of specific compartments within the basic space, and search for presence of specific compartments. Methods When a sampling procedure is applied in diagnostic processes two different procedures can be distinguished: I the evaluation of a diagnostic significance of a certain object, which is the probability that the object can be grouped into a certain diagnosis, and II the probability to detect these basic units. Sampling can be performed without or with external knowledge, such as size of searched objects, neighbourhood conditions, spatial distribution of objects, etc. If the sample size is much larger than the object size, the application of a translation invariant transformation results in Kriege's formula, which is widely used in search for ores. Usually, sampling is performed in a series of area (space selections of identical size. The size can be defined in relation to the reference space or according to interspatial relationship. The first method is called random sampling, the second stratified sampling. Results Random sampling does not require knowledge about the reference space, and is used to estimate the number and size of objects. Estimated features include area (volume fraction, numerical, boundary and surface densities. Stratified sampling requires the knowledge of objects (and their features and evaluates spatial features in relation to

  15. Animal Investigation Program 1976 annual report: Nevada test site and vicinity. [Radioanalysis of tissues from animals residing on or near NTS in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-11-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle and mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1976. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of /sup 131/I in animal thyroid samples collected after September 25 (the date of a Chinese nuclear test). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within ambient limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., Sedan Crater, drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels, etc. Analysis of actinide in tissues was emphasized during 1976. Graphs illustrate the /sup 239/P levels in lungs, livers, and femurs from Nevada Test Site beef cattle for the years 1971 through 1976. Femur and lung residue data are nearly identical for each year with liver concentrations being a factor of 2 or 3 lower. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak actinide levels. The highest postulated dose was 11 millirem from tritium from tissues for a mule deer. This dose is about 2% of the 500 millirems/year guide for radiation doses to an individual in the general public. All other postulated doses for consumption of the tissue containing other radionuclides are less than 0.1% of this guide. The food habits of desert bighorn sheep were discussed according to the geographic locations of the animals at time of collection. Grasses made up approximately 60% of the diet at all locations, with shrubs content approaching 30%, and the remainder consisting of various forbs. The movement of 13 mule deer fitted with collars containing a radiotransmitter unit was monitored on a weekly basis.

  16. Tissue engineering in animal models for urinary diversion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloff, Marije; de Vries, Rob; Geutjes, Paul; IntHout, Joanna; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Feitz, Wout

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) approaches may provide alternatives for gastrointestinal tissue in urinary diversion. To continue to clinically translatable studies, TERM alternatives need to be evaluated in (large) controlled and standardized animal studies. Here, we investigated all evidence for the efficacy of tissue engineered constructs in animal models for urinary diversion. Studies investigating this subject were identified through a systematic search of three different databases (PubMed, Embase and Web of Science). From each study, animal characteristics, study characteristics and experimental outcomes for meta-analyses were tabulated. Furthermore, the reporting of items vital for study replication was assessed. The retrieved studies (8 in total) showed extreme heterogeneity in study design, including animal models, biomaterials and type of urinary diversion. All studies were feasibility studies, indicating the novelty of this field. None of the studies included appropriate control groups, i.e. a comparison with the classical treatment using GI tissue. The meta-analysis showed a trend towards successful experimentation in larger animals although no specific animal species could be identified as the most suitable model. Larger animals appear to allow a better translation to the human situation, with respect to anatomy and surgical approaches. It was unclear whether the use of cells benefits the formation of a neo urinary conduit. The reporting of the methodology and data according to standardized guidelines was insufficient and should be improved to increase the value of such publications. In conclusion, animal models in the field of TERM for urinary diversion have probably been chosen for reasons other than their predictive value. Controlled and comparative long term animal studies, with adequate methodological reporting are needed to proceed to clinical translatable studies. This will aid in good quality research with the reduction in

  17. Tissue engineering in animal models for urinary diversion: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije Sloff

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM approaches may provide alternatives for gastrointestinal tissue in urinary diversion. To continue to clinically translatable studies, TERM alternatives need to be evaluated in (large controlled and standardized animal studies. Here, we investigated all evidence for the efficacy of tissue engineered constructs in animal models for urinary diversion. Studies investigating this subject were identified through a systematic search of three different databases (PubMed, Embase and Web of Science. From each study, animal characteristics, study characteristics and experimental outcomes for meta-analyses were tabulated. Furthermore, the reporting of items vital for study replication was assessed. The retrieved studies (8 in total showed extreme heterogeneity in study design, including animal models, biomaterials and type of urinary diversion. All studies were feasibility studies, indicating the novelty of this field. None of the studies included appropriate control groups, i.e. a comparison with the classical treatment using GI tissue. The meta-analysis showed a trend towards successful experimentation in larger animals although no specific animal species could be identified as the most suitable model. Larger animals appear to allow a better translation to the human situation, with respect to anatomy and surgical approaches. It was unclear whether the use of cells benefits the formation of a neo urinary conduit. The reporting of the methodology and data according to standardized guidelines was insufficient and should be improved to increase the value of such publications. In conclusion, animal models in the field of TERM for urinary diversion have probably been chosen for reasons other than their predictive value. Controlled and comparative long term animal studies, with adequate methodological reporting are needed to proceed to clinical translatable studies. This will aid in good quality research with

  18. Enhanced detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in animal tissues using a semi-nested probe-based real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Costa

    Full Text Available Bovine tuberculosis has been tackled for decades by costly eradication programs in most developed countries, involving the laboratory testing of tissue samples from allegedly infected animals for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC members, namely Mycobacterium bovis. Definitive diagnosis is usually achieved by bacteriological culture, which may take up to 6-12 weeks, during which the suspect animal carcass and herd are under sanitary arrest. In this work, a user-friendly DNA extraction protocol adapted for tissues was coupled with an IS6110-targeted semi-nested duplex real-time PCR assay to enhance the direct detection of MTC bacteria in animal specimens, reducing the time to achieve a diagnosis and, thus, potentially limiting the herd restriction period. The duplex use of a novel β-actin gene targeted probe, with complementary targets in most mammals, allowed the assessment of amplification inhibitors in the tissue samples. The assay was evaluated with a group of 128 fresh tissue specimens collected from bovines, wild boars, deer and foxes. Mycobacterium bovis was cultured from 57 of these samples. Overall, the full test performance corresponds to a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 98.2% (CIP95% 89.4-99.9% and 88.7% (CIP95% 78.5-94.7%, respectively. An observed kappa coefficient was estimated in 0.859 (CI P95% 0.771-0.948 for the overall agreement between the semi-nested PCR assay and the bacteriological culture. Considering only bovine samples (n = 69, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were estimated in 100% (CIP95% 84.0-100% and 97.7% (CIP95% 86.2-99.9%, respectively. Eight negative culture samples exhibiting TB-like lesions were detected by the semi-nested real-time PCR, thus emphasizing the increased potential of this molecular approach to detect MTC-infected animal tissues. This novel IS6110-targeted assay allows the fast detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in animal specimens with very high

  19. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, Mariela; Bosio, Luis A; Corach, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year o...

  20. Swine infectious agents in Tayassu pecari and Pecari tajacu tissue samples from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Alessandra Marnie Martins Gomes; Brombila, Talita; Bersano, Josete Garcia; Soares, Herbert Sousa; Silva, Sheila Oliveira de Souza; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Ogata, Renato Akio; Gennari, Solange Maria; Richtzenhain, Leonardo Jose

    2014-04-01

    Peccaries and pigs, Tayassuidae and Suidae respectively, diverged approximately one million years ago from a common ancestor. Because these families share some pathogens, peccaries can act as reservoirs of infectious pathogens for domestic and wild swine. We evaluated the presence of swine infectious agents in the spleen and lung tissues of white-lipped peccaries (WLP; Tayassu pecari) and collared peccaries (CP; Pecari tajacu) in Brazil. Samples from 10 adult CP and three WLP, which had been hunted by locals or hit by motor vehicles, were obtained from two free-ranging Brazilian populations. The samples were tested by PCR for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), and porcine parvovirus (PPV). Positive samples were sequenced. Both species were negative for PPV and B. bronchiseptica and positive for PCV2 and SuHV-1. The lungs of two animals were positive for M. hyopneumoniae and P. multocida. This report is the first demonstration of PCV2 and SuHV-1 swine viruses and of M. hyopneumoniae and P. multocida bacteria in peccaries. One factor contributing to this detection was access to tissue samples, which is uncommon. The role of these infectious agents in peccaries is unknown and further epidemiologic studies should be performed. This study identified several infectious agents in peccaries and highlighted the importance of the tissue type used to detect pathogens. PMID:24484498

  1. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  2. Elemental analysis of biological tissues of animal models in muscular dystrophies investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Element concentrations in biological tissues of Dmdmdx/J and C57BL/6 J mice strains were determined using the neutron activation analysis technique. Samples of whole blood, bones and organs (heart and muscle) of these strains were irradiated in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil). To perform this investigation biological samples of two-month-old adult females (n = 10) and males (n = 9) for Dmdmdx/J (dystrophic mice), and males (n 12) for C57BL/6 J (control group), originally obtained from the Jackson Laboratory (Maine, USA) and further inbred at IPEN-CNEN/SP (Sao Paulo, Brazil), were used. A significant change was observed in the analysis of the heart of dystrophic mice suggesting that this dysfunction affects severely the heart muscle. These data may, in the future, contribute to the healthcare area, in veterinary medicine and in the pharmaceutical industry allowing the evaluation of the best procedures in diagnosis, treatment and investigations of neuromuscular diseases (muscular dystrophy) of patients through the use of animal models. (author)

  3. Activity Based Profiling of Deubiquitylating Enzymes and Inhibitors in Animal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lauren; Forder, Cassie; Cranston, Aaron; Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like modifiers to proteins is an important signal for the regulation of a variety of biological processes including the targeting of substrates for degradation, receptor internalization, regulation of gene expression, and DNA repair. Posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitin controls many cellular processes, and aberrant ubiquitylation can contribute to cancer, immunopathologies, and neurodegeneration. Thus, deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that remove ubiquitin from proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. Monitoring the activity of DUBs in cells or in tissues is critical for understanding the biological function of DUBs in particular pathways and is essential for determining the physiological specificity and potency of small-molecule DUB inhibitors. Here, we describe a method for the homogenization of animal tissues and incubation of tissue lysates with ubiquitin-based activity probes to monitor DUB activity in mouse tissues and target engagement following treatment of animals with small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:27613053

  4. Measurement of phthalates in small samples of mammalian tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acott, P.D.; Murphy, M.G.; Ogborn, M.R.; Crocker, J.F.S.

    1987-03-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is a phthalic acid ester that is used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products, many of which have widespread medical application. DEHP has been shown to be leached from products used for storage and delivery of blood transfusions during procedures such as plasmaphoresis, hemodialysis and open heart surgery. Results of studies in this laboratory have suggested that there is an association between the absorption and deposition of DEHP (and/or related chemicals) in the kidney and the acquired renal cystic disease (ACD) frequently seen in patients who have undergone prolonged dialysis treatment. In order to determine the relationship between the two, it has been necessary to establish a method for extracting and accurately quantitating minute amounts of these chemicals in small tissue samples. The authors have now established such a method using kidneys from normal rats and from a rat model for ACD.

  5. Measurement of phthalates in small samples of mammalian tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) is a phthalic acid ester that is used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products, many of which have widespread medical application. DEHP has been shown to be leached from products used for storage and delivery of blood transfusions during procedures such as plasmaphoresis, hemodialysis and open heart surgery. Results of studies in this laboratory have suggested that there is an association between the absorption and deposition of DEHP (and/or related chemicals) in the kidney and the acquired renal cystic disease (ACD) frequently seen in patients who have undergone prolonged dialysis treatment. In order to determine the relationship between the two, it has been necessary to establish a method for extracting and accurately quantitating minute amounts of these chemicals in small tissue samples. The authors have now established such a method using kidneys from normal rats and from a rat model for ACD

  6. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Morcatti Coura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P<0.001 and F (P=0.018 were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P<0.001 and E (P=0.002 were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P=0.003 and D (P=0.017 were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  7. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  8. Spatial distribution of heavy metals in healthy and melanoma animal tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, V.; Zítka, O.; Húska, D.; Křížková, S.; Strnádel, Ján; Horák, Vratislav; Vaculovič, T.; Novotný, K.; Kanický, V.; Kaiser, J.; Kizek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 96-96. ISSN 1742-464X. [34th Congress of the Federation-of-European-Biochemical-Societies. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : melanoma * heavy metals * animal tissues Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  9. Long-term room temperature preservation of corpse soft tissue: an approach for tissue sample storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Disaster victim identification (DVI) represents one of the most difficult challenges in forensic sciences, and subsequent DNA typing is essential. Collected samples for DNA-based human identification are usually stored at low temperature to halt the degradation processes of human remains. We have developed a simple and reliable procedure for soft tissue storage and preservation for DNA extraction. It ensures high quality DNA suitable for PCR-based DNA typing after at least 1 year of room temperature storage. Methods Fragments of human psoas muscle were exposed to three different environmental conditions for diverse time periods at room temperature. Storage conditions included: (a) a preserving medium consisting of solid sodium chloride (salt), (b) no additional substances and (c) garden soil. DNA was extracted with proteinase K/SDS followed by organic solvent treatment and concentration by centrifugal filter devices. Quantification was carried out by real-time PCR using commercial kits. Short tandem repeat (STR) typing profiles were analysed with 'expert software'. Results DNA quantities recovered from samples stored in salt were similar up to the complete storage time and underscored the effectiveness of the preservation method. It was possible to reliably and accurately type different genetic systems including autosomal STRs and mitochondrial and Y-chromosome haplogroups. Autosomal STR typing quality was evaluated by expert software, denoting high quality profiles from DNA samples obtained from corpse tissue stored in salt for up to 365 days. Conclusions The procedure proposed herein is a cost efficient alternative for storage of human remains in challenging environmental areas, such as mass disaster locations, mass graves and exhumations. This technique should be considered as an additional method for sample storage when preservation of DNA integrity is required for PCR-based DNA typing. PMID:21846338

  10. Potential hazard to human health from exposure to fragments of lead bullets and shot in the tissues of game animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Pain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lead is highly toxic to animals. Humans eating game killed using lead ammunition generally avoid swallowing shot or bullets and dietary lead exposure from this source has been considered low. Recent evidence illustrates that lead bullets fragment on impact, leaving small lead particles widely distributed in game tissues. Our paper asks whether lead gunshot pellets also fragment upon impact, and whether lead derived from spent gunshot and bullets in the tissues of game animals could pose a threat to human health. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild-shot gamebirds (6 species obtained in the UK were X-rayed to determine the number of shot and shot fragments present, and cooked using typical methods. Shot were then removed to simulate realistic practice before consumption, and lead concentrations determined. Data from the Veterinary Medicines Directorate Statutory Surveillance Programme documenting lead levels in raw tissues of wild gamebirds and deer, without shot being removed, are also presented. Gamebirds containing > or =5 shot had high tissue lead concentrations, but some with fewer or no shot also had high lead concentrations, confirming X-ray results indicating that small lead fragments remain in the flesh of birds even when the shot exits the body. A high proportion of samples from both surveys had lead concentrations exceeding the European Union Maximum Level of 100 ppb w.w. (0.1 mg kg(-1 w.w. for meat from bovine animals, sheep, pigs and poultry (no level is set for game meat, some by several orders of magnitude. High, but feasible, levels of consumption of some species could result in the current FAO/WHO Provisional Weekly Tolerable Intake of lead being exceeded. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The potential health hazard from lead ingested in the meat of game animals may be larger than previous risk assessments indicated, especially for vulnerable groups, such as children, and those consuming large amounts of game.

  11. MicroCT for comparative morphology: simple staining methods allow high-contrast 3D imaging of diverse non-mineralized animal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metscher Brian D

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative, functional, and developmental studies of animal morphology require accurate visualization of three-dimensional structures, but few widely applicable methods exist for non-destructive whole-volume imaging of animal tissues. Quantitative studies in particular require accurately aligned and calibrated volume images of animal structures. X-ray microtomography (microCT has the potential to produce quantitative 3D images of small biological samples, but its widespread use for non-mineralized tissues has been limited by the low x-ray contrast of soft tissues. Although osmium staining and a few other techniques have been used for contrast enhancement, generally useful methods for microCT imaging for comparative morphology are still lacking. Results Several very simple and versatile staining methods are presented for microCT imaging of animal soft tissues, along with advice on tissue fixation and sample preparation. The stains, based on inorganic iodine and phosphotungstic acid, are easier to handle and much less toxic than osmium, and they produce high-contrast x-ray images of a wide variety of soft tissues. The breadth of possible applications is illustrated with a few microCT images of model and non-model animals, including volume and section images of vertebrates, embryos, insects, and other invertebrates. Each image dataset contains x-ray absorbance values for every point in the imaged volume, and objects as small as individual muscle fibers and single blood cells can be resolved in their original locations and orientations within the sample. Conclusion With very simple contrast staining, microCT imaging can produce quantitative, high-resolution, high-contrast volume images of animal soft tissues, without destroying the specimens and with possibilities of combining with other preparation and imaging methods. Such images are expected to be useful in comparative, developmental, functional, and quantitative studies of

  12. Evaluation of sample preparation methods and optimization of nickel determination in vegetable tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernando dos Santos Salazar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel, although essential to plants, may be toxic to plants and animals. It is mainly assimilated by food ingestion. However, information about the average levels of elements (including Ni in edible vegetables from different regions is still scarce in Brazil. The objectives of this study were to: (a evaluate and optimize a method for preparation of vegetable tissue samples for Ni determination; (b optimize the analytical procedures for determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS and by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption (ETAAS in vegetable samples and (c determine the Ni concentration in vegetables consumed in the cities of Lorena and Taubaté in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo, Brazil. By means of the analytical technique for determination by ETAAS or FAAS, the results were validated by the test of analyte addition and recovery. The most viable method tested for quantification of this element was HClO4-HNO3 wet digestion. All samples but carrot tissue collected in Lorena contained Ni levels above the permitted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The most disturbing results, requiring more detailed studies, were the Ni concentrations measured in carrot samples from Taubaté, where levels were five times higher than permitted by Brazilian regulations.

  13. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Schreier; Werner Kremer; Fritz Huber; Sindy Neumann; Philipp Pagel; Kai Lienemann; Sabine Pestel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing) and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats wit...

  14. Neutron activation analysis of NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and IAEA animal bone (H-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (INAA and RNAA) were employed to measure about 37 major, minor, and trace elements in two standard reference materials: oyster tissue (SRM 1566) supplied by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and animal bone (H-5) supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Wherever the comparison exists, the data show excellent agreement with accepted values for each SRM. These SRM's are useful as reference standards for the analysis of biological materials. Additionally, the chondritic normalized rare earth element pattern of animal bone behaves as a smooth function of the ionic radii, as previously observed for biological materials. 7 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  15. Use of radioimmunoassay procedures for the determination of sex hormones in animal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, B. (Institut fuer Veterinaermedizin des Bundesgesundheitsamtes (Robert von Ostertag-Institut), Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-07-01

    Radioimmunoassay methods for the determination of sex steroids and other compounds with sex hormone-like activities in various edible animal tissues and endocrine glands have been developed. Reliability of these methods, allowing quantification in a range of 10/sup -11/ M, has been adequately demonstrated. When applied to monitoring residues of anabolic sex hormones in edible tissues of veal calves, physiological baseline levels of some endogenous ''anabolic'' steroids (like testosterone, oestrogens) were established; in the case of xenobiotics residues at the scheduled time of slaughter could be quantified (trenbolone) and a regulatory method to implement the ban of diethylstilbestrol was introduced.

  16. Angular dispersive diffraction microCT of small breast tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffraction microCT system was used at a synchrotron radiation source to create images of small breast tissue samples which highlight the fatty regions within the samples. Transmission microCT images of the samples were also obtained for correlation with, and attenuation correction of, the diffraction images. The results show that diffraction techniques have the ability to increase contrast between tissue types and also that an attenuation correction has no significant effect when imaging small tissue samples at mammographic energies

  17. Desferal (DFO) induced Ga-67 washout from normal tissue, tumor and abscess in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the experimental animal, desferal (DFO) given intravenously washes out Ga-67 from all tissues. This effect is not uniform: blood activity is reduced very markedly, while liver activity is less affected. Maximal effect of DFO occurs if given close to the Ga-67 injection. When the time interval between the two is increased, the absolute amount of Ga-67 excreted in the urine in excess of the spontaneous excretion is reduced. Administration of DFO does not effect Ga-67 gastrointestinal excretion. In three animal tumor models (EMT-6 sarcoma in Balb/c mice, spontaneous adenocarcinoma in mice, and spontaneous adenocarcinoma in the rabbit) and in sterile abscess-bearing rats, the administration of DFO 24 hrs after Ga-67-citrate improves significantly the target-to-nontarget ratio. Animals given 50 mg/kg DFO I.V. after Ga-67 citrate showed a significant reduction in the whole-body activity as seen in a one-week follow up

  18. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  19. Porcine Heterotopic Composite Tissue Allograft Transplantation using A Large Animal Model for Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yur-Ren Kuo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite tissue allograft (CTA transplantation is currently limited by therisks of side effects resulting from long-term high-dose immunosuppression.Therefore, preclinical animal models are essential to help CTA transplantationadvance into clinical reality. Evidence has shown that small-animalmodel (rodents immunotherapy protocols cannot be directly applied tohumans. This study investigated whether a miniature porcine model is reproduciblefor preclinical studies.Methods: Based on the concept of vascularized skeletal tissue allograft transplantation,limb heterotopic allograft tissue from a mismatched donor miniature pig consistingof the distal femur, knee joint, tibia, fibula, and surrounding musclewith a vascularized skin paddle model supplied by the superficial femoralvessels was transplanted into recipient pigs. Swine viability and rejectionsigns of the allograft were monitored postoperatively. Histopathologicalchanges in the allograft tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosinstaining if the allo-skin flap was rejected.Results: The recipient pigs were ambulatory immediately following surgery. Theflaps showed no visible signs of rejection over the first 4 days of observation.The skin flaps appeared bluish-purple and edematous on postoperative days5~7, and progressed to tissue necrosis and rejection on postoperative days8~13. Histological examination revealed marked mononuclear cell infiltrationand necrotic changes in the all rejected tissues, especial in the allograftskin tissues (skin > muscle > bone > cartilage.Conclusions: The results showed this the porcine CTA model is reproducible and suitablefor preclinical training for human CTA transplantation. Monitoring of theallo-skin flap is a useful strategy to evaluate composite tissue allograft rejection.

  20. Assessment of radionuclide contamination of body and tissue of farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear tests, conducted at the territory of Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS ) within 1949-1989 made radiation situation more complicated and radiation contamination of the territory adjacent to the test site. Nowadays unauthorized agricultural arrangements such as hay making take place at contaminated areas. research into features of radionuclide transfer into natural grassland vegetation and into bodies of animals has a special significance at studying of ingress of radionuclides into the human body. Villages (wintering ground) of 'Akzharski' farm located in the north part of the test site and Shagan wintering ground of 'Chaganski' farm located in the south-east part of the former tests site were selected as object for research activities. Laboratory analysis displayed presence of fission products (137Cs and 90Sr) as well as non-reacted nuclear fuel (239/240Pu, 241Am) and radionuclides caused by activation (60 Co, 155/154 Eu) in bioprobes. Results of the research activities justify that so called 'spotted' form of radionuclide contamination of pasture lands is predominant, investigation areas with low-radionuclide content interlace with heavily contaminated areas. Intensity of pasture lands contamination varies within 4400 Bq/m2 - 20560 Bq/m2 on 137Cs. Buildup factors (Bf) in organs and tissues of five sheep in Chaganski farm were obtained by calculation. According to the data obtained, radiocesium in a greater degree deposits in muscle tissue, Bf - 0.15. The result is in accord with literature data which indicated that 137Cs in greater degree deposited in muscles. During the investigation at Akzharski farm, we selected 3 horses of different age, and they were killed in order to determine radionuclide structure in organs and tissues. Buildup factors (Bf) in different organs and tissues of horses were obtained by way of calculation: 137Cs deposited in heart Bf-2.3, muscle tissue -1.4, skin integument - 4.4, high concentration in skin integument result from

  1. Representative sampling of animal feed and mixtures in the Danish agricultural sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Kim Harry

    2005-01-01

    Sampling of grain, animal feeds (solid & liquid) including important mineral mixtures in the Danish agricultural sector is subject to an ongoing investigation with the objective of improving existing (sub-optimal) sampling procedures. Results from the first 6 months are presented here; the project...

  2. Dead or alive: animal sampling during Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien O. Joly

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no widely accepted animal surveillance guidelines for human Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF outbreak investigations to identify potential sources of Ebolavirus (EBOV spillover into humans and other animals. Animal field surveillance during and following an outbreak has several purposes, from helping identify the specific animal source of a human case to guiding control activities by describing the spatial and temporal distribution of wild circulating EBOV, informing public health efforts, and contributing to broader EHF research questions. Since 1976, researchers have sampled over 10,000 individual vertebrates from areas associated with human EHF outbreaks and tested for EBOV or antibodies. Using field surveillance data associated with EHF outbreaks, this review provides guidance on animal sampling for resource-limited outbreak situations, target species, and in some cases which diagnostics should be prioritized to rapidly assess the presence of EBOV in animal reservoirs. In brief, EBOV detection was 32.7% (18/55 for carcasses (animals found dead and 0.2% (13/5309 for live captured animals. Our review indicates that for the purposes of identifying potential sources of transmission from animals to humans and isolating suspected virus in an animal in outbreak situations, (1 surveillance of free-ranging non-human primate mortality and morbidity should be a priority, (2 any wildlife morbidity or mortality events should be investigated and may hold the most promise for locating virus or viral genome sequences, (3 surveillance of some bat species is worthwhile to isolate and detect evidence of exposure, and (4 morbidity, mortality, and serology studies of domestic animals should prioritize dogs and pigs and include testing for virus and previous exposure.

  3. Among a German Sample of Forensic Patients, Previous Animal Abuse Mediates Between Psychopathy and Sadistic Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupperich, Alexandra; Strack, Micha

    2016-05-01

    In an attempt to explain the relationship between psychopathy and severe violent behavior, this study associates previous animal abuse, psychopathy, and sadistic acting in forensic patients. Two topics are addressed: (i) whether previous animal abuse can be identified by a patient's Psychopathy Checklist profile and (ii) whether animal abuse statistically mediates between psychopathy and sadistic acting. In a German forensic hospital, 60 patients were investigated. Animal abuse was assessed using face-to-face interviews and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), and sadistic acting was identified by file records.Discriminant analysis separated previous animal abuse (10/60) by high adolescent antisocial behavior, superficiality, lack of remorse, lack of empathy, and grandiosity. The mediation from psychopathy to sadistic acting (6/60) through animal abuse was found to be complete.The results, although sample size is limited and base rate of animal abuse and sadistic acting are low, fit with a model suggestive of animal abuse as a causal step toward sadistic crimes. Animal abuse correlates with callous, unemotional traits, and a development of sadistic crimes. PMID:27122409

  4. Regulation of glucose utilization and lipogenesis in adipose tissue of diabetic and fat fed animals: Effects of insulin and manganese

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Najma Z Baquer; M Sinclair; S Kunjara; Umesh C S Yadav; P McLean

    2003-03-01

    In order to evaluate the modulatory effects of manganese, high fat diet fed and alloxan diabetic rats were taken and the changes in the glucose oxidation, glycerol release and effects of manganese on these parameters were measured from adipose tissue. An insulin-mimetic effect of manganese was observed in the adipose tissue in the controls and an additive effect of insulin and manganese on glucose oxidation was seen when Mn2+ was added in vitro. The flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis was significantly decreased in high fat fed animals. Although the in vitro addition of Mn2+ was additive with insulin when 14CO2 was measured from control animals, it was found neither in young diabetic animals (6–8 weeks old) nor in the old (16 weeks old). Both insulin and manganese caused an increased oxidation of carbon-1 of glucose and an increase of its incorporation into 14C-lipids in the young control animals; the additive effect of insulin and manganese suggests separate site of action. This effect was decreased in fat fed animals, diabetic animals and old animals. Manganese alone was found to decrease glycerol in both the control and diabetic adipose tissue in in vitro incubations. The results of the effects of glucose oxidation, lipogenesis, and glycerol release in adipose tissue of control and diabetic animals of different ages are presented together with the effect of manganese on adipose tissue from high fat milk diet fed animals.

  5. Use of solid phase extraction for the isolation and clean-up of a derivatised furazolidone metabolite from animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conneely, A; Nugent, A; O'Keeffe, M

    2002-06-01

    A method is presented for the determination of protein-bound residues of furazolidone in animal tissue. The use of furazolidone in food-producing animals has been banned in the EU. Illegal use of furazolidone can be monitored most effectively by testing for bound residues containing the 3-amino-2-oxazolidone (AOZ) moiety which, unlike the parent drug, is stable and can be detected for prolonged periods after cessation of treatment. This paper reports the development of an extraction and clean-up procedure for AOZ from liver using solid phase extraction. The method replaces solvent extraction and provides extensive sample clean-up with removal of approximately 99% of the derivatising agent, 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, which may interfere with the determination. It also offers the advantage of being suitable for automation, thereby increasing throughput of samples. The extraction procedure may be used for HPLC and ELISA screening techniques. The method has been validated in fortified and incurred pig liver samples, yielding mean recovery of AOZ in excess of 60%. PMID:12146898

  6. Bioaerosol sampling for airborne bacteria in a small animal veterinary teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Tisha A. M. Harper; Bridgewater, Shelley; Brown, Latoya; Pow-Brown, Patricia; Stewart-Johnson, Alva

    2013-01-01

    Background: Airborne microorganisms within the hospital environment can potentially cause infection in susceptible patients. The objectives of this study were to identify, quantify, and determine the nosocomial potential of common airborne microorganisms present within a small animal teaching hospital. Methods: Bioaerosol sampling was done initially in all 11 rooms and, subsequently, weekly samples were taken from selected rooms over a 9-week period. Samples were collected twice (morning and ...

  7. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

    OpenAIRE

    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; CUNHA Elenice Maria S.; Elizabeth A.C. Aguiar; SILVA Luzia Helena Q.; Miriam M. SODRÉ; SOUZA Maria Conceição A.M.; Kotait, Ivanete

    2002-01-01

    Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cel...

  8. Reliability of non-invasive tissue sampling methods for DNA extraction in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Ben Larbi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA can be extracted from different tissue sources. The most common is blood, but in some situations it can be easier to take a biopsy. In some cases when it is difficult to capture animals, especially in wild populations, faeces and hairs can be considered as a source of DNA. This paper presents a pilot study conducted to compare the applicability of invasive and non-invasive sampling methods for extracting DNA for use in genetic studies of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus. The study included 24 rabbits from the INRA 1001 strain.  Blood, hair, ear biopsies and faeces were collected and used as DNA sources. Our aim was to verify the quantity of DNA obtained from different tissues using two or three types of extraction. DNA was obtained for all tissue types and all extraction methods. DNA extraction was shown to be optimal with the LGC (Laboratory of Cellular Genetics blood extraction method. With regard to non-invasive methods, DNA extraction for hair using the LGC protocol and QIAamp® DNA mini kit gave very low quantities of DNA that could not be used for PCR reactions. The Chelex extraction protocol gave good results for PCR but could not be quantified. DNA extracted from faeces is a viable source of DNA for determining individual genotypes. The use of such non-invasive samples as a source of genetic material is a recent and very promising technique, especially for the study of endangered species, but these techniques are still too unreliable and costly to altogether replace invasive techniques when the latter are possible.

  9. Variations among animals when estimating the undegradable fraction of fiber in forage samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Batista Sampaio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the variability among animals regarding the critical time to estimate the undegradable fraction of fiber (ct using an in situ incubation procedure. Five rumenfistulated Nellore steers were used to estimate the degradation profile of fiber. Animals were fed a standard diet with an 80:20 forage:concentrate ratio. Sugarcane, signal grass hay, corn silage and fresh elephant grass samples were assessed. Samples were put in F57 Ankom® bags and were incubated in the rumens of the animals for 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144, 168, 192, 216, 240 and 312 hours. The degradation profiles were interpreted using a mixed non-linear model in which a random effect was associated with the degradation rate. For sugarcane, signal grass hay and corn silage, there were no significant variations among animals regarding the fractional degradation rate of neutral and acid detergent fiber; consequently, the ct required to estimate the undegradable fiber fraction did not vary among animals for those forages. However, a significant variability among animals was found for the fresh elephant grass. The results seem to suggest that the variability among animals regarding the degradation rate of fibrous components can be significant.

  10. Determination of drug residues by CLAR-MS/MS in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced food of animal origin, present the possibility of occurrence of any contact with substances that have negative effects on the health of people who consume them. The use of drugs in veterinary medicine is one of the possible sources of such waste; so, the conditions for the analysis of some classes of antibiotics in animal tissues are based on the study. Costa Rica and the countries that are export destination, have regulation and programs for control before to be distributed in local markets, or post if it is received any complaint of pollution. The high resolution liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometers (CLAR-MS/MS) allows the analysis of analytes monitored, according to the specifications required by the legislation. The cases of two laboratories in Costa Rica are presented as the only ones who have the ability to perform the analysis of drug residues CLAR-MS/MS. (author)

  11. Species identification and authentication of tissues of animal origin using mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Gurdeep; Dharne, Mahesh S; Walujkar, Sandeep; Kumar, Ashutosh; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2007-08-01

    We evaluated and compared the utility of mitochondrial markers viz. 16S rDNA and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) and a nuclear marker viz. the actin gene to identify the specimens of animal origin for forensic identification, food regulatory control and to prevent illegal trading, poaching and conservation of endangered species. We also tested PCR fingerprinting methods like RAPD and actin barcoding to generate species-specific "fingerprints". Our results suggested that mitochondrial markers are more efficient than nuclear markers for the purpose of species identification and authentication. Among PCR fingerprinting approaches, RAPD was proved to be more discriminatory, accurate and efficient than actin fingerprinting. Considering the present scenario in trading of vertebrate animal tissues like buffalo, cow, pig, goat, chicken, frogs, fishes and snakes etc., mitogenomics based technology proved to be efficient and reliable in resolving problems like meat adulteration and smuggling across countries. PMID:22061243

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against troponin I for the detection of rendered muscle tissues in animal feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fur-Chi; Hsieh, Y-H Peggy; Bridgman, Roger C

    2002-12-01

    Regulatory controls to prevent the spread of BSE have prohibited the use of certain animal proteins in feed in several countries. Accurate analytical methods for detecting prohibited material in feedstuffs are needed to ensure compliance with the new regulations. Six IgG class monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against troponin I (TnI), a thermostable marker protein, have been developed for the detection and differentiation of rendered muscle tissue in animal feed. MAbs 1F9, 2G3 and 7F7 reacted to TnI of all species, including mammalian, poultry and fish, while MAbs 7A12 and 8A12 recognized only mammalian TnI (porcine, bovine, ovine, equine, and deer). MAb 2A8 was able to differentiate TnI of ruminant origin (bovine, ovine and deer) from other species. Three indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) employing these MAbs were developed for the determination of animal muscle, mammalian muscle or ruminant muscle in animal feeds. PMID:22061747

  13. Distribution of plutonium and americium in human and animal tissues after chronic exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of plutonium in the tissues of a group of southern Finns was determined. Their Pu intake had been solely from fallout via inhalation. A group of northern Finns was also studied. They obtain most of the Pu from inhalation, but also some from their diet which is rich in reindeer liver. Reindeer obtain large amounts of transuranium elements in their natural winter diet, which mainly consists of lichen. Pu-239, 240 and Am-241 were also analyzed in elk because it is closely related to reindeer but does not feed on lichen. It was found that much of the Am-241 in reindeer tissues is due to ingrowth from Pu-241 in the animal. The aim of this study to establish whether this situation is also true for the human bone. (H.K.)

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of bone tissue of experimental animals after glucocorticoid treatment and recovery period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, Žarko J.; Najman, Stevo J.; Cakić, Milorad D.; Ajduković, Zorica R.; Ignjatović, Nenad L.; Nikolić, Ružica S.; Nikolić, Goran M.; Stojanović, Sanja T.; Vukelić, Marija Đ.; Trajanović, Miroslav D.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of glucocorticoids on the composition and mineral/organic content of the mandible in tested animals after recovery and healing phase was investigated in this work. The results of FTIR analysis demonstrated that bone tissue composition was changed after glucocorticoid treatment. The increase of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus content and mineral part of bones was statistically significant in recovery phase and in treatment phase that included calcitonin and thymus extract. Some changes also happened in the organic part of the matrix, as indicated by intensity changes for already present IR bands and the appearance of new IR bands in the region 3500-1300 cm-1.

  15. Sample size considerations for one-to-one animal transmission studies of the influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nishiura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal transmission studies can provide important insights into host, viral and environmental factors affecting transmission of viruses including influenza A. The basic unit of analysis in typical animal transmission experiments is the presence or absence of transmission from an infectious animal to a susceptible animal. In studies comparing two groups (e.g. two host genetic variants, two virus strains, or two arrangements of animal cages, differences between groups are evaluated by comparing the proportion of pairs with successful transmission in each group. The present study aimed to discuss the significance and power to estimate transmissibility and identify differences in the transmissibility based on one-to-one trials. The analyses are illustrated on transmission studies of influenza A viruses in the ferret model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Employing the stochastic general epidemic model, the basic reproduction number, R₀, is derived from the final state of an epidemic and is related to the probability of successful transmission during each one-to-one trial. In studies to estimate transmissibility, we show that 3 pairs of infectious/susceptible animals cannot demonstrate a significantly higher transmissibility than R₀= 1, even if infection occurs in all three pairs. In comparisons between two groups, at least 4 pairs of infectious/susceptible animals are required in each group to ensure high power to identify significant differences in transmissibility between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results inform the appropriate sample sizes for animal transmission experiments, while relating the observed proportion of infected pairs to R₀, an interpretable epidemiological measure of transmissibility. In addition to the hypothesis testing results, the wide confidence intervals of R₀ with small sample sizes also imply that the objective demonstration of difference or similarity should rest on firmly calculated sample size.

  16. Reproducibility of NMR Analysis of Urine Samples: Impact of Sample Preparation, Storage Conditions, and Animal Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Schreier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spectroscopic analysis of urine samples from laboratory animals can be used to predict the efficacy and side effects of drugs. This employs methods combining 1H NMR spectroscopy with quantification of biomarkers or with multivariate data analysis. The most critical steps in data evaluation are analytical reproducibility of NMR data (collection, storage, and processing and the health status of the animals, which may influence urine pH and osmolarity. Methods. We treated rats with a solvent, a diuretic, or a nephrotoxicant and collected urine samples. Samples were titrated to pH 3 to 9, or salt concentrations increased up to 20-fold. The effects of storage conditions and freeze-thaw cycles were monitored. Selected metabolites and multivariate data analysis were evaluated after 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. We showed that variation of pH from 3 to 9 and increases in osmolarity up to 6-fold had no effect on the quantification of the metabolites or on multivariate data analysis. Storage led to changes after 14 days at 4°C or after 12 months at −20°C, independent of sample composition. Multiple freeze-thaw cycles did not affect data analysis. Conclusion. Reproducibility of NMR measurements is not dependent on sample composition under physiological or pathological conditions.

  17. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  18. Activity of lysosomal and mitochondrial ferments in serum and liver tissue at controlled and treated by leukotitin animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter author describes the experiments on rats and gives the information on activity of lysosomal and mitochondrial ferments in serum and liver tissue at controlled and treated by leukotitin animals

  19. High resolution ultrasonic scanning of animal and human tissue in-vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roswell, R. L.; Goans, R. E.; Cantrell, Jr., J. H.

    1977-08-01

    Burns impose one of the most serious injuries to the skin due to the organ's function within the body system and to the body as a whole. In an effort to better deal with the burn wound by the immediate excision and grafting of third degree burns, a high resolution (approximately 0.2 mm) ultrasonic pulse-echo technique was developed for determining burn depth. The experimental subjects were Yorkshire pigs because of the histological similarity between human and porcine skin. Burn depths were readily identifiable immediately postburn with the ultrasonic techniques, as were general trends concerning the burn-viable and viable-fat interfaces. The tissue characteristics, density and acoustic attenuation, effecting the impedance mismatch at the burn-viable tissue interface were investigated. The methods of fluid displacements and specific gravities yielded density values, while spectrum analyses produced attenuation measurements for normal, viable and burned tissue samples.

  20. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M.; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. Procedures A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N=6) or sham injury (N=4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Results Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted. PMID:25905474

  1. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD SAMPLES OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jaroslav Pochop; Miroslava Kačániová; Lukáš Hleba; Jana Petrová; Ľubomír Lopašovský; Adriana Pavelková; Alica Bobková

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to follow the contamination of food with Listeria monocytogenes by using Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and SensiFAST SYBR Hi-ROX Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 24 samples of food of animal origin without incubation were detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in 15 samples (swabs). Nine samples were negative. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assa...

  2. PEGDA hydrogels as a replacement for animal tissues in mucoadhesion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel-Green, Tal; Eliyahu, Shaked; Avidan-Shlomovich, Shlomit; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2016-06-15

    Utilization of animal parts in ex-vivo mucoadhesion assays is a common approach that presents many difficulties due to animal rights issues and large variance between animals. This study examines the suitability of two PEGDA (poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate) based hydrogels to serve as tissue mimetics for mucoadhesion evaluation. One hydrogel, termed PEGDA-QT, was composed of pentaerythritol tetrakis (3-mercaptopropionate) and PEG and contained free thiol groups mimicking those found in natural mucosa. The other hydrogel was formed by UV (ultraviolet) curing of PEGDA and mimicked the mechanical property of mucosa but not its chemical constitute. When ranking different first generation mucoadhesive polymers using a tensile assay, both hydrogels showed good agreement with the ranking achieved for porcine small intestine. However, only PEGDA-QT and porcine small intestine shared a similar displacement curve. The same ranking for PEGDA-QT and porcine small intestine was also observed when comparing a second-generation mucoadhesive polymer, thiolated alginate, to native alginate. Our findings suggest that PEGDA-QT could serve as a replacement for porcine small intestine in both mucoadhesion evaluations using a tensile machine and the flow-through method for first and second-generation mucoadhesive polymers. PMID:27084292

  3. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation

  4. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  5. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  6. Subcellular Distribution of Gallium-67 and other Auger-emitting Radionuclides in Human and Animal Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subcellular distributions of the Auger-emitting radiopharmaceuticals 67Ga citrate, 111In-bleomycin, 63Zn-bleomycin, 123/125/I-Conray and 123/125I-Biligram in human and animal tumours and normal tissues were studied using differential centrifugation. For 67Ga, at 19 to 54 h after injection, the observed subcellular distribution patterns were similar in all the tissues studied with 2-5% of the total tissue radioactivity being associated with the cell nuclei. For 63Zn and 111In administered as the bleomycin complex or as chloride, as well as for the X ray contrast media 135/125I-Conray and 123/125I-Biligram the fraction associated with the nuclei was only 1-2%. The studies indicate that, for the 67Ga, 111In, 63Zn complexes or compounds studied, only γ1 to 4% of the Auger emissions are likely to arise in the cell nucleus. (author)

  7. Determination of residues of tetracycline antibiotics in animal tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, E J; van de Lagemaat, D

    1989-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC), chlortetracycline (CTC) and doxycycline (DC) in animal tissues. Tissues were macerated with a buffer solution and centrifuged. The supernatant solution was purified over a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge which had previously been deactivated by silylation. Tetracyclines were eluted with methanol, the solvent evaporated and the residue dissolved in the HPLC mobile phase. Compounds were separated on a Novapak Phenyl Radial-Pak cartridge with a Resolve CN guard column using gradient elution and UV detection. The method was tested on chicken, porcine and bovine muscle. Recoveries were determined for OTC, TC, CTC and DC added to porcine, bovine and chicken muscle at levels of 0.05 and 0.2 mg kg-1. They varied from about 90% for OTC to about 68% for DC with coefficients of variation of 1.8-7.5%. The limit of determination is 5-10 micrograms kg-1. The method was validated on tissues of laying-hens after intramuscular injection of OTC. PMID:2490571

  8. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  9. Swab or biopsy samples for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettas, Kerry

    2014-12-01

    Swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue are most commonly collected by tissue banks for bacterial and fungal bioburden testing. An in vitro study was performed using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards standard 'Quality control of microbiological transport systems' (2003) to validate and evaluate the recovery of six challenge organisms from swab and biopsy samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. On average, 8.4 to >100 and 7.2 to >100 % of the inoculum was recovered from swab and biopsy samples respectively. A retrospective review of donor episodes was also performed, consisting of paired swab and biopsy samples received in this laboratory during the period 2001-2012. Samples of allograft femoral heads were collected from living donors during hip operations. From the 3,859 donor episodes received, 21 paired swab and biopsy samples each recovered an isolate, 247 swab samples only and 79 biopsy samples only were culture positive. Low numbers of challenge organisms were recovered from inoculated swab and biopsy samples in the in vitro study and validated their use for bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal tissue. Skin commensals were the most common group of organisms isolated during a 12-year retrospective review of paired swab and biopsy samples from living donor allograft femoral heads. Paired swab and biopsy samples are a suitable representative sample of allograft musculoskeletal tissue for bioburden testing. PMID:24599706

  10. Tissue Microarray Technology for Molecular Applications: Investigation of Cross-Contamination between Tissue Samples Obtained from the Same Punching Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Vassella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tissue microarray (TMA technology allows rapid visualization of molecular markers by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In addition, TMA instrumentation has the potential to assist in other applications: punches taken from donor blocks can be placed directly into tubes and used for nucleic acid analysis by PCR approaches. However, the question of possible cross-contamination between samples punched with the same device has frequently been raised but never addressed. Methods: Two experiments were performed. (1 A block from mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB positive tissue and a second from an uninfected patient were aligned side-by-side in an automated tissue microarrayer. Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from each sample and placed inside their corresponding tube. Between coring of each donor block, a mechanical cleaning step was performed by insertion of the puncher into a paraffin block. This sequence of coring and cleaning was repeated three times, alternating between positive and negative blocks. A fragment from the 6110 insertion sequence specific for mycobacterium tuberculosis was analyzed; (2 Four 0.6 mm punches were cored from three KRAS mutated colorectal cancer blocks, alternating with three different wild-type tissues using the same TMA instrument (sequence of coring: G12D, WT, G12V, WT, G13D and WT. Mechanical cleaning of the device between each donor block was made. Mutation analysis by pyrosequencing was carried out. This sequence of coring was repeated manually without any cleaning step between blocks. Results/Discussion: In both analyses, all alternating samples showed the expected result (samples 1, 3 and 5: positive or mutated, samples 2, 4 and 6: negative or wild-type. Similar results were obtained without cleaning step. These findings suggest that no cross-contamination of tissue samples occurs when donor blocks are punched using the same device, however a cleaning step is nonetheless recommended. Our

  11. Effects of experimental radiotherapy and hyperthermia on tumors and normal tissues in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on responses of tumors, implanted subcutaneously in the leg, to irradiation alone or combined with heat are reported. The influence of factors modifying the fraction of hypoxic cells (e.g. anesthesia of the animal and tumor volume) is also discussed. The radiosensitivity of developing lung tumors was examined for spontaneous as well as for artificial lung metastases. Both experimental tumor models were compared with regard to their value in experimental radiotherapy. Data obtained on the response of artificial metastases and lung tissue to combined treatment with irradiation and several drugs are presented. Data on damage of the mouse foot, as a result of heat and/or irradiation treatments are presented. In particular the influence of thermotolerance on thermal enhancement of the radiation induced skin reaction was studied. Tolerance of the skin of previously irradiated mice to retreatment with irradiation, to hyperthermia alone and combined with X-rays was assessed. (Auth.)

