WorldWideScience

Sample records for animal pet scanner

  1. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Research on small animal PET scanners has been a hot topic in recent years. These devices are used in the preclinical phases of drug tests and during the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. They also provide a cost efficient way to test new materials, new design concepts and new technologies that later can be used to build more efficient human medical imaging devices. The development of a PET scanner requires expertise on different fields, therefore a consortium was formed that brought together Hungarian academic and industrial partners: the Nuclear Research Institute (which has experience in the development of nuclear detectors and data acquisition systems), the PET Center of the University of Debrecen (which has clinical experience in the application of nuclear imaging devices and background in image processing software), Mediso Ltd. (which has been developing, manufacturing, selling and servicing medical imaging devices since 1990) and other academic partners. This consortium has been working together since 2003: the knowledge base acquired during the development of our small animal PET scanners (miniPET-I and miniPET-II) is now being utilized to build a commercial multimodal human PET scanner. The operation of a PET scanner is based on the simultaneous detection ('coincidence') of two gamma photons originating from a positron annihilation. In traditional PET scanners coincidence is detected by a central unit during the measurement. In our system there is no such central module: all detected single gamma events are recorded (list mode data acquisition), and the list of events are processed using a computer cluster (built from PCs). The usage of independent detector modules and commercial components reduce both development and maintenance costs. Also, this mode of data acquisition is more suitable for development purposes, since once the data is collected and stored it can be used many times to test different signal

  2. Design of a small animal MR compatible PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, the authors have designed a small animal MR compatible PET (McPET) scanner for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of mice and rats in vivo. The scanner consists of one ring of 480 LSO crystals arranged in 3 layers with 160 crystals per layer. The crystal dimensions are 2 x 3 x 7.5 mm3. This was based on a target resolution of 2.5 mm and simulations showing that a depth of 7.5 mm avoided significant depth of interaction effects across the desired field of view. The system diameter of 11.2 cm is large enough to accommodate the animal positioned inside a stereotactic frame. Each crystal will be coupled through 2 mm diameter optical fibers to multi-channel PMT's which reside outside the main magnetic field. Through 50 cm of optical fiber, a photopeak is clearly seen and the measured energy resolution is 25%. Prototype optical fiber connectors have been tested to increase the flexibility of the system and result in a light loss of only 6%. The proposed system will have adequate resolution and sensitivity for a number of applications in small animals and will be the first practical device for simultaneous in vivo imaging with PET and MR

  3. Attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Rutao; Liow, JeihSan; Seidel, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated two methods of attenuation correction for the NIH ATLAS small animal PET scanner: 1) a CT-based method that derives 511 keV attenuation coefficients (mu) by extrapolation from spatially registered CT images; and 2) an analytic method based on the body outline of emission images and an empirical mu. A specially fabricated attenuation calibration phantom with cylindrical inserts that mimic different body tissues was used to derive the relationship to convert CT values to (I for PET. The methods were applied to three test data sets: 1) a uniform cylinder phantom, 2) the attenuation calibration phantom, and 3) a mouse injected with left bracket **1**8F right bracket FDG. The CT-based attenuation correction factors were larger in non-uniform regions of the imaging subject, e.g. mouse head, than the analytic method. The two methods had similar correction factors for regions with uniform density and detectable emission source distributions.

  4. Performance Evaluation of microPET: A High-Resolution Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate PET Scanner for Animal Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Cherry, Simon R.; Shao, Yiping; Silverman, Robert W.; Meadors, Ken; Farquhar, Thomas H.; Pedarsani, Marjan; Phelps, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    A new dedicated PET scanner, microPET, was designed and developed at the University of California, Los Angeles, for imaging small laboratory animals. The goal was to provide a compact system with superior spatial resolution at a fraction of the cost of a clinical PET scanner.

  5. Development of a PET scanner for simultaneously imaging small animals with MRI and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Christopher J; Goertzen, Andrew L; Thiessen, Jonathan D; Bishop, Daryl; Stortz, Greg; Kozlowski, Piotr; Retière, Fabrice; Zhang, Xuezhu; Sossi, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT) in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay) and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution. PMID:25120157

  6. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  7. PET-based geometrical calibration of a pinhole SPECT add-on for an animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner to provide a cost effective option for animal SPECT imaging. The SPECT add-on sub-system was enabled by mechanically integrating a multiple-pinhole collimator in the PET detector ring. This study introduces a method to calibrate the geometrical parameters of the SPECT add-on using the PET imaging capability of the scanner. The proposed PET imaging-based calibration method consists of two steps: (1) paint the pinhole apertures of the collimator with a positron emitting radioactive solution; and (2) image the collimator inside the scanner in PET mode. The geometrical parameters of the multi-pinhole SPECT add-on can then be derived directly from a set of PET images by simple linear calculation and used in defining the SPECT system. The method was compared to our implementation of a SPECT calibration approach with model-based fitting of SPECT projection data. The procedure for carrying out the PET imaging-based calibration method is simpler and faster than that of our implementation of the SPECT model-based calibration method. Since it does not require model fitting, the uniqueness of the calibration result is warranted. Better quality SPECT images were reconstructed using the PET-derived calibration parameters rather than our implementation of the SPECT model-based calibration parameters. We conclude that the proposed PET imaging-based calibration method provides a highly effective means for enabling SPECT imaging on a PET scanner. (paper)

  8. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  9. A combined micro-PET/CT scanner for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-PET/CT system was developed by combination of an in-house micro-CT and a microPET[reg] R4 scanner. The cone-beam micro-CT consists of a rotational gantry that fits an X-ray tube, a CCD-based X-ray detector, and motor-driven linear stages. The gantry was designed to be coaxial with the scanner of microPET'' (registered) R4. It can be moved for the convenience of mounting the Ge-68 point-source holder for PET's calibration. The image volumes obtained from two modalities is registered by a pre-determined, inherent spatial transformation function. This hardware-approach fusion, which provides accurate and no labor-intensive alignment, is suitable for mass scanning. The micro-PET/CT system has been operated successfully. Merging the anatomical and functional images benefit studies of the small animal imaging

  10. Improved attenuation correction for freely moving animal brain PET studies using a virtual scanner geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Georgios I.; Ryder, William J.; Kyme, Andre Z.; Fulton, Roger R.; Meikle, Steven R.

    2014-03-01

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals can be very challenging since the body of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible atten- uating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the convex hull of the animal's head based on the reconstructed emission images. However, this approach ignores the potential attenuation introduced by the animal's body. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry, which moves in synchrony with the animal's head and discriminates between those events that traverse only the animal's head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal's body. For each pose a new virtual scanner geometry was defined and therefore a new system matrix was calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made rat phantom. Results showed that when the animal's body is within the FOV and not accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10%. On the contrary, at- tenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias <2%), without the need to account for the animal's body.

  11. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method. (paper)

  12. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, E.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method.

  13. [2D imaging simulations of a small animal PET scanner with DOI measurement: jPET-RD.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Hagiwara, Naoki; Obi, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Tsuda, Tomoaki; Inadama, Naoko; Wada, Yasuhiro; Murayama, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    We present a preliminary study on the design of a high sensitivity small animal DOI-PET scanner: jPET-RD (for Rodents with DOI detectors), which will contribute to molecular imaging. The 4-layer DOI block detector for the jPET-RD that consists of scintillation crystals (1.4 mm x 1.4 mm x 4.5 mm) and a flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (52 mm x 52 mm) was previously proposed. In this paper, we investigate imaging performance of the jPET-RD through numerical simulations. The scanner has a hexagonal geometry with a small diameter and a large axial aperture. Therefore DOI information is expected to improve resolution uniformity in the whole field of view (FOV). We simulate the scanner for various parameters of the number of DOI channels and the crystal length. Simulated data are reconstructed using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization with accurate system modeling. The trade-off results between background noise and spatial resolution show that only shortening the length of crystal does not improve the trade-off at all, and that 4-layer DOI information improves uniformity of spatial resolution in the whole FOV. Excellent performance of the jPET-RD can be expected based on the numerical simulation results. PMID:15961924

  14. Contribution of normalization to image noise for the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the large number of detector elements (25,600 crystals) and lines of response (LOR) (88,453,120), normalization of the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner can introduce additional image noise when using the standard, individual LOR-based normalization (ILORNORM) of 10 h scan duration. Recently, component-based normalization (CNORM) has been made available for this scanner. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of both normalization algorithms and to determine the minimum time needed for a normalization scan. Normalization scans of 1 min up to 115 h were performed. Reconstructed image noise was determined using the FDG-filled NEMA NU-4 small-animal PET image quality phantom. CNORM significantly reduced image noise as compared to ILORNORM. For CNORM, the scan duration could even be reduced to 10 min without deterioration of reconstructed image quality. Such a short scan duration implies that scanner normalization can easily be incorporated in daily or weekly quality control procedures.

  15. Contribution of normalization to image noise for the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Eric P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.visser@nucmed.umcn.nl; Disselhorst, Jonathan A.; Laverman, Peter; Gotthardt, Martin; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    Due to the large number of detector elements (25,600 crystals) and lines of response (LOR) (88,453,120), normalization of the Siemens Inveon small-animal PET scanner can introduce additional image noise when using the standard, individual LOR-based normalization (ILORNORM) of 10 h scan duration. Recently, component-based normalization (CNORM) has been made available for this scanner. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of both normalization algorithms and to determine the minimum time needed for a normalization scan. Normalization scans of 1 min up to 115 h were performed. Reconstructed image noise was determined using the FDG-filled NEMA NU-4 small-animal PET image quality phantom. CNORM significantly reduced image noise as compared to ILORNORM. For CNORM, the scan duration could even be reduced to 10 min without deterioration of reconstructed image quality. Such a short scan duration implies that scanner normalization can easily be incorporated in daily or weekly quality control procedures.

  16. Attenuation correction for freely moving small animal brain PET studies based on a virtual scanner geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, G. I.; Kyme, A. Z.; Ryder, W. J.; Fulton, R. R.; Meikle, S. R.

    2014-10-01

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals is a very challenging problem since the torso of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible attenuating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. In the context of unrestrained small animal imaging, estimation of the attenuation correction factors without the need for a transmission scan is highly desirable. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the hull of the animal’s head based on the reconstructed motion corrected emission images. However, this approach ignores the attenuation introduced by the animal’s torso. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry which moves in synchrony with the animal’s head and discriminates between those events that traversed only the animal’s head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal’s torso. For each recorded pose of the animal’s head a new virtual scanner geometry is defined and therefore a new system matrix must be calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made phantom and step-wise motion. Results showed that when the animal’s torso is within the FOV and not appropriately accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10% . Attenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias introduced by the extraneous compartment. Although the proposed method requires increased computational resources, it can provide a reliable approach towards quantitatively accurate attenuation correction for freely moving animal studies.

  17. Attenuation correction for freely moving small animal brain PET studies based on a virtual scanner geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals is a very challenging problem since the torso of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible attenuating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. In the context of unrestrained small animal imaging, estimation of the attenuation correction factors without the need for a transmission scan is highly desirable. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the hull of the animal’s head based on the reconstructed motion corrected emission images. However, this approach ignores the attenuation introduced by the animal’s torso. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry which moves in synchrony with the animal’s head and discriminates between those events that traversed only the animal’s head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal’s torso. For each recorded pose of the animal’s head a new virtual scanner geometry is defined and therefore a new system matrix must be calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made phantom and step-wise motion. Results showed that when the animal’s torso is within the FOV and not appropriately accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10% . Attenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias < 2%), without the need to account for the attenuation introduced by the extraneous compartment. Although the proposed method requires increased computational resources, it can provide a reliable approach towards quantitatively accurate attenuation correction for freely moving animal studies. (paper)

  18. An investigation of a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate and design a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner and evaluate its preliminary performance properties. Methods: This coincidence module adopted a coincidence identification mode based on singles data in list-mode.Using digital signal processing technology, energy calibration, crystal identification, timing alignment and coincidence events extraction were performed on singles data in list-mode. The obtained data could be used for image reconstruction. Results: The 13 × 13 crystal array was well recognized by the position histogram of one lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal block. In the coincidence timing histogram of the micro-Derenzo phantom, 1.36 ns full width at half maximum was obtained. The rods with a diameter of 1.2 mm were clearly displayed in the reconstructed image of the micro-Derenzo phantom. Conclusion: The coincidence module can provide satisfactory performance to meet the design needs of an all-digital small animal PET scanner. (authors)

  19. Performance characteristics of microPET R4 scanner for small animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated animal PET is useful equipment for the study of new PET tracer. Recently microPET R4 was installed in the Korea institute of radiology and medical science. In this study, we measured the characteristics of scanner. Resolution was measured using a line source (F-18:65 μ Ci, inner diameter: 0.5 mm). The line source was put in the axial direction and was moved from the center of field of view to outside with 1 mm interval. PET images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection and ordered subset expectation maximization. Line source (16.5 μ Ci, 78 mm) was put on the center of axial direction to measure the sensitivity when the deadtime was under 1%. Images were acquired during 4 minutes respectively from center to 39 mm outward. Delayed count was subtracted from total count and then decay was corrected for the calculation of sensitivity. Noise equivalent count ratio and scatter fraction were calculated using cylindrical phantom. Spatial resolution of reconstructed image using filtered back-projection was 1.86 mm(radial), 1.95 mm(tangential), 1.95 mm(axial) in the center of field of view, and 2.54 mm, 2.8 mm, 1.61 mm in 2 cm away from the center respectively. Sensitivity was 2.36% at the center of transaxial field of view. Scatter fraction was 20%. Maximal noise equivalent count ratio was 66.4 kcps at 242 kBq/mL. Small animal images were acquired for confirmation of performance. Performance characteristics of microPET R4 were similar with reported value. So this will be a useful tool for small animal imaging

  20. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  1. Accurate modeling of a DOI capable small animal PET scanner using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    data confirms that the developed simulation setup is a useful tool for a wide range of research applications. - Highlights: ► We developed an MC model of the Argus (Sedecal) small-animal PET scanner using GATE. ► Validation was performed through comparison between simulated and experimental data. ► Spatial resolution, sensitivity and scatter fraction showed agreement within 7%. ► NEC was in excellent agreement at activities up to 50 MBq in the field of view. ► Image quality was also compared through the NEMA NU-4 phantom

  2. Performance evaluation of a high-sensitivity large-aperture small-animal PET scanner. ClairvivoPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we evaluated the performance of a newly commercialized small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, ClairvivoPET, which provides significant advantages in spatial resolution, sensitivity, and quantitative accuracy. This scanner consists of depth of interaction detector modules with a large axial extent of 151 mm and an external 137Cs source for attenuation correction. Physical performances, resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction (SF), counting rate including noise equivalent count (NEC) rate, quantitative accuracy versus activity strength, and transmission accuracy, were measured and evaluated. Animal studies were also performed. Transaxial spatial resolution, measured with a capillary tube, was 1.54 mm at the center and 2.93 mm at a radial offset of 40 mm. The absolute sensitivity was 8.2% at the center, and SFs for mouse- and rat-sized phantoms were 10.7% and 24.2%, respectively. Peak NEC rates for mouse- and rat-sized uniform cylindrical phantoms were 328 kcps at 173 kBq/ml and 119 kcps at 49 kBq/ml, respectively. The quantitative stability of emission counts against activity strength was within 2% over 5 half-lives, ranging from 0.6 MBq to 30 MBq. Transmission measurement based on segmented attenuation correction allowed 6-min and 10-min scans for mouse- and rat-sized cylindrical phantoms, respectively. Rat imaging injected with 18F-NaF resulted in visibility of fine bone structures, and mouse imaging injected with 18F-D-fluoromethyl tyrosine demonstrated the feasibility of using this system to obtain simultaneous time activity curves from separate regions, such as for the heart and tumors. ClairvivoPET is well suited to quantitative imaging even with short scan times, and will provide a number of advantages in new drug development and for kinetic measurement in molecular imaging. (author)

  3. A high resolution animal PET scanner using compact PS-PMT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high resolution PET scanner dedicated to animal studies has been designed, built and tested. The system utilizes 240 block detectors, each of which consists of a new compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) and an 8 x 4 BGO array. A total number of 7,680 crystals (480 per ring) are positioned to form a 508 mm diameter of 16 detector rings with 7.2 mm pitch and 114 mm axial field of view (FOV). The system is designed to perform activation studies using a monkey in a sitting position. The data can be acquired in either 2D or 3D mode, where the slice collimators are retracted in 3D mode. The transaxial resolution is 2.6 mm FWHM at the center of the FOV, and the average axial resolution on the axis of the ring is 3.3 mm FWHM in the direct slice and 3.2 mm FWHM in the cross slice. The scatter fraction, sensitivity and count rate performance were evaluated for a 10 cm diameter cylindrical phantom. The total system sensitivity is 2.3 kcps/kBq/ml in 2D mode and 22.8 kcps/kBq/ml in 3D mode. The noise equivalent count rate with 3D mode is equivalent to that with 2D mode at five times higher radioactivity level. The applicable imaging capabilities of the scanner was demonstrated by animal studies with a monkey

  4. NEMA NU-04-based performance characteristics of the LabPET-8(TM) small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to characterize the performance of the preclinical avalanche photodiode (APD)-based LabPET-8(TM) subsystem of the fully integrated trimodality PET/SPECT/CT Triumph(TM) scanner using the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 04-2008 protocol. The characterized performance parameters include the spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, counts rate performance and image-quality characteristics. The PET system is fully digital using APD-based detector modules with highly integrated electronics. The detector assembly consists of phoswich pairs of Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5 (LYSO) and Lu0.4Gd1.6SiO5 (LGSO) crystals with dimensions of 2 x 2 x 14 mm3 having 7.5 cm axial and 10 cm transverse field of view (FOV). The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured using a small 22Na point source at different positions in the scanner's FOV. The scatter fraction and count rate characteristics were measured using mouse- and rat-sized phantoms fitted with an18F line source. The overall imaging capabilities of the scanner were assessed using the NEMA image-quality phantom and laboratory animal studies. The NEMA-based radial and tangential spatial resolution ranged from 1.7 mm at the center of the FOV to 2.59 mm at a radial offset of 2.5 cm and from 1.85 mm at the center of the FOV to 1.76 mm at a radial offset of 2.5 cm, respectively. Iterative reconstruction improved the spatial resolution to 0.84 mm at the center of the FOV. The total absolute system sensitivity is 12.74% for an energy window of 250-650 keV. For the mouse-sized phantom, the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) is 183 kcps at 2.07 MBq cc-1, whereas the peak true count rate is 320 kcps at 2.5 MBq cc-1 with a scatter fraction of 19%. The rat-sized phantom had a scatter fraction of 31%, with a peak NECR of 67 kcps at 0.23 MBq cc-1 and a peak true count rate of 186 kcps at 0.27 MBq cc-1. The average activity concentration and percentage standard deviation were 126

  5. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  6. Development of a prototype of time-over-threshold based small animal PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazoe, K., E-mail: shimazoe@it-club.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kumagai, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, S.; Sato, H.; Usuki, Y. [Furukawa Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A time-over-threshold (ToT)-based positron emission tomography (TODPET) scanner was designed and fabricated. The PET scanner consisted of eight block detectors, each of which is composed of a 12×12 array of 2×2×10 mm{sup 3} Pr:LuAG crystals individually coupled with a 12×12 UV-enhanced avalanche photodiode (APD) array. The APDs were individually read out using a custom-designed time-over-threshold application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) readout system. The PET scanner has an energy resolution of 10% and a time resolution of 4.2 ns. A spatial resolution of 1.17 mm (FWHM) was demonstrated in the initial results.

  7. Development of a prototype of time-over-threshold based small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-over-threshold (ToT)-based positron emission tomography (TODPET) scanner was designed and fabricated. The PET scanner consisted of eight block detectors, each of which is composed of a 12×12 array of 2×2×10 mm3 Pr:LuAG crystals individually coupled with a 12×12 UV-enhanced avalanche photodiode (APD) array. The APDs were individually read out using a custom-designed time-over-threshold application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) readout system. The PET scanner has an energy resolution of 10% and a time resolution of 4.2 ns. A spatial resolution of 1.17 mm (FWHM) was demonstrated in the initial results

  8. Performance evaluation of the small-animal PET scanner ClairvivoPET using NEMA NU 4-2008 Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Shidahara, M.; Watabe, H.; Watanuki, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Arakawa, Y.; Nai, YH; Furumoto, S.; Tashiro, M.; Shoji, T.; Yanai, K.; Gonda, K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of ClairvivoPET using NEMA NU4 standards. The ClairvivoPET incorporates a LYSO dual depth-of-interaction detector system with 151 mm axial field of view (FOV). Spatial resolution, sensitivity, counting rate capabilities, and image quality were evaluated using NEMA NU4-2008 standards. Normal mouse imaging was also performed for 10min after intravenous injection of 18F(-)-NaF. Data were compared with 19 other preclinical PET scanners. Spatial resolution measured using full width at half maximum on FBP-ramp reconstructed images was 2.16 mm at radial offset 5 mm of the axial centre FOV. The maximum absolute sensitivity for a point source at the FOV centre was 8.72%. Peak noise equivalent counting rate (NECR) was 415kcps at 14.6MBq ml-1. The uniformity with the image-quality phantom was 4.62%. Spillover ratios in the images of air and water filled chambers were 0.19 and 0.06, respectively. Our results were comparable with the 19 other preclinical PET scanners based on NEMA NU4 standards, with excellent sensitivity because of the large FOV. The ClairvivoPET with iterative reconstruction algorithm also provided sufficient visualization of the mouse spine. The high sensitivity and resolution of the ClairvivoPET scanner provided high quality images for preclinical studies.

  9. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom

  10. A rat head holder for simultaneous scanning of two rats in small animal PET scanners: Design, construction, feasibility testing and kinetic validation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Tee Ean; Yoder, Karmen K; Normandin, Marc D.; Risacher, Shannon L; Converse, Alexander K; Hampel, Joseph A; Miller, Michael A.; Morris, Evan D

    2008-01-01

    To reduce imaging costs, we designed a head holder for scanning two rats simultaneously in small animal PET scanners. Our goals were (i) to maintain high sensitivity and (ii) to minimize repositioning error between scans.

  11. Monte Carlo modelling of singles-mode transmission data for small animal PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The attenuation corrections factors (ACFs), which are necessary for quantitatively accurate PET imaging, can be obtained using singles-mode transmission scanning. However, contamination from scatter is a largely unresolved problem for these data. We present an extension of the Monte Carlo simulation tool, GATE, for singles-mode transmission data and its validation using experimental data from the microPET R4 and Focus 120 scanners. We first validated our simulated PET scanner for coincidence-mode data where we found that experimental resolution and scatter fractions (SFs) agreed well for simulations that included positron interactions and scatter in the source material. After modifying GATE to model singles-mode data, we compared simulated and experimental ACFs and SFs for three different sized water cylinders using 57Co (122 keV photon emitter) and 68Ge (positron emitter) transmission sources. We also propose a simple correction for a large background contamination we identified in the 68Ge singles-mode data due to intrinsic 176Lu radioactivity present in the detector crystals. For simulation data, the SFs agreed to within 1.5% and 2.5% of experimental values for background-corrected 68Ge and 57Co transmission data, respectively. This new simulation tool accurately models the photon interactions and data acquisition for singles-mode transmission scans

  12. Ga-68-DOTATOC: Feasibility of high throughput screening by small animal PET using a clinical high-resolution PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As radio peptide tracers have been developed in recent years for the high sensitive detection of neuroendocrine tumors, still the broad application of other peptides to breast and prostate cancer is missing. A rapid screening of new peptides can, in theory, be based on in vivo screening in animals by PET/CT. To test this hypothesis and to asses the minimum screening time needed per animal, we used the application of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT in rats as test system. The Ga-68-DOTATOC yields in a hot spot imaging with minimal background. To delineate liver and spleen, we performed PET/CT of 10 animals on a SIEMENS Biograph 16 LSO HIGHREZ after intravenous injection of 1.5 MBq Ga-68-DOTATOC per animal. Animals were mounted in an '18 slot' holding device and scanned for a single-bed position. The emission times for the PET scan was varied from 1 to 20 min. The images were assessed first for 'PET only' and afterwards in PET/CT fusion mode. The detection of the two organs was good at emission times down to 1 min in PET/CT fusion mode. In the 'PET only' scans, the liver was clearly to be identified down to 1 min emission in all animals. But the spleen could only be delineated only by 1 min of emission in the PET/CT-fusion mode. In conclusion the screening of 'hot spot' enriching peptides is feasible. 'PET only' is in terms of delineation of small organs by far inferior to PET/CT fusion. If animal tumors are above a diameter of 10 mm small, animal PET/CT using clinical high resolution scanners will enable rapid screening. Even the determination of bio-distributions becomes feasible by using list mode tools. The time for the whole survey of 18 animals including anesthesia, preparation and mounting was approximately 20 min. By use of several holding devices mounted simultaneously, a survey time of less than 1 h for 180 animals can be expected

  13. MicroPET II: design, development and initial performance of an improved microPET scanner for small-animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Y. C.; Chatziioannou, A. F.; Yang, Y. F.; Silverman, R W; Meadors, K; Siegel, S.; Newport, D F; Stickel, J R; Cherry, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    MicroPET II is a second-generation animal PET scanner designed for high-resolution imaging of small laboratory rodents. The system consists of 90 scintillation detector modules arranged in three contiguous axial rings with a ring diameter of 16.0 cm and an axial length of 4.9 cm. Each detector module consists of a 14 x 14 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to a multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT) through a coherent optical fibre bundle. Each LSO crystal element ...

  14. Design and construction of a small animal PET/CT scanner combining scintillation Phoswich modules and hybrid pixels detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathway that has been followed by the imXgam team at CPPM was to combine on a single rotating device the detector modules of the small animal PET scanner ClearPET with a photon counting X-ray detector in order to perform simultaneous acquisition of images from the anatomy (X-ray CT) and from the metabolic function (PET) of the common field-of-view. A preliminary study of the hybrid imaging system ClearPET/XPAD3 carried out using Gate led us to form a new PET detection assembly based on 21 Phoswich modules, to fix the design of the PET/CT device, as well as to study and solve the difficulties arising from simultaneous hybrid imaging. Last but not least, the simulation tool also allowed us for thinking how well such a system could judiciously use the spatial and temporal correlations between anatomic and functional information. From an instrumentation point of view, we succeeded to set up the ClearPET/XPAD3 prototype. Once both imaging systems were operational individually, we demonstrated on one side that the ClearPET prototype was perfectly capable of performing correctly in simultaneous acquisition conditions, providing that the detector modules were appropriately shielded. On the other side, the new generation of the hybrid pixel camera using the XPAD3-S chip proved to be quite promising given the good quality of the first reconstructed images. Finally, the proof of concept of simultaneous PET/CT data acquisition was made using a sealed positron source and an X-ray tube. (author)

  15. Scanner calibration of a small animal PET camera based on continuous LSO crystals and flat panel PSPMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have constructed a small animal PET with four identical detector modules, each consisting of a continuous LYSO crystal attached to a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (PSPMT). The dimensions of the continuous crystal are 50x50 mm2 and 10 mm thickness. The modules are separated 11 cm between each other in the scanner. In this paper we discuss the method used for the calibration of the camera for this special system with continuous detectors. We also present the preliminary values for the main performance parameters such as spatial and energy resolution, and sensitivity of the system

  16. An evaluation of exact and approximate 3-D reconstruction algorithms for a high-resolution small-animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroPET is a low-cost, high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner designed for imaging small animals. MicroPET operates exclusively without septa, acquiring fully three-dimensional (3-D) data sets. The performance of the projection-reprojection (3DRP), variable axial rebinning (VARB), single slice rebinning (SSRB), and Fourier rebinning (FORE) methods for reconstruction of microPET data were evaluated. The algorithms were compared with respect to resolution, noise variance, and reconstruction time. Results suggested that the 3DRP algorithm gives the best combination of resolution and noise performance in 9 min of reconstruction time on a Sun UltraSparc I workstation. The FORE algorithm provided the most acceptable accelerated method of reconstruction, giving similar resolution performance with a 10%--20% degradation in noise variance in under 2 min. Significant degradation in the axial resolution was measured with the VARB and SSRB methods, offsetting the decrease in reconstruction time achieved with those methods. In-plane angular mashing of the 3-D data before reconstruct ion led to a 50% reduction in reconstruction time but also introduced unacceptable tangential blurring artifacts. This thorough evaluation of analytical 3-D reconstruction techniques allowed for optimal selection of a reconstruction method for the diverse range of microPET applications

  17. Spatial resolution evaluation with a pair of two four-layer DOI detectors for small animal PET scanner: jPET-RD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: funis@nirs.go.jp; Tsuda, Tomoaki [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Shibuya, Kengo; Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kitamura, Keishi [Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1 Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Takahashi, Kei [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Yayoi-cho 1-33, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ohmura, Atsushi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a small animal PET scanner, 'jPET-RD' to achieve high sensitivity as well as high spatial resolution by using four-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The jPET-RD is designed with two detector rings. Each detector ring is composed of six DOI detectors arranged hexagonally. The diameter of the field-of-view (FOV) is 8.8 cm, which is smaller than typical small animal PET scanners on the market now. Each detector module consists of a crystal block and a 256-channel flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The crystal block, consisting of 32x32x4 crystal (4096 crystals, each 1.46 mmx1.46 mmx4.5 mm) and a reflector, is mounted on the 256ch FP-PMT. In this study, we evaluated the spatial resolution of reconstructed images with the evaluation system of two four-layer DOI detectors which consist of 32x32x4 LYSO (Lu: 98%, Y: 2%) crystals coupled on the 256ch FP-PMT by using RTV rubber. The spatial resolution of 1.5 mm was obtained at the center of the FOV by the filtered back projection. The spatial resolution, better than 2 mm in the whole FOV, was also achieved with DOI while the spatial resolution without DOI was degraded to 3.3 mm.

  18. A feasibility study of PETiPIX: an ultra high resolution small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PETiPIX is an ultra high spatial resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner designed for imaging mice brains. Four Timepix pixellated silicon detector modules are placed in an edge-on configuration to form a scanner with a field of view (FoV) 15 mm in diameter. Each detector module consists of 256 × 256 pixels with dimensions of 55 × 55 × 300 μm3. Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the PETiPIX design, including estimation of system sensitivity, angular dependence, spatial resolution (point source, hot and cold phantom studies) and evaluation of potential detector shield designs. Initial experimental work also established that scattered photons and recoil electrons could be detected using a single edge-on Timepix detector with a positron source. Simulation results estimate a spatial resolution of 0.26 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) at the centre of FoV and 0.29 mm FWHM overall spatial resolution with sensitivity of 0.01%, and indicate that a 1.5 mm thick tungsten shield parallel to the detectors will absorb the majority of non-coplanar annihilation photons, significantly reducing the rates of randoms. Results from the simulated phantom studies demonstrate that PETiPIX is a promising design for studies demanding high resolution images of mice brains

  19. SiliPET: Design of an ultra-high resolution small animal PET scanner based on stacks of semi-conductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesca, N.; Auricchio, N.; Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.; Malaguti, R.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schopper, F.

    2007-03-01

    We studied with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSnrc code, a new scanner for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), based on stacks of double-sided semiconductor detectors. Each stack is composed of planar detectors with dimension 70×60×1 mm 3 and orthogonal strips on both sides with 500 μm pitch to read the two interaction coordinates, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded. In this way, we achieve a precise determination of the first interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results of scanners based on Si planar detectors are presented and the initial tomographic reconstructions demonstrate very good spatial resolution limited only by the positron range. This suggests that, this is a promising new approach for small animal PET imaging. We are testing some double-sided silicon detectors, equipped with 128 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides using VATAGP3 ASIC by IDEAS.

  20. SiliPET: Design of an ultra-high resolution small animal PET scanner based on stacks of semi-conductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSnrc code, a new scanner for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), based on stacks of double-sided semiconductor detectors. Each stack is composed of planar detectors with dimension 70x60x1 mm3 and orthogonal strips on both sides with 500 μm pitch to read the two interaction coordinates, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded. In this way, we achieve a precise determination of the first interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results of scanners based on Si planar detectors are presented and the initial tomographic reconstructions demonstrate very good spatial resolution limited only by the positron range. This suggests that, this is a promising new approach for small animal PET imaging. We are testing some double-sided silicon detectors, equipped with 128 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides using VATAGP3 ASIC by IDEAS

  1. A prototype of very high-resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S J; Huh, S; Kagan, H; Honscheid, K; Burdette, D; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Mikuz, M; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P; Clinthorne, N H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A very high-resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET), which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution, is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32×16 array of 1.4×1.4 mm pads readout with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self-triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04×10−3% from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source. Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximizat...

  2. MicroPET II: design, development and initial performance of an improved microPET scanner for small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroPET II is a second-generation animal PET scanner designed for high-resolution imaging of small laboratory rodents. The system consists of 90 scintillation detector modules arranged in three contiguous axial rings with a ring diameter of 16.0 cm and an axial length of 4.9 cm. Each detector module consists of a 14 x 14 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to a multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT) through a coherent optical fibre bundle. Each LSO crystal element measures 0.975 mm x 0.975 mm in cross section by 12.5 mm in length. A barium sulphate reflector material was used between LSO elements leading to a detector pitch of 1.15 mm in both axial and transverse directions. Fused optical fibre bundles were made from 90 μm diameter glass fibres with a numerical aperture of 0.56. Interstitial extramural absorber was added between the fibres to reduce optical cross talk. A charge-division readout circuit was implemented on printed circuit boards to decode the 196 crystals in each array from the outputs of the 64 anode signals of the MC-PMT. Electronics from Concorde Microsystems Inc. (Knoxville, TN) were used for signal amplification, digitization, event qualification, coincidence processing and data capture. Coincidence data were passed to a host PC that recorded events in list mode. Following acquisition, data were sorted into sinograms and reconstructed using Fourier rebinning and filtered backprojection algorithms. Basic evaluation of the system has been completed. The absolute sensitivity of the microPET II scanner was 2.26% at the centre of the field of view (CFOV) for an energy window of 250-750 keV and a timing window of 10 ns. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the detectors in the system averaged 1.21 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) when measured with a 22Na point source 0.5 mm in diameter. Reconstructed image resolution ranged from 0.83 mm FWHM at the CFOV to 1.47 mm FWHM in the radial direction, 1.17 mm FWHM in the

  3. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  4. Cold wall effect eliminating method to determine the contrast recovery coefficient for small animal PET scanners using the NEMA NU-4 image quality phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtos, Imre; Czernin, Johannes; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; Emri, Miklos; Farshchi-Heydari, Salman; Forgacs, Attila; Hoh, Carl K.; Joszai, Istvan; Krizsan, Aron K.; Lantos, Judit; Major, Peter; Molnar, Jozsef; Opposits, Gabor; Tron, Lajos; Vera, David R.; Balkay, Laszlo

    2014-06-01

    The contrast recovery coefficients (CRC) were evaluated for five different small animal PET scanners: GE Explore Vista, Genisys4, MiniPET-2, nanoScan PC and Siemens Inveon. The NEMA NU-4 2008 performance test with the suggested image quality phantom (NU4IQ) does not allow the determination of the CRC values for the hot regions in the phantom. This drawback of NU4IQ phantom motivated us to develop a new method for this purpose. The method includes special acquisition and reconstruction protocols using the original phantom, and results in an artificially merged image enabling the evaluation of CRC values. An advantageous feature of this method is that it stops the cold wall effect from distorting the CRC calculation. Our suggested protocol results in a set of CRC values contributing to the characterization of small animal PET scanners. GATE simulations were also performed to validate the new method and verify the evaluated CRC values. We also demonstrated that the numerical values of this parameter depend on the actual object contrast of the hot region(s) and this mainly comes from the spillover effect. This effect was also studied while analysing the background activity level around the hot rods. We revealed that the calculated background mean values depended on the target contrast in a scanner specific manner. Performing the artificially merged imaging procedure and additional simulations using the micro hollow sphere (MHS) phantom geometry, we also proved that the inactive wall around the hot spheres can have a remarkable impact on the calculated CRC. In conclusion, we have shown that the proposed artificial merging procedure and the commonly used NU4IQ phantom prescribed by the NEMA NU-4 can easily deliver reliable CRC data otherwise unavailable for the NU4IQ phantom in the conventional protocol or the MHS phantom.

  5. Cold wall effect eliminating method to determine the contrast recovery coefficient for small animal PET scanners using the NEMA NU-4 image quality phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contrast recovery coefficients (CRC) were evaluated for five different small animal PET scanners: GE Explore Vista, Genisys4, MiniPET-2, nanoScan PC and Siemens Inveon. The NEMA NU-4 2008 performance test with the suggested image quality phantom (NU4IQ) does not allow the determination of the CRC values for the hot regions in the phantom. This drawback of NU4IQ phantom motivated us to develop a new method for this purpose. The method includes special acquisition and reconstruction protocols using the original phantom, and results in an artificially merged image enabling the evaluation of CRC values. An advantageous feature of this method is that it stops the cold wall effect from distorting the CRC calculation. Our suggested protocol results in a set of CRC values contributing to the characterization of small animal PET scanners. GATE simulations were also performed to validate the new method and verify the evaluated CRC values. We also demonstrated that the numerical values of this parameter depend on the actual object contrast of the hot region(s) and this mainly comes from the spillover effect. This effect was also studied while analysing the background activity level around the hot rods. We revealed that the calculated background mean values depended on the target contrast in a scanner specific manner. Performing the artificially merged imaging procedure and additional simulations using the micro hollow sphere (MHS) phantom geometry, we also proved that the inactive wall around the hot spheres can have a remarkable impact on the calculated CRC. In conclusion, we have shown that the proposed artificial merging procedure and the commonly used NU4IQ phantom prescribed by the NEMA NU-4 can easily deliver reliable CRC data otherwise unavailable for the NU4IQ phantom in the conventional protocol or the MHS phantom. (paper)

  6. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at ...

  7. Simultaneous scanning of two mice in a small-animal PET scanner: a simulation-based assessment of the signal degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Boisson, Frédéric; Wimberley, Catriona; Parmar, Arvind; Zahra, David; Hamze, Hasar; Davis, Emma; Arthur, Andrew; Bouillot, Caroline; Charil, Arnaud; Grégoire, Marie-Claude

    2016-02-01

    In PET imaging, research groups have recently proposed different experimental set ups allowing multiple animals to be simultaneously imaged in a scanner in order to reduce the costs and increase the throughput. In those studies, the technical feasibility was demonstrated and the signal degradation caused by additional mice in the FOV characterized, however, the impact of the signal degradation on the outcome of a PET study has not yet been studied. Here we thoroughly investigated, using Monte Carlo simulated [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride PET studies, different experimental designs for whole-body and brain acquisitions of two mice and assessed the actual impact on the detection of biological variations as compared to a single-mouse setting. First, we extended the validation of the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulation platform for the simultaneous simulation of two animals. Then, we designed [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride input mouse models for the simulation of realistic whole-body and brain PET studies. Simulated studies allowed us to accurately estimate the differences in detection between single- and dual-mode acquisition settings that are purely the result of having two animals in the FOV. Validation results showed that PET-SORTEO accurately reproduced the spatial resolution and noise degradations that were observed with actual dual phantom experiments. The simulated [18F]FDG whole-body study showed that the resolution loss due to the off-center positioning of the mice was the biggest contributing factor in signal degradation at the pixel level and a minimal inter-animal distance as well as the use of reconstruction methods with resolution modeling should be preferred. Dual mode acquisition did not have a major impact on ROI-based analysis except in situations where uptake values in organs from the same subject were compared. The simulated [11C]Raclopride study however showed that dual-mice imaging strongly reduced the sensitivity to variations when mice were

  8. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  9. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of ± 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented

  10. Determining Block Detector Positions for PET Scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm for accurate localization of block detectors in a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Accurate reconstruction of PET images requires precise knowledge of the physical position and orientation of the detectors. However, in some systems, block detector positioning and orientation can have relatively large tolerances, leading to implicit errors in the coincidence line-of-response (LOR) positioning. To compensate we utilize a rotating point source phantom where the...

  11. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  12. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  13. Detector characterization for an inline PET scanner in hadrontherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group at the 'Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon' (IPNL) is working on physics and detectors for medical imaging. We are presently developing a small animal Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scanner prototype with an innovative slow control and data acquisition features, for a demonstration purpose and within the crystal clear international collaboration. We also investigate a feasibility study of an online PET dedicated for inline and in situ dose deposition control in hadrontherapy. Here, we present the characterization setup and method we used to calibrate the detector heads of our PET prototype. Each of these heads consists of a single block continuous scintillating LySO crystal coupled to a multi-anode photomultiplier equipped with its proper acquisition readout chain

  14. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcari, Nicola [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)]. E-mail: belcari@df.unipi.it; Guerra, Alberto Del [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Bartoli, Antonietta [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Bianchi, Daniele [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Lazzarotti, Marco [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Sensi, Luca [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Menichetti, Luca [IFC-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Erba, Paola A. [Nuclear Medicine Section, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Mariani, Giuliano [Nuclear Medicine Section, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Corsini, Giovanni U. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Sgado, Paola [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using {sup 123}I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  15. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  16. Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect in dependence of the attenuation correction of a state-of-the-art small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE) of the Siemens Inveon PET scanner were evaluated. The influence of transmission source activities (40 and 160 MBq) on the quantification accuracy and the PVE were determined. Dynamic range, object size and PVE for different sphere sizes, contrast ratios and positions in the field of view (FOV) were evaluated. The acquired data were reconstructed using different algorithms and correction methods. The activity level of the transmission source and the total emission activity in the FOV strongly influenced the attenuation maps. Reconstruction algorithms, correction methods, object size and location within the FOV had a strong influence on the PVE in all configurations. All evaluated parameters potentially influence the quantification accuracy. Hence, all protocols should be kept constant during a study to allow a comparison between different scans. (paper)

  17. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  18. Simultaneous PET/MR body imaging in rats. Initial experiences with an integrated PET/MRI scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently developed an integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (iPET/MRI) scanner for small animals, which had relatively large field-of-view (FOV) covering up to the size of a rat body. The purpose of this study was to report results of simultaneous PET/MRI of a rat body using this scanner with some radiotracers. C-11-methionine (MET), F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), or F-18-sodium fluoride (NaF) was injected as a radiotracer for PET portion in addition to gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, a hepatobiliary contrast agent, for MRI portion. Simultaneous PET/MRI was performed in normal rats. PET, MRI, and co-registered fusion images were evaluated regarding image quality and feasibility for rat imaging studies. MET uptake was clearly shown in the liver and pancreas, which was confirmed with magnetic resonance (MR) and fused PET/MR images. PET/MR images depicted intense FDG uptake in the brain, Harderian glands, and myocardium. NaF uptake was observed in all bones and joints within FOV, except in ribs, which was well recognized with the help of MR and fused PET/MR images. This study demonstrated that simultaneous PET/MRI with an integrated dual-modality molecular imaging scanner was a feasible technique for imaging studies targeting on a rat body. However, further developments including attenuation correction methods are required to use this technique routinely in rat imaging studies. (author)

  19. Performance evaluation of the microPET R4 PET scanner for rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoess, Christof; Richerzhagen, Norbert; Graf, Rudolf; Wienhard, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Siegel, Stefan; Smith, Anne; Newport, Danny; Goble, Rhonda N. [Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Winkeler, Alexandra [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Jacobs, Andreas; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter [Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleuelerstrasse 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Center of Molecular Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Department of Neurology at the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The microPET R4 scanner is a dedicated positron emission tomograph (PET) for studies of rodents. A number of scanner parameters such as spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter, and count rate performance were determined in this work, which showed that the microPET R4 is a suitable PET scanner for small animals like mice and rats. In the center of the field of view (FOV) a maximal sensitivity of 43.66 cps/kBq for a centered point source was calculated from a measurement with a germanium-68 line source within an energy widow of 250-750 keV. A spatial resolution of 1.85 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) in the axial direction and 1.66 mm FWHM in the transaxial direction was measured in the center with a 1-mm-diameter sodium-22 point source. Within the inner 20 mm of the FOV the volumetric resolution is better than 15.6 {mu}l, corresponding to a linear resolution of less than 2.5 mm in all three dimensions. Images of a high-resolution phantom and from mice and rat studies illustrate the good performance of the scanner. A maximal noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was reached at 174 kcps for a mouse phantom and at 93 kcps for a rat phantom (energy window 250-750 keV). Scatter fractions were measured between 0.30 and 0.42 for an energy window of 250-750 keV and phantom diameters similar to mice and rats. A comparison with the microPET P4 model for primates illustrates the gain in sensitivity due to a smaller detector ring diameter but also the changes in NECR. (orig.)