  12. Diet authentication in sheep from the composition of animal tissues and products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Prache

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an increased consumer demand for information on herbivore production factors, particularly animal diet. To meet these demands, producers and commercial entities develop specifications via quality certifications. There is therefore a need for analytical tools that may guarantee that the specification commitments have been fully met or to help with constructing them. The present paper reviews the current state of knowledge concerning diet authentication in sheep meat and milk, the different approaches that have been investigated, some leading examples concerning the discrimination of contrasting feeding situations, together with the persistence of some diet markers in the event of changes in animals' diet. The nature of the diet strongly influences the composition of the animal tissues and products, which is due to specific compounds that are directly transferred from the feed to the end product or that are transformed or produced by rumen micro-organisms or the animal's metabolism under the effect of specific diets. Some of these compounds can therefore be used as diet markers. Compounds such as carotenoids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids, volatile compounds and ratios of oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope are potential tracers in meat and milk or animal tissues of animal feeding diets. Moreover, differences in meat and milk composition induce differences in their optical properties, and therefore in their spectral features, which can also be used for diet authentication. These techniques have already allowed discrimination among products obtained in contrasting feeding conditions. Intermediate situations, for example in case of modification of the animal's diet, may be less easily recognized and may require a combination of tracing methods. In particular, the persistence of tracers when animals are stall-fed a concentrate-based diet after pasture and its implications for traceability are discussed. Finally

  13. Measurement of natural radioactivity in animal feed supplements samples by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work is to determine the radiation levels found in animal feed supplements due to natural radioactivity. Knowledge of the radiation levels in samples of animal and poultry feed supplements is important, because they directly or indirectly form part of the human diet. In order to obtain this data, gamma-ray spectrometry technique was used, employing a p-type HPGe detector of 30% of relative efficiency, with an energy resolution of 1.9 KeV for the 60Co 1332.46 KeV line. The radioactivity due to radionuclides 40K, 226Ra, 238U, 232Th and its respective decay series was measured. The accommodation recipient of the samples was a 250 cc cylindrical plastic container. The 238U series radioactivity was calculated through 214Pb and 214Bi activities, and the 232Th series' activity was calculated through the 228Ac, 212Pb, 212Bi and 208Tl values. The animal feed supplements samples measured in this work were samples received in this laboratory for radioactivity test certification. Among the samples, the radioactivity concentration of Uranium-238, Thorium-232, Radium-226 and Potassium-40 in animal supplement was found to be in the range of 1.4 ± 0.2 to 32.7 ± 5.7 Bq/kg, 1.8 ± 0.2 to 44.5 ± 6.6 Bq/kg, 4.0 ± 1. 2 to 105.2 ± 10.2 Bq/kg and 13.1 ± 3.6 to 397.2 ± 19.9 Bq/kg respectively. (author)

  14. Cadmium and lead in animal tissue (muscle, liver and kidney), cow milk and dairy products in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Gyu; Kim, MeeKyung; Shin, Jin Young; Son, Seong-Wan

    2016-03-01

    A survey of Cd and Pb in animal tissue, milk and dairy products was conducted. Muscle, liver and kidney of domestically produced cows, pigs, chickens and ducks were collected from eight regions in Korea. Raw cow milk was collected from 9 regions, and imported dairy products (butter, cheese, cream and powdered milk) were collected from 15 countries. Cd and Pb were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave digestion. Concentrations of Cd and Pb did not exceed the Korean legal maximum levels in any of the samples. Correlation coefficients were estimated between concentration of Cd or Pb and animal age and between muscle, liver and kidney. In cows, there were good correlations between age and Cd in kidney (r = 0.748) and between Cd in liver and in kidney (r = 0.878). Continuous monitoring will be an important role to safeguard consumers in the event of a food contamination incident. PMID:26588172

  15. Isolation of high quality protein samples from punches of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kroll(Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, United States of America); Becker, K.F.; Kuphal, S; Hein, R.; Hofstädter, F; Bosserhoff, A K

    2008-01-01

    In general, it is believed that the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples is not feasible. However, recently a new technique was developed, presenting the extraction of non-degraded, full length proteins from formalin fixed tissues, usable for western blotting and protein arrays. In the study presented here, we applied this technique to punch biopsies of formalin fixed tissues embedded in paraffin to reduce heterogeneity of the tissue rep...

  16. An integrated optical platform for micromanipulation of cells and tissue in live animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Raphael

    The hematopoietic stem cell niche is a specialized bone marrow (BM) microenvironment where blood-forming cells reside. Interactions between these rare cells and their niche need to be studied at the single-cell level. While live animal cell tracking with optical microscopy has proven useful for this purpose, a more thorough characterization requires novel approaches. This can be accomplished by using an integrated optical platform for cell and tissue manipulations (cell transplantation and extraction) in the skull bone of live mice. The platform integrates a non-damaging laser ablation microbeam for bone removal and tissue cutting, optical tweezers for single cell trapping, and a video-rate scanning microscope. For single cell delivery, a narrow channel is ablated through bone under imaging guidance. Cells are then transferred from a micropipette into an optical trap, which brings cells into the BM through the channel. The survival and proliferation of implanted cells can be tracked in vivo by imaging. For cell extraction after laser bone thinning, different approaches can be implemented and three of them are presented.

  17. DNA Damage in Preserved Specimens and Tissue Samples: A Molecular Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Cantin Elizabeth; Hanken James; Blackburn David C; Hajibabaei Mehrdad; Zimmermann Juergen; Posfai Janos; Evans Thomas C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The extraction of genetic information from preserved tissue samples or museum specimens is a fundamental component of many fields of research, including the Barcode of Life initiative, forensic investigations, biological studies using scat sample analysis, and cancer research utilizing formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Efforts to obtain genetic information from these sources are often hampered by an inability to amplify the desired DNA as a consequence of DNA damage. Prev...

  18. A laser microdissection-based workflow for FFPE tissue microproteomics: Important considerations for small sample processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuespée, Rémi; Alberts, Deborah; Pottier, Charles; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Baiwir, Dominique; Kriegsmann, Mark; Herfs, Michael; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Delvenne, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-15

    Proteomic methods are today widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for several applications in research, especially in molecular pathology. To date, there is an unmet need for the analysis of small tissue samples, such as for early cancerous lesions. Indeed, no method has yet been proposed for the reproducible processing of small FFPE tissue samples to allow biomarker discovery. In this work, we tested several procedures to process laser microdissected tissue pieces bearing less than 3000 cells. Combined with appropriate settings for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, a citric acid antigen retrieval (CAAR)-based procedure was established, allowing to identify more than 1400 proteins from a single microdissected breast cancer tissue biopsy. This work demonstrates important considerations concerning the handling and processing of laser microdissected tissue samples of extremely limited size, in the process opening new perspectives in molecular pathology. A proof of the proposed method for biomarker discovery, with respect to these specific handling considerations, is illustrated using the differential proteomic analysis of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type and invasive lobular triple-negative breast cancer tissues. This work will be of utmost importance for early biomarker discovery or in support of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging for microproteomics from small regions of interest. PMID:26690073

  19. Arsenic residues in meat and organ samples from farm animals, water fowl and game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, J.

    1978-09-01

    There are still gaps in our knowledge of the extent to which animal foods are contaminated with arsenic. An examination was therefore made of the meat, livers and kidneys of 65 pigs, 40 bulls including some heifers, 35 calves, 50 cows and 30 horses from north-eastern area of Lower Saxony. Arsenic contents were also determined in 269 geese and 27 ducks and in 29 deer and 11 hares. The samples were treated with a nitric acid/perchloric acid mixture until dry, absorbed into 25 ml of 3.2% nitric acid and determined by means of the arsenic hydride system and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer 300 made by Perkin Elmer with ED-lamp. The results show that food of animal origin is only very slightly contaminated with arsenic. The guide values for arsenic contents in meat and organ samples taken from pigs and bovines were not exceeded in any case. 7 bovines from an immission area however had undesirably high arsenic values with maximum quantities of 0.16 ppM in the meat, 0.14 ppM in the liver and 0.22 ppM in the kidneys. Unlike the situation with cadmium and lead there was no build-up of arsenic in the organs. Results so far would suggest that arsenic only plays a subordinate role as a ''problem element'' in the contamination of animal foods with harmful metals. Continual supervision of this harmful metal would therefore not appear to be absolutely essential and random sampling of and control tests on animal foods from immission areas would seem more appropriate. 11 references, 1 table.

  20. A method to measure the hyperelastic parameters of ex vivo breast tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Abbas; Plewes, Donald

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade, there has been increasing interest in modelling soft tissue deformation. This topic has several biomedical applications ranging from medical imaging to robotic assisted telesurgery. In these applications, tissue deformation can be very large due to low tissue stiffness and lack of physical constraints. As a result, deformation modelling of such organs often requires a treatment, which reflects nonlinear behaviour. While computational techniques such as nonlinear finite element methods are well developed, the required intrinsic nonlinear mechanical parameters of soft tissues that are critical to develop reliable tissue deformation models are not well known. To address this issue, we developed a system to measure the hyperelastic parameters of small ex vivo tissue samples. This measurement technique consists of indenting an unconfined small block of tissue using a computer controlled loading system while measuring the resulting indentation force. The nonlinear tissue force-displacement response is used to calculate the hyperelastic parameters via an appropriate inversion technique. This technique is based on a nonlinear least squares formulation that uses a nonlinear finite element model as the direct problem solver. The features of the system are demonstrated with two samples of breast tissue and typical hyperelastic results are presented.

  1. High stability of microRNAs in tissue samples of compromised quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Peña-Chilet, María; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; García-Giménez, José Luis; Alonso-Yuste, Elisa; Burgues, Octavio; Lluch, Ana; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Ribas, Gloria

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of tissue samples limits performing RNA-based molecular studies, but little is known about the potential usefulness of samples of compromised quality for studies focused on miRNAs. In this work we analyze a series of cryopreserved tissue samples (n = 14), frozen samples that underwent a severe thawing process (n = 10), and their paired formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (n = 24) from patients with breast cancer obtained during primary surgical resection and collected in 2011. Quality and integrity analyses of the total and small fraction of RNA were carried out. Recovery of specific RNA molecules (miRNAs hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-125b, and hsa-miR-191; snoRNA RNU6B; and mRNAs GAPDH and HPRT1) was also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Our results suggest that visualisation of the small RNA electrophoretic profiles obtained using the Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer makes it possible to differentiate between the three groups of samples (optimally frozen, thawed, and FFPE). We demonstrate that specific miRNA molecules can be similarly recovered from different tissue sample sources, which supports their high degree of stability. We conclude that miRNAs are robustly detected irrespective of the quality of the tissue sample. In this regard, a word of caution should be raised before degraded samples are discarded: although prior quality assessment of the biological material to be analyzed is recommended, our work demonstrates that degraded tissue samples are also suitable for miRNA studies. PMID:24197449

  2. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN FOOD SAMPLES OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Pochop

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to follow the contamination of food with Listeria monocytogenes by using Step One real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We used the PrepSEQ Rapid Spin Sample Preparation Kit for isolation of DNA and SensiFAST SYBR Hi-ROX Kit for the real-time PCR performance. In 24 samples of food of animal origin without incubation were detected strains of Listeria monocytogenes in 15 samples (swabs. Nine samples were negative. Our results indicated that the real-time PCR assay developed in this study could sensitively detect Listeria monocytogenes in food of animal origin without incubation. This could prevent infection caused by Listeria monocytogenes, and also could benefit food manufacturing companies by extending their product’s shelf-life as well as saving the cost of warehousing their food products while awaiting pathogen testing results. The rapid real-time PCR-based method performed very well compared to the conventional method. It is a fast, simple, specific and sensitive way to detect nucleic acids, which could be used in clinical diagnostic tests in the future.

  3. A new osteonecrosis animal model of the femoral head induced by microwave heating and repaired with tissue engineered bone

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanlin; Han, Rui; Geng, Chengkui; Wang, Yongnian; Wei, Lei

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to induce a new animal model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) by microwave heating and then repair with tissue engineered bone. The bilateral femoral heads of 84 rabbits were heated by microwave at various temperatures. Tissue engineered bone was used to repair the osteonecrosis of femoral heads induced by microwave heating. The roentgenographic and histological examinations were used to evaluate the results. The femoral heads heated at 55°C for t...

  4. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  5. Storage and shipping of tissue samples for DNA analyses: A case study on earthworms ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Straube, Daniela; Juen, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, molecular analyses play an important role in studies of soil dwelling animals, for example in taxonomy, phylogeography or food web analyses. The quality of the DNA, used for later molecular analyses, is an important factor and depends on collection and preservation of samples prior to DNA extraction. Ideally, DNA samples are frozen immediately upon collection, but if samples are collected in the field, suitable preservation methods might be limited due to unavailability of resources...

  6. Online recovery of radiocesium from soil, tissue paper and plant samples by supercritical fluid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of recovery of radio-cesium from soil, tissue papers, and plant samples has been evaluated by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) route employing calix(4)arene-mono(crown-6) (CC) dissolved in acetonitrile. These studies showed that quantitative recovery of 137Cs from soil samples was difficult under the conditions of these studies. However, experiments performed on tissue papers (cellulose matrix) showed quantitative recovery of 137Cs. On the other hand, 137Cs recovery from plant samples varied between ∼50 % (for stems) and ∼67.2 % (for leaves) employing 1x10-3 M CC + 4 M HNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile. (author)

  7. Evaluation and establishing the performance of different screening tests for tetracycline residues in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okerman, L; Croubels, S; Cherlet, M; De Wasch, K; De Backer, P; Van Hoof, J

    2004-02-01

    Four methods intended for screening muscle tissue for residues belonging to the tetracycline group were compared using artificially contaminated as well as incurred samples. Two agar diffusion methods were studied: one with Bacillus subtilis as a test strain, the second with Bacillus cereus. Two variants of each method were compared: thin plates for analysis of intact or minced meat, and thick plates for analysis of meat fluid. The thin plate variants could not be evaluated with artificially contaminated samples because it was impossible to prepare homogeneously spiked, undiluted meat. The thick plates were suited for doxycycline and chlortetracycline, but they did not detect oxytetracycline or tetracycline in spiked meat fluid. The results of these tests done on incurred meat were very good for doxycycline and satisfying or just failing for oxytetracycline, while the best detection capability was obtained when intact frozen meat was examined on thin plates seeded with B. cereus. Two commercially available screening tests were also evaluated. The Premi(R) test, an inhibitor test with Bacillus stearothermophilus as a test strain and an indicator for growth, was not suited for detection of tetracyclines up to the maximum residue limit. Tetrasensor(R), a receptor test specific for tetracyclines, proved a quick and simple test able to detect meat samples artificially contaminated with tetracycline, oxytetracycline, doxycycline or chlortetracycline, as well as meat incurred with oxytetracycline or doxycycline. PMID:14754636

  8. Activity and growth of microbial populations in pressurized deep-sea sediment and animal gut samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, P S; Deming, J W; Ohwada, K; Colwell, R R

    1982-08-01

    Benthic animals and sediment samples were collected at deep-sea stations in the northwest (3,600-m depth) and southeast (4,300- and 5200-m depths) Atlantic Ocean. Utilization rates of [14C]glutamate (0.67 to 0.74 nmol) in sediment suspensions incubated at in situ temperatures and pressures (3 to 5 degrees C and 360, 430, or 520 atmospheres) were relatively slow, ranging from 0.09 to 0.39 nmol g-1 day-1, whereas rates for pressurized samples of gut suspensions varied widely, ranging from no detectable activity to a rapid rate of 986 nmol g-1 day-1. Gut flora from a holothurian specimen and a fish demonstrated rapid, barophilic substrate utilization, based on relative rates calculated for pressurized samples and samples held at 1 atm (101.325 kPa). Substrate utilization by microbial populations in several sediment samples was not inhibited by in situ pressure. Deep-sea pressures did not restrict growth, measured as doubling time, of culturable bacteria present in a northwest Atlantic sediment sample and in a gut suspension prepared from an abyssal scavenging amphipod. From the results of this study, it was concluded that microbial populations in benthic environments can demonstrate significant metabolic activity under deep-ocean conditions of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, rates of microbial activity in the guts of benthic macrofauna are potentially more rapid than in surrounding deep-sea sediments. PMID:6127054

  9. Sampling of prenatal and postnatal offspring from individual rat dams enhances animal use without compromising development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, J. R.; Burden, H. W.; Hawes, N.; Ronca, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    To assess prenatal and postnatal developmental status in the offspring of a group of animals, it is typical to examine fetuses from some of the dams as well as infants born to the remaining dams. Statistical limitations often arise, particularly when the animals are rare or especially precious, because all offspring of the dam represent only a single statistical observation; littermates are not independent observations (biologically or statistically). We describe a study in which pregnant laboratory rats were laparotomized on day 7 of gestation (GD7) to ascertain the number and distribution of uterine implantation sites and were subjected to a simulated experience on a 10-day space shuttle flight. After the simulated landing on GD18, rats were unilaterally hysterectomized, thus providing a sample of fetuses from 10 independent uteruses, followed by successful vaginal delivery on GD22, yielding postnatal samples from 10 uteruses. A broad profile of maternal and offspring morphologic and physiologic measures indicated that these novel sampling procedures did not compromise maternal well-being and maintained normal offspring development and function. Measures included maternal organ weights and hormone concentrations, offspring body size, growth, organ weights, sexual differentiation, and catecholamine concentrations.

  10. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  11. Quantified Facial Soft-tissue Strain in Animation Measured by Real-time Dynamic 3-Dimensional Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Hsu, MD

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: This pilot study illustrates that the face can be objectively and quantitatively evaluated using dynamic major strain analysis. The technology of 3-dimensional optical imaging can be used to advance our understanding of facial soft-tissue dynamics and the effects of animation on facial strain over time.

  12. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshemey, Wael M.; Mohamed, Fayrouz S.; Khater, Ibrahim M.

    2013-09-01

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm-1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively.

  13. Measurement of the hyperelastic properties of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Joseph J.; Samani, Abbas

    2009-04-01

    The elastic and hyperelastic properties of biological soft tissues have been of interest to the medical community. There are several biomedical applications where parameters characterizing such properties are critical for a reliable clinical outcome. These applications include surgery planning, needle biopsy and brachtherapy where tissue biomechanical modeling is involved. Another important application is interpreting nonlinear elastography images. While there has been considerable research on the measurement of the linear elastic modulus of small tissue samples, little research has been conducted for measuring parameters that characterize the nonlinear elasticity of tissues included in tissue slice specimens. This work presents hyperelastic measurement results of 44 pathological ex vivo breast tissue samples. For each sample, five hyperelastic models have been used, including the Yeoh, N = 2 polynomial, N = 1 Ogden, Arruda-Boyce, and Veronda-Westmann models. Results show that the Yeoh, polynomial and Ogden models are the most accurate in terms of fitting experimental data. The results indicate that almost all of the parameters corresponding to the pathological tissues are between two times to over two orders of magnitude larger than those of normal tissues, with C11 showing the most significant difference. Furthermore, statistical analysis indicates that C02 of the Yeoh model, and C11 and C20 of the polynomial model have very good potential for cancer classification as they show statistically significant differences for various cancer types, especially for invasive lobular carcinoma. In addition to the potential for use in cancer classification, the presented data are very important for applications such as surgery planning and virtual reality based clinician training systems where accurate nonlinear tissue response modeling is required.

  14. Bioaerosol sampling for airborne bacteria in a small animal veterinary teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisha A. M. Harper

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airborne microorganisms within the hospital environment can potentially cause infection in susceptible patients. The objectives of this study were to identify, quantify, and determine the nosocomial potential of common airborne microorganisms present within a small animal teaching hospital. Methods: Bioaerosol sampling was done initially in all 11 rooms and, subsequently, weekly samples were taken from selected rooms over a 9-week period. Samples were collected twice (morning and afternoon at each site on each sampling day. The rooms were divided into two groups: Group 1, in which morning sampling was post-cleaning and afternoon sampling was during activity, and Group 2, in which morning sampling was pre-cleaning and afternoon sampling was post-cleaning. The total aerobic bacterial plate counts per m3 and bacterial identification were done using standard microbiological methods. Results: A total of 14 bacterial genera were isolated with the most frequent being Micrococcus spp. followed by species of Corynebacterium, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. There was a significant interaction between location and time for rooms in Group 1 (p=0.0028 but not in Group 2 (p>0.05. Microbial counts for rooms in Group 2 were significantly greater in the mornings than in the afternoon (p=0.0049. The microbial counts were also significantly different between some rooms (p=0.0333. Conclusion: The detection of significantly higher airborne microbial loads in different rooms at different times of the day suggests that the probability of acquiring nosocomial infections is higher at these times and locations.

  15. Detection and genetic characterization of foot‐and‐mouth disease viruses in samples from clinically healthy animals in endemic settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Ferrari, G.; Hussain, M.;

    2012-01-01

    A total of 1501 oral swab samples from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan were collected from clinically healthy animals between July 2008 and August 2009 and assayed for the presence of foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA. The oral swab samples from two (of four) live animal markets...... in Pakistan (n = 245), one (of three) live animal market in Afghanistan (n = 61) and both the live animal markets in Tajikistan (n = 120) all tested negative. However, 2 of 129 (∼2%) samples from Gondal and 11 of 123 (9%) from Chichawatni markets in Pakistan were positive for FMDV RNA. Similarly, 12 of 81 (15......%) samples from Kabul and 10 of 20 (50%) from Badakhshan in Afghanistan were found to be positive. Serotypes A and O of FMDV were identified within these samples. Oral swab samples were also collected from dairy colonies in Harbanspura, Lahore (n = 232) and Nagori, Karachi (n = 136), but all tested negative...

  16. Quantitative mapping of collagen fiber alignment in thick tissue samples using transmission polarized-light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Dmitry D; Shvachkina, Marina E; Sherman, Maria M; Spivak, Andrey V; Pravdin, Alexander B; Yakovlev, Dmitry A

    2016-07-01

    Immersion optical clearing makes it possible to use transmission polarized-light microscopy for characterization of thick (200 to 2000  μm) layers of biological tissues. We discuss polarization properties of thick samples in the context of the problem of characterization of collagen fiber alignment in connective tissues such as sclera and dermis. Optical chirality caused by azimuthal variations of the macroscopic (effective) optic axis of the medium across the sample thickness should be considered in polarization mapping of thick samples of these tissues. We experimentally evaluate to what extent the optical chirality affects the measurement results in typical situations and show under what conditions it can be easily taken into account and does not hinder, but rather helps, in characterization of collagen fiber alignment. PMID:27027930

  17. Laser ablation sample transfer for localized LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a mid-infrared laser ablation sampling technique for nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry proteomic profiling of discrete regions from biological samples. Laser ablation performed in transmission geometry was used to transfer material from 50-µm thick tissue sections mounted on a glass microscope slide to a capturing solvent. Captured samples were processed using filter-aided sample preparation and enzymatically digested to produce tryptic peptides for data-dependent analysis with an ion trap mass spectrometer. Comparison with ultraviolet laser capture microdissection from neighboring regions on the same tissue section revealed that infrared laser ablation transfer has higher reproducibility between samples from different consecutive sections. Both techniques allowed for proteomics investigation of different organelles without the addition of surfactants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27041656

  18. Factors influencing diagnostic sample submission by food animal veterinarians in Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Robinson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A focus group was organised to gather information and opinions from food animal veterinarians in Mississippi regarding sample submission to diagnostic laboratories. The research found that a range of factors influence the veterinarian's decision regarding whether samples will be submitted to a diagnostic laboratory, with the cost of diagnostics as the key influence. The veterinarians believed that the relationship they had with diagnostic laboratories was important in the protection of public health, but they thought that their role in disease surveillance was under-utilised. More attention needs to be directed towards strengthening veterinary surveillance at ground level to ensure that emergent diseases are detected effectively by a partnership approach between veterinary practitioners in the field and diagnosticians in diagnostic laboratories. This partnership is a vital component of the 'One Health' concept for the protection of both animal and human health. This study demonstrates that qualitative social science methodologies, such as focus groups, can usefully be applied to topics of relevance to veterinary public health.

  19. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal samples of healthy farm animals and pets in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A total of 261 healthy farm and pet animals (75 cattle, 52 goats, 100 dogs, and 34 cats) from different regions of Tunisia were screened for Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. Molecular typing of isolates (by spa- and multilocus sequence-typing) was performed, and their antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes were determined by PCR and sequencing. S. aureus isolates were detected in 17 of 261 tested samples (6.5%). All S. aureus isolates recovered were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), and one isolate/sample was further studied. Eight different spa types were detected (t189, t279, t582, t701, t1166, t1268, t1534, and t1773), and eight different sequence types were identified (ST6, ST15, ST45, ST133, ST188, ST700 [clonal complex CC130], ST2057, and a new ST2121). MSSA from pets (six isolates) showed resistance to (number of isolates, resistance gene): penicillin (six, blaZ), tetracycline (one, tet[M]), erythromycin one, erm[A]), streptomycin (one, ant[6]-Ia), and ciprofloxacin (one). All isolates from farm animals showed susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, except for two penicillin-resistant isolates. Five S. aureus isolates from goats and cats harbored the lukF/lukS-PV genes, encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and six isolates from goats harbored the tst virulence gene. In addition, diverse combinations of enterotoxin genes were detected, including two variants of the egc cluster. Goats and cats could represent a reservoir of important toxin genes, with potential implications in animal and human health. PMID:25700041

  20. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  1. X-ray scattering for the characterization of lyophilized breast tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates the possibility of characterizing breast cancer by measuring the X-ray scattering profiles of lyophilized excised breast tissue samples. Since X-ray scattering from water-rich tissue is dominated by scattering from water, the removal of water by lyophilization would enhance the characterization process. In the present study, X-ray scattering profiles of 22 normal, 22 malignant and 10 benign breast tissue samples are measured. The cut-offs of scatter diagrams, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of three characterization parameters (full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the peak at 1.1 nm−1, area under curve (AUC), and ratio of 1st to 2nd scattering peak intensities (I1/I2%)) are calculated and compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. Results show increased sensitivity (up to 100%) of the present data on lyophilized breast tissue samples compared to previously reported data for non-lyophilized samples while the specificity (up to 95.4%), diagnostic accuracy (up to 95.4%) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve values (up to 0.9979) for both sets of data are comparable. The present study shows significant differences between normal samples and each of malignant and benign samples. Only subtle differences exist between malignant and benign lyophilized breast tissue samples where FWHM=0.7±0.1 and 0.8±0.3, AUC=1.3±0.2 and 1.4±0.2 and I1/I2%=44.9±11.0 and 52.4±7.6 for malignant and benign samples respectively. - Highlights: • X-ray scattering profiles of breast tissue samples are acquired. • Three X-ray profile characterization parameters are calculated. • The cut-offs, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy are calculated. • They are compared to the data from non-lyophilized samples. • Results show increased sensitivity in case of lyophilized samples

  2. Determination of Magnesium in Needle Biopsy Samples of Muscle Tissue by Means of Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium has been determined by means of neutron-activation analysis in needle biopsy samples of the order of magnitude 1 mg dry weight. The procedure applied was to extract the Mg-27 activity from irradiated muscle tissue with concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by a fast hydroxide precipitation and gamma-spectrometric measurements. The Mg activity was recovered in the muscle tissue samples to (97 ± 2) per cent. The sensitivity for the magnesium determination is estimated as 0.3 μg

  3. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  4. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν¯fat) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν¯fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μs of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, νfat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν¯fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10−5 sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μs was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μs of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μs of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν¯fat=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μs for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μs of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby validating the

  5. Automated MALDI Matrix Coating System for Multiple Tissue Samples for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounfield, William P.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2012-03-01

    Uniform matrix deposition on tissue samples for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is key for reproducible analyte ion signals. Current methods often result in nonhomogenous matrix deposition, and take time and effort to produce acceptable ion signals. Here we describe a fully-automated method for matrix deposition using an enclosed spray chamber and spray nozzle for matrix solution delivery. A commercial air-atomizing spray nozzle was modified and combined with solenoid controlled valves and a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to control and deliver the matrix solution. A spray chamber was employed to contain the nozzle, sample, and atomized matrix solution stream, and to prevent any interference from outside conditions as well as allow complete control of the sample environment. A gravity cup was filled with MALDI matrix solutions, including DHB in chloroform/methanol (50:50) at concentrations up to 60 mg/mL. Various samples (including rat brain tissue sections) were prepared using two deposition methods (spray chamber, inkjet). A linear ion trap equipped with an intermediate-pressure MALDI source was used for analyses. Optical microscopic examination showed a uniform coating of matrix crystals across the sample. Overall, the mass spectral images gathered from tissues coated using the spray chamber system were of better quality and more reproducible than from tissue specimens prepared by the inkjet deposition method.

  6. Detection and species identification of Campylobacter in stool samples of children and animals from Vellore, south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rajendran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. are an important cause of bacterial gastroenteritis frequently isolated from animal, poultry and environmental samples. In this study, we investigated the zoonotic potential of Campylobacter spp. by comparing prevalence rates and species in 394 children with diarrhoea and 652 animals in Vellore using PCR-based tools. Eighteen children (4.5% had campylobacteriosis, a majority of whom had co-pathogens (15/18 and most were infected with Campylobacter jejuni (16/18. A few C. coli and mixed infections with both species were also seen. Among the animal samples, 16/25 chicken samples (64% were positive and all were found to be C. jejuni.

  7. Skeletal Muscle Troponin I (TnI) in Animal Fat Tissues to Be Used as Biomarker for the Identification of Fat Adulteration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Bong-Sup; Oh, Young-Kyoung; Kim, Min-Jin; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the existence of skeletal muscle troponin I (smTnI), well-known as a muscle protein in fat tissues, and the utilization of smTnI as a biomarker for the identification of fat adulteration were investigated. A commercial antibody (ab97427) specific to all of animals smTnI was used in this study. Fat and meat samples (cooked and non-cooked) of pork and beef, and chicken considered as representative meats were well minced and extracted by heating and non-heating methods, and the ex...

  8. Plastinated tissue samples as three-dimensional models for optical instrument characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-09-29

    Histology of biological specimens is largely limited to investigating two-dimensional structure because of the sectioning required to produce optically thin samples for conventional microscopy. With the advent of three-dimensional optical imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), methods of tissue preparation that minimally disrupt three-dimensional structure are needed. We propose plastination as a means of transforming tissues into three-dimensional models suitable for optical instrument characterization. Tissues are plastinated by infusing them with transparent polymers, after which they can be safely handled, unlike fresh or fixed tissues. Such models are useful for investigating three-dimensional structure, testing and comparing the performance of optical instruments, and potentially investigating tissue properties not normally observed after the three-dimensional scattering properties of a biological samples are lost. We detail our plastination procedures and show examples of imaging several plastinated tissues from a pre-clinical rat model using optical coherence tomography. PMID:18825267

  9. Three dimensional imaging of paraffin embedded human lung tissue samples by micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Scott

    Full Text Available Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data.FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4 were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging.The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15 mm x 7 mm. Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections.We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis.

  10. Molecular strain identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in archival tissue samples

    OpenAIRE

    Zink, A. R.; Nerlich, A G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the use of different molecular analyses that can identify distinct strains of human pathogenic mycobacteria in formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded archival tissue samples to see whether it is possible to differentiate between the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (M tuberculosis, M bovis, M africanum, M microti, or M canettii) and/or substrains in a high number of samples. This would be of interest for identifying individual infection traits and super...

  11. Multiresidue analysis of sulfonamides, quinolones, and tetracyclines in animal tissues by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Jiang, Haiyang; Shen, Jianzhong; Xia, Xi

    2016-08-01

    A multiresidue method for the efficient identification and quantification of 38 compounds from 3 different classes of antibiotics (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and quinolones) in animal tissues has been developed. The method optimization involved the selection of extraction solutions, comparison of different solid-phase extraction cartridges and different mobile phases. As a result, the samples were extracted with Mcllvaine and phosphate buffers, followed by clean-up step based on solid-phase extraction with Oasis HLB cartridge. All compounds were determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in one single injection with a chromatographic run time of only 9min. The method efficiency was evaluated in 5 tissues including muscle, liver, and kidney, and the mean recoveries ranged from 54% to 102%, with inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 14%. The limits of quantification were between 0.5 and 10μg/kg, which were satisfactory to support future surveillance monitoring. The developed method was applied to the analysis of swine liver and chicken samples from local markets, and sulfamethazine was the most commonly detected compound in the animal samples, with the highest residue level of 998μg/kg. PMID:26988500

  12. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  13. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results

  14. Concentration of organochlorines in human brain, liver, and adipose tissue autopsy samples from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewailly, Éric; Mulvad, Gert; Pedersen, Henning S.;

    1999-01-01

    Organochlorines are persistent lipophilic compounds that accumulate in Inuit people living in circumpolar countries. Organochlorines accumulate as a result of the Inuits' large consumption of sea mammal fat; however, available data are limited to blood lipids, milk fat, and adipose tissue. We...... report results of organochlorine determination in liver, brain, omental fat, and subcutaneous abdominal fat samples collected from deceased Greenlanders between 1992 and 1994. Eleven chlorinated pesticides and 14 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured in tissue lipid extracts by high...... than those measured using the same analytical method in samples from Canadians in Quebec City, Quebec. Brain lipids contained lower concentrations of all organochlorines than lipids extracted from other tissues. Organochlorine residue levels in lipid extracts from liver, omental fat, and subcutaneous...

  15. Comparing performance of K-zero neutron activation. Fresh and freeze-dried animal tissue analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success attainable in K-zero neutron activation analysis using a Triga Mark-1 reactor, IPR-R1 CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte - Brazil, operating at 100 MW and thermal neutron flux of 6.6 1011 neutron.cm-2.s-1 - is to a large degree dependent on the sample composition and the upper limit of each element considered. In practice, carrying out investigations on essential and non-essential elements in fresh cattle muscle tissues, only concentrations of major elements which often dominate the gamma-ray spectrum are obtained by virtue of their relative high values. In order to evidence additional elements when their concentrations have values under the upper limits, the pre-concentration of biological matrices before applying K-zero neutron activation analysis will probably be an appropriate alternative. For this purpose, a nondestructive freeze-drying process - lyophilization was carried out in this study due to small losses of chemical elements as reviewed in previous studies. (orig.)

  16. A systematic review of animal models used to study nerve regeneration in tissue-engineered scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Angius, Diana; Wang, Huan; Spinner, Robert J.; Gutierrez-Cotto, Yearim; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Research on biomaterial nerve scaffolds has been carried out for 50 years. Only three materials (collagen, polycaprolactone and polyglycollic acid) have progressed to clinical use. Pre-clinical animal models are critical for testing nerve scaffolds prior to implementation in clinical practice. We have conducted a systematic review of 416 reports in which animal models were used for evaluation of nerve regeneration into synthetic conduits. A valid animal model of nerve regeneration requires it...

  17. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven. The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site. This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Prevalence of antimicrobial residues in eggs, tissue and feed samples in the State of Kuwait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 238 locally produced and imported eggs, tissue (meat, poultry and aquacultured fish) and feed and feedstuffs samples were collected at different seasonal periods from different farms and retail outlets in Kuwait and screened for presence of beta-lactams, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, streptomycin, macrolides and chloramphenicol (799 tests) using Charm II system. The results indicated that all of the 222 tests performed on table egg samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues indicating adherence to the guidelines for microbial use and withdrawal. Similarly, all of the 268 tests performed on tissue samples were negative for the analyzed antimicrobial residues except for chloramphenicol. These chloramphenicol positive samples, all of the 66 tests performed were negative for beta-lactams residues. Out of the 79 feed and feedstuff samples analyzed for teracyclines residues, broiler diet and concentrate samples (5%) were above the tetracyclines MRL (100 ppb.). On the other hands, results have revealed a widespread of sulfonamide residues and to a less extent chloramphenicol in tested feed and feedstuff samples. The Charm II system was reliable for rapid screening of antimicrobial residues. In general, results obtained in our study necessitate more effective and well planned national antimicrobial residues surveillance programs focusing particularly on samples imported from highly risk sources. (author)

  19. Use of perfusion bioreactors and large animal models for long bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Gardel, Leandro. S.; Serra, L. A.; Reis, R. L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies for generation of new bone tissue includes the combined use of autologous or heterologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and three-dimensional (3D) scaffold materials serving as structural support for the cells, that develop into tissue-like substitutes under appropriate in vitro culture conditions. This approach is very important due to the limitations and risks associated with autologous, as well as allogenic bone graf...

  20. Horvitz-Thompson survey sample methods for estimating large-scale animal abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M.D.; Garton, E.O.

    1994-01-01

    Large-scale surveys to estimate animal abundance can be useful for monitoring population status and trends, for measuring responses to management or environmental alterations, and for testing ecological hypotheses about abundance. However, large-scale surveys may be expensive and logistically complex. To ensure resources are not wasted on unattainable targets, the goals and uses of each survey should be specified carefully and alternative methods for addressing these objectives always should be considered. During survey design, the impoflance of each survey error component (spatial design, propofiion of detected animals, precision in detection) should be considered carefully to produce a complete statistically based survey. Failure to address these three survey components may produce population estimates that are inaccurate (biased low), have unrealistic precision (too precise) and do not satisfactorily meet the survey objectives. Optimum survey design requires trade-offs in these sources of error relative to the costs of sampling plots and detecting animals on plots, considerations that are specific to the spatial logistics and survey methods. The Horvitz-Thompson estimators provide a comprehensive framework for considering all three survey components during the design and analysis of large-scale wildlife surveys. Problems of spatial and temporal (especially survey to survey) heterogeneity in detection probabilities have received little consideration, but failure to account for heterogeneity produces biased population estimates. The goal of producing unbiased population estimates is in conflict with the increased variation from heterogeneous detection in the population estimate. One solution to this conflict is to use an MSE-based approach to achieve a balance between bias reduction and increased variation. Further research is needed to develop methods that address spatial heterogeneity in detection, evaluate the effects of temporal heterogeneity on survey

  1. A method for the determination of potassium concentration in organic tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original method has been developed to detect small variations of potassium in several samples of organic tissue. These variations are relative to elements that are biologically representative, such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. The samples are irradiated with a beam of protons from a Van de Graaff accelerator (4MV). Vacancies are created in the K-shell of potassium, and x-rays are emitted when these vacancies are filled with outer electrons. These X-rays and the protons elastically scattered by the nuclei of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are detected and their energy spectra are analysed by computer programs especially elaborated for this purpose. A technique for routine preparation of samples in the laboratory was developed including the production of aluminum support layers, and the preparation of organic tissue samples with a low temperature microtome. The unique features of this method are that it does not destroy the tissue, permitting further analysis with the microscope, and the normalization of the amount of potassium using other elements (C,O,N) instead of the total mass of the sample. (Author)

  2. The Novel Application of Non-Lethal Citizen Science Tissue Sampling in Recreational Fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel M Williams

    Full Text Available Increasing fishing pressure and uncertainty surrounding recreational fishing catch and effort data promoted the development of alternative methods for conducting fisheries research. A pilot investigation was undertaken to engage the Australian game fishing community and promote the non-lethal collection of tissue samples from the black marlin Istiompax indica, a valuable recreational-only species in Australian waters, for the purpose of future genetic research. Recruitment of recreational anglers was achieved by publicizing the project in magazines, local newspapers, social media, blogs, websites and direct communication workshops at game fishing tournaments. The Game Fishing Association of Australia and the Queensland Game Fishing Association were also engaged to advertise the project and recruit participants with a focus on those anglers already involved in the tag-and-release of marlin. Participants of the program took small tissue samples using non-lethal methods which were stored for future genetic analysis. The program resulted in 165 samples from 49 participants across the known distribution of I. indica within Australian waters which was a sufficient number to facilitate a downstream population genetic analysis. The project demonstrated the potential for the development of citizen science sampling programs to collect tissue samples using non-lethal methods in order to achieve targeted research objects in recreationally caught species.

  3. Sample Preparation for in vitro Analysis of Iodine in Thyroid Tissue using X-ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud Berg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is enriched and stored in the thyroid gland. Due to several factors, the size of the thyroid iodine pool varies both between individuals and within individuals over time. Excess iodine as well as iodine deficiency may promote thyroid cancer. Therefore, knowledge of iodine content and distribution within thyroid cancer tissue is of interest. X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS are two methods that can be used to assess iodine content in thyroid tissue. With both techniques, choice of sample preparation affects the results. Aldehyde fixatives are required for SIMS analysis while a freezing method might be satisfactory for XRF analysis. The aims of the present study were primarily to evaluate a simple freezing technique for preserving samples for XRF analysis and also to use XRF to evaluate the efficacy of using aldehyde fixatives to prepare samples for SIMS analysis. Ten porcine thyroids were sectioned into four pieces that were either frozen or fixed in formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, or a modified Karnovsky fixative. The frozen samples were assessed for iodine content with XRF after 1 and 2 months, and the fixed samples were analyzed for iodine content after 1 week. Freezing of untreated tissue yielded no significant iodine loss, whereas fixation with aldehydes yielded an iodine loss of 14–30%, with Karnovsky producing the least loss.

  4. Comparison of accumulation of clenbuterol and salbutamol residues in animal internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana; Terzić, Svjetlana; Vahčić, Nada; Šandor, Ksenija; Perak, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accumulation of β-adrenergic agonist residues clenbuterol (CLB) and salbutamol (SAL) in internal tissues, non-pigmented eyes and hair of laboratory animals repeatedly administered with CLB and SAL during 7 days. Experimental albino guinea pigs (n = 20) were treated with CLB (n = 10) and SAL (n = 10) in anabolic doses of 0.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, whereas the control animal group (n = 10) was left untreated. Methodology validation showed that the ELISA assay to be suitable for β-agonists' semiquantitative determination. The results revealed a significantly higher (P 0.05) from those obtained in their internal tissues. PMID:24990876

  5. Tissue expression of TGF-β1 in uterine cervical samples from HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Thiago X; Pacheco, Juliana T; Xavier, Marilia B; Quaresma, Juarez A S

    2012-07-01

    Case-control study based on the immunohistochemistry for TGF-β1 evaluation of cervical samples obtained from two groups of women: CIN/HIV- and CIN/HIV+. Eleven women infected with HIV and with a histopathological diagnosis of CIN were included. The control group consisted of 12 patients with CIN. Cervical tissue samples obtained from all patients were submitted to histopathology and semiquantitative analysis of immunostaining for TGF-β1 protein. In addition, the peripheral CD4+ cell count and viral load were evaluated in HIV + patients. Tissue expression of the cytokine was higher in the CIN/HIV+ group compared to control (p = 0.0023). In addition, higher TGF-β1 expression was observed in higher grade cervical lesions in the two groups. There was a trend toward a direct correlation between peripheral CD4+ T cell count and tissue TGF-β1, and toward an inverse correlation between viral load and cytokine expression. Thus, TGF-β1 was more marked in situations in which cervical lesions are known to present a more aggressive behavior, suggesting that this cytokine is involved in the pathogenesis of tumor growth in these lesions. Tissue expression of TGF-β1 is increased in cervical samples from HIV-infected women with CIN. PMID:22542711

  6. Late effects of intraoperative radiation therapy on retroperitoneal tissues, intestine, and bile duct in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The late histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on retroperitoneal tissues, intestine, and bile duct were investigated in dogs. Fourteen adult foxhounds were subjected to laparotomy and varying doses (0-45 Gy) of IORT (11 MeV electrons) delivered to retroperitoneal tissues including the great vessels and ureters, to a loop of defunctionalized small bowel, or to the extrahepatic bile duct. One control animal received an aortic transection and reanastomosis at the time of laparotomy; another control received laparotomy alone. This paper describes the late effects of single-fraction IORT occurring 3-5 years following treatment. Dogs receiving IORT to the retroperitoneum through a 4 X 15 cm portal showed few gross or histologic abnormalities at 20 Gy. At doses ranging from 30-45 Gy, radiation changes in normal tissues were consistently observed. Retroperitoneal fibrosis with encasement of the ureters and great vessels developed at doses ≥30 Gy. Radiation changes were present in the aorta and vena cava at doses ≥40 Gy. A 30 Gy dog developed an in-field malignant osteosarcoma at 3 years which invaded the vertebral column and compressed the spinal cord. A 40 Gy animal developed obstruction of the right ureter with fatal septic hydronephrosis at 4 years. Animals receiving IORT through a 5 cm IORT portal to an upper abdominal field which included a defunctionalized loop of small bowel, showed few gross or histologic abnormalities at a dose of 20 Gy. At 30 Gy, hyaline degeneration of the intestinal muscularis layer of the bowel occurred. At a dose of 45 Gy, internal intestinal fistulae developed. One 30 Gy animal developed right ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis at 5 years. A dog receiving 30 Gy IORT through a 5 cm portal to the extrahepatic bile duct showed diffuse fibrosis through the gastroduodenal ligament. These canine studies contribute to the area of late tissue tolerance to IORT. 7 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Do anesthetics and sampling strategies affect transcription analysis of fish tissues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hevrøy Ernst M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current examination was to evaluate if sedation and anesthetic treatment techniques affect the quality of RNA extracted from liver, gill, head kidney and brain tissues in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. Blood parameters were measured and tissue specimens sampled in six groups of fish; one control group (0 minutes, two groups kept in pure seawater in 90 liter tanks for 30 and 120 minutes, two groups treated with the anesthetic isoeugenol for 30 and 120 minutes, and one group kept in pure seawater for 105 minutes and then anaesthetized with metacaine for 15 minutes. RNA quality was assessed with the NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer (260/280 and 260/230 nm ratios and with the Agilent Bioanalyzer (28S/18S ratio and RIN data in samples either preserved in liquefied nitrogen (N2 or in RNAlater. In addition, the transcriptional levels of two fast-responding genes were quantified in gill and brain tissues. Results The results show that physiological stress during sampling does not affect the quality of RNA extracted from fish specimens. However, prolonged sedation (2 hours resulted in a metabolic alkalosis that again affected the transcriptional levels of genes involved in ionoregulation and respiration. In gills, Na+-K+-ATPase α1b was significantly downregulated and hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1 significantly upregulated after two hours of treatment with isoeugenol, suggesting that this commonly used sedative affects osmo-regulation and respiration in the fish. The results also suggest that for tissue preservation in general it is better to flash-freeze fish specimens in liquefied N2 than to use RNAlater. Conclusion Prolonged sedation may affect the transcription of fast-responding genes in tissues of fish. Two hours of sedation with isoeugenol resulted in downregulation of the Na+-K+-ATPase α1b gene and upregulation of the HIF1 gene in gills of Atlantic salmon. The quality of RNA extracted from tissue specimens

  8. Adipose tissue development in extramuscular and intramuscular depots in meat animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cellular and metabolic aspects of developing intramuscular adipose tissue and other adipose tissue depots have been studied including examination of the expression of a number of genes. Depot dependent or depot “marker” genes such as stearoyl-CoA desaturase and leptin for subcutaneous adipose ti...

  9. Radioisotopic method for the measurement of lipolysis in small samples of human adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the study of adrenoreceptor response in small needle biopsy samples of human subcutaneous adipose tissue, we developed a dual radioisotopic technique for measuring lipolysis rate. Aliquots (20-75 mg) of adipose tissue fragments were incubated in a buffered albumin medium containing [3H]palmitate and [14C]glucose, each of high specific activity. In neutral glycerides synthesized in this system, [14C]glucose is incorporated exclusively into the glyceride-glycerol moiety and 3H appears solely in the esterified fatty acid. Alpha-2 and beta-1 adrenoreceptor activation of tissue incubated in this system does not alter rates of 14C-labeled glyceride accumulation, but does produce a respective increase or decrease in the specific activity of fatty acids esterified into newly synthesized glycerides. This alteration in esterified fatty acid specific activity is reflected in the ratio of 14C:3H in newly synthesized triglycerides extracted from the incubated adipose tissue. There is a high correlation (r . 0.90) between the 14C:3H ratio in triglycerides and the rate of lipolysis as reflected in glycerol release into the incubation medium. The degree of adrenoreceptor activation by various concentrations of lipolytic and anti-lipolytic substances can be assessed by comparing this ratio in stimulated tissue to that characterizing unstimulated tissue or the incubation medium. This technique permits the study of very small, unweighed tissue biopsy fragments, the only limitation on sensitivity being the specific activity of the medium glucose and palmitate. It is, therefore, useful for serial examinations of adipose tissue adrenoreceptor dose-response characteristics under a variety of clinical circumstances

  10. Selected radioisotopes in animal tissues in Nevada: 90Sr and 137Cs measurements from 1956 to 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1956 the Animal Investigation Program (AIP) has been conducting surveillance of domestic and wild animals on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and assessing the radionuclide burdens present in their tissues and any resulting pathological effects. Other AIP objectives were to investigate alleged dosage to animals, to maintain public information contacts with the off-site population, and to conduct special ad hoc investigations. Most of the radionuclide burden data and the AIP's history and evolution have been published in the annual reports of this program. Additional unpublished data were gleaned from the AIP historical files. This rather substantial body of radiological data has been reviewed and analyzed for trends with time and source of exposure. Because of the volume of data, only a summary has been included in the appendices of this report. The complete data are available in the AIP file for further study

  11. Screening of Viral Pathogens from Pediatric Ileal Tissue Samples after Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hewitson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, researchers reported that the two US-licensed rotavirus vaccines contained DNA or DNA fragments from porcine circovirus (PCV. Although PCV, a common virus among pigs, is not thought to cause illness in humans, these findings raised several safety concerns. In this study, we sought to determine whether viruses, including PCV, could be detected in ileal tissue samples of children vaccinated with one of the two rotavirus vaccines. A broad spectrum, novel DNA detection technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA, was utilized, and confirmation of viral pathogens using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR was conducted. The LLMDA technology was recently used to identify PCV from one rotavirus vaccine. Ileal tissue samples were analyzed from 21 subjects, aged 15–62 months. PCV was not detected in any ileal tissue samples by the LLMDA or PCR. LLMDA identified a human rotavirus A from one of the vaccinated subjects, which is likely due to a recent infection from a wild type rotavirus. LLMDA also identified human parechovirus, a common gastroenteritis viral infection, from two subjects. Additionally, LLMDA detected common gastrointestinal bacterial organisms from the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Streptococcaceae families from several subjects. This study provides a survey of viral and bacterial pathogens from pediatric ileal samples, and may shed light on future studies to identify pathogen associations with pediatric vaccinations.

  12. Dead or alive: animal sampling during Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah H Olson; Reed, Patricia; Cameron, Kenneth N.; Ssebide, Benard J; Johnson, Christine K.; Stephen S Morse; Karesh, William B.; Mazet, Jonna A.K.; Joly, Damien O.

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no widely accepted animal surveillance guidelines for human Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreak investigations to identify potential sources of Ebolavirus (EBOV) spillover into humans and other animals. Animal field surveillance during and following an outbreak has several purposes, from helping identify the specific animal source of a human case to guiding control activities by describing the spatial and temporal distribution of wild circulating EBOV, informing public ...

  13. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  14. Analysis of dissected tissues with digital holographic microscopy: quantification of inflammation mediated tissue alteration, influence of sample preparation, and reliability of numerical autofocusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) allows label-free imaging of tissue sections and quantification of the spatial refractive index distribution, which is of interest for applications in digital pathology. We show that DHM allows quantitative imaging of different layers in unstained tissue samples by detection of refractive index changes. In addition, we evaluate the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on dissected tissues and could achieve highly reproducible holographic autofocusing for unstained and moderately stained samples. Finally, it is demonstrated that in human ulcerative colitis patients the average tissue refractive index is reduced significantly in all parts of the inflamed colonic wall in comparison to patients in remission.

  15. Protocols for the in vitro design of animal articular cartilage based on tissue engineering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Correa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is the structure that covers the joint ends. It has some specific tasks crucial to the correct joint physiology. It may experience a large amount of injuries that could generate considerable disabilities. Unfortunately its selfrepair capacity is too limited; therefore, many treatments have been developed with partial success, given the suboptimal biomechanical behavior of the resultant tissue. Given that, Tissue Engineering offers an alternative, based on the design of a new tissue with biological and biomechanical features which resembles the native tissue. In this work, the authors describe the methodologies followed to accomplish that goal, studying the chondrocytes harvesting, the cellular cultures, the scaffold seeding processes, the mechanical stimulation and the structural and biomechanical evaluation. Finally, exposed some of the preliminary results, as a experimental validation of the methods proposed are.

  16. Detection of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from fish tissue and water samples by PCR amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, T.; Madsen, Lone; Bruun, Morten Sichlau;

    2000-01-01

    more sensitive than agar cultivation of tissue samples from the brain of rainbow trout injected with Fl. psychrophilum. In non-sterile fresh water seeded with Fl. psychrophilum the detection limit of the PCR- assay was 1.7 cfu in the PCR tube, corresponding to 110 cfu ml(-1) water. The PCR......Rainbow trout fry syndrome and cold-water disease, caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum, are important diseases in farmed salmonids. Some of the presently available techniques for the detection of Fl. psychrophilum are either time consuming or lack sufficient sensitivity. In the present...... investigation, the possible detection of Fl. psychrophilum from fish tissue and water samples was examined using nested PCR with DNA probes against a sequence of the 16S rRNA genes. The DNA was extracted using Chelex(R) 100 chelating resin. The primers, which were tested against strains isolated from diseased...

  17. Lead content in autopsy liver tissue in samples from Greenlandic Inuit and Danes

    OpenAIRE

    Milman, Nils; Laursen, Jens; Byg, Keld-Erik; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Mulvad, Gert; Hansen, Jens Carl

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. To measure the quantity of lead (Pb) in liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit, and compare the results with those obtained in Caucasian Danes. Study design. Observational, descriptive survey on environmental pathology. Methods. The setting was related to forensic medicine and hospitalised care in Nuuk, Ilulissat and Copenhagen. Participants were 50 Greenlandic Inuit (27 men) with a median age of 61 years (range 23-83) and 74 Danes (44 men) with a median age of 60 years (rang...

  18. Plastinated tissue samples as three-dimensional models for optical instrument characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Daniel L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Histology of biological specimens is largely limited to investigating two-dimensional structure because of the sectioning required to produce optically thin samples for conventional microscopy. With the advent of three-dimensional optical imaging technologies such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and multiphoton microscopy (MPM), methods of tissue preparation that minimally disrupt three-dimensional structure are needed. We propose plastination as a mea...

  19. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  20. Application of a Liquid Extraction Based Sealing Surface Sampling Probe for Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dried Blood Spots and Mouse Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The utility of a liquid extraction based sealing surface sampling probe (SSSP) for the direct mass spectrometric analysis of targeted drugs and metabolites in dried blood spots (DBSs) and whole mouse thin tissue sections was demonstrated. The accuracy and precision for the quantitative analysis of a minimum of 50 ng/mL sitamaquine or acetaminophen in DBSs on paper were well within the required 15% dictated by internationally recognized acceptance criteria for assay validations. Analysis of whole-body mouse thin tissue sections from animals dosed with propranolol, adhered to an adhesive tape substrate, provided semi-quantitative information for propranolol and its hydroxyproranolol glucuronide metabolite within specific organs of the tissue. The relative abundances recorded for the two compounds in the brain, lung, kidney and liver were in nominal agreement with previously reported amounts based on analysis using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP), and whole-body autoradiography (WBA) and HPLC-MS analysis. The ability to sample and analyze from tape-adhered tissue samples, which are generally employed in WBA analysis, presents the possibility of consecutive WBA and SSSP-MS analysis of the same tissue section. This would facilitate assignment, and possibly quantitation, of the different molecular forms of total drug related material detected in the WBA analysis. The flexibility to sample larger or smaller spot sizes, alternative probe sealing mechanisms, and a reduction in internal volumes and associated sample carryover issues will be among the first simple improvements necessary to make the SSSP-MS method a practical DBS and/or thin tissue section analysis tool or to expand its use to other surface sampling applications.

  1. Multiobjective Simulated Annealing-Based Clustering of Tissue Samples for Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Sudipta; Saha, Sriparna; Thadisina, Yamini

    2016-03-01

    In the field of pattern recognition, the study of the gene expression profiles of different tissue samples over different experimental conditions has become feasible with the arrival of microarray-based technology. In cancer research, classification of tissue samples is necessary for cancer diagnosis, which can be done with the help of microarray technology. In this paper, we have presented a multiobjective optimization (MOO)-based clustering technique utilizing archived multiobjective simulated annealing(AMOSA) as the underlying optimization strategy for classification of tissue samples from cancer datasets. The presented clustering technique is evaluated for three open source benchmark cancer datasets [Brain tumor dataset, Adult Malignancy, and Small Round Blood Cell Tumors (SRBCT)]. In order to evaluate the quality or goodness of produced clusters, two cluster quality measures viz, adjusted rand index and classification accuracy ( % CoA) are calculated. Comparative results of the presented clustering algorithm with ten state-of-the-art existing clustering techniques are shown for three benchmark datasets. Also, we have conducted a statistical significance test called t-test to prove the superiority of our presented MOO-based clustering technique over other clustering techniques. Moreover, significant gene markers have been identified and demonstrated visually from the clustering solutions obtained. In the field of cancer subtype prediction, this study can have important impact. PMID:25706936

  2. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of calcified tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samek, O.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.; Kaiser, J.; Liška, M.; Cáceres, J. O.; Gonzáles Ureña, A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the analysis of important minerals and the accumulation of potentially toxic elements in calcified tissue, to trace e.g. the influence of environmental exposure, and other medical or biological factors. This theme was exemplified for quantitative detection and mapping of Al, Pb and Sr in representative samples, including teeth (first teeth of infants, second teeth of children and teeth of adults) and bones (tibia and femur). In addition to identifying and quantifying major and trace elements in the tissues, one- and two-dimensional profiles and maps were generated. Such maps (a) provide time/concentration relations, (b) allow to follow mineralisation of the hydroxyapatite matrix and the migration of the elements within it and (c) enable to identify disease states, such as caries in teeth. In order to obtain quantitative calibration, reference samples in the form of pressed pellets with calcified tissue-equivalent material (majority compound of pellets is CaCO 3) were used whose physical properties closely resembled hydroxyapatite. Compounds of Al, Sr and Pb were added to the pellets, containing atomic concentrations in the range 100-10 000 ppm relative to the Ca content of the matrix. Analytical results based on this calibration against artificial samples for the trace elements under investigation agree with literature values, and with our atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) cross-validation measurements.

  3. Inorganic elements determination in human and animal whole blood samples by X-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood is a suspension of cells contained in a complex liquid called plasma. The term 'whole blood' refers to samples with both solid and liquid parts. Inorganic elements are responsible for essential functions, such as osmotic regulation, cardiac frequency and contractibility, blood clotting and neuromuscular excitability. The determination of inorganic elements in corporeal fluids such as blood, serum, plasma, tissue and urine is used as a monitor for a part or the whole organism. In this work, the X-Ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF) was used for the determination of inorganic elements in whole blood samples from humans and animals (golden hamsters, Mesocricetus auratus and crioula breed horses, Equus caballus). The reference intervals of Na (1788 - 1826 μg g'-1), Mg (63 - 75 μg g-1), P (602 - 676 μg g-1), S (1519 - 1718 μg g-1), Cl (2743 - 2867 μg g-1), K (1508 - 1630 μg g-1), Ca (214 - 228 μg g'-1), Cu (4 -6 μg g-1) e Zn (1 - 3 μg g'-1) were determined for human blood. The reference intervals, for golden hamster blood were found to be: Na (1714 - 1819 μg g-1), Mg (51 - 79 μg g-1), P (970 - 1080 μg g-1), S (1231 - 1739 μg g-1), Cl (2775 - 2865 μg g-1), K (1968 - 2248 μg g-1), Ca (209 - 257 μg g-1), Cu (4 - 6 μg g-1) e Zn (3 - 5 μg g-1). The reference intervals, for crioula breed horse blood, showed to be: Na (1955 - 2013 μg g-1), Mg (51 - 75 μg g-1), P (443 - 476 μg g-1), S (1038 - 1140 μg g-'1), Cl (2388 - 2574 μg g-1), K (1678 - 1753 μg g-1), Ca (202 - 213 μg g-1), Cu (4,1 - 4,5 μg g-1) e Zn (2,0 - 2,2 μg g-1). Comparative study between NAA and EDXRF, both techniques showed the same performance for the analyses of biological matrices. The results contribute for the establishment of reference intervals for the Brazilian healthy population and the referred animal species. (author)

  4. Environmental processes leading to the presence of organically bound plutonium in plant tissues consumed by animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long half-life of plutonium (Pu) and its possible entry into the environment as a result of the nuclear fuel cycle necessitate estimation of its availability to animals over thousands of years. A major uncertainty in this evaluation arises from the effects of physical and biogeochemical processes on Pu form and biological availability. However, a general understanding of the principal mechanisms governing Pu behavior in the terrestrial ingestion pathway is developing which ultimately should serve as a framework for estimation of long-term availability to animals. This review briefly integrates and synthesizes present information on the chemical/biochemical processes governing the form of Pu in soils and plants and the relationships of these phenomena to gut absorption in animals. A proposed model for Pu behavior will be used as a framework for integration of current knowledge

  5. Collection and processing of plant, animal and soil samples from Bikini, Enewetak and Rongelap Atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States used the Marshall Islands for its nuclear weapons program testing site from 1946 to 1958. The BRAVO test was detonated at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Due to shifting wind conditions at the time of the nuclear detonation, many of the surrounding Atolls became contaminated with fallout (radionuclides carried by the wind currents). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Marshall Islands Project has been responsible for the collecting, processing, and analyzing of food crops, vegetation, soil, water, animals, and marine species to characterize the radionuclides in the environment, and to estimate dose at atolls that may have been contaminated. Tropical agriculture experiments reducing the uptake of 137Cs have been conducted on Bikini Atoll. The Marshall Islands field team and laboratory processing team play an important role in the overall scheme of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. This report gives a general description of the Marshall Islands field sampling and laboratory processing procedures currently used by our staff

  6. Collection and processing of plant, animal and soil samples from Bikini, Enewetak and Rongelap Atolls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The United States used the Marshall Islands for its nuclear weapons program testing site from 1946 to 1958. The BRAVO test was detonated at Bikini Atoll on March 1, 1954. Due to shifting wind conditions at the time of the nuclear detonation, many of the surrounding Atolls became contaminated with fallout (radionuclides carried by the wind currents). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Marshall Islands Project has been responsible for the collecting, processing, and analyzing of food crops, vegetation, soil, water, animals, and marine species to characterize the radionuclides in the environment, and to estimate dose at atolls that may have been contaminated. Tropical agriculture experiments reducing the uptake of {sup 137}Cs have been conducted on Bikini Atoll. The Marshall Islands field team and laboratory processing team play an important role in the overall scheme of the Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology Project. This report gives a general description of the Marshall Islands field sampling and laboratory processing procedures currently used by our staff.

  7. Multispectral and Photoplethysmography Optical Imaging Techniques Identify Important Tissue Characteristics in an Animal Model of Tangential Burn Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E; Li, Weizhi; Rodriguez-Vaqueiro, Yolanda; Squiers, John J; Mo, Weirong; Lu, Yang; Plant, Kevin D; Sellke, Eric; King, Darlene R; Fan, Wensheng; Martinez-Lorenzo, Jose A; DiMaio, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Burn excision, a difficult technique owing to the training required to identify the extent and depth of injury, will benefit from a tool that can cue the surgeon as to where and how much to resect. We explored two rapid and noninvasive optical imaging techniques in their ability to identify burn tissue from the viable wound bed using an animal model of tangential burn excision. Photoplethysmography (PPG) imaging and multispectral imaging (MSI) were used to image the initial, intermediate, and final stages of burn excision of a deep partial-thickness burn. PPG imaging maps blood flow in the skin's microcirculation, and MSI collects the tissue reflectance spectrum in visible and infrared wavelengths of light to classify tissue based on a reference library. A porcine deep partial-thickness burn model was generated and serial tangential excision accomplished with an electric dermatome set to 1.0 mm depth. Excised eschar was stained with hematoxylin and eosin to determine the extent of burn remaining at each excision depth. We confirmed that the PPG imaging device showed significantly less blood flow where burn tissue was present, and the MSI method could delineate burn tissue in the wound bed from the viable wound bed. These results were confirmed independently by a histological analysis. We found these devices can identify the proper depth of excision, and their images could cue a surgeon as to the preparedness of the wound bed for grafting. These image outputs are expected to facilitate clinical judgment in the operating room. PMID:26594863

  8. "ISA-Lation" of Single-Stranded Positive-Sense RNA Viruses from Non-Infectious Clinical/Animal Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Aubry

    Full Text Available Isolation of viral pathogens from clinical and/or animal samples has traditionally relied on either cell cultures or laboratory animal model systems. However, virus viability is notoriously susceptible to adverse conditions that may include inappropriate procedures for sample collection, storage temperature, support media and transportation. Using our recently described ISA method, we have developed a novel procedure to isolate infectious single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses from clinical or animal samples. This approach, that we have now called "ISA-lation", exploits the capacity of viral cDNA subgenomic fragments to re-assemble and produce infectious viral RNA in susceptible cells. Here, it was successfully used to rescue enterovirus, Chikungunya and Tick-borne encephalitis viruses from a variety of inactivated animal and human samples. ISA-lation represents an effective option to rescue infectious virus from clinical and/or animal samples that may have deteriorated during the collection and storage period, but also potentially overcomes logistic and administrative difficulties generated when complying with current health and safety and biosecurity guidelines associated with shipment of infectious viral material.

  9. Development of test fixture for measurement of dielectric properties and its verification using animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic compatibility of implantable or wearable medical devices has often been evaluated using human phantoms to electrically mimic biological tissues. However, no currently existing test fixture can measure the electrical characteristics of gel-like materials. In this paper, we report the development of a new test fixture that consists of a coaxial tube whose outer conductor is divided along the axial direction into two sections, which facilitates filling and removal of gel-like materials in order to measure their electrical characteristics. Using this test fixture, we measured the electrical characteristics of a cow's muscular tissues up to 1 h post-mortem; these measurements allowed us to obtain the relative permittivity and conductivity of the biological tissue, which should help to enable the design of new human phantoms. (paper)

  10. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard OC

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering. PMID:27577960

  11. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A; Janeczek, Agnieszka A; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering. PMID:27577960

  12. High-performance liquid chromatographic strategies for the determination and confirmation of anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K

    1985-03-15

    A comprehensive approach to the analysis of anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissues based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed. Residues of warfarin, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, diphacinone and chlorophacinone were extracted with chloroformacetone (1:1, v/v). Extracts were cleaned-up by an integrated gel permeation and adsorption chromatographic procedure which divided the rodenticides into two groups. Residues were then determined and confirmed using normal-phase, ion-pair and weak ion-exchange HPLC techniques. Ion-pair gradient separation resolved all seven rodenticides in a single chromatographic analysis. UV detection methods were employed for all seven rodenticides. Use of a diode array detection system permitted additional confirmation of residues down to 0.1 mg kg-1 by matching UV spectra and derivatives of spectra. Sensitive fluorescence detection was possible for the coumarin-based rodenticides but not for diphacinone and chlorophacinone. Post-column pH-switching fluorescence detection methods were shown to be superior to other methods of fluorescence detection of coumarin-based rodenticides. Recoveries from spiked liver tissue were around 90% at levels from 0.05 to 1 mg kg-1. Detection limits of around 0.002 mg kg-1 for most rodenticides and of 0.01 mg kg-1 for warfarin could be achieved with animal tissue extracts. PMID:3988841

  13. Toxicological and radiobiological investigations using tissue cultures: Substitute and supplement for animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are carried out on cell cultures with the aim of researching the biochemistry, sub-cellular distribution and toxicity of radio-nuclides and heavy metals. Investigations with the advanced tissue culture system of the multi-cellular spheroids are used to obtain reliable data on radiation tolerance and the origin of cancers in specific tissue conditions. In particular, there are reports on the results of chelate formation for treating cadmium poisoning and for the decorporation of radio-nuclides (Pu poisoning) and on radiation biology examination of Xeroderma Pigmentosum and the histology of cells of carcinoma of the cervix and hepatozytes. (DG)

  14. Transaminase catalitique activity features derived from intact and irradiated animal tissue at iodine ions effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of X-radiation with simultaneous introduction of iodine ions into the animal on activity of two wide-spread trasnminase - Ac and A - was investigated. This is probably related with change of membrane permeability under the effect of radiation, as well as with peculiarities of structure and physico-chemical properites of isoenzyme spectrum of A- and Ac-transminase

  15. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4-8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and type-I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of 8 fish could detect an increase of ∼ 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α = 0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of ∼ 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2 this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of ∼ 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated by increased precision of composites for estimating mean

  16. The relationship between decorrelation time and sample thickness in acute rat brain tissue slices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Joshua; Jang, Mooseok; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    The optical opacity of biological tissue has long been a challenge in biomedical optics due to the strong scattering nature of tissue in the optical regime. While most conventional optical techniques attempt to gate out multiply scattered light and use only unscattered light, new approaches in the field of wavefront shaping exploit the time reversible symmetry of optical scattering in order to focus light inside or through scattering media. While these approaches have been demonstrated effectively on static samples, it has proven difficult to apply them to dynamic biological samples since even small changes in the relative positions of the scatterers within will cause the time symmetry that wavefront shaping relies upon to decorrelate. In this paper we investigate the decorrelation curves of acute rat brain slices for thicknesses in the range 1-3 mm (1/e decorrelation time on the order of seconds) using multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) and compare the results with theoretical predictions. The results of this study demonstrate that the 1/L^2 relationship between decorrelation time and thickness predicted by diffusing wave spectroscopy provides a good rule of thumb for estimating how the decorrelation of a sample will change with increasing thickness. Understanding this relationship will provide insight to guide the future development of biophotonic wavefront shaping tools by giving an estimate of how fast wavefront shaping systems need to operate to overcome the dynamic nature of biological samples.

  17. Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus: A comparison of tissue types and sample preservation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andvik, R.T.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.; French, William E.; Bertrand, K.N.; Chipps, S.R.; Klumb, R.A.; Graeb, B.D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional techniques for stable isotope analysis (SIA) generally require sacrificing animals to collect tissue samples; this can be problematic when studying diets of endangered species such as the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus. Our objectives were to (i) determine if pectoral fin tissue (non-lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate the influence of preservation techniques on stable isotope values. In the laboratory, individual juvenile pallid sturgeon were held for up to 186 day and fed chironomids, fish, or a commercially available pellet diet. Significant, positive relationships (r2 ??? 0.8) were observed between fin and muscle tissues for both ??15N and ??13C; in all samples isotopes were enriched in fins compared to muscle tissue. Chironomid and fish based diets of juvenile pallid sturgeon were distinguishable for fast growing fish (0.3 mm day-1) using stable ??15N and ??13C isotopes. Frozen and preserved fin tissue ??15N isotopes were strongly related (r2 = 0.89) but ??13C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended for preservation of fin clips to avoid the confounding effect of enrichment by ethanol. This study demonstrates the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon and should be applicable to other threatened or endangered species. ?? 2010 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  18. Towards implantable body sensor networks - Performance of MICS band radio communication in animal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandran, V.R.K.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Zhang, Kui; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable wireless communication inside the human body is crucial for the design of implantable body sensor networks (IBSN). The tissues in human body are heterogeneous and have dierent conductivity and permitivity, which make the modeling of the wireless channel challenging. The design of upper laye

  19. Review of Research Projects on Qualitative and Quantitative Effects of Radiation on Haematopoietic Tissue in Man and Experimental Animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By way of introduction to a review of Research Projects of the Division of Radiological Health concerned with effects of radiation on the haematopoietic tissue in man and the experimental animal, I should like first to discuss briefly the organization of research. Our research is organized into three major disciplines: (1) Epidemiology, (2) Radiation biology, and (3) Environmental sciences. Briefly, epidemiology is concerned with studies, of populations and effects of radiation in.man; radiation biology is concerned with effects in the experimental animal under controlled situations and also concerned with basic research in cellular and sub-cellular effects; and environmental science is concerned with transport mechanisms in the biosphere and how these mechanisms may operate and be interrupted to reduce radiation hazard to man

  20. A novel method for accurate collagen and biochemical assessment of pulmonary tissue utilizing one animal

    OpenAIRE

    Kliment, Corrine R.; Englert, Judson M; Crum, Lauren P; Oury, Tim D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to develop an improved method for collagen and protein assessment of fibrotic lungs while decreasing animal use. methods: 8-10 week old, male C57BL/6 mice were given a single intratracheal instillation of crocidolite asbestos or control titanium dioxide. Lungs were collected on day 14 and dried as whole lung, or homogenized in CHAPS buffer, for hydroxyproline analysis. Insoluble and salt-soluble collagen content was also determined in lung homogenates using ...

  1. EVALUATION OF TOTAL MERCURY CONTENT IN MUSCLE TISSUE OF MARINE FISH AND ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Bajčan; Július Árvay; Janette Musilová

    2013-01-01

    Nowdays, a degree of contamination by heavy metals can be observed in the environment. Heavy metals have serious effects on all living organisms because they can accumulate in lethal or sublethal concentrations in the various parts of food chain and so they can cause different health problems like cardiovascular and cancer diseases. Marine fish and animals are one of the bigges source of mercury in human food. Therefore this work is focused to the rate of mercury content in muscle tisuues of ...

  2. REGene: a literature-based knowledgebase of animal regeneration that bridge tissue regeneration and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Min Zhao; Bronwyn Rotgans; Tianfang Wang; Cummins, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration is a common phenomenon across multiple animal phyla. Regeneration-related genes (REGs) are critical for fundamental cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation. Identification of REGs and elucidating their functions may help to further develop effective treatment strategies in regenerative medicine. So far, REGs have been largely identified by small-scale experimental studies and a comprehensive characterization of the diverse biological processes regulated by RE...

  3. Correlation of energy dispersive diffraction signatures and microCT of small breast tissue samples with pathological analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of specific tissue types in conventional mammographic examinations is extremely limited. However, the use of x-ray diffraction effects during imaging has the potential to characterize the tissue types present due to the fact that each tissue type produces its own unique diffraction signature. Nevertheless, the analysis and categorization of these diffraction signatures by tissue type can be hampered by the inhomogeneous nature of breast tissue, leading to categorization errors where several types are present. This work aims to reduce sample categorization errors by combining spectral diffraction signature collection with sample imaging, giving more detailed data on the composition of each sample. Diffraction microCT was carried out on 19 unfixed breast tissue samples using an energy resolving translate-rotate CT system. High-resolution transmission microCT images were also recorded for comparison and sample composition analysis. Following imaging, the samples were subjected to histopathological analysis. Reconstructing on various momentum transfer regions allows different tissue types to be identified in the diffraction images. Results show a correlation between measured x-ray diffraction images and stained histopathological tissue sections. X-ray diffraction signatures generated from the measured data were categorized and analysed, with a t-test indicating that they have the potential for use in tissue type identification

  4. Soft tissue measurement of arsenic and selenium in an animal model using portable X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David E. B.; Groves, John W.; Gherase, Mihai R.; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Ponomarenko, Olena; Langan, George; Spallholz, Julian E.; Alauddin, Mohammad; Ahsan, Habibul; Ahmed, Selim; La Porte, Paul F.

    2015-11-01

    The ingestion of trace amounts of arsenic (As) through drinking water is a relatively common pathway of exposure with potentially serious long-term health effects. Studies involving animal models have indicated that selenium (Se) may bind with As inside the body and facilitate excretion. A portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique was previously developed to allow in vivo measurement of As and Se in human tissue. In the current paper, this portable XRF approach was tested for the first time using animal tissue. Seven female Lakeview Golden/LVG Syrian hamsters were dosed under either control, As-only, Se-only, or As and Se conditions. Minimum XRF detection limits in soft tissue of 1.00±0.05 ppm for As and 0.83±0.02 ppm for Se were determined from phantom calibration trials. For dosed hamsters, consistently higher concentrations of As and Se were found in the liver and gall bladder, with elevated levels also observed in the intestines. Concentrations ranged up to 26.4±1.4 ppm for As and 11.8±0.8 ppm for Se. The stomach and heart exhibited more moderate concentrations, while the brain, lung, and muscle demonstrated lower levels. For a given organ, As concentrations generally exceeded Se concentrations. A ratio of approximately 2.5:1 was observed for concentrations of As:Se when considering the same or similar tissue sites in dosed hamsters. Implications for potential in vivo human applications of the technique are briefly considered.

  5. Determination of vitamin B6 bioavailability in animal tissues using intrinsic and extrinsic labeling in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of thermal processing on the bioavailability of vitamin B6 in liver and muscle was examined by radioisotopic enrichment of these tissues. Rats were fed a single gelled test meal containing rat liver or muscle intrinsically enriched by vascular perfusion with [3H]vitamin B6 or a gelled test meal containing [3H]pyridoxine (PN). Diets were extrinsically enriched with [14C]PN to permit a direct comparison of enrichment methods. Absorption and metabolism were examined by analysis of tissues and excreta 24 h after the test meal had been consumed. The bioavailability of [3H]B6 vitamers in the raw tissues was equivalent to that of [3H]PN in controls. Thermal processing of the tissues (1210C, 45 min) induced destruction of 25-30% of the [3H]B6 vitamers and weakly reduced (≤10%) the utilization of the remaining[3H]B6 vitamers. The presence of monosodium glutamate (MSG) during thermal processing did not alter the results. The utilization of [14C]PN was unaffected by diet composition. These data demonstrate the high bioavailability of vitamin B6 in animal-derived foods and support the use of isotopic enrichment methods as an alternative to conventional bioassay procedures

  6. EPR evaluation of absorbed doses in γ-irradiated animal bone tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the ESR method accumulation of CO2- radicals in γ-irradiated bone tissues of swine, chicken, cattle, navaga and other small fish of the cod family, hen's eggs shell was studied to reveal the fact of radiation exposure and to evaluate exposure dose received during radiation treatment of food stuffs. It is shown that in the range of doses 0-10 kGy dependence of the radicals concentration on dose is of linear character, while coefficient of the radicals radiation-chemical yield variation for diverse biological types of bone tissue does not exceed 30 %. Potentiality of using the method of additive doses for the ESR dosimetry of radiation-treated beef was considered. It is shown that the linear model used in the additive doses method provides overrated results compared to the exponential model

  7. ELF (extremely-low-frequency) field interactions at the animal, tissue and cellular levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1990-10-01

    A description is given of the fundamental physical properties of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, and the mechanisms through which these fields interact with the human body at a macroscopic level. Biological responses to ELF fields at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels are summarized, including new evidence that ELF field exposure produces alterations in gene expression and the cytoplasmic concentrations of specific proteins.

  8. The AEO, an Ontology of Anatomical Entities for Classifying Animal Tissues and Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Bard, Jonathan B. L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the AEO, an ontology of anatomical entities that expands the common anatomy reference ontology (CARO) and whose major novel feature is a type hierarchy of ~160 anatomical terms. The breadth of the AEO is wider than CARO as it includes both developmental and gender-specific classes, while the granularity of the AEO terms is at a level adequate to classify simple-tissues (~70 classes) characterized by their containing a predominantly single cell-type. For convenience and to...

  9. A rapid, enzymatic assay for the measurement of inorganic pyrophosphate in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G A; O'Brien, W E; Wood, H G; King, M T; Veech, R L

    1978-12-01

    A simple, rapid enzymatic assay for the determination of inorganic pyrophosphate in tissue and plasma has been developed using the enzyme pyrophosphate--fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (EC 2.7.1.90) which was purified from extracts of Propionibacterium shermanii. The enzyme phosphorylates fructose-6-phosphate to produce fructose-1,6-bisphosphate using inorganic pyrophosphate as the phosphate donor. The utilization of inorganic pyrophosphate is measured by coupling the production of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate with the oxidation of NADH using fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13), triosephosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.1), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NAD+)(EC 1.1.1.8). The assay is completed in less than 5 min and is not affected by any of the components of tissue or plasma extracts. The recovery of pyrophosphate added to frozen tissue powder was 97 +/- 1% (n = 4). In this assay the change in absorbance is linearly related to the concentration of inorganic pyrophosphate over the curvette concentration range of 0.1 microM to 0.1 mM. PMID:9762143

  10. Evaluation of sample holders designed for long-lasting X-ray micro-tomographic scans of ex-vivo soft tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Krejci, F.; Karch, J.; Patzelt, M.; Zach, P.; Sykora, V.; Mrzilkova, J.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray microradiography and microtomography are imaging techniques with increasing applicability in the field of biomedical and preclinical research. Application of hybrid pixel detector Timepix enables to obtain very high contrast of low attenuating materials such as soft biological tissue. However X-ray imaging of ex-vivo soft tissue samples is a difficult task due to its structural instability. Ex-vivo biological tissue is prone to fast drying-out which is connected with undesired changes of sample size and shape producing later on artefacts within the tomographic reconstruction. In this work we present the optimization of our Timepix equipped micro-CT system aiming to maintain soft tissue sample in stable condition. Thanks to the suggested approach higher contrast of tomographic reconstructions can be achieved while also large samples that require detector scanning can be easily measured.

  11. Evaluation of sample holders designed for long-lasting X-ray micro-tomographic scans of ex-vivo soft tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray microradiography and microtomography are imaging techniques with increasing applicability in the field of biomedical and preclinical research. Application of hybrid pixel detector Timepix enables to obtain very high contrast of low attenuating materials such as soft biological tissue. However X-ray imaging of ex-vivo soft tissue samples is a difficult task due to its structural instability. Ex-vivo biological tissue is prone to fast drying-out which is connected with undesired changes of sample size and shape producing later on artefacts within the tomographic reconstruction. In this work we present the optimization of our Timepix equipped micro-CT system aiming to maintain soft tissue sample in stable condition. Thanks to the suggested approach higher contrast of tomographic reconstructions can be achieved while also large samples that require detector scanning can be easily measured

  12. Ethics and Animal Numbers: Informal Analyses, Uncertain Sample Sizes, Inefficient Replications, and Type I Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Fitts, Douglas A

    2011-01-01

    To obtain approval for the use vertebrate animals in research, an investigator must assure an ethics committee that the proposed number of animals is the minimum necessary to achieve a scientific goal. How does an investigator make that assurance? A power analysis is most accurate when the outcome is known before the study, which it rarely is. A ‘pilot study’ is appropriate only when the number of animals used is a tiny fraction of the numbers that will be invested in the main study because t...

  13. Evaluation of oxidant-antioxidant status in tissue samples in oral cancer: A case control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kumar Chandan; Austin, Ravi David; Shrivastava, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imbalances between the oxidant-antioxidant status have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in the tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients of different clinical stages in comparison with the healthy controls. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed with 20 new histopathologically proven oral carcinoma patients and an equal number of age, sex, and tobacco chewing habit matched healthy subjects. Their tissue samples were subjected to evaluation of lipid peroxidation product and antioxidant enzymes, namely, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) using spectrophotometric methods. The data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The statistical comparisons between the study groups were performed by independent Student's unpaired t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Post-hoc analysis was performed for within study group comparisons. Karl Pearson correlation was performed for the biochemical parameters within the group and between the groups. For statistically significant correlations, simple linear regression was performed using SPSS (α=0.05). Results: Significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (P < 0.001) SOD and CAT (P < 0.001) was observed in the tissue of OSCC patients as compared with the healthy controls. On the other hand, reduced GSH and GPx were significantly increased in tumor samples. Conclusion: Reduced lipid peroxidation and increased activity of reduced GSH and GPx provides the suitable environment for the local growth and invasion of the tumor and metastasis in the later stages. Among the antioxidant enzymes, GSH reductase appears to have a profound role in carcinogenesis and thus it can be considered as potential prognostic marker. PMID:27076834

  14. Expression of an antigen homologous to the human CO17-1A/GA733 colon cancer antigen in animal tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaloudik, J; Basak, S.; Nesbit, M.; Speicher, D W; Wunner, W H; Miller, E.; Ernst-Grotkowski, C.; Kennedy, R; Bergsagel, L. P.; Koido, T.; Herlyn, D

    1997-01-01

    The CO17-1A/GA733 antigen is associated with human carcinomas and some normal epithelial tissues. This antigen has shown promise as a target in approaches to passive and active immunotherapy of colorectal cancer. The relevance of animal models for studies of immunotherapy targeting this antigen in patients is dependent on the expression of the antigen on normal animal tissues. Immunohistoperoxidase staining with polyclonal rabbit antibodies to the human antigen revealed the human homologue on...

  15. Vanadium poisoning of cattle with basic slag. Concentrations in tissues from poisoned animals and from a reference, slaughterhouse material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A; Madej, A; Galgan, V; Petersson, L R

    1996-03-01

    In northern Sweden, 23 heifers out of 98 cattle died of acute vanadium toxicity in a 10-day period. Eight months earlier a pasture had been fertilized with basic slag, containing 3% vanadium. The fertilizer was laid on the surface without being ploughed in. Mainly heifers, and some cows, were fed with basic slag-contaminated fresh hay. The first signs of illness appeared 11 days later, and the first case of death appeared 14 days after the initial clinical signs. The signs were diffuse and difficult to interpret. Inappetence, black diarrhea, lethargy, dehydration and spontaneous abortions occurred. Further, pulmonary lesions, conjunctivitis, neurological disturbances such as depression, leg incoordination, and paralysis of the hind limbs and face were also noted. Although feeding with the contaminated hay was stopped at the outbreak of the toxicity, the 23 animals died or had to be slaughtered, and at necropsy of another heifer 4 weeks later, large amounts of basic slag were still found in the alimentary tract. High vanadium concentrations were found in the liver, kidneys, spleen and urine, 5.9, 5.5, 1.9 and 4.8 mg/kg w.w., respectively. In bone tissue (coccygeal vertebrae), the highest value in an acutely poisoned heifer was 0.680 mg/kd d.w., in the same range as that of an experimentally poisoned sheep. Surviving heifers were more affected than cows; the state of health of these heifers gradually deteriorated and, therefore, a few were slaughtered 3 months later. Because of residual neurological disturbances and decreased milk production, the rest of the herd was slaughtered 5 months after the outbreak, and samples were collected and analyzed. Elevated vanadium concentrations were found in the organs, especially in the spleen, where values of 1.40 and 1.42 mg/kg w.w. were found in 2 heifers at 3 months. The values in heifers (n = 6) were decreased 5 months after the outbreak. The median concentrations were somewhat higher in the liver than in the spleen, and

  16. Transcriptional profiling and genotyping of degraded nucleic acids from autopsy tissue samples after prolonged formalin fixation times

    OpenAIRE

    Ferruelo, Antonio; González, Constancio

    2011-01-01

    [Background]: Samples used for genotyping and transcription studies are obtained and conserved in very specific conditions. The possibility to use autopsy tissue samples, which contain nucleic acids of very poor quality, would open new possibilities for genetic studies. [Methods]: We have used liver tissue samples from autopsy cases to (i) determine its quality; (ii) study gene expression of 13 genes involved in different cell processes, before and after cDNA pre-amplification (quantitative r...

  17. Transcriptional profiling and genotyping of degraded nucleic acids from autopsy tissue samples after prolonged formalin fixation times

    OpenAIRE

    Ferruelo, Antonio; El-Assar, Mariam; Lorente, José A; Nin, Nicolás; Peñuelas, Oscar; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Gonzalez, Constancio; Esteban, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Background: Samples used for genotyping and transcription studies are obtained and conserved in very specific conditions. The possibility to use autopsy tissue samples, which contain nucleic acids of very poor quality, would open new possibilities for genetic studies. Methods: We have used liver tissue samples from autopsy cases to (i) determine its quality; (ii) study gene expression of 13 genes involved in different cell processes, before and after cDNA pre-amplification (quantitative rever...

  18. Parasitology and urban livestock farming in Nigeria : prevalence of ova in faecal and soil samples and animal ectoparasites in Makurdi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Omudu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Domestic environmental pollution resulting from urban livestock farming was investigated in Makurdi using parasitological techniques. The test tube flotation technique was used for the parasitological analysis of animal faecal matter and soil samples collected from residential premises. Ectoparasitic fauna of dogs, goats, sheep and cattle cohabiting with humans within the same residential compound were also collected and identified. The hand-picking and body brushing methods were employed to search for ticks, fleas, lice and mites. Of the 150 soil samples examined, 55 (36.7 % were positive for 1 or more eggs of helminth parasites. There was no significant difference in the distribution of eggs in the soil samples from the 3 areas sampled (c2=0.046, df=2, P>0.05. Ascaris species were the dominant parasite eggs found. Of the 180 faecal samples examined, 107 (59.4 % were positive for 1 or more eggs of helminth parasites. Chi-square analysis showed no significant difference in the level of infection of different animal faeces sampled (c2=5.74, df=4, P>0.05. Ascaris species were again the dominating helminth parasite eggs found. There was also no significant difference in the prevalence of helminth eggs in the animal faecal samples from the 3 areas sampled (c2=5.99, df=4, P>0.05. A total of 1908 ectoparasites was recovered (ticks: 32.80 %; lice: 22.43 %; fleas: 22.06% and mite: 22.69 %. There was no significant difference in infestation animals between sexes (c2=0.10, df=4, P>0.05. The predominant genus encountered for ticks were Amblyomma, while Linognathus (43.90%, Ctenocephalides (97.38% and Sarcoptes (58.89 % were most predominant for lice, fleas and mites respectively. The public health implications of the findings, especially as these relate to the increasing incidence and prevalence of zoonotic infections, are discussed.

  19. Effect of plasma immersion ion implantation in TiNi implants on its interaction with animal subcutaneous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Shishkova, Darya K.; Krukovskii, Konstantin V.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated in vivo interaction of Si-modified titanium nickelide (TiNi) samples with adjacent tissues in a rat subcutaneous implant model to assess the impact of the modification on the biocompatibility of the implant. Modification was performed by plasma immersion ion processing, which allows doping of different elements into surface layers of complex-shaped articles. The aim of modification was to reduce the level of toxic Ni ions on the implant surface for increasing biocompatibility. We identified a thin connective tissue capsule, endothelial cells, and capillary-like structures around the Si-modified implants both 30 and 90 days postimplantation. No signs of inflammation were found. In conclusion, modification of TiNi samples with Si ions increases biocompatibility of the implant.

  20. Biomarker discovery in heterogeneous tissue samples -taking the in-silico deconfounding approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parida Shreemanta K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For heterogeneous tissues, such as blood, measurements of gene expression are confounded by relative proportions of cell types involved. Conclusions have to rely on estimation of gene expression signals for homogeneous cell populations, e.g. by applying micro-dissection, fluorescence activated cell sorting, or in-silico deconfounding. We studied feasibility and validity of a non-negative matrix decomposition algorithm using experimental gene expression data for blood and sorted cells from the same donor samples. Our objective was to optimize the algorithm regarding detection of differentially expressed genes and to enable its use for classification in the difficult scenario of reversely regulated genes. This would be of importance for the identification of candidate biomarkers in heterogeneous tissues. Results Experimental data and simulation studies involving noise parameters estimated from these data revealed that for valid detection of differential gene expression, quantile normalization and use of non-log data are optimal. We demonstrate the feasibility of predicting proportions of constituting cell types from gene expression data of single samples, as a prerequisite for a deconfounding-based classification approach. Classification cross-validation errors with and without using deconfounding results are reported as well as sample-size dependencies. Implementation of the algorithm, simulation and analysis scripts are available. Conclusions The deconfounding algorithm without decorrelation using quantile normalization on non-log data is proposed for biomarkers that are difficult to detect, and for cases where confounding by varying proportions of cell types is the suspected reason. In this case, a deconfounding ranking approach can be used as a powerful alternative to, or complement of, other statistical learning approaches to define candidate biomarkers for molecular diagnosis and prediction in biomedicine, in

  1. Tissue distribution, excretion and blood distribution of [3H]-acetylshikonin in mice by sample oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the tissue distribution, excretion and blood distribution of [3H]-acetylshikonin in mice by Sample Oxidizer pretreatment technology. Methods: After 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose suspension containing [3H] - acetylshikonin was administered by gastric gavage at the dose of 120 mg/kg(2.96 x 107 Bq/kg), the tissue, feces, urine and blood samples of the mice were collected. The samples were pretreated by Sample Oxidizer. The radioactivity was determined by Liquid Scintillation Analyzer Tn-Card 29007R. Results: After oral administration of [3H]-acetylshikonin 120 mg/kg with 2.96 x 107 Bq/kg to mice, [3H]-acetylshikonin was mainly distributed in the stomach and intestine, secondarily in the gallbladder, liver, kidneys, lungs, and least in the brain and spinal cord. The cumulative radioactivity rate of the feces and urine was(68.5±3.3)% and (17.6±3.1)% within 271 h, respectively. The total excretion rate was (86.1±5.5)%. Besides, the exploratory study was carried out on acetylshikonin the existing form of in blood, allocation in plasma and blood cells, binding mode and binding rates of plasma proteins. Conclusions: Acetylshikonin has a relatively low absorption rate and wide distribution in mice, and is excreted completely more by fecal route than by urine. Acetylshikonin exits as a binding form in mouse blood. Allocation of acetylshikonin in mouse plasma and blood cells is nearly 4:1. Plasma protein binding rates of three levels (high, medium and low) are (94.7±O.44)%, (94.7±0.29)% and (95.4±0.13)%, respectively. The binding between acetylshikonin and human plasma protein is the coexistence of covalent bonding and hydrophobic interaction. (authors)

  2. [Structural and physicochemical characteristics of DNA from animal tissue subjected to chronic irradiation in the Chernobyl area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoĭ, Iu P; Kornilova, S V; Leont'ev, V S; Sorokin, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Valeev, V A; Grigor'ev, D N; Kapinos, L E; Bondarenko, V N; Kolod, V Ia

    1994-01-01

    The properties of animal DNAs exposed to prolonged irradiation in the Chernobyl zone, have been studied by the methods of viscometry, thermal denaturation, IR-spectroscopy, and electrophoresis. High content of low-molecular fractions have been observed in the preparations of DNA from liver and spleen, their quantities increasing with age and generation of animals. This effect is especially strong in DNA from liver. Low-molecular fraction of DNA is shown to be enriched with G-C pairs and to consist of the following four fractions: 1) approximately 500 base pairs (B.p.), 2) approximately 1.5 divided by 2 thousand B.p., 3) approximately 4 divided by 5 thousand B.p. and 4) a mixture of approximately 20 thousand B.p. fragments. Further, it has been observed that the DNA preparations from the tissues of experimental animals contain about ten times higher contents of Fe, Zn, Se and other elements as compared to the control preparations. PMID:7981273

  3. Effect of diet on animal performance, lipid composition of subcutaneous adipose and liver tissue of beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidiroglou, N; McDowell, L R; Johnson, D D

    1987-01-01

    Two trials were carried out with Brahman beef cattle to study animal performance and carcass characteristics as well as fatty acid composition of subcutaneous adipose and hepatic tissue, as influence by length of grain feeding period or a pasturing regimen. In trial 1, steers were allotted to three feedlot finishing periods (76, 104 and 146 days) after being backgrounded on pasture. Steers fed 76 days had greater average daily gains (P grades, fat over ribeye, quality yield and per cent kidney, pelvic and heart (KPH) fat than steers fed for 104 and 76 days. The proprortions of certain fatty acid of subcutaneous fat and liver tissue were influenced by the length of grain feeding. There was a marked increased in the proportion of oleic acid in both tissues as the steers remained longer in the feedlot and a higher percentage of total saturated fatty acids at 76 days than at the other two times. Quantitative separation of hepatic lipid classes by the Iatroscan revealed that phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the main components of the phospholipids. Presents as minor components were cardiolipin and sphingomyelin. No differences (P > 0.·05) in these individual subclasses of liver lipids or in triglycerides were observed between the feedlot groups. Liver polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were higher (P yield grade, quality grade, fat over ribeye and per cent KPH were higher (P < 0·01) for the concentrate group while fat color scores were higher (P < 0·01) for the pasture group. Liver fatty acid analysis of summed ω6 PUFAs of triglyceride, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine were higher for the feedlot than the pasture group. Linoleic acid was higher (P < 0·05) in the TG and PC liver subclass of the feedlot animals while higher (P < 0·05) linolenic acid occurred in the pasture group. PMID:22054497

  4. Extraction of methylmercury from tissue and plant samples by acid leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintelmann, Holger; Nguyen, Hong T. [Trent University, Chemistry Department, Peterborough, ON (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient extraction method based on acidic leaching has been developed for measurement of methylmercury (MeHg) in benthic organisms and plant material. Methylmercury was measured by speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS), using gas chromatography interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). Reagent concentration and digestion temperature were optimized for several alkaline and acidic extractants. Recovery was evaluated by addition of MeHg enriched with CH{sub 3}{sup 201}Hg{sup +}. Certified reference materials (CRM) were used to evaluate the efficiency of the procedure. The final digestion method used 5 mL of 4 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} at 55 C to leach MeHg from tissue and plant material. The digest was further processed by aqueous phase ethylation, without interference with the ethylation step, resulting in 96{+-}7% recovery of CH{sub 3}{sup 201}Hg{sup +} from oyster tissue and 93{+-}7% from pine needles. Methylmercury was stable in this solution for at least 1 week and measured concentrations of MeHg in CRM were statistically not different from certified values. The method was applied to real samples of benthic invertebrates and inter-laboratory comparisons were conducted using lyophilized zooplankton, chironomidae, and notonectidae samples. (orig.)