  20. Performance evaluation of the microPET R4 PET scanner for rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microPET R4 scanner is a dedicated positron emission tomograph (PET) for studies of rodents. A number of scanner parameters such as spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter, and count rate performance were determined in this work, which showed that the microPET R4 is a suitable PET scanner for small animals like mice and rats. In the center of the field of view (FOV) a maximal sensitivity of 43.66 cps/kBq for a centered point source was calculated from a measurement with a germanium-68 line source within an energy widow of 250-750 keV. A spatial resolution of 1.85 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) in the axial direction and 1.66 mm FWHM in the transaxial direction was measured in the center with a 1-mm-diameter sodium-22 point source. Within the inner 20 mm of the FOV the volumetric resolution is better than 15.6 μl, corresponding to a linear resolution of less than 2.5 mm in all three dimensions. Images of a high-resolution phantom and from mice and rat studies illustrate the good performance of the scanner. A maximal noise equivalent count rate (NECR) was reached at 174 kcps for a mouse phantom and at 93 kcps for a rat phantom (energy window 250-750 keV). Scatter fractions were measured between 0.30 and 0.42 for an energy window of 250-750 keV and phantom diameters similar to mice and rats. A comparison with the microPET P4 model for primates illustrates the gain in sensitivity due to a smaller detector ring diameter but also the changes in NECR. (orig.)

  1. Technology challenges in small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte, Roger E-mail: roger.lecomte@usherbrooke.ca

    2004-07-11

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive nuclear imaging modality allowing biochemical processes to be investigated in vivo with sensitivity in the picomolar range. For this reason, PET has the potential to play a major role in the emerging field of molecular imaging by enabling the study of molecular pathways and genetic processes in living animals non-invasively. The challenge is to obtain a spatial resolution that is appropriate for rat and mouse imaging, the preferred animal models for research in biology, while achieving a sensitivity adequate for real-time measurement of rapid dynamic processes in vivo without violating tracer kinetic principles. An overview of the current state of development of dedicated small animal PET scanners is given, and selected applications are reported and discussed with respect to performance and significance to research in biology.

  2. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Patrick L [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rannou, Fernando R [Departamento de Ingenieria Informatica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3659, Santiago (Chile); Chatziioannou, Arion F [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of California, 700 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-04-21

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET (registered) Focus{sup TM} for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT{sup TM} II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  3. Analysis framework for the J-PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Gruntowski, A; Stola, K; Trybek, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2015-01-01

    J-PET analysis framework is a flexible, lightweight, ROOT-based software package which provides the tools to develop reconstruction and calibration procedures for PET tomography. In this article we present the implementation of the full data-processing chain in the J-PET framework which is used for the data analysis of the J-PET tomography scanner. The Framework incorporates automated handling of PET setup parameters' database as well as high level tools for building data reconstruction procedures. Each of these components is briefly discussed.

  4. Performance evaluation of a LYSO-based PET scanner for monitoring of dose delivery in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbiani, E.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Del Guerra, A.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Panetta, D.; Sportelli, G.; Rosso, V.

    2015-12-01

    The DoPET scanner is a compact positron emission tomography (PET) device. It has been developed for monitoring the range of charged particles during therapy with hadron beams. Previous works have focused on the development and upgrade of the device and on data analysis. In this paper, a full performance characterization of the DoPET system in terms of the energy resolution, spatial resolution, sensitivity, uniformity, and noise equivalent count rate is reported. All measurements refer to an adapted version of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4 - 2008 protocol, which was written originally for small animal PET systems. Since DoPET is a dual head planar system, it requires a modified characterisation procedure with respect to those described for ring geometries as in the NEMA NU 4 - 2008 protocol. The presented procedure may be of interest for any other PET system with a similar geometry as DoPET.

  5. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold;

    2011-01-01

    is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration...

  6. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  7. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts-the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications

  8. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Cristian C; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with (18)F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a (22)Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Phi = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Phi = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity (18)F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with (18)F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon

  9. Performance evaluation of an Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the performance of an Inveon preclinical PET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions), the latest MicroPET system. Spatial resolution was measured with a glass capillary tube (0.26 mm inside diameter, 0.29 mm wall thickness) filled with 18F solution. Transaxial and axial resolutions were measured with the source placed parallel and perpendicular to the axis of the scanner. The sensitivity of the scanner was measured with a 22Na point source, placed on the animal bed and positioned at different offsets from the center of the field of view (FOV), as well as at different energy and coincidence windows. The noise equivalent count rates (NECR) and the system scatter fraction were measured using rat-like (Φ = 60, L = 150 mm) and mouse-like (Φ = 25 mm, L = 70 mm) cylindrical phantoms. Line sources filled with high activity 18F (>250 MBq) were inserted parallel to the axes of the phantoms (13.5 and 10 mm offset). For each phantom, list-mode data were collected over 24 h at 350-650 keV and 250-750 keV energy windows and 3.4 ns coincidence window. System scatter fraction was measured when the random event rates were below 1%. Performance phantoms consisting of cylinders with hot rod inserts filled with 18F were imaged. In addition, we performed imaging studies that show the suitability of the Inveon scanner for imaging small structures such as those in mice with a variety of tracers. The radial, tangential and axial resolutions at the center of FOV were 1.46 mm, 1.49 and 1.15 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 2 cm, the FWHM values were 1.73, 2.20 and 1.47 mm, respectively. At a coincidence window of 3.4 ns, the sensitivity was 5.75% for EW = 350-650 keV and 7.4% for EW = 250-750 keV. For an energy window of 350-650 keV, the peak NECR was 538 kcps at 131.4 MBq for the rat-like phantom, and 1734 kcps at 147.4 MBq for the mouse-like phantom. The system scatter fraction values were 0.22 for the rat phantom and 0.06 for the mouse phantom. The Inveon system

  10. Biometric Recognition for Pet Animal

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Kumar; Sanjay Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Missing, swapping, false insurance claims and reallocation of pet animals (dog) are global problems throughout the world and research done to solve this problem is minimal. Traditional biometrics and non-biometrics methods have their own boundaries and they fail to provide competent level of security to pet animal (dog). The work on animal identification based on their phenotype appearance (coat patterns) has been an active research area in recent years and automatic face recognition for...

  11. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  12. Validation of peneloPET simulations of the Biograph PET/CT scanner with TOF capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Abushab, K. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vicente, E.; España, Samuel; Vaquero, Juan José; Udías, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for optimizing detector design and acquisition protocols, and for developing and assessing corrections and reconstruction methods. PeneloPET is a Monte Carlo code for PET simulations with basic components of detector geometry, acquisition electronics and material and source definitions. The purpose of the present study was to validate the simulations of the Siemens Biograph PET/CT scanner with TOF ...

  13. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated

  14. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  15. Use of an in-field-of-view shield to improve count rate performance of the single crystal layer high-resolution research tomograph PET scanner for small animal brain scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The count rate performance of the single LSO crystal layer high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT-S) PET scanner is limited by the processing speed of its electronics. Therefore, the feasibility of using an in-field-of-view (in-FOV) shield to improve the noise equivalent count rates (NECR) for small animal brain studies was investigated. The in-FOV shield consists of a lead tube of 12 cm length, 6 cm inner diameter and 9 mm wall thickness. It is large enough to shield the activity in the body of a rat or mouse. First, the effect of this shield on NECR was studied. Secondly, a number of experiments were performed to assess the effects of the shield on the accuracy of transmission scan data and, next, on reconstructed activity distribution in the brain. For activities below 150 MBq NECR improved only by 5-10%. For higher activities NECR maxima of 1.2E4 cps at 200 MBq and 2.2E4 cps at 370 MBq were found without and with shield, respectively. Listmode data taken without shield, however, were corrupted for activities above 75 MBq due to data overrun problems (time tag losses) of the electronics. When the shield was used data overrun was avoided up to activities of 150 MBq. For the unshielded part of the phantom, transmission scan data were the same with and without shield. The estimated scatter contribution was approximately 8.5% without and 5.5% with shield. Reconstructed emission data showed a difference up to 5% in the unshielded part of the phantom at 5 mm or more from the edge of the shielding. Of this 5% about 3% results from the difference in the uncorrected scatter contribution. In conclusion, an in-FOV shield can be used successfully in an HRRT PET scanner to improve NECR and accuracy of small animal brain studies. The latter is especially important when high activities are required for tracers with low brain uptake or when multiple animals are scanned simultaneously. (note)

  16. An investigation of a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner%全数字化小动物PET符合探测系统的设计与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 陈源宝; 龙岸文; 陈忻; 吴中毅; 张永学; 谢庆国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate and design a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner and evaluate its preliminary performance properties.Methods This coincidence module adopted a coincidence identification mode based on singles data in list-mode.Using digital signal processing technology,energy calibration,crystal identification,timing alignment and coincidence events extraction were performed on singles data in list-mode.The obtained data could be used for image reconstruction.Results The 13 × 13 crystal array was well recognized by the position histogram of one lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal block.In the coincidence timing histogram of the micro-Derenzo phantom,1.36 ns full width at half maximum was obtained.The rods with a diameter of 1.2 mm were clearly displayed in the reconstructed image of the micro-Derenzo phantom.Conclusion The coincidence module can provide satisfactory performance to meet the design needs of an all-digital small animal PET scanner.%目的 设计和研究全数字化小动物PET符合探测系统,并对其进行初步性能评估.方法 采用基于单事件列表式数据的符合判选模式,运用数字信号处理技术对单事件数据集进行晶格分割、能量校正、时间校正以及符合事件判断等操作,获取可供图像重建使用的数据.结果 硅酸钇镥闪烁晶体(LYSO)晶体阵列点阵图可清晰分辨13×13个晶格点.Micro-Derenzo假体符合时间分布图的半高全宽为1.36 ns.Micro-Derenzo假体重建图像可清晰分辨直径为1.2 mm的小孔.结论 硬件软件化的符合探测模式可以提供满意的性能指标,满足全数字化小动物PET的设计需求.

  17. Scatter fraction of the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, P; Raczyński, L; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, J; Kamińska, D; Korcyl, G; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammad, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    A novel Positron Emission Tomography system, based on plastic scintillators, is being developed by the J-PET collaboration. In this article we present the simulation results of the scatter fraction, representing one of the parameters crucial for background studies defined in the NEMA-NU-2-2012 norm. We elaborate an event selection methods allowing to suppress events in which gamma quanta were scattered in the phantom or underwent the multiple scattering in the detector. The estimated scatter fraction for the single-layer J-PET scanner varies from 37% to 53% depending on the applied energy threshold.

  18. Development of prototype PET scanner using dual-sided readout DOI-PET modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our previous work, we proposed a novel design for a gamma-ray detector module capable of measuring the depth of interaction (DOI). In this paper, we further developed DOI-PET detector modules and a data acquisition system, and evaluated its performance. Each detector module was composed of a 3-D scintillator array and two large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays coupled to both ends of the 3-D scintillator array, leading to only 8-ch signal outputs from a module. The 3-D scintillator array was composed of 9 × 9 × 7 matrices of 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals. The detector module showed good energy resolution of 10.6% as measured at 511 keV and a high average peak to valley ratio higher than 8 for each pixel crystal identified in the X-Y-Z directions. Moreover, we evaluated the spatial resolution of a virtual 18-ch PET gantry simulated by using two detector modules that were flexibly controlled using both the X-stage and θ-stage in 20-degree steps. By measuring a 22Na point source (0.25 mm in diameter), we showed that spatial resolution substantially degrades from 1.0 mm to 7.8 mm (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center) with a non-DOI configuration, whereas the corresponding values for the DOI configuration were 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center). This preliminary study confirms that our DOI-PET module is useful for future high spatial resolution and compact small-animal PET scanners without radial image distortions at the peripheral regions of the field of view (FOV)

  19. Optimization and characterization of PET scanners for Medical Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cucciati,

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an imaging technique that appeared to be a valid instrument for cancers detection and neuro-imaging studies. Since first models built during 1960s, an incredible effort has been done by researchers to develop scanners more and more advanced with higher specificity and efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations have shown to be a very important tool during design phase of PET prototypes thanks to their ability to simulate systems with many coupled degrees of freedom, a...

  20. Effect of surrounding materials on iterative reconstruction-based line-source response function, and annihilations outside the source assessed by a small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of surrounding materials on the iterative reconstruction-based line-source response function (IR-RF) of 18F, 11C, 13N, and 15O using a preclinical PET system, and (2) to determine whether and how annihilation outside the source can be visualized experimentally. We performed all the measurements using the LabPET-8 PET/CT subsystem built-in the Triumph II platform (TriFoil Imaging, Inc., Northridge, CA, USA). IR-RF was measured for 18F, 11C, 13N, and 15O, and was expressed as full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) using a glass capillary phantom mounted in materials of various densities, which were chosen to cover the wide range of real tissues. To determine whether and how annihilation outside the source can be visualized, we designed a concentric ring paper phantom, which consisted of a source at the center with 4 ring-like paper layers. When the radionuclides were placed in air (material density 0 g/cm3), IR-RFs were similar among the radionuclides tested. As the surrounding material density increased, IR-RFs for higher energy-emitting radionuclides (11C, 13N, and 15O) became worse, whereas those of 18F remained relatively constant over the range of surrounding material densities (0-2.17 g/cm3). Both FWHM and FWTM values were closely correlated with mean energy of radionuclides at middle to high material densities (material density 0.94-2.17 g/cm3). The FWTM/FWHM ratio of high energy-emitting radionuclides such as 15O increased as a function of material density, which was followed by subsequent decrease at high material densities (1.2-2.17 g/cm3). Using a concentric ring paper phantom, annihilations outside the source were visible and measurable. The innermost layer was visible with all radionuclides, whereas the outer layers only with high energy positron emitters. The results indicate that surrounding material affects IR-RF particularly for high energy positron emitters

  1. Development of DEPTH-of-interaction (DOI) detector for PET and prototype PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group has been developed a prototype PET scanner, jPET-D4. It is designed to achieve high performance by the use of depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors The DOI detector offers 3D radiation detected location and it is the new technic of necessity to gain sensitivity with maintaining spatial resolution in a PET system. In most proposals, DOI detectors have two scintillation crystal layers as depth information. However, we developed a 4-layer DOI detector and showed capability of easy construction and performance reliability even in mass-product process. On the basis of the 4-layer DOI encoding technique, we further developed a simpler 4-layer DOI encoding method and recently an 8-l a encoding method. In this presentation, we will introduce the jPET-D4 scanner our DOI detectors. (author)

  2. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  3. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  4. Imaging performance of LabPET APD-based digital PET scanners for pre-clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LabPET is an avalanche photodiode (APD) based digital PET scanner with quasi-individual detector read-out and highly parallel electronic architecture for high-performance in vivo molecular imaging of small animals. The scanner is based on LYSO and LGSO scintillation crystals (2×2×12/14 mm3), assembled side-by-side in phoswich pairs read out by an APD. High spatial resolution is achieved through the individual and independent read-out of an individual APD detector for recording impinging annihilation photons. The LabPET exists in three versions, LabPET4 (3.75 cm axial length), LabPET8 (7.5 cm axial length) and LabPET12 (11.4 cm axial length). This paper focuses on the systematic characterization of the three LabPET versions using two different energy window settings to implement a high-efficiency mode (250–650 keV) and a high-resolution mode (350–650 keV) in the most suitable operating conditions. Prior to measurements, a global timing alignment of the scanners and optimization of the APD operating bias have been carried out. Characteristics such as spatial resolution, absolute sensitivity, count rate performance and image quality have been thoroughly investigated following the NEMA NU 4-2008 protocol. Phantom and small animal images were acquired to assess the scanners' suitability for the most demanding imaging tasks in preclinical biomedical research. The three systems achieve the same radial FBP spatial resolution at 5 mm from the field-of-view center: 1.65/3.40 mm (FWHM/FWTM) for an energy threshold of 250 keV and 1.51/2.97 mm for an energy threshold of 350 keV. The absolute sensitivity for an energy window of 250–650 keV is 1.4%/2.6%/4.3% for LabPET4/8/12, respectively. The best count rate performance peaking at 362 kcps is achieved by the LabPET12 with an energy window of 250–650 keV and a mouse phantom (2.5 cm diameter) at an activity of 2.4 MBq ml−1. With the same phantom, the scatter fraction for all scanners is about 17

  5. Qualification test of a MPPC-based PET module for future MRI-PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurei, Y., E-mail: yk-3562.mss@toki.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Funamoto, H.; Tsujikawa, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65-banchi, Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-11-21

    We have developed a high-resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module for future use in MRI-PET scanners. The module consists of large-area, 4×4 ch MPPC arrays (Hamamatsu S11827-3344MG) optically coupled with Ce:LYSO scintillators fabricated into 12×12 matrices of 1×1 mm{sup 2} pixels. At this stage, a pair of module and coincidence circuits was assembled into an experimental prototype gantry arranged in a ring of 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. The PET detector ring was then positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point {sup 22}Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure interference between the MPPC-based PET and the MRI. We only found a slight degradation in the spatial resolution of the PET image from 1.63 to 1.70 mm (FWHM; x-direction), or 1.48–1.55 mm (FWHM; y-direction) when operating with the MRI, while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI image was only degraded by 5%. These results encouraged us to develop a more advanced version of the MRI-PET gantry with eight MPPC-based PET modules, whose detailed design and first qualification test are also presented in this paper. - Highlights: • We developed a high resolution, compact PET module for future MRI-PET. • We found slight degradation in the resolution of PET images operating with the MRI. • The SNR of the MR images was only degraded by 5% operating with PET. • PET and MRI have little impact on each other. • We are now developing a more advanced version of the MRI-PET gantry.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data

  8. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...... bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%). The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude of...... the AC recovery could be overestimated using the uniform map. Therefore, application of a global attenuation factor on PET data might not be accurate for attenuation correction....

  9. Scatter Characterization and Correction for Simultaneous Multiple Small-Animal PET Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasad, Rameshwar; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth and usage of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) in molecular imaging research has led to increased demand on PET scanner's time. One potential solution to increase throughput is to scan multiple rodents simultaneously. However, this is achieved at the expense of deterio

  10. An image quality approach for optimizing {sup 124}I PET imaging on Siemens Inveon PET Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, A Ram; Kim, Jin Su; An, Gwang Il; Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Jong Guk; Park, Ji Ae; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Byeong Il; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Joung [College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    {sup 124}I has a long half life of 4.2 days that is suitable for imaging over several days during the biological uptake and washout of radioiodine. However {sup 124}I has a low positron branching ratio (23%). High-energy {gamma}- photons (602 keV to 1,326 keV) are emitted in cascade with the positrons. These cascade {gamma}- photons degrade the image quality. To find optimal parameter, image quality of the Inveon {sup 124}I PET scanner with various energy window settings was measured based on the NEMA NU4-standars and compared with those of {sup 18}F PET

  11. STRIP-PET: a novel detector concept for the TOF-PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    We briefly present a design of a new PET scanner based on strips of polymer scintillators arranged in a barrel constituting a large acceptance detector. The solution proposed is based on the superior timing properties of the polymer scintillators. The position and time of the reaction of the gamma quanta in the detector material will be determined based on the time of arrival of light signals to the edges of the scintillator strips.

  12. Performance characteristics of 3D GSO PET/CT scanner (Philips GEMINI PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips GEMINI is a newly introduced whole-body GSO PET/CT scanner. In this study, performance of the scanner including spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) was measured utilizing NEMA NU2-2001 standard protocol and compared with performance of LSO, BGO crystal scanner. GEMINI is composed of the Philips ALLEGRO PET and MX8000 D multi-slice CT scanners. The PET scanner has 28 detector segments which have an array of 29 by 22 GSO crystals (4*6*20 mm), covering axial FOV of 18 cm. PET data to measure spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and NECR were acquired in 3D mode according to the NEMA NU2 protocols (coincidence window: 8 ns, energy window : 409∼664 keV). For the measurement of spatial resolution, images were reconstructed with FBP using ramp filter and an iterative reconstruction algorithm, 3D RAMLA. Data for sensitivity measurement were acquired using NEMA sensitivity phantom filled with F-18 solution and surrounded by 1∼5 aluminum sleeves after we confirmed that dead time loss did not exceed 1%. To measure NECR and scatter fraction, 1110 MBq of F-18 solution was injected into a NEMA scatter phantom with a length of 70 cm and dynamic scan with 20-min frame duration was acquired for 7 half-lives. Oblique sinograms were collapsed into transaxial slices using single slice rebinning method, and true to background (scatter + random) ratio for each slice and frame was estimated. Scatter fraction was determined by averaging the true to background ratio of last 3 frames in which the dead time loss was below 1%. Transverse and axial resolutions at 1 cm radius were (1) 5.3 and 6.5 mm (FBP), (2) 5.1 and 5.9 mm (3D RAMLA). Transverse radial, transverse tangential, and axial resolution at 10 cm were (1) 5.7, 5.7, and 7.0 mm (FBP), (2) 5.4, 5.4, and 6.4 mm (3D RAMLA). Attenuation free values of sensitivity were 3,620 counts/sec/MBq at the center of transaxial FOV and 4,324 counts/sec/MBq at 10 cm offset

  13. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  14. Necessity and clinical application of diagnostic CT in PET-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET scanning has a definite clinical impact on diagnosis, initial staging, restaging, monitoring therapeutic effects of malignancies, and on assessment of myocardial viability. Whereas, PET scans has false positive diagnosis and false negative diagnosis of malignant lesions. It leads to reduce specifity in PET imaging. application of diagnostic CT, especially applying contrast enhanced CT scans, three dimensional technique, CTA(CT angiography), CT perfusion and CT virtual endoscopy can realize dominance complementation with PET and CT, PET-CT imaging diagnosis combines with PET and CT diagnostic technique, it improves sensitivity, specifity, and accuracy in clinical application of PET-CT scanner. (authors)

  15. Performance comparison of a state-of-the-art neuro-SPET scanner and a dedicated neuro-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical performances of two current state-of-the-art scanners dedicated to functional imaging of the brain, one a SPET scanner and the other a PET scanner, have been compared under identical conditions. The aim of the study was to compare the capabilities of the devices under conditions resembling the routine clinical environment, as well as to consider other issues such as radiation burden for some common investigations. Both systems have slightly less than 11-cm axial fields of view. The PET system can be operated in a septa-less (3D) mode as well as conventionally with septa (2D). The spatial resolution of both devices was less than 8 mm in all dimensions in scattering media. On average, the PET scanner's resolution was approximately 10%-15% better than the SPET system. Energy resolution on the SPET system was superior due the scinitillator use [NaI(Tl)]. Sensitivity in air with a line source on the PET system was found to be ∝150 times greater in 3D and ∝25 times greater in 2D than with the SPET system. A normal subject was studied on each system in an attempt to obtain the highest quality data possible for a subjective comparison. It is clear that, while PET retains the advantages of more desirable radiopharmaceuticals and higher sensitivity, the quality obtainable from SPET devices has improved markedly. SPET may prove a useful for many clinical investigations. (orig.)

  16. NEMA and clinical evaluation of a novel brain PET-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogg, Kira S.; Toole, Terrence; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Normandin, Marc; Johnson, Keith; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a novel mobile human brain/small animal PET-CT system, developed by Photo Diagnostic Systems Inc. The scanner has a 35.7-cm diameter bore and a 22-cm axial extent. The detector ring has 7 modules each with 3×4 cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal blocks, each consisting of 22×22 outer layer and 21×21 inner layer crystals, each layer 1 cm thick. Light is collected by 12×12 SiPMs. The integrated CT can be used for attenuation correction and anatomical localization. The scanner was designed as a low-cost device that nevertheless produces high-quality PET images with the unique capability of battery-powered propulsion, enabling use in many settings. Methods Spatial resolution, sensitivity and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) were measured based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-2012 procedures. Reconstruction was done with tight energy and timing cuts: 400-650 keV and 7ns, and loose cuts: 350-700 keV and 10ns. Additional image quality measurements were made from phantoms, human, and animal studies. Performance was compared to a reference scanner (ECAT Exact HR+) with comparable imaging properties. Results The full-width half-max transverse resolution at 1 cm (10 cm) radius is 3.2 mm (5.2 mm radial, 3.1 mm tangential) and the axial resolution is 3.5 mm (4.0 mm). For tight (loose) cuts, a sensitivity of 7.5 (11.7) kcps/MBq at the center increases to 8.8 (13.9) kcps/MBq at a 10 cm radial offset. The maximum NECR of 19.5 (22.7) kcps was achieved for an activity concentration of 2.9 kBq/ml. Contrast recovery for 4:1 hot cylinder to warm background was 76% for the 25 mm diameter cylinder, but decreased with decreasing cylinder size. The quantitation agrees within 2% of the known activity distribution and concentration. Brain phantom and human scans have shown agreement in SUV values and image quality with the HR+. Conclusion We have characterized the performance of the NeuroPET

  17. A hybrid algorithm for PET/CT image merger in hybrid scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the PET image quality of a hybrid PET/CT scanner by merging CT borders with PET texture. PET/CT scanners provide both high-resolution CT images showing anatomical details and PET images of low-resolution physiological information about radiopharmaceutical uptake. Standard smoothing of noisy PET images may further impair PET resolution, reducing small lesion detectability. The CT edge data and the PET texture data were merged using a modified form of an algorithm called HCT (hybrid computed tomography). In merged PET/CT images, each PET pixel value was estimated by iteratively applying a corrected 2D Taylor expansion to each of its eight neighbors. The spatial derivative term was used only near anatomical edges provided by the CT. This counts-preserving algorithm was tested on a special resolution phantom and patient data sets obtained by PET/CT acquisitions. The HCT algorithm provided phantom PET images with sharp borders and improved resolution (≤3 mm as compared to ≥4 mm). HCT increased the signal to background contrast ratios by an average of 61% (40-89%) while maintaining noise reduction similar to the Gaussian filtering standard in PET. In the clinical PET images, HCT allowed for an improved delineation of pulmonary and pelvic lesions and an improved visualization of the brain. A new reconstruction algorithm for merging CT anatomical edge data with functional PET data has been introduced. The algorithm smoothes noisy PET images while retaining sharper edges at corresponding anatomical borders, resulting in an improvement in resolution and contrast ratio. (orig.)

  18. Voxel-based classification of FDG PET in dementia using inter-scanner normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Frank; Young, Stewart; Buchert, Ralph; Wenzel, Fabian

    2013-08-15

    Statistical mapping of FDG PET brain images has become a common tool in differential diagnosis of patients with dementia. We present a voxel-based classification system of neurodegenerative dementias based on partial least squares (PLS). Such a classifier relies on image databases of normal controls and dementia cases as training data. Variations in PET image characteristics can be expected between databases, for example due to differences in instrumentation, patient preparation, and image reconstruction. This study evaluates (i) the impact of databases from different scanners on classification accuracy and (ii) a method to improve inter-scanner classification. Brain FDG PET databases from three scanners (A, B, C) at two clinical sites were evaluated. Diagnostic categories included normal controls (NC, nA=26, nB=20, nC=24 for each scanner respectively), Alzheimer's disease (AD, nA=44, nB=11, nC=16), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD, nA=13, nB=13, nC=5). Spatially normalized images were classified as NC, AD, or FTD using partial least squares. Supervised learning was employed to determine classifier parameters, whereby available data is sub-divided into training and test sets. Four different database setups were evaluated: (i) "in-scanner": training and test data from the same scanner, (ii) "x-scanner": training and test data from different scanners, (iii) "train other": train on both x-scanners, and (iv) "train all": train on all scanners. In order to moderate the impact of inter-scanner variations on image evaluation, voxel-by-voxel scaling was applied based on "ratio images". Good classification accuracy of on average 94% was achieved for the in-scanner setups. Accuracy deteriorated for setups with mismatched scanners (79-91%). Ratio-image normalization improved all results with mismatched scanners (85-92%). In conclusion, automatic classification of individual FDG PET in differential diagnosis of dementia is feasible. Accuracy can vary with respect to scanner or

  19. Processing optimization with parallel computing for the J-PET tomography scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Krzemień, W; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Gorgol, M; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Stola, K; Strzelecki, A; Trybek, D; Wieczorek, Anna; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zgardzińska, B K; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    The Jagiellonian-PET (J-PET) collaboration is developing a prototype TOF-PET detector based on long polymer scintillators. This novel approach exploits the excellent time properties of the plastic scintillators, which permit very precise time measurements. The very fast, FPGA-based front-end electronics and the data acquisition system, as well as, low- and high-level reconstruction algorithms were specially developed to be used with the J-PET scanner. The TOF-PET data processing and reconstruction are time and resource demanding operations, especially in case of a large acceptance detector, which works in triggerless data acquisition mode. In this article, we discuss the parallel computing methods applied to optimize the data processing for the J-PET detector. We begin with general concepts of parallel computing and then we discuss several applications of those techniques in the J-PET data processing.

  20. Design and performance evaluation of a high resolution IRI-microPET preclinical scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET for small animal, IRI-microPET, was designed and built at the NSTRI. The scanner is made of four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance 50 mm from the center. Each detector consists of a 10×10 crystal matrix of 2×2×10 mm3 directly coupled to a PS-PMT. A position encoding circuit for specific PS-PMT has been designed, built and tested with a PD-MFS-2MS/s-8/14 data acquisition board. After implementing reconstruction algorithms (FBP, MLEM and SART) on sinograms, images quality and system performance were evaluated by energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, RMS contrast and SNR parameters. The energy spectra were obtained for the crystals with an energy window of 300–700 keV. The energy resolution in 511 keV averaged over all modules, detectors, and crystals, was 23.5%. A timing resolution of 2.4 ns FWHM obtained by coincidence timing spectrum was measured with crystal LYSO. The radial and tangential resolutions for 18F (1.15-mm inner diameter) at the center of the field of view were 1.81 mm and 1.90 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 5 mm, the FWHM values were 1.96 and 2.06 mm. The system scatter fraction was 7.1% for the mouse phantom. The sensitivity was measured for different energy windows, leading to a sensitivity of 1.74% at the center of FOV. Also, images quality was evaluated by RMS contrast and SNR factors, and the results show that the reconstructed images by MLEM algorithm have the best RMS contrast, and SNR. The IRI-microPET presents high image resolution, low scatter fraction values and improved SNR for animal studies

  1. Design and performance evaluation of a high resolution IRI-microPET preclinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islami rad, S.Z., E-mail: szislami@yahoo.com [Department of Physic, Faculty of Science, University of Qom, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Peyvandi, R. Gholipour; Lehdarboni, M. Askari; Ghafari, A.A. [Instrumentation Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    PET for small animal, IRI-microPET, was designed and built at the NSTRI. The scanner is made of four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance 50 mm from the center. Each detector consists of a 10×10 crystal matrix of 2×2×10 mm{sup 3} directly coupled to a PS-PMT. A position encoding circuit for specific PS-PMT has been designed, built and tested with a PD-MFS-2MS/s-8/14 data acquisition board. After implementing reconstruction algorithms (FBP, MLEM and SART) on sinograms, images quality and system performance were evaluated by energy resolution, timing resolution, spatial resolution, scatter fraction, sensitivity, RMS contrast and SNR parameters. The energy spectra were obtained for the crystals with an energy window of 300–700 keV. The energy resolution in 511 keV averaged over all modules, detectors, and crystals, was 23.5%. A timing resolution of 2.4 ns FWHM obtained by coincidence timing spectrum was measured with crystal LYSO. The radial and tangential resolutions for {sup 18}F (1.15-mm inner diameter) at the center of the field of view were 1.81 mm and 1.90 mm, respectively. At a radial offset of 5 mm, the FWHM values were 1.96 and 2.06 mm. The system scatter fraction was 7.1% for the mouse phantom. The sensitivity was measured for different energy windows, leading to a sensitivity of 1.74% at the center of FOV. Also, images quality was evaluated by RMS contrast and SNR factors, and the results show that the reconstructed images by MLEM algorithm have the best RMS contrast, and SNR. The IRI-microPET presents high image resolution, low scatter fraction values and improved SNR for animal studies.

  2. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC for Small Animal PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El Ali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a correction for annihilation photon attenuation in small objects such as mice is necessary. The attenuation recovery for specific organs and subcutaneous tumors was investigated. A comparison between different attenuation correction methods was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II. CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%, for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19–21%, and for bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%. The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude of the AC recovery could be overestimated using the uniform map. Therefore, application of a global attenuation factor on PET data might not be accurate for attenuation correction.

  3. Studies of the interactions of an MRI system with the shielding in a combined PET/MRI scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A positron emission tomography (PET) system or 'insert' has been constructed for placement and operation in the bore of a small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to allow simultaneous MR and PET imaging. The insert contains electronics, components with a variety of magnetic properties and large continuous sheets of metal-all characteristics of an object that should, by conventional wisdom, never be placed in the bore of an MR scanner, especially near the imaging volume. There are a variety of ways the two systems might be expected to interact that could negatively impact the performance of either or both. In this article, the interaction mechanisms, particularly the impact of the PET insert and shielding on MR imaging, are defined and explored. Additionally, some of the difficulties in quantifying errors introduced into the MR images as a result of the presence of the PET components are demonstrated. Several different approaches are used to characterize image artifacts and determine optimal placement of the shielding. Data are also presented that suggest ways the shielding could be modified to reduce errors and enable placement closer to the isocenter of the magnet.

  4. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems

  5. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvikis, D.; Lefevre, T.; Lamare, F.; Kontaxakis, G.; Santos, A.; Darambara, D.

    2006-12-01

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  6. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lefevre, T. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Kontaxakis, G. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Santos, A. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Darambara, D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-20

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  7. The simulation of a data acquisition system for a proposed high resolution PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation of a specific data acquisition (DAQ) system architecture for a proposed high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner is discussed. Stochastic processes are used extensively to model PET scanner signal timing and probable DAQ circuit limitations. Certain architectural parameters, along with stochastic parameters, are varied to quantatively study the resulting output under various conditions. The inclusion of the DAQ in the model represents a novel method of more complete simulations of tomograph designs, and could prove to be of pivotal importance in the optimization of such designs

  8. Attenuation correction for the HRRT PET-scanner using transmission scatter correction and total variation regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Svarer, Claus; Sibomana, Merence

    2013-01-01

    In the standard software for the Siemens high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner the most commonly used segmentation in the μ -map reconstruction for human brain scans is maximum a posteriori for transmission (MAP-TR). Bias in the lower cerebellum and...... scanner using TXTV to the GE Advance scanner images and found high quantitative correspondence. TXTV has been used to reconstruct more than 4000 HRRT scans at seven different sites with no reports of biases. Conclusion: TXTV-based reconstruction is recommended for human brain scans on the HRRT....

  9. Performance Evaluation of a Small-Animal PET/CT System

    OpenAIRE

    Dahle, Tordis Johnsen

    2014-01-01

    This master project is the first vendor-independent performance evaluation of the new nanoScan PET/CT system at the University of Bergen. A comprehensive performance evaluation of a novel scanner is very important, particularly when quantitative assessments of images are required. The nanoScan PET/CT system is a fully integrated small-animal PET/CT system. An abbreviated performance evaluation of the CT subsystem was done, which included a Hounsfield quality check, a comparison of reconstr...

  10. Metallic artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on PET images. A PET/CT phantom study using different PET/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of computed tomography (CT) artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on positron emission tomography (PET) images. A dental arch cast was fixed in a cylindrical water-bath phantom. A spherical phantom positioned in the vicinity of the dental arch cast was used to simulate a tumor. To simulate the tumor imaging, the ratio of the 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose radioactivity concentration of the spherical phantom to that of the water-bath phantom was set at 2.5. A dental bridge composed of a gold-silver-palladium alloy on the right mandibular side was prepared. A spherical phantom was set in the white artifact area on the CT images (site A), in a slightly remote area from the white artifact (site B), and in a black artifact area (site C). A PET/CT scan was performed with and without the metal bridge at each simulated tumor site, and the artifactual influence was evaluated on the axial attenuation-corrected (AC) PET images, in which the simulated tumor produced the strongest accumulation. Measurements were performed using three types of PET/CT scanners (scanners 1 and 2 with CT-based attenuation correction, and 3 with Cesium-137 (137Cs)-based attenuation correction). The influence of the metal bridge was evaluated using the change rate of the SUVmean with and without the metal bridge. At site A, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +5.0% and scanner 2: +2.5%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -31.8%. At site B, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +2.1% and scanner 2: +2.0%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -2.6%. However, at site C, an underestimation was shown (scanner 1: -25.0%, scanner 2: -32.4%, and scanner 3: -8.4%). When CT is used for attenuation correction in patients with dental metal prostheses, an underestimation of radioactivity of accumulated tracer is anticipated in the dark streak artifact area on the CT images. In this study, the dark streak artifacts of the CT

  11. A device to measure the effects of strong magnetic fields on the image resolution of PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, D; Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N H; Cochran, E; Honscheid, K; Huh, S S; Kagan, H; Knopp, M; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Schmalbrock, P; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P

    2009-01-01

    Very high resolution images can be achieved in small animal PET systems utilizing solid state silicon pad detectors. As these systems approach sub-millimeter resolutions, the range of the positron is becoming the dominant contribution to image blur. The size of the positron range effect depends on the initial positron energy and hence the radioactive tracer used. For higher energy positron emitters, such as and , which are gaining importance in small animal studies, the width of the annihilation point distribution dominates the spatial resolution. This positron range effect can be reduced by embedding the field of view of the PET scanner in a strong magnetic field. In order to confirm this effect experimentally, we developed a high resolution PET instrument based on silicon pad detectors that can operate in a 7 T magnetic field. In this paper, we describe the instrument and present initial results of a study of the effects of magnetic fields up to 7 T on PET image resolution for and point sources.

  12. Important bacterial infections transmitted to humans from pet animals

    OpenAIRE

    Gökçen Dinç; Mehmet Doğanay; Müjgan İzgür

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, pets have started to be more commonly in family life, in our country and also all over the world. Previously, animals such as cats, dogs, birds have been ownered more frequently, but today pet range increased remarkably and the animals like hamsters, mice, rats, snakes, lizards, alligators have started to been preferred. Pet animals provide people feel better as psychological and physiological. It is mentioned that pet owners have lower blood pressure ...

  13. Usefulness of a PET/CT scanner and a proposal for examination fee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined PET/CT scanner has been developed, its clinical application has begun and there is much evidence that it is very helpful, particularly in oncology. In our country, a PET/CT scan, like a dedicated PET scan, is obtained after other conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, are performed. Therefore, patients who receive a PET/CT scan are obliged to have CT scans performed twice, i.e. a conventional CT scan with or without contrast material and a second CT scan as a part of the PET/CT study. Since a radiation exposure by CT can be excessive, the electric current has to be reduced in order to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure by PET/CT scanning, and this results in poor image quality of the CT. A PET study with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is especially useful for staging and re-staging disease in patients with cancer. If patients could undergo a PET/CT scan using the highest quality CT and avoid receiving a conventional CT scan fur diagnostic purposes, we would be able to save time for evaluating each patient, save time in ordering and interpreting procedures, and avoid redundant radiation exposure to the patients. All of this should lead to greater cost-effectiveness in patient care. If a revised fee of PET/CT with contrast would be 87300 yen, then it could reduce about 7 million yen of medical cost fur one thousand tests, as compared wit/i the case in which a CT scan is performed in 80% before a PET scan and another CT scan is recommended after PET in 50%. We have reviewed the clinical usefulness of PET/CT with FDG in oncology, and propose a novel system in applying this device based on evidence of its cost-effectiveness. (author)

  14. Assessment of the Contrast to Noise Ratio in PET Scanners with Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The PET scanner simulated was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution. Image quality was assessed in terms of the CNR. CNR was estimated from coronal reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3, 15 and 21) and various iterations (2 to 20). CNR values were found to decrease when both iterations and subsets increase. Two (2) iterations were found to be optimal. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in image quality assessment of PET scanners.

  15. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen Cedex (France); Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Visser, Eric P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lheureux, Stephanie [Caen University, BioTICLA team, EA 4656, IFR 146, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Heutte, Natacha [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, Clinical Research Unit, Caen (France); Szanda, Istvan [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the number of groups that will be imaged, and the expected intra-animal variability for a given tracer. We also review how high-throughput studies can be performed in dedicated small-animal PET, high-resolution clinical PET systems and planar positron imaging systems by imaging more than one animal simultaneously. Customized beds designed to image more than one animal in large-bore small-animal PET scanners are described. Physics issues related to the presence of several rodents within the field of view (i.e. deterioration of spatial resolution and sensitivity as the radial and the axial offsets increase, respectively, as well as a larger effect of attenuation and the number of scatter events), which can be assessed by using the NEMA NU 4 image quality phantom, are detailed. (orig.)

  16. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the number of groups that will be imaged, and the expected intra-animal variability for a given tracer. We also review how high-throughput studies can be performed in dedicated small-animal PET, high-resolution clinical PET systems and planar positron imaging systems by imaging more than one animal simultaneously. Customized beds designed to image more than one animal in large-bore small-animal PET scanners are described. Physics issues related to the presence of several rodents within the field of view (i.e. deterioration of spatial resolution and sensitivity as the radial and the axial offsets increase, respectively, as well as a larger effect of attenuation and the number of scatter events), which can be assessed by using the NEMA NU 4 image quality phantom, are detailed. (orig.)

  17. Clinical utility of a combined PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, after several years of development work, the first integral device combining positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) was introduced to clinical practice on a wider scale. In principle, the device represents a combination of the hardware of two diagnostic instruments, its primary purpose being to provide an accurate superposition of the tomographies supplied by each. The present paper discusses this technology from a medical viewpoint, especially as regards oncology, giving due consideration to technical aspects wherever necessary

  18. Preclinical evaluation of MR-attenuation correction versus CT-attenuation correction on a sequential whole-body MR/PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Jason; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mateo, Jesus; Machac, Josef; Narula, Jagat; Fuster, Valentin; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The application of attenuation correction for combined MR/PET systems is still a major challenge for accurate quantitative PET. CT attenuation correction (CTAC) is the current clinical standard for PET/CT scans. MR, unlike CT, has no direct information about photon attenuation but rather proton densities. On combined MR/PET scanners, MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) consists of assigning empirical attenuation coefficients to MR signal intensities. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the MRAC implemented on the combined MR/PET scanner versus the CTAC with the same PET data in an animal model. MATERIALS AND METHODS MR/PET acquisition was performed using a clinically approved sequential MR/PET scanner (Philips Ingenuity TF). CT and MR/PET images of 20 NZW rabbits were retrospectively analyzed. Animals were positioned on a customized animal bed to avoid movement between CT and MR/PET scanners. PET images from both methods (MRAC and CTAC) were generated. Voxel-by-voxel and region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were performed to determine differences in standardized uptake values (SUV). ROIs were drawn on the coregistered CT images for aorta, liver, kidney, spine and soft tissue (muscle) and superimposed on the PET images. RESULTS Voxel-by-voxel comparison of PET showed excellent correlation between MRAC and CTAC SUV values (R=0.99, p<0.0001). The mean of the difference of SUVs between all respective MRAC and CTAC voxels was −0.94% (−0.06±0.30SD), confirming slight underestimation of MRAC. The ROI-based comparison similarly showed MRAC SUV values were underestimated compared to CTAC. The mean difference between MRAC and CTAC for all ROIs was 10.8% (−0.08±0.06SD, R=0.99, p< 0.0001) and −9.7% (−0.15±0.12SD, R=0.99, p<0.0001) for SUVmean and SUVmax, respectively. The highest differences were found in the spine (SUVmean −26.1% (−0.11)) and areas close to large bones such as the back muscles (SUVmean −16.8% (−0

  19. A Movable Phantom Design for Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Correction Studies on High Resolution PET Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Svarer, C.; Sibomana, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Head movements during brain imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) impair the image quality which, along with the improvement of the spatial resolution of PET scanners, in general, raises the importance of motion correction. Here, we present a new design for an automatic...... maximization algorithm with modeling of the point spread function (3DOSEM-PSF), and they were corrected for motions based on external tracking information using the Polaris Vicra real-time stereo motion-tracking system. The new automatic, movable phantom has a robust design and is a potential quality...