  5. Extraction of methylmercury from tissue and plant samples by acid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintelmann, Holger; Nguyen, Hong T

    2005-01-01

    A simple and efficient extraction method based on acidic leaching has been developed for measurement of methylmercury (MeHg) in benthic organisms and plant material. Methylmercury was measured by speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS), using gas chromatography interfaced with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). Reagent concentration and digestion temperature were optimized for several alkaline and acidic extractants. Recovery was evaluated by addition of MeHg enriched with CH3 201Hg+. Certified reference materials (CRM) were used to evaluate the efficiency of the procedure. The final digestion method used 5 mL of 4 mol L(-1) HNO3 at 55 degrees C to leach MeHg from tissue and plant material. The digest was further processed by aqueous phase ethylation, without interference with the ethylation step, resulting in 96 +/- 7% recovery of CH3 201Hg+ from oyster tissue and 93+/-7% from pine needles. Methylmercury was stable in this solution for at least 1 week and measured concentrations of MeHg in CRM were statistically not different from certified values. The method was applied to real samples of benthic invertebrates and inter-laboratory comparisons were conducted using lyophilized zooplankton, chironomidae, and notonectidae samples. PMID:15662514

  6. Animal and human mucosal tissue models to study HIV biomedical interventions: can we predict success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene S Dezzutti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preclinical testing plays an integral role in the development of HIV prevention modalities. Several models are used including humanized mice, non-human primates and human mucosal tissue cultures. Discussion: Pharmaceutical development traditionally uses preclinical models to evaluate product safety. The HIV prevention field has extended this paradigm to include models of efficacy, encompassing humanized mice, non-human primates (typically Asian macaques and human mucosal tissue (such as cervical and colorectal. As our understanding of the biology of HIV transmission improves and includes the influence of human behaviour/biology and co-pathogens, these models have evolved as well to address more complex questions. These three models have demonstrated the effectiveness of systemic (oral and topical use of antiretroviral drugs. Importantly, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships are being developed and linked to information gathered from human clinical trials. The models are incorporating co-pathogens (bacterial and viral and the effects of coitus (mucosal fluids on drug distribution and efficacy. Humanized mice are being tailored in their immune reconstitution to better represent humans. Importantly, human mucosal tissue cultures are now being used in early clinical trials to provide information on product efficacy to more accurately characterize efficacious products to advance to larger clinical trials. While all of these models have made advancements in product development, each has limitations and the data need to be interpreted by keeping these limitations in mind. Conclusions: Development and refinement of each of these models has been an iterative process and linkages to data generated among each of them and from human clinical trials are needed to determine their reliability. Preclinical testing has evolved from simply identifying products that demonstrate efficacy prior to clinical trials to defining essential

  7. Protocol: High-throughput and quantitative assays of auxin and auxin precursors from minute tissue samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xing

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant hormone auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, plays important roles in plant growth and development. The signaling response to IAA is largely dependent on the local concentration of IAA, and this concentration is regulated by multiple mechanisms in plants. Therefore, the precise quantification of local IAA concentration provides insights into the regulation of IAA and its biological roles. Meanwhile, pathways and genes involved in IAA biosynthesis are not fully understood, so it is necessary to analyze the production of IAA at the metabolite level for unbiased studies of IAA biosynthesis. Results We have developed high-throughput methods to quantify plant endogenous IAA and its biosynthetic precursors including indole, tryptophan, indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA, and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA. The protocol starts with homogenizing plant tissues with stable-labeled internal standards added, followed by analyte purification using solid phase extraction (SPE tips and analyte derivatization. The derivatized analytes are finally analyzed by selected reaction monitoring on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS/MS to determine the precise abundance of analytes. The amount of plant tissue required for the assay is small (typically 2–10 mg fresh weight, and the use of SPE tips is simple and convenient, which allows preparation of large sets of samples within reasonable time periods. Conclusions The SPE tips and GC-MS/MS based method enables high-throughput and accurate quantification of IAA and its biosynthetic precursors from minute plant tissue samples. The protocol can be used for measurement of these endogenous compounds using isotope dilution, and it can also be applied to analyze IAA biosynthesis and biosynthetic pathways using stable isotope labeling. The method will potentially advance knowledge of the role and regulation of IAA.

  8. Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, J. J., E-mail: johann.wendler@med.ovgu.de; Porsch, M.; Huehne, S.; Baumunk, D. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany); Buhtz, P. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Fischbach, F.; Pech, M. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Mahnkopf, D. [Institute of Medical Technology and Research (Germany); Kropf, S. [Institute of Biometry, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Roessner, A. [Institute of Pathology, University of Magdeburg (Germany); Ricke, J. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schostak, M.; Liehr, U.-B. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Urology (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting. Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days. A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney. This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

  9. Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting. Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days. A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney. This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

  10. 76 FR 24862 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Protocol for Access to Tissue Specimen Samples...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ..., pilot whales, harbor porpoises), animals from mass strandings, animals that have been obtained... unusual mortality events through two projects, the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response...

  11. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Koeplinger, Kenneth A. [Merck Research Laboratories; Vavek, Marissa [Merck Research Laboratories; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony [Rutgers University

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  12. Determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples by radiochemical activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples. A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel has been developed. The destruction device used consisted of a combined wet-ashing-distillation and ion-exchange system. Six samples could be treated at the same time. The samples were wet-ashed with H*L2SO*L4-H*L2O*L2 mixture. Volatile elements were distilled as bromide compounds with HBr*H-. The distillation residue in 8M HCl was passed through hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) in order to remove disturbing *H2*H4Na-activity and through a Dowex 2 x 8 column so as to retain *H6*H0Co (formed from *H5*H8Ni). Chromium was elutriated from the column and precipitated as Cr(OH)*L3 for the removal of disturbing *H3*H2P-activity. The standards and samples were treated in a similar manner each so that the yield determination is not necessarily needed. The yields by tracer experiments were (43 +- 5) % for Cr, (93 +- 4) % for Co and (88 +- 14) % for Ni. The precision and accuracy of the method were studied by using reference materials of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  13. Some Aspects on the Degradation of Macromolecules in Lymphoid and Haemopoietic Tissues of Irradiated Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiated cells of lymphoid and haemopoietic tissues undergo an early, pyknotic death. Their macromolecules, especially the deoxyribonucleoprotein complex, are degraded and thus provide metabolites, used as biochemical indicators of radiation injury. The first steps in the degradation of deoxyribonucleoprotein molecules have been extensively studied in our laboratory, namely the release of salt-soluble polydeoxyribonucleotides from deoxyribonucleoprotein and the labilization of deoxyribonucleoprotein, as revealed by the increased sensitivity to heparin and other strong polyanions. Both.these changes appear very soon after irradiation in vivo, reaching their maximum about 6 hours after irradiation. They are almost linearly dose-dependent in the range of whole-body exposures of 0—300 R, the lowest provable exposure being 20—30 R. Data are presented on the possible mechanisms of these changes and the question is discussed whether this early post-irradiation damage to deoxyribonucleoprotein could be used as an indicator of radiation injury. Furthermore, the relation of the deoxyribonucleoprotein changes described to the appearance of low-molecular DNA degradation products in body fluids and their significance for biochemical diagnosis is considered. Finally, some proposals are discussed on the improvement of the sensitivity of biochemical indicators based on testing the amount of degradation products and low-molecular metabolites. (author)

  14. Multimodal Raman-fluorescence spectroscopy of formalin fixed samples is able to discriminate brain tumors from dysplastic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years, there has been a considerable surge in the application of spectroscopy for disease diagnosis. Raman and fluorescence spectra provide characteristic spectral profile related to biochemical and morphological changes when tissues progress from normal state towards malignancy. Spectroscopic techniques offer the advantage of being minimally invasive compared to traditional histopathology, real time and quantitative. In biomedical optical diagnostics, freshly excised specimens are preferred for making ex-vivo spectroscopic measurements. With regard to fresh tissues, if the lab is located far away from the clinic it could pose a problem as spectral measurements have to be performed immediately after dissection. Tissue samples are usually placed in a fixative agent such as 4% formaldehyde to preserve the samples before processing them for routine histopathological studies. Fixation prevents the tissues from decomposition by arresting autolysis. In the present study, we intend to investigate the possibility of using formalin fixed samples for discrimination of brain tumours from dysplastic tissue using Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Formalin fixed samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline for about 5 minutes in order to remove the effects of formalin during spectroscopic measurements. In case of fluorescence spectroscopy, changes in spectral profile have been observed in the region between 550-670 nm between dysplastic and tumor samples. For Raman measurements, we found significant differences in the spectral profiles between dysplasia and tumor. In conclusion, formalin fixed samples can be potentially used for the spectroscopic discrimination of tumor against dysplastic tissue in brain samples.

  15. The Preservation and De-livery of the Samples for the Animal Epidemic Dis-ease Monitoring and Di-agnosis%动物疫病检测及诊断样品的保存与运送

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛家红

    2014-01-01

    动物疫病的检测与诊断依赖于病料样品,样品的保存与运送就显得更加重要。病料样品的种类繁多,不同样品应有不同的采集、保存与运送方法。该文简单叙述了动物疫病检测与诊断常见样品的保存、运送方法及注意事项。%The test and diagnosis of animal disease depends on tissue sam-ples, which caused it becoming more important of the preservation and deliv-ery of the tissue samples. There are many types of tissue samples. Different samples should have different methods of collection, preservation and delivery. In this article, we summarized the preservation and delivery and an-nouncement of the common tissue sam-ples which were used animal epidemic disease monitoring and diagnosis.

  16. Detection and Toxin Typing of Clostridium perfringens in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples by PCR▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Josephine; Zhang, Wandi; Xie, Boxun; Wu, Maoxin; Tong, Xiaodi; Kalpoe, Jayant; Zhang, David

    2008-01-01

    Since current microbiology methods are not suitable to detect Clostridium perfringens in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples, we developed a PCR assay to detect toxin-encoding genes and the 16S rRNA gene of C. perfringens. We successfully detected and genotyped C. perfringens in tissue sections from two autopsy cases.

  17. Determination of trace amount of lanthanum in animal tissues, special reference to teeth and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a lanthanum solution is swabbed on the surface of teeth in vivo or in vitro, lanthanum is substituted for the calcium of enamel surface, and therefore, dental caries formation is inhibited. The study was to determine the amount of lanthanum uptake into teeth and bone, furthermore internal organs, and to provide an aid for estimation on the effect of the element in living bodies. Samples were digested with nitric acid-perchloric acid mixture. After dissolution, lanthanum was precipitated with oxalate using calcium oxalate carrier. The precipitate was decomposed. Lanthanum was extracted into 0.1 M TTA-MIBK, and back-extracted with 1 M nitric acid. ICP emission spectrometry was applied for the determination. Teeth, thighbone, and other organs were drawn out from the rats of which teeth was swabbed with 8 % lanthanum nitrate, 2.5 % lanthanum EDTA, and 10.5 % lanthanum EDTA, once a day for 2 weeks. The maximum content of lanthanum was 54 μg/g in the teeth and 2.7 μg/g in the thighbone. Lanthanum contents for liver, spleen, kidney, and blood were also presented for the samples drawn out within one day and 1, 3, and 5 month later after swabbing. (author)

  18. Effects of MRTI sampling characteristics on estimation of HIFU SAR and tissue thermal diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the non-invasive and three-dimensional nature of magnetic-resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) makes it a valuable tool for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, random and systematic errors in MRTI measurements may propagate into temperature-based parameter estimates used for pretreatment planning. This study assesses the MRTI effects of zero-mean Gaussian noise (SD = 0.0–2.0 °C), temporal sampling (tacq = 1.0–8.0 s), and spatial averaging (Res = 0.5–2.0 mm isotropic) on HIFU temperature measurements and temperature-based estimates of the amplitude and full width half maximum (FWHM) of the HIFU specific absorption rate and of tissue thermal diffusivity. The ultrasound beam used in simulations and ex vivo pork loin experiments has lateral and axial FWHM dimensions of 1.4 mm and 7.9 mm respectively. For spatial averaging simulations, beams with lateral FWHM varying from 1.2–2.2 mm are also assessed. Under noisy conditions, parameter estimates are improved by fitting to data from larger voxel regions. Varying the temporal sampling results in minimal changes in measured temperatures (3 or smaller is required to keep errors in temperature and all estimated parameters less than 10%. By quantifying the errors associated with these sampling characteristics, this work provides researchers with appropriate MRTI conditions for obtaining estimates of parameters essential to pretreatment modeling of HIFU thermal therapies. (paper)

  19. Effects of MRTI sampling characteristics on estimation of HIFU SAR and tissue thermal diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, C. R.; Todd, N.; Payne, A.; Parker, D. L.; Christensen, D. A.; Roemer, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    While the non-invasive and three-dimensional nature of magnetic-resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) makes it a valuable tool for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, random and systematic errors in MRTI measurements may propagate into temperature-based parameter estimates used for pretreatment planning. This study assesses the MRTI effects of zero-mean Gaussian noise (SD = 0.0-2.0 °C), temporal sampling (tacq = 1.0-8.0 s), and spatial averaging (Res = 0.5-2.0 mm isotropic) on HIFU temperature measurements and temperature-based estimates of the amplitude and full width half maximum (FWHM) of the HIFU specific absorption rate and of tissue thermal diffusivity. The ultrasound beam used in simulations and ex vivo pork loin experiments has lateral and axial FWHM dimensions of 1.4 mm and 7.9 mm respectively. For spatial averaging simulations, beams with lateral FWHM varying from 1.2-2.2 mm are also assessed. Under noisy conditions, parameter estimates are improved by fitting to data from larger voxel regions. Varying the temporal sampling results in minimal changes in measured temperatures (HIFU beams studied, a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 or smaller is required to keep errors in temperature and all estimated parameters less than 10%. By quantifying the errors associated with these sampling characteristics, this work provides researchers with appropriate MRTI conditions for obtaining estimates of parameters essential to pretreatment modeling of HIFU thermal therapies.

  20. Large animal normal tissue tolerance using an epithermal neutron beam and borocaptate sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of the canine head following intravenous Na2B12H11SH (BSH) administration has provided useful information concerning the tolerance of skin and brain to the resultant complex form of irradiation. The effect of the boron capture reaction in skin and brain has provided estimates of the influence of the microscopic dosimetry involved. Dogs irradiated with the epithermal bam alone provided valuable insight into the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron component (>10 keV) of the epithermal beam. When comapred with literature values for X-rays for the occurrence of skin necrosis in dogs, an RBE of 4.5 was derived. Previous pharmacokinetic data concerning the distribution of Na2B12H11SH (BSH) to blood and bran has been used to obtain input parameters for computer models of the microvasculature of the brain. Monte Carlo computer models were used to simulate the microscopic distribution of BSH in the normal brain. The term compo- und factor describes the product of the microscopic boron fission fragment dose hitting the nucleus and the relative biologic effectiveness divided by the macroscopic equilibrium dose of the boron reaction in the tissue of interest. The computed compound factor for Na2B12H11SH (BSH) in normal brain was 0.37. This factor agreed very well with the value of 0.32 obtained for the brain necrosis with the dog irradiations. The compound factor for the dog's skin was experimentally derived from the dog experiments and was equal to 0.5. (orig.)

  1. Pulsed electromembrane extraction for analysis of derivatized amino acids: A powerful technique for determination of animal source of gelatin samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Aghaei, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Differentiation of animal sources of gelatin is required for many reasons such as some anxieties about bovine spongiform encephalopathy or a ban on consuming porcine gelatin in some religions. In the present work, an efficient method is introduced for determination of animal origin of gelatin samples. The basis of this procedure is the application of pulsed electric field for extraction, preconcentration, and analysis of derivatized amino acids in gelatin. To this end, after derivatization of amino acids of interest by means of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) for enhancing their ultraviolet (UV) absorbance as well as increasing their lipophilicities, a 137V electric field was applied for 20min with 10min(-1) frequency to make the analytes migrate through a 200µm organic liquid membrane into an aqueous acceptor phase. Finally, the acceptor phase was analyzed by HPLC-UV. The proposed technique offered a high efficiency for analysis of amino acids, regarding 43% and 79% as extraction recoveries and 25ng mL(-1) and 50ng mL(-1) as limits of detection (LODs) for asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Therefore, due to sample cleanup ability of the proposed method and obtained preconcentration factors (29 and 53 for asparagine and glutamine, respectively), it could be carried out for differentiation of animal origins of gelatin samples, even if only small amounts of samples are available or in complicated media of foodstuffs and medicament. PMID:25703002

  2. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  3. Estimating the abundance of clustered animal population by using adaptive cluster sampling and negative binomial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yizhou; Shifa, Naima

    2013-09-01

    An estimator for finding the abundance of a rare, clustered and mobile population has been introduced. This model is based on adaptive cluster sampling (ACS) to identify the location of the population and negative binomial distribution to estimate the total in each site. To identify the location of the population we consider both sampling with replacement (WR) and sampling without replacement (WOR). Some mathematical properties of the model are also developed.

  4. Leptine: an hormone secreted by adipose tissue. First study in Uruguayan population sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent discovery of leptine, an hormone secreted by adipose tissue which modulates the energetic expenditure has signified a gigantic advance in studying obesity facts. In spite of a recent description of absence of leptine in humans, the obesity human model answers to leptine resistance. In this paper, we revise the actual concepts and show leptine values of a sample of 101 middle aged uruguayans, male and female, of normal weight and over weighted (table 1), correlated with corporal mass index (CMI) as an indirect measure of total body fat and waist diameter as an indirect measure of visceral fat, and hips (periferical fat). Bioimpedance studies were carried out to get the corporal composition. Results: good correlation between corporal fat and leptine, but fat distribution was not found representative. All in all, this data set confirms the correlation between leptine and total body fat mass

  5. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, P.; Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.; Rank, Fritz; Timmermans, Vera Jacqueline Marita; Moreira, José

    2008-01-01

    Cancer, being a major healthcare concern worldwide, is one of the main targets for the application of emerging proteomic technologies and these tools promise to revolutionize the way cancer will be diagnosed and treated in the near future. Today, as a result of the unprecedented advances that have...... number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer......-based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis of a...

  6. Identification of animal glue species in artworks using proteomics: application to a 18th century gilt sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallongeville, Sophie; Koperska, Monika; Garnier, Nicolas; Reille-Taillefert, Geneviève; Rolando, Christian; Tokarski, Caroline

    2011-12-15

    This study proposes a proteomic-based strategy for the identification of the origin species of glues used as binding media and adhesives in artworks. The methodology, based on FTICR high resolution mass spectrometry, was evaluated on glues from different animal origin (i.e., bovine, rabbit, and fish). The analysis of the peptide mixture resulting from the enzymatic hydrolysis of the proteins led to the identification of species-specific peptides. Up to 15 specific peptides were identified for the bovine species and three for the rabbit species and, in the case of sturgeon glue, three fish-specific peptides were found by sequence homology to the rainbow trout. Then, the method was applied to authenticate different rabbit skin glue samples, including a 100 year-old sample named "Colle à Doreurs" coming from the "Maison Totin-Frères". For this sample, two specific peptides of rabbit collagen were identified. To evaluate the method in a complex matrix, model paints composed of lead white, linseed oil, and animal glue were prepared. Species-specific peptides were identified in each paint sample. Finally, a gilt sample from St Maximin church dating from the eighteenth century was analyzed, and 13 peptides specific to bovine collagens were identified starting from very low sample amount (50 μg). PMID:22014085

  7. SAMPLING ADAPTIVE STRATEGY AND SPATIAL ORGANISATION ESTIMATION OF SOIL ANIMAL COMMUNITIES AT VARIOUS HIERARCHICAL LEVELS OF URBANISED TERRITORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljuk J.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In work the algorithm of adaptive strategy of optimum spatial sampling for studying of the spatial organisation of communities of soil animals in the conditions of an urbanization have been presented. As operating variables the principal components obtained as a result of the analysis of the field data on soil penetration resistance, soils electrical conductivity and density of a forest stand, collected on a quasiregular grid have been used. The locations of experimental polygons have been stated by means of program ESAP. The sampling has been made on a regular grid within experimental polygons. The biogeocoenological estimation of experimental polygons have been made on a basis of A.L.Belgard's ecomorphic analysis. The spatial configuration of biogeocoenosis types has been established on the basis of the data of earth remote sensing and the analysis of digital elevation model. The algorithm was suggested which allows to reveal the spatial organisation of soil animal communities at investigated point, biogeocoenosis, and landscape.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Braykov, Nikolay P.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; CEVALLOS, WILLIAM; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A.; Marrs, Carl F.; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 “production ...

  9. Analysis of multiple anticoagulant rodenticides in animal blood and liver tissue using principles of QuEChERS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vudathala, Daljit; Cummings, Margaret; Murphy, Lisa

    2010-06-01

    A quick and easy method for the analysis of anticoagulant rodenticides in blood or tissue using principles of dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE), commonly known as QuEChERS (short for quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe), was developed. Briefly, a combination of magnesium sulfate, PSA, florisil, and basic alumina was used to cleanup blood samples. Further, to cleanup liver tissue samples, C(18) sorbent was included along with the previously mentioned. The samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a reversed-phase C(18) column (150 x 4.6 mm, 5-microm particle size) and a UV and fluorescence detector. The mobile phase consisted of 0.03 M tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBA) adjusted to pH 7/methanol (1:1, v/v) as solvent A and methanol as solvent B in a gradient run. The method detection limit was as low as 10 ng/mL for brodifacoum and difenacoum in blood and 10 ng/g in liver; 50 ng/mL for bromadiolone, difethialone, and chlorphacinone in blood and similarly 50 ng/g in liver; and 100 ng/mL for coumafuryl, pindone, warfarin, and diphacinone in blood and 100 ng/g in liver samples. A number of clinical samples of both blood and liver were analyzed; the comparison of this modified QuEChERS and traditional solid-phase extraction data was found to be in close agreement. This method resulted in drastic reduction in processing time and solvent cost both in terms of consumption and disposal, thus making it an attractive alternative to the traditional solid-phase extraction. PMID:20529461

  10. Estimation of vitamin D2 vitamin D3, and their 25-hydroxy metabolites in animal tissues and foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method was developed for the determination of vitamins D2 and D3 and their 25-hydroxy metabolites that could be applicable to a variety of tissues and foods. Tritiated vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were used to monitor vitamin losses through the assay procedure. The first step used a saponification and extraction to free the vitamins D from their matrix and reduce the lipids. Most samples were saponified using the AOAC method, while a new procedure was developed for high fat samples. This utilized greater extraction volumes, a more polar extraction solvent, and three salt washes. Three different types of chromatography were then used to enable quantitation. The method was reproducible and accurate for the estimation of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, but not as accurate for determining vitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 due to a lack of radioisotope standards of these compounds

  11. Comparing the proteome of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona;

    2016-01-01

    Large biobanks exist worldwide containing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and samples stored in RNAlater. However, the impact of tissue preservation on the result of a quantative proteome analysis remains poorly described. Human colon mucosal biopsies were extracted from the sigmoideum...

  12. Quality control in diagnostic molecular pathology in the Netherlands; proficiency testing for patient identification in tissue samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, F.B.J.M.; Tilanus, M.G.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nederlof, P.M.; Dinjens, W.N.; Meulemans, E.; Brule, A.J. van den; Noesel, C.J. van; Leeuw, W. de; Schuuring, E.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the evolution of proficiency testing for molecular diagnostic pathology with respect to determining unambiguously the patient identity of tissue samples by microsatellite analysis. METHOD: Four rounds of quality control exchanges of samples from different patients were sent with th

  13. Detection of Campylobacter in human and animal field samples in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbjer, Kristina; Tano, Eva; Chhayheng, Leang; Mac-Kwashie, Akofa Olivia; Fernström, Lise-Lotte; Ellström, Patrik; Sokerya, Seng; Sokheng, Choup; Mom, Veng; Chheng, Kannarath; San, Sorn; Davun, Holl; Boqvist, Sofia; Rautelin, Hilpi; Magnusson, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter are zoonotic bacteria and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide with Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli being the most commonly detected species. The aim of this study was to detect Campylobacter in humans and livestock (chickens, ducks, pigs, cattle, water buffalo, quail, pigeons and geese) in rural households by routine culturing and multiplex PCR in faecal samples frozen before analysis. Of 681 human samples, 82 (12%) tested positive by PCR (C. jejuni in 66 samples and C. coli in 16), but none by routine culture. Children were more commonly Campylobacter positive (19%) than adult males (8%) and females (7%). Of 853 livestock samples, 106 (12%) tested positive by routine culture and 352 (41%) by PCR. Campylobacter jejuni was more frequent in chickens and ducks and C. coli in pigs. In conclusion, Campylobacter proved to be highly prevalent by PCR in children (19%), ducks (24%), chickens (56%) and pigs (72%). Routine culturing was insufficiently sensitive in detecting Campylobacter in field samples frozen before analysis. These findings suggest that PCR should be the preferred diagnostic method for detection of Campylobacter in humans and livestock where timely culture is not feasible. PMID:26991032

  14. Expression of somatostatin receptors subtype 2 and 5 in extraocular muscle tissue of hypothyroidism animal induced by 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the expression and distribution of somatostatin receptors 2 and 5 (SSTR2, 5) in extraocular muscle in hypothyroidism and thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) Wister rats induced by 131I. Methods: 20 Wister rats were randomly divided into experimental group and normal group(group D). According to 131I doses of intraperitoneal injection, the experimental groups were divided into low (group A), middle (group B) and high dose group (group C). After 8 weeks, all rats were sacrificed and orbital tissue sections were applied to HE staining and Immunohistochemistry for the analysis of rat orbital tissue changes and SSTR2 and 5 distribution in extraocular muscle. Results: The serum FT4 levels in group A (16.98±2.92 pmol / L), group B (1.84±0.44 pmol / L) and group C (1.35 ±0.37 pmol /L) eight weeks after 131I injection were decreased, and had significant difference compared with group D (P4 levels in group B and C were significantly lower than that in group A (P 0.05). Orbital tissue in experimental group showed mucoid degeneration and edema, the extent was about 25% in group A, 50% in group B, 70% in group C. The rats in group B and group C appeared obvious proliferation of fibrous and adipose tissue, muscle fibers degeneration fracture, even extraocular muscles in group C have vacuole formation. Immunohistochemical analysis displayed highest SSTR5 distribution and strongest expression was in extraocular muscle of group C, second in A B combination group (A and B groups)and weakest in group D. There were significant differences between A B combination group,group C and group D (P 0.05). Conclusion: This study observed the distribution and expression of SSTR2 and SSTR5 in extraocular muscle on the established hypothyroidism animal model. It is some significance for understanding the mechanism of somatostatin receptors in occurrence and development of TAO, similar to provide a reference for the use of somatostatin analogue orbital imaging

  15. On the importance of sampling variance to investigations of temporal variation in animal population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Our purpose here is to emphasize the need to properly deal with sampling variance when studying population variability and to present a means of doing so. We present an estimator for temporal variance of population size for the general case in which there are both sampling variances and covariances associated with estimates of population size. We illustrate the estimation approach with a series of population size estimates for black-capped chickadees (Parus atricapillus) wintering in a Connecticut study area and with a series of population size estimates for breeding populations of ducks in southwestern Manitoba.

  16. Micro-PIXE on thin plant tissue samples in frozen hydrated state: A novel addition to JSI nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we completed a construction of a cryostat at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe enabling us to analyze various types of biological samples in frozen hydrated state using micro-PIXE/STIM/RBS. Sample load-lock system was added to our existing setup to enable us to quickly insert a sample holder with frozen hydrated tissue samples onto a cold goniometer head cooled with liquid nitrogen inside the measuring chamber. Cryotome-cut slices of frozen hydrated plant samples were mounted between two thin silicon nitride foils and then attached to the sample holder. Sufficient thermal contact between silicon nitride foils and sample holder must be achieved, as well as between the sample holder and the cold goniometer head inside the measuring chamber to prevent melting of the samples. Matrix composition of frozen hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Thinning of the sample as well as water evaporation during high vacuum and proton beam exposure was inspected by the measurements with RBS and STIM method simultaneously with micro-PIXE. For first measuring attempts a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping was used with proton beam cross section of 1.2 × 1.2 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The temperature of the cold goniometer head was kept below 130 K throughout the entire proton beam exposure. First measurements of thin plant tissue samples in frozen hydrated state show minute sample degradation during the 10 h period of micro-PIXE measurements

  17. ☆Comparing the proteome of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue samples

    OpenAIRE

    Tue Bjerg Bennike; Kenneth Kastaniegaard; Simona Padurariu; Michael Gaihede; Svend Birkelund; Vibeke Andersen; Allan Stensballe

    2016-01-01

    Large biobanks exist worldwide containing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and samples stored in RNAlater. However, the impact of tissue preservation on the result of a quantative proteome analysis remains poorly described. Human colon mucosal biopsies were extracted from the sigmoideum and either immediately frozen, stabilized in RNAlater, or stabilized by formalin-fixation. In one set of biopsies, formalin stabilization was delayed for 30 min. The protein content of the samples ...

  18. Estimate of beta and gamma contamination in vegetable and animal biologic samples using GM detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the use of a large area Geiger-Mueller Detector (GMD) with aluminium window of 50 mm thickness (3,4 mg/cm2) in a measuring chain in order to estimate the beta and gamma contamination of biologic samples. The technical data for GMD are: - window area for gamma radiation: 300 cm2; - grid transmission: 80%; - operating voltage: 1100 - 1300 V; - minimum detectable beta energy: 125 keV; - dead time: 250 ms; - background (shielded with 100 mm Pb + 1 mm Cu): 6 pulses/s; - service life: 5 x 108 counts. Using this GMD together with a set of large area beta standard sources and a set of point gamma sources we could estimate beta and gamma contamination in the energy range 125 keV - 2.5 MeV for biologic samples. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of analytical methods for bioconcentratable contaminants in effluent, sediment, and tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a study sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute, effluent, sediment, and tissue samples were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for bioconcentratable contaminants following EPA draft methods as part of a round-robin intercalibration exercise. In addition, three petroleum industry treated effluents representing marketing terminal, refinery, and produced water effluents were analyzed using the EPA effluent method and two modified methods that included alternative extract cleanup procedures. For all three methods, recoveries of surrogate compounds spiked prior to extraction were generally low, suggesting a need to reduce/eliminate some of the procedures that contribute analyte losses. The EPA draft method for effluents and sediments contains an acid cleanup procedure that appears responsible for consistent losses of 5- and 6-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Two alternative cleanup procedures were evaluated for the effluent method, one using alumina column chromatography and the other using normal-phase silica column automated HPLC. Both alternative cleanup methods proved better suited than the acid cleanup procedure for effluents containing PAHs. Additional procedural modifications to the draft methods are recommended

  20. Normalization of gene expression measurement of tissue samples obtained by transurethral resection of bladder tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop LA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura A Pop,1,* Valentina Pileczki,1,2,* Roxana M Cojocneanu-Petric,1 Bogdan Petrut,3,4 Cornelia Braicu,1 Ancuta M Jurj,1 Rares Buiga,5 Patriciu Achimas-Cadariu,6,7 Ioana Berindan-Neagoe1,8 1The Research Center for Functional Genomics, Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 2Department of Analytical Chemistry, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 3Department of Surgery II – Urology, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 4Department of Urology, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 5Department of Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof. Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 6Department of Surgery, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 7Department of Surgical Oncology and Gynecological Oncology, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 8Department of Functional Genomics and Experimental Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Sample processing is a crucial step for all types of genomic studies. A major challenge for researchers is to understand and predict how RNA quality affects the identification of transcriptional differences (by introducing either false-positive or false-negative errors. Nanotechnologies help improve the quality and quantity control for gene expression studies. Patients and methods: The study was performed on 14 tumor and matched normal pairs of tissue from patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas. We assessed the RNA quantity by using the NanoDrop spectrophotometer and the quality by nano-microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology provided by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. We evaluated the amplification status of three

  1. TREM2-transduced myeloid precursors mediate nervous tissue debris clearance and facilitate recovery in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Takahashi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In multiple sclerosis, inflammation can successfully be prevented, while promoting repair is still a major challenge. Microglial cells, the resident phagocytes of the central nervous system (CNS, are hematopoietic-derived myeloid cells and express the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2, an innate immune receptor. Myeloid cells are an accessible source for ex vivo gene therapy. We investigated whether myeloid precursor cells genetically modified to express TREM2 affect the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: EAE was induced in mice by immunization with a myelin autoantigen. Intravenous application of TREM2-transduced bone marrow-derived myeloid precursor cells at the EAE peak led to an amelioration of clinical symptoms, reduction in axonal damage, and prevention of further demyelination. TREM2-transduced myeloid cells applied intravenously migrated into the inflammatory spinal cord lesions of EAE-diseased mice, showed increased lysosomal and phagocytic activity, cleared degenerated myelin, and created an anti-inflammatory cytokine milieu within the CNS. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenously applied bone marrow-derived and TREM2-tranduced myeloid precursor cells limit tissue destruction and facilitate repair within the murine CNS by clearance of cellular debris during EAE. TREM2 is a new attractive target for promotion of repair and resolution of inflammation in multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory diseases.

  2. Collagen gel contraction as a measure of fibroblast function in an animal model of subsynovial connective tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R; Gingery, Anne; Larson, Dirk R; Passe, Sandra M; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a peripheral neuropathy characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissues (SSCT). A rabbit model of CTS was developed to test the hypothesis that SSCT fibrosis causes the neuropathy. We used a cell-seeded collagen-gel contraction model to characterize the fibrosis in this model in terms of cellular mechanics, specifically to compare the ability of SSCT cells from the rabbit model and normal rabbits to contract the gel, and to assess the effect of transforming growth factor-β1,which is upregulated in CTS, on these cells. SSCT fibrosis was induced in six retired breeder female rabbits which were sacrificed at 6 weeks (N = 3) and 12 weeks (n = 3). An additional two rabbits served as controls. SSCT was harvested according to a standard protocol. Gels seeded with SSCT cells from rabbits sacrificed at 6 weeks had significantly higher tensile strength (p < 0.001) and Young's modulus (p < 0.001) than gels seeded with cells from rabbits sacrificed at 12 weeks or control animals. TGF-β1 significantly increased the decay time constant (p < 0.001), tensile strength (p < 0.001), and Young's modulus (p < 0.001) regardless of the cell source. This model may be useful in screening therapeutic agents that may block SSCT fibrosis, identifying possible candidates for CTS treatment. PMID:25626430

  3. Direct and rapid detection by PCR of Erysipelothrix sp. DNAs prepared from bacterial strains and animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, K; Makino, S; Ikeda, T; Takada, N; Nakashiro, A; Nakanishi, K; Oguma, K; Katoh, Y; Sunagawa, H; Ohyama, T

    1999-12-01

    A PCR method for rapid screening of Erysipelothrix spp. in the slaughterhouse was carried out by using four species-specific sets of oligonucleotide primers after initial amplification with the primer set MO101-MO102, which amplifies the 16S rRNA sequences of all four Erysipelothrix species. The DNA sequences coding for the rRNA gene cluster, including 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and the noncoding region downstream of 5S rRNA, were determined in order to design primers for the species-specific PCR detection system. The homology among the 4.5-kb DNA sequences of the rRNA genes of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serovar 2 (DNA Data Bank of Japan accession no. AB019247), E. tonsillarum serovar 7 (accession no. AB019248), E. rhusiopathiae serovar 13 (accession no. AB019249), and E. rhusiopathiae serovar 18 (accession no. AB019250) ranged from 96.0 to 98.4%. The PCR amplifications were specific and were able to distinguish the DNAs from each of the four Erysipelothrix species. The results of PCR tests performed directly with tissue specimens from diseased animals were compared with the results of cultivation tests, and the PCR tests were completed within 5 h. The test with this species-specific system based on PCR amplification with the DNA sequences coding for the rRNA gene cluster was an accurate, easy-to-read screening method for rapid diagnosis of Erysipelothrix sp. infection in the slaughterhouse. PMID:10565937

  4. Direct and Rapid Detection by PCR of Erysipelothrix sp. DNAs Prepared from Bacterial Strains and Animal Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshi, Kouichi; Makino, Souichi; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Takada, Noriko; Nakashiro, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Kazunori; Oguma, Keiji; Katoh, Yoshinobu; Sunagawa, Hiroyuki; Ohyama, Tohru

    1999-01-01

    A PCR method for rapid screening of Erysipelothrix spp. in the slaughterhouse was carried out by using four species-specific sets of oligonucleotide primers after initial amplification with the primer set MO101-MO102, which amplifies the 16S rRNA sequences of all four Erysipelothrix species. The DNA sequences coding for the rRNA gene cluster, including 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and the noncoding region downstream of 5S rRNA, were determined in order to design primers for the species-specific PCR detection system. The homology among the 4.5-kb DNA sequences of the rRNA genes of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serovar 2 (DNA Data Bank of Japan accession no. AB019247), E. tonsillarum serovar 7 (accession no. AB019248), E. rhusiopathiae serovar 13 (accession no. AB019249), and E. rhusiopathiae serovar 18 (accession no. AB019250) ranged from 96.0 to 98.4%. The PCR amplifications were specific and were able to distinguish the DNAs from each of the four Erysipelothrix species. The results of PCR tests performed directly with tissue specimens from diseased animals were compared with the results of cultivation tests, and the PCR tests were completed within 5 h. The test with this species-specific system based on PCR amplification with the DNA sequences coding for the rRNA gene cluster was an accurate, easy-to-read screening method for rapid diagnosis of Erysipelothrix sp. infection in the slaughterhouse. PMID:10565937

  5. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M

    2016-08-01

    Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples.Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland-Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers.Although the Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs.Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder urothelial carcinoma obtained from TMA-based samples can be susceptible to systematic bias, and the lack

  6. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P.; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples. Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland–Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers. Although the Bland–Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs. Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder

  7. The BUME method: a new rapid and simple chloroform-free method for total lipid extraction of animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Lars; Forsberg, Gun-Britt; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    In this study we present a simple and rapid method for tissue lipid extraction. Snap-frozen tissue (15–150 mg) is collected in 2 ml homogenization tubes. 500 μl BUME mixture (butanol:methanol [3:1]) is added and automated homogenization of up to 24 frozen samples at a time in less than 60 seconds is performed, followed by a 5-minute single-phase extraction. After the addition of 500 μl heptane:ethyl acetate (3:1) and 500 μl 1% acetic acid a 5-minute two-phase extraction is performed. Lipids are recovered from the upper phase by automated liquid handling using a standard 96-tip robot. A second two-phase extraction is performed using 500 μl heptane:ethyl acetate (3:1). Validation of the method showed that the extraction recoveries for the investigated lipids, which included sterols, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids were similar or better than for the Folch method. We also applied the method for lipid extraction of liver and heart and compared the lipid species profiles with profiles generated after Folch and MTBE extraction. We conclude that the BUME method is superior to the Folch method in terms of simplicity, through-put, automation, solvent consumption, economy, health and environment yet delivering lipid recoveries fully comparable to or better than the Folch method.

  8. The BUME method: a new rapid and simple chloroform-free method for total lipid extraction of animal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Lars; Forsberg, Gun-Britt; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a simple and rapid method for tissue lipid extraction. Snap-frozen tissue (15-150 mg) is collected in 2 ml homogenization tubes. 500 μl BUME mixture (butanol:methanol [3:1]) is added and automated homogenization of up to 24 frozen samples at a time in less than 60 seconds is performed, followed by a 5-minute single-phase extraction. After the addition of 500 μl heptane:ethyl acetate (3:1) and 500 μl 1% acetic acid a 5-minute two-phase extraction is performed. Lipids are recovered from the upper phase by automated liquid handling using a standard 96-tip robot. A second two-phase extraction is performed using 500 μl heptane:ethyl acetate (3:1). Validation of the method showed that the extraction recoveries for the investigated lipids, which included sterols, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids were similar or better than for the Folch method. We also applied the method for lipid extraction of liver and heart and compared the lipid species profiles with profiles generated after Folch and MTBE extraction. We conclude that the BUME method is superior to the Folch method in terms of simplicity, through-put, automation, solvent consumption, economy, health and environment yet delivering lipid recoveries fully comparable to or better than the Folch method. PMID:27282822

  9. Penetration of Laser Light at 808 and 980 nm in Bovine Tissue Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Donald E.; Hudson, Doreen O.; Wininger, James M.; Richardson, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the penetration of 808 and 980 nm laser light through bovine tissue samples 18–95 mm thick. Background data: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is frequently used to treat musculoskeletal pathologies. Some of the therapeutic targets are several centimeters deep. Methods: Laser light at 808 and 980 nm (1 W/cm2) was projected through bovine tissue samples ranging in thickness from 18 to 95 mm. Power density measurements were taken for each wavelen...

  10. Deuterium MR spectroscopy at 4.7 T. Quantification of tumour and subcutaneous tissue blood flow in animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirestam, R; Larsen, V.A.; Stubgaard, M;

    1995-01-01

    Deuterium MR spectroscopy was used for the determination of tissue blood flow (TBF). The tracer D2O was injected into the tissue of interest, and tracer washout was followed using a 4.7 T spectroscopy/imaging unit. Normal subcutaneous tissue in rats was studied, as well as tissue influenced by...

  11. Quantitative analysis of penicillins in porcine tissues, milk and animal feed using derivatisation with piperidine and stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holthoon, van F.L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bennekom, van E.O.; Heskamp, H.H.; Zuidema, T.; Rhijn, van J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Penicillins are used universally in both human and veterinary medicine. The European Union (EU) has established maximum residue levels (MRLs) for most ß-lactam antibiotics in milk and animal tissues and included them in the National Residue Monitoring Programs. In this study, a novel method is descr

  12. A pilot study of sampling subcutaneous adipose tissue to examine biomarkers of cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Kristin L.; Makar, Karen W.; Kratz, Mario; Foster-Schubert, Karen E.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of adipose tissue biology may provide important insight into mechanistic links for the observed association between higher body fat and risk of several types of cancer, in particular colorectal and breast cancer. We tested two different methods of obtaining adipose tissue from healthy individuals.

  13. HPLC Measurement of the DNA Oxidation Biomarker, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, in Cultured Cells and Animal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Kennedy, Dean A; Gagné, Remi; White, Taryn; Long, Alexandra S; Yauk, Carole L; White, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with many physiological and pathological processes, as well as xenobiotic metabolism, leading to the oxidation of biomacromolecules, including DNA. Therefore, efficient detection of DNA oxidation is important for a variety of research disciplines, including medicine and toxicology. A common biomarker of oxidatively damaged DNA is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo; often erroneously referred to as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dGuo or 8-oxo-dG)). Several protocols for 8-oxo-dGuo measurement by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED) have been described. However, these were mainly applied to purified DNA treated with pro-oxidants. In addition, due to methodological differences between laboratories, mainly due to differences in analytical equipment, the adoption of published methods for detection of 8-oxo-dGuo by HPLC-ED requires careful optimization by each laboratory. A comprehensive protocol, describing such an optimization process, is lacking. Here, a detailed protocol is described for the detection of 8-oxo-dGuo by HPLC-ED, in DNA from cultured cells or animal tissues. It illustrates how DNA sample preparation can be easily and rapidly optimized to minimize undesirable DNA oxidation that can occur during sample preparation. This protocol shows how to detect 8-oxo-dGuo in cultured human alveolar adenocarcinoma cells (i.e., A549 cells) treated with the oxidizing agent KBrO3, and from the spleen of mice exposed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC, formerly known as dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, DalP). Overall, this work illustrates how an HPLC-ED methodology can be readily optimized for the detection of 8-oxo-dGuo in biological samples. PMID:26273842

  14. Development and application of specific cytokine assays in tissue samples from a bottlenose dolphin with hyperinsulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia) , chronic = inflamma...

  15. Plasma disposition and tissue depletion of difloxacin and its metabolite sarafloxacin in the food producing animals, chickens for fattening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadón, Arturo; Suárez, Frank H; Martínez, María A; Castellano, Víctor; Martínez, Marta; Ares, Irma; Ramos, Eva; Gamboa, Felipe; Martínez-Larrañaga, María R

    2011-02-01

    Chickens were used to investigate plasma disposition of difloxacin after single intravenous (IV) and oral dose (10 mg/kg body weight (BW)) and to study residue depletion of difloxacin and its major metabolite sarafloxacin after multiple oral doses (10 mg difloxacin/kg BW, daily for 5 days). Plasma and tissue samples were analyzed using a HPLC method. After IV and oral administration, plasma drug concentration-time curves were best described by a two-compartment open model. Mean (± SD) elimination half-lives (t(½)β) of difloxacin were 9.53±1.00 and 12.23±1.81 h after IV and oral administration. Maximum plasma concentration was 2.34±0.50 μg/ml and interval from oral administration until maximal concentration was 1.34±0.03 h. Oral bioavailability was found to be 68.89±15.21%. Difloxacin was converted to sarafloxacin. After multiple oral dose (10mg difloxacin/kg BW, daily for 5 days), mean kidney, liver, muscle and skin + fat tissue concentrations of difloxacin and sarafloxacin ranging between 604.8±132.5 and 368.1±52.5 μg/kg and 136.4±18.3 and 10.4±1.2 μg/kg, respectively, were measured 1 day after administration of the final dose of difloxacin. A withdrawal time of 5 days was necessary to ensure that the residues of difloxacin were less than the maximal residue limits (MRL) or tolerance established by the European Union. PMID:21108984

  16. Effects of Fixation and Storage of Human Tissue Samples on Nucleic Acid Preservation

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Soo Kyung; Im, Joon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Han, Nayoung; Nam, Kyung Han; Seo, An Na; Lee, Hye Seung

    2014-01-01

    Background Because of recent advances in the molecular diagnosis of cancer patients, tissue quality has become more important in daily practice. Methods To evaluate the effects of fixative, duration of fixation, decalcification, and storage periods on nucleic acid integrity, DNA and RNA were extracted from gastrointestinal cancer tissue. The yield and purity were analyzed, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; 60 bp), β-actin (148 bp), and hu...

  17. Development and application of specific cytokine assays in tissue samples from a bottlenose dolphin with hyperinsulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RandyESacco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year-old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, chronic inflammation (white blood cell count greater than 12,000 cells/μL, and mild fatty liver disease was evaluated for elevated pro-inflammatory mediators. Cytokine mRNA expression in postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue, as determined by real-time PCR, included an array of cytokines: TGF-β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13, and IL-18. Values from this dolphin were compared to a younger reference dolphin with no known chronic metabolic perturbations or inflammation. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-4 were higher in the case dolphin's liver compared to that of the reference dolphin. In the case dolphin's spleen, IL-10 and IFN-γ mRNA was upregulated while IL-4 was less than reference dolphin. IL-18 and IL-13 were upregulated in both tissues. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC utilized the following antibodies: anti-porcine IL-6, anti-bovine IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10, anti-human TGF-β, anti-ovine IL-1β, and anti-dolphin IL-8. Fluorescent IHC in spleen from the case dolphin revealed staining of IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and TGF-β throughout the tissue. IL-10 and IFN-γ were seen to predominate in areas surrounding the follicles of splenic tissue. This is the first characterization of cytokine levels in dolphin hepatic and splenic tissue. While there are limitations to a case study, this report of inflammatory biomarkers in tissues of a dolphin with insulin resistance and fatty liver disease are similar to those observed in human patients.

  18. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  19. A lab-on-a-chip system integrating tissue sample preparation and multiplex RT-qPCR for gene expression analysis in point-of-care hepatotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geok Soon; Chang, Joseph S; Lei, Zhang; Wu, Ruige; Wang, Zhiping; Cui, Kemi; Wong, Stephen

    2015-10-21

    A truly practical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system for point-of-care testing (POCT) hepatotoxicity assessment necessitates the embodiment of full-automation, ease-of-use and "sample-in-answer-out" diagnostic capabilities. To date, the reported microfluidic devices for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment remain rudimentary as they largely embody only semi-quantitative or single sample/gene detection capabilities. In this paper, we describe, for the first time, an integrated LOC system that is somewhat close to a practical POCT hepatotoxicity assessment device - it embodies both tissue sample preparation and multiplex real-time RT-PCR. It features semi-automation, is relatively easy to use, and has "sample-in-answer-out" capabilities for multiplex gene expression analysis. Our tissue sample preparation module incorporating both a microhomogenizer and surface-treated paramagnetic microbeads yielded high purity mRNA extracts, considerably better than manual means of extraction. A primer preloading surface treatment procedure and the single-loading inlet on our multiplex real-time RT-PCR module simplify off-chip handling procedures for ease-of-use. To demonstrate the efficacy of our LOC system for POCT hepatotoxicity assessment, we perform a preclinical animal study with the administration of cyclophosphamide, followed by gene expression analysis of two critical protein biomarkers for liver function tests, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT). Our experimental results depict normalized fold changes of 1.62 and 1.31 for AST and ALT, respectively, illustrating up-regulations in their expression levels and hence validating their selection as critical genes of interest. In short, we illustrate the feasibility of multiplex gene expression analysis in an integrated LOC system as a viable POCT means for hepatotoxicity assessment. PMID:26329655

  20. Probing focal cortical dysplasia in formalin fixed samples using tissue optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Suresh; Cicchi, Riccardo; Giordano, Flavio; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Conti, Valerio; Guerrini, Renzo; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2016-03-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of most common causes of intractable epilepsy in pediatric population and these are often insensitive to anti-epileptic drugs. FCD is characterized by a disarray in localized regions of the cerebral cortex and abnormal neurons which results them to misfire with incorrect signals. Resective neurosurgery to remove or disconnect the affected parts from the rest of the brain seems to be a viable option to treat FCD. Before neurosurgery the subject could undergo imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scans. On the downside FCD could be elusive in MRI images and may be practically invisible in CT scans. Furthermore, unnecessary removal of normal tissues is to be taken into consideration as this could lead to neurological defects. In this context, optical spectroscopy have been widely investigated as an alternative technique for the detection of abnormal tissues in different organ sites. Disease progression is accompanied by a number of architectural, biochemical and morphological changes. These variations are reflected in the spectral intensity and line shape. Here, in this proof of concept study we propose to investigate the application of tissue optical spectroscopy based on fluorescence excitation at two wavelength 378 and 445 nm coupled along with Raman spectroscopy for the detection of FCD on formalin fixed tissue specimens from pediatric subjects. For fluorescence at both the excitation wavelengths FCD showed a decreased intensity at longer wavelength when compared to normal tissues. Also, differences exist in the Raman spectral profiles of normal and FCD.

  1. Determination of coumarin anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography. II. fluorescence detection using ion-pair chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K

    1983-11-18

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of warfarin, coumatetralyl, bromadiolone, difenacoum and brodifacoum in animal tissues using fluorescence detection. Ion-pair chromatography, with the tetrabutylammmonium ion as counter-ion, was used to take full advantage of their native fluorescence. Detection limits in liver tissue after gel permeation clean-up were 0.002 mg kg-1 for coumatetralyl, difenacoum and bromdifacoum, 0.008 mg kg-1 for bromadiolone, and 0.01 mg kg-1 for warfarin. PMID:6655020

  2. The focus on sample quality: Influence of colon tissue collection on reliability of qPCR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenkova, Vlasta; Slyskova, Jana; Novosadova, Vendula; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Langerova, Lucie; Bjorkman, Jens; Vycital, Ondrej; Liska, Vaclav; Levy, Miroslav; Veskrna, Karel; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Kubista, Mikael; Verderio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Successful molecular analyses of human solid tissues require intact biological material with well-preserved nucleic acids, proteins, and other cell structures. Pre-analytical handling, comprising of the collection of material at the operating theatre, is among the first critical steps that influence sample quality. The aim of this study was to compare the experimental outcomes obtained from samples collected and stored by the conventional means of snap freezing and by PAXgene Tissue System (Qiagen). These approaches were evaluated by measuring rRNA and mRNA integrity of the samples (RNA Quality Indicator and Differential Amplification Method) and by gene expression profiling. The collection procedures of the biological material were implemented in two hospitals during colon cancer surgery in order to identify the impact of the collection method on the experimental outcome. Our study shows that the pre-analytical sample handling has a significant effect on the quality of RNA and on the variability of qPCR data. PAXgene collection mode proved to be more easily implemented in the operating room and moreover the quality of RNA obtained from human colon tissues by this method is superior to the one obtained by snap freezing. PMID:27383461

  3. The focus on sample quality: Influence of colon tissue collection on reliability of qPCR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenkova, Vlasta; Slyskova, Jana; Novosadova, Vendula; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Langerova, Lucie; Bjorkman, Jens; Vycital, Ondrej; Liska, Vaclav; Levy, Miroslav; Veskrna, Karel; Vodicka, Pavel; Vodickova, Ludmila; Kubista, Mikael; Verderio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Successful molecular analyses of human solid tissues require intact biological material with well-preserved nucleic acids, proteins, and other cell structures. Pre-analytical handling, comprising of the collection of material at the operating theatre, is among the first critical steps that influence sample quality. The aim of this study was to compare the experimental outcomes obtained from samples collected and stored by the conventional means of snap freezing and by PAXgene Tissue System (Qiagen). These approaches were evaluated by measuring rRNA and mRNA integrity of the samples (RNA Quality Indicator and Differential Amplification Method) and by gene expression profiling. The collection procedures of the biological material were implemented in two hospitals during colon cancer surgery in order to identify the impact of the collection method on the experimental outcome. Our study shows that the pre-analytical sample handling has a significant effect on the quality of RNA and on the variability of qPCR data. PAXgene collection mode proved to be more easily implemented in the operating room and moreover the quality of RNA obtained from human colon tissues by this method is superior to the one obtained by snap freezing. PMID:27383461

  4. In vivo optical detection of pH in microscopic tissue samples of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Martan, Tomáš; Matějec, Vlastimil; Hoyerová, Klára; Kamínek, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 8 (2013), s. 4809-4815. ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/2139 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Ratiometric fluorescence * Arabidopsis thaliana * Tissue Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.736, year: 2013

  5. Cyromazine imprinted polymers for selective stir bar sorptive extraction of melamine in animal feed and milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenying; Gao, Mingqi; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar was prepared using a self-designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold and in situ polymerization, with cyromazine as the dummy template for the target melamine. The prepared MIP coated stir bar presented a uniform and porous surface as well as good chemical stability and selectivity for melamine. Based on it, a method of MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the quantification of melamine in food samples. Significant factors affecting the extraction efficiency of melamine by MIP-SBSE, such as the extraction solvent and time, stirring rate, desorption solvent and time, were investigated thoroughly. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of this method was evaluated. The detection limit of the developed method was 0.54 μg L(-1) for melamine with an enrichment factor of 42-fold and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.1% (c = 5 μg L(-1), n = 7), and the linear range was 2-200 μg L(-1). The established method was applied for the determination of melamine in a variety of real samples including cat food, dog food, chicken feed A, chicken feed B and milk powder, and the recoveries for melamine in the spiked samples were in the range of 76.2-98.2%, 80.0-85.5%, 89.5-113%, 85.0-95.5% and 65.0-111%, respectively. The proposed method presented a good specific recognition ability and matrix interference resistance, and was demonstrated to be effective and sensitive for the analysis of melamine in animal food and milk samples. PMID:25875596

  6. Development of a chromogenic in situ hybridization for Giardia duodenalis and its application in canine, feline, and porcine intestinal tissues samples

    OpenAIRE

    Weissenböck, Herbert; Ondrovics, Martina; Gurtner, Susanne; Schiessl, Peter; MOSTEGL, MEIKE M.; Richter, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a chromogenic in situ hybridization for the identification of Giardia duodenalis in paraffin-embedded tissue samples was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of the probe was validated by testing it on cultured reference samples of different assemblages of G. duodenalis as well as culture and tissue samples containing other protozoa and infectious agents. The probe gave a positive reaction with the Giardia samples and a negative reaction with all other samples. Fur...

  7. Simultaneous Determination of 30 Trace Elements in Cancerous and Noncancerous Human Tissue Samples with Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following trace elements were quantitatively determined by gamma-ray spectrometry in T samples of non-cancerous and 5 samples of cancerous human tissue: P, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, La, Au, and Hg. In some of the samples the following elements were qualitatively determined: Ti+Sc, Ga, Sr, In, Ba, Ce, Hf, Os, Pt, and U. Most of the trace elements were found to be present in much higher concentrations in the non-cancerous than in the corresponding cancerous liver samples. In a typical run one sample each of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue was irradiated together with standards of the elements to be determined in a thermal flux of 2.1013 n/cm2/sec. for 24 hours. The radioactive trace elements were separated into 16, and in some cases 18, groups by means of a chemical group separation method. Subsequently, the gamma spectrometric measurements were performed. Two persons can manage the chemical separations and measure the different activities from a run in 1,5 days. A new method of comparing unknown samples with standards was developed

  8. Quantification of Human and Animal Viruses to Differentiate the Origin of the Fecal Contamination Present in Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many different viruses are excreted by humans and animals and are frequently detected in fecal contaminated waters causing public health concerns. Classical bacterial indicator such as E. coli and enterococci could fail to predict the risk for waterborne pathogens such as viruses. Moreover, the presence and levels of bacterial indicators do not always correlate with the presence and concentration of viruses, especially when these indicators are present in low concentrations. Our research group has proposed new viral indicators and methodologies for determining the presence of fecal pollution in environmental samples as well as for tracing the origin of this fecal contamination (microbial source tracking. In this paper, we examine to what extent have these indicators been applied by the scientific community. Recently, quantitative assays for quantification of poultry and ovine viruses have also been described. Overall, quantification by qPCR of human adenoviruses and human polyomavirus JC, porcine adenoviruses, bovine polyomaviruses, chicken/turkey parvoviruses, and ovine polyomaviruses is suggested as a toolbox for the identification of human, porcine, bovine, poultry, and ovine fecal pollution in environmental samples.

  9. Possible additional exposure to dioxin and dioxin-like compounds from waste incineration. Biomonitoring using human milk and animal samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, C.; M. Fatima Reis; J. Pereira Miguel [Inst. of Preventive Medicine, Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal); Murk, A. [Wageningen Univ., Dept. of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    In the ambit of an Environmental Health Survey Program relative to a MSW facility, which has been operating near to Lisbon since 1999 a biomonitoring study using human breast milk has been performed. Specific aims of this study were: (1) determine whether living in the vicinity of the incinerator increases dioxin maternal body burden and accordingly perinatal (intra-uterus and lactacional) exposure; (2) to investigate the possibility of increased human exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds via locally produced food items from animal origin. Therefore, levels of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds have been determined in human milk samples collected in the vicinity of the incinerator and in a control area, for comparison. From the same areas, cow and sheep milk and eggs from free-range chickens have also been collected to get an indication of possible local additional exposure to air-borne dioxins via the food chain. Analyses of TCDD-equivalents (TEQs) were mainly performed with a reporter gene assay for dioxin-like activity, the DR-CALUX bioassay (Dioxin Responsive Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression).To determine congeners profile, some human milk samples have also been analysed for PCDD/Fs and relevant dioxin-like PCBs, by using high-resolution gas chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS). Both the Ethics Committees of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, and of the Maternity Dr. Alfredo da Costa have approved the study protocol.

  10. SELECTED RADIOISOTOPES IN ANIMAL TISSUES IN NEVADA: 90SR AND 137CS MEASUREMENTS FROM 1956 TO 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements have been made since 1956 of the strontium-90 and cesium-137 concentrations in tissues from cattle, deer, and bighorn sheep living on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Examination of this data cumulation indicates that the measured tissue concentrations reflect ...

  11. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Peter B Noël; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of ...

  12. 3-Dimensional quantitative detection of nanoparticle content in biological tissue samples after local cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, Helene, E-mail: helene.rahn@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [ENT-Department, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftungsprofessur), University Hospital Erlangen, Waldstraße 1, Erlangen 91054 (Germany); Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestraße 2-12, Berlin 10587 (Germany); Odenbach, Stefan [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden 01069 (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    X-ray computed tomography is nowadays used for a wide range of applications in medicine, science and technology. X-ray microcomputed tomography (XµCT) follows the same principles used for conventional medical CT scanners, but improves the spatial resolution to a few micrometers. We present an example of an application of X-ray microtomography, a study of 3-dimensional biodistribution, as along with the quantification of nanoparticle content in tumoral tissue after minimally invasive cancer therapy. One of these minimal invasive cancer treatments is magnetic drug targeting, where the magnetic nanoparticles are used as controllable drug carriers. The quantification is based on a calibration of the XµCT-equipment. The developed calibration procedure of the X-ray-µCT-equipment is based on a phantom system which allows the discrimination between the various gray values of the data set. These phantoms consist of a biological tissue substitute and magnetic nanoparticles. The phantoms have been studied with XµCT and have been examined magnetically. The obtained gray values and nanoparticle concentration lead to a calibration curve. This curve can be applied to tomographic data sets. Accordingly, this calibration enables a voxel-wise assignment of gray values in the digital tomographic data set to nanoparticle content. Thus, the calibration procedure enables a 3-dimensional study of nanoparticle distribution as well as concentration. - Highlights: • Local cancer treatments are promising in reducing negative side effects occurring during conventional chemotherapy. • The nanoparticles play an important role in delivering drugs to the designated area during local cancer treatments as magnetic drug targeting. • We study the nanoparticles distribution in tumor tissue after magnetic drug targeting with X-ray computed tomography. • We achieved a 3-dimensional quantification of the nanoparticles content in tumor tissue out of digital tomographic data.

  13. Genotyping of DNA Samples Isolated from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues Using Preamplification

    OpenAIRE

    Baak-Pablo, Renee; Dezentje, Vincent; GUCHELAAR, Henk-Jan; van der Straaten, Tahar

    2010-01-01

    DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is often fragmented and cross-linked and is therefore difficult to genotype. To enable this source of DNA for genotyping analysis using Taqman probes, we tested whether enrichment of the target genes would increase the amount of available DNA. For enrichment of the target genes, we used preamplification by means of diluted Taqman assays. To establish the appropriateness of preamplification, we used DNA extracted from paraffin-em...

  14. Development and Application of Specific Cytokine Assays in Tissue Samples from a Bottlenose Dolphin with Hyperinsulinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eberle, Kirsten C.; Waters, Theresa E.; Jensen, Eric D.; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year-old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia), chronic inflammation (white blood cell count greater than 12,000 cells/μL), and mild fatty liver disease was evaluated for elevated pro-inflammatory mediators. Cytokine mRNA expression in postmortem hepatic and s...

  15. Development and application of specific cytokine assays in tissue samples from a bottlenose dolphin with hyperinsulinemia

    OpenAIRE

    RandyESacco; EricJensen; StephanieVenn-Watson

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. Postmortem hepatic and splenic tissue from a 46-year-old geriatric male bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) with insulin resistance (chronic hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia), chronic inflammation (white blood cell count greater than 12,000 cells/μL), and mild fatty liver disease was evaluated for elevated pro-inflammatory mediators. Cytokine mRNA expression in postmortem hepatic and...

  16. Balanced-PCR amplification allows unbiased identification of genomic copy changes in minute cell and tissue samples

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gang; Brennan, Cameron; Rook, Martha; Wolfe, Jia Liu; Leo, Christopher; Chin, Lynda; Pan, Hongjie; Liu, Wei-Hua; Price, Brendan; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of genomic DNA derived from cells and fresh or fixed tissues often requires whole genome amplification prior to microarray screening. Technical hurdles to this process are the introduction of amplification bias and/or the inhibitory effects of formalin fixation on DNA amplification. Here we demonstrate a balanced-PCR procedure that allows unbiased amplification of genomic DNA from fresh or modestly degraded paraffin-embedded DNA samples. Following digestion and ligation of a target a...

  17. Evaluation of Streck Tissue Fixative, a Nonformalin Fixative for Preservation of Stool Samples and Subsequent Parasitologic Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Nace, Eva K.; Frank J Steurer; Eberhard, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a study to evaluate Streck tissue fixative (STF) as a substitute for formalin and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in fecal preservation. A comparison of formalin, PVA, (mercuric chloride based), and STF was done by aliquoting fecal samples into each fixative. Stool specimens were collected in Haiti, and parasites included Cyclospora cayetanensis, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Endolimax nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis...

  18. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples*

    OpenAIRE

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbias...

  19. Epo receptors are not detectable in primary human tumor tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Elliott

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo is a cytokine that binds and activates an Epo receptor (EpoR expressed on the surface of erythroid progenitor cells to promote erythropoiesis. While early studies suggested EpoR transcripts were expressed exclusively in the erythroid compartment, low-level EpoR transcripts were detected in nonhematopoietic tissues and tumor cell lines using sensitive RT-PCR methods. However due to the widespread use of nonspecific anti-EpoR antibodies there are conflicting data on EpoR protein expression. In tumor cell lines and normal human tissues examined with a specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody to human EpoR (A82, little/no EpoR protein was detected and it was not functional. In contrast, EpoR protein was reportedly detectable in a breast tumor cell line (MCF-7 and breast cancer tissues with an anti-EpoR polyclonal antibody (M-20, and functional responses to rHuEpo were reported with MCF-7 cells. In another study, a functional response was reported with the lung tumor cell line (NCI-H838 at physiological levels of rHuEpo. However, the specificity of M-20 is in question and the absence of appropriate negative controls raise questions about possible false-positive effects. Here we show that with A82, no EpoR protein was detectable in normal human and matching cancer tissues from breast, lung, colon, ovary and skin with little/no EpoR in MCF-7 and most other breast and lung tumor cell lines. We show further that M-20 provides false positive staining with tissues and it binds to a non-EpoR protein that migrates at the same size as EpoR with MCF-7 lysates. EpoR protein was detectable with NCI-H838 cells, but no rHuEpo-induced phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3, pS6RP or STAT5 was observed suggesting the EpoR was not functional. Taken together these results raise questions about the hypothesis that most tumors express high levels of functional EpoR protein.

  20. Transcriptional profiling and genotyping of degraded nucleic acids from autopsy tissue samples after prolonged formalin fixation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruelo, Antonio; El-Assar, Mariam; Lorente, José A; Nin, Nicolás; Peñuelas, Oscar; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Gonzalez, Constancio; Esteban, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Background: Samples used for genotyping and transcription studies are obtained and conserved in very specific conditions. The possibility to use autopsy tissue samples, which contain nucleic acids of very poor quality, would open new possibilities for genetic studies. Methods: We have used liver tissue samples from autopsy cases to (i) determine its quality; (ii) study gene expression of 13 genes involved in different cell processes, before and after cDNA pre-amplification (quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction); and (iii) analyze the presence of 2 common polymorphisms of relevance for illness (ACE I/D genotype by PCR amplification, and TNF-α promoter gene polymorphism, by DNA sequencing). Results: Samples were grouped according to different buffered formalin fixation times (group 1, <15 days; group 2, 60-90 days; group 3, 150-180 days; group 4, 240-270 days). Nucleic acids showed a time-dependent degradation. The expression of 13 genes could be studied in all cases from groups 1 and 2, only 7 from group 3 and none from group 4. cDNA preamplification allowed the study of all genes in all samples. DNA genotyping for ACE and TNF-α promoter region was possible in all cases. Conclusions: We conclude that nucleic acids extracted from autopsy specimens after prolonged periods of time in formalin were of sufficient quality to study gene expression and genotyping using currently available methodology and cDNA pre-amplification. PMID:21326810

  1. Preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the separation of tetracycline antibiotics from egg and tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ligang; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Qinglei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Hanqi; Ding, Lan

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared using hydrophobic Fe(3)O(4) magnetite as the magnetically susceptible component, oxytetracycline as template molecule, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and styrene and divinylbenzene as polymeric matrix components. The polymers were applied to the separation of tetracycline antibiotics from egg and tissue samples. The extraction and clean-up procedures were carried out in a single step by blending and stirring the sample, extraction solvent and polymers. The analytes can be transferred from the sample matrix to the polymers directly or through the extraction solvent as medium. When the extraction was complete, the polymers adsorbing the analytes were easily separated from the sample matrix by an adscititious magnet. The analytes eluted from the polymers were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recoveries ranging from 72.8% to 96.5% were obtained with relative standard deviations in the range of 2.9-12.3%. The limit of detection was less than 0.2 ng g(-1). The feasibility of this method was validated by analysis of incurred egg and tissue samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by the classical method in which solvent extraction, centrifugation, and subsequent clean-up and concentration by solid-phase extraction were applied. The proposed method reduced the complicacy of classical method and improved the reliability of method. PMID:19268956

  2. 牙周组织再生动物模型的研究进展%Animal models in periodontal tissue regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶成凤

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that causes destruction of the periodontal tissue, periodontal liga-ment is an important part of the periodontal tissue, the loss of periodontal tissue is the main cause of adult tooth loss, and how to terminate the lesions and regenerate the periodontal tissue is likely to be one of the new treatments for peri-odontitis. Animal model counts for much in the periodontal regeneration research, a review about animal model in the periodontal regeneration research and their characteristics will be present here.%牙周炎是以造成牙周组织破坏为特点的口腔疾病,牙周膜是口腔牙周组织重要的组成部分,牙周组织的丧失是成年人失牙的主要原因,如何有效地终止病变并再生牙周组织在将来有可能会成为牙周炎新的治疗方法之一。牙周组织的再生研究中,动物模型起到了非常重要的作用,本文对牙周组织再生研究中使用的动物及其特点做一综述。

  3. Determination of coumarin anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography. I. Fluorescence detection using post-column techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K

    1983-11-18

    A multi-residue method was developed for the determination of the rodenticides warfarin, coumatetralyl, bromadiolone, difenacoum and brodifacoum in animal tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Extracts were cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography on Bio-Beads SX-3 and residues determined by normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using post-column pH-switching, with chloroform -sec.-butylamine and borate buffer (pH 10.4) respectively, to maximise the native fluorimetric responses. Confirmation of identification was possible by re-chromatographing extracts in the absence of the post-column reagent. Chloroform-acetone (1:1) was significantly better than chloroform for the extraction of residues of these rodenticides from liver tissues. Recoveries from spiked liver tissue were generally greater than 90% at levels of 0.05-1 mg kg-1. Detection limits in animal tissues of 0.002 mg kg-1 for coumatetratyl, difenacoum and brodifacoum, 0.01 mg kg-1 for bromadiolone and 0.02 mg kg-1 for warfarin and could be routinely achieved. PMID:6655019

  4. Plastination of tissues and organs: interdisciplinary approach to replace laboratory animals that are in use for education and research

    OpenAIRE

    Ilieski Vlatko; Pendovski Lazo; Petkov Vladimir; Popovska-Percinic Florina; Mizrahi Rasela

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to apply the plastination as an alternative method for protection on animals that are used in education, experiments and research according the European Directive 86/609/EEC. A two years old female guinea pig is used as material. The dissection of muscles as well subcutaneous structures and organs from abdominal cavity is preformed immediately after the death of animal. The guinea pig is plastinated using the protocol for S10 plastination. The plastinated guinea pig ha...

  5. Comparing paraffined and deparaffinized breast cancer tissue samples and an analysis of Raman spectroscopy and infrared methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J.; Kaznowska, E.; Szmuc, K.; Zawlik, I.; Cholewa, M.; Heraud, P.; Cebulski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer makes up a quarter of all cancer in women, which is why research into new diagnostic methods and sample preparations need to be developed at an accelerated pace. Researchers are looking for diagnostic tools to detect when an individual has cancer cells and use that information to see what measurements and approaches can be used to take further diagnostic steps. The most common method of sample preparation is the imbibing of tumor tissue in paraffin, which can produce a background for spectroscopic measurements in the range of 500-3500 cm-1. In this study we demonstrated that proper preparation of paraffin-embedded specimens and the measurement methodology can eliminate paraffin vibration, as was done in the work Depciuch et al. 2015. Thanks to this spectroscopic technique there may become a reliable and accurate method of diagnosing breast cancer based on the evidence found from the prepared samples. The study compared the results obtained through Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) measurements of healthy and cancerous breast tissues that were either embedded in paraffin or deparaffinized. The resulting spectrum and accurate analysis led to the conclusion that the appropriate measurement of the background and the elimination of peaks from the paraffin had the greatest impact on the reliability of results. Furthermore, after the accurate, detailed studies FTIR and Raman spectroscopy on samples of breast tissue that were deparaffinized or embedded in paraffin, including a complete analysis of the peak after transformation Kramers-Kröning (KK), it was found that sample preparation did not affect the result obtained by measuring the reflectance in the mid-infrared range, and that this only had a minimal effect relating to the intensity obtained by the measurement of the Raman peak. Only in special cases, when Raman spectroscopic methods are used for research to find the peculiarities of the spectra, are deparaffinization recommended

  6. A low dimensional entropy-based descriptor of several tissues in skin cancer histopathology samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Pablo; Corredor, Germán.; García-Arteaga, Juan D.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The use of low-level visual features to assign high level labels in datasets of histopathology images is a possible solution to the problems derived from manual labeling by experts. However, in many cases, the visual cues are not enough. In this article we propose the use of features derived exclusively from the spatial distribution of the cell nuclei. These features are calculated using the weight of k-nn graphs constructed from the distances between cells. Results show that there are k values with enhanced discriminatory power, especially when comparing cancerous and non-cancerous tissue.

  7. Distribution of Caesium-137 in Samples Consisting of Soft Tissue, Bone and Bone Marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigations which were performed up to now on the distribution of-caesium-137 in the human organism could not explain exactly the distribution of the radiocaesium between bone and bone marrow. That is why a reliable estimation of the radiation burden of the skeleton caused by the incorporation of atmospheric caesium-137 is not given in the literature. Therefore, the concentration of caesium-137 in compact bones as well as in bone marrow was determined. Furthermore, the concentration of caesium-137 in the soft tissue of the same individuals was measured. (author)

  8. Clinical procedure for colon carcinoma tissue sampling directly affects the cancer marker-capacity of VEGF family members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mRNA levels of members of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor family (VEGF-A, -B, -C, -D, Placental Growth Factor/PlGF) have been investigated as tissue-based markers of colon cancer. These studies, which used specimens obtained by surgical resection or colonoscopic biopsy, yielded contradictory results. We studied the effect of the sampling method on the marker accuracy of VEGF family members. Comparative RT-qPCR analysis was performed on healthy colon and colon carcinoma samples obtained by biopsy (n = 38) or resection (n = 39) to measure mRNA expression levels of individual VEGF family members. mRNA levels of genes encoding the eicosanoid enzymes cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and of genes encoding the hypoxia markers glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) were included as markers for cellular stress and hypoxia. Expression levels of COX2, 5-LOX, GLUT-1 and CAIX revealed the occurrence in healthy colon resection samples of hypoxic cellular stress and a concurrent increment of basal expression levels of VEGF family members. This increment abolished differential expression of VEGF-B and VEGF-C in matched carcinoma resection samples and created a surgery-induced underexpression of VEGF-D. VEGF-A and PlGF showed strong overexpression in carcinoma samples regardless of the sampling method. Sampling-induced hypoxia in resection samples but not in biopsy samples affects the marker-reliability of VEGF family members. Therefore, biopsy samples provide a more accurate report on VEGF family mRNA levels. Furthermore, this limited expression analysis proposes VEGF-A and PlGF as reliable, sampling procedure insensitive mRNA-markers for molecular diagnosis of colon cancer

  9. Simulating an investigative study of clinical cancer samples: use of tissue slides and PCR-based promoter-hypermethylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Yuan Yuan; Chin, Cheen Fei; Yeong, Foong May

    2015-01-01

    Topics on the molecular basis underlying cancer are quite popular among students. Also, excellent textbooks abound that provide interesting materials for discussion during lectures and tutorials about major events leading to cancer formation and progression. However, much less is available for students to conduct experiments for the analysis of cancer samples in undergraduate modules where there is a limited time-frame. Given the difficulty of working with cancer samples and the scarcity of good samples even in the clinical laboratories, it is impossible to run large-class practicals using patients' samples. Here, we describe the use of tissue slides in combination with polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) as a means of simulating an investigative approach to supplement students' learning of clinical research. By using tissue slides for histo-pathological examinations and specific budding yeast genomic DNA and primers adapted to demonstrate methylation-specific PCR, we designed an inquiry-based lab session to simulate the clinical investigation of a cohort of biopsies that students could analyze in a one-session practical. PMID:25395208

  10. Whole-genome gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig April

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have developed a gene expression assay (Whole-Genome DASL, capable of generating whole-genome gene expression profiles from degraded samples such as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE specimens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated a similar level of sensitivity in gene detection between matched fresh-frozen (FF and FFPE samples, with the number and overlap of probes detected in the FFPE samples being approximately 88% and 95% of that in the corresponding FF samples, respectively; 74% of the differentially expressed probes overlapped between the FF and FFPE pairs. The WG-DASL assay is also able to detect 1.3-1.5 and 1.5-2 -fold changes in intact and FFPE samples, respectively. The dynamic range for the assay is approximately 3 logs. Comparing the WG-DASL assay with an in vitro transcription-based labeling method yielded fold-change correlations of R(2 approximately 0.83, while fold-change comparisons with quantitative RT-PCR assays yielded R(2 approximately 0.86 and R(2 approximately 0.55 for intact and FFPE samples, respectively. Additionally, the WG-DASL assay yielded high self-correlations (R(2>0.98 with low intact RNA inputs ranging from 1 ng to 100 ng; reproducible expression profiles were also obtained with 250 pg total RNA (R(2 approximately 0.92, with approximately 71% of the probes detected in 100 ng total RNA also detected at the 250 pg level. When FFPE samples were assayed, 1 ng total RNA yielded self-correlations of R(2 approximately 0.80, while still maintaining a correlation of R(2 approximately 0.75 with standard FFPE inputs (200 ng. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results show that WG-DASL assay provides a reliable platform for genome-wide expression profiling in archived materials. It also possesses utility within clinical settings where only limited quantities of samples may be available (e.g. microdissected material or when minimally invasive procedures are performed (e

  11. A Novel Method for Single Sample Multi-Axial Nanoindentation of Hydrated Heterogeneous Tissues Based on Testing Great White Shark Jaws

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, Toni L.; Philip Boughton; Eve Slavich; Stephen Wroe

    2013-01-01

    Nanomechanical testing methods that are suitable for a range of hydrated tissues are crucial for understanding biological systems. Nanoindentation of tissues can provide valuable insights into biology, tissue engineering and biomimetic design. However, testing hydrated biological samples still remains a significant challenge. Shark jaw cartilage is an ideal substrate for developing a method to test hydrated tissues because it is a unique heterogeneous composite of both mineralized (hard) and ...

  12. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-10-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  13. The presence of enterovirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus B19 in myocardial tissue samples from autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Hansen, Jakob; Nielsen, Lars Peter;

    2014-01-01

    adenovirus, enterovirus, and parvovirus B19 (PVB) in myocardial autopsy samples from myocarditis related deaths and in non-inflamed control hearts in an effort to clarify their significance as the causes of myocarditis in a forensic material. METHODS: We collected all autopsy cases diagnosed with myocarditis...

  14. Molecular Detection and Identification of Zoonotic Microspor-idia Spore in Fecal Samples of Some Animals with Close-Con-tact to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab ASKARI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microsporidia species are obligatory intracellular agents that can in­fect all major animal groups including mammals, birds, fishes and insects. Whereas world­wide human infection reports are increasing, the cognition of sources of infec­tion particularly zoonotic transmission could be helpful. We aimed to detect zoono­tic microsporidia spore in fecal samples from some animals with close – contact to human.Methods: Overall, 142 fecal samples were collected from animals with closed-con­tact to human, during 2012-2013. Trichrome – blue staining were performed and DNA was then extracted from samples, identified positive, microscopically. Nested PCR was also carried out with primers targeting SSU rRNA gene and PCR products were sequenced.Results: From 142 stool samples, microsporidia spores have been observed microscopi­cally in 15 (10.56% samples. En. cuniculi was found in the faces of 3 (15% small white mice and 1 (10% laboratory rabbits(totally 2.81%. Moreover, E. bieneusi was detected in 3 (10% samples of sheep, 2 (5.12% cattle, 1 (10% rabbit, 3 (11.53% cats and 2 (11.76% ownership dogs (totally 7.74%. Phylogenetic analysis showed interesting data. This is the first study in Iran, which identified E. bieneusi and En. Cuniculi in fecal samples of laboratory animals with close – contact to human as well as domesticated animal and analyzed them in phylogenetic tree. Conclusion: E. bieneusi is the most prevalent microsporidia species in animals. Our results can also alert us about potentially zoonotic transmission of microsporidiosis.

  15. 利用鞣制对动物组织的固定研究%Animal Tissue Fixation with Tanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史楷岐; 尹维刚; 李亚; 邵双喜; 韩瑾润

    2011-01-01

    Tissue fixatives and their fixation mechanisms were reviewed, and compared with tanning mechanism. It is concluded that tissue fixatives and tanning agents had same reactive function groups and reacting points. Therefore, it is feasible to fix tissue with tanning agents theoretically. Furthermore, tanning agent, phosphonium salts, was employed to rabbit tissue fixation. After 2 years, the fixed rabbit specimen was dissected and observed. It is clear that there was no rot and mildew and the morphological maintains was desirable. It is feasible to fix tissue with tanning agent practically.%综述了现有组织固定材料及其机理,并与皮革鞣制机理进行对比,得出两者具有相类似的活性基团,组织固定和皮革鞣制过程具有相同的反应点,利用皮革鞣剂固定动物组织理论可行;进一步利用鳞盐鞣剂对兔子进行固定、观察,固定后的兔组织形态保持良好,证明利用皮革鞣剂固定动物组织实践可行.

  16. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD in Renal Cell Carcinoma – Tissue Microarray of Human Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retnagowri Rajandram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of “inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase” (ICAD, an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05 as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01 compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  17. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO in rat peripheral tissues using small-animal PET with [18F]FEDAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) is widely expressed in peripheral tissues, including the heart, lung, and kidney. Our laboratory developed N-benzyl-N-methyl-2-[7,8-dihydro-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl) -8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl]acetamide ([18F]FEDAC) as a TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) ligand. Here, using small-animal PET with [18F]FEDAC, we performed TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. Methods: The in vivo distribution and kinetics of [18F]FEDAC were measured in rat peripheral tissues (heart, lung and kidney). Using the in vivo pseudo-equilibrium method, TSPO binding parameters [TSPO density (Bmax), dissociation constant (KD)] and receptor occupancy were estimated in these peripheral tissues. Results: [18F]FEDAC was highly distributed in the lung, heart and kidney, and these TSPO-enriched tissues could be clearly visualized. The kinetics of this radioligand in these tissues was rapid, which is suitable for the determination of in vivo TSPO binding parameters and receptor occupancy. The Bmax value of TSPO in the heart, lung, and kidney was 393, 141, and 158 pmol/ml, respectively. The KD value of the radioligand in the heart, lung, and kidney was 119, 36 and 123 nM, respectively. By pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864 (a TSPO ligand), about 90% of binding sites for TSPO in the heart and lung were occupied. In the kidney, the binding sites were completely occupied by 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864. Conclusions: [18F]FEDAC is a suitable PET ligand for TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. The utilization of [18F]FEDAC-PET and the pseudo-equilibrium method can contribute to the study of the TSPO function and evaluate the in vivo binding parameters and receptor occupancy of TSPO therapeutic compounds.

  18. Plastination of tissues and organs: interdisciplinary approach to replace laboratory animals that are in use for education and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilieski Vlatko

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to apply the plastination as an alternative method for protection on animals that are used in education, experiments and research according the European Directive 86/609/EEC. A two years old female guinea pig is used as material. The dissection of muscles as well subcutaneous structures and organs from abdominal cavity is preformed immediately after the death of animal. The guinea pig is plastinated using the protocol for S10 plastination. The plastinated guinea pig has firm consistention, it is dry on hand touch, oddorless and free of any chemical substances. The dissected skeletal muscle enable to learn their topography and easy to understand their function. Because of permanent preservation, the organs from abdominal cavity retain their topographical position enabling complete view of anatomical relationship of organs like stomach, spleen, pancreas and left kidney are, the mesenteries with apart of thin and large intestines, the relationship between the ovary and the horns of the uterus. According the results, the S10 plastination technique can be use for developing an anatomical model from one laboratory animal witch can be used for education process in anatomy. The method of plastination is an important tool allowing 3.R concept to be aplied and widely accepted since plastinated models can reduce using the laboratory animals for education and research purposes.

  19. Enhanced expression of polysialic acid correlates with malignant phenotype in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xiang; Zeng, Ying-Nan; He, Fa; Yang, Xiao-Min; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is highly expressed during embryonic development, but barely expressed during postnatal development, and may be 're-expressed' in cancer tissues. In this study, motility and migration assays were performed to compare the changes in cell behavior between non-malignant and maligant cells. Next, the expression levels of PSA were evaluated in 4 human and mouse normal breast or breast cancer (BC) cell lines using 1,2-diamino-4,5-methylenedioxybenzene-labeling HPLC technology, as well as in human clinical BC tissue samples. PSA expression was significantly higher in malignant cells (where it appeared to facilitate cell migration and motility) than in non-malignant cells. Enhanced PSA expression levels were also observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a leading cause of cancer cell metastasis, which was induced in the NMuMG and MCF10A cells by treatment with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). An increased PSA expression also correlated with the disease stage in the patients with BC (PPST) and polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII (STX), which are responsible for PSA synthesis, were differently expressed in the tested BC samples. However, PST, but not STX, was re-expressed in 14 out of 20 clinical BC samples. The findings of the present study indicate that the pathophysiology of BC involves the aberrant regulation of PSA expression and PST gene expression. PMID:26530860

  20. Whirling agitated single drop microextraction technique for the simultaneous analysis of Paraquat and Maneb in tissue samples of treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rupender; Jha, Rakesh R; Singh, Mahendra P; Patel, Devendra K

    2016-05-01

    A new microextraction technique, whirling agitated single drop microextraction, has been proposed for the simultaneous analysis of Paraquat and Maneb in tissue samples before liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. This technique is based on the idea that the escalatory motion of the sample solution along with the extraction solvent increases the movement of molecules into the extraction solvent. In this technique, a simple handheld rotator was utilized to rapidly agitate the biphasic extraction system for the instantaneous extraction of targeted analytes. After extraction, the extracted phase was directly solidified by cooling in crushed ice and easily collected using a micro-spatula. The method showed good performance by achieving sensitive detection limits at 4.81 ng g(-1) (Paraquat) and 9.12 ng g(-1) (Maneb). Mean recoveries and enrichment factors were obtained >91.21% and up to 114 that ensured the preconcentration capacity of the method. The method precision was verified by evaluating intraday variation (n = 10) ≤4.57 (Paraquat) and ≤4.68 (Maneb) in terms of percent relative standard deviation. Additionally, method efficacy was assured by obtaining very little matrix interferences (≤3.11%). Moreover, the method suitability was also checked with its application on tissue samples of intraperitoneally treated mice with Paraquat and Maneb. PMID:26970105

  1. Micro-scaled high-throughput digestion of plant tissue samples for multi-elemental analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husted Søren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative multi-elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrometry depends on a complete digestion of solid samples. However, fast and thorough sample digestion is a challenging analytical task which constitutes a bottleneck in modern multi-elemental analysis. Additional obstacles may be that sample quantities are limited and elemental concentrations low. In such cases, digestion in small volumes with minimum dilution and contamination is required in order to obtain high accuracy data. Results We have developed a micro-scaled microwave digestion procedure and optimized it for accurate elemental profiling of plant materials (1-20 mg dry weight. A commercially available 64-position rotor with 5 ml disposable glass vials, originally designed for microwave-based parallel organic synthesis, was used as a platform for the digestion. The novel micro-scaled method was successfully validated by the use of various certified reference materials (CRM with matrices rich in starch, lipid or protein. When the micro-scaled digestion procedure was applied on single rice grains or small batches of Arabidopsis seeds (1 mg, corresponding to approximately 50 seeds, the obtained elemental profiles closely matched those obtained by conventional analysis using digestion in large volume vessels. Accumulated elemental contents derived from separate analyses of rice grain fractions (aleurone, embryo and endosperm closely matched the total content obtained by analysis of the whole rice grain. Conclusion A high-throughput micro-scaled method has been developed which enables digestion of small quantities of plant samples for subsequent elemental profiling by ICP-spectrometry. The method constitutes a valuable tool for screening of mutants and transformants. In addition, the method facilitates studies of the distribution of essential trace elements between and within plant organs which is relevant for, e.g., breeding programmes aiming at

  2. Military ‘live tissue trauma training’ using animals in the US – its purpose, importance and commentary on military medcal research and the debate on use of animals in military training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Martinic

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant change in the types of injuries sustained on the modern battlefield due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs which are designed to cause severe penetrating injuries to limbs and torso, often resulting in massive haemorrhage in injured soldiers. Massive haemorrhage is the most common preventable cause of death for soldiers wounded in combat1. Hence life saving training techniques and practices are being used by US military medical personnel in an effort to reduce this incidence. ‘Live tissue trauma training’ (LTTT, or ‘combat medic training’2, as it is referred to in the US, involves the use of animals (mostly goats and pigs for the purposes of direct surgical intervention in which physicians and paramedical personnel (military and civilian obtain surgical skills by treating severe traumatic injuries. Once animals are deeply anaesthetized, wounds of the type army paramedics and doctors are likely to see in combat situations are inflicted. Such wounds are then appropriately treated in order to gain valuable ‘trauma care’ experience not likely to be offered in any other form. Upon completion of LTTT, animals are humanely euthanased without ever regaining consciousness. Despite the understandable highly emotive and sensitive nature of LTTT, by providing new combat medics with methods in how to manage critically-injured soldiers within the first few hours post-event, and where there is no local access to doctors or medical facilities, military personnel assert that such realistic training programs are necessary and have facilitated the saving of countless lives of soldiers who have sustained life-threatening injuries on the battlefield.2,7,8,9 In this ‘opinion’ article the author explains how and why animals are used for LTTT and in some areas of military medical research (MMR, as well as why he feels that the continued use of animals for LTTT is justified at this time. He also highlights

  3. Qualitative screening of veterinary anti-microbial agents in tissues, milk, and eggs of food-producing animals using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Yu, Jie; Tao, Yanfei; Pan, Yuanhu; Xie, Shuyu; Huang, Lingli; Peng, Dapeng; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-04-01

    A method for the analysis of 120 drugs in animal derived food was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These analytes belong to 12 families of veterinary anti-microbial agents (quinolones, macrolides, β-lactams, nitroimidazoles, sulfonamides, lincomycines, chloramphenicols, quinoxalines, tetracyclines, polypeptides, and antibacterial synergists) as well as other compounds not assigned to a particular drug family. The animal derived food samples include muscle and liver of swine, bovine, sheep, and chicken, as well as hen eggs and dairy milk. The sample preparation included ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) with acetonitrile-water and a final clean-up with auto solid-phase extraction (SPE) on HLB cartridges. The detection and quantification of 120 anti-microbial agents was performed using LC-MS/MS in positive and negative ion mode. The chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of all drugs in food-producing animals were 0.5-3.0μg/kg and 1.5-10.0μg/kg, respectively. The developed method was successfully utilized to monitor real samples, which demonstrated that it is a simple, fast, and robust method, and could be used as a regulatory to screen for the presence of residues from veterinary anti-microbial drugs in animal-derived foods. PMID:26950031

  4. Elements in autopsy liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit and Danes. V. Selenium measured by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Nils; Laursen, Jens; Byg, Keld-Erik; Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Mulvad, Gerd; Hansen, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    The content of selenium in normal liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit was measured and the results compared with those obtained in normal liver tissue samples from Danes. Normal liver tissue samples were obtained at autopsy from 50 Greenlandic Inuit (27 men, 23 women) with a median age of 61 years (range 23-83) and from 74 Danes (44 men, 30 women) with a median age of 60 years (range 15-87). Total liver selenium content was measured by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The content of selenium (median) was in Inuit 26.6 micromol/kg dry liver (5-95 percentile: 15.2-49.4) and in Danes 17.7 micromol/kg dry liver (5-95 percentile: < 3.8-36.5) (p < 0.0001). Liver selenium content displayed no significant gender difference, either in Inuit or Danes. In Inuit men, there was a negative correlation between liver selenium content and age (rs = -0.39, p < 0.05), whereas Danish men displayed a positive correlation between liver selenium content and age (rs = 0.37, p = 0.02). There was no correlation in Inuit or Danish women. In Inuit, the median hepatic selenium index (liver selenium content divided by age) was 0.48 and in Danes 0.33 (p = 0.001). There was an inverse correlation between hepatic selenium index and age both in Inuit (rs = -0.77, p < 0.0001) and in Danes (rs = -0.47, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, Inuit had a higher liver content of selenium and a higher hepatic selenium index compared with Danes. The more favourable selenium status is due to a higher nutritional selenium intake with fish and meat from sea mammals. PMID:15139392

  5. Development of triplex real-time PCR and detection of Toxoplasma gondii DNA in infected mice tissues and spiked human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahumatullah, A; Khoo, B Y; Noordin, R

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important pathogen in veterinary and human medicine. In this study, a new multiplex TaqMan real-time PCR for detection of T. gondii DNA was developed. This assay consisted of new sets of primers and probes which targeted B1 gene and ITS-1 region of T. gondii, with Vibrio cholera gene as internal control. The B1 gene primers were designed to detect T. gondii RH strain, while the ITS-1 region primers detected most T. gondii strains. Specificity test using common protozoal and bacterial DNA revealed that the assay was very specific to T. gondii. Standard curves constructed using human body fluids spiked with T. gondii (RH and ME49 strains) showed that the sensitivity of the assay was one parasite, with R² value of 0.975 to 0.999 and efficiency of 97% to 99% for all types of samples. The assay performed on DNA extracted from tissues of mice infected with T. gondii showed that liver contained the highest parasite load for both strains of T. gondii. The multiplex real-time PCR developed in this study would be potentially useful for detection of T. gondii in human and animal samples. PMID:26691266

  6. Experimental Approach to Evaluate the 11C Perfusion and Diffusion in Small Animal Tissues for HadronPET Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immaculada Martínez-Rovira

    Full Text Available The development of a reliable dose monitoring system in hadron therapy is essential in order to control the treatment plan delivery. Positron Emission Tomography (PET is the only method used in clinics nowadays for quality assurance. However, the accuracy of this method is limited by the loss of signal due to the biological washout processes. Up to the moment, very few studies measured the washout processes and there is no database of washout data as a function of the tissue and radioisotope. One of the main difficulties is related to the complexity of such measurements, along with the limited time slots available in hadron therapy facilities. Thus, in this work, we proposed an alternative in vivo methodology for the measurement and modeling of the biological washout parameters without any radiative devices. It consists in the implementation of a point-like radioisotope source by direct injection on the tissues of interest and its measurement by means of high-resolution preclinical PET systems. In particular, the washout of 11C carbonate radioisotopes was assessed, considering that 11C is is the most abundant β+ emitter produced by carbon beams. 11C washout measurements were performed in several tissues of interest (brain, muscle and 9L tumor xenograf in rodents (Wistar rat. Results show that the methodology presented is sensitive to the washout variations depending on the selected tissue. Finally, a first qualitative correlation between 11C tumor washout properties and tumor metabolism (via 18F-FDG tracer uptake was found.