  20. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsha Maramraju, Sri; Smith, S. David; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L.; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L.; Schlyer, David J.

    2011-04-01

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm3) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [11C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  1. A comparative study on PET and SPECT image formation systems for a proper scanner choice in a considered PET center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last twenty years, the developed technology is being applied, making available better diagnoses and therapy to a variety of diseases. Since then the short-lived radionuclides were available only in the large physics research centers. The increasing clinical applications of radiopharmaceuticals have led to the rapid rise in the number of compact cyclotrons throughout the world. All medical cyclotrons currently available are suitable for sustaining programs for PET research and clinical application. To date, up to 122 medical cyclotrons have been established worldwide, and Brazil is about to install a new dedicated cyclotron (RDS111 from CTI), to its first PET Center, in Rio de Janeiro. Also the number of scanners in use in the world has increased, mainly those based on the positrons emission and annihilation. The better result gotten in the final contrast of the object imposes necessarily a comparative study and analysis of the image formation process, either in a system based on a Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT), as well as on Positron Emission Tomography (PET.) This comparative study should at least follow same increasing rates of the new devices with technological advances. That kind of study can be helpful on the decision of what type of scan should be the proper one, to a PET Center, on a specific region. Obviously, many other parameters are involved in that decision, and this discussion and analyses are the main subject of the present work. The objective is to make available a realistic comparative scenario, considering as many as possible the parameters involving. Many of the new devices have been introduced making great progresses. As an example, in the new PET scanners, the reduction of examination time, and the remarkable improvement on the diagnoses based on images. As a consequence, we have a broadening on the field of application, better performance, and making possible the precocious discovery of males. Presently multi

  2. Under-sampling in PET scanners as a source of image blurring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.J. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada)]. E-mail: christopher.thompson@mcgill.ca; James, S.St. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Tomic, N. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2005-06-11

    The spatial resolution of PET scanners is degraded by a number of causes, both fundamental to the nature of positron decay, and to detectors. The crystal dimensions, their placement in the block and readout all contribute to the loss of resolution. We investigated the relative effects of sampling of the image space by the detectors, and the use of block detectors in a whole body PET scanner on resolution degradation. Three sources were mounted on a linear translation stage which moved them trans-axially through the central field of a Siemens CTI HR+ PET scanner. A 140 frame study was acquired as the sources moved horizontally 0.5mm between frames. The vertical projection from each frame was summed over all slices. The FWHM of each source's representation was estimated in each frame in the summed projections. The response functions were much sharper from crystals at the edge of the detector blocks, than from those from the central crystals. They were consistent with the effects of source size, non-collinearity, and crystal dimensions. The response from the central crystals were degraded by an additional term of 1.2mm added in quadrature to the other blurring effects. The intensity of the image of a small source depended on the source location, as did the FWHM of the response of the central crystals in the block detectors. The response functions of edge crystals were found to be sharper than those of the central crystals in the block detectors. However, a more interesting finding is that when very small sources are imaged in PET scanners their apparent intensity and their associated response functions depend on their location along any projection. This under-sampling results in resolution loss equivalent to about 12 of the crystal width.

  3. Performance evaluation of the HAMAMATSU SHR22000 whole-body PET scanner using the IEC standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHR22000 is a whole-body PET scanner developed by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. The scanner has a 600 mm patient aperture and a 225 mm axial FOV, which can cover the whole human head and large portion of the body so that a common whole-body scan can be accomplished within 5 bed position with a 3.2 mm average transverse resolution at 10 mm from the axis of FOV. The paper gives a system performance evaluation of this scanner using GB/T 18988.1-2003/IEC 61675-1:1998 standard, which includes the spatial resolution, tomographic sensitivity, count rate characteristic, scatter fraction and recovery coefficient. At last a human body scanning result is given as an imaging example. (authors)

  4. COMPET: High resolution high sensitivity MRI compatible pre-clinical PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector has been built using 8×8cm2 square layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals (2×3×80mm2) interleaved with 24 Wavelength Shifting Fibers (WLS) (3×1×80mm3). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers form a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked so that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the reconstructed images are produced with the novel geometry-independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and energy resolution have been resolved and found to be around 4 ns and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance have been carried out. The reconstruction algorithm has been verified with data acquired by means of a COMPET full ring PET scanner

  5. Multi-contrast attenuation map synthesis for PET/MR scanners: assessment on FDG and Florbetapir PET tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Ninon [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Cardoso, M.J.; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [University College London, Translational Imaging Group, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris; Dickson, John [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Schott, Jonathan M. [University College London, Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R. [University College London, Centre for Medical Image Computing, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); University of Wollongong, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MR) scanners are expected to offer a new range of clinical applications. Attenuation correction is an essential requirement for quantification of PET data but MRI images do not directly provide a patient-specific attenuation map. Methods We further validate and extend a Computed Tomography (CT) and attenuation map (μ-map) synthesis method based on pre-acquired MRI-CT image pairs. The validation consists of comparing the CT images synthesised with the proposed method to the original CT images. PET images were acquired using two different tracers ({sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-florbetapir). They were then reconstructed and corrected for attenuation using the synthetic μ-maps and compared to the reference PET images corrected with the CT-based μ-maps. During the validation, we observed that the CT synthesis was inaccurate in areas such as the neck and the cerebellum, and propose a refinement to mitigate these problems, as well as an extension of the method to multi-contrast MRI data. Results With the improvements proposed, a significant enhancement in CT synthesis, which results in a reduced absolute error and a decrease in the bias when reconstructing PET images, was observed. For both tracers, on average, the absolute difference between the reference PET images and the PET images corrected with the proposed method was less than 2%, with a bias inferior to 1%. Conclusion With the proposed method, attenuation information can be accurately derived from MRI images by synthesising CT using routine anatomical sequences. MRI sequences, or combination of sequences, can be used to synthesise CT images, as long as they provide sufficient anatomical information. (orig.)

  6. Multi-contrast attenuation map synthesis for PET/MR scanners: assessment on FDG and Florbetapir PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MR) scanners are expected to offer a new range of clinical applications. Attenuation correction is an essential requirement for quantification of PET data but MRI images do not directly provide a patient-specific attenuation map. Methods We further validate and extend a Computed Tomography (CT) and attenuation map (μ-map) synthesis method based on pre-acquired MRI-CT image pairs. The validation consists of comparing the CT images synthesised with the proposed method to the original CT images. PET images were acquired using two different tracers (18F-FDG and 18F-florbetapir). They were then reconstructed and corrected for attenuation using the synthetic μ-maps and compared to the reference PET images corrected with the CT-based μ-maps. During the validation, we observed that the CT synthesis was inaccurate in areas such as the neck and the cerebellum, and propose a refinement to mitigate these problems, as well as an extension of the method to multi-contrast MRI data. Results With the improvements proposed, a significant enhancement in CT synthesis, which results in a reduced absolute error and a decrease in the bias when reconstructing PET images, was observed. For both tracers, on average, the absolute difference between the reference PET images and the PET images corrected with the proposed method was less than 2%, with a bias inferior to 1%. Conclusion With the proposed method, attenuation information can be accurately derived from MRI images by synthesising CT using routine anatomical sequences. MRI sequences, or combination of sequences, can be used to synthesise CT images, as long as they provide sufficient anatomical information. (orig.)

  7. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  8. Novel Geometrical Concept of a High Performance Brain PET Scanner Principle, Design and Performance Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Weilhammer, P; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Correia, J G; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Garibaldi, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Schoenahl, F; Zaidi, H

    2006-01-01

    We present the principle, a possible implementation and performance estimates of a novel geometrical concept for a high resolution positron emission tomograph. The concept, which can for example be implemented in a brain PET device, promisses to lead to an essentially parallax free 3D image reconstruction with excellent spatial resolution and constrast, uniform over the complete field of view. The key components are matrices of long axially oriented scintillator crystals which are read out at both extremities by segmented Hybrid Photon Detectors. We discuss the relevant design considerations for a 3D axial PET camera module, motivate parameter and material choices, and estimate its performance in terms of spatial and energy resolution. We support these estimates by Monte Carlo simulations and in some cases by first experimental results. From the performance of a camera module, we extrapolate to the reconstruction resolution of a 3D axial PET scanner in a semi-analytical way and compare it to an existing state...

  9. Processing optimization with parallel computing for the J-PET scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzemień Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET collaboration is developing a prototype time of flight (TOF-positron emission tomograph (PET detector based on long polymer scintillators. This novel approach exploits the excellent time properties of the plastic scintillators, which permit very precise time measurements. The very fast field programmable gate array (FPGA-based front-end electronics and the data acquisition system, as well as low- and high-level reconstruction algorithms were specially developed to be used with the J-PET scanner. The TOF-PET data processing and reconstruction are time and resource demanding operations, especially in the case of a large acceptance detector that works in triggerless data acquisition mode. In this article, we discuss the parallel computing methods applied to optimize the data processing for the J-PET detector. We begin with general concepts of parallel computing and then we discuss several applications of those techniques in the J-PET data processing.

  10. A comparative study on PET and SPECT image formation systems for a proper scanner choice in a considered PET center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the last twenty years, the conjunction of technology and research had provided exceptional conditions for improvements on the quality of life, specially on nuclear medicine. In this area, the developed technology is being applied, making available better diagnoses and therapy to a variety of diseases. Since then the short-lived radionuclides were available only in the large physics research centers. The increasing clinical applications have led to the rapid rise in the number of compact cyclotrons throughout the world. All medical cyclotrons currently are suitable for sustaining programs for PET research and clinical application. To date, up to 122 medical cyclotrons have been established worldwide, and Brazil is about to install a new dedicated cyclotron (RDS111 from CTI), to its first PET Center, in Rio de Janeiro. Also the number of scanners worldwide has increased, mainly those based on the positrons emission and annihilation. The better result gotten in the final contrast of the object imposes a comparative study and analysis of the image formation process, either in a system based on a Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT), as well as on Positron Emission Tomography (PET.) This comparative study should at least follow same increasing rates of the new devices with technological advances. That kind of study can be helpful on the decision of what type of scan should be the proper one, to a PET Center, on a specific region. Obviously, many other parameters are involved in that decision, and this discussion and analyses are the main subject of the present work. The objective is to make available a realistic comparative scenario. Many of the new devices have been introduced making progresses. As an example, in the new PET scanners, the reduction of examination time, and the remarkable improvement on the diagnoses based on images. As a consequence, we have a broadening on application, better performance, and making possible the

  11. The Power of Pets: How Animals Affect Family Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Geller, Krista Scott

    2002-01-01

    THE POWER OF PETS: HOW ANIMALS AFFECT FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS By Krista Scott Geller Katherine R. Allen, Committee Chair Department of Human Development Virginia polytechnic Institute and State University (ABSTRACT) This study was designed to explore the importance a pet can have on someoneâ s life, including ways a pet affects the relationships an individual has with other family members. This study assessed how pets can be influential in peopleâ s lives, espe...

  12. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, T.; El-Ali, H.H.; Skovgaard, D.;

    2011-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this achie...... small animal PET/CT for studies of muscle and tendon in exercise models. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.......Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However, with this...... this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume...

  13. A novel method for calibration and monitoring of time synchronization of TOF-PET scanners by means of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Silarski, M; Bednarski, T; Moskal, P; Białas, P; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2013-01-01

    All of the present methods for calibration and monitoring of TOF-PET scanner detectors utilize radioactive isotopes such as e.g. $^{22}$Na or $^{68}$Ge, which are placed or rotate inside the scanner. In this article we describe a novel method based on the cosmic rays application to the PET calibration and monitoring methods. The concept allows to overcome many of the drawbacks of the present methods and it is well suited for newly developed TOF-PET scanners with a large longitudinal field of view. The method enables also monitoring of the quality of the scintillator materials and in general allows for the continuous quality assurance of the PET detector performance.

  14. Pragmatic fully 3D image reconstruction for the MiCES mouse imaging PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a pragmatic approach to image reconstruction for data from the micro crystal elements system (MiCES) fully 3D mouse imaging positron emission tomography (PET) scanner under construction at the University of Washington. Our approach is modelled on fully 3D image reconstruction used in clinical PET scanners, which is based on Fourier rebinning (FORE) followed by 2D iterative image reconstruction using ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM). The use of iterative methods allows modelling of physical effects (e.g., statistical noise, detector blurring, attenuation, etc), while FORE accelerates the reconstruction process by reducing the fully 3D data to a stacked set of independent 2D sinograms. Previous investigations have indicated that non-stationary detector point-spread response effects, which are typically ignored for clinical imaging, significantly impact image quality for the MiCES scanner geometry. To model the effect of non-stationary detector blurring (DB) in the FORE+OSEM(DB) algorithm, we have added a factorized system matrix to the ASPIRE reconstruction library. Initial results indicate that the proposed approach produces an improvement in resolution without an undue increase in noise and without a significant increase in the computational burden. The impact on task performance, however, remains to be evaluated

  15. Questions and Answers about Ebola, Pets, and Other Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions and Answers about Ebola, Pets, and Other Animals Language: English Español Français Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How are animals involved in Ebola outbreaks? Because the natural reservoir ...

  16. Conceptual design and simulation study of an ROI-focused panel-PET scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Xie

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an important imaging modality for clincial use. Conventionally, the PET scanner is generally built to provide a roomy enough transverse field-of-view (FOV for imaging most adults' torsos. However, in many cases, the region-of-interest (ROI for imaging is usually a small area inside the human body. Therefore, to fulfill a PET system which provides an FOV comparable in size to the target ROI seems appealing and more cost effective. Meanwhile, such a PET system has the potential for portable or bedside application with the reduced system size. In this work, we have investigated the feasibility of using dual-headed panel-detectors to build an ROI-focused PET scanner. A novel windowed list-mode ordered subset expectation maximization method was developed to perform the ROI image reconstruction. With this method, the ROI of the object can be reconstructed from the coincidences whose position determined by time-of-flight (TOF measurements was inside the ROI. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrates the feasibility of detecting lesions not less than 1 cm in diameter, with a 300 ps full width at half maximum timing resolution. As a critical system performance, the impact of TOF information on image quality has been studied and the required TOF capability was assessed. With enhanced timing resolution, the distortions and artifacts were reduced effectively. The further improved TOF capability also shows a noticeable improvement of detection performance for low uptake lesions, as well as the recovery speed of lesion contrast, which is of practical significance in the lesion detection task.

  17. Errors in MR-based attenuation correction for brain imaging with PET/MR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Herzog, Hans

    2013-02-01

    AimAttenuation correction of PET data acquired by hybrid MR/PET scanners remains a challenge, even if several methods for brain and whole-body measurements have been developed recently. A template-based attenuation correction for brain imaging proposed by our group is easy to handle and delivers reliable attenuation maps in a short time. However, some potential error sources are analyzed in this study. We investigated the choice of template reference head among all the available data (error A), and possible skull anomalies of the specific patient, such as discontinuities due to surgery (error B). Materials and methodsAn anatomical MR measurement and a 2-bed-position transmission scan covering the whole head and neck region were performed in eight normal subjects (4 females, 4 males). Error A: Taking alternatively one of the eight heads as reference, eight different templates were created by nonlinearly registering the images to the reference and calculating the average. Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; 4 with brain lesions, 4 w/o brain lesions) were measured in the Siemens BrainPET/MR scanner. The eight templates were used to generate the patients' attenuation maps required for reconstruction. ROI and VOI atlas-based comparisons were performed employing all the reconstructed images. Error B: CT-based attenuation maps of two volunteers were manipulated by manually inserting several skull lesions and filling a nasal cavity. The corresponding attenuation coefficients were substituted with the water's coefficient (0.096/cm). ResultsError A: The mean SUVs over the eight templates pairs for all eight patients and all VOIs did not differ significantly one from each other. Standard deviations up to 1.24% were found. Error B: After reconstruction of the volunteers' BrainPET data with the CT-based attenuation maps without and with skull anomalies, a VOI-atlas analysis was performed revealing very little influence of the skull lesions (less than 3%), while the filled nasal

  18. Development of a MPPC-based prototype gantry for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high spatial resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module designed for small animals and intended for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. This module consists of large-area, 4 × 4 ch MPPC arrays (S11830-3344MF; Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) optically coupled with Ce-doped (Lu,Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) scintillators fabricated into 16 × 16 matrices of 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 pixels. We set the temperature sensor (LM73CIMK-0; National Semiconductor Corp.) at the rear of the MPPC acceptance surface, and apply optimum voltage to maintain the gain. The eight MPPC-based PET modules and coincidence circuits were assembled into a gantry arranged in a ring 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. We have developed two types PET gantry: one made of non-magnetic metal and the other made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) resins. The PET gantry was positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point }22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure the interference between the MPPC-based PET and MRI. The spatial resolution of PET imaging in a transaxial plane of about 1 mm (FWHM) was achieved in all cases. Operating with PET made of ABS has no effect on MR images, while operating with PET made of non-magnetic metal has a significant detrimental effect on MR images. This paper describes our quantitative evaluations of PET images and MR images, and presents a more advanced version of the gantry for future MRI/DOI-PET systems.

  19. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac 18F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  20. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  1. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using -F and [18F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies

  2. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Susana [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: susana.silva@fc.ul.pt; Jan, Sebastien [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV/DRM, Orsay (France); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-10-01

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using {sup -}F and [{sup 18}F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies.

  3. Comparative evaluation of two commercial PET scanners, ECAT EXACT HR+ and Biograph 2, using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) is a generic Monte Carlo simulation platform based on a general-purpose code GEANT4 and designed to simulate positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography systems. Monte Carlo simulations are used in nuclear medicine to model imaging systems and develop and assess tomographic reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for improved image quantification. The purpose of this study is to validate two GATE models of the commercial available PET scanner HR+ and the PET/CT Biograph 2. The geometry of the system components has been described in GATE, including detector ring, crystal blocks, PMTs etc. The energy and spatial resolution of the scanners as given by the manufacturers have been taken into account. The GATE simulated results are compared directly to experimental data obtained using a number of NEMA NU-2-2001 performance protocols, including spatial resolution, sensitivity and scatter fraction. All the respective phantoms are precisely modeled. Furthermore, an approximate dead-time model both at the level of single and coincidence events was developed so that the simulated count rate curve can satisfactorily match the experimental count rate performance curve for each scanner In addition a software tool was developed to build the sinograms from the simulated data and import them into the software for tomographic image reconstruction where the reconstruction algorithm of FBP3DRP was applied. An agreement of less than 0.8 mm was obtained between the spatial resolution of the simulated system and the experimental results. Also the simulated scatter fraction for the NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom matched the experimental results to within 3% of measured values. Finally the ratio of the simulated sensitivities with sources radially offset 0 and 10 cm from the central axis of each of the two scanners reaches an agreement of less than 1% between the simulated and experimental values. This

  4. Improvement of the spatial resolution of the MicroPET R4 scanner by wobbling the bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Joon Young; Thompson, Christopher J; Labuda, Aleks; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2008-04-01

    The MicroPET R4 scanner was designed for imaging small rodents such as mice and rats. In many cases the spatial resolution of this system is not sufficient for resolving structures of interest. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the MicroPET R4 through improved spatial sampling, the authors have implemented a variable radius eccentric motion, commonly referred to as wobbling, which is applied to the animal bed during scanning. The wobble motion is incorporated into the sinograms using modified histogramming software, capable of reading the bed wobble position from the list-mode data. The histogramming software corrects the data for the dwell time, apparent crystal location, and crystal-pair efficiency and applies a resolution matching filter. The data acquisition, reconstruction, and image display programs provided from the manufacturer required no modifications. For all studies a wobble period of 8 s was used. The optimal wobble radius was found to be 1.50 mm. The wobbled bed acquisition technique was tested by scanning a resolution phantom and a rat. Images from both studies acquired when using the wobble motion showed an improved spatial resolution when compared with comparable images acquired without the wobble motion. The bed wobbling mechanism can be added to any MicroPET system without major changes and without compromising any imaging modes. Implementing the wobble mechanism may represent a cost-effective method to upgrade the spatial resolution of a MicroPET when compared to the purchase of a newer generation system. PMID:18491514

  5. Effect of filters and reconstruction algorithms on I-124 PET in Siemens Inveon PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the effects of filtering and reconstruction on Siemens I-124 PET data. Methods: A Siemens Inveon PET was used. Spatial resolution of I-124 was measured to a transverse offset of 50 mm from the center FBP, 2D ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM2D), 3D re-projection algorithm (3DRP), and maximum a posteriori (MAP) methods were tested. Non-uniformity (NU), recovery coefficient (RC), and spillover ratio (SOR) parameterized image quality. Mini deluxe phantom data of I-124 was also assessed. Results: Volumetric resolution was 7.3 mm3 from the transverse FOV center when FBP reconstruction algorithms with ramp filter was used. MAP yielded minimal NU with β =1.5. OSEM2D yielded maximal RC. SOR was below 4% for FBP with ramp, Hamming, Hanning, or Shepp-Logan filters. Based on the mini deluxe phantom results, an FBP with Hanning or Parzen filters, or a 3DRP with Hanning filter yielded feasible I-124 PET data.Conclusions: Reconstruction algorithms and filters were compared. FBP with Hanning or Parzen filters, or 3DRP with Hanning filter yielded feasible data for quantifying I-124 PET

  6. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kamińska, D; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Curceanu, C; Dulski, K; Głowacz, B; Gupta-Sharma, N; Gorgol, M; Hiesmayr, B C; Jasińska, B; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Krzemień, W; Krawczyk, N; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps$\\to3\\gamma$ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to $\\sigma(\\theta) \\approx 0.4^{\\circ}$ and $\\sigma(E) \\approx 4.1$ keV, respect...

  7. The design of an animal PET: flexible geometry for achieving optimal spatial resolution or high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S; Terstegge, A; Herzog, H; Reinartz, R; Reinhart, P; Rongen, F; Müller-Gärtner, H W; Halling, H

    1997-10-01

    We present the design of a positron emission tomograph (PET) with flexible geometry dedicated to in vivo studies of small animals (TierPET). The scanner uses two pairs of detectors. Each detector consists of 400 small individual yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) scintillator crystals of dimensions 2 x 2 x 15 mm3, optically isolated and glued together, which are coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT's). The detector modules can be moved in a radial direction so that the detector-to-detector spacing can be varied. Special hardware has been built for coincidence detection, position detection, and real-time data acquisition, which is performed by a PC. The single-event data are transferred to workstations where the radioactivity distribution is reconstructed. The dimensions of the crystals and the detector layout are the result of extensive simulations which are described in this report, taking into account sensitivity, spatial resolution and additional parameters like parallax error or scatter effects. For the three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction a genuine 3-D expectation-maximization (EM)-algorithm which can include the characteristics of the detector system has been implemented. The reconstruction software is flexible and matches the different detector configurations. The main advantage of the proposed animal PET scanner is its high flexibility, allowing the realization of various detector-system configurations. By changing the detector-to-detector spacing, the system is capable of either providing good spatial resolution or high sensitivity for dynamic studies of pharmacokinetics. PMID:9368124

  8. A Review of Cancer Chemotherapy for Pet Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, A. M.; Withrow, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the principles of cancer chemotherapy for pet animals is presented. The various pharmacological classes of antineoplastic drugs are described with specific references to those drugs that have been widely used in veterinary medicine.

  9. First experimental results of time-of-flight reconstruction on an LSO PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) was studied and preliminarily developed in the 1980s, but the lack of a scintillator able to deliver at the same time proper time resolution and stopping power has prevented this technique from becoming widespread and commercially available. With the introduction of LSO in PET, TOF is now a feasible option. TOF reconstruction has been implemented in the CPS Hi-Rez PET scanner, both with 2D filtered-back-projection (FBP2D) and 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM3D). A new procedure has been introduced in the time alignment to compensate for the limited digital time resolution of the present electronics. A preliminary version of scatter correction for TOF has been devised and is presented. The measured time resolution of 1.2 ns (FWHM) allowed for a signal-to-noise ratio increase of about 50% in phantoms of about 40 cm transaxial size, or a gain larger than 2 in noise equivalent counts (NEC). TOF reconstruction has shown the expected improvement in SNR, both in simulation and experimental data. First experimental results show two improvements of TOF reconstruction over conventional (non-TOF) reconstruction: a lower noise level and a better capability to resolve structures deep inside large objects

  10. Energy spectra analysis of the four-layer DOI detector for the brain PET scanner: jPET-D4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depth of interaction (DOI) detector is being developed for the brain PET scanner, jPET-D4. We introduce a light output correction procedure to compensate for variations among the crystal elements in the DOI detector. Under uniform irradiation with 511 keV gamma rays, we estimate the light output of each crystal element by identifying each crystal element, and generate a look-up table (LUT) for light output correction. We evaluate the energy resolution of all crystal elements. The energy resolution of 16% is achieved after light output correction for all crystal elements. The DOI detector can correct light output variations that are related to the DOI. We analyze the crystal position dependence of the energy spectra due to inter-crystal scattering among the multiple crystal elements in the DOI detector. It is highly possible that gamma rays interacting with central crystal elements in the crystal array are absorbed by surrounding crystal elements and the Compton part of the energy spectrum is decreased. Inter-crystal scattering has less impact on the energy resolution of the DOI detector

  11. 15 CFR 265.43 - Pets and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets and other animals. 265.43 Section... animals. Except in connection with the conduct of official business on the site or with the approval of... person shall bring upon the site any cat, dog, or other animal, provided, however, that blind persons...

  12. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M. A.; Reader, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  13. Image quality assessment of LaBr3-based whole-body 3D PET scanners: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main thrust for this work is the investigation and design of a whole-body PET scanner based on new lanthanum bromide scintillators. We use Monte Carlo simulations to generate data for a 3D PET scanner based on LaBr3 detectors, and to assess the count-rate capability and the reconstructed image quality of phantoms with hot and cold spheres using contrast and noise parameters. Previously we have shown that LaBr3 has very high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties which can lead to the design of a time-of-flight (TOF) whole-body PET camera. The data presented here illustrate the performance of LaBr3 without the additional benefit of TOF information, although our intention is to develop a scanner with TOF measurement capability. The only drawbacks of LaBr3 are the lower stopping power and photo-fraction which affect both sensitivity and spatial resolution. However, in 3D PET imaging where energy resolution is very important for reducing scattered coincidences in the reconstructed image, the image quality attained in a non-TOF LaBr3 scanner can potentially equal or surpass that achieved with other high sensitivity scanners. Our results show that there is a gain in NEC arising from the reduced scatter and random fractions in a LaBr3 scanner. The reconstructed image resolution is slightly worse than a high-Z scintillator, but at increased count-rates, reduced pulse pileup leads to an image resolution similar to that of LSO. Image quality simulations predict reduced contrast for small hot spheres compared to an LSO scanner, but improved noise characteristics at similar clinical activity levels

  14. The research on detector sensitivity of full-coverage animal PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve detector sensitivity of small animal PET system and increase geometry angle coverage rate of detector, a full-coverage animal PET system design is proposed, in which two square detectors are added to the original circular PET scanner's both ends. There is a hole in the middle of each of the two square detectors. To investigate the detector sensitivity performance of the new system, GATE was used to build system model and simulation was performed with three different types of radioactive sources which is point, plane and volume sources. The simulation results demonstrate that the change to the detector structure effectively increase the detector sensitivity, and the number of line of responses (LOR) is doubled more than before which will potentially benefit image reconstruction; meanwhile the simulation results of point and plane radioactive sources show that the proposed full-coverage arrangement of detectors improves the uniformity of sensitivity in the FOV, however the hole on the board detector weakens the improvement of detector sensitivity, especially to the radioactive source which is put on the edge of the FOV. Full-coverage animal PET system as proposed can improve detector sensitivity and image quality. (authors)

  15. Investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner based in liquid xenon: A Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Ferrario, P; Monrabal, F; Rodríguez, J; Toledo, J F

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the time of flight of the two 511 keV gammas recorded in coincidence in a PET scanner provides an effective way of reducing the random background and therefore increases the scanner sensitivity, provided that the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of the gammas is sufficiently good. Existing commercial systems based in LYSO crystals, such as the GEMINIS of Philips, reach CRT values of ~ 600 ps (FWHM). In this paper we present a Monte Carlo investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner exploiting the scintillating properties of liquid xenon. We find that an excellent CRT of 60-70 ps (depending on the PDE of the sensor) can be obtained if the scanner is instrumented with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) sensitive to the ultraviolet light emitted by xenon. Alternatively, a CRT of 120 ps can be obtained instrumenting the scanner with (much cheaper) blue-sensitive SiPMs coated with a suitable wavelength shifter. These results show the excellent time of flight capabilities of a PET device b...

  16. NEMA NU 4-2008 validation and applications of the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulations platform for the geometry of the Inveon PET preclinical scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo-based simulation of positron emission tomography (PET) data plays a key role in the design and optimization of data correction and processing methods. Our first aim was to adapt and configure the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulation program for the geometry of the widely distributed Inveon PET preclinical scanner manufactured by Siemens Preclinical Solutions. The validation was carried out against actual measurements performed on the Inveon PET scanner at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation in Australia and at the Brain and Mind Research Institute and by strictly following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements included spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates, image quality and Derenzo phantom studies. Results showed that PET-SORTEO reliably reproduces the performances of this Inveon preclinical system. In addition, imaging studies showed that the PET-SORTEO simulation program provides raw data for the Inveon scanner that can be fully corrected and reconstructed using the same programs as for the actual data. All correction techniques (attenuation, scatter, randoms, dead-time, and normalization) can be applied on the simulated data leading to fully quantitative reconstructed images. In the second part of the study, we demonstrated its ability to generate fast and realistic biological studies. PET-SORTEO is a workable and reliable tool that can be used, in a classical way, to validate and/or optimize a single PET data processing step such as a reconstruction method. However, we demonstrated that by combining a realistic simulated biological study ([11C]Raclopride here) involving different condition groups, simulation allows one also to assess and optimize the data correction, reconstruction and data processing line flow as a whole, specifically for each biological study, which is our ultimate intent. (paper)

  17. Data processing and image reconstruction methods for the HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of reconstruction and quantitation are developed for a 3D system and are evaluated on the septa-less HEAD PENN-PET scanner, which has a very large axial acceptance angle (θmax = ±28 degree in the center) and large axial field-of-view of 256 mm. To overcome the difficulties of data storage and reconstruction time with 3D reconstruction, the authors have reduced the size of the 4-D projection matrix required for 3D-RP reconstruction, and compared the results to the Fourier rebinning (FORE) algorithm. Both approaches achieve a favorable tradeoff in data storage requirements, reconstruction time, and accuracy that are suitable for clinical use. The authors have also studied the application of the FORE algorithm to transmission scans acquired with a singles point source (137Cs) so that data quantitation can be performed

  18. Development of ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, H., E-mail: aken.matsu@gmail.com [Faculty of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Faculty of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, H. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Kato, T.; Anbe, T. [Faculty of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Yamamura, K. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1 Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    We have developed a front-end ASIC (MPPC32) intended for future PET scanners that offers time-of-flight (TOF) capability in conjunction with a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array. The ASIC design is based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and was realized in TSMC 0.35-μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 32-channel, low impedance CMOS current conveyors (CCs) to effectively acquire fast MPPC signals. In order to precisely measure the coincidence timing of 511 keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was employed instead of conventional zero-crossing measurement to discriminate signals. As a result, we obtained time jitter and walk measurement of 67 ps (FWHM) and 98 ps (within 511 keV±20%), respectively. Moreover, excellent energy resolutions of 9.8% (662 keV; FWHM) and 10.5% (511 keV; FWHM) were obtained by utilizing a 3×3 mm{sup 2} MPPC (of 50μm pitch) coupled with a Ce-doped LYSO (Ce:LYSO) crystal 3×3×10 mm{sup 3} in size. We finally report on the TOF measurements, and demonstrate that the MPPC32 developed here can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners using the MPPC array. -- Highlights: ► We developed an analog front-end ASIC for fast MPPC readout that offers TOF capability. ► We employed CMOS current conveyors with low impedance to acquire fast MPPC signals. ► The excellent coincidence timing resolution between two MPPCs was obtained when coupled to LYSO crystals.

  19. Preliminary experience of a three-dimensional, large-field-of-view PET scanner for the localization of partial epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PET scanning is a useful ancillary technique in the localization of intractable partial epilepsy, but its widespread use has been limited by the high cost of traditional PET equipment and radioisotopes. The use of 3D-scanning mode with a large-field of-view PET scanner involves lower equipment costs and requires significantly lower doses of radioisotope. Our aim was to report our preliminary experience of the use of a 3-D, large-field-of-view scanner for FDG-PET studies in the localization of partial epilepsy. 31 patients (pts) with partial epilepsy were studied. The FDG-PET scans were reviewed blindly by a single reviewer without knowledge of seizure localization on structural imaging or ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. The PET results were correlated with the localization by more traditional techniques and the results on surgery when available. A localized region of hypometabolism on FDG-PET scanning was reported in 26/31 (84%) patients (21 temporal, 5 extratemporal). This compared favourably with volumetric MRI on which 19/31 (61%) had a focal potentially epileptogenic abnormality, all of which were concordant with the PET localization. PET was concordant with ictal EEG onset in all 22 patients with localizing studies, including 5 pts with normal MRI. PET demonstrated localized hypometabolism in 4/5 pts with non-localizing ictal EEG and was concordant in both pts with abnormal MRI in this group. PET was considered normal in 4 pts, including 3 pts with normal MRI but localizing EEG and 1 pt without EEG or MRI abnormality. One pt with a localizing EEG and normal MRI was felt to have bitemporal hypometabolism. Five patients have subsequently had resective epilepsy surgery with 4 currently seizure-free and 1 significantly improved. Four patients are planned for surgery in the near future. In conclusion, FDG-PET using a 3-D, large-field-of view PET scanner provides sensitive and specific localization in partial epilepsy, and may provide a

  20. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Pfeiffer, Norman [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group; Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany); Herrmann, Lutz [Ernst-Abbe-Fachhochschule Jena (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  1. MRI compatible small animal monitoring and trigger system for whole body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments with small animals requires continuous monitoring of vital parameters, especially the respiration rate. Clinical whole-body MR scanners represent an attractive option for preclinical imaging as dedicated animal scanners are cost-intensive in both investment and maintenance, thus limiting their availability. Even though impressive image quality is achievable with clinical MR systems in combination with special coils, their built-in physiologic monitoring and triggering units are often not suited for small animal imaging. In this work, we present a simple, MRI compatible low cost solution to monitor the respiration and heart rate of small animals in a clinical whole-body MR scanner. The recording and processing of the biosignals as well as the optimisation of the respiratory trigger generation is described. Additionally rat and mouse in-vivo MRI experiments are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the monitoring and respiratory trigger system in suppressing motion artifacts. (orig.)

  2. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ''deconvolution'' procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs

  3. A method for small-animal PET/CT alignment calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-animal positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners provide anatomical and molecular imaging, which enables the joint visualization and analysis of both types of data. A proper alignment calibration procedure is essential for small-animal imaging since resolution is much higher than that in human devices. This work presents an alignment phantom and two different calibration methods that provide a reliable and repeatable measurement of the spatial geometrical alignment between the PET and the CT subsystems of a hybrid scanner. The phantom can be built using laboratory materials, and it is meant to estimate the rigid spatial transformation that aligns both modalities. It consists of three glass capillaries filled with a positron-emitter solution and positioned in a non-coplanar triangular geometry inside the system field of view. The calibration methods proposed are both based on automatic line detection, but with different approaches to calculate the transformation of the lines between both modalities. Our results show an average accuracy of the alignment estimation of 0.39 mm over the whole field of view. (note)

  4. Validation of the SimSET simulation package for modeling the Siemens Biograph mCT PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo simulation provides a valuable tool in performance assessment and optimization of system design parameters for PET scanners. SimSET is a popular Monte Carlo simulation toolkit that features fast simulation time, as well as variance reduction tools to further enhance computational efficiency. However, SimSET has lacked the ability to simulate block detectors until its most recent release. Our goal is to validate new features of SimSET by developing a simulation model of the Siemens Biograph mCT PET scanner and comparing the results to a simulation model developed in the GATE simulation suite and to experimental results. We used the NEMA NU-2 2007 scatter fraction, count rates, and spatial resolution protocols to validate the SimSET simulation model and its new features. The SimSET model overestimated the experimental results of the count rate tests by 11–23% and the spatial resolution test by 13–28%, which is comparable to previous validation studies of other PET scanners in the literature. The difference between the SimSET and GATE simulation was approximately 4–8% for the count rate test and approximately 3–11% for the spatial resolution test. In terms of computational time, SimSET performed simulations approximately 11 times faster than GATE simulations. The new block detector model in SimSET offers a fast and reasonably accurate simulation toolkit for PET imaging applications. (note)

  5. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs

  6. Molecular Characterization of Pneumococcal Isolates from Pets and Laboratory Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mark van der Linden; Adnan Al-Lahham; Werner Nicklas; Ralf René Reinert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Between 1986 and 2008 Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from 41 pets/zoo animals (guinea pigs (n = 17), cats (n = 12), horses (n = 4), dogs (n = 3), dolphins (n = 2), rat (n = 2), gorilla (n = 1)) treated in medical veterinary laboratories and zoos, and 44 laboratory animals (mastomys (multimammate mice; n = 32), mice (n = 6), rats (n = 4), guinea pigs (n = 2)) during routine health monitoring in an animal facility. S. pneumoniae was isolated from nose, lung and respiratory tr...

  7. Comparison of reconstruction methods and quantitative accuracy in Siemens Inveon PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET reconstruction is key to the quantification of PET data. To our knowledge, no comparative study of reconstruction methods has been performed to date. In this study, we compared reconstruction methods with various filters in terms of their spatial resolution, non-uniformities (NU), recovery coefficients (RCs), and spillover ratios (SORs). In addition, the linearity of reconstructed radioactivity between linearity of measured and true concentrations were also assessed. A Siemens Inveon PET scanner was used in this study. Spatial resolution was measured with NEMA standard by using a 1 mm3 sized 18F point source. Image quality was assessed in terms of NU, RC and SOR. To measure the effect of reconstruction algorithms and filters, data was reconstructed using FBP, 3D reprojection algorithm (3DRP), ordered subset expectation maximization 2D (OSEM 2D), and maximum a posteriori (MAP) with various filters or smoothing factors (β). To assess the linearity of reconstructed radioactivity, image quality phantom filled with 18F was used using FBP, OSEM and MAP (β =1.5 and 5 × 10−5). The highest achievable volumetric resolution was 2.31 mm3 and the highest RCs were obtained when OSEM 2D was used. SOR was 4.87% for air and 3.97% for water, obtained OSEM 2D reconstruction was used. The measured radioactivity of reconstruction image was proportional to the injected one for radioactivity below 16 MBq/ml when FBP or OSEM 2D reconstruction methods were used. By contrast, when the MAP reconstruction method was used, activity of reconstruction image increased proportionally, regardless of the amount of injected radioactivity. When OSEM 2D or FBP were used, the measured radioactivity concentration was reduced by 53% compared with true injected radioactivity for radioactivity <16 MBq/ml. The OSEM 2D reconstruction method provides the highest achievable volumetric resolution and highest RC among all the tested methods and yields a linear relation between the measured and true

  8. Quality assurance of gamma cameras and PET scanners - Implementation of the Euratom Directive in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Council Directive 97/43/Euratom on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure requests acceptance testing (carried out before the first use of the equipment for clinical purposes), and thereafter performance testing on a regular basis and after any major maintenance work. This directive has been put into national legislation by a governmental regulation in July 2001. Materials and Methods: A task force of the Austrian Societies of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics developed a comprehensive set of recommendations to serve as a guideline for correct implementation of the directive. Regular performance testing for planar and SPECT-cameras is carried out according to existing national standards. As no guidelines for regular performance testing were available for gamma camera PET (GCPET) and dedicated PET (DPET) systems by now, suitable procedures were defined by the task force to enable testing of important performance parameters of those systems. Wherever possible, the newly developed procedures were based on NEMA standard procedures and manufacturer's recommendations. For some performance parameters modified tests were developed which were adapted to the needs of frequently used routine tests. Results: Performance testing for SPECT-cameras includes inspection of planar properties as well as regular verification of center of rotation, inhomogeneity, spatial resolution, and contrast of reconstructed images. For gamma cameras with coincidence imaging capabilities, uniformity in coincidence mode, energy resolution, and sensitivity of coincidence imaging are inspected as well. Dedicated PET scanners require a daily check of detector sensitivity and a calibration scan for the attenuation correction mechanisms. Some of those systems require further calibration procedures such as update of amplifier gain or coincidence timing. For quantitative measurements a quarterly performance test of tomographic

  9. The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

  10. An effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for a 3D whole-body PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamatsu SHR74000 is a newly designed full three-dimensional (3D) whole body positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with small crystal size and large field of view (FOV). With the improvement of sensitivity, the scatter events increase significantly at the same time, especially for large objects. Monte Carlo simulations help us to understand the scatter phenomena and provide good references for scatter correction. In this paper, we introduce an effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for the new PET scanner, which accounts for the full 3D scatter correction. With the results from Monte Carlo simulations, we implement a new scale method with special concentration on scatter events from outside the axial FOV and multiple scatter events. The effects of scatter correction are investigated and evaluated by phantom experiments; the results show good improvements in quantitative accuracy and contrast of the images, even for large objects. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  12. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Gomes, Marcelo S., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W.; Pacheco, Ludimila M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chaves, Rosa M. [Instituto de Radium e Supervoltagem Ivo Roesler, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  13. Preliminary evaluation of a monolithic detector module for integrated PET/MRI scanner with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposal of Mindview European Project concerns with the development of a very high resolution and high efficiency brain dedicated PET scanner simultaneously working with a Magnetic Resonance scanner, that expects to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in the quest to better diagnose schizophrenia. On behalf of this project, we propose a low cost PET module for the first prototype, based on monolithic crystals, suitable to be integrated with a head Radio Frequency (RF) coil. The aim of the suggested module is to achieve high performances in terms of efficiency, planar spatial resolution (expected about 1 mm) and discrimination of gamma Depth Of Interaction (DOI) in order to reduce the parallax error. Our preliminary results are very promising: a DOI resolution of about 3 mm, a spatial resolution ranging from about 1 to 1.5 mm and a good position linearity

  14. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PETCT) and from PET/MR (PETMR) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVavg, respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PETCT were identified by PETMR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PETCT and by PETMR. In four patients, more lesions were identified by PETMR than by PETCT, in one patient PETCT revealed an additional focus compared to PETMR. The mean SUVmax and SUVavg of all lesions determined by PETMR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PETCT (p CT and PETMR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PETMR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  15. Towards very high resolution RPC-PET for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present imaging results of needle-like and planar 22Na sources obtained with a prototype of a high-acceptance small-animal positron emission tomograph based on resistive plate chambers (RPC-PET). The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) reconstruction of the acquired data yielded an excellent and stable resolution of 0.4 mm FWHM

  16. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Sattler, Bernhard; Sorge, Ina; Kurch, Lars; Viehweger, Adrian; Ritter, Lutz; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Barthel, Henryk; Bierbach, Uta; Till, Holger; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine

    2013-01-01

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition ...

  17. Feasibility study of a highly sensitive LaBr{sub 3} PET scanner based on the DOI-dependent extended-energy window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji [Naitonal Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)], E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Kitamura, Keishi [Shimadzu Corporation, Kyoto (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko; Shibuya, Kengo [Naitonal Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Tomoyuki [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [Naitonal Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2009-06-01

    Conventionally, positron emission tomograph (PET) scanners use scintillators which have a high effective atomic number. Recently, novel scintillators like LaBr{sub 3} have been developed which have excellent timing and energy resolutions. LaBr{sub 3} has a high performance for PET scanner use, but its effective atomic number is lower than that of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO). As an alternative, we have developed a scatter reduction method using depth-of-interaction (DOI) information and energy information to increase the sensitivity. The sensitivity of the PET scanner with LaBr{sub 3} can be improved using the DOI-dependent extended-energy window (DEEW) method. In this work, our method is applied to the whole-body LSO/LaBr{sub 3} PET scanner using the GATE simulation toolkit. Simulation results show the number of true coincidences can be increased while minimizing the scatter and random coincidences by using the DEEW method. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) can be improved by 20-70% for the whole-body DOI-PET scanner. Sensitivity of the PET scanner with a scintillator of low-effective atomic number can be improved by the DEEW method.

  18. Evaluation of the ECAT EXACT HR+ 3D PET scanner in 15O-water brain activation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the performance of the ECAT EXACT HR+ 3D whole body PET scanner when employed to measure brain function using 15O-water-bolus activation protocols in single data acquisition sessions. Using vibrotactile and auditory stimuli as independent activation tasks, we studied the scanner's performance under different imaging conditions in four healthy volunteers. Cerebral blood flow images were acquired from each volunteer using 15O-water-bolus injections of activity varying from 5 to 20mCi. Performance characteristics. The scanner's dead time grew linearly with injected dose from 10% to 25%. Random events varied from 30% to 50% of the detected events. Scattered events were efficiently corrected at all doses. Noise-effective-count curves plateau at about 15mCi. One-session 12-injection bolus PET activation protocol. Using an acquisition protocol that accounts for the scanner's performance and the practical aspects of imaging volunteers and patients in one session, we assessed the correlation between the statistical significance of activation foci and the dose per injection used The one-session protocol employs 12 bolus injections per subject. We present evidence suggesting that 15-20mCi is the optimal dose per injection to be used routinely in one-time scanning sessions

  19. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this paper we report on tests of a single detection module built out from the BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5×19×300 mm3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50 ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80 ps (σ) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93 cm (σ) for the annihilation quanta. The fractional energy resolution for the energy E deposited by the annihilation quanta via the Compton scattering amounts to σ(E)/E≈0.044/√(E(MeV)) and corresponds to the σ(E)/E of 7.5% at the Compton edge

  20. Sampling FEE and Trigger-less DAQ for the J-PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, G; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Dulski, K; Gajos, A; Głowacz, B; Jasińska, B; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, Ł; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Stoła, K; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B K; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete Data Acquisition System (DAQ) together with the readout mechanisms for the J-PET tomography scanner. In general detector readout chain is constructed out of Front-End Electronics (FEE), measurement devices like Time-to-Digital or Analog-to-Digital Converters (TDCs or ADCs), data collectors and storage. We have developed a system capable for maintaining continuous readout of digitized data without preliminary selection. Such operation mode results in up to 8 Gbps data stream, therefore it is required to introduce a dedicated module for online event building and feature extraction. The Central Controller Module, equipped with Xilinx Zynq SoC and 16 optical transceivers serves as such true real time computing facility. Our solution for the continuous data recording (trigger-less) is a novel approach in such detector systems and assures that most of the information is preserved on the storage for further, high-level processing. Signal discrimination applies an unique method of...

  1. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  2. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data combines the advantages of the two previously separate modalities. Furthermore, the technique also enables whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and statements to be made about the biological cellularity and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of tumours. Combined PET/MR saves time and resources. One disadvantage of PET/MR is that in order to have an effect, a significantly longer examination time is needed than with PET/CT. In our initial experience, PET/MR has turned out to be an unexpectedly stable and reliable hybrid imaging modality, which generates a complementary diagnostic study of great additional value. (orig.)

  3. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Sorge, Ina; Viehweger, Adrian; Ritter, Lutz [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Sattler, Bernhard; Kurch, Lars; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Bierbach, Uta [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Till, Holger [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data combines the advantages of the two previously separate modalities. Furthermore, the technique also enables whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and statements to be made about the biological cellularity and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of tumours. Combined PET/MR saves time and resources. One disadvantage of PET/MR is that in order to have an effect, a significantly longer examination time is needed than with PET/CT. In our initial experience, PET/MR has turned out to be an unexpectedly stable and reliable hybrid imaging modality, which generates a complementary diagnostic study of great additional value. (orig.)

  4. Performance evaluation of the new whole-body PET/CT scanner: Discovery ST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Danna, Massimo; Savi, Annarita; Lecchi, Michela; Castiglioni, Isabella; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Bammer, Helmut; Lucignani, Giovanni; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2004-06-01

    Characterisation of the physical performance of the new integrated PET/CT system Discovery ST (GE Medical Systems) has been performed following the NEMA NU 2-1994 (N-94) and the NEMA NU 2-2001 (N-01) standards in both 2D and 3D acquisition configuration. The Discovery ST combines a four or eight multi-slice helical CT scanner with a PET tomograph which consists of 10,080 BGO crystals arranged in 24 rings. The crystal dimensions are 6.3 x 6.3 x 30 mm(3) and they are organised in blocks of 6 x 6 crystals, coupled to a single photomultiplier tube with four anodes. The 24 rings of the PET system allow 47 images to be obtained, spaced by 3.27 mm, and covering an axial field of view of 157 mm. The low- and high-energy thresholds are set to 375 and 650 keV, respectively. The coincidence time window is set to 11.7 ns. Using the NEMA N-94 standard, the main results were: (1) the average (radial and tangential) transverse spatial resolution (FWHM) at 1, 10 and 20 cm off axis was 6.28 mm, 7.09 mm and 7.45 mm in 2D, and 6.68 mm, 7.72 mm and 8.13 mm in 3D; (2) the sensitivity for true events was 8,567 cps/kBq/cc in 2D and 36,649 cps/kBq/cc in 3D; (3) the scatter fraction was 15% in 2D and 30% in 3D; (4) the peak true events rate, the true events rate at 50% of the system dead-time and the true events rate when equal to the random events rate were 750 kcps at 189.81 kBq/cc, 744 kcps at 186.48 kBq/cc and 686 kcps at 150.59 kBq/cc, respectively, in 2D, and 922 kcps at 44.03 kBq/cc, 834 kcps at 53.28 kBq/cc and 921 kcps at 44.03 kBq/cc in 3D; (5) the noise equivalent count (NEC) peak rate was 270 kcps at 34.38 kBq/cc in 3D, with random coincidences estimated by delayed events. Using the NEMA N-01 standards the main results were: (1) the average transverse and axial spatial resolution (FWHM) at 1 cm and 10 cm off axis was 6.28 (4.56) mm and 6.88 (6.11) mm in 2D, and 6.29 (5.68) mm and 6.82 (6.05) mm in 3D; (2) the average sensitivity for the two radial positions (r=0 cm and r=10 cm

  5. Evaluation of the attenuation properties of MR equipment for its use in a whole-body PET/MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners can provide a powerful tool for clinical diagnosis and investigation. Among the challenges of developing a combined scanner, obtaining attenuation maps for PET reconstruction is of critical importance. This requires accounting for the presence of MR hardware in the field of view. The attenuation introduced by this hardware cannot be obtained from MR data. We propose the creation of attenuation models of MR hardware, to be registered into the MR-based attenuation map prior to PET reconstruction. Two steps were followed to assess the viability of this method. First, transmission and emission measurements were performed on MR components (RF coils and medical probes). The severity of the artifacts in the reconstructed PET images was evaluated. Secondly, a high-exposure computed tomography (CT) scan was used to obtain a model of a head coil. This model was registered into the attenuation map of PET/CT scans of a uniform phantom fitted with the coil. The resulting PET images were compared to the PET/CT reconstruction in the absence of coils. The artifacts introduced by misregistration of the model were studied. The transmission scans revealed 17% count loss due to the presence of head and neck coils in the field of view. Important sources of attenuation were found in the lock, signal cables and connectors. However, the worst source of attenuation was the casing between both coils. None of the measured medical probes introduced a significant amount of attenuation. Concerning the attenuation model of the head coil, reconstructed PET images with model-based correction were comparable to the reference PET/CT reconstruction. However, inaccuracies greater than 1-2 mm in the axial positioning of the model led to important artifacts. In conclusion, the results show that model-based attenuation correction is possible. Using a high-exposure scan to create an attenuation model of the

  6. Evaluation of the attenuation properties of MR equipment for its use in a whole-body PET/MR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delso, G.; Martinez-Möller, A.; Bundschuh, R. A.; Ladebeck, R.; Candidus, Y.; Faul, D.; Ziegler, S. I.

    2010-08-01

    The combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners can provide a powerful tool for clinical diagnosis and investigation. Among the challenges of developing a combined scanner, obtaining attenuation maps for PET reconstruction is of critical importance. This requires accounting for the presence of MR hardware in the field of view. The attenuation introduced by this hardware cannot be obtained from MR data. We propose the creation of attenuation models of MR hardware, to be registered into the MR-based attenuation map prior to PET reconstruction. Two steps were followed to assess the viability of this method. First, transmission and emission measurements were performed on MR components (RF coils and medical probes). The severity of the artifacts in the reconstructed PET images was evaluated. Secondly, a high-exposure computed tomography (CT) scan was used to obtain a model of a head coil. This model was registered into the attenuation map of PET/CT scans of a uniform phantom fitted with the coil. The resulting PET images were compared to the PET/CT reconstruction in the absence of coils. The artifacts introduced by misregistration of the model were studied. The transmission scans revealed 17% count loss due to the presence of head and neck coils in the field of view. Important sources of attenuation were found in the lock, signal cables and connectors. However, the worst source of attenuation was the casing between both coils. None of the measured medical probes introduced a significant amount of attenuation. Concerning the attenuation model of the head coil, reconstructed PET images with model-based correction were comparable to the reference PET/CT reconstruction. However, inaccuracies greater than 1-2 mm in the axial positioning of the model led to important artifacts. In conclusion, the results show that model-based attenuation correction is possible. Using a high-exposure scan to create an attenuation model of the

  7. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohwein, Lynn J., E-mail: frohwein@uni-muenster.de; Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany); Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital of Münster, Münster 48149 (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  8. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  9. Detector normalization and scatter correction for the jPET-D4: A 4-layer depth-of-interaction PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Keishi [Shimadzu Corporation, 1 Nishinokyo-Kuwabaracho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan)]. E-mail: kitam@shimadzu.co.jp; Ishikawa, Akihiro [Shimadzu Corporation, 1 Nishinokyo-Kuwabaracho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Mizuta, Tetsuro [Shimadzu Corporation, 1 Nishinokyo-Kuwabaracho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 9-1 Anagawa-4, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 9-1 Anagawa-4, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 9-1 Anagawa-4, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-02-01

    The jPET-D4 is a brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner composed of 4-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors with a large number of GSO crystals, which achieves both high spatial resolution and high scanner sensitivity. Since the sensitivity of each crystal element is highly dependent on DOI layer depth and incidental {gamma} ray energy, it is difficult to estimate normalization factors and scatter components with high statistical accuracy. In this work, we implemented a hybrid scatter correction method combined with component-based normalization, which estimates scatter components with a dual energy acquisition using a convolution subtraction-method for an estimation of trues from an upper energy window. In order to reduce statistical noise in sinograms, the implemented scheme uses the DOI compression (DOIC) method, that combines deep pairs of DOI layers into the nearest shallow pairs of DOI layers with natural detector samplings. Since the compressed data preserve the block detector configuration, as if the data are acquired using 'virtual' detectors with high {gamma}-ray stopping power, these correction methods can be applied directly to DOIC sinograms. The proposed method provides high-quality corrected images with low statistical noise, even for a multi-layer DOI-PET.

  10. Pet Face: Mechanisms Underlying Human-Animal Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Borgi, Marta; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the idea of infantile (cute) faces as highly biologically relevant stimuli rapidly and unconsciously capturing attention and eliciting positive/affectionate behaviors, including willingness to care. It has been hypothesized that the presence of infantile physical and behavioral features in companion (or pet) animals (i.e., dogs and cats) might form the basis of our attraction to these species. Preliminary evidence has indeed shown...

  11. Performance evaluation of the Ingenuity TF PET/CT scanner with a focus on high count-rate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging performance of the Ingenuity TF 128 PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner which has a PET component that was designed to support a wider radioactivity range than is possible with those of Gemini TF PET/CT and Ingenuity TF PET/MR. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate characteristics and image quality were evaluated according to the NEMA NU 2–2007 standard and ACR phantom accreditation procedures; these were supplemented by additional measurements intended to characterize the system under conditions that would be encountered during quantitative cardiac imaging with 82Rb. Image quality was evaluated using a hot spheres phantom, and various contrast recovery and noise measurements were made from replicated images. Timing and energy resolution, dead time, and the linearity of the image activity concentration, were all measured over a wide range of count rates. Spatial resolution (4.8–5.1 mm FWHM), sensitivity (7.3 cps kBq–1), peak noise-equivalent count rate (124 kcps), and peak trues rate (365 kcps) were similar to those of the Gemini TF PET/CT. Contrast recovery was higher with a 2 mm, body-detail reconstruction than with a 4 mm, body reconstruction, although the precision was reduced. The noise equivalent count rate peak was broad (within 10% of peak from 241–609 MBq). The activity measured in phantom images was within 10% of the true activity for count rates up to those observed in 82Rb cardiac PET studies. (paper)

  12. PET ANIMALS (CATS AND DOGS) OWNERS PROSPECTS FOR THE VETERINARY CLINICS

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, Pınar; UĞURLU KOÇ, Aysun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the views and expectations of pet animal owners were determined for their veterinary clinic. The material of this study was obtained from a survey conducted with the owners of 102 pet animals in Ankara Altinpark. 55.9% of the pet owners, who surveyed, were  female and the average age of pet owners were 34.9±1.28 and having pet animals average 8.2±0.79 years. The study also determined that almost 55% of animal breeders who surveyed feed the cat. The average monthly income of the...

  13. Full modelling of the MOSAIC animal PET system based on the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to animal imaging are now widely used for biological studies. The scanner performance strongly depends on the design and the characteristics of the system. Many parameters must be optimized like the dimensions and type of crystals, geometry and field-of-view (FOV), sampling, electronics, lightguide, shielding, etc. Monte Carlo modelling is a powerful tool to study the effect of each of these parameters on the basis of realistic simulated data. Performance assessment in terms of spatial resolution, count rates, scatter fraction and sensitivity is an important prerequisite before the model can be used instead of real data for a reliable description of the system response function or for optimization of reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study is to model the performance of the Philips Mosaic(TM) animal PET system using a comprehensive PET simulation code in order to understand and describe the origin of important factors that influence image quality. We use GATE, a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for a realistic description of the ring PET model, the detectors, shielding, cap, electronic processing and dead times. We incorporate new features to adjust signal processing to the Anger logic underlying the Mosaic(TM) system. Special attention was paid to dead time and energy spectra descriptions. Sorting of simulated events in a list mode format similar to the system outputs was developed to compare experimental and simulated sensitivity and scatter fractions for different energy thresholds using various models of phantoms describing rat and mouse geometries. Count rates were compared for both cylindrical homogeneous phantoms. Simulated spatial resolution was fitted to experimental data for 18F point sources at different locations within the FOV with an analytical blurring function for electronic processing effects. Simulated and measured sensitivities differed by less than 3%, while scatter fractions agreed

  14. X-ray micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging based on Timepix detector technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudak, Jan, E-mail: jan.dudak@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Nam. Sitna 3105, 272 00 Kladno (Czech Republic); Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek; Polansky, Stepan; Jakubek, Jan [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Mrzilkova, Jana; Patzelt, Matej; Trnka, Jan [Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Ruska 87, 100 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-11

    We describe a newly developed compact micro-CT scanner with rotating gantry equipped with a Timepix Quad hybrid pixel semiconductor detector and a micro-focus X-ray tube providing spatial resolution down to 30 µm. The resolving power of the device in relation to soft tissue sensitivity is demonstrated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and different types of biological samples. The results demonstrate that the use of noiseless particle counting detectors is a promising way to achieve sufficient soft tissue contrast even without any contrast agents. - Highlights: • We developed a new micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging. • Application of Timepix technology to obtain enhanced soft tissue contrast. • Spatial resolution below 30 µm achieved. • Performance demonstrated using a tissue equivalent phantom and biological samples.

  15. X-ray micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging based on Timepix detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a newly developed compact micro-CT scanner with rotating gantry equipped with a Timepix Quad hybrid pixel semiconductor detector and a micro-focus X-ray tube providing spatial resolution down to 30 µm. The resolving power of the device in relation to soft tissue sensitivity is demonstrated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and different types of biological samples. The results demonstrate that the use of noiseless particle counting detectors is a promising way to achieve sufficient soft tissue contrast even without any contrast agents. - Highlights: • We developed a new micro-CT scanner for small animal imaging. • Application of Timepix technology to obtain enhanced soft tissue contrast. • Spatial resolution below 30 µm achieved. • Performance demonstrated using a tissue equivalent phantom and biological samples

  16. Childhood pet ownership, attachment to pets, and subsequent meat avoidance. The mediating role of empathy toward animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgerber, Hank; Mican, Frances

    2014-08-01

    Researchers studying childhood pet ownership outcomes do not typically focus on measures of adult diet, and those studying the psychology of meat consumption do not normally consider early experiences with companion animals. The present research sought to integrate these two areas by examining relationships between childhood pet ownership, pet attachment, empathy toward animals, belief in human-animal similarity, meat avoidance, and justifications for eating meat. Results from 273 individuals responding to a survey on an internet platform revealed that participants with greater childhood attachment to a pet reported greater meat avoidance as adults, an effect that disappeared when controlling for animal empathy. Greater childhood pet attachment was also related to the use of indirect, apologetic justifications for meat consumption, and this effect too, was mediated by empathy toward animals. Child pet ownership itself predicted views toward animals but not dietary behavior or meat-eating justifications. The authors propose a sequence of events by which greater childhood pet attachment leads to increased meat avoidance, focusing on the central role played by empathy toward animals. PMID:24704704

  17. An OpenPET scanner with bridged detectors to compensate for incomplete data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-10-01

    We are developing an open-type PET ‘OpenPET’ geometry. One possible geometry is a dual-ring OpenPET, which consists of two detector rings separated by a gap for entrance of a radiotherapy beam or for inserting other modalities. In our previous simulations and experiments the OpenPET imaging geometry was shown to be feasible by applying iterative reconstruction methods. However, the gap violates Orlov’s completeness condition for accurate tomographic reconstruction. In this study, we propose a solution for the incompleteness problem by adding bridge detectors to fill in parts of the gaps of the OpenPET geometry; we call this bridged OpenPET. Although this geometry was considered previously, its analytical property was not discussed. Therefore, we applied the direct Fourier method as an analytical reconstruction method to the bridged OpenPET, dual-ring OpenPET and conventional cylindrical PET for comparison. Numerical simulations showed that the additional bridge detectors compensate for the incompleteness of the OpenPET by covering one direction perpendicular to the transaxial slices of the imaging subjects.

  18. An OpenPET scanner with bridged detectors to compensate for incomplete data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing an open-type PET ‘OpenPET’ geometry. One possible geometry is a dual-ring OpenPET, which consists of two detector rings separated by a gap for entrance of a radiotherapy beam or for inserting other modalities. In our previous simulations and experiments the OpenPET imaging geometry was shown to be feasible by applying iterative reconstruction methods. However, the gap violates Orlov’s completeness condition for accurate tomographic reconstruction. In this study, we propose a solution for the incompleteness problem by adding bridge detectors to fill in parts of the gaps of the OpenPET geometry; we call this bridged OpenPET. Although this geometry was considered previously, its analytical property was not discussed. Therefore, we applied the direct Fourier method as an analytical reconstruction method to the bridged OpenPET, dual-ring OpenPET and conventional cylindrical PET for comparison. Numerical simulations showed that the additional bridge detectors compensate for the incompleteness of the OpenPET by covering one direction perpendicular to the transaxial slices of the imaging subjects. (paper)

  19. Development and evaluation of an ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC array detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kataoka, J.; Matsuda, H.; Kato, T.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a front-end ASIC for future PET scanners with Time-Of-Flight (TOF) capability to be coupled with 4×4 Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays. The ASIC is designed based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and realized in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 16-channel, low impedance current conveyors for effectively acquiring fast MPPC signals. For precise measurement of the coincidence timing of 511-keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was used to discriminate the signals. We first tested the time response of the ASIC by illuminating each channel of a MPPC array device 3×3 mm2 in size with a Pico-second Light Pulsar with a light emission peak of 655 nm and pulse duration of 54 ps (FWHM). We obtained 105 ps (FWHM) on average for each channel in time jitter measurements. Moreover, we compensated for the time lag of each channel with inner delay circuits and succeeded in suppressing about a 700-ps lag to only 15 ps. This paper reports TOF measurements using back-to-back 511-keV signals, and suggests that the ASIC can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners based on the MPPC array.

  20. Why Did You Choose This Pet?: Adopters and Pet Selection Preferences in Five Animal Shelters in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Vela; Heather Mohan-Gibbons; Emily Weiss; Katherine Miller

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary This study examined reasons why adopters chose their pet in an animal shelter, what behaviors were first exhibited by the pet to the adopter, what information was important during their selection process, and the relative importance of seeing the animals’ behavior in various contexts. Abstract Responses from an adopter survey (n = 1,491) determined reasons for pet selection, type of information received by the adopter, and the context in which the animal’s behavior was observed...

  1. Molecular characterization of pneumococcal isolates from pets and laboratory animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van der Linden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Between 1986 and 2008 Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from 41 pets/zoo animals (guinea pigs (n = 17, cats (n = 12, horses (n = 4, dogs (n = 3, dolphins (n = 2, rat (n = 2, gorilla (n = 1 treated in medical veterinary laboratories and zoos, and 44 laboratory animals (mastomys (multimammate mice; n = 32, mice (n = 6, rats (n = 4, guinea pigs (n = 2 during routine health monitoring in an animal facility. S. pneumoniae was isolated from nose, lung and respiratory tract, eye, ear and other sites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carriage of the same isolate of S. pneumoniae over a period of up to 22 weeks was shown for four mastomys. Forty-one animals showed disease symptoms. Pneumococcal isolates were characterized by optochin sensitivity, bile solubility, DNA hybridization, pneumolysin PCR, serotyping and multilocus sequence typing. Eighteen of the 32 mastomys isolates (56% were optochin resistant, all other isolates were optochin susceptible. All mastomys isolates were serotype 14, all guinea pig isolates serotype 19F, all horse isolates serotype 3. Rats had serotypes 14 or 19A, mice 33A or 33F. Dolphins had serotype 23F, the gorilla serotype 14. Cats and dogs had many different serotypes. Four isolates were resistant to macrolides, three isolates also to clindamycin and tetracycline. Mastomys isolates were sequence type (ST 15 (serotype 14, an ST/serotype combination commonly found in human isolates. Cats, dogs, pet rats, gorilla and dolphins showed various human ST/serotype combinations. Lab rats and lab mice showed single locus variants (SLV of human STs, in human ST/serotype combinations. All guinea pig isolates showed the same completely new combination of known alleles. The horse isolates showed an unknown allele combination and three new alleles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The isolates found in mastomys, mice, rats, cats, dogs, gorilla and dolphins are most likely identical to human pneumococcal isolates. Isolates from

  2. 77 FR 28799 - Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ..., testing, experimentation, exhibition, or for use as a pet; or any dog at the wholesale level for hunting...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 1 and 2 RIN 0579-AD57 Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...

  3. What about animals dealing with working dogs, pets and other animals during terrorism incidents and disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is highly likely that K9 teams (patrol, search and rescue, and cadaver) will be exposed to hazardous materials as a result of an act of CBRN terrorism, and thus require decontamination. Service animals and pets which have been exposed to toxic agents and materials will also need to be decontaminated, along with their owners. Emergency evacuation and sheltering plans need to consider how service animals, pets and livestock will be handled. The United States has recently made significant changes to focus in this regard, to the extent that caring for animals must now be addressed in disaster preparedness planning. In this paper we describe lessons learned from work done by the Massachusetts Urban Search and Rescue Team (USAR), and the response to hurricane Katrina, concerning the handling and decontamination of animals following major incidents. We discuss: how the new Federal and state mandates have changed evacuation and sheltering concepts; cooperation among government entities, veterinarians, animal facilities, humane societies, animal rescue organizations and animal owners; and describe some practical considerations and solutions to sheltering and mass decontamination of animals along with their humans.(author)

  4. A novel adaptive discrete cosine transform-domain filter for gap-inpainting of high resolution PET scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, Jay, E-mail: jwu@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shu-Jun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Several positron emission tomography (PET) scanners with special detector block arrangements have been developed in recent years to improve the resolution of PET images. However, the discontinuous detector blocks cause gaps in the sinogram. This study proposes an adaptive discrete cosine transform-based (aDCT) filter for gap-inpainting. Methods: The gap-corrupted sinogram was morphologically closed and subsequently converted to the DCT domain. A certain number of the largest coefficients in the DCT spectrum were identified to determine the low-frequency preservation region. The weighting factors for the remaining coefficients were determined by an exponential weighting function. The aDCT filter was constructed and applied to two digital phantoms and a simulated phantom introduced with various levels of noise. Results: For the Shepp-Logan head phantom, the aDCT filter filled the gaps effectively. For the Jaszczak phantom, no secondary artifacts were induced after aDCT filtering. The percent mean square error and mean structure similarity of the aDCT filter were superior to those of the DCT2 filter at all noise levels. For the simulated striatal dopamine innervation study, the aDCT filter recovered the shape of the striatum and restored the striatum to reference activity ratios to the ideal value. Conclusions: The proposed aDCT filter can recover the missing gap data in the sinogram and improve the image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images.

  5. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20-25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16-22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15

  6. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20–25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16–22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15

  7. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and improve imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8 × 8 array of about 1.9 × 1.9 × 30.0 mm3 lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scintillators, with each end optically connected to an SSPM array (16 channels in a 4 × 4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3 × 3 mm2, and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific integrated circuit to directly convert analogue signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and are decoded by a field-programmable gate array-based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable the use of flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a

  8. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lan, Kejian A.; Bircher, Chad; Lou, Kai; Deng, Zhi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and improve imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8 × 8 array of about 1.9 × 1.9 × 30.0 mm3 lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scintillators, with each end optically connected to an SSPM array (16 channels in a 4 × 4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3 × 3 mm2, and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific integrated circuit to directly convert analogue signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and are decoded by a field-programmable gate array-based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable the use of flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a practical DOI

  9. Validation of a small-animal PET simulation using GAMOS: a GEANT4-based framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, M.; Arce, P.; Rato Mendes, P.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo-based modelling is a powerful tool to help in the design and optimization of positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The performance of these systems depends on several parameters, such as detector physical characteristics, shielding or electronics, whose effects can be studied on the basis of realistic simulated data. The aim of this paper is to validate a comprehensive study of the Raytest ClearPET small-animal PET scanner using a new Monte Carlo simulation platform which has been developed at CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain), called GAMOS (GEANT4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations). This toolkit, based on the GEANT4 code, was originally designed to cover multiple applications in the field of medical physics from radiotherapy to nuclear medicine, but has since been applied by some of its users in other fields of physics, such as neutron shielding, space physics, high energy physics, etc. Our simulation model includes the relevant characteristics of the ClearPET system, namely, the double layer of scintillator crystals in phoswich configuration, the rotating gantry, the presence of intrinsic radioactivity in the crystals or the storage of single events for an off-line coincidence sorting. Simulated results are contrasted with experimental acquisitions including studies of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates in accordance with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4-2008 protocol. Spatial resolution results showed a discrepancy between simulated and measured values equal to 8.4% (with a maximum FWHM difference over all measurement directions of 0.5 mm). Sensitivity results differ less than 1% for a 250-750 keV energy window. Simulated and measured count rates agree well within a wide range of activities, including under electronic saturation of the system (the measured peak of total coincidences, for the mouse-sized phantom, was 250.8 kcps reached at 0.95 MBq mL-1 and the simulated peak was

  10. Pet Face: Mechanisms Underlying Human-Animal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the idea of infantile (cute) faces as highly biologically relevant stimuli rapidly and unconsciously capturing attention and eliciting positive/affectionate behaviors, including willingness to care. It has been hypothesized that the presence of infantile physical and behavioral features in companion (or pet) animals (i.e., dogs and cats) might form the basis of our attraction to these species. Preliminary evidence has indeed shown that the human attentional bias toward the baby schema may extend to animal facial configurations. In this review, the role of facial cues, specifically of infantile traits and facial signals (i.e., eyes gaze) as emotional and communicative signals is highlighted and discussed as regulating the human-animal bond, similarly to what can be observed in the adult-infant interaction context. Particular emphasis is given to the neuroendocrine regulation of the social bond between humans and animals through oxytocin secretion. Instead of considering companion animals as mere baby substitutes for their owners, in this review we highlight the central role of cats and dogs in human lives. Specifically, we consider the ability of companion animals to bond with humans as fulfilling the need for attention and emotional intimacy, thus serving similar psychological and adaptive functions as human-human friendships. In this context, facial cuteness is viewed not just as a releaser of care/parental behavior, but, more in general, as a trait motivating social engagement. To conclude, the impact of this information for applied disciplines is briefly described, particularly in consideration of the increasing evidence of the beneficial effects of contacts with animals for human health and wellbeing. PMID:27014120

  11. PET FACE: MECHANISMS UNDERLYING HUMAN-ANIMAL RELATIONSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eBorgi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the idea of infantile (cute faces as highly biologically relevant stimuli rapidly and unconsciously capturing attention and eliciting positive/affectionate behaviors, including willingness to care. It has been hypothesized that the presence of infantile physical and behavioral features in companion (or pet animals (i.e. dogs and cats might form the basis of our attraction to these species. Preliminary evidence has indeed shown that the human attentional bias toward the baby schema may extend to animal facial configurations. In this review, the role of facial cues, specifically of infantile traits and facial signals (i.e. eyes gaze as emotional and communicative signals is highlighted and discussed as regulating human-animal bond, similarly to what can be observed in the adult-infant interaction context. Particular emphasis is given to the neuroendocrine regulation of social bond between humans and animals through oxytocin secretion. Instead of considering companion animals as mere baby substitutes for their owners, in this review we highlight the central role of cats and dogs in human lives. Specifically, we consider the ability of companion animals to bond with humans as fulfilling the need for attention and emotional intimacy, thus serving similar psychological and adaptive functions as human-human friendships. In this context, facial cuteness is viewed not just as a releaser of care/parental behavior, but more in general as a trait motivating social engagement. To conclude, the impact of this information for applied disciplines is briefly described, particularly in consideration of the increasing evidence of the beneficial effects of contacts with animals for human health and wellbeing.

  12. Pet Face: Mechanisms Underlying Human-Animal Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, Marta; Cirulli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the idea of infantile (cute) faces as highly biologically relevant stimuli rapidly and unconsciously capturing attention and eliciting positive/affectionate behaviors, including willingness to care. It has been hypothesized that the presence of infantile physical and behavioral features in companion (or pet) animals (i.e., dogs and cats) might form the basis of our attraction to these species. Preliminary evidence has indeed shown that the human attentional bias toward the baby schema may extend to animal facial configurations. In this review, the role of facial cues, specifically of infantile traits and facial signals (i.e., eyes gaze) as emotional and communicative signals is highlighted and discussed as regulating the human-animal bond, similarly to what can be observed in the adult-infant interaction context. Particular emphasis is given to the neuroendocrine regulation of the social bond between humans and animals through oxytocin secretion. Instead of considering companion animals as mere baby substitutes for their owners, in this review we highlight the central role of cats and dogs in human lives. Specifically, we consider the ability of companion animals to bond with humans as fulfilling the need for attention and emotional intimacy, thus serving similar psychological and adaptive functions as human-human friendships. In this context, facial cuteness is viewed not just as a releaser of care/parental behavior, but, more in general, as a trait motivating social engagement. To conclude, the impact of this information for applied disciplines is briefly described, particularly in consideration of the increasing evidence of the beneficial effects of contacts with animals for human health and wellbeing. PMID:27014120

  13. An investigation of the challenges in reconstructing PET images of a freely moving animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging the brain of a freely moving small animal using positron emission tomography (PET) while simultaneously observing its behaviour is an important goal for neuroscience. While we have successfully demonstrated the use of line-of-response (LOR) rebinning to correct the head motion of confined animals, a large proportion of events may need to be discarded because they either 'miss' the detector array after transformation or fall out of the acceptance range of a sinogram. The proportion of events that would have been measured had motion not occurred, so-called 'lost events', is expected to be even larger for freely moving animals. Moreover, the data acquisition in the case of a freely moving animal is further complicated by a complex attenuation field. The aims of this study were (a) to characterise the severity of 'lost events' problem for the freely moving animal scenario, and (b) to investigate the relative impact of attenuation correction errors on quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. A phantom study was performed to simulate the uncorrelated motion of a target and non-target source volume. A small animal PET scanner was used to acquire list-mode data for different sets of phantom positions. The list-mode data were processed using the standard LOR rebinning approach, and multiple frame variants of this designed to reduce discarded events. We found that LOR rebinning caused up to 86 % 'lost events', and artifacts that we attribute to incomplete projections, when applied to a freely moving target. This fraction was reduced by up to 18 % using the variant approaches, resulting in slightly reduced image artifacts. The effect of the non-target compartment on attenuation correction of the target volume was surprisingly small. However, for certain poses where the target and non-target volumes are aligned transaxially in the field-of-view, the attenuation problem becomes more complex and sophisticated correction methods will be required. We conclude that

  14. DigiPET: sub-millimeter spatial resolution small-animal PET imaging using thin monolithic scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Samuel; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw; Keereman, Vincent; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel

    2014-07-01

    A new preclinical PET system based on dSiPMs, called DigiPET, is presented. The system is based on thin monolithic scintillation crystals and exhibits superior spatial resolution at low-cost compared to systems based on pixelated crystals. Current dedicated small-rodent PET scanners have a spatial resolution in the order of 1 mm. Most of them have a large footprint, requiring considerable laboratory space. For rodent brain imaging, a PET scanner with sub-millimeter resolution is desired. To achieve this, crystals with a pixel pitch down to 0.5 mm have been used. However, fine pixels are difficult to produce and will render systems expensive. In this work, we present the first results with a high-resolution preclinical PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillators and a large solid angle. The design is dedicated to rat-brain imaging and therefore has a very compact geometry. Four detectors were placed in a square arrangement with a distance of 34.5 mm between two opposing detector modules, defining a field of view (FOV) of 32 × 32 × 32 mm(3). Each detector consists of a thin monolithic LYSO crystal of 32 × 32 × 2 mm(3) optically coupled to a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Event positioning within each detector was obtained using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. To evaluate the system performance, we measured the energy resolution, coincidence resolving time (CRT), sensitivity and spatial resolution. The image quality was evaluated by acquiring a hot-rod phantom filled with (18)F-FDG and a rat head one hour after an (18)F-FDG injection. The MLE yielded an average intrinsic spatial resolution on the detector of 0.54 mm FWHM. We obtained a CRT of 680 ps and an energy resolution of 18% FWHM at 511 keV. The sensitivity and spatial resolution obtained at the center of the FOV were 6.0 cps kBq(-1) and 0.7 mm, respectively. In the reconstructed images of the hot-rod phantom, hot rods down to 0.7 mm can be discriminated

  15. DigiPET: sub-millimeter spatial resolution small-animal PET imaging using thin monolithic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new preclinical PET system based on dSiPMs, called DigiPET, is presented. The system is based on thin monolithic scintillation crystals and exhibits superior spatial resolution at low-cost compared to systems based on pixelated crystals. Current dedicated small-rodent PET scanners have a spatial resolution in the order of 1 mm. Most of them have a large footprint, requiring considerable laboratory space. For rodent brain imaging, a PET scanner with sub-millimeter resolution is desired. To achieve this, crystals with a pixel pitch down to 0.5 mm have been used. However, fine pixels are difficult to produce and will render systems expensive. In this work, we present the first results with a high-resolution preclinical PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillators and a large solid angle. The design is dedicated to rat-brain imaging and therefore has a very compact geometry. Four detectors were placed in a square arrangement with a distance of 34.5 mm between two opposing detector modules, defining a field of view (FOV) of 32 × 32 × 32 mm3. Each detector consists of a thin monolithic LYSO crystal of 32 × 32 × 2 mm3 optically coupled to a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Event positioning within each detector was obtained using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. To evaluate the system performance, we measured the energy resolution, coincidence resolving time (CRT), sensitivity and spatial resolution. The image quality was evaluated by acquiring a hot-rod phantom filled with 18F-FDG and a rat head one hour after an 18F-FDG injection. The MLE yielded an average intrinsic spatial resolution on the detector of 0.54 mm FWHM. We obtained a CRT of 680 ps and an energy resolution of 18% FWHM at 511 keV. The sensitivity and spatial resolution obtained at the center of the FOV were 6.0 cps kBq−1 and 0.7 mm, respectively. In the reconstructed images of the hot-rod phantom, hot rods down to 0.7 mm can be discriminated. In

  16. Development and evaluation of an ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC array detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambe, T., E-mail: hiro-a-be.n@akane.waseda.jp [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Ikeda, H. [ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa (Japan); Kataoka, J.; Matsuda, H.; Kato, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-21

    We developed a front-end ASIC for future PET scanners with Time-Of-Flight (TOF) capability to be coupled with 4×4 Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays. The ASIC is designed based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and realized in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 16-channel, low impedance current conveyors for effectively acquiring fast MPPC signals. For precise measurement of the coincidence timing of 511-keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was used to discriminate the signals. We first tested the time response of the ASIC by illuminating each channel of a MPPC array device 3×3 mm{sup 2} in size with a Pico-second Light Pulsar with a light emission peak of 655 nm and pulse duration of 54 ps (FWHM). We obtained 105 ps (FWHM) on average for each channel in time jitter measurements. Moreover, we compensated for the time lag of each channel with inner delay circuits and succeeded in suppressing about a 700-ps lag to only 15 ps. This paper reports TOF measurements using back-to-back 511-keV signals, and suggests that the ASIC can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners based on the MPPC array. - Highlights: • We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. • We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. • We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and the submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. • In the flood images, each crystal of scintillator matrices was clearly resolved. • Good energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each LYSO and GGAG scintillator matrices were obtained.

  17. Characterization of a high-resolution hybrid DOI detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, Felipe; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Yang, Yongfeng; Farrell, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to design and test a new high-resolution hybrid depth of interaction (DOI) detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. Two detectors have been designed and built. The completed detectors are based on a 14 × 14 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 20 mm(3) unpolished lutetium orthosilicate scintillation crystals, with each element coated in a 50 μm layer of reflective material. The detector is read out from both ends using a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) and a large active area (20 × 20 mm(2)) avalanche photodiode (APD) to enable acquisition of DOI information. Nuclear instrumentation modules were used to characterize the detectors' performances in terms of timing, intrinsic spatial resolution (ISR) and energy resolution, as well as DOI resolution with a dual-ended readout configuration. Measurements with the APD were performed at a temperature of 10 °C. All crystals were identified at all depths, even though the signal amplitude from the PSPMT decreases with depth away from it. We measured a timing resolution of 2.4 ns, and an average energy resolution of 19%. The mean ISR was measured to be 1.2 mm for crystals in the central row of the array for detectors in the face-to-face position. Two off-center positions were measured corresponding to 26° and 51° oblique photon incidence, and the mean ISR at these positions was 1.5 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The average DOI resolution across all crystals and depths was measured to be 2.9 mm (including the beam width of 0.6 mm). This detector design shows good promise as a high-resolution detector for a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner. PMID:22581109

  18. Development and evaluation of an ultra-fast ASIC for future PET scanners using TOF-capable MPPC array detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a front-end ASIC for future PET scanners with Time-Of-Flight (TOF) capability to be coupled with 4×4 Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays. The ASIC is designed based on the open-IP project proposed by JAXA and realized in TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The circuit comprises 16-channel, low impedance current conveyors for effectively acquiring fast MPPC signals. For precise measurement of the coincidence timing of 511-keV gamma rays, the leading-edge method was used to discriminate the signals. We first tested the time response of the ASIC by illuminating each channel of a MPPC array device 3×3 mm2 in size with a Pico-second Light Pulsar with a light emission peak of 655 nm and pulse duration of 54 ps (FWHM). We obtained 105 ps (FWHM) on average for each channel in time jitter measurements. Moreover, we compensated for the time lag of each channel with inner delay circuits and succeeded in suppressing about a 700-ps lag to only 15 ps. This paper reports TOF measurements using back-to-back 511-keV signals, and suggests that the ASIC can be a promising device for future TOF-PET scanners based on the MPPC array. - Highlights: • We developed a newly designed large-area monolithic MPPC array. • We obtained fine gain uniformity, and good energy and time resolutions when coupled to the LYSO scintillator. • We fabricated gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array and the submillimeter pixelized LYSO and GGAG scintillators. • In the flood images, each crystal of scintillator matrices was clearly resolved. • Good energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each LYSO and GGAG scintillator matrices were obtained

  19. A modular data acquisition system for high resolution clinical PET scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Sportelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    En las últimas dos décadas, la Tomografía por Emisión de Positrones (PET) ha demostrado ser una modalidad clave para el estudio de la biología del cúncer y trastornos cardíacos, y para la realizaciún imágenes moleculares, una tecnica que permite la terapia individualizada de la enfermedad [Weissleder01]. La mejor característica de la PET es su sensibilidad: es la tecnica que proporciona imúagenes moleculares con la mayor sensibilidad, y las imúagenes de cuerpo entero que produce no pueden ser...

  20. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS; Estudios para la optimizaciOn de la calidad de imagen en el escaner ClearPET, modifi cando parametros del algoritmo IMF-OSEM 3D sobre adquisiciones simuladas con GAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, M.; Mendoza, J.; Embid, M.

    2007-09-27

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs.