  7. Optimization of immunohistochemical and fluorescent antibody techniques for localization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IF) techniques were optimized for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) structural and non-structural proteins in frozen and paraformaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded (PFPE) tissues of bovine and porcine origin. Immunohistochemical local...

  8. Simultaneous extraction and clean-up of polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites from small tissue samples using pressurized liquid extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Zhao, Hongxia; Norstrom, Karin; Li, Xueshu; HORNBUCKLE, KERI C.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    A pressurized liquid extraction-based method for the simultaneous extraction and in situ clean-up of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated (OH)-PCBs and methylsulfonyl (MeSO2)-PCBs from small (< 0.5 gram) tissue samples was developed and validated. Extraction of a laboratory reference material with hexane:dichloromethane:methanol (48:43:9, v/v) and Florisil as fat retainer allowed an efficient recovery of PCBs (78–112%; RSD: 13–37%), OH-PCBs (46±2%; RSD: 4%) and MeSO2-PCBs (89±21%; R...

  9. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal and Environmental Samples Associated with Small-Scale Poultry Farming in Northwestern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braykov, Nikolay P; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Grossman, Marissa; Zhang, Lixin; Vasco, Karla; Cevallos, William; Muñoz, Diana; Acevedo, Andrés; Moser, Kara A; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy; Trostle, James; Trueba, Gabriel; Levy, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The effects of animal agriculture on the spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) are cross-cutting and thus require a multidisciplinary perspective. Here we use ecological, epidemiological, and ethnographic methods to examine populations of Escherichia coli circulating in the production poultry farming environment versus the domestic environment in rural Ecuador, where small-scale poultry production employing nontherapeutic antibiotics is increasingly common. We sampled 262 "production birds" (commercially raised broiler chickens and laying hens) and 455 "household birds" (raised for domestic use) and household and coop environmental samples from 17 villages between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed data on zones of inhibition from Kirby-Bauer tests, rather than established clinical breakpoints for AR, to distinguish between populations of organisms. We saw significantly higher levels of AR in bacteria from production versus household birds; resistance to either amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalothin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin was found in 52.8% of production bird isolates and 16% of household ones. A strain jointly resistant to the 4 drugs was exclusive to a subset of isolates from production birds (7.6%) and coop surfaces (6.5%) and was associated with a particular purchase site. The prevalence of AR in production birds declined with bird age (P Farming status did not impact AR in domestic environments at the household or village level. Our results suggest that AR associated with small-scale poultry farming is present in the immediate production environment and likely originates from sources outside the study area. These outside sources might be a better place to target control efforts than local management practices. IMPORTANCE In developing countries, small-scale poultry farming employing antibiotics as growth promoters is being advanced as an inexpensive source of protein and income. Here, we present the results of a large ecoepidemiological study examining patterns of

  10. Detection of Bartonella tamiae, Coxiella burnetii and rickettsiae in arthropods and tissues from wild and domestic animals in northeastern Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Leulmi, Hamza; Aouadi, Atef; Bitam, Idir; Bessas, Amina; Benakhla, Ahmed; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, the scope and importance of emergent vector-borne diseases has increased dramatically. In Algeria, only limited information is currently available concerning the presence and prevalence of these zoonotic diseases. For this reason, we conducted a survey of hematophagous ectoparasites of domestic mammals and/or spleens of wild animals in El Tarf and Souk Ahras, Algeria. Methods Using real-time PCR, standard PCR and sequencing, the presence of Bartonella spp., Rickett...

  11. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, Asami; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Ayako; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  12. Direct polymerase chain reaction from blood and tissue samples for rapid diagnosis of bovine leukemia virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    NISHIMORI, Asami; KONNAI, Satoru; IKEBUCHI, Ryoyo; OKAGAWA, Tomohiro; NAKAHARA, Ayako; MURATA, Shiro; OHASHI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection induces bovine leukemia in cattle and causes significant financial harm to farmers and farm management. There is no effective therapy or vaccine; thus, the diagnosis and elimination of BLV-infected cattle are the most effective method to eradicate the infection. Clinical veterinarians need a simpler and more rapid method of diagnosing infection, because both nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR are labor intensive, time-consuming, and require specialized molecular biology techniques and expensive equipment. In this study, we describe a novel PCR method for amplifying the BLV provirus from whole blood, thus eliminating the need for DNA extraction. Although the sensitivity of PCR directly from whole blood (PCR-DB) samples as measured in bovine blood containing BLV-infected cell lines was lower than that of nested PCR, the PCR-DB technique showed high specificity and reproducibility. Among 225 clinical samples, 49 samples were positive by nested PCR, and 37 samples were positive by PCR-DB. There were no false positive samples; thus, PCR-DB sensitivity and specificity were 75.51% and 100%, respectively. However, the provirus loads of the samples detected by nested PCR and not PCR-DB were quite low. Moreover, PCR-DB also stably amplified the BLV provirus from tumor tissue samples. PCR-DB method exhibited good reproducibility and excellent specificity and is suitable for screening of thousands of cattle, thus serving as a viable alternative to nested PCR and real-time PCR. PMID:26911373

  13. Collagen Gel Contraction as a Measure of Fibroblast Function in an Animal Model of Subsynovial Connective Tissue Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tai-hua; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Gingery, Anne; Larson, Dirk R.; Passe, Sandra M.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a peripheral neuropathy characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissues (SSCT). A rabbit model of CTS was developed to test the hypothesis that SSCT fibrosis causes the neuropathy. We used a cell-seeded collagen-gel contraction model to characterize the fibrosis in this model in terms of cellular mechanics, specifically to compare the ability of SSCT cells from the rabbit model and normal rabbits to contract the gel, and to asse...

  14. Effect of soil and water environment on typeability of PowerPlex Y (Promega in selected tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Koc-Zorawska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In cases of decomposed bodies Y chromosomal STR markers may be useful in identification of a male relative. The authors assessed typeability PowerPlex Y (Promega loci in tissue material stored in water and soil environment. Tissue material was collected during autopsies of five persons aged 20-30 years with time of death determined within the limit of 14 hours. Heart muscle, liver and lung specimens were stored in pond water, sea water, sand and peat soil. DNA was extracted by organic method from tissue samples collected in 7-day intervals. Liver specimens were typeable in all PowerPlex Y loci within 100 days of storage in pond water with gradual decline at DYS392 in sea water. Heart muscle specimens stored in pond water exhibited allelic loss at DYS19, DYS385, DYS389II and DYS392, while all loci were typeable in sea water stored samples. For lung specimens allelic loss was noted throughout the profile. Storage of liver specimens in peat soil for more than 14 days resulted in allelic drop-out, and after 21 days no profiles were typeable. Heart muscle specimens were typeable in all PowerPlex Y systems after 35-day storage in sand, while allelic drop-out and subsequent lack of profiles were noted after 14 and 35 days respectively. Lung specimens stored in garden soil exhibited allelic drop-out and subsequent lack of profiles after 7 and 21 days, respectively. All PowerPlex Y loci were typeable in the latter material in sand up to day 35 with gradual decline of longer amplicons (DYS19, DYS385, DYS389II and DYS392.

  15. The problem with medical research on tissue and organ samples taken in connection with forensic autopsies in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Dupont, V; Jousset, N

    2016-02-01

    Currently, in France, it is legally impossible to conduct scientific research on tissue and organ samples taken from forensic autopsies. In fact, the law schedules the destruction of such samples at the end of the judicial investigation, and the common law rules governing cadaver research cannot be applied to the forensic context. However, nothing seems in itself to stand in the way of such research since, despite their specific nature, these samples from forensic autopsies could be subject, following legislative amendments, to common law relating to medical research on samples taken from deceased persons. But an essential legislative amendment, firstly to allow the Biomedicine Agency to become authorized to issue a research permit and secondly, to change the research conditions in terms of the non-opposition of the deceased to said research. Such an amendment would be a true breakthrough because it would allow teams to continue to move forward calmly in research, and allow this research to be placed within a legal framework, which would promote international exchanges. PMID:26694871

  16. Effects of DNA Extraction Procedures on Bacteroides Profiles in Fecal Samples From Various Animals Determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major assumption in microbial source tracking is that some fecal bacteria are specific to a host animal, and thus provide unique microbial fingerprints that can be used to differentiate hosts. However, the DNA information obtained from a particular sample may be biased dependi...

  17. Elements in autopsy liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit and Danes. III. Zinc measured by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, J; Milman, N; Pedersen, H S; Mulvad, G; Saaby, H; Byg, K E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the content of zinc (Zn) in liver tissue samples from Greenlandic Inuit using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and compare the results with those obtained in liver samples from Danes. Normal liver tissue samples was obtained at autopsy from 50 Greenlandic Inuit (27 men) with a median age of 61 years (range 23-83) and from 74 Danes (44 men) with a median age of 60 years (range 15-87). In the entire series, liver zinc content in Inuit was not significantly different compared with Danes. There was no significant gender difference in liver zinc content either in Inuit or in Danes. The content of zinc given as median (5-95 percentile) was in Inuit 3.809 mmol/kg dry liver (2.355-7.406), and in Danes 3.992 mmol/kg dry liver (2.499-8.645). There was a significant, positive correlation between liver zinc content and age in Danish women (r(s) = 0.43, p = 0.02), which could not be demonstrated in Danish men or in Inuit. Median hepatic zinc index (zinc content in mmol/kg dry weight divided by age in years) in Inuit was 0.073, and in Danes 0.080 (p = 0.3) without any significant difference between the two genders. In Inuit and Danes there was an inverse correlation between hepatic zinc index and age both in the two genders and in the entire series: Inuit: r(s) = -0.62, p < 0.0001; Danes: r(s) = -0.70, p < 0.0001. The results indicate that Inuit have liver zinc levels, which are similar to those found in Danes. PMID:11846009

  18. 50-MeV/sub d→Be/ neutrons: a comparison of normal tissue tolerance in animals with clinical observations in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute and late effects of 50 MeV neutrons were investigated by irradiating a variety of organ systems in large animals using dosage schedules similar to those that have been employed clinically. The RBE's for acute effects in pig skin and rhesus monkey oral mucosa were significantly less than the RBE's for late effects. This observation has also been noticed clinically. The RBE's for late effects in pig skin, rhesus monkey oral mucosa, and rhesus monkey kidney were consistent with values of 3.1 to 3.4 relative to approx.200 rad 60Co fractions and approx.2.2 to 2.6 relative to approx.400 rad 60Co fractions. The RBE for radiation myelitis was significantly greater (4.2 to 4.6 relative to approx.270 rad 60Co fractions). The tolerance doses for 50 MeV/sub d→Be/ neutrons in large animals were approx.2200 rad/sub nγ//6-1/2 weeks for skin contraction, approx.2100 rad/sub nγ//6-1/2 weeks for oromucosal necrosis, approx.1300 rad/sub nγ//4-1/2 weeks for radiation myelitis, and approx.960 rad/sub nγ//4 weeks for radiation nephritis. These values correlate well with clinical observations at TAMVEC, since the majority of soft tissue complications in patients occurred following tissue doses in excess of 2100 rad/sub nγ/

  19. 50-MEV/sub d→Be/ neutrons: a comparion of normal tissue tolerance in animals with clinical observations in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acute and late effects of 50 MeV neutrons were investigated by irradiating a variety of organ systems in large animals using dosage schedules similar to those that have been employed clinically. The RBEs for acute effects in pig skin and rhesus monkey oral mucosa were significantly less than the RBEs for late effects. This observation has also been noticed clinically. The RBEs for late effects in pig skin, rhesus monkey oral mucosa, and rhesus monkey kidney were consistent with values of 3.1 to 3.4 relative to approx.200 rad 60Co fraction and approx.2.2 to 2.6 relative to approx.400 rad 60Co fractions. The RBE for radiation myelitis was significant greater. The tolerance doses for 50 MeV neutrons in large animals were approx.2200 rad/6 1/2 weeks for skin contraction, approx.2100 rad/6 1/2 weeks for oromucosal necrosis, approx.1300 rad/4 1/2 weeks for radiation myelitis, and approx.960 rad/4 weeks for radiation nephritis. These values correlate well with clinical observations at TAMVEC, since the majority of soft tissue complications in patients occurred following tissue doses in excess of 2100 rad

  20. Virome profiling of bats from Myanmar by metagenomic analysis of tissue samples reveals more novel Mammalian viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao He

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoir animals harboring many important pathogenic viruses and with the capability of transmitting these to humans and other animals. To establish an effective surveillance to monitor transboundary spread of bat viruses between Myanmar and China, complete organs from the thorax and abdomen from 853 bats of six species from two Myanmar counties close to Yunnan province, China, were collected and tested for their virome through metagenomics by Solexa sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. In total, 3,742,314 reads of 114 bases were generated, and over 86% were assembled into 1,649,512 contigs with an average length of 114 bp, of which 26,698 (2% contigs were recognizable viral sequences belonging to 24 viral families. Of the viral contigs 45% (12,086/26,698 were related to vertebrate viruses, 28% (7,443/26,698 to insect viruses, 27% (7,074/26,698 to phages and 95 contigs to plant viruses. The metagenomic results were confirmed by PCR of selected viruses in all bat samples followed by phylogenetic analysis, which has led to the discovery of some novel bat viruses of the genera Mamastrovirus, Bocavirus, Circovirus, Iflavirus and Orthohepadnavirus and to their prevalence rates in two bat species. In conclusion, the present study aims to present the bat virome in Myanmar, and the results obtained further expand the spectrum of viruses harbored by bats.

  1. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Induces Neurological Side Effects Independent on Thrombolysis in Mechanical Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Infarction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xue Dong

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA is the only effective drug approved by US FDA to treat ischemic stroke, and it contains pleiotropic effects besides thrombolysis. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA on cerebral infarction besides its thrombolysis property in mechanical animal stroke.Relevant studies were identified by two reviewers after searching online databases, including Pubmed, Embase, and ScienceDirect, from 1979 to 2016. We identified 6, 65, 17, 12, 16, 12 and 13 comparisons reporting effect of endogenous tPA on infarction volume and effects of rtPA on infarction volume, blood-brain barrier, brain edema, intracerebral hemorrhage, neurological function and mortality rate in all 47 included studies. Standardized mean differences for continuous measures and risk ratio for dichotomous measures were calculated to assess the effects of endogenous tPA and rtPA on cerebral infarction in animals. The quality of included studies was assessed using the Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable score. Subgroup analysis, meta-regression and sensitivity analysis were performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Funnel plot, Trim and Fill method and Egger's test were obtained to detect publication bias.We found that both endogenous tPA and rtPA had not enlarged infarction volume, or deteriorated neurological function. However, rtPA would disrupt blood-brain barrier, aggravate brain edema, induce intracerebral hemorrhage and increase mortality rate.This meta-analysis reveals rtPA can lead to neurological side effects besides thrombolysis in mechanical animal stroke, which may account for clinical exacerbation for stroke patients that do not achieve vascular recanalization with rtPA.

  2. A New Sample Substrate for Imaging and Correlating Organic and Trace Metal Composition in Biological Cells and Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many disease processes involve alterations in the chemical makeup of tissue. Synchrotron-based infrared (IR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopes are becoming increasingly popular tools for imaging the organic and trace metal compositions of biological materials, respectively, without the need for extrinsic labels or stains. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) provides chemical information on the organic components of a material at a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 2-10 μm in the mid-infrared region. The synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe is a complementary technique used to probe trace element content in the same systems with a similar spatial resolution. However to be most beneficial, it is important to combine the results from both imaging techniques on a single sample, which requires precise overlap of the IR and X-ray images. In this work, we have developed a sample substrate containing a gold grid pattern on its surface, which can be imaged with both the IR and X-ray microscopes. The substrate consists of a low trace element glass slide that has a gold grid patterned on its surface, where the major and minor parts of the grid contain 25 and 12 nm gold, respectively. This grid pattern can be imaged with the IR microscope because the reflectivity of gold differs as a function of thickness. The pattern can also be imaged with the SXRF microprobe because the Au fluorescence intensity changes with gold thickness. The tissue sample is placed on top of the patterned substrate. The grid pattern's IR reflectivity image and the gold SXRF image are used as fiducial markers for spatially overlapping the IR and SXRF images from the tissue. Results show that IR and X-ray images can be correlated precisely, with a spatial resolution of less than one pixel (i.e., 2-3 microns). The development of this new tool will be presented along with applications to paraffin-embedded metalloprotein crystals, Alzheimer's disease, and hair

  3. Paralytic shellfish poisoning: post-mortem analysis of tissue and body fluid samples from human victims in the Patagonia fjords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Carlos; del Carmen Bravo, María; Lagos, Marcelo; Lagos, Néstor

    2004-02-01

    In July 5, 2002 fishermen working in harvesting sea urchin (Loxechinus albus) in the Patagonia Chilean fjords were intoxicated by consumption of filter-feeder bivalve Aulacomya ater. After the ingestion of 7-9 ribbed mussel, two fishermen died 3-4 h after shellfish consumption. The forensic examination in both victims did not show pathological abnormalities with the exception of the lungs conditions, crackling to the touch, pulmonary congestion and edema. The toxic mussel sample showed a toxicity measured by mouse bioassay of 8575 microg of STX (saxitoxin) equivalent by 100 g of shellfish meat. Using post-column derivatization HPLC method with fluorescent on line detection was possible to measure mass amount of each paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin yielding individual toxin concentrations. These PSP toxins were identified in the gastric content, body fluids (urine, bile and cerebrospinal fluid) and tissue samples (liver, kidney, lung, stomach, spleen, heart, brain, adrenal glands, pancreas and thyroids glands). The toxin profiles of each body fluid and tissue samples and the amount of each PSP toxin detected are reported. The PSP toxins found in the gastric content, were STX and the gonyautoxins (GTX4, GTX1, GTX5, GTX3 and GTX2) which showed to be the major amount of PSP toxins found in the victims biological samples. The PSP toxin composition in urine and bile showed as major PSP toxins neoSaxitoxin (neoSTX) and GTX4/GTX1 epimers, both STX analogues with an hydroxyl group (-OH) in the N(1) of the tetrahydropurine nucleus. The neoSTX was not present in the gastric content sample, indicating that the oxidation of N(1) in the STX tetrahydropurine nucleus resulted neoSTX, in a similar way that GTX3/GTX2 epimers were transformed in GTX4/GTX1 epimers. Beside this metabolic transformation, also the hydrolysis of carbamoyl group from STX to form its decarbomoyl analogue decarbamoylsaxitoxin was detected in liver, kidney and lung. These two findings show that PSP

  4. Contaminants in white-tailed deer tissue from the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge Morris and Somerset Counties, New Jersey: Results of 1988 sampling and analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) tissues were sampled during the December, 1988, public deer hunt at the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GSNWR) to...

  5. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO in rat peripheral tissues using small-animal PET with [{sup 18}F]FEDAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nengaki, Nobuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service Co., Ltd., Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 141-0032 (Japan); Takei, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Tokyo Nuclear Service Co., Ltd., Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-0016 (Japan); Wakizaka, Hidekatsu [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Hosoi, Rie; Momosaki, Sotaro [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Yui, Joji; Kawamura, Kazunori; Hatori, Akiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Zhang, Ming-Rong, E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.j [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Introduction: The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) is widely expressed in peripheral tissues, including the heart, lung, and kidney. Our laboratory developed N-benzyl-N-methyl-2-[7,8-dihydro-7-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl) -8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl]acetamide ([{sup 18}F]FEDAC) as a TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) ligand. Here, using small-animal PET with [{sup 18}F]FEDAC, we performed TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. Methods: The in vivo distribution and kinetics of [{sup 18}F]FEDAC were measured in rat peripheral tissues (heart, lung and kidney). Using the in vivo pseudo-equilibrium method, TSPO binding parameters [TSPO density (B{sub max}), dissociation constant (K{sub D})] and receptor occupancy were estimated in these peripheral tissues. Results: [{sup 18}F]FEDAC was highly distributed in the lung, heart and kidney, and these TSPO-enriched tissues could be clearly visualized. The kinetics of this radioligand in these tissues was rapid, which is suitable for the determination of in vivo TSPO binding parameters and receptor occupancy. The B{sub max} value of TSPO in the heart, lung, and kidney was 393, 141, and 158 pmol/ml, respectively. The K{sub D} value of the radioligand in the heart, lung, and kidney was 119, 36 and 123 nM, respectively. By pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864 (a TSPO ligand), about 90% of binding sites for TSPO in the heart and lung were occupied. In the kidney, the binding sites were completely occupied by 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864. Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]FEDAC is a suitable PET ligand for TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. The utilization of [{sup 18}F]FEDAC-PET and the pseudo-equilibrium method can contribute to the study of the TSPO function and evaluate the in vivo binding parameters and receptor occupancy of TSPO therapeutic compounds.

  6. Isolation of tick and mosquito-borne arboviruses from ticks sampled from livestock and wild animal hosts in Ijara District, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Lutomiah, Joel; Obanda, Vincent; Gakuya, Francis; Mutisya, James; Mulwa, Francis; Michuki, George; Chepkorir, Edith; Fischer, Anne; Venter, Marietjie; Sang, Rosemary

    2013-09-01

    Tick-borne viruses infect humans through the bite of infected ticks during opportunistic feeding or through crushing of ticks by hand and, in some instances, through contact with infected viremic animals. The Ijara District, an arid to semiarid region in northern Kenya, is home to a pastoralist community for whom livestock keeping is a way of life. Part of the Ijara District lies within the boundaries of a Kenya Wildlife Service-protected conservation area. Arbovirus activity among mosquitoes, animals, and humans is reported in the region, mainly because prevailing conditions necessitate that people continuously move their animals in search of pasture, bringing them in contact with ongoing arbovirus transmission cycles. To identify the tick-borne viruses circulating among these communities, we analyzed ticks sampled from diverse animal hosts. A total of 10,488 ticks were sampled from both wildlife and livestock hosts and processed in 1520 pools of up to eight ticks per pool. The sampled ticks were classified to species, processed for virus screening by cell culture using Vero cells and RT-PCR (in the case of Hyalomma species), followed by amplicon sequencing. The tick species sampled included Rhipicephalus pulchellus (76.12%), Hyalomma truncatum (8.68%), Amblyomma gemma (5.00%), Amblyomma lepidum (4.34%), and others (5.86%). We isolated and identified Bunyamwera (44), Dugbe (5), Ndumu (2), Semliki forest (25), Thogoto (3), and West Nile (3) virus strains. This observation constitutes a previously unreported detection of mosquito-borne Semliki forest and Bunyamwera viruses in ticks, and association of West Nile virus with A. gemma and Rh. pulchellus ticks. These findings provide additional evidence on the potential role of ticks and associated animals in the circulation of diverse arboviruses in northeastern Kenya, including viruses previously known to be essentially mosquito borne. PMID:23805790

  7. Brazilian minipig as a large-animal model for basic research and stem cell-based tissue engineering. Characterization and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Targa STRAMANDINOLI-ZANICOTTI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based regenerative medicine is one of the most intensively researched medical issues. Pre-clinical studies in a large-animal model, especially in swine or miniature pigs, are highly relevant to human applications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been isolated and expanded from different sources. Objective: This study aimed at isolating and characterizing, for the first time, bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs from a Brazilian minipig (BR1. Also, this aimed to validate a new large-animal model for stem cell-based tissue engineering. Material and Methods: Bone marrow (BM was aspirated from the posterior iliac crest of twelve adult male BR1 under general anesthesia. MSCs were selected by plastic-adherence as originally described by Friedenstein. Cell morphology, surface marker expression, and cellular differentiation were examined. The immunophenotypic profile was determined by flow cytometry. The differentiation potential was assessed by cytological staining and by RT-PCR. Results: MSCs were present in all minipig BM samples. These cells showed fibroblastic morphology and were positive for the surface markers CD90 (88.6%, CD29 (89.8%, CD44 (86.9% and negative for CD34 (1.61%, CD45 (1.83%, CD14 (1.77% and MHC-II (2.69%. MSCs were differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts as demonstrated by the presence of lipidic-rich vacuoles, the mineralized extracellular matrix, and the great presence of glycosaminoglycans, respectively. The higher gene expression of adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (AP2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and collagen type 2 (COLII also confirmed the trilineage differentiation (p<0.001, p<0.001, p=0.031; respectively. Conclusions: The isolation, cultivation, and differentiation of BM-MSCs from BR1 makes this animal eligible as a useful large-animal model for stem cell-based studies in Brazil.

  8. Utility of different massive parallel sequencing platforms for mutation profiling in clinical samples and identification of pitfalls using FFPE tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassunke, Jana; Haller, Florian; Hebele, Simone; Moskalev, Evgeny A; Penzel, Roland; Pfarr, Nicole; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Endris, Volker

    2015-11-01

    In the growing field of personalised medicine, the analysis of numerous potential targets is becoming a challenge in terms of work load, tissue availability, as well as costs. The molecular analysis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has shifted from the analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status to the analysis of different gene regions, including resistance mutations or translocations. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) allows rapid comprehensive mutation testing in routine molecular pathological diagnostics even on small formalin-fixed, paraffin‑embedded (FFPE) biopsies. In this study, we compared and evaluated currently used MPS platforms for their application in routine pathological diagnostics. We initiated a first round‑robin testing of 30 cases diagnosed with NSCLC and a known EGFR gene mutation status. In this study, three pathology institutes from Germany received FFPE tumour sections that had been individually processed. Fragment libraries were prepared by targeted multiplex PCR using institution‑specific gene panels. Sequencing was carried out using three MPS systems: MiSeq™, GS Junior and PGM Ion Torrent™. In two institutes, data analysis was performed with the platform-specific software and the Integrative Genomics Viewer. In one institute, data analysis was carried out using an in-house software system. Of 30 samples, 26 were analysed by all institutes. Concerning the EGFR mutation status, concordance was found in 26 out of 26 samples. The analysis of a few samples failed due to poor DNA quality in alternating institutes. We found 100% concordance when comparing the results of the EGFR mutation status. A total of 38 additional mutations were identified in the 26 samples. In two samples, minor variants were found which could not be confirmed by qPCR. Other characteristic variants were identified as fixation artefacts by reanalyzing the respective sample by Sanger sequencing. Overall, the results of this study

  9. Gefarnate stimulates mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in conjunctival tissue and ameliorates corneal epithelial damage in animal dry-eye models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dota A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atsuyoshi Dota, Yuko Takaoka-Shichijo, Masatsugu NakamuraOphthalmic Research and Development Center, Santen Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Ikoma-shi, Nara, JapanPurpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gefarnate on mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in isolated rabbit conjunctival tissue, and on corneal epithelial damage in rabbit and cat dry-eye models.Methods: Conjunctival tissue isolated from rabbits was treated with gefarnate. Mucin-like glycoprotein was detected in the culture supernatant by an enzyme-linked lectin assay. Gefarnate ointment was topically applied to eyes once daily for 7 days in the rabbit dry-eye model, in which the lacrimal glands, Harderian gland, and nictitating membrane were removed, or for 4 weeks in the cat dry-eye model, in which the lacrimal gland and nictitating membrane were removed. Corneal epithelial damage was evaluated by measurement of corneal permeability by rose bengal in the rabbit model or by fluorescein staining in the cat model.Results: Gefarnate stimulated mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in conjunctival tissue in a dose-dependent manner. In the rabbit dry-eye model, application of gefarnate ointment to the eyes resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in rose bengal permeability in the cornea, with the effect being significant at concentrations of ≥0.3%. In the cat dry-eye model, application of gefarnate ointment resulted in a significant decrease in the corneal fluorescein staining score.Conclusion: These results suggest that gefarnate stimulates in vitro secretion of mucin-like glycoprotein in conjunctival tissue and ameliorates corneal epithelial damage in animal dry-eye models. Gefarnate may therefore be effective for treating dry eye.Keywords: gefarnate, fluorescein staining, rose bengal permeability, rabbit, cat, dry eye

  10. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.;

    2003-01-01

    in highly heterogeneous species, sequence divergence was observed and more than one PCR-DGGE profile was obtained. Application of the PCR-DGGE method to DNA extracted from faeces of zoo animals revealed the presence of Helicobacter DNA in 13 of 16 samples; a correlation was seen between the mobility of PCR...... on purified amplicons. Sixteen DGGE profiles were derived from 44 type and reference strains of 20 Helicobacter species, indicating the potential of this approach for resolving infection of a single host by multiple Helicobacter species. Some more highly related species were not differentiated whereas...... products in DGGE analysis and DNA sequencing. In combination, this indicated that zoo animals are colonized by a wide range of different Helicobacter species; seven animals appeared to be colonized by multiple Helicobacter species. By this approach, presumptive identifications were made of Helicobacter...

  11. Biased visualization of hypoperfused tissue by computed tomography due to short imaging duration: improved classification by image down-sampling and vascular models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, Irene Klaerke; Ribe, Lars Riisgaard; Bekke, Susanne Lise; Tietze, Anna; Oestergaard, Leif; Mouridsen, Kim [Aarhus University Hospital, Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus C (Denmark); Jones, P.S.; Alawneh, Josef [University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Puig, Josep; Pedraza, Salva [Dr. Josep Trueta Girona University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Girona Biomedical Research Institute, Girona (Spain); Gillard, Jonathan H. [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Warburton, Elisabeth A. [Cambrigde University Hospitals, Addenbrooke, Stroke Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Baron, Jean-Claude [University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Centre Hospitalier Sainte Anne, INSERM U894, Paris (France)

    2015-07-15

    Lesion detection in acute stroke by computed-tomography perfusion (CTP) can be affected by incomplete bolus coverage in veins and hypoperfused tissue, so-called bolus truncation (BT), and low contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). We examined the BT-frequency and hypothesized that image down-sampling and a vascular model (VM) for perfusion calculation would improve normo- and hypoperfused tissue classification. CTP datasets from 40 acute stroke patients were retrospectively analysed for BT. In 16 patients with hypoperfused tissue but no BT, repeated 2-by-2 image down-sampling and uniform filtering was performed, comparing CNR to perfusion-MRI levels and tissue classification to that of unprocessed data. By simulating reduced scan duration, the minimum scan-duration at which estimated lesion volumes came within 10 % of their true volume was compared for VM and state-of-the-art algorithms. BT in veins and hypoperfused tissue was observed in 9/40 (22.5 %) and 17/40 patients (42.5 %), respectively. Down-sampling to 128 x 128 resolution yielded CNR comparable to MR data and improved tissue classification (p = 0.0069). VM reduced minimum scan duration, providing reliable maps of cerebral blood flow and mean transit time: 5 s (p = 0.03) and 7 s (p < 0.0001), respectively. BT is not uncommon in stroke CTP with 40-s scan duration. Applying image down-sampling and VM improve tissue classification. (orig.)

  12. Biased visualization of hypoperfused tissue by computed tomography due to short imaging duration: improved classification by image down-sampling and vascular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesion detection in acute stroke by computed-tomography perfusion (CTP) can be affected by incomplete bolus coverage in veins and hypoperfused tissue, so-called bolus truncation (BT), and low contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). We examined the BT-frequency and hypothesized that image down-sampling and a vascular model (VM) for perfusion calculation would improve normo- and hypoperfused tissue classification. CTP datasets from 40 acute stroke patients were retrospectively analysed for BT. In 16 patients with hypoperfused tissue but no BT, repeated 2-by-2 image down-sampling and uniform filtering was performed, comparing CNR to perfusion-MRI levels and tissue classification to that of unprocessed data. By simulating reduced scan duration, the minimum scan-duration at which estimated lesion volumes came within 10 % of their true volume was compared for VM and state-of-the-art algorithms. BT in veins and hypoperfused tissue was observed in 9/40 (22.5 %) and 17/40 patients (42.5 %), respectively. Down-sampling to 128 x 128 resolution yielded CNR comparable to MR data and improved tissue classification (p = 0.0069). VM reduced minimum scan duration, providing reliable maps of cerebral blood flow and mean transit time: 5 s (p = 0.03) and 7 s (p < 0.0001), respectively. BT is not uncommon in stroke CTP with 40-s scan duration. Applying image down-sampling and VM improve tissue classification. (orig.)

  13. Transgenic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    Describes three methods and their advantages and disadvantages for introducing genes into animals. Discusses the predictability and tissue-specificity of the injected genes. Outlines the applications of transgenic technology for studying gene expression, the early stages of mammalian development, mutations, and the molecular nature of chromosomes.…

  14. Histopathological identification of aspergillosis in animals at Dhaka Zoo

    OpenAIRE

    Ahasan, S.A.; Chowdhury, E.H.; Rahman, M M; Rahman, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Dhaka Zoo with 2000 animal heads of 184 species from significant genetic diversity and five million visitors’ influx round the year is placing it a public health important spot. This study was conducted to investigate aspergillosis in animals at Dhaka Zoo to ascertain animal health, welfare and public health safety standard. One hundred and two necropsied tissue samples preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin at necropsy from 36 animals of 25 different species were collected from Dhaka Zoo...

  15. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterisation of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Obtained from Animal Fecal Samples in Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Olugbenga Adekunle Olowe; Olufunmilayo Adewumi; Gbolabo Odewale; Olusola Ojurongbe; Olusolabomi Jose Adefioye

    2015-01-01

    Production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing E. coli in animals and different methods of identifications from Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria, were investigated. Three hundred and fifty fecal samples, collected from apparently healthy cattle and pigs, were cultured and identified following standard procedures. ESBL phenotypic detection was carried out using combination disc test, double disc synergism test, and ESBL brilliance agar screening. Molecular detection of TEM, SHV,...

  16. Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in formalinfixed Porcine Intestinal Tissue Samples: Comparison of Immunofluorescense and In-situ Hybridization, and Evaluation of the Effectf of Controlled Autolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boesen, H. T.; Vigre, Håkan;

    2010-01-01

    (the cause of porcine proliferative enteritis [PE]) in formalin-fixed samples of intestinal tissue. Of 69 intestinal samples with gross lesions of PE, 63 were positive by both FISH and IFA, but six were positive only by IFA. This indicated that the sensitivity of FISH was 91% that of IFA. However, both...

  17. A novel method for single sample multi-axial nanoindentation of hydrated heterogeneous tissues based on testing great white shark jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Toni L; Boughton, Philip; Slavich, Eve; Wroe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Nanomechanical testing methods that are suitable for a range of hydrated tissues are crucial for understanding biological systems. Nanoindentation of tissues can provide valuable insights into biology, tissue engineering and biomimetic design. However, testing hydrated biological samples still remains a significant challenge. Shark jaw cartilage is an ideal substrate for developing a method to test hydrated tissues because it is a unique heterogeneous composite of both mineralized (hard) and non-mineralized (soft) layers and possesses a jaw geometry that is challenging to test mechanically. The aim of this study is to develop a novel method for obtaining multidirectional nanomechanical properties for both layers of jaw cartilage from a single sample, taken from the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). A method for obtaining multidirectional data from a single sample is necessary for examining tissue mechanics in this shark because it is a protected species and hence samples may be difficult to obtain. Results show that this method maintains hydration of samples that would otherwise rapidly dehydrate. Our study is the first analysis of nanomechanical properties of great white shark jaw cartilage. Variation in nanomechanical properties were detected in different orthogonal directions for both layers of jaw cartilage in this species. The data further suggest that the mineralized layer of shark jaw cartilage is less stiff than previously posited. Our method allows multidirectional nanomechanical properties to be obtained from a single, small, hydrated heterogeneous sample. Our technique is therefore suitable for use when specimens are rare, valuable or limited in quantity, such as samples obtained from endangered species or pathological tissues. We also outline a method for tip-to-optic calibration that facilitates nanoindentation of soft biological tissues. Our technique may help address the critical need for a nanomechanical testing method that is applicable

  18. A novel method for single sample multi-axial nanoindentation of hydrated heterogeneous tissues based on testing great white shark jaws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni L Ferrara

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical testing methods that are suitable for a range of hydrated tissues are crucial for understanding biological systems. Nanoindentation of tissues can provide valuable insights into biology, tissue engineering and biomimetic design. However, testing hydrated biological samples still remains a significant challenge. Shark jaw cartilage is an ideal substrate for developing a method to test hydrated tissues because it is a unique heterogeneous composite of both mineralized (hard and non-mineralized (soft layers and possesses a jaw geometry that is challenging to test mechanically. The aim of this study is to develop a novel method for obtaining multidirectional nanomechanical properties for both layers of jaw cartilage from a single sample, taken from the great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias. A method for obtaining multidirectional data from a single sample is necessary for examining tissue mechanics in this shark because it is a protected species and hence samples may be difficult to obtain. Results show that this method maintains hydration of samples that would otherwise rapidly dehydrate. Our study is the first analysis of nanomechanical properties of great white shark jaw cartilage. Variation in nanomechanical properties were detected in different orthogonal directions for both layers of jaw cartilage in this species. The data further suggest that the mineralized layer of shark jaw cartilage is less stiff than previously posited. Our method allows multidirectional nanomechanical properties to be obtained from a single, small, hydrated heterogeneous sample. Our technique is therefore suitable for use when specimens are rare, valuable or limited in quantity, such as samples obtained from endangered species or pathological tissues. We also outline a method for tip-to-optic calibration that facilitates nanoindentation of soft biological tissues. Our technique may help address the critical need for a nanomechanical testing method

  19. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  20. Preliminary results of a phase III trial of spontaneous animal tumors to heat and/or radiation: early normal tissue response and tumor volume influence on initial response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Phase III randomized trial was initiated to test the relative efficacies of heat alone, radiation alone and heat plus radiation using spontaneous malignancies in pet animals. Heat alone was inferior to the other two treatment arms as demonstrated by a significantly higher non-response rate and shorter response duration. The ratio of complete response rates (CR) for heat plus radiation to radiation alone or the thermal relative risk (TRR) was greater for tumors > 10 cm3 as compared to those 3 (TRR = 4.8 and 1.4, respectively). The overall TRR for complete responses was 2.3. The CR data for the combined therapy arm indicate at least an additive effect between heat and radiation for small tumors but most likely a synergistic effect in the larger tumor gap. Based on the data currently available, no significant difference in response duration is observed between the two radiation arms, although a nonsignificant advantage to the combination therapy exists. Normal tissue effects were evaluated by incidence of full moist desquamation within the irradiated volume, late fibrosis and bone necrosis. Since the radiation skin dose depended upon the technique being used it was possible to estimate the dose to achieve moist desquamation in 50% of the animals (DD50) by a logistic regression model as being 3728 -/+ 344 rad for radiation alone. Significant lowering of the DD50 was not observed for the addition of heat to radiation. Low patient numbers where intact skin was heated prevented an accurate analysis of the effect, however

  1. Traceability of animal byproducts in quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica tissues using carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Móri

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Consistent information on meat products consumed by the public is essential. The technique of stable isotopes is a powerful tool to recover consumers' confidence, as it allows the detection of animal byproduct residues in poultry meat, particularly in quail meat. This study aimed at checking the presence of poultry byproduct mixtures in quail diets by applying the technique of carbon (13C/12C and nitrogen (15N/14N stable isotopes in quail breast muscle, keel, and tibia. Sixty four one-day-old male quails were obtained from a commercial farm. Birds were housed in an experimental house from one to 42 days of age, and were randomly distributed into 8 experimental treatments, and fed diets containing poultry offal meal (POM, bovine meat and bone meal (MBM or poultry feather meal (PFM, or their mixtures. Four birds per treatment were slaughtered at 42 days of age, and breast (Pectoralis major, keel, and tibia were collected for analyses. The inclusion of animal byproducts in quail diets was detected by 13C e 15N analyses in the tissues of the birds; however, it was not possible to specify which byproducts were used. It was concluded that quail meat can be certified by the technique of stable isotopes.

  2. Validation of the cyclone as a pre-separator for airborne fine dust sampling in animal houses

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnink, A.J.A.; Yang Zhao, Yang; Hofschreuder, P.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the overloading of greased impaction pre-separators (IPs) in samplers for PM10 and PM2.5. Furthermore, the use of cyclone pre-separators (CPs) as equivalent samplers, which are less vulnerable for overloading, was validated. In the overloading test, the greased plates of IPs were replaced by new ones at different time intervals. Additional validating tests were conducted in different animal houses (pigs and poultry), in a technical lab, and in ambient air. ...

  3. Physico-chemical characteristiques and bio affinity of 99mTc-glucose-6-phosphate on tumor tissues in animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-glucose-6- phosphate when injected into the human body will be accumulated in the tissues or organ with metabolic rate is relatively faster or higher than in other organs or normal tissues as well as cancer cells or malignant tumor, so it can be used to detect the presence and viability of malignant cells in the human body. The standard methods of preparation glucose-6-phosphate dried-kit as ideally diagnostics kit has been carried out. Physico-chemical characteristics of 99mTc-glucose-6-phosphate have been investigated, included radiochemical purity was determined using the paper and thin-layer chromatography method, lipophilicity using the partitions octanol/water method, the protein-plasma binding was determined by precipitation method using a solution of 20% TCA and the electric charge using paper electrophoresis method. Stability of the preparation in the form of dried-kits and labeled compounds is also determined by chromatographic methods. Whereas the high affinity for cancer cells demonstrated by injecting the compound into the body of animals model that have artificially tumor tissue in the body. The results showed that dry kit glucose-6-phosphate is stable up to 20 weeks storage in the refrigerator (4°C), while labeled compound 99Tc- glucose-6-phosphate is stable at room temperature up to 2 hours after labeling. Radiochemical purity obtained were 94.4 ± 2.25%. Radioactivity of 99mTc-pertechnetate can be added to the dried-kit were 5-30 mCi with a maximum volume 3 mL. 99mTc-glucose-6-phosphate was hydrophilic with partition coefficient octanol/water (P) of 1.09 ± 0.45 and plasma protein binding of 81.26 ± 12.74%. The ratio of accumulation in tumor tissues (target) to normal tissues (non-target) in muscle and liver were 4 times (400%) after 60 min post injection (p.i.) and 2.5 times (250%) after 45 min p.i. respectively. This labeled compound is expected to substitute of 18FDG-(dioxy glucose labeled flouro-18) for nuclear medicine no having

  4. Determination of Quinolones and Nonsteroidal anti-Inflammatory Agents in Animal Tissues and Bovine Milk by Microwave-assisted Extraction High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xi-Liu; DING Lan; JIN Hai-Yan; LIU Miao; CHENG Jian-Hua; WU Xiu-Feng; ZHAI Yu-Juan; SUN Yan-Tao; ZHANG Han-Qi; YU Yong; WANG Xiu-Pin

    2008-01-01

    A rapid,specific microwave-assisted extraction high performance liquid chromatography is described for assaying three quinolones(fleroxacin,lomefloxacin and sparfloxacin)and two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents(ketoprofen and ibuprofen)in samples of sheep liver,bovine muscle and milk.The optimal microwave-assisted extraction conditions such as extraction temperature(40 ℃),extraction time(6 min),solvent volume(10 mL)and solvent(acetonitrile)were determined by an orthogonal experiment.Recoveries were 60.0%-107% in the concentration range 0.25-0.75 μg·g with good precision(< 11%)from three varieties of spiked animal samples.

  5. Application of FTA technology for sampling, recovery and molecular characterization of viral pathogens and virus-derived transgenes from plant tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Aveling Terry; Legg James P; Aly Haytham; Yadav Jitender; Taylor Nigel J; Ndunguru Joseph; Thompson Graham; Fauquet Claude M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Plant viral diseases present major constraints to crop production. Effective sampling of the viruses infecting plants is required to facilitate their molecular study and is essential for the development of crop protection and improvement programs. Retaining integrity of viral pathogens within sampled plant tissues is often a limiting factor in this process, most especially when sample sizes are large and when operating in developing counties and regions remote from laborat...

  6. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in Viking-age settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Nejsum, Peter;

    which parasite eggs from environmental samples collected at a Viking-age settlement (1018-1030 A.D.) are DNA typed to the species level. The human whipworm (Trichuris trichiura) and the human roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) are identified indicating that these parasites were endemic in Denmark in the...

  7. Simulation of ultrasound radio-frequency signals in deformed tissue for validation of 2D motion estimation with sub-sample accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksel, Orcun; Zahiri-Azar, Reza; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2007-01-01

    Motion estimation in sequences of ultrasound echo signals is essential for a wide range of applications. In time domain cross correlation, which is a common motion estimation technique, the displacements are typically not integral multiples of the sampling period. Therefore, to estimate the motion with sub-sample accuracy, 1D and 2D interpolation methods such as parabolic, cosine, and ellipsoid fitting have been introduced in the literature. In this paper, a simulation framework is presented in order to compare the performance of currently available techniques. First, the tissue deformation is modeled using the finite element method (FEM) and then the corresponding pre-/post-deformation radio-frequency (RF) signals are generated using Field II ultrasound simulation software. Using these simulated RF data of deformation, both axial and lateral tissue motion are estimated with sub-sample accuracy. The estimated displacements are then evaluated by comparing them to the known displacements computed by the FEM. This simulation approach was used to evaluate three different lateral motion estimation techniques employing (i) two separate 1D sub-sampling, (ii) two consecutive 1D sub-sampling, and (iii) 2D joint sub-sampling estimators. The estimation errors during two different tissue compression tests are presented with and without spatial filtering. Results show that RF signal processing methods involving tissue deformation can be evaluated using the proposed simulation technique, which employs accurate models. PMID:18002416

  8. Effect of topical anaesthetics on interstitial colloid osmotic pressure in human subcutaneous tissue sampled by wick technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jørgen Timm Guthe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure colloid osmotic pressure in interstitial fluid (COP(i from human subcutaneous tissue with the modified wick technique in order to determine influence of topical application of anaesthetics, dry vs. wet wick and implantation time on COP(i. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 50 healthy volunteers interstitial fluid (IF was collected by subcutaneous implantation of multi-filamentous nylon wicks. Study subjects were allocated to two groups; one for comparing COP(i obtained from dry and saline soaked wicks, and one for comparing COP(i from unanaesthetized skin, and skin after application of a eutectic mixture of local anaesthetic (EMLA®, Astra Zeneca cream. IF was sampled from the skin of the shoulders, and implantation time was 30, 60, 75, 90 and 120 min. Colloid osmotic pressure was measured with a colloid osmometer. Pain assessment during the procedure was compared for EMLA cream and no topical anaesthesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS in a subgroup of 10 subjects. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between COP(i obtained from dry compared to wet wicks, except that the values after 75 and 90 min. were somewhat higher for the dry wicks. Topical anaesthesia with EMLA cream did not affect COP(i values. COP(i decreased from 30 to 75 min. of implantation (23.2 ± 4.4 mmHg to 19.6 ± 2.9 mmHg, p = 0.008 and subsequently tended to increase until 120 min. EMLA cream resulted in significant lower VAS score for the procedure. CONCLUSION: COP(i from subcutaneous tissue was easily obtained and fluid harvesting was well tolerated when topical anaesthetic was used. The difference in COP(i assessed by dry and wet wicks between 75 min. and 90 min. of implantation was in accordance with previous reports. The use of topical analgesia did not influence COP(i and topical analgesia may make the wick technique more acceptable for subjects who dislike technical procedures, including children. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  9. Preliminary results of a phase III trial of spontaneous animal tumors to heat and/or radiation: early normal tissue response and tumor volume influence on initial response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Phase III randomized trial was initiated to test the relative efficacies of heat alone, radiation alone and heat plus radiation using spontaneous malignancies in pet animals. Heat alone was inferior to the other two treatment arms as demonstrated by a significantly higher non-response rate and shorter response duration. The ratio of complete response rates (CR) for heat plus radiation to radiation alone or the thermal relative risk (TRR) was greater for tumors > 10 cm3 as compared to those 3 (TRR = 4.8 and 1.4, respectively). The overall TRR for complete responses was 2.3. The CR data for the combined therapy arm indicate at least an additive effect between heat and radiation for small tumors but most likely a synergistic effect in the larger tumor group. Based on the data currently available, no significant difference in response duration is observed between the two radiation arms, although a nonsignificant advantage to the combination therapy exists. Normal tissue effects were evaluated by incidence of full moist desquamation within the irradiated volume, late fibrosis and bone necrosis. Since the radiation skin dose depended upon the technique being used it was possible to estimate the dose to achieve moist desquamation in 50% of the animals (DD50) by a logistic regression model as being 3728 +/- 344 rad for radiation alone. Significant lowering of the DD50 was not observed for the addition of the heat to radiation. Low patient numbers where intact skin was heated prevented an accurate analysis of the effect, however

  10. Life sciences research in space: The requirement for animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.; Philips, R. W.; Ballard, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Use of animals in NASA space programs is reviewed. Animals are needed because life science experimentation frequently requires long-term controlled exposure to environments, statistical validation, invasive instrumentation or biological tissue sampling, tissue destruction, exposure to dangerous or unknown agents, or sacrifice of the subject. The availability and use of human subjects inflight is complicated by the multiple needs and demands upon crew time. Because only living organisms can sense, integrate and respond to the environment around them, the sole use of tissue culture and computer models is insufficient for understanding the influence of the space environment on intact organisms. Equipment for spaceborne experiments with animals is described.