  1. Appropriate collimators in a small animal SPECT scanner with CZT detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all small animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is performed with pinhole collimators (PH), including single-PH (SPH) and multi-PH (MPH). In the clinical study, not only PH but also parallel-hole collimator (PAH) is often used in planar and SPECT imaging. However, there have been no comparative studies on image quality with various collimators on the small animal imaging. This study compared the basic characteristics of PH and PAH in small animal imaging. Performance of planar and SPECT images was evaluated using 99mTcO4- and SPH, MPH and PAH with low energy and high resolution on the SPECT/CT scanner FX3200. We measured sensitivity, resolution, concentration linearity and uniformity. Planar imaging of mice with 99mTc-labeled mercaptoacetyltriglycine (99mTc-MAG3) was performed using SPH and PAH. SPECT imaging with 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) was performed using all collimators. With SPH, MPH and PAH, sensitivity was 43.5, 211.2 and 926.5 cps/MBq, respectively, and spatial resolution was 0.60/0.56, non/0.96, 5.20/5.34 mm full-width half maximum (planar/SPECT), respectively. There were marked correlations between the radioactivity counts on images and radioactivity with all collimators. Values of % standard deviation on planar imaging showed small differences between the SPH and PAH, while the values were the smallest on SPECT imaging with MPH. On imaging of mice, SPH yielded high-quality 99mTc-MAG3-planar images when compared with PAH. MPH yielded sharper 99mTc-MDP-SPECT images than SPH and PAH. The characteristics of PH and PAH differed on small animal imaging. Although sensitivity was higher with PAH, PH showed higher resolution. Among the PH collimators, SPH was more appropriate for planar imaging, and MPH was more suitable for SPECT imaging in a small animal imaging scanner with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. (author)

  2. Companion animal welfare and possible implications on the human-pet relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of pets (dogs and cats in particular in human society has changed in recent years. Nowadays pets are an integral part of the human family and this aspect has many social and emotional implications. For their positive effects on human health, pets are also employed in some special and therapeutic activities known by the generic term of “Pet Therapy”. In these programmes the animal becomes an integral part of the therapeutic plan in order to induce some physical, social, emotional, and cognitive improvements in human patients. However, the close bond between companion animals and man is not always the herald of beneficial effects. Sometimes the welfare of pets may be compromised by distress due to many factors, mostly related to the environment and to management by humans. Both behavioural and physiological variables may be analysed in order to evaluate welfare level in pets. Reduced welfare may be indicated by the onset of some behavioural problems, which have usually a multifactorial aetiology, related both to the genetic individual basis and environmental factors. Physiological variables which may be analysed in order to evaluate pet welfare include hormone levels, mainly related to the HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal- axis and to the immune systems activations. Behavioural problems may also lead to the relinquishment of pets to shelters. Animals housed in rescue shelters cannot display their ethogram and show behavioural and physiological signs of distress. Thus it is very important to improve the human-pet relationship both by educating owners and reducing the number of stray animals, in accordance with the indications of the European Convention for the Protection of Pet Animals stated at Strasbourg in 1987, mainly as regards pet breeding and welfare. Humans have to realise that adopting pets implies the responsibility to care for their health and welfare, avoiding undue stress in the living environment and improving the

  3. Accurate and efficient modeling of the detector response in small animal multi-head PET systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fully three-dimensional PET imaging, iterative image reconstruction techniques usually outperform analytical algorithms in terms of image quality provided that an appropriate system model is used. In this study we concentrate on the calculation of an accurate system model for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal scanner, with the aim to obtain fully resolution- and contrast-recovered images at low levels of image roughness. For this purpose we calculate the system model by decomposing it into a product of five matrices: (1) a detector response component obtained via Monte Carlo simulations, (2) a geometric component which describes the scanner geometry and which is calculated via a multi-ray method, (3) a detector normalization component derived from the acquisition of a planar source, (4) a photon attenuation component calculated from x-ray computed tomography data, and finally, (5) a positron range component is formally included. This system model factorization allows the optimization of each component in terms of computation time, storage requirements and accuracy. The main contribution of this work is a new, efficient way to calculate the detector response component for rotating, planar detectors, that consists of a GEANT4 based simulation of a subset of lines of flight (LOFs) for a single detector head whereas the missing LOFs are obtained by using intrinsic detector symmetries. Additionally, we introduce and analyze a probability threshold for matrix elements of the detector component to optimize the trade-off between the matrix size in terms of non-zero elements and the resulting quality of the reconstructed images. In order to evaluate our proposed system model we reconstructed various images of objects, acquired according to the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard, and we compared them to the images reconstructed with two other system models: a model that does not include any detector response component and a model that approximates analytically the depth of interaction

  4. Jet set pets: examining the zoonosis risk in animal import and travel across the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Anthony R Fooks,1,2 Nicholas Johnson1 1Wildlife Zoonoses and Vector-Borne Diseases Research Group, Animal and Plant Health Agency, Addlestone, Surrey, 2Department of Clinical Infection, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Ownership of companion animals or pets is popular throughout the world. Unfortunately, such animals are susceptible to and potential reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens. Close proximity to and contact with pets can lead to human infections. The distribution of zoo...

  5. The motivations and methodology for high-throughput PET imaging of small animals in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Aide, Nicolas; Visser, Eric P.; Lheureux, Stéphanie; Heutte, Natacha; Szanda, Istvan; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, small-animal PET imaging has become a vital platform technology in cancer research. With the development of molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations requiring evaluation of different schedules, the number of animals to be imaged within a PET experiment has increased. This paper describes experimental design requirements to reach statistical significance, based on the expected change in tracer uptake in treated animals as compared to the control group, the num...

  6. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  7. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development

  8. Validity of using a 3-dimensional PET scanner during inhalation of 15O-labeled oxygen for quantitative assessment of regional metabolic rate of oxygen in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of 15O labeled oxygen (15O2) and positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative assessment of the regional metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) in vivo, which is essential to understanding the pathological status of patients with cerebral vascular and neurological disorders. The method has, however, been challenging, when a 3D PET scanner is employed, largely attributed to the presence of gaseous radioactivity in the trachea and the inhalation system, which results in a large amount of scatter and random events in the PET assessment. The present study was intended to evaluate the adequacy of using a recently available commercial 3D PET scanner in the assessment of regional cerebral radioactivity distribution during an inhalation of 15O2. Systematic experiments were carried out on a brain phantom. Experiments were also performed on a healthy volunteer following a recently developed protocol for simultaneous assessment of CMRO2 and cerebral blood flow, which involves sequential administration of 15O2 and C15O2. A particular intention was to evaluate the adequacy of the scatter-correction procedures. The phantom experiment demonstrated that errors were within 3% at the practically maximum radioactivity in the face mask, with the greatest radioactivity in the lung. The volunteer experiment demonstrated that the counting rate was at peak during the 15O gas inhalation period, within a verified range. Tomographic images represented good quality over the entire FOV, including the lower part of the cerebral structures and the carotid artery regions. The scatter-correction procedures appeared to be important, particularly in the process to compensate for the scatter originating outside the FOV. Reconstructed images dramatically changed if the correction was carried out using inappropriate procedures. This study demonstrated that accurate reconstruction could be obtained when the scatter compensation was appropriately carried out. This study also suggested the

  9. The benefit of pets and animal-assisted therapy to the health of older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniack, E Paul; Cherniack, Ariella R

    2014-01-01

    Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health of older persons, such as relief social isolation and boredom, but these have not been formally studied. Several investigations of the effect of pets on physical health suggest animals can lower blood pressure, and dog walkers partake in more physical activity. Dog walking, in epidemiological studies and few preliminary trials, is associated with lower complication risk among patients with cardiovascular disease. Pets may also have harms: they may be expensive to care for, and their owners are more likely to fall. Theoretically, zoonotic infections and bites can occur, but how often this occurs in the context of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy is unknown. Despite the poor methodological quality of pet research after decades of study, pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are likely to continue due to positive subjective feelings many people have toward animals. PMID:25477957

  10. The Benefit of Pets and Animal-Assisted Therapy to the Health of Older Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Paul Cherniack

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health of older persons, such as relief social isolation and boredom, but these have not been formally studied. Several investigations of the effect of pets on physical health suggest animals can lower blood pressure, and dog walkers partake in more physical activity. Dog walking, in epidemiological studies and few preliminary trials, is associated with lower complication risk among patients with cardiovascular disease. Pets may also have harms: they may be expensive to care for, and their owners are more likely to fall. Theoretically, zoonotic infections and bites can occur, but how often this occurs in the context of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy is unknown. Despite the poor methodological quality of pet research after decades of study, pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are likely to continue due to positive subjective feelings many people have toward animals.

  11. Design considerations for a C-shaped PET system, dedicated to small animal brain imaging, using GATE Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiou, N.; Papadimitroulas, P.; Kostou, T.; Loudos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Commercial clinical and preclinical PET scanners rely on the full cylindrical geometry for whole body scans as well as for dedicated organs. In this study we propose the construction of a low cost dual-head C-shaped PET system dedicated for small animal brain imaging. Monte Carlo simulation studies were performed using GATE toolkit to evaluate the optimum design in terms of sensitivity, distortions in the FOV and spatial resolution. The PET model is based on SiPMs and BGO pixelated arrays. Four different configurations with C- angle 0°, 15°, 30° and 45° within the modules, were considered. Geometrical phantoms were used for the evaluation process. STIR software, extended by an efficient multi-threaded ray tracing technique, was used for the image reconstruction. The algorithm automatically adjusts the size of the FOV according to the shape of the detector's geometry. The results showed improvement in sensitivity of ∼15% in case of 45° C-angle compared to the 0° case. The spatial resolution was found 2 mm for 45° C-angle.

  12. Investigation of time-of-flight benefits in an LYSO-based PET/CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geramifar, P. [Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, M.R., E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsaie Zafarghandi, M. [Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Amir Kabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, S. [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Shariati Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Loudos, G. [Department of Medical Instruments Technology, Technological Educational Institute, Athens (Greece); Rahmim, A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2011-06-11

    The advent of fast scintillators yielding great light yield and/or stopping power, along with advances in photomultiplier tubes and electronics, have rekindled interest in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Because the potential performance improvements offered by TOF PET are substantial, efforts to improve PET timing should prove very fruitful. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore what gains in PET performance could be achieved if the coincidence resolving time (CRT) in the LYSO-based PET component of Discovery RX PET/CT scanner were improved. For this purpose, the GATE Monte Carlo package was utilized, providing the ability to model and characterize various physical phenomena in PET imaging. For the present investigation, count rate performance and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in different activity concentrations were simulated for different coincidence timing windows of 4, 5.85, 6, 6.5, 8, 10 and 12 ns and with different CRTs of 100-900 ps FWHM involving 50 ps FWHM increments using the NEMA scatter phantom. Strong evidence supporting robustness of the simulations was found as observed in the good agreement between measured and simulated data for the cases of estimating axial sensitivity, axial and transaxial detection position, gamma non-collinearity angle distribution and positron annihilation distance. In the non-TOF context, the results show that the random event rate can be reduced by using narrower coincidence timing window widths, demonstrating considerable enhancements in the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) performance. The peak NECR had increased by {approx}50% when utilizing the coincidence window width of 4 ns. At the same time, utilization of TOF information resulted in improved NECR and SNR with the dramatic reduction of random coincidences as a function of CRT. For example, with CRT of 500 ps FWHM, a factor of 2.3 reduction in random rates, factor of 1.5 increase in NECR and factor of 2.1 improvement in SNR is

  13. Investigation of time-of-flight benefits in an LYSO-based PET/CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of fast scintillators yielding great light yield and/or stopping power, along with advances in photomultiplier tubes and electronics, have rekindled interest in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Because the potential performance improvements offered by TOF PET are substantial, efforts to improve PET timing should prove very fruitful. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore what gains in PET performance could be achieved if the coincidence resolving time (CRT) in the LYSO-based PET component of Discovery RX PET/CT scanner were improved. For this purpose, the GATE Monte Carlo package was utilized, providing the ability to model and characterize various physical phenomena in PET imaging. For the present investigation, count rate performance and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in different activity concentrations were simulated for different coincidence timing windows of 4, 5.85, 6, 6.5, 8, 10 and 12 ns and with different CRTs of 100-900 ps FWHM involving 50 ps FWHM increments using the NEMA scatter phantom. Strong evidence supporting robustness of the simulations was found as observed in the good agreement between measured and simulated data for the cases of estimating axial sensitivity, axial and transaxial detection position, gamma non-collinearity angle distribution and positron annihilation distance. In the non-TOF context, the results show that the random event rate can be reduced by using narrower coincidence timing window widths, demonstrating considerable enhancements in the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) performance. The peak NECR had increased by ∼50% when utilizing the coincidence window width of 4 ns. At the same time, utilization of TOF information resulted in improved NECR and SNR with the dramatic reduction of random coincidences as a function of CRT. For example, with CRT of 500 ps FWHM, a factor of 2.3 reduction in random rates, factor of 1.5 increase in NECR and factor of 2.1 improvement in SNR is achievable

  14. Use of animal waste for the production of pet food for dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kubáčková, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The reason why I have chosen the topic named “Use of animal waste for the production of pet food for dogs“ was mainly the fact that I am interested in pet food for dogs its composition and use of animal waste for its prepare. Literature research is focused on the use of animal waste, such as slaughter waste, uneaten leftovers from the store, etc., to the production of feed dogs as pets. It can be industry food, which has three sections dry food, semi-dry food and canned or homemade BARF di...

  15. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing. PMID:19930434

  16. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  17. Prevalence, species distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant staphylococci in Lithuanian pet animals

    OpenAIRE

    Ruzauskas, Modestas; Couto, Natacha; Kerziene, Sigita; Siugzdiniene, Rita; Klimiene, Irena; Virgailis, Marius; Pomba, Constança

    2015-01-01

    Background The bacterial genus Staphylococcus consists of many species that causes infections in pet animals. Antimicrobial resistant staphylococci cause infections that are difficult to treat and they are important from the point of one health perspective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) species, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in diseased pet animals (Group A) and kennel dogs (Group B) in Lithuania and to c...

  18. The Benefit of Pets and Animal-Assisted Therapy to the Health of Older Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    E. Paul Cherniack; Cherniack, Ariella R.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health...

  19. Evaluation of the respiratory motion effect in small animal PET images with GATE Monte Carlo simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Susana; Almeida, Pedro; Jan, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to increased interest in in vivo small animal imaging. Small animal imaging has been applied frequently to the imaging of small animals (mice and rats), which are ubiquitous in modeling human diseases and testing treatments. The use of PET in small animals allows the use of subjects as their own control, reducing the interanimal variability....

  20. Complicated grief and posttraumatic stress disorder in humans' response to the death of pets/animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Julie A Luiz; Deliramich, Aimee N; Frueh, B Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The present exploratory project represents a cross-sectional study designed to determine the percentage of people reporting significant symptoms of complicated grief (CG) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to the death of companion pets/animals. Human participants (N = 106) were sampled from a veterinary clinic. Fifty-two percent of participants had lost one to three pets from natural causes, 60% had never lost a pet to euthanasia, and 37% had lost one to three pets to euthanasia. The study suggests that many people experience significant attachment to their pets/animals and experience significant features of grief reactions (about 20%) after the death of a pet/animal. However, the percentage of people experiencing major pathological disruption is relatively low (pets/animals and last 6 months or more for about 30% of those sampled. Severe pathological reactions do occur but are quite rare among human survivors. Implications for mental health clinicians working with affected populations are discussed. PMID:19807222

  1. Influence of single-photon-transmission scan duration measured with the ECAT ART PET-scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The aim was to study the influence of single-photon-transmission scan duration in 3D-PET on the quantitative values of attenuation coefficients and noise in transmission images and of activity concentrations and noise in attenuation corrected emission images of thorax phantom- and patient data. Method and material: Using dual collimated Cs-137 singles transmission sources (Eγ = 662 keV, A = 2* 614 MBq) on an ECAT ART tomography series of transmission scans of a thorax phantom were acquired pre- and post-injection of 18F. 17 patients underwent two transmission scans. The scan time of the short transmission was chosen according to the results of the phantom studies (noise of Poisson statistics less than 4%). Transmission and attenuation corrected emission images were evaluated with respect to estimated linear attenuation coefficients, noise and specific activities in organs. Results: The phantom studies reveal little variation of the estimated linear attenuation coefficients as a function of scan duration. The estimates of the attenuation coefficients are found to be 1% lower than the expected values for pre- and up to 6.5% lower for post-injection transmissions. The noise level in the transmission images increases as expected for Poisson data. The noise level in the attenuation corrected emission images shows only little increase with decreasing transmission scan time whereas it is strongly influenced by a variation of emission scan time. In patient studies, less than 3% difference was found in the estimated linear attenuation coefficients as well as in the activity concentrations between short (pre or post-injection) and long transmission scans. The noise levels in transmission and emission images are 1% (pre-injection) and 4% (post-injection) higher for short transmission scans. Conclusion: Due to the high photon flux, single photon transmission offers good clinical performance with significantly reduced transmission scan durations (<2 min/bed in pre-, <4

  2. Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowski, Radosław; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2016-03-01

    The mouse model is widely used in a vast range of biomedical and preclinical studies. Thanks to the ability to detect and quantify biological processes at the molecular level in vivo, PET has become a well-established tool in these investigations. However, the need to visualize and quantify radiopharmaceuticals in anatomic structures of millimetre or less requires good spatial resolution and sensitivity from small-animal PET imaging systems.In previous work we have presented a proof-of-concept of a dedicated high-resolution small-animal PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillator crystals and Digital Photon Counter photosensor. The combination of thin monolithic crystals and MLE positioning algorithm resulted in an excellent spatial resolution of 0.7 mm uniform in the entire field of view (FOV). However, the limitation of the scanner was its low sensitivity due to small thickness of the lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals (2 mm).Here we present an improved detector design for a small-animal PET system that simultaneously achieves higher sensitivity and sustains a sub-millimetre spatial resolution. The proposed detector consists of a 5 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal optically coupled to a Digital Photon Counter. Mean nearest neighbour (MNN) positioning combined with depth of interaction (DOI) decoding was employed to achieve sub-millimetre spatial resolution. To evaluate detector performance the intrinsic spatial resolution, energy resolution and coincidence resolving time (CRT) were measured. The average intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector was 0.60 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). A DOI resolution of 1.66 mm was achieved. The energy resolution was 23% FWHM at 511 keV and CRT of 529 ps were measured. The improved detector design overcomes the sensitivity limitation of the previous design by increasing the nominal sensitivity of the detector block and retains an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution. PMID:26907952

  3. Jet set pets: examining the zoonosis risk in animal import and travel across the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fooks AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthony R Fooks,1,2 Nicholas Johnson1 1Wildlife Zoonoses and Vector-Borne Diseases Research Group, Animal and Plant Health Agency, Addlestone, Surrey, 2Department of Clinical Infection, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Ownership of companion animals or pets is popular throughout the world. Unfortunately, such animals are susceptible to and potential reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens. Close proximity to and contact with pets can lead to human infections. The distribution of zoonotic diseases associated with companion animals such as dogs and cats is not uniform around the world, and moving animals between regions, countries, and continents carries with it the risk of relocating the pathogens they might harbor. Critical among these zoonotic diseases are rabies, echinococcosis, and leishmania. In addition, the protozoan parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Giardia duodenalis, are also significant agents for human disease of pet origin. Considerable effort is applied to controlling movements of companion animals, particularly dogs, into the European Union. However, free movement of people and their pets within the European Union is a risk factor for the translocation of diseases and their vectors. This review considers the current distribution of some of these diseases, the risks associated with pet travel, and the controls implemented within Europe to prevent the free movement of zoonotic pathogens. Keywords: zoonosis, companion animal, rabies, alveolar echinococcosis, leishmania

  4. Monte Carlo simulations versus experimental measurements in a small animal PET system. A comparison in the NEMA NU 4-2008 framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popota, F. D.; Aguiar, P.; España, S.; Lois, C.; Udias, J. M.; Ros, D.; Pavia, J.; Gispert, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    In this work a comparison between experimental and simulated data using GATE and PeneloPET Monte Carlo simulation packages is presented. All simulated setups, as well as the experimental measurements, followed exactly the guidelines of the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards using the microPET R4 scanner. The comparison was focused on spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and counting rates performance. Both GATE and PeneloPET showed reasonable agreement for the spatial resolution when compared to experimental measurements, although they lead to slight underestimations for the points close to the edge. High accuracy was obtained between experiments and simulations of the system’s sensitivity and scatter fraction for an energy window of 350-650 keV, as well as for the counting rate simulations. The latter was the most complicated test to perform since each code demands different specifications for the characterization of the system’s dead time. Although simulated and experimental results were in excellent agreement for both simulation codes, PeneloPET demanded more information about the behavior of the real data acquisition system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first validation of these Monte Carlo codes for the full NEMA NU 4-2008 standards for small animal PET imaging systems.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations versus experimental measurements in a small animal PET system. A comparison in the NEMA NU 4-2008 framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a comparison between experimental and simulated data using GATE and PeneloPET Monte Carlo simulation packages is presented. All simulated setups, as well as the experimental measurements, followed exactly the guidelines of the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards using the microPET R4 scanner. The comparison was focused on spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and counting rates performance. Both GATE and PeneloPET showed reasonable agreement for the spatial resolution when compared to experimental measurements, although they lead to slight underestimations for the points close to the edge. High accuracy was obtained between experiments and simulations of the system’s sensitivity and scatter fraction for an energy window of 350–650 keV, as well as for the counting rate simulations. The latter was the most complicated test to perform since each code demands different specifications for the characterization of the system’s dead time. Although simulated and experimental results were in excellent agreement for both simulation codes, PeneloPET demanded more information about the behavior of the real data acquisition system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first validation of these Monte Carlo codes for the full NEMA NU 4-2008 standards for small animal PET imaging systems. (paper)

  6. Pet projects: animal assisted therapy in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammonley, J; Yates, J

    1991-01-01

    1. Animal assisted therapy is an applied science using animals to solve a human problem. It is an interdisciplinary approach using animals as an adjunct to other therapies. 2. The major difference between animals as therapy and entertainment is the animal-human bond, a special relationship that develops when a person has strong feelings of psychological attachment to the animal. 3. It is essential that a complete nursing and activity assessment be made before implementation of individualized animal assisted therapy. PMID:1899683

  7. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose

  8. Performance evaluation of three-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector blocks for an ultra-high resolution brain PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an ultra-high resolution human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with the resolution of less than 1 mm FWHM, in which cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detectors were used. As the detector of the scanner, we have developed a two-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector (2D-PSD) which was developed in our previous study. The 2D-PSD can detect gamma rays with a position resolution of approximately 1.2 mm. We developed a three-dimensional position-sensitive CdTe detector block (3D-PSD block) by stacking 80 2D-PSDs which were connected to subsequent circuits (amplifiers, analog to digital converters, and other data processing circuits). We constructed an ultra-high resolution semiconductor brain PET gantry placing the ten 3D-PSD blocks in decagonal arrangement. In this paper, we checked all 2D-PSDs and classified their performance. As the results, we confirmed that our 3D-PSD blocks can be used to the ultra-high resolution human brain PET. We made a circuit to reduce the dead time due to restoration from polarization phenomena in CdTe detector and we could stabilize count rates. (author)

  9. Automated method for small-animal PET image registration with intrinsic validation

    OpenAIRE

    Pascau, Javier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Michaelides, Michael; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Volkow, Nora D.; Vaquero, Juan José; Soto-Montenegro, Maria Luisa; Desco, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We propose and compare different registration approaches to align small-animal PET studies and a procedure to validate the results by means of objective registration consistency measurements. Procedures: We have applied a registration algorithm based on information theory, using different approaches to mask the reference image. The registration consistency allows for the detection of incorrect registrations. This methodology has been evaluated on a test dataset(FDG-PET rat brain images)...

  10. High resolution SPECT imaging for visualization of intratumoral heterogeneity using a SPECT/CT scanner dedicated for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor interiors are never homogeneous and in vivo visualization of intratumoral heterogeneity would be an innovation that contributes to improved cancer therapy. But, conventional nuclear medicine tests have failed to visualize heterogeneity in vivo because of limited spatial resolution. Recently developed single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scanners dedicated for small animal imaging are of interest due to their excellent spatial resolution of 111In and simulations of actual small animal imaging. The optimal conditions obtained were validated by in vivo imaging of sarcoma 180-bearing mice. Larger number of counts must be obtained within limited acquisition time to visualize tumor heterogeneity in vivo in animal imaging, compared to cases that simply detect tumors. At an acquisition time of 30 min, better image quality was obtained with pinhole apertures diameter of 1.4 mm than of 1.0 mm. The obtained best spatial resolution was 1.3 mm, it was acceptable for our purpose, though a little worse than the best possible performance of the scanner (1.0 mm). Additionally, the reconstruction parameters, such as noise suppression, voxel size, and iteration/subset number, needed to be optimized under the limited conditions and were different from those found under the ideal condition. The minimal radioactivity concentration for visualization of heterogeneous tumor interiors was estimated to be as high as 0.2-0.5 MBq/mL. Liposomes containing 111In met this requirement and were administered to tumor-bearing mice. SPECT imaging successfully showed heterogeneous 111In distribution within the tumors in vivo with good spatial resolution. A threshold of 0.2 MBq/g for clear visualization of tumor heterogeneity was validated. Autoradiograms obtained ex vivo of excised tumors confirmed that the in vivo SPECT images accurately depicted the heterogeneous intratumoral accumulation of liposomes. Intratumoral heterogeneity was successfully visualized under the optimized

  11. Small lesions detectability with the biograph 16 Hi-Rez PET/CT scanner and fast imaging protocols. Performance evaluation using an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and ROC analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact on lesion detectability of fast imaging protocols using 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a 3-dimensional lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanner. An anthropomorphic thoracic phantom was used simulating the anatomical structures of radioactivity distribution for the upper torso of an underweight patient. Irregularly shaped targets of small dimensions, the zeolites, were located inside the phantom in an unpredictable position for the observers. Target-to background ratios and target dimensions were selected in order to sample the range of detectability. Repeated imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying emission scan duration (ESD) of 1, 2, 3 and 4 min/bed and background activity concentrations of 10, 5 and 3 kBq/mL in the torso cavity. Three observers ranked the targets and a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for each acquisition protocol. Detection performances improved when passing from a short (ESD=1 min) protocol to longer (ESD ≥2 min) protocols. This improvement was established with adequate statistical significance. Short image acquisition times of 1 min/bed using 18F-FDG and the specific scanner model considered in the study lead to reduced lesion detectability and should be avoided also in underweight patients. (author)

  12. Multimodal imaging of orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma using small animal PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with small-animal PET and bioluminescence imaging has been used as an important tool in cancer research. One of the disadvantages of these imaging modalities is the lack of anatomic information. To obtain fusion images with both molecular and anatomical information, small-animal PET and bioluminescence images fused with contrast enhance CT image in orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. We retrovially transfected dual gene (HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase) to morris hepatoma cells. The expression of HSV1-tk and luciferase was checked by optical imager and in vitro radiolabeled FIAU uptake, respectively and also checked by RT-PCR analysis. MCA-TL cells (5X105/ 0.05 ml) mixed with matrigel (1: 10) injected into left lobe of liver in nude mice. 124I-FIAU-PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT images were obtained in the orthotopic HCC model and digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Small animal PET image was obtained at 2 h post injection of 124I-FIAU and contrast enhanced CT image was obtained at 3 h post injection of Fenestra LC (0.3 ml). MCA-TL cells showed more specific 124I-FIAU uptake and higher luminescent activity than parental cells. The orthotopic HCC was detected by 124I-FIAU PET, contrast enhanced CT, and BLI and confirmed by DWBA. Registered image in orthotopic HCC t models showed a good correlation of images from both PET and CT. Contrast enhanced CT image delineated margin of HCC. Multimodal imaging with 124I-FIAU PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT allows a precise and improved detection of tumor in orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model. Multimodal imaging is potentially useful for monitoring progression of hepatic metastasis and for the evaluation of cancer treatments

  13. In vivo imaging of microglial activation using a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand. [11C]PK-11195 and animal PET following ethanol injury in rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether [11C]PK-11195, a specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) ligand for positron emission tomography (PET), can show activated microglia in a rat brain injury model. On day 1, ethanol was injected into the rat's right striatum (ST) using a stereotaxic operative procedure. On day 3, head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for surgically treated rats were performed to evaluate ethanol injury morphologically. On day 4, dynamic PET scans (17 injured rats and 7 non-injured controls) were performed for 60 min with an animal PET scanner under chloral hydrate anesthesia following a bolus injection of [11C]PK-11195 through tail vein. Because PBRs are present throughout the brain, there is no suitable receptor-free reference region. The reference tissue model may not be applicable because of low target to back-ground ratio for low affinity of [11C]PK-11195 to PBRs. We evaluated the PBRs binding with regions of interest (ROIs)-based approach to estimate total distribution volume (V). We used an integral from 0 min to 60 min (V60) as an estimate of V. On the coronal PET image, ROIs were placed on bilateral ST. Differences in right/left ST V60 ratios between lesioned and unlesioned control rats were compared using unpaired t tests. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for confirming the presence of activated microglia following decapitation on the PET experiment day. The right/left ST V60 ratios in lesioned rats (1.07±0.08) were significantly higher than those in unlesioned control rats (1.00±0.06, P11C]PK-11195 PET imaging would be a useful tool for evaluating microglial activation in a rat brain injury model. (author)

  14. Study of Time-of-flight Influence on Image Quality by PET/CT Scanner%PET/CT显像中飞行时间技术对图像质量的评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王风; 杨志; 张岩; 赵伟; 朱华; 谢卿; 周妮娜; 于江媛; 李囡; 王雪鹃

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the benefits of time-of-flight(TOF) technology on image quality in a PET/CT scanner, and to apply Monte Carlo method to simulating some performances of PET/CT with TOF capability. Methods Philips GEMINI TF PET/CT was used for phantom scan studies. The raw data were acquired and reconstructed using TOF and non-TOF methods. The contrast of TOF and non-TOF images were compared and analyzed in different experiment conditions. The PET/CT scanner's geometry and physics models were established using Monte Carlo method and the PET/CT counting performance and signal-to-noise(SNR) were simulated in different time resolutions. Results Research results stated that PET images quality was clear and contrasts were good with TOF technology. The contrast could be improved by 10%, especially in low counts and small lesion. Monte Carlo simulation showed shat coincidence counts and SNR increased with activity. However, in higher activity region there were much more random counts and the SNR increased slowly. The relation between SNR and the time resolution was that the less the time resolution, the higher the SNR gained. The SNR of 520 ps time resolution was improved by 50% larger than that with 1 000 ps time resolution. Conclusion The PET/CT image quality can be improved using TOF technology, and short scan time and low dose can be gained at the same image quality.%目的:研究飞行时间(TOF)技术对PET/CT图像质量的影响,并通过蒙特卡罗方法模拟验证TOF技术的优越性.方法:使用拥有TOF技术的飞利浦Gemini TF型号PET/CT,通过模体扫描分析不同采集计数下TOF重建和non-TOF重建图像的对比度变化.使用蒙特卡罗方法建立PET/CT仪器几何模型和物理过程,模拟PET/CT活度-计数特性曲线和不同时间分辨率下的信噪比(SNR).结果:从模体实验所获得的图像比较中可以直观地看到,与non-TOF图像比较,TOF图像更加清晰,其均匀性、病灶轮廓区分度、鉴别小病

  15. Impact of metallic dental implants on CT-based attenuation correction in a combined PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to study the effect of metal-induced artifacts on the accuracy of the CT-based anatomic map as a prerequisite for attenuation correction of the positron emission tomography (PET) emission data. Twenty-seven oncology patients with dental metalwork were enrolled in the present study. Data acquisition was performed on a PET/CT in-line system (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Attenuation correction of emission data was done twice, using an 80-mA CT scan (PETCT80) and a 68Ge transmission scan (PET68Ge). Average count in kBq/cc was measured in regions with and without artifacts and compared for PETCT80 and PET68Ge. Data analysis of region of interests (ROIs) revealed that the ratio (ROIs PETCT80/ROIs PET68Ge) and the difference (ROIs PETCT80 minus ROIs PET68Ge) had a higher mean of values in regions with artifacts than in regions without artifacts (1.2±0.17 vs 1.06±0.06 and 0.68±0.67 vs 0.15±0.17 kBq/cc, respectively). For most of the studied artifactual ROIs, the PETCT80 values were higher than those of the PET68Ge. Attenuation correction of PET emission data using an artifactual CT map yields false values in regions nearby artifacts caused by dental metalwork. This may falsely estimate PET quantitative studies and may disturb the visual interpretation of PET scan. (orig.)

  16. Time over threshold readout method of SiPM based small animal PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the work was to design a readout concept for silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) sensor array used in small animal PET scanner. The detector module consist of LYSO 35x35 scintillation crystals, 324 SiPM sensors (arranged in 2x2 blocks and those quads in a 9x9 configuration) and FPGA based readout electronics. The dimensions of the SiPM matrix are area: 48x48 mm2 and the size of one SiPM sensor is 1.95x2.2 mm2. Due to the high dark current of the SiPM, conventional Anger based readout method does not provide sufficient crystal position maps. Digitizing the 324 SiPM channels is a straightforward way to obtain proper crystal position maps. However handling hundreds of analogue input channels and the required DSP resources cause large racks of data acquisition electronics. Therefore coding of the readout channels is required. Proposed readout method: The coding of the 324 SiPMs consists two steps: Step 1) Reduction of the channels from 324 to 36: Row column readout, SiPMs are connected to each other in column by column and row-by row, thus the required channels are 36. The dark current of 18 connected SiPMs is small in off for identifying pulses coming from scintillating events. Step 2) Reduction of the 18 rows and columns to 4 channels: Comparators were connected to each rows and columns, and the level was set above the level of dark noise. Therefore only few comparators are active when scintillation light enters in the tile. The output of the comparator rows and columns are divided to two parts using resistor chains. Then the outputs of the resistor chains are digitized by a 4 channel ADC. However instead of the Anger method, time over threshold (ToT) was used. Figure 1 shows the readout concept of the SiPM matrix. In order to validate the new method and optimize the front-end electronics of the detector, the analogue signals were digitized before the comparators using a CAEN DT5740 32 channel digitizer, then the

  17. PET Quantification of Cerebral Oxygen Metabolism in Small Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Temma; Kazuhiro Koshino; Tetsuaki Moriguchi; Jun-ichiro Enmi; Hidehiro Iida

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cerebral oxygen metabolism is of great importance in both clinical diagnosis and animal experiments because oxygen is a fundamental source of brain energy and supports brain functional activities. Since small animals such as rats are widely used to study various diseases including cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases, the development of a noninvasive in vivo measurement method of cerebral oxygen metabolic parameters such as oxygen extractio...

  18. A small animal pet prototype with sub-millimetre spatial resolution based on tRPCs

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco Castro, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore the possibility of building a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system with sub-millimetre spatial resolution and absence of parallax error based on timing Resistive Plate Chambers (tRPC), to be used in the imaging of small animals. An RPC-PET prototype has been built consisting in two detector heads. Each head is built from sixteen independent metal-glass RPCs with a gas gap of 0.300 mm working on avalanche mode in the standard mixture. The cha...

  19. Non-invasive imaging of acute renal allograft rejection in rats using small animal F-FDG-PET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reuter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present, renal grafts are the most common solid organ transplants world-wide. Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donor kidneys, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival are important. Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection (AR is still a major risk for graft survival. Nowadays, AR can only be definitively by renal biopsy. However, biopsies carry a risk of renal transplant injury and loss. Most important, they can not be performed in patients taking anticoagulant drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a non-invasive, entirely image-based method to assess AR in an allogeneic rat renal transplantation model using small animal positron emission tomography (PET and (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG. 3 h after i.v. injection of 30 MBq FDG into adult uni-nephrectomized, allogeneically transplanted rats, tissue radioactivity of renal parenchyma was assessed in vivo by a small animal PET-scanner (post operative day (POD 1,2,4, and 7 and post mortem dissection. The mean radioactivity (cps/mm(3 tissue as well as the percent injected dose (%ID was compared between graft and native reference kidney. Results were confirmed by histological and autoradiographic analysis. Healthy rats, rats with acute CSA nephrotoxicity, with acute tubular necrosis, and syngeneically transplanted rats served as controls. FDG-uptake was significantly elevated only in allogeneic grafts from POD 1 on when compared to the native kidney (%ID graft POD 1: 0.54+/-0.06; POD 2: 0.58+/-0.12; POD 4: 0.81+/-0.06; POD 7: 0.77+/-0.1; CTR: 0.22+/-0.01, n = 3-28. Renal FDG-uptake in vivo correlated with the results obtained by micro-autoradiography and the degree of inflammatory infiltrates observed in histology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that graft FDG-PET imaging is a new option to non-invasively, specifically, early detect, and follow

  20. Pulmonary emphysema diagnosis using a preclinical small-animal X-ray dark-field scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary emphysema is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide that is difficult to detect using conventional x-ray radiographic methods. For emphysematous lungs with enlarged distal airspaces, x-ray scattering decreases and transmission increases, as has been demonstrated by the proof-of-principle experiments with brilliant x-rays from a synchrotron source. Therefore, combination of the transmission and dark-field signals leads to a novel diagnostic approach for pulmonary emphysema. In this study, images of excised murine lungs with pulmonary emphysema and control lungs were acquired using a compact phase- and dark-field scanner with a polychromatic source and a cone-beam geometry. The data analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups in the per-pixel scatter plot. The main difference was observed in the angle of the distribution to the vertical. The presented study reveals the high potential of the approach for the pulmonary emphysema diagnosis.

  1. Pulmonary emphysema diagnosis using a preclinical small-animal X-ray dark-field scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Meinel, Felix; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Muenchen (Germany); Bohla, Alexander; Yildirim, Ali Oender; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide that is difficult to detect using conventional x-ray radiographic methods. For emphysematous lungs with enlarged distal airspaces, x-ray scattering decreases and transmission increases, as has been demonstrated by the proof-of-principle experiments with brilliant x-rays from a synchrotron source. Therefore, combination of the transmission and dark-field signals leads to a novel diagnostic approach for pulmonary emphysema. In this study, images of excised murine lungs with pulmonary emphysema and control lungs were acquired using a compact phase- and dark-field scanner with a polychromatic source and a cone-beam geometry. The data analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups in the per-pixel scatter plot. The main difference was observed in the angle of the distribution to the vertical. The presented study reveals the high potential of the approach for the pulmonary emphysema diagnosis.

  2. Radiation protection in an animal research unit with pet: Occupational doses and dose rates produced by animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the occupational doses of technologists working at an Animal Research Unit using PET radiotracers and on the environmental dose rates produced by the animals (mice, rats and monkeys). In particular, whole body and extremity monitoring is reported and related with the workload. The study shows that doses not only depend on the amount of activity injected but also on the type of animals and radiotracers managed. The extremities, with a great variability of the doses received, are the limiting organs as far as regulatory dose limits for workers are concerned. Mean H∗(10) rates in contact and at 20 cm from the animals, when they are handled by the technologist, range from around 1 mSv/h to 20 μSv/h, respectively.

  3. Comparison of target volumes in radiotherapy defined on scanner and on PET-T.D.M. with 18F-F.D.G. in the frame of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to study in a prospective way, in the frame of head and neck cancers, the impact of the positron computed tomography with 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-F.D.G.) on the limitation of target volumes in radiotherapy. In conclusions, the gross tumor volume (G.T.V.) defined on PET is smaller than this one defined on scanner, that could be interesting in radiotherapy, in the perspective of a dose escalation. In addition, areas of discordance exist between the clinical target volumes (C.T.V.70 and C.T.V.50) defined on PET and on scanner. These discordances, synonyms of under or over estimation of target volumes, could have important clinical consequences in term of local control and toxicity. (N.C.)

  4. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event's time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e(-) RMS at room temperature. PMID:24187382

  5. Potential Role of Pet Animals in Household Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bramble, Manuel; Morris, Daniel; Tolomeo, Pam; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2011-01-01

    In this narrative review, we found numerous reports suggesting that dogs and cats may play a role in household methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and recurrent MRSA infection in human contacts. Future work should emphasize elucidating more clearly the prevalence of MRSA in household pets and characterize transmission dynamics of MRSA humans and pet animals.

  6. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yun Hui; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Jin Su; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institite of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 {mu}l was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using {sup 18}F-FDG microPET scanner.

  7. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. J.; Lee, D. S.; Kim, J. H.; Hwang, D. W.; Jung, J. G.; Lee, M. C [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advance of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not so much satisfactory as human image. As cats have relatively large sized brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mice or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCl. A burr hole was made at 1cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 ul was injected using 30G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. F-18 FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville. TN) scans were performed 1. 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition. 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using Gemini PET scanner (Philips medical systems. CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infraction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the Gemini PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using F-18 FDG microPET scanner.

  8. Evaluation of cat brain infarction model using microPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET has some disadvantage in the imaging of small animal due to poor resolution. With the advent of microPET scanner, it is possible to image small animals. However, the image quality was not good enough as human image. Due to larger brain, cat brain imaging was superior to mouse or rat. In this study, we established the cat brain infarction model and evaluate it and its temporal change using microPET scanner. Two adult male cats were used. Anesthesia was done with xylazine and ketamine HCI. A burr hole was made at 1 cm right lateral to the bregma. Collagenase type IV 10 μl was injected using 30 G needle for 5 minutes to establish the infarction model. 18F-FDG microPET (Concorde Microsystems Inc., Knoxville, TN) scans were performed 1, 11 and 32 days after the infarction. In addition, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed using human PET scanner (Gemini, Philips medical systems, CA, USA) 13 and 47 days after the infarction. Two cat brain infarction models were established. The glucose metabolism of an infarction lesion improved with time. An infarction lesion was also distinguishable in the human PET scan. We successfully established the cat brain infarction model and evaluated the infarcted lesion and its temporal change using 18F-FDG microPET scanner

  9. Comparison of target volumes in radiotherapy defined on scanner and on PET-T.D.M. with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. in the frame of head and neck cancers; Comparaison des volumes cibles en radiotherapie definis sur scanner et sur TEP-TDM au 18F FDG dans le cadre des cancers de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques De Figueiredo, B.; Barret, O.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P. [Service de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France); Demeaux, H.; Maire, J.P.; Lagarde, P. [service de radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Andre, Bordeaux, (France); Kantor, G.; Richau, P. [departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, Bordeaux, (France); De Mones Del Pujol, E. [service d' ORL, hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The objective is to study in a prospective way, in the frame of head and neck cancers, the impact of the positron computed tomography with {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-F.D.G.) on the limitation of target volumes in radiotherapy. In conclusions, the gross tumor volume (G.T.V.) defined on PET is smaller than this one defined on scanner, that could be interesting in radiotherapy, in the perspective of a dose escalation. In addition, areas of discordance exist between the clinical target volumes (C.T.V.70 and C.T.V.50) defined on PET and on scanner. These discordances, synonyms of under or over estimation of target volumes, could have important clinical consequences in term of local control and toxicity. (N.C.)

  10. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    OpenAIRE

    Kass, Philip H.; Johnson, Karen L.; Hsin-Yi Weng

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently di...

  11. Initial studies using the RatCAP conscious animal PET tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RatCAP is a small, head-mounted PET tomograph designed to image the brain of a conscious rat without the use of anesthesia. The detector is a complete, high-performance 3D tomograph consisting of a 3.8 cm inside-diameter ring containing 12 block detectors, each of which is comprised of a 4x8 array of 2.2x2.2x5 mm3 LSO crystals readout with a matching APD array and custom ASIC, and has a 1.8 cm axial field of view. Construction of the first working prototype detector has been completed and its performance characteristics have been measured. The results show an intrinsic spatial resolution of 2.1 mm, a time resolution of ∼14 ns FWHM, and a sensitivity of 0.7% at an energy threshold of 150 keV. First preliminary images have been obtained using 18F-FDG and 11C-methamphetamine, which show comparable image quality to those obtained from a commercial MicroPET R4 scanner. Initial studies have also been carried out to study stress levels in rats wearing the RatCAP

  12. OSSI-PET: Open-Access Database of Simulated [(11)C]Raclopride Scans for the Inveon Preclinical PET Scanner: Application to the Optimization of Reconstruction Methods for Dynamic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Charil, Arnaud; Callaghan, Paul; Wimberley, Catriona; Busso, Florian; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Bardies, Manuel; Reilhac, Anthonin

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of medical imaging applications benefits from the availability of realistic ground truth data. In the case of positron emission tomography (PET), ground truth data is crucial to validate processing algorithms and assessing their performances. The design of such ground truth data often relies on Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. Since the creation of a large dataset is not trivial both in terms of computing time and realism, we propose the OSSI-PET database containing 350 simulated [(11)C]Raclopride dynamic scans for rats, created specifically for the Inveon pre-clinical PET scanner. The originality of this database lies on the availability of several groups of scans with controlled biological variations in the striata. Besides, each group consists of a large number of realizations (i.e., noise replicates). We present the construction methodology of this database using rat pharmacokinetic and anatomical models. A first application using the OSSI-PET database is presented. Several commonly used reconstruction techniques were compared in terms of image quality, accuracy and variability of the activity estimates and of the computed kinetic parameters. The results showed that OP-OSEM3D iterative reconstruction method outperformed the other tested methods. Analytical methods such as FBP2D and 3DRP also produced satisfactory results. However, FORE followed by OSEM2D reconstructions should be avoided. Beyond the illustration of the potential of the database, this application will help scientists to understand the different sources of noise and bias that can occur at the different steps in the processing and will be very useful for choosing appropriate reconstruction methods and parameters. PMID:26863655

  13. Evaluation of strategies towards harmonization of FDG PET/CT studies in multicentre trials: comparison of scanner validation phantoms and data analysis procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET quantification based on standardized uptake values (SUV) is hampered by several factors, in particular by variability in PET acquisition settings and data analysis methods. Quantitative PET/CT studies acquired during a multicentre trial require harmonization of imaging procedures to maximize study power. The aims of this study were to determine which phantoms are most suitable for detecting differences in image quality and quantification, and which methods for defining volumes of interest (VOI) are least sensitive to these differences. The most common accreditation phantoms used in oncology FDG PET/CT trials were scanned on the same scanner. These phantoms were those used by the Society of Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trials Network (SNM-CTN), the European Association of Nuclear Medicine/National Electrical Manufacturers Association (EANM/NEMA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). In addition, tumour SUVs were derived from ten oncology whole-body examinations performed on the same PET/CT system. Both phantom and clinical data were reconstructed using different numbers of iterations, subsets and time-of-flight kernel widths. Subsequently, different VOI methods (VOIA50%, VOImax, VOI3Dpeak, VOI2Dpeak) were applied to assess the impact of changes in image reconstruction settings on SUV and recovery coefficients (RC). All phantoms demonstrated sensitivity for detecting changes in SUV and RC measures in response to changes in image reconstruction settings and VOI analysis methods. The SNM-CTN and EANM/NEMA phantoms showed almost equal sensitivity in detecting RC differences with changes in image characteristics. Phantom and clinical data demonstrated that the VOI analysis methods VOIA50% and VOImax gave SUV and RC values with large variability in relation to image characteristics, whereas VOI3Dpeak and VOI2Dpeak were less sensitive to these differences. All three phantoms may be used to harmonize parameters for data acquisition, processing and analysis. However

  14. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A

  15. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (Ac,out) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with 18F (11 kBq mL-1) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (Ac,bkg) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL-1. The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide Ac,out in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of Ac,out on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, Ac,bkg and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and Ac,out have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated Ac,out activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to Ac,out.

  16. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners. PMID:22755630

  17. Strategies for improving the Voxel-based statistical analysis for animal PET studies: assessment of cerebral glucose metabolism in cat deafness model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In imaging studies of the human brain, voxel-based statistical analysis method was widely used, since these methods were originally developed for the analysis of the human brain data, they are not optimal for the animal brain data. The aim of this study is to optimize the procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of cat FDG PET brain images. A microPET Focus 120 scanner was used. Eight cats underwent FDG PET scans twice before and after inducing the deafness. Only the brain and adjacent regions were extracted from each data set by manual masking. Individual PET image at normal and deaf state was realigned to each other to remove the confounding effects by the different spatial normalization parameters on the results of statistical analyses. Distance between the sampling points on the reference image and kernel size of Gaussian filter applied to the images before estimating the realignment parameters were adjusted to 0.5 mm and 2 mm. Both data was then spatial normalized onto study-specific cat brain template. Spatially normalized PET data were smoothed and voxel-based paired t-test was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism decreased significantly after the loss of hearing capability in parietal lobes, postcentral gyri, STG, MTG, lTG, and IC at both hemisphere and left SC (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). Cerebral glucose metabolism in deaf cats was found to be significantly higher than in controls in the right cingulate (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). The ROI analysis also showed significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the same areas as in the SPM analysis, except for some regions (P < 0.05). Method for the voxel-based analysis of cat brain PET data was optimized for analysis of cat brain PET. This result was also confirmed by ROI analysis. The results obtained demonstrated the high localization accuracy and specificity of the developed method, and were found to be useful for examining cerebral glucose metabolism in a cat cortical deafness model

  18. Strategies for improving the Voxel-based statistical analysis for animal PET studies: assessment of cerebral glucose metabolism in cat deafness model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Hyun; Kang, Hye Jin; Im, Ki Chun; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lim, Sang Moo; Oh, Seung Ha; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In imaging studies of the human brain, voxel-based statistical analysis method was widely used, since these methods were originally developed for the analysis of the human brain data, they are not optimal for the animal brain data. The aim of this study is to optimize the procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of cat FDG PET brain images. A microPET Focus 120 scanner was used. Eight cats underwent FDG PET scans twice before and after inducing the deafness. Only the brain and adjacent regions were extracted from each data set by manual masking. Individual PET image at normal and deaf state was realigned to each other to remove the confounding effects by the different spatial normalization parameters on the results of statistical analyses. Distance between the sampling points on the reference image and kernel size of Gaussian filter applied to the images before estimating the realignment parameters were adjusted to 0.5 mm and 2 mm. Both data was then spatial normalized onto study-specific cat brain template. Spatially normalized PET data were smoothed and voxel-based paired t-test was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism decreased significantly after the loss of hearing capability in parietal lobes, postcentral gyri, STG, MTG, lTG, and IC at both hemisphere and left SC (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). Cerebral glucose metabolism in deaf cats was found to be significantly higher than in controls in the right cingulate (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). The ROI analysis also showed significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the same areas as in the SPM analysis, except for some regions (P < 0.05). Method for the voxel-based analysis of cat brain PET data was optimized for analysis of cat brain PET. This result was also confirmed by ROI analysis. The results obtained demonstrated the high localization accuracy and specificity of the developed method, and were found to be useful for examining cerebral glucose metabolism in a cat cortical deafness model.

  19. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT-CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners

  20. Design and performance of a multi-pinhole collimation device for small animal imaging with clinical SPECT and SPECT CT scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Frank P.

    2008-08-01

    A multi-pinhole collimation device is developed that uses the gamma camera detectors of a clinical SPECT or SPECT-CT scanner to produce high-resolution SPECT images. The device consists of a rotating cylindrical collimator having 22 tungsten pinholes with 0.9 mm diameter apertures and an animal bed inside the collimator that moves linearly to provide helical or ordered-subsets axial sampling. CT images also may be acquired on a SPECT-CT scanner for purposes of image co-registration and SPECT attenuation correction. The device is placed on the patient table of the scanner without attaching to the detectors or scanner gantry. The system geometry is calibrated in-place from point source data and is then used during image reconstruction. The SPECT imaging performance of the device is evaluated with test phantom scans. Spatial resolution from reconstructed point source images is measured to be 0.6 mm full width at half maximum or better. Micro-Derenzo phantom images demonstrate the ability to resolve 0.7 mm diameter rod patterns. The axial slabs of a Micro-Defrise phantom are visualized well. Collimator efficiency exceeds 0.05% at the center of the field of view, and images of a uniform phantom show acceptable uniformity and minimal artifact. The overall simplicity and relatively good imaging performance of the device make it an interesting low-cost alternative to dedicated small animal scanners.

  1. Low radiation dose imaging of myocardial perfusion and coronary angiography with a hybrid PET/CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kajander, S; Ukkonen, H; Sipilä, H.; Teräs, M.; Knuuti, J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To test the image quality and feasibility of a sequential low radiation dose protocol for hybrid cardiac PET/CT angiography (CTA). Background: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a non-invasive method for coronary angiography. The negative predictive value of MDCT is high but perfusion imaging has a role in detecting functional significance of coronary lesions. This has encouraged combining these techniques. However, radiation dose is of concern. We report our first experi...

  2. A segmented hybrid photon detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics for a PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented hybrid photon detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a positron emission tomograph. Emphasis is put on the PET-specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN

  3. Recent results with a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector for a novel, parallax-free PET Scanner for Brain Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is laid on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN

  4. Recent Results with a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector for a novel parallax-free PET Scanner for Brain Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Joram, Christian; Mathot, Serge; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, Peter; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Argentieri, A; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Pasqua, D

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is laid on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  5. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Correia, J G; Garibaldi, F; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Nappi, E; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Schoenahl, F; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Zaidi, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr /sub 3/:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial fi...

  6. Kinetic parametric estimation in animal PET molecular imaging based on artificial immune network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop an accurate,reliable method without the need of initialization in animal PET modeling for estimation of the tracer kinetic parameters based on the artificial immune network. Methods: The hepatic and left ventricular time activity curves (TACs) were obtained by drawing ROIs of liver tissue and left ventricle on dynamic 18F-FDG PET imaging of small mice. Meanwhile, the blood TAC was analyzed by sampling the tail vein blood at different time points after injection. The artificial immune network for parametric optimization of pharmacokinetics (PKAIN) was adapted to estimate the model parameters and the metabolic rate of glucose (Ki) was calculated. Results: TACs of liver,left ventricle and tail vein blood were obtained.Based on the artificial immune network, Ki in 3 mice was estimated as 0.0024, 0.0417 and 0.0047, respectively. The average weighted residual sum of squares of the output model generated by PKAIN was less than 0.0745 with a maximum standard deviation of 0.0084, which indicated that the proposed PKAIN method can provide accurate and reliable parametric estimation. Conclusion: The PKAIN method could provide accurate and reliable tracer kinetic modeling in animal PET imaging without the need of initialization of model parameters. (authors)

  7. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F. [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  8. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  9. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc. and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves. The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or ‘piggybacking’ disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general. Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together.

  10. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Every, Danielle; Rainbird, Sophia; Cornell, Victoria; Smith, Bradley; Trigg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Increased vulnerability to natural disasters has been associated with particular groups in the community. This includes those who are considered de facto vulnerable (children, older people, those with disabilities etc.) and those who own pets (not to mention pets themselves). The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to vulnerable members of the community who own pets or other animals? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives. Despite different vulnerabilities, animals were found to be important to the disaster resilience of seven vulnerable groups in Australia. Animal attachment and animal-related activities and networks are identified as underexplored devices for disseminating or 'piggybacking' disaster-related information and engaging vulnerable people in resilience building behaviors (in addition to including animals in disaster planning initiatives in general). Animals may provide the kind of innovative approach required to overcome the challenges in accessing and engaging vulnerable groups. As the survival of humans and animals are so often intertwined, the benefits of increasing the resilience of vulnerable communities through animal attachment is twofold: human and animal lives can be saved together. PMID:26480038

  11. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1792, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre Francois Baclesse, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen cedex 5 (France); Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard [Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Beyer, Thomas [cmi-experts GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Bern, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Kinross, Kathryn [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Sir Donald and Lady Trescowthick Laboratories, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Department of Medicine, Parkville (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of {sup 68}Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR{sub air} and SOR{sub water} were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.0001) between quantitative data obtained in mice imaged alone and simultaneously in a group of three was found following PSF reconstruction. The correlation between ex vivo counting and PET/CT data was better with PSF reconstruction (r {sup 2} = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p < 0.0001) than without (r {sup 2} = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p < 0.001). Valid time-activity curves of the blood pool, kidneys and bladder could be derived from {sup 68}Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  12. The study of regional cerebral glucose metabolic change in human being normal aging process by using PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: With the technique development, PET has been more and more applied in brain function research. The aim of this study was to investigate the tendency of regional cerebral glucose metabolism changes in human being normal aging process by using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging data acquired from 252 healthy normal subjects (age ranging: 21 to 88 years old) were divided into 6 groups according to their age: 21-30, 31-40, 41-50, 51-60, 61-70, 71-88. All 5 groups with age ≥31 years old were compared to the control group of 21-30 years old, and pixel-by-pixel t-statistic analysis was applied using the SPM2. The hypo-metabolic areas were identified by MNI space utility (MSU) software and the voxel value of each brain areas were calculated (P60 years old showed significant metabolic decreases with aging mainly involved bilateral frontal lobe (pre-motto cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, frontal pole), temporal lobe (temporal pole), insula, anterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum. The most significant metabolic decrease area with aging was the frontal lobe , followed by the anterior cingulate cortex, temporal lobe, insula and cerebellum at predominance right hemisphere (P<0.0001). Parietal lobe, parahippocampal gyrus, basal ganglia and thalamus remain metabolically unchanged with advancing aging. Conclusions: Cerebral metabolic function decrease with normal aging shows an inconstant and unsymmetrical process. The regional cerebral metabolic decrease much more significantly in older than 60 years old healthy volunteers, mainly involving bilateral frontal lobe, temporal lobe, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum at right predominance hemisphere. (authors)

  13. PET-COMPTON System. Comparative evaluation with PET System using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called PET-Compton systems and has included comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation was done on a PET-Compton system made-up of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named Clear-PET and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e+) and quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. By means of analytical reconstruction using SSRB (Single Slide Rebinning) method were obtained superior spatial resolution in PET-Compton system for all tested radionuclides (reaching sub-millimeter values of for 22Na source). However this analysis done by simulation have shown limited global efficiency values in PET-Compton system (in the order of 10-5-10-6 %) instead of values around 5*10-1 % that have been achieved in PET system. (author)

  14. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT

  15. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, Saeed [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teymoorian, Behnoosh [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafarian, Pardis [Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); PET/CT and Cyclotron Center, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Reza Ay, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@sina.tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-21

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT.

  16. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  17. A 3D HIDAC-PET camera with sub-millimeter resolution for imaging small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A HIDAC-PET camera consisting essentially of 5 million 0.5 mm gas avalanching detectors has been constructed for small-animal imaging. The particular HIDAC advantage--a high 3D spatial resolution--has been improved to 0.95 mm fwhm and to 0.7 mm fwhm when reconstructing with 3D-OSEM methods incorporating resolution recovery. A depth-of-interaction resolution of 2.5 mm is implicit, due to the laminar construction. Scatter-corrected sensitivity, at 8.9 cps/kBq (i.e. 0.9%) from a central point source, or 7.2 cps/kBq (543 cps/kBq/cm3) from a distributed (40 mm diameter, 60 mm long) source is now much higher than previous, and other, work. A field-of-view of 100 mm (adjustable to 200 mm) diameter by 210 mm axially permits whole-body imaging of small animals, containing typically 4MBqs of activity, at 40 kcps of which 16% are random coincidences, with a typical scatter fraction of 44%. Throughout the field-of-view there are no positional distortions and relative quantitation is uniform to ± 3.5%, but some variation of spatial resolution is found. The performance demonstrates that HIDAC technology is quite appropriate for small-animal PET cameras

  18. A dual layer DOI GSO block detector for a small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a high resolution animal positron emission tomography (PET), depth-of-interaction (DOI) is a useful method to improve both spatial resolution and sensitivity. Gd2SiO5 (GSO) with different amounts of Ce can provide different decay times and is ideal for DOI detector using pulse shape analysis. Dual layer DOI GSO block detectors using different amounts of Ce were developed for a new animal PET. The DOI GSO block detector employed two types of GSOs; one with 1.5 mol% Ce concentration (decay time: 35 ns) and the other with 0.5 mol% (decay time: 60 ns). These two GSO types were optically coupled in the DOI direction. The sizes of single GSOs were 1.9 mmx1.9 mmx6 mm and 1.9 mmx1.9 mmx9 mm, for 1.5 and 0.5 mol%, respectively. These GSO were arranged by 11x37 matrix and optically coupled to three position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs), where the PSPMTs used were Hamamatsu R8520U-00-C12. Different lengths of reflectors were used between crystals to increase the useful field-of-view (FOV) of the PSPMT and to avoid the dead areas between PSPMTs. With this configuration, almost all islands in a 2-D position histogram corresponding to GSO cells could be separated. The width of the GSO block was 22 mm in the transaxial direction and 74 mm in axial direction with no gaps. Also, two types of GSO of different decay time could be separated using dual integration method for pulse shape analysis. These results indicate that developed block detectors might be useful for a high resolution and high sensitivity animal PET with dual layer DOI detection capability, with no gaps in transaxial or axial directions.

  19. PET: An Eye-tracking Dataset for Animal-centric PASCAL Object Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Gilani, Syed Omer; Subramanian, Ramanathan; Yan, Yan; Melcher, David; Sebe, Nicu; Winkler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present the Pascal animal classes Eye Tracking database. Our database comprises eye movement recordings compiled from forty users for the bird, cat, cow, dog, horse and sheep {trainval} sets from the VOC 2012 image set. Different from recent eye-tracking databases such as \\cite{kiwon_cvpr13_gaze,PapadopoulosCKF14}, a salient aspect of PET is that it contains eye movements recorded for both the free-viewing and visual search task conditions. While some differences in terms of overall gaze b...

  20. Molecular identification of Cryptosporidium isolates from exotic pet animals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Niichiro; Matsubara, Katsuki

    2015-04-30

    The Cryptosporidium horse genotype, a zoonotic protozoan parasite first found in a Prezewalski wild horse, has not been found in any other mammal but calves, horses, and humans. Hedgehogs, popular exotic pet animals in Japan, are a reservoir of two zoonotic Cryptosporidum: C. parvum and C. erinacei (previously known as the hedgehog genotype). Recently, after finding Cryptosporidium infection in a four-toed hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris), we identified the isolate genetically as the Cryptosporidium horse genotype. Its subtype (VIbA13) was the same as that of an isolate from a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms, as reported previously from sequencing analysis of the partial Cryptosporidum 60kDa glycoprotein gene sequence. The occurrence of this genotype in hedgehog indicates that the horse genotype has broad host specificity. This report is the first of a study identifying isolates from pet reptiles genetically in Japan. The study identified a new host (Teratoscincus scincus) in C. serpentis lizard genotype by sequencing analysis of partial SSU rRNA and actin genes. PMID:25801359

  1. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  2. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A

  3. Application of a semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images to animal PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ProASSIST, a semi-automatic ROI (region of interest) setting system for human brain PET images, has been modified for use with the canine brain, and the performance of the obtained system was evaluated by comparing the operational simplicity for ROI setting and the consistency of ROI values obtained with those by a conventional manual procedure. Namely, we created segment maps for the canine brain by making reference to the coronal section atlas of the canine brain by Lim et al., and incorporated them into the ProASSIST system. For the performance test, CBF (cerebral blood flow) and CMRglc (cerebral metabolic rate in glucose) images in dogs with or without focal cerebral ischemia were used. In ProASSIST, brain contours were defined semiautomatically. In the ROI analysis of the test image, manual modification of the contour was necessary in half cases examined (8/16). However, the operation was rather simple so that the operation time per one brain section was significantly shorter than that in the manual operation. The ROI values determined by the system were comparable with those by the manual procedure, confirming the applicability of the system to these animal studies. The use of the system like the present one would also merit the more objective data acquisition for the quantitative ROI analysis, because no manual procedure except for some specifications of the anatomical features is required for ROI setting. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm2 and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm2. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system can resolve

  5. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen L.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. PMID:23638352

  6. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo. However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005. The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes.

  7. Noise reduction in small-animal PET images using a multiresolution transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Jose M; Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús; Vergara Villegas, Osslan Osiris; Ortega Máynez, Leticia; Mederos, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of denoising reconstructed small animal positron emission tomography (PET) images, based on a multiresolution approach which can be implemented with any transform such as contourlet, shearlet, curvelet, and wavelet. The PET images are analyzed and processed in the transform domain by modeling each subband as a set of different regions separated by boundaries. Homogeneous and heterogeneous regions are considered. Each region is independently processed using different filters: a linear estimator for homogeneous regions and a surface polynomial estimator for the heterogeneous region. The boundaries between the different regions are estimated using a modified edge focusing filter. The proposed approach was validated by a series of experiments. Our method achieved an overall reduction of up to 26% in the %STD of the reconstructed image of a small animal NEMA phantom. Additionally, a test on a simulated lesion showed that our method yields better contrast preservation than other state-of-the art techniques used for noise reduction. Thus, the proposed method provides a significant reduction of noise while at the same time preserving contrast and important structures such as lesions. PMID:24951682

  8. cMiCE: a high resolution animal PET using continuous LSO with a statistics based positioning scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Detector designs for small animal scanners are currently dominated by discrete crystal implementations. However, given the small crystal cross-sections required to obtain very high resolution, discrete designs are typically expensive, have low packing fraction, reduced light collection, and are labor intensive to build. To overcome these limitations we have investigated the feasibility of using a continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module for high resolution small animal PET applications. Methods: The detector module consists of a single continuous slab of LSO, 25x25 mm2 in exposed cross-section and 4 mm thick, coupled directly to a PS-PMT (Hamamatsu R5900-00-C12). The large area surfaces of the crystal were polished and painted with TiO2 and the short surfaces were left unpolished and painted black. Further, a new statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm has been implemented to address linearity and edge effect artifacts that are inherent with conventional Anger style positioning schemes. To characterize the light response function (LRF) of the detector, data were collected on a coarse grid using a highly collimated coincidence setup. The LRF was then estimated using cubic spline interpolation. Detector performance has been evaluated for both SBP and Anger based decoding using measured data and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: Using the SBP scheme, edge artifacts were successfully handled. Simulation results show that the useful field of view (UFOV) was extended to ∼22x22 mm2 with an average point spread function of ∼0.5 mm full width of half maximum (FWHMPSF). For the same detector with Anger decoding the UFOV of the detector was ∼16x16 mm2 with an average FWHMPSP of ∼0.9 mm. Experimental results yielded similar differences between FOV and resolution performance. FWHMPSF for the SBP and Anger based method was 1.4 and 2.0 mm, uncorrected for source size, with a 1 mm diameter point source, respectively. Conclusion: A

  9. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Máynez, Leticia O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Vergara Villegas, Osslan O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  10. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image

  11. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal samples of healthy farm animals and pets in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A total of 261 healthy farm and pet animals (75 cattle, 52 goats, 100 dogs, and 34 cats) from different regions of Tunisia were screened for Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. Molecular typing of isolates (by spa- and multilocus sequence-typing) was performed, and their antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes were determined by PCR and sequencing. S. aureus isolates were detected in 17 of 261 tested samples (6.5%). All S. aureus isolates recovered were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), and one isolate/sample was further studied. Eight different spa types were detected (t189, t279, t582, t701, t1166, t1268, t1534, and t1773), and eight different sequence types were identified (ST6, ST15, ST45, ST133, ST188, ST700 [clonal complex CC130], ST2057, and a new ST2121). MSSA from pets (six isolates) showed resistance to (number of isolates, resistance gene): penicillin (six, blaZ), tetracycline (one, tet[M]), erythromycin one, erm[A]), streptomycin (one, ant[6]-Ia), and ciprofloxacin (one). All isolates from farm animals showed susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, except for two penicillin-resistant isolates. Five S. aureus isolates from goats and cats harbored the lukF/lukS-PV genes, encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and six isolates from goats harbored the tst virulence gene. In addition, diverse combinations of enterotoxin genes were detected, including two variants of the egc cluster. Goats and cats could represent a reservoir of important toxin genes, with potential implications in animal and human health. PMID:25700041

  12. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x105 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  13. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  14. Intensity correction method customized for multi-animal abdominal MR imaging with 3 T clinical scanner and multi-array coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of multiple small animals in a single session increases throughput of preclinical imaging experiments. Such imaging using a 3-tesla clinical scanner with multi-array coil requires correction of intensity variation caused by the inhomogeneous sensitivity profile of the coil. We explored a method for correcting intensity that we customized for multi-animal MR imaging, especially abdominal imaging. Our institutional committee for animal experimentation approved the protocol. We acquired high resolution T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted images and low resolution proton density-weighted images (PDWIs) of 4 rat abdomens simultaneously using a 3T clinical scanner and custom-made multi-array coil. For comparison, we also acquired T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted volume coil images in the same rats in 4 separate sessions. We used software created in-house to correct intensity variation. We applied thresholding to the PDWIs to produce binary images that displayed only a signal-producing area, calculated multi-array coil sensitivity maps by dividing low-pass filtered PDWIs by low-pass filtered binary images pixel by pixel, and divided uncorrected T1-, T2-, or T2*-weighted images by those maps to obtain intensity-corrected images. We compared tissue contrast among the liver, spinal canal, and muscle between intensity-corrected multi-array coil images and volume coil images. Our intensity correction method performed well for all pulse sequences studied and corrected variation in original multi-array coil images without deteriorating the throughput of animal experiments. Tissue contrasts were comparable between intensity-corrected multi-array coil images and volume coil images. Our intensity correction method customized for multi-animal abdominal MR imaging using a 3T clinical scanner and dedicated multi-array coil could facilitate image interpretation. (author)

  15. Non-Invasive imaging of small-animal tumors: high-frequency ultrasound vs. MicroPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Li, Chen-Han; Cheng, Weng-Fang; Li, Pai-Chi

    2005-01-01

    Tumor volume measurement on small animals is important but currently invasive. We employ ultrasonic micro-imaging (UMI) in this study and demonstrate its feasibility. In addition, we use small animal positron emission tomography (microPET) as a preliminary effort to develop multi-modality small animal imaging techniques. The tumor growth curve from UMI is also compared to radioactivity from microPET. Both UMI and [18F] FDG microPET imaging were performed on C57BL/6J black mice bearing WF-3 ovary cancer cells at various stages from the second week till up to the eighth week. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction were also done. The growth curve was obtained in vivo noninvasively by UMI. The cell doubling time was 7.46 days according to UMI. This result was compared with vernier caliper measurement and radioactivity counting by microPET. In microPET, we obtained the time-activity curves from the tumor and the tumor-surrounding tissue. The tumor-to-normal-tissues ratios reached maximum at the fifth week after tumor cell implantation. PMID:17281549

  16. Performance of a DOI-encoding small animal PET system with monolithic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carles, M., E-mail: montcar@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain); Lerche, Ch.W. [Department X-Ray Imaging Systems, Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany); Sanchez, F.; Orero, A.; Moliner, L.; Soriano, A.; Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-12-11

    PET systems designed for specific applications require high resolution and sensitivity instrumentation. In dedicated system design smaller ring diameters and deeper crystals are widely used in order to increase the system sensitivity. However, this design increases the parallax error, which degrades the spatial image resolution gradually from the center to the edge of the field-of-view (FOV). Our group has designed a depth of interaction(DOI)-encoding small animal PET system based on monolithic crystals. In this work we investigate the restoration of radial resolution for transaxially off-center sources using the DOI information provided by our system. For this purpose we have designed a support for point like sources adapted to our system geometry that allows a spatial compression and resolution response study. For different point source radial positions along vertical and horizontal axes of a FOV transaxial plane we compare the results obtained by three methods: without DOI information, with the DOI provided by our system and with the assumption that all the {gamma}-rays interact at half depth of the crystal thickness. Results show an improvement of the mean resolution of 10% with the half thickness assumption and a 16% achieved using the DOI provided by the system. Furthermore, a 10% restoration of the resolution uniformity is obtained using the half depth assumption and an 18% restoration using measured DOI.

  17. Quantitative assessment of small animal cardiac 18F-FDG PET and MRI image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac disease research relies increasingly on small animal models and non-invasive imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) using gadolinium-based contrast agents appear to be a visualizing infracted myocardium with high spatial resolution. Polar map (or bull's-eye image) was used to determination of the myocardial infarction area. Polar map is a comprehensive interpretation of the left ventricle. The infarct size was computed as the fraction of the total polar map areas. The threshold was computed as the percentage of mean intensity of the normal region. In other study, 50% predefined threshold value in varying range (30∼70%) was most commonly use. However, predefined threshold value isn't acceptance in all case. The purpose of this study was to investigate methodological approach for automatic measurement of rat myocardial infarct size using PET and MRI polar map with adaptive threshold value driven from Multi gaussian mixture model (MGMM)

  18. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for your family. What is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  19. Development of Input Function Measurement System for Small Animal PET Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Guk; Kim, Byung Su; Kim, Jin Su [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    For quantitative measurement of radioactivity concentration in tissue and a validated tracer kinetic model, the high sensitive detection system has been required for blood sampling. With the accurate measurement of time activity curves (TACs) of labeled compounds in blood (plasma) enable to provide quantitative information on biological parameters of interest in local tissue. Especially, the development of new tracers for PET imaging requires knowledge of the kinetics of the tracer in the body and in arterial blood and plasma. Conventional approaches of obtaining an input function are to sample arterial blood sequentially by manual as a function of time. Several continuous blood sampling systems have been developed and used in nuclear medicine research field to overcome the limited temporal resolution in sampling by the conventional method. In this work, we developed the high sensitive and unique geometric design of GSO detector for small animal blood activity measurement

  20. Improved automated synthesis and preliminary animal PET/CT imaging of 11C-acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study a simple and rapid automated synthetic technology of 11C-acetate (11C- AC), automated synthesis of 11C-AC was performed by carboxylation of MeMgBr/tetrahydrofuran (THF) on a polyethylene loop with 11C-CO2, followed by hydrolysis and purification on solid-phase extraction cartridges using a 11C-Choline/Methionine synthesizer made in China. A high and reproducible radiochemical yield of above 40% (decay corrected) was obtained within the whole synthesis time about 8 min from 11C-CO2. The radiochemical purity of 11C-AC was over 95%. The novel, simple and rapid on-column hydrolysis-purification procedure should adaptable to the fully automated synthesis of 11C-AC at several commercial synthesis module. 11C-AC injection produced by the automated procedure is safe and effective, and can be used for PET imaging of animals and humans. (authors)

  1. Fast synthesis of 11C-Raclopride and its initial PET study on animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: 11C-Raclopride is a type-2 dopamine receptor (D2R) binding agent used in the study of Parkinson's disease. This study introduced a fast and convenient method for preparation of 11C- Raclopride and reported on the preclinical trial of this receptor tracer on animal studies. Methods: 11C- Raclopride was synthesized via reaction of 11C-CH3-Triflate with Nor-Raclopride. The mixture of primary product was water-diluted and loaded on Sep-Pak C18 column for separation. The final product, 11C-Raclopride, was purified by column chromatography and then eluted from the C18 column with ethanol. The bio-distribution was studied in SD rats and the in vivo imaging pattern was studied in hem ipark insonjan mon- keys. Results: Within 16 min from beginning of processing with 11CO2, the synthetic yield of 11C-Raclopride was 60%, radiochemical purity (RCP) > 95% and specific activity 8 GBq/mmol. The uptake ratios of striatum to cerebellum and cerebral cortex were 4.67 and 6.20, respectively, at 30 min after 11C-Raclopride administration. The striatal uptake in normal rat brain could be blocked by N-methylspiperone (NMSP) and raclopride, but not by Nor-raclopride. PET imaging showed higher striatal D2R uptake on the D2 receptor up-regulated side of the experimental monkeys relative to the contralateral side. Conclusions: Column chromatography for purification of 11C-Raclopride was fast, convenient and with a RCP similar to that of high performance liquid chromatography purification. Preliminary PET findings using animal model suggested that 11C-Raclopride by column chromatogram purification might be considered for clinical use. (authors)

  2. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrs, Sascha; Del Guerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 x 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of approximately 70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than approximately 0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm). PMID:16481681

  3. Dynamic 11C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-11C-methionine (11C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic 11C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of 11C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG), and dynamic 18F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. 11C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of 11C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p 11C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 ± 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 ± 0.18, p 18F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic 11C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  5. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer (18)F-THK5117, the temporal and spatial progression could be visualized in good correlation with gold standard assessments of tau accumulation. The serial small-animal PET method could afford the means for preclinical testing of novel therapeutic approaches by accommodating interanimal variability at baseline, while detection thresholds in young animals have to be considered

  6. 78 FR 34565 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... (78 FR 27303). That document used incorrect style for the strength units describing radiation sources... Register of May 10, 2013 (78 FR 27303). That document used incorrect style for the strength units..., and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of...

  7. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Junwei, E-mail: jwdu@ucdavis.edu; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl [SensL Technologies Ltd., 6800 Airport Business Park, Cork (Ireland); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm{sup 2} and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm{sup 2}. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Tianyu, E-mail: maty@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-21

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  9. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  10. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  11. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains from pet animals and veterinary staff in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanjiang; Hao, Zhihui; Wang, Yang; Cao, Xingyuan; Logue, Catherine M; Wang, Bing; Yang, Jing; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from pet animals and veterinary staff and the characteristics of these isolates. A total of 22 MRSA isolates were isolated from nasal swabs from dogs, cats and veterinary staff in six pet hospitals in six cities, and examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, the presence of resistance genes, Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene lukF-lukS, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCC) mec typing, spa tying, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Of 22 MRSA isolates, 21 were recovered from pet animals, and one was isolated from a member of sstaff. All 22 MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin, oxacillin, azithromycin, clindamycin and ceftriaxone, and harboured mecA, ermB and linA genes. The lukF-lukS gene was not detected in any of the MRSA isolates. Eighteen MRSA strains from Qingdao belonged to ST59-MRSA-IV-spa t437. Of four MRSA isolates from Beijing, one belonged to ST398-MRSA-V-spa t034, and three belonged to ST239-MRSA-III-spa t030 profiles. Two PFGE types (A and B) were identified. Two isolates originating from dogs and one isolate originating from a staff member in Beijing shared similar PFGE patterns. Our cumulative data suggested that cross-transmission of MRSA may have occurred between pet animals and veterinary staff. PMID:21382731

  12. Anesthesia condition for {sup 18}F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: larry@kcch.re.kr; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of {sup 18}F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The {sup 18}F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire {sup 18}F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model.

  13. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Angelis, G I; Noonan, P J; Jackson, A [Imaging, Genomics and Proteomics, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, P [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: fotis.kotasidis@mmic.man.ac.uk [Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-05-21

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [{sup 11}C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [{sup 18}F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to

  14. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [11C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [18F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to projection

  15. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pets can add fun, companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for ... is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  16. Advances in PET Physics and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical development of positron emission tomography (PET) is marked by numerous significant technological accomplishments driven by an unprecedented collaboration between multi-disciplinary groups of investigators with backgrounds in medical sciences, physics, chemistry, mathematics, bioengineering, and computer science. During the last two decades, functional and metabolic imaging using PET has advanced elegantly and steadily gained importance in the clinical and research arenas. Significant progress has been made by scanner manufacturers and academic research groups in the design of dedicated high-resolution 3-D PET units; however, emerging clinical and research applications of functional brain imaging promise even greater levels of accuracy and precision and therefore impose more constraints with respect to the intrinsic performance of the PET scanner and the quantitative analysis capabilities of the provided software. The development of optimized PET detection geometries combined with high performance detector technologies and compact designs of PET scanners have become the goal of active research groups both in academic and corporate settings. Thus, there are many different design paths being pursued and it will be interesting to see what technologies become the most successful in the future. In addition to being a powerful clinical tool, PET is also used in small laboratory animal research to visualize and track certain molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease and neurological disorders in living small animal models of disease. During the past decade there has been substantial research and energy devoted to the development of high resolution preclinical PET systems for rodent research. This work has resulted in the development of numerous research prototypes as well as several commercially available high-resolution PET systems. The challenges of advancing PET's capabilities and some of the new imaging system

  17. Contrast-enhanced small-animal PET/CT in cancer research: strong improvement of diagnostic accuracy without significant alteration of quantitative accuracy and NEMA NU 4–2008 image quality parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Lasnon, Charline; Quak, Elske; Briand, Mélanie; Gu, Zheng; Louis, Marie-Hélène; Aide, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of iodinated contrast media in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) could improve anatomic referencing and tumor delineation but may introduce inaccuracies in the attenuation correction of the PET images. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance and accuracy of quantitative values in contrast-enhanced small-animal PET/CT (CEPET/CT) as compared to unenhanced small animal PET/CT (UEPET/CT). Methods Firstly, a NEMA NU 4–2008 phantom (...

  18. Imaging of lung metastasis tumor mouse model using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June Youp; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Tae Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to image metastaic lung melanoma model with optimal pre-conditions for animal handling by using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and clinical CT. The pre-conditions for lung region tumor imaging were 16-22 h fasting and warming temperature at 30 .deg. C. Small animal PET image was obtained at 60 min postinjection of 7.4 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG and compared pattern of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake and glucose standard uptake value (SUVG) of lung region between Ketamine/Xylazine (Ke/Xy) and Isoflurane (Iso) anesthetized group in normal mice. Metastasis tumor mouse model to lung was established by intravenous injection of B16-F10 cells in C57BL/6 mice. In lung metastasis tumor model, [{sup 18}F]FDG image was obtained and fused with anatomical clinical CT image. Average blood glucose concentration in normal mice were 128.0 {+-} 22.87 and 86.0 {+-} 21.65 mg/dL in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. Ke/Xy group showed 1.5 fold higher blood glucose concentration than Iso group. Lung to Background ratio (L/B) in SUVG image was 8.6 {+-} 0.48 and 12.1 {+-}0.63 in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. In tumor detection in lung region, [{sup 18}F]FDG image of Iso group was better than that of Ke/Xy group, because of high L/B ratio. Metastatic tumor location in [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET image was confirmed by fusion image using clinical CT. Tumor imaging in small animal lung region with [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET should be considered pre-conditions which fasting, warming and an anesthesia during [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. Fused imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of metastatic tumor in lung region.

  19. The distribution of D2/D3 receptor binding in the adolescent rhesus monkey using small animal PET imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Christian, BT; Vandehey, NT; Fox, AS; Murali, D.; Oakes, TR; Converse, AK; Nickles, RJ; Shelton, SE; Davidson, RJ; Kalin, NH

    2008-01-01

    PET imaging of the neuroreceptor systems in the brain has earned a prominent role in studying normal development, neuropsychiatric illness and developing targeted drugs. The dopaminergic system is of particular interest due to its role in the development of cognitive function and mood as well as its suspected involvement in neuropsychiatric illness. Nonhuman primate animal models provide a valuable resource for relating neurochemical changes to behavior. To facilitate comparison within and be...

  20. The Pet Factor - Companion Animals as a Conduit for Getting to Know People, Friendship Formation and Social Support

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Lisa; Martin, Karen; Christian, Hayley; Nathan, Andrea; Lauritsen, Claire; Houghton, Steve; Kawachi, Ichiro; McCune, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: While companion animals have been previously identified as a direct source of companionship and support to their owners, their role as a catalyst for friendship formation or social support networks among humans has received little attention. This study investigated the indirect role of pets as facilitators for three dimensions of social relatedness; getting to know people, friendship formation and social support networks. Methods: A telephone survey of randomly selected residents ...

  1. No Pet or Their Person Left Behind: Increasing the Disaster Resilience of Vulnerable Groups through Animal Attachment, Activities and Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kirrilly Thompson; Danielle Every; Sophia Rainbird; Victoria Cornell; Bradley Smith; Joshua Trigg

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The potential for reconfiguring pet ownership from a risk factor to a protective factor for natural disaster survival has been recently proposed. But how might this resilience-building proposition apply to members of the community who are already considered vulnerable? This article addresses this important question by synthesizing information about what makes seven particular groups vulnerable, the challenges to increasing their resilience and how animals figure in their lives....

  2. 78 FR 57227 - Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ..., serum, or other parts) for research, teaching, testing, experimentation, exhibition, or for use as a pet... purposes listed in the definition of dealer (research, teaching, testing, experimentation, exhibition, or..., testing, experimentation, exhibition, or for use as a pet '' Several commenters stated that they...

  3. {sup 13}N-ammonia myocardial perfusion imaging with a PET/CT scanner: impact on clinical decision making and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, Patrick T.; Husmann, Lars; Knabenhans, Martina; Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Hoefflinghaus, Tobias [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University Zurich, Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the study is to determine the impact of {sup 13}N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on clinical decision making and its cost-effectiveness. One hundred consecutive patients (28 women, 72 men; mean age 60.9 {+-} 12.0 years; range 24-85 years) underwent {sup 13}N-ammonia PET scanning (and computed tomography, used only for attenuation correction) to assess myocardial perfusion in patients with known (n = 79) or suspected (n = 8) coronary artery disease (CAD), or for suspected small-vessel disease (SVD; n = 13). Before PET, the referring physician was asked to determine patient treatment if PET would not be available. Four weeks later, PET patient management was reassessed for each patient individually. Before PET management strategies would have been: diagnostic angiography (62 of 100 patients), diagnostic angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; 6 of 100), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; 3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (28 of 100). After PET scanning, treatment strategies were altered in 78 patients leading to: diagnostic angiography (0 of 100), PCI (20 of 100), CABG (3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (76 of 100). Patient management followed the recommendations of PET findings in 97% of the cases. Cost-effectiveness analysis revealed lower costs of EUR206/patient as a result of PET scanning. In a population with a high prevalence of known CAD, PET is cost-effective and has an important impact on patient management. (orig.)

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION L(Y)SO DETECTORS USING PMT-QUADRANT-SHARING FOR HUMAN & ANIMAL PET CAMERAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Rocio A; Liu, Shitao; Liu, Jiguo; Zhang, Yuxuan; Kim, Soonseok; Baghaei, Hossain; Li, Hongdi; Wang, Yu; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2008-06-01

    We developed high resolution L(Y)SO detectors for human and animal PET applications using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technology. The crystal sizes were 1.27 × 1.27 × 10 mm(3) for the animal PQS-blocks and 3.25 × 3.25 × 20 mm(3) for human ones. Polymer mirror film patterns (PMR) were placed between crystals as reflector. The blocks were assembled together using optical grease and wrapped by Teflon tape. The blocks were coupled to regular round PMT's of 19/51 mm in PQS configuration. List-mode data of Ga-68 source (511 KeV) were acquired with our high yield pileup-event recovery (HYPER) electronics and data acquisition software. The high voltage bias was 1100V. Crystal decoding maps and individual crystal energy resolutions were extracted from the data. To investigate the potential imaging resolution of the PET cameras with these blocks, we used GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) simulation package. GATE is a GEANT4 based software toolkit for realistic simulation of PET and SPECT systems. The packing fractions of these blocks were found to be 95.6% and 98.2%. From the decoding maps, all 196 and 225 crystals were clearly identified. The average energy resolutions were 14.0% and 15.6%. For small animal PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 16.5 cm with an axial field of view (AFOV) of 11.8 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 1.24 (1.25) mm near the center is potentially achievable. For the wholebody human PET systems, the detector ring diameter was 86 cm. The simulation data suggests that a reconstructed radial (tangential) spatial resolution of 3.09(3.38) mm near the center is potentially achievable. From this study we can conclude that PQS design could achieve high spatial resolutions and excellent energy resolutions on human and animal PET systems with substantially lower production costs and inexpensive readout devices. PMID:19946463

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION L(Y)SO DETECTORS USING PMT-QUADRANT-SHARING FOR HUMAN & ANIMAL PET CAMERAS

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Rocio A.; Liu, Shitao; Liu, Jiguo; Zhang, Yuxuan; Kim, Soonseok; Baghaei, Hossain; Li, Hongdi; Wang, Yu; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2008-01-01

    We developed high resolution L(Y)SO detectors for human and animal PET applications using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technology. The crystal sizes were 1.27 × 1.27 × 10 mm3 for the animal PQS-blocks and 3.25 × 3.25 × 20 mm3 for human ones. Polymer mirror film patterns (PMR) were placed between crystals as reflector. The blocks were assembled together using optical grease and wrapped by Teflon tape. The blocks were coupled to regular round PMT’s of 19/51 mm in PQS configuration. Li...