  11. Influence of sample preparation and reliability of automated numerical refocusing in stain-free analysis of dissected tissues with quantitative phase digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Björn; Lenz, Philipp; Bettenworth, Dominik; Krausewitz, Philipp; Domagk, Dirk; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2015-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has been demonstrated to be a versatile tool for high resolution non-destructive quantitative phase imaging of surfaces and multi-modal minimally-invasive monitoring of living cell cultures in-vitro. DHM provides quantitative monitoring of physiological processes through functional imaging and structural analysis which, for example, gives new insight into signalling of cellular water permeability and cell morphology changes due to toxins and infections. Also the analysis of dissected tissues quantitative DHM phase contrast prospects application fields by stain-free imaging and the quantification of tissue density changes. We show that DHM allows imaging of different tissue layers with high contrast in unstained tissue sections. As the investigation of fixed samples represents a very important application field in pathology, we also analyzed the influence of the sample preparation. The retrieved data demonstrate that the quality of quantitative DHM phase images of dissected tissues depends strongly on the fixing method and common staining agents. As in DHM the reconstruction is performed numerically, multi-focus imaging is achieved from a single digital hologram. Thus, we evaluated the automated refocussing feature of DHM for application on different types of dissected tissues and revealed that on moderately stained samples highly reproducible holographic autofocussing can be achieved. Finally, it is demonstrated that alterations of the spatial refractive index distribution in murine and human tissue samples represent a reliable absolute parameter that is related of different degrees of inflammation in experimental colitis and Crohn's disease. This paves the way towards the usage of DHM in digital pathology for automated histological examinations and further studies to elucidate the translational potential of quantitative phase microscopy for the clinical management of patients, e.g., with inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Research Progress of Alkaline Hydrolysis Technology for Disposal of Animal Tissues%动物组织碱水解处理技术的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 吴金辉; 祁建城; 王润泽

    2013-01-01

      碱水解是近年来发展起来的一种动物组织处理技术,通过NaOH或KOH等碱性物质在高温高压条件下催化动物组织水解为无害的固体残渣和废液并实现组织的灭菌和分解,具有彻底灭活病原微生物、不产生有害气体、操作简单、费用低廉等优点。本文从原理、应用及研究进展等方面,综述了碱水解处理技术的发展与现状。比较分析了碱水解相对于传统组织处理方法的优势,介绍了组织处理机的类型、存在的问题和未来发展趋势。%  Alkaline hydrolysis technology is an approach to disposal of animal tissue. Sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide, is used under heat and high pressure to catalyze the hydrolysis of biological material into harmless solid residue and effluent. Alkaline hydrolysis technology has advantages of effective extinction of pathogenic,no hazard gas release,convenient operation and low cost. This paper presents an overall review of the technique principles,applications and research progress of alkaline hydrolysis technology. The superiority of alkaline hydrolysis is also discussed compared with traditional methods and various types of tissue digester,the existing problems and development trends are introduced.

  13. Selective culturing and genus-specific PCR detection for identification of Aeromonas in tissue samples to assist the medico-legal diagnosis of death by drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Geert; Coopman, Vera; Van Varenbergh, Dirk; Cordonnier, Jan

    2012-09-10

    The detection of autochthonous aquatic bacteria in tissue samples from drowning cases is increasingly considered as an alternative approach to assist the medico-legal diagnosis of death by drowning. Bacteria belonging to the genus Aeromonas may be suitable candidates for this application as they are ubiquitous in natural aquatic environments but are generally not part of the human microbiota. The research aims of this study were (i) to develop a sensitive, specific and rapid screening and confirmation method for Aeromonas species in tissue samples and (ii) to evaluate aseptic sternal puncture as a post-mortem sample technique and bone marrow as an alternative matrix to provide evidence of death by drowning. The presence of Aeromonas in tissue samples was verified by cultivation using the selective media Ampicillin Dextrin Agar (ADA) and Ryan's Aeromonas Medium. The use of ADA medium was found most optimal for the sensitive, inexpensive and quick detection of aeromonads in human tissue samples. Positive culture plates were confirmed by harvesting all colonies for DNA extraction and subsequent PCR amplification using Aeromonas genus-specific primers. Aeromonads were detected in lung swab, blood and bone marrow of drowned bodies (n=3), but were negative in these three matrices for all negative controls (n=90) tested. Bone marrow proved to be a suitable alternative matrix and can be sampled post-mortem by an aseptic sternal puncture. In conclusion, this study confirms previous indications that aeromonads in cultures from blood of water bodies can be considered a potential marker for drowning. Given the fact that the number of immersed bodies (drowned and non-drowned) included in this study is statistically not significant, however, more tissue samples need to be investigated to confirm the validity of these methods to aid the diagnosis of death by wet drowning. PMID:22497704

  14. A simple and reliable pretreatment protocol facilitates fluorescent in situ hybridisation on tissue microarrays of paraffin wax embedded tumour samples

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, S-F; Daigo, Y; Huang, H-E; Iyer, N G; Callagy, G; Kranjac, T; Gonzalez, M; Sangan, T; Earl, H; Caldas, C.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe a robust pretreatment protocol for preparing paraffin wax embedded tissues on tissue microarrays for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). The newly developed pretreatment protocol described here was compared with the commonly used sodium thiocyanate based protocol and two different heating methods used in standard antigen unmasking protocols for immunohistochemistry (pressure cooking and microwaving in citrate acid buffer).

  15. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  16. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections.

  17. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in viking-age settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter; Fredensborg, Brian Lund;

    2015-01-01

    Ancient parasite eggs were recovered from environmental samples collected at a Viking-age settlement in Viborg, Denmark, dated 1018-1030 A.D. Morphological examination identified Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp., and Fasciola sp. eggs, but size and shape did not allow species identification. By carefully...... selecting genetic markers, PCR amplification and sequencing of ancient DNA (aDNA) isolates resulted in identification of: the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura, using SSUrRNA sequence homology; Ascaris sp. with 100% homology to cox1 haplotype 07; and Fasciola hepatica using ITS1 sequence homology. The...... identification of T. trichiura eggs indicates that human fecal material is present and, hence, that the Ascaris sp. haplotype 07 was most likely a human variant in Viking-age Denmark. The location of the F. hepatica finding suggests that sheep or cattle are the most likely hosts. Further, we sequenced the...

  18. A micromethod for assay of lipoprotein lipase activity in needle biopsy samples of human adipose tissue and skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and simple procedure for assay of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in small amounts of human adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is described and validated. The enzyme is eluted from tissues with heparin and the activity is determined from the eluate by measuring the release of [14C]oleic acid from a gum arabic stabilized emulsion of glycerol-tri[14C]oleate in a Tris-buffer medium containing albumin and pooled normal human serum. Reproducible results are obtained with amounts of tissue ranging from 2 to 25 mg. The Ksub(m) values of the adipose tissue and skeletal muscle LPL for the triolein substrate were 0.74 +- 0.06 and 0.77 +- 0.05 mmol/l, respectively. The standard radioactive triolein emulsion was hydrolyzed by adipose tissue LPL at a rate closely similar to rat VLDL-triglyceride labeled in vivo with [1-14C]palmitic acid, suggesting that the experimental substrate behaved in a similar manner to the natural substrate. The LPL activity was much higher in adipose tissue than in muscle. In adipose tissue the LPL activity was 2-4 times higher in women than in men whereas no sex difference was present in the LPL activity of muscle. (Auth.)

  19. Dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece for simultaneous tissue cutting and coagulation: first report on a conceptual design validated by an animal experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik HA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hatem A Tawfik,1 Yousef A Fouad,2 Rashad Hafez3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Oculoplastics Service, Ain Shams University, 2Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, 3Eye Subspecialty Centre, Cairo, Egypt Objective: To introduce and evaluate the safety of a novel dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece design for simultaneous tissue cutting and coagulation. Methods: We designed a prototype double-sided handpiece allowing automatic switching between two electrodes with a simple handpiece flip. The concept of the system as a surgical instrument was assessed by an animal experiment. Results: The skin of 15 Wistar albino white rats could be successfully incised and coagulated using both ends of the handpiece, thereby confirming the prospects and clinical applications of the system. Conclusion: The dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece is a simple and safe alternative to the traditional electrosurgery pencil, allowing the simultaneous use of two electrodes without the hassle of frequent electrode replacement. Keywords: radiosurgery, ablative surgery, laser resurfacing, electrocautery, electrosurgery

  20. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology.

    OpenAIRE

    Bravin, Alberto; Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Fiedler, Stefan; Nemoz, Christian; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Suortti, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    International audience The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images...

  1. Transfection of RNA from organ samples of infected animals represents a highly sensitive method for virus detection and recovery of classical swine fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Meyer

    Full Text Available Translation and replication of positive stranded RNA viruses are directly initiated in the cellular cytoplasm after uncoating of the viral genome. Accordingly, infectious virus can be generated by transfection of RNA genomes into susceptible cells. In the present study, efficiency of conventional virus isolation after inoculation of cells with infectious sample material was compared to virus recovery after transfection of total RNA derived from organ samples of pigs infected with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Compared to the conventional method of virus isolation applied in three different porcine cell lines used in routine diagnosis of CSF, RNA transfection showed a similar efficiency for virus rescue. For two samples, recovery of infectious virus was only possible by RNA transfection, but not by the classical approach of virus isolation. Therefore, RNA transfection represents a valuable alternative to conventional virus isolation in particular when virus isolation is not possible, sample material is not suitable for virus isolation or when infectious material is not available. To estimate the potential risk of RNA prepared from sample material for infection of pigs, five domestic pigs were oronasally inoculated with RNA that was tested positive for virus rescue after RNA transfection. This exposure did not result in viral infection or clinical disease of the animals. In consequence, shipment of CSFV RNA can be regarded as a safe alternative to transportation of infectious virus and thereby facilitates the exchange of virus isolates among authorized laboratories with appropriate containment facilities.

  2. Human and animal integrated influenza surveillance: a novel sampling approach for an additional transmission way in the aquatic bird reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Delogu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: infectious low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPaIVs have been recently detected on feathers of wild ducks. Laboratory trial results suggested that the preen oil gland secretion, covering waterbirds’ feathers, may attract and concentrate virus particles from aIV-contaminated waters to birds’ bodies. We evaluated whether ducks can become infected by the ingestion of preen oil-associated viral particles, experimentally smeared on their plumage. In addition, we compared virologic and serologic results obtained from mallards whose feathers were experimentally infected, with those from wild mallards naturally carrying aIVs on feathers.

    Methods: we experimentally coated 7 mallards (anas plathyrynchos using preen oil mixed with a LPaIV (h10n7 subtype, and housed them for 45 days with a control, uncoated duck. cloacal, oropharyngeal and feather swabs were collected from all birds and examined for aIV molecular detection and isolation. Blood samples were also taken to detect influenza specific antibodies. In addition, sera from 10 wild mallards, carrying on feathers infectious LPaIV h10n7, were examined.

    Results: virologic and serologic results indicated that through self- and allopreening all the birds experimentally coated with the preen oil/aIV mix and the control duck ingested viruses covering feathers and became infected. Virus isolation from feathers was up to 32 days post-coating treatment. one out of 8 wild mallards showing antibodies against type a influenza virus was seropositive for h10 subtype too.

    Conclusions: our experimental and field results show evidences suggesting that uninfected birds carrying viruses on their feathers, including immune ones, might play an active role in spreading aIV infection in nature. For this reason, routine aIV surveillance programs, aimed at detecting intestinal and/or respiratory viruses, should

  3. Analysis of corrosions-products in tissue samples near surgical implants by means of LAMMA (Laser Microprobe Mass Analyzer) and ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work corrosion products of surgical implants in tissue samples were identified. For the characterization of the corrosion products the LAMMA 500 (Laser Microprobe Mass Analyzer) was used. Additional analysis were made with the ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer) to determine the concentration of chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum in the tissues. In the first part several synthetic chromium- and molybdenum compounds were investigated with LAMMA. With the anionic mass spectra of the chromium-compounds it is possible to the oxidation state of chromium. The mass spectra of the synthetic compounds were used to identify, the compounds in the corrosion products. In the second part thin sections prepared from the tissue samples from the surrounding of the implants were analyzed. Several embedding and cutting methods were tested. Histological staining methods and LAMMA spectra were used to characterize the deposits in the tissue. Three different deposits were found in the tissue. In all tissues metal splinters from the implant were found. In most of the tissues iron-rich deposits were found, that were identified as iron-phosphate. As definitive corrosion products of the implant mixtures of chromium(III)phosphate, calcium molybdate, calcium phosphate and chromium(III) molybdate were identified. The ICP-MS results show in comparison to normal values, very high concentrations for chromium, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum. These results support the conclusions based on LAMMA results. The results of these investigations clearly indicate, that stainless steel implants, are not corrosion-resistant in the body. Relatively high amounts of the constituents, of the implant dissolved, and are deposited as solid compounds in the tissue next to the implant. (author)

  4. Proteomics analysis of tissue samples from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis and positive to human papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Koifman; Paulo Ornellas; Antonio Augusto Ornellas; Denise de Abreu Pereira; Benedeta Russolina Zingali; Silvia Maria Baeta Cavalcanti; Larissa Alves Afonso; Vanessa Sandim; Gilda Alves

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify possible protein biomarkers and/or candidates for therapeutic targets in tissues of patients with SCCP, infected by HPV, applying one dimensional electrophoresis (1DE), followed by direct mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Materials and Methods: Tissues from 10 HPV positive patients with SCCP and from 10 patients with HPV negative non-tumorous penile foreskins were analyzed applying 1D electrophoresis, followed by analysis with direct mass...

  5. Some Precautions in Preparation of Blood Plasma Samples Labelled with 3HOH in Liquid Scintillation Counting to Estimate Total Body Water in Farm Animals Using Nuclear Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of counting the tritiated water radioactivity in Liquid Scintillation is dependent on the careful control of several experimental variables. Obtaining the data necessary to evaluate the precision of nuclear techniques is the objective of this study. The effect of mixing the suspended precipitate, precipitate of sedimentation, light exposure and temperature on liquid scintillation counting are studied. The results showed that unmixed suspended precipitation decreased the counting of liquid scintillation by 38.2%. In addition, sedimentation of the precipitate of plasma proteins in the liquid scintillation counter is important because the average of the samples count was lower about 3.5% in case plasma samples were counted before the precipitate sedimentation. Plasma samples exposure to either day or florescent light caused over counting by 7.1 and 7.6% respectively. Frozen plasma samples labelled with TOH caused a decrease in normal counting by 9.5%. In addition, it was compared between internal standard and dioxane precipitation techniques to estimate total body water in farm animals with taking the precaution mentioned previously in considerations. The internal standard method and precipitation method gave comparable counting (4599 vs 4317 cpm, respectively) and total body water values (209.3 vs 211.9L, respectively).

  6. Failed detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 subgenotype a (BVDV-2a) by direct fluorescent antibody test on tissue samples due to reduced reactivity of field isolates to raw anti-BVDV antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lifang; Pace, Lanny W; Baughman, Brittany; Wilson, Floyd D; Zhang, Shuping; Zhang, Michael Z

    2016-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) is associated with mild or subclinical infections, whereas BVDV-2 is frequently implicated in outbreaks of severe thrombocytopenia and acute fatal disease. In the present study, the carcass of a beef breed cow and tissue samples of a beef calf were received for laboratory diagnosis. Both animals exhibited severe clinical signs compatible with thrombocytopenia or hemorrhagic syndrome. Direct fluorescent antibody test (DFAT) failed to detect BVDV antigen in the tissue specimens of both cases. However, immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed the presence of BVDV antigen in oral and esophageal mucosa and Peyer patches of the beef breed cow. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) detected BVDV-2 in selected tissues of both animals. Subsequently, BVDV was isolated from both cases and subjected to genetic and serologic characterizations. Mutations in the 5'-untranslated genomic region (5'-UTR) primer and probe binding sites and the E2 gene were associated with reduced efficiency of an established real-time RT-PCR assay and amino acid alterations in the E2 glycoprotein, respectively. Both viral isolates were classified by real-time RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis as BVDV-2 subgenotype a. Unlike BVDV reference strains Singer and 125c, the isolates cross-reacted with anti-BVDV-1 and anti-BVDV-2 reference sera, indicating antigenic variations in field isolates. The isolates also showed reduced reactivity to porcine anti-BVDV antiserum (the raw serum used to produce BVDV DFA conjugate). In summary, data from the present investigation indicated that genetic and antigenic variations affected the performance of detection assays, especially DFAT, highlighting the need for regular evaluation and modification of BVDV tests. PMID:26965235

  7. Application of FTA technology for sampling, recovery and molecular characterization of viral pathogens and virus-derived transgenes from plant tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aveling Terry

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant viral diseases present major constraints to crop production. Effective sampling of the viruses infecting plants is required to facilitate their molecular study and is essential for the development of crop protection and improvement programs. Retaining integrity of viral pathogens within sampled plant tissues is often a limiting factor in this process, most especially when sample sizes are large and when operating in developing counties and regions remote from laboratory facilities. FTA is a paper-based system designed to fix and store nucleic acids directly from fresh tissues pressed into the treated paper. We report here the use of FTA as an effective technology for sampling and retrieval of DNA and RNA viruses from plant tissues and their subsequent molecular analysis. Results DNA and RNA viruses were successfully recovered from leaf tissues of maize, cassava, tomato and tobacco pressed into FTA® Classic Cards. Viral nucleic acids eluted from FTA cards were found to be suitable for diagnostic molecular analysis by PCR-based techniques and restriction analysis, and for cloning and nucleotide sequencing in a manner equivalent to that offered by tradition isolation methods. Efficacy of the technology was demonstrated both from sampled greenhouse-grown plants and from leaf presses taken from crop plants growing in farmer's fields in East Africa. In addition, FTA technology was shown to be suitable for recovery of viral-derived transgene sequences integrated into the plant genome. Conclusion Results demonstrate that FTA is a practical, economical and sensitive method for sampling, storage and retrieval of viral pathogens and plant genomic sequences, when working under controlled conditions and in the field. Application of this technology has the potential to significantly increase ability to bring modern analytical techniques to bear on the viral pathogens infecting crop plants.

  8. A Correlative Method for Imaging Identical Regions of Samples by Micro-CT, Light Microscopy, and Electron Microscopy: Imaging Adipose Tissue in a Model System

    OpenAIRE

    Sengle, Gerhard; Tufa, Sara F.; Sakai, Lynn Y.; Zulliger, Martin A.; Keene, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    We present a method in which a precise region of interest within an intact organism is spatially mapped in three dimensions by non-invasive micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT), then further evaluated by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissues are prepared as if for TEM including osmium fixation, which imparts soft tissue contrast in the micro-CT due to its strong X-ray attenuation. This method may therefore be applied to embedded, archived TEM samples....

  9. Isolation of DNA after Extraction of RNA To Detect the Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi and Expression of Host Cellular Genes from the Same Tissue Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemiya, Kei; Schaefer, Henry; Pachner, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating the neuropathogenesis of Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi in a nonhuman primate model. In the past, two separate pieces of tissue had to be used when both analyzing for the presence of the spirochete and examining the host response to infection. We have modified a procedure to purify DNA from the same sample after the extraction of RNA. The remaining material containing the DNA was precipitated, and residual organic reagent was removed prior to deproteinization and extraction of the DNA. This procedure now allows us to both assay for the presence of the Lyme microorganism and analyze the host response in the same tissue preparation. PMID:10325389

  10. Effect of soil and water environment on typeability of PowerPlex Y (Promega) in selected tissue samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Koc-Zorawska; Jerzy Janica; Malgorzata Skawronska; Jacek Robert Janica; Witold Pepinski; Anna Niemcunowicz-Janica; Ireneusz Stolyszewski

    2008-01-01

    In cases of decomposed bodies Y chromosomal STR markers may be useful in identification of a male relative. The authors assessed typeability PowerPlex Y (Promega) loci in tissue material stored in water and soil environment. Tissue material was collected during autopsies of five persons aged 20-30 years with time of death determined within the limit of 14 hours. Heart muscle, liver and lung specimens were stored in pond water, sea water, sand and peat soil. DNA was extracted by organic method...

  11. Quantitative analysis of very small quantity of organs taken from patients and experimental animals. Standard-free method for organ samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A standard-free method for small lymph node and spleen samples taken from rats, and lymph node, esophagus, colon etc. taken from real patients has been developed in order to take measure to meet increasing demands for quantitative analyses of small amount of organs. It becomes possible to quantitatively analyze organ samples of less than 1 mg collected from small experimental animals and also from patients by biopsy, and accuracy and sensitivity of the method were examined by comparing the results with those obtained by a powdered-internal-standard method and a chemical-ashing method. It is found that the method is quite effective for estimating therapeutic effect of CDDP (Cisplatin) since it allows us to quantitatively evaluate uptake of CDDP into organs by analyzing small quantity of samples taken from actual patients by biopsy. It is expected that the method will become a powerful tool for studies not only in fundamental and clinical medicines but also on practical diagnosis and treatment. (author)

  12. Trace metals in mussel shells and corresponding soft tissue samples: a validation experiment for the use of Perna perna shells in pollution monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotto, V.R. [Vale do Itajai University (UNIVALI), CTTMAR (Center for Technology Earth and Ocean Science), Itajai (Brazil); Miekeley, N. [Pontifical Catholic University (PUC-Rio), Department of Chemistry, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-10-15

    The uptake of Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in soft tissue of Perna perna mussels and their shells has been studied in aquarium experiments in which mussels were exposed for 30 or 60 days to seawater spiked with different concentrations of these contaminants (125 and 500 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Tissue samples were analyzed after acid digestion by conventional solution nebulization ICP-MS. Laser ablation ICP-MS was used for the quantitative determination of trace elements in different areas of the corresponding shells. With the exception of Mn and Zn, all other elements studied showed a significant concentration enhancements in soft tissue, with the magnitude of this enhancement following the order: Cr > Ni > Cd > Cu > Pb. A corresponding increase in most contaminants, although less pronounced, was also observed in the newly formed growth rings of mussel shells, contributing to the validation of Perna perna mussel shell as a bioindicator of toxic elements. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ensel Oh; Yoon-La Choi; Mi Jeong Kwon; Ryong Nam Kim; Yu Jin Kim; Ji-Young Song; Kyung Soo Jung; Young Kee Shin

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing o...

  14. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Bedeković Tomislav; Lemo Nina; Lojkić Ivana; Beck Ana; Lojkić Mirko; Madić Josip

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One...

  15. Development of a novel DNA extraction method for identification and quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from tissue samples by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kun Taek; Allen, Andrew J; Davis, William C

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants and possibly associated with human Crohn's disease. One impediment in furthering our understanding of this potential association has been the lack of an accurate method for detection of Map in affected tissues. Real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods have been reported to have different sensitivities in detection of Map. This is in part attributable to the difficulties of extracting Map DNA and removing PCR inhibitors from the clinical specimens. The maximum efficiency of RT-PCR can only be achieved by using high quality DNA samples. In this study, we present a novel pre-treatment method which significantly increases Map DNA recovery and decreases PCR inhibitors (pMap DNA extraction method from tissue samples will make RT-PCR a more powerful tool for a wide range of applications for Map identification and quantification. PMID:24534783

  16. Proteomics analysis of tissue samples from patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis and positive to human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Koifman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:The aim of this study was to identify possible protein biomarkers and/or candidates for therapeutic targets in tissues of patients with SCCP, infected by HPV, applying one dimensional electrophoresis (1DE, followed by direct mass spectrometry (MS analysis.Materials and Methods:Tissues from 10 HPV positive patients with SCCP and from 10 patients with HPV negative non-tumorous penile foreskins were analyzed applying 1D electrophoresis, followed by analysis with direct mass spectrometry (MS.Results:Sixty-three different proteins were identified in the first group and 50 in the second group. Recognition was possible for 28 proteins exclusively detected in Group 1 and 21 proteins presented only in Group 2.Conclusion:Some proteins in the first group are directly involved in the development of other types of cancer, and therefore, suitable for analysis. Complement C3 protein is a strong candidate for evaluating SCCP patients.

  17. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID

  18. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mee, Blanaid C.

    2011-12-29

    The Saint James\\'s Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260\\/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng\\/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng\\/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng\\/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng\\/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates.

  19. Isolation of DNA after Extraction of RNA To Detect the Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi and Expression of Host Cellular Genes from the Same Tissue Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Amemiya, Kei; Schaefer, Henry; Pachner, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating the neuropathogenesis of Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi in a nonhuman primate model. In the past, two separate pieces of tissue had to be used when both analyzing for the presence of the spirochete and examining the host response to infection. We have modified a procedure to purify DNA from the same sample after the extraction of RNA. The remaining material containing the DNA was precipitated, and residual organic reagent was removed prior to deproteinization...

  20. IgG and IgM anti-snRNP reactivity in sequentially obtained serum samples from patients with connective tissue diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyman, U; Lundberg, I; Hedfors, E; Wahren, M; Pettersson, I

    1992-01-01

    Sequentially obtained serum samples from 30 patients with connective tissue disease positive for antibody to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) were examined to determine the specificities of IgG and IgM antibodies to snRNP during the disease course using immunoblotting of nuclear extracts. The antibody patterns were correlated with disease activity. The patterns of antibody to snRNP of individual patients were mainly stable during the study but changes in levels of antibody to snRNP were seen correspon...

  1. Opening the archives for state of the art tumour genetic research: sample processing for array-CGH using decalcified, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue-derived DNA samples

    OpenAIRE

    Bovee Judith VMG; Hogendoorn Pancras CW; Meijer Danielle; Verbeke Sofie LJ; de Jong Danielle; Szuhai Károly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genetic studies on rare tumour entities, such as bone tumours, often require the use of decalcified, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (dFFPE) samples. Regardless of which decalcification procedure is used, this introduces a vast breakdown of DNA that precludes the possibility of further molecular genetic testing. We set out to establish a robust protocol that would overcome these intrinsic hurdles for bone tumour research. Findings The goal of our study w...

  2. Numerical and structural genomic aberrations are reliably detectable in tissue microarrays of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Horn

    Full Text Available Few data are available regarding the reliability of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH, especially for chromosomal deletions, in high-throughput settings using tissue microarrays (TMAs. We performed a comprehensive FISH study for the detection of chromosomal translocations and deletions in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor specimens arranged in TMA format. We analyzed 46 B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL specimens with known karyotypes for translocations of IGH-, BCL2-, BCL6- and MYC-genes. Locus-specific DNA probes were used for the detection of deletions in chromosome bands 6q21 and 9p21 in 62 follicular lymphomas (FL and six malignant mesothelioma (MM samples, respectively. To test for aberrant signals generated by truncation of nuclei following sectioning of FFPE tissue samples, cell line dilutions with 9p21-deletions were embedded into paraffin blocks. The overall TMA hybridization efficiency was 94%. FISH results regarding translocations matched karyotyping data in 93%. As for chromosomal deletions, sectioning artefacts occurred in 17% to 25% of cells, suggesting that the proportion of cells showing deletions should exceed 25% to be reliably detectable. In conclusion, FISH represents a robust tool for the detection of structural as well as numerical aberrations in FFPE tissue samples in a TMA-based high-throughput setting, when rigorous cut-off values and appropriate controls are maintained, and, of note, was superior to quantitative PCR approaches.

  3. Nested-PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in bronchial alveolar swabs, frozen tissues and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded swine lung samples: comparative evaluation with immunohistochemical findings and histological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula R. Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection is often performed through histopathology, immunohistochemistry (IHC and polymerase chain reaction (PCR or a combination of these techniques. PCR can be performed on samples using several conservation methods, including swabs, frozen tissue or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. However, the formalin fixation process often inhibits DNA amplification. To evaluate whether M. hyopneumoniae DNA could be recovered from FFPE tissues, 15 lungs with cranioventral consolidation lesions were collected in a slaughterhouse from swine bred in herds with respiratory disease. Bronchial swabs and fresh lung tissue were collected, and a fragment of the corresponding lung section was placed in neutral buffered formalin for 48 hours. A PCR assay was performed to compare FFPE tissue samples with samples that were only refrigerated (bronchial swabs or frozen (tissue pieces. M. hyopneumoniae was detected by PCR in all 15 samples of the swab and frozen tissue, while it was detected in only 11 of the 15 FFPE samples. Histological features of M. hyopneumoniae infection were presented in 11 cases and 7 of these samples stained positive in IHC. Concordance between the histological features and detection results was observed in 13 of the FFPE tissue samples. PCR was the most sensitive technique. Comparison of different sample conservation methods indicated that it is possible to detect M. hyopneumoniae from FFPE tissue. It is important to conduct further research using archived material because the efficiency of PCR could be compromised under these conditions.

  4. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterisation of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli Obtained from Animal Fecal Samples in Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga Adekunle Olowe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs producing E. coli in animals and different methods of identifications from Ado Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria, were investigated. Three hundred and fifty fecal samples, collected from apparently healthy cattle and pigs, were cultured and identified following standard procedures. ESBL phenotypic detection was carried out using combination disc test, double disc synergism test, and ESBL brilliance agar screening. Molecular detection of TEM, SHV, and CTX-M genes was carried out using standard molecular method. One hundred and fourteen E. coli isolates were recovered from the 350 samples processed, out of which 72 (63.2% isolates were positive for ESBLs with multiple resistance to the antibiotics used. Eighty-one (71% isolates were positive for ESBL by combination disc test, 90 (78.9% were positive for double disc synergism test, and 93 (81.6% were positive for ESBL brilliance agar. TEM and CTX-M genes were detected in 48 (42.1% and 51 (44.7% isolates, respectively. SHV gene was not detected in any of the isolates while TEM and CTX-M were detected in 33 (28.9% isolates. This study showed high resistance of E. coli to antibiotics, particularly to the third generation cephalosporins. Regular monitoring and regulated use of antibiotics in livestock should be encouraged.

  5. A compact and high sensitivity positron detector using dual-layer thin GSO scintillators for a small animal PET blood sampling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanai, Yasukazu; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Minato, Kotaro; Shimizu, Keiji; Senda, Michio; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    For quantitative measurements of small animals such as mice or rats, a compact and high sensitivity continuous blood sampling detector is required because their blood sampling volume is limited. For this purpose we have developed and tested a new positron detector. The positron detector uses a pair of dual-layer thin gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times. The front layer detects the positron and the background gamma photons, and the back layer detects the background gamma photons. By subtracting the count rate of the latter from that of the former, the count rate of the positrons can be estimated. The GSO for the front layer has a Ce concentration of 1.5 mol% (decay time of 35 ns), and that for the back layer has a Ce concentration of 0.5 mol% (decay time of 60 ns). By using the pulse shape analysis, the count rate of these two GSOs can be discriminated. The thickness is 0.5 mm, which is thick enough to detect positrons while minimizing the detection of the background gamma photons. These two types of thin GSOs were optically coupled to each other and connected to a metal photomultiplier tube (PMT) through triangular light guides. The signal from the PMT was digitized by 100 MHz free-running A-D converters in the data acquisition system and digitally integrated at two different integration times for the pulse shape analysis. We obtained good separation of the pulse shape distributions of these two GSOs. The energy threshold level was decreased to 80 keV, increasing the sensitivity of the detector. The sensitivity of a small diameter plastic tube was 8.6% and 24% for the F-18 and C-11 positrons, respectively. The count rate performance was linear up to approximately 50 kcps. The background counts from the gamma photons could be precisely corrected. The time-activity curve (TAC) of the rat artery blood was successfully obtained and showed a good correlation with that measured using a well counter. With these results, we confirmed

  6. A compact and high sensitivity positron detector using dual-layer thin GSO scintillators for a small animal PET blood sampling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For quantitative measurements of small animals such as mice or rats, a compact and high sensitivity continuous blood sampling detector is required because their blood sampling volume is limited. For this purpose we have developed and tested a new positron detector. The positron detector uses a pair of dual-layer thin gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times. The front layer detects the positron and the background gamma photons, and the back layer detects the background gamma photons. By subtracting the count rate of the latter from that of the former, the count rate of the positrons can be estimated. The GSO for the front layer has a Ce concentration of 1.5 mol% (decay time of 35 ns), and that for the back layer has a Ce concentration of 0.5 mol% (decay time of 60 ns). By using the pulse shape analysis, the count rate of these two GSOs can be discriminated. The thickness is 0.5 mm, which is thick enough to detect positrons while minimizing the detection of the background gamma photons. These two types of thin GSOs were optically coupled to each other and connected to a metal photomultiplier tube (PMT) through triangular light guides. The signal from the PMT was digitized by 100 MHz free-running A-D converters in the data acquisition system and digitally integrated at two different integration times for the pulse shape analysis. We obtained good separation of the pulse shape distributions of these two GSOs. The energy threshold level was decreased to 80 keV, increasing the sensitivity of the detector. The sensitivity of a small diameter plastic tube was 8.6% and 24% for the F-18 and C-11 positrons, respectively. The count rate performance was linear up to ∼50 kcps. The background counts from the gamma photons could be precisely corrected. The time-activity curve (TAC) of the rat artery blood was successfully obtained and showed a good correlation with that measured using a well counter. With these results, we confirmed that the

  7. Determination of reference interval values for inorganic elements in whole blood samples of humans and laboratory animals by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic elements are responsible for essential bodily functions, such as osmotic regulation, cardiac frequency and contractibility, blood clotting and neuromuscular excitability. The determination of inorganic elements in corporeal fluids such as blood, serum, plasma and urine is used as a monitor for a part or the whole organism; their values, then, are compared with reference interval values. In this study, the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF), applying the Fundamental Parameters method, for the determination of inorganic elements in whole blood samples from humans and laboratory animals, was used. Peripheral blood samples were collected and, before coagulation, 100 μL of sample were deposited onto Whatman No. 41 filter paper and dried, using infrared spotlight. The reference interval values for healthy Brazilian population of Na were found to be 1,788-1,826 μg g-1, of Mg 63-75 μg g-1, of P 602-676 μg g-1, of S 1,519-1,718 μg g-1, of Cl 2,743-2,867 μg g-1, of K 1,508-1,630 μg g-1, of Ca 214-228 μg g-1, of Fe 170-184 μg g-1, of Cu 4-6 μg g-1 and of Zn 1-3 μg g-1. The reference interval values for golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) of Na were found to be 1,714-1,819 μg g-1, Mg 51-79 μg g-1, P 970-1,080 μg g-1, S 1,231-1,739 μg g-1, Cl 2,775-2,865 μg g-1, of K 1,968-2,248 μg g-1, of Ca 209-257 μg g-1, of Fe 145-267 μg g-1, of Cu 4-6 μg g-1 and of Zn 3-5 μg g-1. A comparative study between EDXRF and instrumental neutron activation analysis data was carried out and the results for both techniques are statistically equal (α = 0.05). The results contribute for the establishment of reference interval values for Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cu and Zn in the healthy Brazilian population and the referred laboratory animal species. (author)

  8. A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the determination of linarin in small-volume rat plasma and tissue samples and its application to pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xinchi; Liu, Youping; Wang, Xin; Di, Xin

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of linarin in small-volume rat plasma and tissue sample. Sample preparation was employed by the combination of protein precipitation (PPT) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) to allow measurement over a 5-order-of-magnitude concentration range. Fast chromatographic separation was achieved on a Hypersil Gold column (100 × 2.1 mm i.d., 5 µm). Mass spectrometric detection was achieved using a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization interface operating in positive ionization mode. Quantification was performed using selected reaction monitoring of precursor-product ion transitions at m/z 593 → 285 for linarin and m/z 447 → 271 for baicalin (internal standard). The total run time was only 2.8 min per sample. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 0.4-200 µg/mL for PPT and 0.001-1.0 µg/mL for LLE. A lower limit of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL was achieved using only 20 μL of plasma or tissue homogenate. The intra- and inter-day precisions in all samples were ≤14.7%, while the accuracy was within ±5.2% of nominal values. The validated method has been successfully applied to pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution study of linarin. PMID:26385597

  9. Organ-specific pollutant analyses on tissue samples of former uranium miners of SAG/SDAG WISMUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the German Cancer Research Centre Heidelberg samples of 247 persons, selected according to pathological criteria, have been examined for uranium mining pollutant content. Samples were taken from the former Central Pathological Institute Stollberg of the SAG/SDAG Wismut. It comprises samples of lung, lymphnodes and liver as relevant paraffin embedded organ samples for the investigations. The investigated group of workers was classified according to exposure to long lived radionuclides (LRN, U-238 containing dust), and latency time. 105 cases expressed a lung tumor. By means of mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) the content of U, Th, As, Pb, Co, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Cu, and Zn was measured at samples of lung, lymphnodes, and liver. The measured organ content was correlated to the job case histories. The expected uranium content was modelled according to ICRP models. The calculations were carried out by means of 'DOSAGE', a computer code of the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS-SG). The code is based on ICRP lung and biokinetic models. Modelling is carried out on basis of radionuclide intakes via lung, revealed from data of an individual job exposure matrix (JEM, state: June 2003) for LRN supplied by the Main Occupational Safety Association (HVBG). Statistical analyses of the measured data were carried out for the variables 'cumulated intake', 'year of the first exposure', 'time after end of exposure' and 'lung tumor occurrence'. (orig.)

  10. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  11. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  12. Content determination and health risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in fish tissue samples from Perhentian Island, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in three fish species with different feeding habits and habitat for examples Lolong (Selar boops), Kerisi (Nemipterus peronii) dan Mengkarong (Trachinocephalus myops) from offshore of Perhentian Island, Malaysia was determined. Three individuals from each species were taken at random and the PAHs contents were determined in the muscles. Ten PAH compounds, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene were determined. PAH in fish tissues was extracted using Soxhlet method and detected using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The level of PAH in fish tissue ranged from 17.89 - 42.18 ng/ g wet weight and 393.98 - 511.07 ng/ g lipid weight. The order of PAH concentration in wet weight was Kerisi (511.07 ng/ g)> Mengkarong (409.50 ng/ g)> Lolong (393.98 ng/ g) but in terms of lipid weight, the order was Kerisi (511.07 ng/ g)> Mengkarong (409.50 ng/ g)> Lolong (393.98 ng/ g). Kerisi has the lowest lipid content of 3.5 % compared to Lolong (6.5 %) and Mengkarong (10.3 %). No obvious significant difference (p > 0.05) of PAH levels in three fish species was observed (ANOVA, p > 0.05). There was no significant relationship between lipid content and PAH accumulation in fish. Based on fish consumption rate of 142.2 g/ day, the Potency Equivalent Concentration (PEC), which is a carcinogenic potency value for PAH, was found to be ranged from 0.41 - 0.63 ng/ g wet weight in all three species of fish. This value is below the limit set by USEPA, which is 0.67 ng/ g wet weight for human consumption. (author)

  13. The determination of 22 natural brassinosteroids in a minute sample of plant tissue by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Oklestkova, Jana; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    The triterpenoid plant hormones brassinosteroids (BRs) are believed to influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. We have developed a sensitive mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous profiling of twenty-two naturally occurring brassinosteroids including biosynthetic precursors and the majority of biologically active metabolites. Using ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) analysis, the run time was reduced up to three times (to 9 min) in comparison to standard HPLC BRs analyses, the retention time stability was improved to 0.1-0.2 % RSD and the injection accuracy was increased to 1.1-4.9 % RSD. The procedures for extraction and for two-step purification based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) were optimised in combination with subsequent UHPLC analysis coupled to electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) using Brassica flowers and Arabidopsis plant tissue extracts. In multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, the average detection limit for BRs analysed was close to 7 pg, and the linear range covered up to 3 orders of magnitude. The low detection limits for this broad range of BR metabolites enabled as little as 50 mg of plant tissue to be used for quantitative analyses. The results of determinations exploiting internal standards showed that this approach provides a high level of practicality, reproducibility and recovery. The method we have established will enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of the biosynthesis and metabolism of brassinosteroids and their modes of action in plant growth and development. PMID:27531032

  14. Effect of sample preparation techniques on the concentrations and distributions of elements in biological tissues using µSRXRF: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine tissue sample preparation using chemical fixatives is known to preserve the morphology of the tissue being studied. A competitive method, cryofixation followed by freeze drying, involves no chemical agents and maintains the biological function of the tissue. The possible effects of both sample preparation techniques in terms of the distribution of bio-metals (calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) specifically) in human skin tissue samples was investigated. Micro synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) was used to map bio-metal distribution in epidermal and dermal layers of human skin samples from various locations of the body that have been prepared using both techniques. For Ca, Cu and Zn, there were statistically significant differences between the epidermis and dermis using the freeze drying technique (p = 0.02, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). Also using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique the levels of Ca, Cu and Zn, were significantly different between the epidermis and dermis layers (p = 0.03, p < 0.01, and p < 0.01, respectively). However, the difference in levels of Fe between the epidermis and dermis was unclear and further analysis was required. The epidermis was further divided into two sub-layers, one mainly composed of the stratum corneum and the other deeper layer, the stratum basale. It was found that the difference between the distribution of Fe in the two epidermal layers using the freeze drying technique resulted in a statistically significant difference (p = 0.012). This same region also showed a difference in Fe using the formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique (p < 0.01). The formalin fixed, paraffin embedded technique also showed a difference between the deeper epidermal layer and the dermis (p < 0.01). It can be concluded that studies involving Ca, Cu and Zn might show similar results using both sample preparation techniques, however studies involving Fe would need more

  15. Direct online HPLC-CV-AFS method for traces of methylmercury without derivatisation: a matrix-independent method for urine, sediment and biological tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Gajdosechova, Zuzana; Chen, Bin; Brownlow, Andrew; Corns, Warren T; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant which occurs in different species, with methylmercury (MeHg) being the critical compound due to its neurotoxicity and bioaccumulation through the food chain. Methods for trace speciation of MeHg are therefore needed for a vast range of sample matrices, such as biological tissues, fluids, soils or sediments. We have previously developed an ultra-trace speciation method for methylmercury in water, based on a preconcentration HPLC cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CV-AFS) method. The focus of this work is mercury speciation in a variety of sample matrices to assess the versatility of the method. Certified reference materials were used where possible, and samples were spiked where reference materials were not available, e.g. human urine. Solid samples were submitted for commonly used digestion or extraction processes to obtain a liquid sample for injection into the analytical system. For MeHg in sediment samples, an extraction procedure was adapted to accommodate MeHg separation from high amounts of Hg(2+) to avoid an overload of the column. The recovery for MeHg determination was found to be in the range of 88-104% in fish reference materials (DOLT-2, DOLT-4, DORM-3), lobster (TORT-2), seaweed (IAEA-140/TM), sediments (ERM(®)-CC580) and spiked urine and has been proven to be robust, reliable, virtually matrix-independent and relatively cost-effective. Applications in the ultra-trace concentration range are possible using the preconcentration up to 200 mL, while for higher MeHg-containing samples, lower volumes can be applied. A comparison was carried out between species-specific isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SSID-GC-ICP-MS) as the gold standard and HPLC-CV-AFS for biological tissues (liver, kidney and muscle of pilot whales), showing a slope of 1.008 and R (2) = 0.97, which indicates that the HPLC-CV-AFS method achieves well-correlated results for MeHg in

  16. 动物组织中类胡萝卜素分析、分布的研究进展%Process on Analysis and Distribution Research of Carotenoids in Animal Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛峰; 李晨; 潘思轶

    2011-01-01

    对动物组织中类胡萝卜素的分析、分布和类胡萝卜素特异性结合蛋白的研究进行了综述.动物组织中类胡萝卜素的提取主要采用混合有机溶剂提取;分析检测主要采用反相高效液相色谱法和二极管阵列检测器;类胡萝卜素主要由小肠黏膜吸收;脂蛋白被认为参与类胡萝卜素的转运;β-胡萝卜素可经生物转化生成视黄醇;动物各组织对类胡萝卜素表现出选择性吸收,且这种选择性吸收因物种不同而差异显著;类胡萝卜素在吸收过程中相互之间存在交互作用,且这种交互作用主要发生在碳氢类胡萝卜素和含氧类胡萝卜素之间;类胡萝卜素的选择性吸收与交互作用被认为与组织中某种特异性结合蛋白的存在相关.%The carotenoids analysis and distribution in animal tissues and the study of carotenoids binding protein were reviewed in this article. Complete extraction of carotenoids from animal tissues was reported by using slightly polar solvents plus non -polar solvents;Reversed Phase High Pedormance Liquid Chromatography, coupling a photodiode array detector,was most often employed in routine use to analyze the carotenoids;carotenoids were absorbed by the mucosa of the small intestine;lipoproteins played an important role in transportation of carotenoids;the various pathways of β - carotene biotransformation were either known or suspected of occurring in mammalian tissues, and pathways known or proposed were involved in the conversion of β - carotene to retinoids; selective absorption of carotenoids was found in animal tissues and there were obvious variabilities in the selective absorption of carotenoid among animal species;the interactions between carotenoids were found during the process of absorption and antagonistic effects had been reported between the hydrocarbon carotenoids and oxycarotenoids;special carotenoids binding proteins had been isolated and purified from animal tissues, which

  17. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigbeder, Alice; Vélot, Lauriane; James, D Andrew; Bisson, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    A precisely controlled network of protein-protein interactions constitutes the basis for functional signaling pathways. This equilibrium is more often than not disrupted in cancer cells, by the aberrant expression or activation of oncogenic proteins. Therefore, the analysis of protein interaction networks in cancer cells has become crucial to expand our comprehension of the molecular underpinnings of tumor formation and progression. This protocol describes a sample preparation method for the analysis of signaling complexes by mass spectrometry (MS), following the affinity purification of a protein of interest from a cancer cell line or a solid tumor. In particular, we provide a spin tip-based protease digestion procedure that offers a more rapid and controlled alternative to other gel-based and gel-free methods. This sample preparation protocol represents a useful strategy to identify protein interactions and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that contribute to a given cancer phenotype. PMID:27581032

  18. A novel method for sample preparation of fresh lung cancer tissue for proteomics analysis by tumor cell enrichment and removal of blood contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orre Lotta

    2010-02-01

    was an effective removal of contaminants from red blood cells and plasma proteins resulting in larger proteome coverage compared to the direct lysis of frozen samples. This sample preparation method may be successfully implemented for the discovery of lung cancer biomarkers on tissue samples using mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

  19. Effects of Supplemental Acerola Juice on the Mineral Concentrations in Liver and Kidney Tissue Samples of Mice Fed with Cafeteria Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Daniela Dimer; dos Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; Amaral, Livio; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; da Silva, Juliana; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the impact of a supplemental acerola juice (unripe, ripe, and industrial) and its main pharmaceutically active components on the concentrations of minerals in the liver and kidney of mice fed with cafeteria diet. Swiss male mice were fed with a cafeteria (CAF) diet for 13 weeks. The CAF consisted of a variety of supermarket products with high energy content. Subsequently, animals received one of the following food supplements for 1 month: water, unripe acerola juice, ripe acerola juice, industrial acerola juice, vitamin C, or rutin. Mineral concentrations of the tissues were determined by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Our study suggests that the simultaneous intake of acerola juices, vitamin C, or rutin in association with a hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet provides change in the mineral composition of organisms in the conditions of this study, which plays an important role in the antioxidant defenses of the body. This may help to reduce the metabolism of the fat tissue or even to reduce the oxidative stress. PMID:25724149

  20. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola M Marcinkiewicz

    Full Text Available The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age. Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung.