  6. Multiple-animal MR imaging using a 3T clinical scanner and multi-channel coil for volumetric analysis in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple small-animal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure tumor volume may increase the throughput of preclinical cancer research assessing tumor response to novel therapies. We used a clinical scanner and multi-channel coil to evaluate the usefulness of this imaging to assess experimental tumor volume in mice. We performed a phantom study to assess 2-dimensional (2D) geometric distortion using 9-cm spherical and 32-cell (8 x 4 one-cm2 grids) phantoms using a 3-tesla clinical MR scanner and dedicated multi-channel coil composed of 16 5-cm circular coils. Employing the multi-channel coil, we simultaneously scanned 6 or 8 mice bearing sarcoma 180 tumors. We estimated tumor volume from the sum of the product of tumor area and slice thickness on 2D spin-echo images (repetition time/echo time, 3500/16 ms; in-plane resolution, 0.195 x 0.195 x 1 mm3). After MR acquisition, we excised and weighed tumors, calculated reference tumor volumes from actual tumor weight assuming a density of 1.05 g/cm3, and assessed the correlation between the estimated and reference volumes using Pearson's test. Two-dimensional geometric distortion was acceptable below 5% in the 9-cm spherical phantom and in every cell in the 32-cell phantom. We scanned up to 8 mice simultaneously using the multi-channel coil and found 11 tumors larger than 0.1 g in 12 mice. Tumor volumes were 1.04±0.73 estimated by MR imaging and 1.04±0.80 cm3 by reference volume (average±standard deviation) and highly correlated (correlation coefficient, 0.995; P<0.01, Pearson's test). Use of multiple small-animal MR imaging employing a clinical scanner and multi-channel coil enabled accurate assessment of experimental tumor volume in a large number of mice and may facilitate high throughput monitoring of tumor response to therapy in preclinical research. (author)

  7. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  8. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper

  9. MR-based Motion Correction for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    PET image quality is limited by patient motion. Emission data are blurred due to cardiac and/or respiratory motion. Although spatial resolution is 4 mm for standard clinical whole-body PET scanners, the effective resolution can be a low as 1 cm due to motion. Additionally, the deformation of attenuation medium causes image artifacts. Previously, gating is used to “freeze” the motion, but leads to significantly increased noise level. Simultaneous PET-MR modality offers a new way to perform PET motion correction. MR can be used to measure 3D motion fields, which can then be incorporated into the iterative PET reconstruction to obtain motion corrected PET images. In this report, we present MR imaging techniques to acquire dynamic images, a non-rigid image registration algorithm to extract motion fields from acquired MR images, and a PET reconstruction algorithm with motion correction. We also present results from both phantom and in-vivo animal PET-MR studies. We demonstrate that MR-based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR improves image quality and lesion detectability compared to gating and to no motion correction. PMID:23178089

  10. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Herraiz, J L; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M; Udias, J M

    2006-01-01

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performanc...

  11. Optimization of LSO/LuYAP phoswich detector for small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LSO/LuYAP phoswich detectors for small animal PET were developed to measure the depth of interaction (DOI), and to improve the spatial resolution at the edge of the field of view (FOV). The aim of this study was to optimize the optical coupling conditions between the crystal and photomultiplier tube (PMT) to maximize the light-collection efficiency, and to develop a method for rejecting scatter events by applying an equal energy window in each crystal layer. The light yields of the phoswich detector were estimated by changing the refractive index of the optical coupling material using a DETECT simulation. The accuracy of the DOI measurement on the phoswich detector, using an optical coupling material with the optimal light yield, were evaluated experimentally and compared with the air condition. The energy window for the photopeak events cannot be applied properly because the light outputs of LSO and LuYAP are different. The LSO/LuYAP photopeaks need to be superposed in order to effectively discriminate the scattered events by applying an equal energy window. The photopeaks of the LSO and LuYAP can be superposed by inserting a reflecting material between the crystals. The optimal coverage ratio of the inserting material was derived from a DETECT simulation, and its performance was investigated. In the simulation result, optimal refractive index of the optical coupling material was 1.7. The average DOI measurement errors of the LSO/LuYAP were 0.6%/3.4% and 4.9%/41.4% in the phoswich detector with and without an optical coupling material, respectively. The photopeaks of the LSO and LuYAP were superposed by covering 75% of the contact surface between the crystals with white Teflon. The DOI measurement errors of the LSO/LuYAP were 0.2%/2.4%. In this study, the optimal condition of the optical coupling material inserted between the crystal and PMT was derived to improve the accuracy of DOI measurement, and a photopeak superposition method of the LSO and LuYAP was

  12. Preparedness of small animal veterinary practices to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited proficiency in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Ruth E; Beck, Alan; Glickman, Larry T; Litster, Annette; Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Moore, George E

    2016-03-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the preparedness of small animal veterinary personnel to communicate with Spanish-speaking pet owners with limited English-language proficiency (LEP). DESIGN Cross-sectional telephone survey. SAMPLE Data from 383 small animal veterinary practices. PROCEDURES Telephone surveys were conducted with veterinarians and office or practice managers from a random sample of US small animal veterinary practices in 10 states to estimate the number of Spanish-speaking pet owners with LEP visiting these practices, proportion of practices that used services to facilitate communication with Spanish-speaking clients with LEP, and degree of veterinarian satisfaction with their communication with those clients. RESULTS Responses were obtained from 383 of 1,245 (31%) eligible practices, of which 340 (89%) had Spanish-speaking clients with LEP and 200 (52%) had such clients on a weekly basis. Eight percent of practices had veterinary personnel who were conversant or fluent in spoken Spanish. Veterinarians who depended on clients' friends or family to translate were significantly less satisfied with client communication than were those who could converse in Spanish with clients directly. Availability of Spanish-speaking staff and offering of Spanish-language resources were associated with an increase in the number of Spanish-speaking clients with LEP seen on a weekly basis. Industry- and practice-generated Spanish-language materials were offered at 32% (124/383) and 21% (81/383) of practices, respectively; 329 (86%) practices had no Spanish-language marketing. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Opportunities were identified for improving communication with pet owners with LEP in the veterinary clinical setting, which could ultimately positively impact patient well-being and client compliance. PMID:26953924

  13. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 2. in-vivo dosimetry using positron emitting rare earth isotopes with the rotating prototype PET scanner at the Geneva Cantonal Hospital

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS331 \\\\ \\\\ The use of radioactive metal ions (such as $^{90}$Y, $^{153}$Sm or $^{186}$Re) in cancer therapy has made some progress, but has been hampered by factors that could be addressed at CERN with a greater likelihood of success than at any other installation in the world. The present proposal seeks to use the unique advantage of CERN ISOLDE to get round these problems together with the PET scanners at the Cantonal Hospital Geneva (PET~=~positron emission tomography). Radioisotope production by spallation at ISOLDE makes available a complete range of isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. Among these isotopes several positron-emitters having clinical relevance are available.\\\\ \\\\Some free rare earth chelatas are used presently in palliation of painful bone metastases. Curative effects are not able for the moment with this kind of radiopharmaceuticals. More and better data on the biokinetics and bio-distribution...

  14. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mutian; Huang, Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S.; Martin, Kyle; Ling, C. Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A.; Humm, John L.

    2008-10-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ~0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ~0.8 mm could be obtained.

  15. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ∼0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ∼0.8 mm could be obtained.

  16. Demonstration of an Axial PET concept for brain and small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Beltrame, P; Clinthorne, N; Meddi, F; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Pauss, F; Djambazov, L; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    Standard Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras need to reach a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity. To overcome this limitation we developed a novel concept of PET. Our AX-PET demonstrator is made of LYSO crystals aligned along the z coordinate (patient's axis) and WLS strips orthogonally placed with respect to the crystals. This concept offers full 3D localization of the photon interaction inside the camera. Thus the spatial resolution and the sensitivity can be simultaneously improved and the reconstruction of Compton interactions inside the detector is also possible. Moreover, by means of G-APDs for reading out the photons, both from LYSO and WLS, the detector is insensitive to magnetic fields and it is then suitable to be used in a combined PET/MRI apparatus. A complete Monte Carlo simulation and dedicated reconstruction software have been developed. The two final modules, each composed of 48 crystals and 156 WLS strips, have been built and fully characterized in a dedicated test se...

  17. Proton scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanner is based on the nuclear scattering of high energy protons by the nucleons (protons and neutrons) included in the atomic nuclei. Because of the wide scattering angle, three coordinates in space of the interaction point can be computed, giving directly three dimensional radiographs. Volumic resolution is of about a few cubic-millimeters. Because the base interaction is the strong nuclear force, the atomic dependence of the information obtained is different from that of the X-ray scanner, for which the base interaction is electro-magnetic force. (orig./VJ)

  18. Optical fiber readout of scintillator arrays using a multi-channel PMT: A high resolution PET detector for animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the results from a new high resolution gamma ray imaging detector designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) system dedicated to small animal imaging. The detectors consist of an 8 x 8 array of 2 x 2 x 10 mm bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled by 2 mm diameter double clad optical fibers to a 64 pixel multi-channel photomultiplier tube (MC-PMT). A charge division readout board is used to convert the 64 output channels into four position sensitive signals which determine the crystal of interaction. Measurements with a pair of these detectors demonstrate an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.4 mm, a coincidence timing resolution of 15 ns and an energy resolution ranging between 35 and 60%. Based on these encouraging results, the design for a dedicated animal PET tomograph is proposed and simulations of this system project a reconstructed resolution of less than 2 mm within a 5 cm diameter transaxial field of view

  19. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  20. PET Evidence of the Effect of Donepezil on Cognitive Performance in an Animal Model of Chemobrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ilhan; Joung, Hye-Young; Yu, A Ram; Shim, Insop; Kim, Jin Su

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of patients with breast cancer complain of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy. In this study, we showed that donepezil enhanced memory function and increased brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy using behavioral analysis and positron emission tomography (PET). We found that chemotherapy affected spatial learning ability, reference memory, and working memory and that donepezil improved these cognitive impairments. According to PET analysis, chemotherapy reduced glucose metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and donepezil increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and hippocampus. Reduced glucose metabolism was more prominent after treatment with doxorubicin than cyclophosphamide. Our results demonstrated the neural mechanisms for cognitive impairment after chemotherapy and show that cognition was improved after donepezil intervention using both behavioral and imaging methods. Our results suggested that donepezil can be employed clinically for the treatment of cognitive deficits after chemotherapy. PMID:27556039

  1. PET Evidence of the Effect of Donepezil on Cognitive Performance in an Animal Model of Chemobrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ilhan; Yu, A Ram

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of patients with breast cancer complain of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy. In this study, we showed that donepezil enhanced memory function and increased brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy using behavioral analysis and positron emission tomography (PET). We found that chemotherapy affected spatial learning ability, reference memory, and working memory and that donepezil improved these cognitive impairments. According to PET analysis, chemotherapy reduced glucose metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and donepezil increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and hippocampus. Reduced glucose metabolism was more prominent after treatment with doxorubicin than cyclophosphamide. Our results demonstrated the neural mechanisms for cognitive impairment after chemotherapy and show that cognition was improved after donepezil intervention using both behavioral and imaging methods. Our results suggested that donepezil can be employed clinically for the treatment of cognitive deficits after chemotherapy.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  3. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures

  4. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W., E-mail: wbfisica@gmail.com [Bahia Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology – IFBA, Vitória da Conquista, 45.100-000 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Santos, W.S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Paschoal, C.M.M., E-mail: cinthiam.paschoal@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Vale do Acarau State University – UVA, Sobral 62.040-730 (Brazil); Souza, D.N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  5. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging for evaluation of thyroid physiology and dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Eckerwall, Martin; Skovgaard, Dorthe Charlotte;

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid...... physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small...... animal PET/CT based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34 – 70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands...

  6. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  7. Automatic cardiac gating of small-animal PET from list-mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Nuclear; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Aeroespacial; Cusso, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain). Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a method to obtain automatically the cardiac gating signal in a PET study of rats, by employing the variation with time of the counts in the cardiac region, that can be extracted from list-mode data. In an initial step, the cardiac region is identified in the image space by backward-projecting a small fraction of the acquired data and studying the variation with time of the counts in each voxel inside said region, with frequencies within 2 and 8 Hz. The region obtained corresponds accurately to the left-ventricle of the heart of the rat. In a second step, the lines-of-response (LORs) connected with this region are found by forward-projecting this region. The time variation of the number of counts in these LORs contains the cardiac motion information that we want to extract. This variation of counts with time is band-pass filtered to reduce noise, and the time signal so obtained is used to create the gating signal. The result was compared with a cardiac gating signal obtained from an ECG acquired simultaneously to the PET study. Reconstructed gated images obtained from both gating information are similar. The method proposed demonstrates that valid cardiac gating signals can be obtained for rats from PET list-mode data. (orig.)

  8. Small animal PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression with 124IVDU in liver by the hydrodynamic injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. High level of foreign gene expression in liver can be achieved by a large-volume and high-speed intravenous injection of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA), so called hydrodynamic injection. This study is aimed to evaluate liver specific-gene expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase(HSV1-tk) by hydrodynamic injection and image HSV1-tk expression using 124IVDU-PET. We constructed herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-expressing pDNA (pHSV1-tk) modified from pEGFP-N1. Hydrodynamic injection was performed using 40 μg of plasmid (pEGFP/N1 or pHSV1-tk) in 2 ml of 0.85% saline solution for 20∼22g mice in 5 seconds intravenously. At 1 d post-hydrodynamic injection, biodistribution study was performed at 2 h post-injection of radiolabeled IVDU, fluorescence image was obtained using optical imager and small animal PET image was acquired with 124IVDU at 2 h post-injection. After PET imaging, digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Expression of HSV1-tk and EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR in each liver tissue. In liver of pHSV1-tk and pEGFP/N1 injection groups, 123IVDU uptake was 5.65%ID/g and 0.98%ID/g, respectively. 123IVDU uptake in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group showed 5.7-fold higher than that of pEGFP/N1 injection group (p124IVDU uptake was selectively localized in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group and also checked in DWBA, but showed minimal uptake in liver of pEGFP/N1 injection mice. Hydrodynamic injection was effective to liver-specific delivery of plasmid DNA. Small animal PET image of 124IVDU could be used in the evaluation of noninvasive reporter gene imaging in liver

  9. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (5). ''Development of imaging technology in life sciences''. I. PET radiopharmaceuticals and animal imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes PET radiopharmaceuticals (Rp) for imaging of functions of brain and heart and of tumors as well as PET devices for animals. Nuclides in PET are positron emitters with short half-lives like 15O, 13N, 11C, 18F and 62Cu, and Rp contains the nuclide in its chemical structure. For the brain functional studies in animals and man, regional cerebral blood volume, its flow, energy metabolism, neurotransmission/receptor and others are measured with use of a Rp like, typically, 15O2 gas, H215O/123I-IMP, 15O2 gas/18F-FDG, 11C-methylspiperone and 18F-DDNP (a fluorescent dye binding to amyloids), respectively. (123I is not a positron emitter). Rp for early PET diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is awaited. For the cardiac function, energy metabolism, myocardial blood flow and nerve functions are by 18F-FDG/11C-palmitate, 13N-ammonia, and 11C-GB67 (for alpha-receptor imaging), respectively. For tumor imaging, 18F-FDG is a representative Rp and derivatives of nucleic acids, amino acids and choline are now under investigation. PET devices for experimental animals involve small machines like microPET, planar positron imaging system by Hamamatsu Photonics Co., and those for dynamic positron autoradiography of Rp uptake in the living specimen like tissue slices. PET studies in animals have a potential for the development of new drugs, physiological and pathological analyses and novel treatment of diseases as well as for clinical application. (T.I.)

  10. Enhanced PET resolution by combining pinhole collimation and coincidence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFilippo, Frank P

    2015-10-21

    Spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is limited by detector design and photon non-colinearity. Although dedicated small animal PET scanners using specialized high-resolution detectors have been developed, enhancing the spatial resolution of clinical PET scanners is of interest as a more available alternative. Multi-pinhole 511 keV SPECT is capable of high spatial resolution but requires heavily shielded collimators to avoid significant background counts. A practical approach with clinical PET detectors is to combine multi-pinhole collimation with coincidence detection. In this new hybrid modality, there are three locations associated with each event, namely those of the two detected photons and the pinhole aperture. These three locations over-determine the line of response and provide redundant information that is superior to coincidence detection or pinhole collimation alone. Multi-pinhole collimation provides high resolution and avoids non-colinearity error but is subject to collimator penetration and artifacts from overlapping projections. However the coincidence information, though at lower resolution, is valuable for determining whether the photon passed near a pinhole within the cone acceptance angle and for identifying through which pinhole the photon passed. This information allows most photons penetrating through the collimator to be rejected and avoids overlapping projections. With much improved event rejection, a collimator with minimal shielding may be used, and a lightweight add-on collimator for high resolution imaging is feasible for use with a clinical PET scanner. Monte Carlo simulations were performed of a (18)F hot rods phantom and a 54-pinhole unfocused whole-body mouse collimator with a clinical PET scanner. Based on coincidence information and pinhole geometry, events were accepted or rejected, and pinhole-specific crystal-map projections were generated. Tomographic images then were reconstructed using a conventional pinhole SPECT

  11. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, R. R.; Stolin, A.; Majewski, S.; Proffitt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ~45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (~2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  12. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner

  13. A micro-PET/CT approach using O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine in an experimental animal model of F98 glioma for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, L., E-mail: luca.menichetti@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Petroni, D.; Panetta, D. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Burchielli, S. [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana G. Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Bortolussi, Silva [Dept. Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Matteucci, M. [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Pascali, G.; Del Turco, S. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Altieri, S. [Dept. Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Salvadori, P.A. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The present study focuses on a micro-PET/CT application to be used for experimental Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), which integrates, in the same frame, micro-CT derived anatomy and PET radiotracer distribution. Preliminary results have demonstrated that {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine (FET)/PET allows the identification of the extent of cerebral lesions in F98 tumor bearing rat. Neutron autoradiography and {alpha}-spectrometry on axial tissues slices confirmed the tumor localization and extraction, after the administration of fructose-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Therefore, FET-PET approach can be used to assess the transport, the net influx, and the accumulation of FET, as an aromatic amino acid analog of BPA, in experimental animal model. Coregistered micro-CT images allowed the accurate morphological localization of the radiotracer distribution and its potential use for experimental BNCT.

  14. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeputte, Caroline; Casteels, Cindy; Koole, Michel; Gerits, Anneleen [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); Struys, Tom [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Veghel, Daisy van; Evens, Nele; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Lambrichts, Ivo [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 and [{sup 11}C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB{sub 1} binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB{sub 1} immunohistochemical staining. [{sup 11}C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB{sub 2} revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB{sub 1} {sup +} and CB{sub 2} {sup +} cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB{sub 1}, but not CB{sub 2}, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB{sub 1} signalling as the role of CB{sub 2} seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  15. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB1 and CB2 receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB1 and CB2 microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [18F]MK-9470 and [11C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB1 and CB2. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [18F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB1 binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB1 immunohistochemical staining. [11C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB2 revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB1+ and CB2+ cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB1, but not CB2, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB1 signalling as the role of CB2 seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  16. Probabilistic atlas-based segmentation of combined T1-weighted and DUTE MRI for calculation of head attenuation maps in integrated PET/MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynton, Clare B; Chen, Kevin T; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Gollub, Randy L; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Batchelor, Tracy T; Catana, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    We present a new MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) approach for integrated PET/MRI systems that combines both segmentation- and atlas-based methods by incorporating dual-echo ultra-short echo-time (DUTE) and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and a probabilistic atlas. Segmented atlases were constructed from CT training data using a leave-one-out framework and combined with T1w, DUTE, and CT data to train a classifier that computes the probability of air/soft tissue/bone at each voxel. This classifier was applied to segment the MRI of the subject of interest and attenuation maps (μ-maps) were generated by assigning specific linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) to each tissue class. The μ-maps generated with this "Atlas-T1w-DUTE" approach were compared to those obtained from DUTE data using a previously proposed method. For validation of the segmentation results, segmented CT μ-maps were considered to the "silver standard"; the segmentation accuracy was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively through calculation of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Relative change (RC) maps between the CT and MRI-based attenuation corrected PET volumes were also calculated for a global voxel-wise assessment of the reconstruction results. The μ-maps obtained using the Atlas-T1w-DUTE classifier agreed well with those derived from CT; the mean DSCs for the Atlas-T1w-DUTE-based μ-maps across all subjects were higher than those for DUTE-based μ-maps; the atlas-based μ-maps also showed a lower percentage of misclassified voxels across all subjects. RC maps from the atlas-based technique also demonstrated improvement in the PET data compared to the DUTE method, both globally as well as regionally. PMID:24753982

  17. Probabilistic atlas-based segmentation of combined T1-weighted and DUTE MRI for calculation of head attenuation maps in integrated PET/MRI scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Poynton, Clare B.; Chen, Kevin T; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Gollub, Randy L.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Catana, Ciprian

    2014-01-01

    We present a new MRI-based attenuation correction (AC) approach for integrated PET/MRI systems that combines both segmentation- and atlas-based methods by incorporating dual-echo ultra-short echo-time (DUTE) and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and a probabilistic atlas. Segmented atlases were constructed from CT training data using a leave-one-out framework and combined with T1w, DUTE, and CT data to train a classifier that computes the probability of air/soft tissue/bone at each voxel. This class...

  18. Software Solutions for Nuclear Imaging Systems in Cardiology, Small Animal Research and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Valastyán, Iván

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity for observing physiological processes makes nuclear imaging an important tool in medical diagnostics. Different types of nuclear imaging modalities, with emphasis on the software components and image reconstructions, are presented in this thesis:  the Cardiotom for myocardial heart studies at the Karolinska University Hospital, the small animal Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) scanners for research and the SPECT, PET, spiral CT and Cardiotom demonstrators for the Royal Instit...

  19. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El-Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small animal image-based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34–70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information is essential for quantitative thyroid imaging and accurate thyroid absorbed dose calculation.

  20. A new animal model for the imaging of melanoma: correlation of FDG PET with clinical outcome, macroscopic aspect and histological classification in Melanoblastoma-bearing Libechov Minipigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Melanoblastoma-bearing Libechov Minipigs (MeLiM) as an animal model of melanoma for in vivo imaging. Serial whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scans were conducted on five MeLiM. In order to explore different clinical stages of the tumoural lesions, each animal was scanned two to four times, at intervals of 30-155 days. PET images were analysed by a semiquantitative method based on the tumour to muscle metabolic ratio. Histology was performed on biopsies taken between or after the scans and the histological grading of the tumours was compared with the FDG uptake. The overall sensitivity of FDG PET for the detection of cutaneous melanoma was 75%; 62.5% of involved lymph nodes were positive. Sensitivity was better for tumours with vertical growth than for flat lesions. FDG PET did not detect tumours with epidermal involvement only, nor did it detect small metastatic foci. The metabolic ratio was correlated with the evolution of the melanoma. FDG PET is effective in the staging of cutaneous melanoma and the follow-up of tumoural extension and regression in Melanoblastoma-bearing Libechov Minipigs. The results obtained in this animal model correlate well with those described in human melanoma. Accordingly, this model may be useful in testing new tracers specific for melanoma and in helping to detect molecules expressed early during tumoural regression. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of anesthesia effects on [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in mouse brain and heart using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi E-mail: htoyama@fujita-hu.ac.jp; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Vines, Douglass C.; Seneca, Nicholas M.; Modell, Kendra J.; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Innis, Robert B

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluates effects of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) uptake in mouse brain and heart to establish the basic conditions of small animal PET imaging. Prior to FDG injection, 12 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane gas; 11 mice were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a ketamine/xylazine mixture; and 11 mice were awake. In isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine conditions, FDG brain uptake (%ID/g) was significantly lower than in controls. Conversely, in the isoflurane condition, %ID/g in heart was significantly higher than in controls, whereas heart uptake in ketamine/xylazine mice was significantly lower. Results suggest that anesthesia impedes FDG uptake in mouse brain and affects FDG uptake in heart; however, the effects in the brain and heart differ depending on the type of anesthesia used.

  2. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [11C]methamphetamine ([11C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [11C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [11C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [11C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [11C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  3. Design optimization of the PMT-ClearPET prototypes based on simulation studies with GEANT 3

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrichs, U.; Pietrzyk, U; Ziemons, K.

    2003-01-01

    Within the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC), four centers are developing second generation high performance small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for different kinds of animals and medical applications. The first prototypes are photomultiplier tube (PMT)-based systems including depth of interaction (DOI) detection by using a phoswich layer of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) and lutetium yttrium aluminum perovskite (LuYAP). The aim of these simulation studies is to optimize...

  4. A complete implementation of list-mode reconstruction for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomography reconstruction algorithm is one of the key components of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, most PET scanners use statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms from data in sinograms currently. However tomography reconstruction using list-mode data has many unique advantages, in recent years great attention has been paid to it, being in the process of rapid development and improvement. In this paper, using experimental data of small animal PET scanner Eplus-166, exploiting ordinary subsidized list-mode EM (S-LMEM) algorithm and orthogonal distance-based ray-tracer (OD-RT), we eventually achieve list-mode tomography reconstruction. System response matrix (SRM), which establishes mapping relationship between the image and the projection space, is one key problem in iterative reconstruction algorithm. OD-RT is based on an optimization Siddon's algorithm to calculate the SRM, generating line-of-response (LOR) which is approximately Gaussian-shaped, achieving better modeling of detector response function (DRF). The results demonstrate that image resolution recovery achieves the inherent properties of the scanner and that on-the-fly ray-tracer for real-time calculation of system response matrix is feasible for dynamic reconstruction. Meanwhile, the optimal parameters for calculating SRM are found by experiments. (authors)

  5. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner

  6. Another Breed of “Service” Animals: STARS Study Findings about Pet Ownership and Recovery from Serious Mental Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Saedi, Goal Auzeen; Green, Carla A.

    2009-01-01

    This study elucidates the role of pets in recovery processes among adults with serious mental illness. Data derive from interviews with 177 HMO members with serious mental illness (52.2% women, average age 48.8). Interviews and questionnaires addressed factors affecting recovery processes and included questions about pet ownership. Data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory method to identify the roles pets play in the recovery process. Primary themes indicate pets assist individuals...

  7. Impact of target-to-background ratio, target size, emission scan duration, and activity on physical figures of merit for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our work is to describe the way in which physical figures of merit such as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) behave when varying acquisition parameters such as emission scan duration (ESD) or activity at the start of acquisition (Aacq) that in clinical practice can be selected by the user, or object properties such as target dimensions or target-to-background (T/B) ratio, which depend uniquely on the intrinsic characteristics of the object being imaged. Figures of merit, used to characterize image quality and quantitative accuracy for a 3D-LSO based PET/CT scanner, were studied as a function of ESD and Aacq for different target sizes and T/B ratios using a multivariate approach in a wide range of conditions approaching the ones that can be encountered in clinical practice. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an IEC phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The average scatter fraction (SF) of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean SF measured on patients with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of micro-hollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and 18F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL, positioned on the linear portion of the phantom's NECR curve, well below peak NECR of 61.2 kcps that is reached at 31.8 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 1, 2, 3, and 4 min/bed. With T/B ratios of 3.6, 10.3, and 22.5, the 13.0, 8.1, and 6.5 mm spheres were detectable for the whole ranges of background activity concentration and ESD, respectively. The ESD resulted as the most significant

  8. Kinetics of potassium-38 in the heart intercompared by means of a positron-electron transmutation (PET) tomograph and a rectilinear high-energy gamma (HEG) scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium-38 is in a 7.6-min positron and gamma emitter that is generated by the authors in 15-20mCi lots by bombarding NaCl with 15-MeV 4He ions from their biomedical cyclotron. In saline a syringe within the 'atomic rabbit', 38K is propelled 170m in 40s within a pneumatic tube to the place of usage. Results are intercompared of imaging and dynamic studies with 38K, which were made with the first commercial version (PCT-4200) of the Massachusetts General Hospital 'positron camera' and with the High-Energy Gamma (HEG) rectilinear scanner. Two-dimensional tomograms, made with the PCT-4200 in a square area 31cm on a side, revealed high accumulations of 38K in the heart, liver and gut of human volunteers; but insufficient counts resulted at the 38K dosages that were used to make 3-dimensional, transaxial tomograms of 1.0-cm-thick 'slices', at 1.4-cm sequential spacing. The much larger area imaged with the HEG showed small 38K localizations in the lower head and central neck regions; and large amounts in the heart, liver and gut on the left side of the abdomen. The 38K concentrations in the heart and liver regions, made with the PCT-4200 operated in the dynamic mode, showed maximum uptake about 30-40 min after IV injection. Averaged late clearance half-times from the heart regions of four volunteers varied between 2.6+-0.4 and 7.8+-1.5h. Advantages are expected from introducing a multiple-ring, high-efficiency, detector system with which to make tomographic slices quantitatively displaying 3-dimensional concentrations of 11C, 13N, 15O, 30P or 38K in organs or in cancers. (author)

  9. I-124 labeled recombinant human annexin V produced by E. coli for apoptosis image using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. H.; Lee, I. S.; Woo, S. K.; Woo, G. S.; Chung, W. S.; Kang, J. H.; Cheon, G. J.; Choi, C. W.; Urn, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Annexin V labeled with radioisotope and optical probe has been used to detect apoptosis. To evaluate annexin V as a multimodal apoptosis imaging agent, large-scale preparation of Annexin V (AV) is preliminary. The aim of this study is to produce and purify recombinant human Annexin V (rh-AV) in E. coli system and radiolabeled rh-AV evaluate in vitro and in vivo apoptosis model system. Annexin V cDNA was obtained from human placenta and rh-AV cloning vector used fusion E. coli vector. Expression vector was based on the E. coli pET system. Induction of rh-AV was used Isopropyl--D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and purification was used TALON metal affinity resin and T7 - Taq. Purification yield confirmed through SDS-PAGE. In camptothecin (0, 50, 100 uM) induced Jurkat T cell apoptosis model, AV-PI flow cytometry analysis and in vitro binding assay of I-124 labeled rh - AV were performed and compared. Small animal PET images of I-124 labeled rh-AV were obtained in Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model. Optimum expression condition was at 37, 250 rpm, 8 hr in 2X YT media including 1mM IPTG, Through two step purification process, rh-AV confirmed about 35 Kd single band by SDS-PAGE. As camptothecin concentration increasing, annexin V-FITC positive % increased in flow cytometry analysis and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV also increased. Annexin V-FITC positive % was correlated with and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV (R{sup 2}=0.99). In Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model, I-124 labeled rh-AV was selectively localized in liver region in PET image. Recombinant Human annexin V was produced by E. coli system and purified using two step affinity chromatography. Radiolabeled rh-AV was useful for the evaluation of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo model. Recombinant human annexin V could be used as apoptosis imaging agent with various radiolabel and optical probe.

  10. I-124 labeled recombinant human annexin V produced by E. coli for apoptosis image using small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annexin V labeled with radioisotope and optical probe has been used to detect apoptosis. To evaluate annexin V as a multimodal apoptosis imaging agent, large-scale preparation of Annexin V (AV) is preliminary. The aim of this study is to produce and purify recombinant human Annexin V (rh-AV) in E. coli system and radiolabeled rh-AV evaluate in vitro and in vivo apoptosis model system. Annexin V cDNA was obtained from human placenta and rh-AV cloning vector used fusion E. coli vector. Expression vector was based on the E. coli pET system. Induction of rh-AV was used Isopropyl--D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and purification was used TALON metal affinity resin and T7 - Taq. Purification yield confirmed through SDS-PAGE. In camptothecin (0, 50, 100 uM) induced Jurkat T cell apoptosis model, AV-PI flow cytometry analysis and in vitro binding assay of I-124 labeled rh - AV were performed and compared. Small animal PET images of I-124 labeled rh-AV were obtained in Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model. Optimum expression condition was at 37, 250 rpm, 8 hr in 2X YT media including 1mM IPTG, Through two step purification process, rh-AV confirmed about 35 Kd single band by SDS-PAGE. As camptothecin concentration increasing, annexin V-FITC positive % increased in flow cytometry analysis and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV also increased. Annexin V-FITC positive % was correlated with and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV (R2=0.99). In Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model, I-124 labeled rh-AV was selectively localized in liver region in PET image. Recombinant Human annexin V was produced by E. coli system and purified using two step affinity chromatography. Radiolabeled rh-AV was useful for the evaluation of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo model. Recombinant human annexin V could be used as apoptosis imaging agent with various radiolabel and optical probe

  11. Scanner sipping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 4th routine inspection of Biblis A and B, the new method of 'scanner sipping' - a modified 'wet sipping' technique - has been applied for the first time. The curve of activity release from a fuel element into the water of the sipping box is continuously recorded as a function of temperature. Information on the leaktightness of the fuel element is obtained from the increase with temperature of the activity concentration of selected nuclides. The method gives more accurate information than the common method within a shorter period of time; it helps to distinguish between defects and contamination and, with a 30% shorter time required for the measurements, it helps to save personnel costs. (orig./HP)

  12. Animal Companions: Fostering Children's Effort-Making by Nurturing Virtual Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Liao, Calvin; Chien, Tzu-Chao; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2011-01-01

    Virtual character is a significant application in the research field of technology-enhanced learning. In this study, the concept of animal companions, "non-smart" virtual characters, is proposed as a way to encourage students to promote effort-making learning behaviours. The two underpinning design rationales are first discussed followed by the…

  13. Development of a large-area monolithic 4x4 MPPC array for a future PET scanner employing pixelized Ce:LYSO and Pr:LuAG crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a new type of large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of a 4x4 matrix of 3x3 mm2 pixels. Each pixel comprises 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) that achieve an average gain of 9.68x105 at 71.9 V at 0 oC with variations of only ±7.2% over 4x4 pixels. Excellent uniformity was also obtained for photon detection efficiencies (PDE) of ±6.4%, whilst dark count rates at the single photoelectron (1 p.e.) level amounted to ≅2Mcps/pixel, measured at 0 oC. As the first step toward using the device in scintillation photon detectors, we fabricated a prototype gamma-ray camera consisting of an MPPC array optically coupled with a scintillator matrix, namely a 4x4 array of 3x3 x10 mm3 crystals. Specifically, we tested the performance with Ce-doped (Lu, Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO), Pr-doped Lu3Al5O12 (Pr:LuAG) and 'surface coated' Pr:LuAG (Pr:LuAG (WLS)) matrices whereby the emission peak of Pr:LuAG was shifted from 310 to 420 nm via a wavelength shifter (WLS). Average energy resolutions of 13.83%, 14.70% and 13.96% (FWHM) were obtained for 662 keV gamma-rays, as measured at 0 oC with Ce:LYSO, Pr:LuAG and Pr:LuAG (WLS) scintillator matrices, respectively. We confirmed that the effective PDE for Pr:LuAG (WLS) had improved by more than 30% compared to original, non-coated Pr:LuAG matrix. These results suggest that a large-area monolithic MPPC array developed here could be promising for future medical imaging, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  14. PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article provides an overview of the current literature data regarding the value of PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer. Most widely used PET tracers for prostate cancer imaging are 11C-acetate and 11C- or 18F-labeled choline. Available literature data on the performance of PET and PET/CT in the detection of the primary malignancy as well as local or distant metastases are presented and discussed. In addition, our own preliminary results regarding the diagnostic efficacy of 11C-choline PET and PET/CT in 43 patients with suspected prostate cancer are provided. The prevalence of prostate cancer in this patient sample was 55.8%. PET and PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 88% with a specificity of 63% in the detection of the primary prostate cancer. The sensitivity in the detection of metastatic spread was 77% and no false-positives were found. The possible value and limitations of combined PET/CT systems when compared to stand alone PET scanners are discussed. PET and PET/CT is at present the single imaging modality providing functional information not only regarding the primary malignancy but also its metastases. This unique feature distinguishes PET from MRI complemented with magnetic resonance spectroscopy - a competing procedure. Our own results as well as the still limited literature data suggest, that PET and PET/CT may prove to be useful methods for imaging of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  15. Malassezia spp. dan Peranannya sebagai Penyebab Dermatitis pada Hewan Peliharaan (MALASSEZIA SPP AND ITS ROLE AS THE CAUSAL AGENT OF DERMATITIS IN PET ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Nuri Adiyati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia is dimorphic yeast found normally in the animal healthy skin. Malassezia can causehealth problem in pet animals, such as dogs, cats, and other domestic animals. Varies according itsvirulence, Malassezia can cause skin changes characterized by severe pruritus, yellowish erythema andscab, greasy skin, bad odor with hyperpigmentation and lichenification in the face, paws, and neck bottom,as well as belly. Laboratory diagnosis can be performed either by microscopic examination of nativepreparations, or molecular biology. Treatment of Malassezia’s infection can still be made using someantifungals currently available. Malassezia pachydermatitis infection has been known as zoonoticpotential.

  16. From wild animals to domestic pets, an evolutionary view of domestication

    OpenAIRE

    Driscoll, Carlos A; Macdonald, David W.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial selection is the selection of advantageous natural variation for human ends and is the mechanism by which most domestic species evolved. Most domesticates have their origin in one of a few historic centers of domestication as farm animals. Two notable exceptions are cats and dogs. Wolf domestication was initiated late in the Mesolithic when humans were nomadic hunter-gatherers. Those wolves less afraid of humans scavenged nomadic hunting camps and over time developed utility, initi...

  17. Initial results from a PET/planar small animal imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Stefan; Vaquero, Juan José; Aloj, L; Seidel, Jürgen; Jagoda, E.; Gandler, William R.; Eckelman, W. C.; Green, Michael V.

    1999-01-01

    A pair of stationary, opposed scintillation detectors in time coincidence is being used to create planar projection or tomographic images of small animals injected with positronemitting radiotracers. The detectors are comprised of arrays of individual crystals of bismuth germanate coupled to position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The system uses FERA (LeCroy Research Systems) charge-sensitive ADCs and a low cost digital YO board as a E R A bus-to-host bridge. In pro...

  18. The influence of the image reconstruction in relative quantification in SPECT/PET/CT animal; A influencia da reconstrucao da imagem na quantificacao relativa em SPECT/PET/CT animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Sarah; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: sarahsoriano@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ),Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Sergio; Barboza, Thiago [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial resolution of the equipment SPECT/PET/CT animal to different reconstruction methods and the influence of this parameter in the mouse dosimetry C57BL6, aimed at development of new radiopharmaceuticals for use in humans. CT and SPECT images were obtained from a simulator composed of four spheres of different diameters (d), which simulate captating lesions by the equipment FLEX ™ Triumph ™ Pre-Clinical Imaging System used for preclinical studies in the Hospital Universitario (HU/UFRJ). In order to simulate a real study, the total volume of the simulator (body) was filled with a solution of {sup 99m}Tc diluted in water and the spheres were filled with concentrations four time higher than the body of the simulator. From the gross SPECT images it was used filtered backprojection method (FBP) with application of different filters: Hamming, Hann and Ramp, ranging the cutoff frequencies. The resolution of the equipment found in the study was 9.3 to 9.4 mm, very below the value provided by the manufacturer of 1.6mm. Thus, the protocol for mice can be optimized as being the FBP reconstruction method of Hamming filter, cutoff of 0.5 to yield a resolution from 9.3 to 9.4mm. This value indicates that captating regions of diameter below 9.3 mm are not properly quantified.

  19. Determination of dietary starch in animal feeds and pet food by an enzymatic-colorimetric method: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Starch, glycogen, maltooligosaccharides, and other α-1,4- and α-1,6-linked glucose carbohydrates, exclusive of resistant starch, are collectively termed "dietary starch". This nutritionally important fraction is increasingly measured for use in diet formulation for animals as it can have positive or negative effects on animal performance and health by affecting energy supply, glycemic index, and formation of fermentation products by gut microbes. AOAC Method 920.40 that was used for measuring dietary starch in animal feeds was invalidated due to discontinued production of a required enzyme. As a replacement, an enzymatic-colorimetric starch assay developed in 1997 that had advantages in ease of sample handling and accuracy compared to other methods was considered. The assay was further modified to improve utilization of laboratory resources and reduce time required for the assay. The assay is quasi-empirical: glucose is the analyte detected, but its release is determined by run conditions and specification of enzymes. The modified assay was tested in an AOAC collaborative study to evaluate its accuracy and reliability for determination of dietary starch in animal feedstuffs and pet foods. In the assay, samples are incubated in screw cap tubes with thermostable α-amylase in pH 5.0 sodium acetate buffer for 1 h at 100°C with periodic mixing to gelatinize and partially hydrolyze α-glucan. Amyloglucosidase is added, and the reaction mixture is incubated at 50°C for 2 h and mixed once. After subsequent addition of water, mixing, clarification, and dilution as needed, free + enzymatically released glucose are measured. Values from a separate determination of free glucose are subtracted to give values for enzymatically released glucose. Dietary starch equals enzymatically released glucose multiplied by 162/180 (or 0.9) divided by the weight of the as received sample. Fifteen laboratories that represented feed company, regulatory, research, and commercial feed

  20. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Amyloid-Beta Plaques with [11C]PiB and Its Multi-Modal Validation in an APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Manook, André; Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Willuweit, Antje; Platzer, Stefan; Reder, Sybille; Voss, Andreas; Huisman, Marc; Settles, Markus; Neff, Frauke; Velden, Joachim; Schoor, Michael; von der Kammer, Heinz; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Henriksen, Gjermund

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloid-β plaque (Aβ) burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain...

  1. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm{sup 3} uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (2 mm){sup 3} in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (9 mm){sup 3}. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm){sup 3} even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm){sup 3} cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial

  2. Assessment of MR-compatibility of SiPM PET insert using short optical fiber bundles for small animal research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. G.; Hong, S. J.; Ko, G. B.; Yoon, H. S.; Song, I. C.; Rhee, J. T.; Lee, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide new perspectives in human disease research because of their complementary in-vivo imaging techniques. Previously, we have developed an MR-compatible PET insert based on optical fibers using silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). However when echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence was performed, signal intensity was slowly decreased by -0.9% over the 5.5 minutes and significant geometrical distortion was observed as the PET insert was installed inside an MRI bore, indicating that the PET electronics and its shielding boxes might have been too close to an MR imaging object. In this paper, optical fiber bundles with a length of 54 mm instead of 31 mm were employed to minimize PET interference on MR images. Furthermore, the LYSO crystals with a size of 1.5 × 1.5 × 7.0 mm3 were used instead of 2.47 × 2.74 × 20.0 mm3 for preclinical PET/MR applications. To improve the MR image quality, two receive-only loop coils were used. The effects of the PET insert on the SNR of the MR image either for morphological or advanced MR pulse sequences such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), functional MRI (fMRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were investigated. The quantitative MR compatibility such as B0 and B1 field homogeneity without PET, with `PET OFF', and with `PET ON' was also evaluated. In conclusion, B0 maps were not affected by the proposed PET insert whereas B1 maps were significantly affected by the PET insert. The advanced MRI sequences such as DWI, EPI, and MRS can be performed without a significant MR image quality degradation.