  1. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M; Baker, Sandy T; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L; Wolfson, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  2. The development of an optimized sample preparation for trace level detection of 17α-ethinylestradiol and estrone in whole fish tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Saleem, Ammar; Kimpe, Linda E; Trudeau, Vance L; Blais, Jules M

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an optimized method for the extraction and determination of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and estrone (E1) in whole fish tissues at ng/g levels. The optimized procedure for sample preparation includes extraction of tissue by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE-200), lipid removal by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and a cleanup step by acetonitrile precipitation followed by a hexane wash. Analysis was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode after samples were derivatized with pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCl). The method was developed using high lipid content wild fish that were exposed to the tested analytes. The whole procedure recoveries ranged from 74.5 to 93.7% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.3-6.2% for EE2 and 64.8 to 91.6% with RSD of 9.46-0.18% for E1. The method detection limits were 0.67 ng/g for EE2 and 0.68 ng/g for E1 dry weight. The method was applied to determine EE2 levels in male goldfish (Carrasius auratus) after a 72 h dietary exposure. All samples contained EE2 averaging 1.7ng/g (±0.29 standard deviation, n=5). This is the first optimized protocol for EE2 extraction from whole fish tissue at environmentally relevant concentrations. Due to high sensitivity and recovery, the developed method will improve our knowledge about the environmental fate and uptake of synthetic steroidal estrogens in fish populations. PMID:21982913

  3. " Animal, trop animal "

    OpenAIRE

    Potestà, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Dans la tradition philosophique, on trouve plusieurs définitions de l’homme. La célèbre définition aristotélicienne, zoon logon echon (animal doué du langage ou animal rationnel) fournit le paradigme ainsi que la méthode de toutes les définitions successives. Il s’agit d’ajouter au vivant, à l’animal, quelque chose d’autre, quelque chose de plus, qui permette de le caractériser et le fasse entendre comme différent des bêtes. Cette diversité peut être conçue différemment : en tant qu’élévation...

  4. Animal Model of Dermatophytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyoshi Shimamura; Nobuo Kubota; Kazutoshi Shibuya

    2012-01-01

    Dermatophytosis is superficial fungal infection caused by dermatophytes that invade the keratinized tissue of humans and animals. Lesions from dermatophytosis exhibit an inflammatory reaction induced to eliminate the invading fungi by using the host’s normal immune function. Many scientists have attempted to establish an experimental animal model to elucidate the pathogenesis of human dermatophytosis and evaluate drug efficacy. However, current animal models have several issues. In the presen...

  5. Ambient Molecular Analysis of Biological Tissue Using Low-Energy, Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanospray Postionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fengjian; Flanigan, Paul M.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct analysis of plant and animal tissue samples by laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) was investigated using low-energy, femtosecond duration laser vaporization at wavelengths of 800 and 1042 nm followed by nanospray postionization. Low-energy (optimal cutting temperature compounds that are commonly used in animal tissue cryosections.

  6. Tissue slices in the study of lung metabolism and toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, B.A.; O'Neil, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Lung tissue slices are model systems for the study of pulmonary metabolism. Because of the speed and simplicity of slice preparation, lung slices have been used in studies of oxygen, amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid utilization and adenine nucleotide metabolism. Dose-response characteristics for toxicants are readily described because multiple lung samples can be studied from the same animal or a population of animals. Lung slices prepared from animals exposed to oxidant air pollutants exhi...

  7. The use of laser microdissection in the identification of suitable reference genes for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR in human FFPE epithelial ovarian tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cai

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR is a powerful and reproducible method of gene expression analysis in which expression levels are quantified by normalization against reference genes. Therefore, to investigate the potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for epithelial ovarian cancer by qPCR, it is critical to identify stable reference genes. In this study, twelve housekeeping genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18S rRNA, GUSB, PPIA, PBGD, PUM1, TBP, HRPT1, RPLP0, RPL13A, and B2M were analyzed in 50 ovarian samples from normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissues. For reliable results, laser microdissection (LMD, an effective technique used to prepare homogeneous starting material, was utilized to precisely excise target tissues or cells. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the expression differences. NormFinder and geNorm software were employed to further validate the suitability and stability of the candidate genes. Results showed that epithelial cells occupied a small percentage of the normal ovary indeed. The expression of ACTB, PPIA, RPL13A, RPLP0, and TBP were stable independent of the disease progression. In addition, NormFinder and geNorm identified the most stable combination (ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP and the relatively unstable reference gene GAPDH from the twelve commonly used housekeeping genes. Our results highlight the use of homogeneous ovarian tissues and multiple-reference normalization strategy, e.g. the combination of ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP, for qPCR in epithelial ovarian tissues, whereas GAPDH, the most commonly used reference gene, is not recommended, especially as a single reference gene.

  8. Development and evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the rapid diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei in archived tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiufeng; Li, Xiqing; Zeng, Hanxiang; Xie, Zhi; Lu, Changming; Xi, Liyan; de Hoog, Gert S

    2010-04-01

    Penicillium marneffei is the etiologic agent of a severe systemic disease in immunocompromised hosts in Southeast Asia. In the present study, a novel method, known as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), is described for the rapid and specific detection of the species, using a primer set derived from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA gene. Amplification products can be detected macroscopically by visual inspection in vials using SYBR Green I as well as by electrophoresis on agarose gel. The LAMP assay resulted in specific amplification of P. marneffei ITS using pure cultures after a 1-h reaction at 65 degrees C in a water bath; no cross-reactivity with other fungi including other biverticillate penicillia was observed. The detectable DNA limit was two copies. In addition, specific amplification was achieved using paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples from patients with penicilliosis marneffei and tissue samples from bamboo rats. The method provides a powerful tool for rapid diagnostics in the clinical lab, and has potential for use in ecological studies. PMID:20113352

  9. 1300 nm and 890 nm OCT images of oral cancer tissue engineered models and biopsy samples offer complimentary performance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, Joseph; Byers, Robert A.; Fernandes, Jon; Mittar, Shweta; Hearnden, Vanessa; Lu, Zenghai; MacNeil, Sheila; Thornhill, Martin; Murdoch, Craig; Hunter, Keith D.; McKechnie, Alasdair; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    OCT has demonstrated great potential to non-invasively detect oral epithelial cancers, potentially guiding biopsy and surgical resection. On non-ophthalmic tissues the preferred illumination wavelength is 1300 nm. Previous studies on skin have shown that useful image data can also be obtained at shorter wavelengths, with systems at 1060 nm and 820 nm offering reduced depth penetration but higher contrast. Here we apply a similar comparison to tissue engineered models of oral cancer and also to human biopsy samples, generally finding a similar trend. 1300 nm multi-beam OCT (Michelson Diagnostics EX1301) visualises stromal structures and surface keratin more clearly, providing useful image contrast down to around 1 mm. This system was compared with an ultra-high resolution home-built system operating at 890 nm (2.5 micron resolution vs 7.5 micron axial resolution for the EX1301). The UHR system reveals epithelial features more clearly, especially in the DOK pre-invasive cell line model and the biopsy samples. The relative effects of center wavelength vs axial resolution in generating the differential, wavelength-dependent contrast are assessed and the OCT biopsy images are compared with contemporary histology.

  10. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Isabel Favier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3% than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8% and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%. Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5% and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%. One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%. S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%. The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures.

  11. Comprehensive kinetics of triiodothyronine production, distribution, and metabolism in blood and tissue pools of the rat using optimized blood-sampling protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, J J; Jang, M; Malone, T K; Broutman, M

    1982-01-01

    We have determined estimates for 24 physiological parameters of production, interpool transport, distribution, and metabolism of T3 in the major T3 pools of the unanesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rat, from blood-borne data and a comprehensive model and analysis of this system. Most of these indices have previously been unavailable. Whereas only 3% (2 ng/100 g BW) of the total body T3 pool (74 ng/100 g BW) is in plasma, the composite of slowly equilibrating (slow) tissue pools (e.g. muscle, skin, and brain) appears to contain most of the T3, 76% (57 ng/100 g BW) of the total. The composite of rapidly equilibrating (fast) tissue pools (e.g. liver and kidney) contains the remaining 19% (16 ng/100 g BW). The total body T3 production rate is 0.12 ng/100 g BW . min, and we estimate that about half of this emanates directly from T4 in the slow pools, whereas the remainder is derived from both thyroidal secretion and T4 to T3 conversion in the fast pools. Our results also indicate that T3 molecules spend an average of only 0.5 min in transit each time through plasma, whereas the single pass mean transit times in fast and slow tissue pools (the times available for hormone action) are 10 times and 200 times greater. In contrast, the mean residence time for T3 in the entire system is greater than 12 h despite the extremely rapid early disappearance of injected T3 from plasma. To obtain the required accuracy, we used a novel optimization approach for choosing blood-sampling schedules (1, 4, 44, 202, and 600 min), a remarkably small number of sample times, and each was adjustable by about +/- 20% without effect on optimized parameter accuracies. PMID:7053984

  12. A minimally invasive method of piscine tissue collection and an analysis of long-term field-storage conditions for samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smalley John V

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acquisition of high-quality DNA for use in phylogenetic and molecular population genetic studies is a primary concern for evolutionary and genetic researchers. Many non-destructive DNA sampling methods have been developed and are used with a variety of taxa in applications ranging from genetic stock assessment to molecular forensics. Results The authors have developed a field sampling method for obtaining high-quality DNA from sunfish (Lepomis and other freshwater fish that employs a variation on the buccal swab method and results in the collection of DNA suitable for PCR amplification and polymorphism analysis. Additionally, since the circumstances of storage are always a concern for field biologists, the authors have tested the potential storage conditions of swabbed samples and whether those conditions affect DNA extraction and PCR amplification. It was found that samples stored at room temperature in the dark for over 200 days could still yield DNA suitable for PCR amplification and polymorphism detection. Conclusion These findings suggest that valuable molecular genetic data may be obtained from tissues that have not been treated or stored under optimal field conditions. Furthermore, it is clear that the lack of adequately low temperatures during transport and long term storage should not be a barrier to anyone wishing to engage in field-based molecular genetic research.

  13. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravin, Alberto; Keyriläinen, Jani; Fernández, Manuel; Fiedler, Stefan; Nemoz, Christian; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Leidenius, Marjut; von Smitten, Karl; Sipilä, Petri; Suortti, Pekka

    2007-04-21

    The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images (SR-CT). Large contrast enhancement is achieved by the use of the DEI-CT method, where the effects of refraction and scatter rejection are analysed by crystal optics. Clinical mammograms and CT images were recorded as reference material for a radiological examination. Three malignant and benign samples were studied in detail. Their radiographs were compared with optical images of stained histological sections. The DEI-CT images map accurately the morphology of the samples, including collagen strands and micro-calcifications of dimensions less than 0.1 mm. Histo-pathological examination and reading of the radiographs were done independently, and the conclusions were in general agreement. High-resolution DEI-CT images show strong contrast and permit visualization of details invisible in clinical radiographs. The radiation dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude without compromising image quality, which would make possible clinical in vivo DEI-CT with future compact SR sources. PMID:17404464

  14. High-resolution CT by diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging: mapping of breast tissue samples and comparison with their histo-pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravin, Alberto [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Keyrilaeinen, Jani [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Fernandez, Manuel [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Fiedler, Stefan [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Nemoz, Christian [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa [Department of Pathology, HUCH Laboratory Diagnostics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 400, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Physics, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 180, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland); Virkkunen, Pekka [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 180, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland); Leidenius, Marjut [Breast Surgery Unit, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 140, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland); Smitten, Karl von [Breast Surgery Unit, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 140, FIN-00029 HUS, Helsinki (Finland); Sipilae, Petri [Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, POB 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki (Finland); Suortti, Pekka [ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2007-04-21

    The aim of this study was to introduce high-resolution computed tomography (CT) of breast tumours using the diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging (DEI) technique and to compare results with radiological and histo-pathological examinations. X-ray CT images of tumour-bearing breast tissue samples were acquired by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (SR). Due to the narrow beam and a large sample-to-detector distance scattering is rejected in the absorption contrast images (SR-CT). Large contrast enhancement is achieved by the use of the DEI-CT method, where the effects of refraction and scatter rejection are analysed by crystal optics. Clinical mammograms and CT images were recorded as reference material for a radiological examination. Three malignant and benign samples were studied in detail. Their radiographs were compared with optical images of stained histological sections. The DEI-CT images map accurately the morphology of the samples, including collagen strands and micro-calcifications of dimensions less than 0.1 mm. Histo-pathological examination and reading of the radiographs were done independently, and the conclusions were in general agreement. High-resolution DEI-CT images show strong contrast and permit visualization of details invisible in clinical radiographs. The radiation dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude without compromising image quality, which would make possible clinical in vivo DEI-CT with future compact SR sources.

  15. A rapid, non enzymatic method for genomic DNA extraction from whole blood and mammalian tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan F. N Al-azawy

    2011-01-01

    Although several methods have been exist for DNA extraction from blood or animal tissues samples, traditionally most of these methods consume long time and using expensive chemicals such as proteinase K or toxic organic solvent such as phenol. On the other hand, there is no rapid, simple one method for the extraction of genomic DNA from blood and animal tissues samples in the same time. Since the objective of this study was to development easy modified method for DNA extraction from differen...

  16. Salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction as a suitable approach for determination of methoxetamine in large sets of tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkova, Katerina; Jurasek, Bronislav; Sykora, David; Palenicek, Tomas; Miksatkova, Petra; Kuchar, Martin

    2016-02-01

    A new designer drug, a dissociative anesthetic, and a putative N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, methoxetamine (MXE) noted by the EU Early Warning System has been already identified as a cause of several fatalities worldwide. The primary objective of this work was to develop a suitable sample preparation method allowing for isolation of MXE and its main metabolites in high yields from rat brain, liver, and lungs. For the purpose of the project, MXE and five metabolites were synthesized in-house, specifically O-desmethyl-normethoxetamine, O-desmethylmethoxetamine, dihydro-O-desmethylmethoxetamine, normethoxetamine, and dihydromethoxetamine. A sample preparation procedure consisted in the homogenization of the tissue applying salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE). A subsequent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was based on reversed-phased chromatography hyphenated with a triple quad MS system in a positive electrospray mode. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for qualification and quantification of the analytes. The quantification was based on the application of an isotopically labeled internal standard, normethoxetamine-d3. The matrix-matched calibrations were prepared for each type of matrix with regression coefficients 0.9943-1.0000. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 2.5-250 ng g(-1). Limits of quantification (LOQs) were estimated as 2.5 and 5 ng g(-1), respectively. Recovery (80-117%) and matrix effect (94-110%) at 100 ng g(-1) and intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision at low (2.5 ng g(-1)), middle (25 ng g(-1)), and upper (250 ng g(-1)) concentration levels for all the analytes in all three types of tissues were also determined. The developed analytical method was applied to a set of real samples gathered in toxicological trials on rats and MXE, and its metabolites were determined successfully. PMID:26661068

  17. Investigation of proteolytic enzymes expression in brain tissue and cultivated retinal pigment epithelial cells at transgenic animal model of Hintington´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ardan, Taras; Kocurová, Gabriela; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 12-12. ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington´s disease * transgenic porcine model * proteolytic enzymes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  18. Development of sensitive and reliable LC-MS/MS methods for the determination of three fluoroquinolones in water and fish tissue samples and preliminary environmental risk assessment of their presence in two rivers in northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagil, Marta; Kumirska, Jolanta; Stolte, Stefan; Puckowski, Alan; Maszkowska, Joanna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2014-09-15

    Antibiotic consumption (e.g. fluoroquinolones (FQs)) and, as a consequence, their presence in the environment, have received a lot of attention in the last several years due to increasing numbers of diseases and infections that are becoming resistant to traditional treatments for both humans and animals. In addition, even though antibiotics are safe for human and veterinary usage, ecosystems may be exposed to these substances. In this study, analytical methods for determining enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) in water samples and fish tissue based on the LC-MS/MS technique were developed and validated. As there is no data available concerning the risks posed by antibiotics in Poland, the proposed methods were applied for monitoring drug presence in environmental samples collected from two rivers in northern Poland. Evaluations of the ecotoxicity of ENR, NOR and CIP towards four different species of aquatic organisms: marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus), duckweed (Lemna minor) and crustacean (Daphnia magna), were also carried out. All the investigated compounds were detected at least once in the survey. NOR was found to be the most ubiquitous drug with concentrations of up to 442.8 ng L(-1). Moreover, it was established that L. minor is the most sensitive species to the investigated drugs (EC50NOR = 0.13 mg L(-1), EC50ENR = 0.22 mg L(-1) and EC50CIP = 0.34 mg L(-1)). The calculated risk quotient (RQ) values confirmed that the concentrations of the investigated FQs in the environmental samples were at a level of moderate environmental risk (1

  19. IN VITRO IDENTIFICATION OF ANDROGENIC AND ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY FROM CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDLOT OPERATIONS (CAFO) AND TERTIARY-TREATED SEWAGE EFFLUENT SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish living in ecosystems contaminated with human or domestic animal effluents have been shown to display reproductive alterations. Recent research with effluent from cattle feeding operations in the US, for example, have associated morphological alterations in fish collected fr...

  20. Changes in uridylic nucleotides and glycogen amount in animals tissue at exposure to ionizing radiation and physical exertion and some ways of their correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the amount of uridylic nucleoside phosphates and glycogen in the tissues of the rats exposed to ionizing radiation (6 Gy) and maximum physical exertion (running along a tredbahn till complete exhaustion). It has been shown that the amount of glycogen in the skeletal muscles decreases considerably 1 hour after combined action of ionizing radiation and physical exertion, 1 - 3 days after it decreased in the liver. Decrease of uridine diphosphate and uridine triphosphate polyphosphates amount as well as increase of uridine monophosphate in the tissue of the brain and liver are natural for uridylic nucleotides after combined action of ionizing radiation and physical exertion. These changes are more marked with increase of the period after the exposure

  1. Amazing Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  2. Interpreting residues of petroleum hydrocarbons in wildlife tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.J.; Coon, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    A brief guidance publication that explains how to evaluate reports of petroleum concentrations in animal tissue. Sections on background, sampling and handling of samples, reports and interpretation, when to analyze for hydrocarbons, and how to interpret the magnitude of the concentrations.

  3. On the correlation between the radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its derivatives and their ability to modify the local blood flow in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its alkoxy derivatives and their ability to modify a local blood flow in hemopoietic tissues have been comparatively studied in albino mice and rats. The correlation between these two parameters is nonlinear and may be approximated by a hyperbola equation. The correlation coefficient is - 0.88. A high radioprotective effect of serotonin and its derivatives is observed in the case of a three-fold decrease of the blood flow in the spleen

  4. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Jichuan Wu; Terrence L Hubert; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established ...

  5. A Method to Correlate mRNA Expression Datasets Obtained from Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples: A Matter of Thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A M Mustafa

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of tumors is a successful tool for the discovery of new cancer biomarkers and potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Reliable profiling is preferably performed on fresh frozen (FF tissues in which the quality of nucleic acids is better preserved than in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE material. However, since snap-freezing of biopsy materials is often not part of daily routine in pathology laboratories, one may have to rely on archival FFPE material. Procedures to retrieve the RNAs from FFPE materials have been developed and therefore, datasets obtained from FFPE and FF materials need to be made compatible to ensure reliable comparisons are possible.To develop an efficient method to compare gene expression profiles obtained from FFPE and FF samples using the same platform.Twenty-six FFPE-FF sample pairs of the same tumors representing various cancer types, and two FFPE-FF sample pairs of breast cancer cell lines, were included. Total RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was carried out using Illumina's Whole-Genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL V3 arrays, enabling the simultaneous detection of 24,526 mRNA transcripts. A sample exclusion criterion was created based on the expression of 11 stably expressed reference genes. Pearson correlation at the probe level was calculated for paired FFPE-FF, and three cut-off values were chosen. Spearman correlation coefficients between the matched FFPE and FF samples were calculated for three probe lists with varying levels of significance and compared to the correlation based on all measured probes. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to verify performance of the included probe lists to compare matched FPPE-FF samples.Twenty-seven FFPE-FF pairs passed the sample exclusion criterion. From the profiles of 27 FFPE and FF matched samples, the best correlating probes were identified

  6. Space Radiation Program Element Tissue Sharing Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Mayeaux, B M.; Huff, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, a large number of animal experiments have been conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and other facilities under the support of the NASA Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE). Studies using rodents and other animal species to address the space radiation risks will remain a significant portion of the research portfolio of the Element. In order to maximize scientific return of the animal studies, the SRPE has recently released the Space Radiation Tissue Sharing Forum. The Forum provides access to an inventory of investigator-stored tissue samples and enables both NASA SRPE members and NASA-funded investigators to exchange information regarding stored and future radiobiological tissues available for sharing. Registered users may review online data of available tissues, inquire about tissues posted, or request tissues for an upcoming study using an online form. Investigators who have upcoming sacrifices are also encouraged to post the availability of samples using the discussion forum. A brief demo of the forum will be given during the presentation

  7. EPR study of the reactions of tumour and normal tissues under ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the EPR spectrum characteristics of irradiated tissues of tumour-free animals and animals with tumour are presented. Mice of the Csub(3)Hsub(A) line were used in the experiments. Hepatoma was subcutaneously transplanted with the suspension of tumour tissue reduced to fragments. Animals were killed in 6-8 days after transplantation and in the case of tumour-free animals liver was immediately isolated while in the case of animals with tumour isolated were liver and tumour. Tissues cut with scissors were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue samples were exposed to 60Co at 1 Mrad dose and -196 deg C. On the base of the data it has been concluded: firstly, there are differences between the EPR spectra of normal and tumour tissue samples irradiated at -196 deg C. Asymmetryc signal with Δ H=Ge and g=2.0005 (''tumour signal'') is typical only for the EPR spectra of tumour and liver tissues of the animal with tumour. Thus, in the -author's opinion, irradiation use turns out to be useful for detecting the difference between the normal and tumour tissues. Secondly, ''tumour signal'' intensity changes after ionol incorporation into animal organism, used as a modificator of tissue sensitivity to the irradiation effect

  8. Accuracy Verification of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology for Lower-Limb Prosthetic Research: Utilising Animal Soft Tissue Specimen and Common Socket Casting Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Safari; Philip Rowe; Arjan Buis

    2012-01-01

    Lower limb prosthetic socket shape and volume consistency can be quantified using MRI technology. Additionally, MRI images of the residual limb could be used as an input data for CAD-CAM technology and finite element studies. However, the accuracy of MRI when socket casting materials are used has to be defined. A number of six, 46 mm thick, cross-sections of an animal leg were used. Three specimens were wrapped with Plaster of Paris (POP) and the other three with commercially available silico...

  9. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  10. ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM ANIMALS IN DURANGO, MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known concerning the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii infection in people and animals in rural Mexico. Serum samples and tissues from 150 dogs, 150 cats, 65 opossums (Didelphis virginianus), 249 rats (Rattus spp.), 127 mice (Mus musculus), and 69 squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from t...

  11. Promoter Region Hypermethylation and mRNA Expression of MGMT and p16 Genes in Tissue and Blood Samples of Human Premalignant Oral Lesions and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoter methylation and relative gene expression of O6-methyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT and p16 genes were examined in tissue and blood samples of patients with premalignant oral lesions (PMOLs and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR were performed in 146 tissue and blood samples from controls and patients with PMOLs and OSCC. In PMOL group, significant promoter methylation of MGMT and p16 genes was observed in 59% (P=0.0010 and 57% (P=0.0016 of tissue samples, respectively, and 39% (P=0.0135 and 33% (P=0.0074 of blood samples, respectively. Promoter methylation of both genes was more frequent in patients with OSCC, that is, 76% (P=0.0001 and 82% (P=0.0001 in tissue and 57% (P=0.0002 and 70% (P=0.0001 in blood, respectively. Significant downregulation of MGMT and p16 mRNA expression was observed in both tissue and blood samples from patients with PMOLs and OSCC. Hypermethylation-induced transcriptional silencing of MGMT and p16 genes in both precancer and cancer suggests important role of these changes in progression of premalignant state to malignancy. Results support use of blood as potential surrogate to tissue samples for screening or diagnosing PMOLs and early OSCC.

  12. Promoter Region Hypermethylation and mRNA Expression of MGMT and p16 Genes in Tissue and Blood Samples of Human Premalignant Oral Lesions and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Vikram; Makker, Annu; Tewari, Shikha; Yadu, Alka; Shilpi, Priyanka; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.; Goel, Sudhir K.

    2014-01-01

    Promoter methylation and relative gene expression of O6-methyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and p16 genes were examined in tissue and blood samples of patients with premalignant oral lesions (PMOLs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methylation-specific PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR were performed in 146 tissue and blood samples from controls and patients with PMOLs and OSCC. In PMOL group, significant promoter methylation of MGMT and p16 genes was observed in 59% (P = 0.0010) and 57% (P = 0.0016) of tissue samples, respectively, and 39% (P = 0.0135) and 33% (P = 0.0074) of blood samples, respectively. Promoter methylation of both genes was more frequent in patients with OSCC, that is, 76% (P = 0.0001) and 82% (P = 0.0001) in tissue and 57% (P = 0.0002) and 70% (P = 0.0001) in blood, respectively. Significant downregulation of MGMT and p16 mRNA expression was observed in both tissue and blood samples from patients with PMOLs and OSCC. Hypermethylation-induced transcriptional silencing of MGMT and p16 genes in both precancer and cancer suggests important role of these changes in progression of premalignant state to malignancy. Results support use of blood as potential surrogate to tissue samples for screening or diagnosing PMOLs and early OSCC. PMID:24991542

  13. In vivo imaging and characterization of [18F]DPA-714, a potential new TSPO ligand, in mouse brain and peripheral tissues using small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), a biochemical marker of neuroinflammation, is highly expressed in the brain activated microglia and it is also expressed by peripheral inflammatory cells and normal peripheral tissues. Thus, development of radioligands for the TSPO may contribute to further understanding the in vivo TSPO function in central and peripheral inflammatory processes and other pathologies. Here, we report the biodistribution, the specific binding and the radiometabolites of [18F]DPA-714, a promising fluorinated PET radiotracer, in normal mice using a microPET/CT scanner. Methods: The in vivo biodistribution and kinetics of [18F]DPA-714 were measured in mice brain and peripheral tissues. Specific binding to TSPO sites was assessed using pharmacological competitive studies by means of saturation experiments performed by i.v. injection of 1 mg/kg of unlabeled DPA-714 or 3 mg/kg of unlabeled PK11195. A region of interest analysis was performed to generate time-activity curves in the brain, heart, lung, kidney, spleen and liver. Metabolites assay was performed in the plasma and peripheral organs by radio-HPLC. Results: [18F]DPA-714 reached high concentration in lung, heart, kidney and spleen, tissues well known to be rich in TSPO sites. [18F]DPA-714 kinetics were faster in the lung and slower in the kidney. Pre-injection of unlabeled DPA-714 or PK11195 inhibited about 80% of [18F]DPA-714 uptake in the lung and heart (p < 0.0005). The percentage of inhibition in the kidney was lower and achieved at later times only with DPA-714 (p < 0.05) but not with PK11195. Sixty minutes after radiotracer injection only unmetabolized radioligand was found in the brain, lung, heart and spleen. Conclusion: These results suggest that [18F]DPA-714 is a suitable PET ligand for imaging in mice brain and peripheral tissues since it binds with high specificity TSPO binding sites and it is almost unchanged at 60 minutes after radiotracer injection in the brain

  14. Usefulness of pulse-wave doppler tissue sampling and dobutamine stress echocardiography for identification of false positive inferior wall defects in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    False positive inferior wall perfusion defects restrict the accuracy of SPECT in diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Pulse-Wave Tissue Doppler (PWTD) has been recently proposed to assess regional wall motion velocities. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of CAD by using PWTD during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) in patients with an inferior perfusion defect detected by SPECT and compare PWTD parameters of normal cases with patients who had inferior perfusion defect and CAD. Sixty-five patients (mean age 58±8 years, 30 men) with a normal LV systolic function at rest according to echocardiographic evaluation with an inferior ischemia determined by SPECT and a control group (CG) of 34 normal cases (mean age 56±7 years, 16 men) were included in this study. All patients underwent a standard DSE (up to 40 μg/kg/min with additional atropine during sub-maximum heart rate responses). Pulse-wave Doppler tissue sampling of inferior wall was performed in the apical 2-chamber view at rest and stress. The coronary angiography was performed within 24 hours. The results were evaluated for the prediction of significant right coronary artery (RCA) and/or left circumflex coronary artery (CX) with narrowing (≥50% diameter stenosis, assessed by quantitative coronary angiography). It was observed that the peak stress mean E/A ratio was lower in patients with CAD when compared to patients without CAD (0.78±0.2 versus 1.29±0.11 p<0.0001). Also the peak stress E/A ratio of normal cases was significantly higher than patients who had CAD (1.19±0.3 versus 0.78±0.2 p<0.0001). When the cut off point for the E/A ratio was determined as 1, the sensitivity and specificity of dobutamine stress PWTD E/A were 89% and 86%, respectively. The peak stress E/A ratio was higher than 1 in all patients with a false positive perfusion defect. Systolic S velocity increase during DSE was significantly lower in patients with CAD (54%±17 versus 99%±24 p=0

  15. Organic compounds present in airborne particles stimulate superoxide production and DNA fragmentation: role of NOX and xanthine oxidase in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Iván Tavera; Silva, Guillermo Benjamín; Carreras, Hebe Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter trigger the production of reactive oxygen species. However, most of the studies dealing with oxidative damage of airborne particles focus on the effects of individual compounds and not real mixtures. In order to study the enzymatic superoxide production resulting from the exposition to a complex mixture, we derived organic extracts from airborne particles collected daily in an urban area and exposed kidney, liver, and heart mammal tissues. After that, we measured DNA damage employing the comet assay. We observed that in every tissue, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were involved in O2 (-) production when they were exposed to the organic extracts, as the lucigenin's chemiluminescence decays when enzymes were inhibited. The same trend was observed with the percentage of cells with comets, since DNA damage was higher when they were exposed to same experimental conditions. Our data allow us to hypothesize that these enzymes play an important role in the oxidative stress produced by PAHs and that there is a mechanism involving them in the O2 (-)generation. PMID:27180836

  16. Pulmonary inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung after exposure to PM samples from biomass heating appliances of old and modern technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happo, Mikko S; Uski, Oskari; Jalava, Pasi I; Kelz, Joachim; Brunner, Thomas; Hakulinen, Pasi; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Obernberger, Ingwald; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2013-01-15

    Current levels of ambient air fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) are associated with mortality and morbidity in urban populations worldwide. In residential areas wood combustion is one of the main sources of PM(2.5) emissions, especially during wintertime. However, the adverse health effects of particulate emissions from the modern heating appliances and fuels are poorly known. In this study, health related toxicological properties of PM(1) emissions from five modern and two old technology appliances were examined. The PM(1) samples were collected by using a Dekati® Gravimetric Impactor (DGI). The collected samples were weighed and extracted with methanol for chemical and toxicological analyses. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally exposed to a single dose of 1, 3, 10 or 15 mg/kg of the particulate samples for 4, 18 or 24h. Thereafter, the lungs were lavaged and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Lungs of 24h exposed mice were collected for inspection of pulmonary tissue damage. There were substantial differences in the combustion qualities of old and modern technology appliances. Modern technology appliances had the lowest PM(1) (mg/MJ) emissions, but they induced the highest inflammatory, cytotoxic and genotoxic activities. In contrast, old technology appliances had clearly the highest PM(1) (mg/MJ) emissions, but their effect in the mouse lungs were the lowest. Increased inflammatory activity was associated with ash related components of the emissions, whereas high PAH concentrations were correlating with the smallest detected responses, possibly due to their immunosuppressive effect. PMID:23201646

  17. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happo, M.S.; Hirvonen, M.R.; Halinen, A.I.; Jalava, P.I.; Pennanen, A.S.; Sillanpaa, M.; Hillamo, R.; Salonen, R.O. [National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Health

    2008-07-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM2.5-0.2) and coarse (PM10-2.5) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM2.5-0.2 correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca{sup 2+}, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM2.5-0.2-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM10 (2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM2.5 (0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  18. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happo, Mikko S; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Halinen, Arja I; Jalava, Pasi I; Pennanen, Arto S; Sillanpaa, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM(2.5-0.2)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM(2.5-0.2) correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO3(-), NH4(+)) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO4(2-) had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca2+, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM(2.5-0.2)-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM(10-2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM(2.5-0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects. PMID:18855153

  19. Isolated limb perfusion with biochemotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy combines with radiotherapy and surgery to overcome treatment resistance in an animal model of extremity soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Michelle J; Smith, Henry G; Pencavel, Timothy D; Mansfield, David C; Kyula-Currie, Joan; Khan, Aadil A; McEntee, Gráinne; Roulstone, Victoria; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2016-09-15

    The management of locally advanced or recurrent extremity sarcoma often necessitates multimodal therapy to preserve a limb, of which isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a key component. However, with standard chemotherapeutic agents used in ILP, the duration of response is limited. Novel agents or treatment combinations are urgently needed to improve outcomes. Previous work in an animal model has demonstrated the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy when delivered by ILP and, in this study, we report further improvements from combining ILP-delivered oncolytic virotherapy with radiation and surgical resection. In vitro, the combination of radiation with an oncolytic vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) and melphalan demonstrated increased cytotoxicity in a panel of sarcoma cell lines. The effects were mediated through activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In vivo, combinations of radiation, oncolytic virotherapy and standard ILP resulted in delayed tumour growth and prolonged survival when compared with standard ILP alone. However, local disease control could only be secured when such treatment was combined with surgical resection, the timing of which was crucial in determining outcome. Combinations of oncolytic virotherapy with surgical resection and radiation have direct clinical relevance in extremity sarcoma and represent an exciting prospect for improving outcomes in this pathology. PMID:27116656

  20. Development and validation of HPLC method with fluorometric detection for quantification of bisnaphthalimidopropyldiaminooctane in animal tissues following administration in polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, Marcela A; Abreu, Vera L R G; Osório, Marcelo V; Nogueira, Sonia; Lin, Paul Kong Thoo; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Lima, Sofia A C

    2016-02-20

    A simple, sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography method for the quantification of bisnaphthalimidopropyldiaminooctane (BNIPDaoct), a potent anti-Leishmania compound, incorporated into poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles was developed and validated toward bioanalysis application. Biological tissue extracts were injected into a reversed-phase monolithic column coupled to a fluorimetric detector (λexc=234nm, λem=394nm), using isocratic elution with aqueous buffer (acetic acid/acetate 0.10M, pH 4.5, 0.010M octanesulfonic acid) and acetonitrile, 60:40 (v/v) at a flow rate of 1.5mLmin(-1). The run time was 6min, with a BNIPDaoct retention time of 3.3min. Calibration curves were linear for BNIPDaoct concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 0.100μM. Matrix effects were observed and calibration curves were performed using the different organ (spleen, liver, kidney, heart and lung) extracts. The method was found to be specific, accurate (97.3-106.8% of nominal values) and precise for intra-day (RSD88.4%. The LOD and LOQ for biological matrices were ≤0.8 and ≤1.8nM, respectively, corresponding to values ≤4 and ≤9nmolg(-1) in mice organs. The method developed was successfully applied to biodistribution assessment following intravenous administration of BNIPDaoct in solution or incorporated in PLGA nanoparticles. PMID:26765266

  1. Tissue-level cytoprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Hightower, L E; Brown, M A; Renfro, J L; Perdrizet, G.A.; Rewinski, M.; Guidon, P.T.; Mistry, T.; House, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro and ex vivo tissue models provide a useful level of biological organization for cytoprotection studies positioned between cultured cells and intact animals. We have used 2 such models, primary tissue cultures of winter flounder renal secretory epithelium and ex vivo preparations of rat intestinal tissues, the latter to access the microcirculation of exposed mesentery tissues. Herein we discuss studies indicating that differentiated functions are altered in thermotolerant or cytoprote...

  2. Effects of Hyperoxia on Brain Tissue Oxygen Tension in Non-Sedated, Non- Anesthetized Arctic Ground Squirrels: An Animal Model of Hyperoxic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Ground Squirrels (AGS are classic hibernators known for their tolerance to hypoxia. AGS have been studied as a model of hypoxia with potential as a medical research model. Problem statement: Their unique resistance to the stressors of low oxygen led us to hypothesize that AGS might also be adaptable to hyperoxia. Approach: This study examined the physiological pattern associated with hyperoxia in response to brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO2, brain temperature (Tbrain, global oxygen consumption (VO2 and respiratory frequency (fR using non-sedated and nonanesthetized Arctic Ground Squirrels (AGS and rats. Results: We found that 1 100% inspired oxygen (FiO2 increased the baseline values of brain PtO2 significantly in both summer euthermic AGS (24.4 ± 3.6-87.3 ± 3.6 mmHg, n=6 and in rats (18.2 ± 5.2-73.3 ± 5.2 mmHg, n = 3; PtO2 was significantly higher in AGS than in rats during hyperoxic exposure; 2 hyperoxic exposure had no effect on brain temperature in either AGS or rats, with the brain temperatures maintaining constancy before, during and after 100% O2 exposure; 3 systemic metabolic rates increased significantly during hyperoxic exposure in both euthermic AGS and rats; moreover, VO2 were significantly lower in AGS than in rats during hyperoxic exposure; 4 the respiratory rates for rats were maintained before, during and after 100% O2 exposure, while the respiratory responding patterns to hyperoxic exposure changed after exposure in AGS. AGS fR was significantly lower after hyperoxic exposure than before the exposure. Conclusion: These results suggest that hyperoxic ventilation induced PtO2 and VO2 differences between AGS and rats and led to altered respiratory patterns between these species. AGS and the rat serves as an excellent comparative model for hypoxic and hyperoxic stress studies of the brain.

  3. Processes and procedures for a worldwide biological samples distribution; product assurance and logistic activities to support the mice drawer system tissue sharing event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Mario; Cotronei, Vittorio

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) is a scientific payload developed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), it hosted 6 mice on the International Space Station (ISS) and re-entered on ground on November 28, 2009 with the STS 129 at KSC. Linked to the MDS experiment, a Tissue Sharing Program (TSP), was developed in order to make available to 16 Payload Investigators (PI) (located in USA, Canada, EU -Italy, Belgium and Germany -and Japan) the biological samples coming from the mice. ALTEC SpA (a PPP owned by ASI, TAS-I and local institutions) was responsible to support the logistics aspects of the MDS samples for the first MDS mission, in the frame of Italian Space Agency (ASI) OSMA program (OSteoporosis and Muscle Atrophy). The TSP resulted in a complex scenario, as ASI, progressively, extended the original OSMA Team also to researchers from other ASI programs and from other Agencies (ESA, NASA, JAXA). The science coordination was performed by the University of Genova (UNIGE). ALTEC has managed all the logistic process with the support of a specialized freight forwarder agent during the whole shipping operation phases. ALTEC formalized all the steps from the handover of samples by the dissection Team to the packaging and shipping process in a dedicated procedure. ALTEC approached all the work in a structured way, performing: A study of the aspects connected to international shipments of biological samples. A coopera-tive work with UNIGE/ASI /PIs to identify all the needs of the various researchers and their compatibility. A complete revision and integration of shipment requirements (addresses, tem-peratures, samples, materials and so on). A complete definition of the final shipment scenario in terms of boxes, content, refrigerant and requirements. A formal approach to identification and selection of the most suited and specialized Freight Forwarder. A clear identification of all the processes from sample dissection by PI Team, sample processing, freezing, tube preparation

  4. Oral pathology follow-up by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy on tissue and blood serum samples: an application of wavelet and multivariate data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfino, I.; Camerlingo, C.; Zenone, F.; Perna, G.; Capozzi, V.; Cirillo, N.; Gaeta, G. M.; De Mol, E.; Lepore, M.

    2009-02-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a potentially fatal autoimmune disease that cause blistering of the skin and oral cavity. It is characterized by disruption of cell-cell adhesion within the suprabasal layers of epithelium, a phenomenon termed acantholysis Patients with PV develop IgG autoantibodies against normal constituents of the intercellular substance of keratinocytes. The mechanisms by which such autoantibodies induce blisters are not clearly understood. The qualitative analysis of such effects provides important clues in the search for a specific diagnosis, and the quantitative analysis of biochemical abnormalities is important in measuring the extent of the disease process, designing therapy and evaluating the efficacy of treatment. Improved diagnostic techniques could permit the recognition of more subtle forms of disease and reveal incipient lesions clinically unapparent, so that progression of potentially severe forms could be reversed with appropriate treatment. In this paper, we report the results of our micro-Raman spectroscopy study on tissue and blood serum samples from ill, recovered and under therapy PV patients. The complexity of the differences among their characteristic Raman spectra has required a specific strategy to obtain reliable information on the illness stage of the patients For this purpose, wavelet techniques and advanced multivariate analysis methods have been developed and applied to the experimental Raman spectra. Promising results have been obtained.

  5. Evaluation of microwave digestion and solvent extraction for the determination of trace amounts of selenium in feeds and plant and animal tissues by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocquellet, P; Candillier, M P

    1991-05-01

    A sensitive method for the accurate determination of Se in agricultural products at sub-ppm levels is described. The proposed procedure involves the wet oxidation of samples by using a mixture of nitric, sulphuric and perchloric acids, co-extraction of Se and added Pd with diethylammonium N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform, and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Se in the organic extract. Atomization and extraction conditions are discussed. Special attention is given to the wet oxidation step, and its advantages in speed and simplicity over conventional heating have been evaluated using an automated microwave digestion system. The results reported, obtained from several reference materials, confirm the accuracy of the method with which a detection limit of 0.002 micrograms g-1 of Se can be achieved. PMID:1877754

  6. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essayfirst introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  7. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  8. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  9. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essay first introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  10. Monitoring residue in animals and primary products of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Saša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of control and systematic monitoring of residue is to secure, by the examination of a corresponding number of samples, the efficient monitoring of the residue level in tissues and organs of animals, as well as in primary products of animal origin. This creates possibilities for the timely taking of measures toward the securing of food hygiene of animal origin and the protection of public health. Residue can be a consequence of the inadequate use of medicines in veterinary medicine and pesticides in agriculture and veterinary medicine, as well as the polluting of the environment with toxic elements, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls, and others. Residue is being monitored in Serbia since 1972, and in 2004, national monitoring was brought to the level of EU countries through significant investments by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Water Management. This is also evident in the EU directives which permit exports of all kinds of meat and primary products of animal origin, covered by the Residue Monitoring Program. The program of systematic examinations of residue has been coordinated with the requirements of the European Union, both according to the type of examined substance, as well as according to the number of samples and the applied analytical techniques. In addition to the development of methods and the including of new harmful substances into the monitoring programme, it is also necessary to coordinate the national regulations that define the maximum permitted quantities of certain medicines and contaminants with the EU regulations, in order to protect the health of consumers as efficiently as possible, and for the country to take equal part in international trade.

  11. Animal ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possibl...

  12. Quadruped Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Skrba, Ljiljana; Reveret, Lionel; Hétroy, Franck; Cani, Marie-Paule; O'Sullivan, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Films like Shrek, Madagascar, The Chronicles of Narnia and Charlotte's web all have something in common: realistic quadruped animations. While the animation of animals has been popular for a long time, the technical challenges associated with creating highly realistic, computer generated creatures have been receiving increasing attention recently. The entertainment, education and medical industries have increased the demand for simulation of realistic animals in the computer graphics area. In...

  13. Thin Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, D.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice animals provide a discretized model for the theta transition displayed by branched polymers in solvent. Exact graph enumeration studies have given some indications that the phase diagram of such lattice animals may contain two collapsed phases as well as an extended phase. This has not been confirmed by studies using other means. We use the exact correspondence between the q --> 1 limit of an extended Potts model and lattice animals to investigate the phase diagram of lattice animals ...

  14. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political parti

  15. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  16. Evaluation of Tissue Metabolites with High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning MR Spectroscopy Human Prostate Samples After Three-Year Storage at −80 °C

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Kate W.; Wenlei He; Halpern, Elkan F.; Chin-Lee Wu; Cheng, Leo L.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate interpretation and correlation of tissue spectroscopy with pathological conditions requires disease specific tissue metabolite databases; however, specimens for research are often kept in frozen storage for various lengths of time. Whether such frozen storage results in alterations to the measured metabolites is a critical but largely unknown issue. In this study, human prostate tissues from specimens that had been stored at –80 ºC for 32 months were analyzed with high resolution mag...

  17. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  18. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in science (as in any other human use that is not also in the animals’ best interest). These views are not compatible, and since all three views in more or less pure form are found in modern Western societies, use of animals for research is bound to cause controversy. However, there may be room for some kind......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...

  19. Human versus animal: contrasting decomposition dynamics of mammalian analogues in experimental taphonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Kathryn L; Forbes, Shari L; Tibbett, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Taphonomic studies regularly employ animal analogues for human decomposition due to ethical restrictions relating to the use of human tissue. However, the validity of using animal analogues in soil decomposition studies is still questioned. This study compared the decomposition of skeletal muscle tissues (SMTs) from human (Homo sapiens), pork (Sus scrofa), beef (Bos taurus), and lamb (Ovis aries) interred in soil microcosms. Fixed interval samples were collected from the SMT for microbial activity and mass tissue loss determination; samples were also taken from the underlying soil for pH, electrical conductivity, and nutrient (potassium, phosphate, ammonium, and nitrate) analysis. The overall patterns of nutrient fluxes and chemical changes in nonhuman SMT and the underlying soil followed that of human SMT. Ovine tissue was the most similar to human tissue in many of the measured parameters. Although no single analogue was a precise predictor of human decomposition in soil, all models offered close approximations in decomposition dynamics. PMID:23550805

  20. Serum Neutralization Assay Can Efficiently Replace Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test for Detection and Quantitation of West Nile Virus Antibodies in Human and Animal Serum Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gennaro, Annapia; Casaccia, Claudia; Conte, Annamaria; Monaco, Federica; Savini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A serum neutralization assay (SN) was compared with the official plaque reduction neutralization test for the quantitation of West Nile virus antibodies. A total of 1,348 samples from equid sera and 38 from human sera were tested by these two methods. Statistically significant differences were not observed, thus supporting the use of SN for routine purposes. PMID:25100824