  3. Assessment of MR-compatibility of SiPM PET insert using short optical fiber bundles for small animal research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide new perspectives in human disease research because of their complementary in-vivo imaging techniques. Previously, we have developed an MR-compatible PET insert based on optical fibers using silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). However when echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence was performed, signal intensity was slowly decreased by −0.9% over the 5.5 minutes and significant geometrical distortion was observed as the PET insert was installed inside an MRI bore, indicating that the PET electronics and its shielding boxes might have been too close to an MR imaging object. In this paper, optical fiber bundles with a length of 54 mm instead of 31 mm were employed to minimize PET interference on MR images. Furthermore, the LYSO crystals with a size of 1.5 × 1.5 × 7.0 mm3 were used instead of 2.47 × 2.74 × 20.0 mm3 for preclinical PET/MR applications. To improve the MR image quality, two receive-only loop coils were used. The effects of the PET insert on the SNR of the MR image either for morphological or advanced MR pulse sequences such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), functional MRI (fMRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were investigated. The quantitative MR compatibility such as B0 and B1 field homogeneity without PET, with 'PET OFF', and with 'PET ON' was also evaluated. In conclusion, B0 maps were not affected by the proposed PET insert whereas B1 maps were significantly affected by the PET insert. The advanced MRI sequences such as DWI, EPI, and MRS can be performed without a significant MR image quality degradation

  4. Small animal PET imaging of TAG-72 expressing tumor using 68Ga-NOTA-3E8 Fab radioimmunoconjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein TAG-72 is express ed in the majority of human adenocarcinomas but is rarely expressed in most normal tissues, which makes it a potential target for the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of human cancer. 3E8 is anti-TAG-72 humanized antibody. Antibody fragments have some advantages such as improved pharmacokinetics and reduced immunogenicity compared to whole IgG. 68Ga is a short-lived positron emitter (t1/268 min; β+, 88%) that is produced, independent from a cyclotron, by a 68Ge/68Ga generator. The parent nuclide 68Ge has a long half-life (270.8 day), allowing its use as a generator for more than 1 year. A 68Ga is labeled with antibodies through bifunctional chelators, which allows possible kit formulation and which wide availability of the nuclear imaging agents. In this study, Fab fragment of anti-TAG-72 humanized Ab (3E8) was conjugated with 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and radiolabeled with 68Ga and acquire small animal PET image

  5. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, W., E-mail: gaowu@nwpu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Liu, H., E-mail: newhui.cn@gmail.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Gan, B., E-mail: shadow524@163.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Hu, Y., E-mail: Yann.Hu@ires.in2p3.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, IN2P3/CNRS/UDS, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e{sup −} to 180,000e{sup −}, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e{sup −} at zero farad plus 5.4 e{sup −} per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  6. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatziioannou, A.; Qi, J.; Moore, A.; Annala, A.; Nguyen, K.; Leahy, R.M.; Cherry, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior.

  7. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior

  8. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  9. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e− to 180,000e−, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e− at zero farad plus 5.4 e− per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel

  10. Performance of three-photon PET imaging: Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacperski, Krzysztof; Spyrou, Nicholas M.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently introduced the idea of making use of three-photon positron annihilations in positron emission tomography. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the three-gamma imaging in PET are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical computations. Two typical configurations of human and small animal scanners are considered. Three-photon imaging requires high-energy resolution detectors. Parameters currently attainable by CdZnTe semiconductor detectors, the technology of choice for the future development of radiation imaging, are assumed. Spatial resolution is calculated as a function of detector energy resolution and size, position in the field of view, scanner size and the energies of the three-gamma annihilation photons. Possible ways to improve the spatial resolution obtained for nominal parameters, 1.5 cm and 3.2 mm FWHM for human and small animal scanners, respectively, are indicated. Counting rates of true and random three-photon events for typical human and small animal scanning configurations are assessed. A simple formula for minimum size of lesions detectable in the three-gamma based images is derived. Depending on the contrast and total number of registered counts, lesions of a few mm size for human and sub mm for small animal scanners can be detected.

  11. Another breed of "service" animals: STARS study findings about pet ownership and recovery from serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Saedi, Goal Auzeen; Green, Carla A

    2009-07-01

    This study elucidates the role of pets in recovery processes among adults with serious mental illness. Data derive from interviews with 177 HMO members with serious mental illness (52.2% women, average age 48.8 years) in the Study of Transitions and Recovery Strategies (STARS). Interviews and questionnaires addressed factors affecting recovery processes and included questions about pet ownership. Data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory method to identify the roles pets play in the recovery process. Primary themes indicate pets assist individuals in recovery from serious mental illness by (a) providing empathy and "therapy"; (b) providing connections that can assist in redeveloping social avenues; (c) serving as "family" in the absence of or in addition to human family members; and (d) supporting self-efficacy and strengthening a sense of empowerment. Pets appear to provide more benefits than merely companionship. Participants' reports of pet-related contributions to their well-being provide impetus to conduct more formal research on the mechanisms by which pets contribute to recovery and to develop pet-based interventions. PMID:19839680

  12. Statistical parametric maps of 18F-FDG PET and 3-D autoradiography in the rat brain: a cross-validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although specific positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have been developed for small animals, spatial resolution remains one of the most critical technical limitations, particularly in the evaluation of the rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability of voxel-based statistical analysis (Statistical Parametric Mapping, SPM) applied to 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images of the rat brain, acquired on a small animal PET not specifically designed for rodents. The gold standard for the validation of the PET results was the autoradiography of the same animals acquired under the same physiological conditions, reconstructed as a 3-D volume and analysed using SPM. Eleven rats were studied under two different conditions: conscious or under inhalatory anaesthesia during 18F-FDG uptake. All animals were studied in vivo under both conditions in a dedicated small animal Philips MOSAIC PET scanner and magnetic resonance images were obtained for subsequent spatial processing. Then, rats were randomly assigned to a conscious or anaesthetized group for postmortem autoradiography, and slices from each animal were aligned and stacked to create a 3-D autoradiographic volume. Finally, differences in 18F-FDG uptake between conscious and anaesthetized states were assessed from PET and autoradiography data by SPM analysis and results were compared. SPM results of PET and 3-D autoradiography are in good agreement and led to the detection of consistent cortical differences between the conscious and anaesthetized groups, particularly in the bilateral somatosensory cortices. However, SPM analysis of 3-D autoradiography also highlighted differences in the thalamus that were not detected with PET. This study demonstrates that any difference detected with SPM analysis of MOSAIC PET images of rat brain is detected also by the gold standard autoradiographic technique, confirming that this methodology provides reliable results, although partial volume

  13. Statistical parametric maps of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 3-D autoradiography in the rat brain: a cross-validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Elena; Marti-Climent, Josep M. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Collantes, Maria; Molinet, Francisco [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) and Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Small Animal Imaging Research Unit, Pamplona (Spain); Delgado, Mercedes; Garcia-Garcia, Luis; Pozo, Miguel A. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Brain Mapping Unit, Madrid (Spain); Juri, Carlos [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Department of Neurology, Santiago (Chile); Fernandez-Valle, Maria E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, MRI Research Center, Madrid (Spain); Gago, Belen [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Obeso, Jose A. [Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), Movement Disorders Group, Neurosciences Division, Pamplona (Spain); Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Pamplona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red sobre Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED), Pamplona (Spain); Penuelas, Ivan [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA) and Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Small Animal Imaging Research Unit, Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Although specific positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have been developed for small animals, spatial resolution remains one of the most critical technical limitations, particularly in the evaluation of the rodent brain. The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability of voxel-based statistical analysis (Statistical Parametric Mapping, SPM) applied to {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images of the rat brain, acquired on a small animal PET not specifically designed for rodents. The gold standard for the validation of the PET results was the autoradiography of the same animals acquired under the same physiological conditions, reconstructed as a 3-D volume and analysed using SPM. Eleven rats were studied under two different conditions: conscious or under inhalatory anaesthesia during {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. All animals were studied in vivo under both conditions in a dedicated small animal Philips MOSAIC PET scanner and magnetic resonance images were obtained for subsequent spatial processing. Then, rats were randomly assigned to a conscious or anaesthetized group for postmortem autoradiography, and slices from each animal were aligned and stacked to create a 3-D autoradiographic volume. Finally, differences in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake between conscious and anaesthetized states were assessed from PET and autoradiography data by SPM analysis and results were compared. SPM results of PET and 3-D autoradiography are in good agreement and led to the detection of consistent cortical differences between the conscious and anaesthetized groups, particularly in the bilateral somatosensory cortices. However, SPM analysis of 3-D autoradiography also highlighted differences in the thalamus that were not detected with PET. This study demonstrates that any difference detected with SPM analysis of MOSAIC PET images of rat brain is detected also by the gold standard autoradiographic technique, confirming that this methodology provides reliable results, although

  14. Analytical Method for Sugar Profile in Pet Food and Animal Feeds by High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography with Pulsed Amperometric Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, David J; Anderson, Phillip; Berg, Daniel P

    2016-03-01

    There is a need for a standardized, accurate, rugged, and consistent method to measure for sugars in pet foods and animal feeds. Many traditional standard sugar methods exist for other matrixes, but when applied in collaborative studies there was poor agreement and sources of error identified with those standard methods. The advancement in technology over the years has given us the ability to improve on these standard methods of analysis. A method is described here that addresses these common issues and was subjected to a single-laboratory validation to assess performance on a wide variety of pet foods and animal feeds. Of key importance to the method performance is the sample preparation before extraction, type of extraction solvent, postextraction cleanup, and, finally, optimized chromatography using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The results obtained from the validation demonstrate how typical issues seen with these matrixes can influence performance of sugar analysis. The results also demonstrate that this method is fit-for-purpose and can meet the challenges of sugar analysis in pet food and animal feeds to lay the foundation for a standardized method of analysis. PMID:26952902

  15. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  16. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  17. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV–140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  19. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  20. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  1. Design and performance evaluation of a coplanar multimodality scanner for rodent imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, E; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; Tapias, G; Abella, M; Rodriguez-Ruano, A; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Espana, S [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Ortuno, J E [Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza (Spain); Udias, A [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Fuenlabrada (Spain)], E-mail: elage@mce.hggm.es

    2009-09-21

    This work reports on the development and performance evaluation of the VrPET/CT, a new multimodality scanner with coplanar geometry for in vivo rodent imaging. The scanner design is based on a partial-ring PET system and a small-animal CT assembled on a rotatory gantry without axial displacement between the geometric centers of both fields of view (FOV). We report on the PET system performance based on the NEMA NU-4 protocol; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. The accuracy of inter-modality alignment and the imaging capability of the whole system are also evaluated on phantom and animal studies. Tangential spatial resolution of PET images ranged between 1.56 mm at the center of the FOV and 2.46 at a radial offset of 3.5 cm. The radial resolution varies from 1.48 mm to 1.88 mm, and the axial resolution from 2.34 mm to 3.38 mm for the same positions. The energy resolution was 16.5% on average for the entire system. The absolute coincidence sensitivity is 2.2% for a 100-700 keV energy window with a 3.8 ns coincident window. The scatter fraction values for the same settings were 11.45% for a mouse-sized phantom and 23.26% for a rat-sized phantom. The peak noise equivalent count rates were also evaluated for those phantoms obtaining 70.8 kcps at 0.66 MBq/cc and 31.5 kcps at 0.11 MBq/cc, respectively. The accuracy of inter-modality alignment is below half the PET resolution, and the image quality of biological specimens agrees with measured performance parameters. The assessment presented in this study shows that the VrPET/CT system is a good performance small-animal imager, while the cost derived from a partial ring detection system is substantially reduced as compared with a full-ring PET tomograph.

  2. Can hypoxia-PET map hypoxic cell density heterogeneity accurately in an animal tumor model at a clinically obtainable image contrast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: PET allows non-invasive mapping of tumor hypoxia, but the combination of low resolution, slow tracer adduct-formation and slow clearance of unbound tracer remains problematic. Using a murine tumor with a hypoxic fraction within the clinical range and a tracer post-injection sampling time that results in clinically obtainable tumor-to-reference tissue activity ratios, we have analyzed to what extent inherent limitations actually compromise the validity of PET-generated hypoxia maps. Materials and methods: Mice bearing SCCVII tumors were injected with the PET hypoxia-marker fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA), and the immunologically detectable hypoxia marker, pimonidazole. Tumors and reference tissue (muscle, blood) were harvested 0.5, 2 and 4 h after FAZA administration. Tumors were analyzed for global (well counter) and regional (autoradiography) tracer distribution and compared to pimonidazole as visualized using immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Hypoxic fraction as measured by pimonidazole staining ranged from 0.09 to 0.32. FAZA tumor to reference tissue ratios were close to unity 0.5 h post-injection but reached values of 2 and 6 when tracer distribution time was prolonged to 2 and 4 h, respectively. A fine-scale pixel-by-pixel comparison of autoradiograms and immunofluorescence images revealed a clear spatial link between FAZA and pimonidazole-adduct signal intensities at 2 h and later. Furthermore, when using a pixel size that mimics the resolution in PET, an excellent correlation between pixel FAZA mean intensity and density of hypoxic cells was observed already at 2 h post-injection. Conclusions: Despite inherent weaknesses, PET-hypoxia imaging is able to generate quantitative tumor maps that accurately reflect the underlying microscopic reality (i.e., hypoxic cell density) in an animal model with a clinical realistic image contrast.

  3. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.; Udías, J. M.

    2006-09-01

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution.

  4. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution

  5. FIRST: Fast Iterative Reconstruction Software for (PET) tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J L [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital GU Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); UdIas, J M [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2006-09-21

    Small animal PET scanners require high spatial resolution and good sensitivity. To reconstruct high-resolution images in 3D-PET, iterative methods, such as OSEM, are superior to analytical reconstruction algorithms, although their high computational cost is still a serious drawback. The higher performance of modern computers could make iterative image reconstruction fast enough to be viable, provided we are able to deal with the large number of probability coefficients for the system response matrix in high-resolution PET scanners, which is a difficult task that prevents the algorithms from reaching peak computing performance. Considering all possible axial and in-plane symmetries, as well as certain quasi-symmetries, we have been able to reduce the memory requirements to store the system response matrix (SRM) well below 1 GB, which allows us to keep the whole response matrix of the system inside RAM of ordinary industry-standard computers, so that the reconstruction algorithm can achieve near peak performance. The elements of the SRM are stored as cubic spline profiles and matched to voxel size during reconstruction. In this way, the advantages of 'on-the-fly' calculation and of fully stored SRM are combined. The on-the-fly part of the calculation (matching the profile functions to voxel size) of the SRM accounts for 10-30% of the reconstruction time, depending on the number of voxels chosen. We tested our approach with real data from a commercial small animal PET scanner. The results (image quality and reconstruction time) show that the proposed technique is a feasible solution.

  6. New scintillating crystals for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Systematic R&D on basic mechanism in inorganic scintillators, initiated by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN 10 years ago, has contributed not to a small amount, to the development of new materials for a new generation of medical imaging devices with increased resolution and sensitivity. The first important requirement for a scintillator to be used in medical imaging devices is the stopping power for the given energy range of X and gamma rays to be considered, and more precisely the conversion efficiency. A high light yield is also mandatory to improve the energy resolution, which is essentially limited by the photostatistics and the electronic noise at these energies. A short scintillation decay time allows to reduce the dead time and therefore to increase the limiting counting rate. When all these requirements are fulfilled the sensitivity and image contrast are increased for a given patient dose, or the dose can be reduced. Examples of new materials under development by the Crystal Clear Collabor...

  7. An overview of the use of pigs in PET research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    imaging. First, a wealth of information has become available concerning similarities of physiologic and pathologic processes in pigs and humans. Second, the size of most pig organs permits studies to be carried out in PET scanners otherwise designed for human use. Third, multiple blood samples can be...... overview over how pig studies in practice can be performed in human PET scanners....

  8. High-resolution image reconstruction for PET using estimated detector response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2007-02-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed PET images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of geometric projection matrix and detector blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D detector blurring matrix from experimental measurements. Point source data were acquired with high-count statistics in the microPET II scanner using a computer-controlled 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner with the modeling of the detector block structure. Since the resulting blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo simulation. Reconstructed images of a line source phantom show improved resolution with the new detector blurring matrix compared to the original one from the Monte Carlo simulation. This method can be applied to other small-animal and clinical scanners.

  9. Quantitative carotid PET/MR imaging: clinical evaluation of MR-Attenuation correction versus CT-Attenuation correction in 18F-FDG PET/MR emission data and comparison to PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2015-01-01

    Current PET/MR systems employ segmentation of MR images and subsequent assignment of empirical attenuation coefficients for quantitative PET reconstruction. In this study we examine the differences in the quantification of 18F-FDG uptake in the carotid arteries between PET/MR and PET/CT scanners. Five comparisons were performed to asses differences in PET quantification: i) PET/MR MR-based AC (MRAC) versus PET/MR CTAC, ii) PET/MR MRAC versus PET/CT, iii) PET/MR MRAC with carotid coil versus P...

  10. Network Security Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    G. MURALI; M.Pranavi; Y.Navateja; K. Bhargavi

    2011-01-01

    Network Security Scanner (NSS) is a tool that allows auditing and monitoring remote network computers for possible vulnerabilities, checks your network for all potential methods that a hacker might use to attack it. Network Security Scanner is a complete networking utilities package that includes a wide range of tools for network security auditing, vulnerability Auditing, scanning, monitoring and more. Network Security Scanner (NSS) is an easy to use, intuitive network security scanner that c...

  11. Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Kero, Tanja; Orndahl, Lovisa Holm; Kim, Won Yong; Bjerner, Tomas; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Wiggers, Henrik; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Sørensen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners. Methods 35 subjects underwent a...... dynamic 11 C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic 15 O-water PET and 11 C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically...

  12. MRI compatibility of position-sensitive photomultiplier depth-of-interaction PET detectors modules for in-line multimodality preclinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses the feasibility of a small-animal, in-line PET/MR system based on Position-Sensitive Photo Multiplier Tubes (PS-PMTs). To this end, we measured the effects of static magnetic fields on the PS-PMTs performance in order to explore the minimal tandem separation between the PET and MR subsystems to preserve their respective performances. We concluded that it is possible to achieve minimal degradation of the PET scanner performance (after a system recalibration) if the magnetic field strength influencing the PET detectors is less than 1 mT and if it is oriented perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube. Therefore, we predict that it will be possible to maintain the PET image quality if it is placed outside the 1 mT line

  13. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO in rat peripheral tissues using small-animal PET with [18F]FEDAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) is widely expressed in peripheral tissues, including the heart, lung, and kidney. Our laboratory developed N-benzyl-N-methyl-2-[7,8-dihydro-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl) -8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl]acetamide ([18F]FEDAC) as a TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) ligand. Here, using small-animal PET with [18F]FEDAC, we performed TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. Methods: The in vivo distribution and kinetics of [18F]FEDAC were measured in rat peripheral tissues (heart, lung and kidney). Using the in vivo pseudo-equilibrium method, TSPO binding parameters [TSPO density (Bmax), dissociation constant (KD)] and receptor occupancy were estimated in these peripheral tissues. Results: [18F]FEDAC was highly distributed in the lung, heart and kidney, and these TSPO-enriched tissues could be clearly visualized. The kinetics of this radioligand in these tissues was rapid, which is suitable for the determination of in vivo TSPO binding parameters and receptor occupancy. The Bmax value of TSPO in the heart, lung, and kidney was 393, 141, and 158 pmol/ml, respectively. The KD value of the radioligand in the heart, lung, and kidney was 119, 36 and 123 nM, respectively. By pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864 (a TSPO ligand), about 90% of binding sites for TSPO in the heart and lung were occupied. In the kidney, the binding sites were completely occupied by 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864. Conclusions: [18F]FEDAC is a suitable PET ligand for TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. The utilization of [18F]FEDAC-PET and the pseudo-equilibrium method can contribute to the study of the TSPO function and evaluate the in vivo binding parameters and receptor occupancy of TSPO therapeutic compounds.

  14. 78 FR 27303 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    .... Background In a notice published in the Federal Register of February 29, 2012 (77 FR 12226), FDA announced... Feed and Pet Food; Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry...

  15. In vivo imaging and characterization of [18F]DPA-714, a potential new TSPO ligand, in mouse brain and peripheral tissues using small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO), a biochemical marker of neuroinflammation, is highly expressed in the brain activated microglia and it is also expressed by peripheral inflammatory cells and normal peripheral tissues. Thus, development of radioligands for the TSPO may contribute to further understanding the in vivo TSPO function in central and peripheral inflammatory processes and other pathologies. Here, we report the biodistribution, the specific binding and the radiometabolites of [18F]DPA-714, a promising fluorinated PET radiotracer, in normal mice using a microPET/CT scanner. Methods: The in vivo biodistribution and kinetics of [18F]DPA-714 were measured in mice brain and peripheral tissues. Specific binding to TSPO sites was assessed using pharmacological competitive studies by means of saturation experiments performed by i.v. injection of 1 mg/kg of unlabeled DPA-714 or 3 mg/kg of unlabeled PK11195. A region of interest analysis was performed to generate time-activity curves in the brain, heart, lung, kidney, spleen and liver. Metabolites assay was performed in the plasma and peripheral organs by radio-HPLC. Results: [18F]DPA-714 reached high concentration in lung, heart, kidney and spleen, tissues well known to be rich in TSPO sites. [18F]DPA-714 kinetics were faster in the lung and slower in the kidney. Pre-injection of unlabeled DPA-714 or PK11195 inhibited about 80% of [18F]DPA-714 uptake in the lung and heart (p < 0.0005). The percentage of inhibition in the kidney was lower and achieved at later times only with DPA-714 (p < 0.05) but not with PK11195. Sixty minutes after radiotracer injection only unmetabolized radioligand was found in the brain, lung, heart and spleen. Conclusion: These results suggest that [18F]DPA-714 is a suitable PET ligand for imaging in mice brain and peripheral tissues since it binds with high specificity TSPO binding sites and it is almost unchanged at 60 minutes after radiotracer injection in the brain

  16. Simultaneous ECG-gated PET imaging of multiple mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: We describe and illustrate a method for creating ECG-gated PET images of the heart for each of several mice imaged at the same time. The method is intended to increase “throughput” in PET research studies of cardiac dynamics or to obtain information derived from such studies, e.g. tracer concentration in end-diastolic left ventricular blood. Methods: An imaging bed with provisions for warming, anesthetic delivery, etc., was fabricated by 3D printing to allow simultaneous PET imaging of two side-by-side mice. After electrode attachment, tracer injection and placement of the animals in the scanner field of view, ECG signals from each animal were continuously analyzed and independent trigger markers generated whenever an R-wave was detected in each signal. PET image data were acquired in “list” mode and these trigger markers were inserted into this list along with the image data. Since each mouse is in a different spatial location in the FOV, sorting of these data using trigger markers first from one animal and then the other yields two independent and correctly formed ECG-gated image sequences that reflect the dynamical properties of the heart during an “average” cardiac cycle. Results: The described method yields two independent ECG-gated image sequences that exhibit the expected properties in each animal, e.g. variation of the ventricular cavity volumes from maximum to minimum and back during the cardiac cycle in the processed animal with little or no variation in these volumes during the cardiac cycle in the unprocessed animal. Conclusion: ECG-gated image sequences for each of several animals can be created from a single list mode data collection using the described method. In principle, this method can be extended to more than two mice (or other animals) and to other forms of physiological gating, e.g. respiratory gating, when several subjects are imaged at the same time

  17. Clinical application of PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomena, Francisco [Hospital Clinico Villarroel, Barcelona (Spain). Nuclear Medicine]. E-mail: flomena@clinic.ub.es; Soler, Marina [CETIR Grup Medic. Esplkugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain). PET Unit

    2005-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluorodeoxyglucose-F 18 (FDG) PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.(author)

  18. Performance characterization of the PET-CT tomograph at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Amato; Sergio Baldari; Francesco Tomasello

    2015-01-01

    A PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry plant was built at Messina University Hospital, whose diagnostics section was equipped with a PET-CT scanner composed by a time of flight PET and a 16-slice CT. The present note reports about the results of tomograph's acceptance tests, which had been planned and carried out in order to verify the correspondence of the specific scanner's performances declared by the firm and the fulfillment of Italian law's minimal criteria of acceptability. Acceptance tests...

  19. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  20. Performance measurements of a depth-encoding TraPET detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new method to correct a parallax error and the loss of coincidence counts caused by the gap between modules was developed for a small animal PET scanner. We proposed the TraPET scanner composed of 6 dual-layer phoswich detector modules. Each detector module consists of a 5.0 mm-thick trapezoidal-shaped monolithic LSO crystal and a 23 x 23 array of GSO crystal. The layer of interaction is identified by the pulse shape discrimination method. One detector module was built and the algorithm for layer identification was optimized. The dual-layer crystals were optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H8500 position-sensitive PMT and a resistive charge divider was used to multiplex 64-channel anode outputs into 4-channel position signals. The 4 signals have been sampled continuously by 14-bit ADC at a sampling rate of 105 MHz and the pulse shape discrimination algorithm was achieved through FPGA programming. The detector module was irradiated with a Na-22 point source from the side of the crystals to obtain flood images of each layer and two layers were clearly identified, thus verifying the DOI capability. The TraPET detector proved to be a reliable design for correcting the parallax error and improving the sensitivity simultaneously in the small animal PET.

  1. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin;

    2012-01-01

    a number of different MRI techniques, such as DWI-MR (diffusion weighted imaging MR), DCE-MR (dynamic contrast enhanced MR), MRS (MR spectroscopy) and MR for attenuation correction of PET. All MR techniques presented in this paper have shown promising results in the treatment of patients with solid......After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some of...... the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to...

  2. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 (micro)m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 (micro)m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  3. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-08

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 {micro}m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 {micro}m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  4. Ready for prime time? Dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    Dual isotope single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dual tracer positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have great potential in clinical and molecular applications in the pediatric as well as the adult populations in many areas of brain, cardiac, and oncologic imaging as it allows the exploration of different physiological and molecular functions (e.g., perfusion, neurotransmission, metabolism, apoptosis, angiogenesis) under the same physiological and physical conditions. This is crucial when the physiological functions studied depend on each other (e.g., perfusion and metabolism) hence requiring simultaneous assessment under identical conditions, and can reduce greatly the quantitation errors associated with physical factors that can change between acquisitions (e.g., human subject or animal motion, change in the attenuation map as a function of time) as is detailed in this editorial. The clinical potential of simultaneous dual isotope SPECT, dual tracer PET and dual SPECT/PET imaging are explored and summarized. In this issue of AJNMMI (http://www.ajnmmi.us), Chapman et al. explore the feasibility of simultaneous and sequential SPECT/PET imaging and conclude that down-scatter and crosstalk from 511 keV photons preclude obtaining useful SPECT information in the presence of PET radiotracers. They report on an alternative strategy that consists of performing sequential SPECT and PET studies in hybrid microPET/SPECT/CT scanners, now widely available for molecular imaging. They validate their approach in a phantom consisting of a 96-well plate with variable 99mTc and 18F concentrations and illustrate the utility of such approaches in two sequential SPECT-PET/CT studies that include 99mTc-MAA/18F-NaF and 99mTc-Pentetate/18F-NaF. These approaches will need to be proven reproducible, accurate and robust to variations in the experimental conditions before they can be accepted by the molecular imaging community and be implemented in routine molecular

  5. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  6. Inventarisatie van ontwikkelingen van PET-CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijwaard H; LSO; mev

    2011-01-01

    De Nederlandse ziekenhuispraktijk heeft de relatief nieuwe PET-CT-technologie omarmd: het aantal PET-CT-scanners en hun toepassingen nemen snel toe. De toepassingen in de medische praktijk lopen voor op de richtlijnen uit 2007. Voor deze richtlijnen wordt daarom een frequentere update aanbevolen. Vo

  7. Performance of three-photon PET imaging: Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kacperski, K; Kacperski, Krzysztof; Spyrou, Nicholas M.

    2005-01-01

    We have recently introduced the idea of making use of three-photon positron annihilations in positron emission tomography. In this paper the basic characteristics of the three-gamma imaging in PET are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical computations. Two typical configurations of human and small animal scanners are considered. Three-photon imaging requires high energy resolution detectors. Parameters currently attainable by CdZnTe semiconductor detectors, the technology of choice for the future development of radiation imaging, are assumed. Spatial resolution is calculated as a function of detector energy resolution and size, position in the field of view, scanner size, and the energies of the three gamma annihilation photons. Possible ways to improve the spatial resolution obtained for nominal parameters: 1.5 cm and 3.2 mm FWHM for human and small animal scanners, respectively, are indicated. Counting rates of true and random three-photon events for typical human and small animal scann...

  8. Increased brain metabolism after acute administration of the synthetic cannabinoid HU210: a small animal PET imaging study with 18F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu H; Verdurand, Mathieu; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wang, Hongqin; Zahra, David; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2012-02-10

    Cannabis use has been shown to alter brain metabolism in both rat models and humans although the observations between both species are conflicting. In the present study, we examined the short term effects of a single-dose injection of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on glucose metabolism in the rat brain using small animal (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of the agonist in the same animal. Young adult male Wistar rats received an intra-peritoneal injection of HU210 (100 μg/kg, n=7) or vehicle (n=5) on Day 1. Approximately 1mCi of (18)F-FDG was injected intravenously into each animal at 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of HU210. A 5-min Computer Tomography (CT) scan followed by a 20-min PET scan was performed 40 min after each (18)F-FDG injection. Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) were calculated for 10 brain regions of interest (ROIs). Global increased SUVs in the whole brain, hence global brain metabolism, were observed following HU210 treatment on Day 1 compared to the controls (21%, PHU210 treated group returned to control levels (21-30% decrease compared to Day 1), in all ROIs investigated (PHU210 increases brain glucose metabolism in the rat brain shortly after administration, in line with normalised human in vivo studies, an effect that was no longer apparent 24 h later. PMID:22155282

  9. Evaluation of brain SERT occupancy by resveratrol against MDMA-induced neurobiological and behavioral changes in rats: A 4-[¹⁸F]-ADAM/small-animal PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jui-Hu; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Chen, Chien-Fu F; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Pao, Li-Heng; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Yeh, Ming-Kung; Li, I-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The misuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has drawn a growing concern worldwide for its psychophysiological impacts on humans. MDMA abusers are often accompanied by long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity, which is associated with reduced density of cerebral serotonin transporters (SERT) and depressive disorders. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenolic phytoalexin that has been known for its antidepressant and neuroprotective effects. However, biological targets of RSV as well as its neuroprotective effects against MDMA remained largely unknown. In this study, we examined binding potency of RSV and MDMA to SERT using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) with the SERT radioligand, N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-[(18)F]fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[(18)F]-ADAM) and investigated the protection of RSV against the acute and long-term adverse effects of MDMA. We found that RSV exhibit binding potentials to SERT in vivo in a dose-dependent manner with variation among brain regions. When the MDMA-treated rats (10mg/kg, s.c.) were co-injected with RSV (20mg/kg, i.p.) twice daily for 4 consecutive days, MDMA-induced acute elevation in plasma corticosterone was significantly reduced. Further, 4-[(18)F]-ADAM PET imaging revealed that RSV protected against the MDMA-induced decrease in SERT availability in the midbrain and the thalamus 2 weeks following the co-treatment. The PET data were comparable to the observation from the forced swim test that RSV sufficiently ameliorated the depressive-like behaviors of the MDMA-treated rats. Together, these findings suggest that RSV is a potential antidepressant and may confer protection against neurobiological and behavioral changes induced by MDMA. PMID:26612383

  10. Early evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy with longitudinal FDG small-animal PET in human testicular cancer xenografts: early flare response does not reflect refractory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of FDG PET in the early prediction of the effects of chemotherapy on human testicular cancer xenografts. Nude rats bearing subcutaneous human embryonal carcinoma xenografts received either cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or saline serum. Small-animal PET studies were performed on days 0, 2, 4 and 7 and compared to immunochemistry studies, flow cytometry studies and hexokinase assays. Cisplatin treatment resulted in biphasic FDG uptake evolution: a peak was observed on day 2, followed by a marked decrease on day 7 despite an insignificant change in tumour volume. Similarly, a peak in cyclin A immunostaining was observed on days 2 and 4, followed by a significant decrease on day 7. Flow cytometry showed that the cyclin A peak was not related to increased cell proliferation but was due to a transient S and G2/M cell cycle arrest. A marked increase in cell apoptosis was observed from day 2 to day 7. GLUT-1 showed a significant decrease on day 7. Macrophagic infiltrate remained stable except for an increase observed on day 7. In control tumours, continuous growth was observed, all immunostaining markers remaining stable over time. Hexokinase activity was significantly lower on day 7 in treated tumours than in controls. FDG PET may be useful in the early evaluation of treatment in patients with testicular cancer. In our model, a very early increased [18F]-FDG uptake was related to a transient cell cycle arrest and early stage apoptosis but did not reveal refractory disease. (orig.)

  11. Early evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy with longitudinal FDG small-animal PET in human testicular cancer xenografts: early flare response does not reflect refractory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [GRECAN, EA 1772, IFR 146 ICORE, Caen University, Bioticla Unit, Caen (France); Francois Baclesse Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen (France); Centre Francois Baclesse, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Caen Cedex 5 (France); Poulain, Laurent; Briand, Melanie; Dutoit, Soizic; Labiche, Alexandre; Gauduchon, Pascal [GRECAN, EA 1772, IFR 146 ICORE, Caen University, Bioticla Unit, Caen (France); Allouche, Stephane [University Hospital, Biochemistry Department, Caen (France); Ngo-Van Do, Aurelie; Nataf, Valerie; Talbot, Jean-Noel; Montravers, Francoise [Tenon Hospital and University Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), LIMP, Paris (France); Batalla, Alain [Francois Baclesse Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical Physics Unit, Caen (France)

    2009-03-15

    We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of FDG PET in the early prediction of the effects of chemotherapy on human testicular cancer xenografts. Nude rats bearing subcutaneous human embryonal carcinoma xenografts received either cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or saline serum. Small-animal PET studies were performed on days 0, 2, 4 and 7 and compared to immunochemistry studies, flow cytometry studies and hexokinase assays. Cisplatin treatment resulted in biphasic FDG uptake evolution: a peak was observed on day 2, followed by a marked decrease on day 7 despite an insignificant change in tumour volume. Similarly, a peak in cyclin A immunostaining was observed on days 2 and 4, followed by a significant decrease on day 7. Flow cytometry showed that the cyclin A peak was not related to increased cell proliferation but was due to a transient S and G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. A marked increase in cell apoptosis was observed from day 2 to day 7. GLUT-1 showed a significant decrease on day 7. Macrophagic infiltrate remained stable except for an increase observed on day 7. In control tumours, continuous growth was observed, all immunostaining markers remaining stable over time. Hexokinase activity was significantly lower on day 7 in treated tumours than in controls. FDG PET may be useful in the early evaluation of treatment in patients with testicular cancer. In our model, a very early increased [{sup 18}F]-FDG uptake was related to a transient cell cycle arrest and early stage apoptosis but did not reveal refractory disease. (orig.)

  12. Noninvasive image derived heart input function for CMRglc measurements in small animal slow infusion FDG PET studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Guoming; Paul, Cumming; Todica, Andrei; Hacker, Marcus; Bartenstein, Peter; Böning, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Absolute quantitation of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) can be obtained in positron emission tomography (PET) studies when serial measurements of the arterial [(18)F]-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) input are available. Since this is not always practical in PET studies of rodents, there has been considerable interest in defining an image-derived input function (IDIF) by placing a volume of interest (VOI) within the left ventricle of the heart. However, spill-in arising from trapping of FDG in the myocardium often leads to progressive contamination of the IDIF, which propagates to underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc. We therefore developed a novel, non-invasive method for correcting the IDIF without scaling to a blood sample. To this end, we first obtained serial arterial samples and dynamic FDG-PET data of the head and heart in a group of eight anaesthetized rats. We fitted a bi-exponential function to the serial measurements of the IDIF, and then used the linear graphical Gjedde-Patlak method to describe the accumulation in myocardium. We next estimated the magnitude of myocardial spill-in reaching the left ventricle VOI by assuming a Gaussian point-spread function, and corrected the measured IDIF for this estimated spill-in. Finally, we calculated parametric maps of CMRglc using the corrected IDIF, and for the sake of comparison, relative to serial blood sampling from the femoral artery. The uncorrected IDIF resulted in 20% underestimation of the magnitude of CMRglc relative to the gold standard arterial input method. However, there was no bias with the corrected IDIF, which was robust to the variable extent of myocardial tracer uptake, such that there was a very high correlation between individual CMRglc measurements using the corrected IDIF with gold-standard arterial input results. Based on simulation, we furthermore find that electrocardiogram-gating, i.e. ECG-gating is not necessary for IDIF quantitation using our approach. PMID:23160517

  13. Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Jinyi

    2000-10-13

    Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored.

  14. Optimization of PET system design for lesion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally, the figures of merit used in designing a PET scanner are spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, noise equivalent sensitivity, etc. These measures, however, do not directly reflect the lesion detectability using the PET scanner. Here we propose to optimize PET scanner design directly for lesion detection. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lesion detection can be easily computed using the theoretical expressions that we have previously derived. Because no time consuming Monte Carlo simulation is needed, the theoretical expressions allow evaluation of a large range of parameters. The PET system parameters can then be chosen to achieve the maximum SNR for lesion detection. The simulation study shown in this paper was focused a single ring PET scanner without depth of interaction measurement. Randoms and scatters were also ignored

  15. P.I.X.S.C.A.N.: a micro-CT scanner for small animal based on hybrid pixel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since more than a dozen years, efforts were led in the field of X-ray tomography for small animals, principally for the improvement of spatial resolution and the diminution of the absorbed dose. The C.P.P.M. developed the micro-CT P.I.X.S.C.A.N. based on the hybrid pixel detector X.P.A.D.2. In this context, my thesis work consists in studying the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 and the contribution of the hybrid pixels in the imaging of small animals. A fast analytical simulation, FastSimu, was developed. An extrapolation of the performance of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N, as well as the validation of the results obtained with the measured data, were led by means of the analytical simulator FastSimu. The demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 allowed to obtain reconstructed images with a rather good quality for a relatively weak absorbed dose. Its spatial resolution is degraded by the high number of defective pixels of the detector X.P.A.D.2. Beyond this study, a new version of the demonstrator P.I.X.S.C.A.N./X.P.A.D.2 is under construction. This latter, characterized by two and a half times smaller pixels and about no defective pixels will bring a considerable improvement on spatial resolution. (author)

  16. Scanner matching optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupers, Michiel; Klingbeil, Patrick; Tschischgale, Joerg; Buhl, Stefan; Hempel, Fritjof

    2009-03-01

    Cost of ownership of scanners for the manufacturing of front end layers is becoming increasingly expensive. The ability to quickly switch the production of a layer to another scanner in case it is down is important. This paper presents a method to match the scanner grids in the most optimal manner so that use of front end scanners in effect becomes interchangeable. A breakdown of the various components of overlay is given and we discuss methods to optimize the matching strategy in the fab. A concern here is how to separate the scanner and process induced effects. We look at the relative contributions of intrafield and interfield errors caused by the scanner and the process. Experimental results of a method to control the scanner grid are presented and discussed. We compare the overlay results before and after optimizing the scanner grids and show that the matching penalty is reduced by 20%. We conclude with some thoughts on the need to correct the remaining matching errors.

  17. Clinic-like animal model for causal-pathogenetical investigations of hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries (Combined application of radioactively labelled microspheres and PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex nature of the pathogenesis in hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries, requires the combined determination of the dynamics of main factors in these disturbing processes. The application of suitable methods for registration of such pathogenetic processes is shown in an adequate animal model for simulating the early hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries. That the radioactive labelled microsphere technique is suitable to comprehend quantitatively the dynamics of the intracerebral redistribution of the circulating blood due to hypoxia/hyercapnia by simultaneous-multiple measuring of the regional cerebral blood flow. Therefore, at the first time an inadequate hypoxia-induced blood flow increase was shown in large parts of the forebrain in intrauterine growth retarded newborn piglets. For estimation of the regional cerebral glucose utilization in newborn piglets, the 18F-FDG PET is introduced. The measurements were carried out on a stationary high-density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) camera and yielded the fundamental application of this camera model for PET investigations also in the newborn brain due to the very good spatial resolution. (author)

  18. Your Pet's Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Animal/Species Browse by Topic Browse by Discipline Resources VMA Resource Center Tools for K-12 ... infection because giving the preventive to a heartworm-positive pet will not treat the infection and could ...

  19. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Cold Weather Pet Safety Client Handout Available for download ... in hot cars , but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ ...

  20. Non-invasive mapping of deep-tissue lymph nodes in live animals using a multimodal PET/MRI nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, David; Diop, Ndeye-Fatou M.; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Doran, Michael G.; Huang, Ruimin; Abou, Diane S.; Larson, Steven M.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The invasion status of tumour-draining lymph nodes (LNs) is a critical indicator of cancer stage and is important for treatment planning. Clinicians currently use planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mTc-radiocolloid to guide biopsy and resection of LNs. However, emerging multimodality approaches such as positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) detect sites of disease with higher sensitivity and accuracy. Here we present a multimodal nanoparticle, 89Zr-ferumoxytol, for the enhanced detection of LNs with PET/MRI. For genuine translational potential, we leverage a clinical iron oxide formulation, altered with minimal modification for radiolabelling. Axillary drainage in naive mice and from healthy and tumour-bearing prostates was investigated. We demonstrate that 89Zr-ferumoxytol can be used for high-resolution tomographic studies of lymphatic drainage in preclinical disease models. This nanoparticle platform has significant translational potential to improve preoperative planning for nodal resection and tumour staging.

  1. Experimental Approach to Evaluate the 11C Perfusion and Diffusion in Small Animal Tissues for HadronPET Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immaculada Martínez-Rovira

    Full Text Available The development of a reliable dose monitoring system in hadron therapy is essential in order to control the treatment plan delivery. Positron Emission Tomography (PET is the only method used in clinics nowadays for quality assurance. However, the accuracy of this method is limited by the loss of signal due to the biological washout processes. Up to the moment, very few studies measured the washout processes and there is no database of washout data as a function of the tissue and radioisotope. One of the main difficulties is related to the complexity of such measurements, along with the limited time slots available in hadron therapy facilities. Thus, in this work, we proposed an alternative in vivo methodology for the measurement and modeling of the biological washout parameters without any radiative devices. It consists in the implementation of a point-like radioisotope source by direct injection on the tissues of interest and its measurement by means of high-resolution preclinical PET systems. In particular, the washout of 11C carbonate radioisotopes was assessed, considering that 11C is is the most abundant β+ emitter produced by carbon beams. 11C washout measurements were performed in several tissues of interest (brain, muscle and 9L tumor xenograf in rodents (Wistar rat. Results show that the methodology presented is sensitive to the washout variations depending on the selected tissue. Finally, a first qualitative correlation between 11C tumor washout properties and tumor metabolism (via 18F-FDG tracer uptake was found.

  2. In vivo imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO in rat peripheral tissues using small-animal PET with [{sup 18}F]FEDAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nengaki, Nobuki [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service Co., Ltd., Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 141-0032 (Japan); Takei, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Tokyo Nuclear Service Co., Ltd., Taito-ku, Tokyo, 110-0016 (Japan); Wakizaka, Hidekatsu [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Hosoi, Rie; Momosaki, Sotaro [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Yui, Joji; Kawamura, Kazunori; Hatori, Akiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Zhang, Ming-Rong, E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.j [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Introduction: The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) is widely expressed in peripheral tissues, including the heart, lung, and kidney. Our laboratory developed N-benzyl-N-methyl-2-[7,8-dihydro-7-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl) -8-oxo-2-phenyl-9H-purin-9-yl]acetamide ([{sup 18}F]FEDAC) as a TSPO positron emission tomography (PET) ligand. Here, using small-animal PET with [{sup 18}F]FEDAC, we performed TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. Methods: The in vivo distribution and kinetics of [{sup 18}F]FEDAC were measured in rat peripheral tissues (heart, lung and kidney). Using the in vivo pseudo-equilibrium method, TSPO binding parameters [TSPO density (B{sub max}), dissociation constant (K{sub D})] and receptor occupancy were estimated in these peripheral tissues. Results: [{sup 18}F]FEDAC was highly distributed in the lung, heart and kidney, and these TSPO-enriched tissues could be clearly visualized. The kinetics of this radioligand in these tissues was rapid, which is suitable for the determination of in vivo TSPO binding parameters and receptor occupancy. The B{sub max} value of TSPO in the heart, lung, and kidney was 393, 141, and 158 pmol/ml, respectively. The K{sub D} value of the radioligand in the heart, lung, and kidney was 119, 36 and 123 nM, respectively. By pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864 (a TSPO ligand), about 90% of binding sites for TSPO in the heart and lung were occupied. In the kidney, the binding sites were completely occupied by 5 mg/kg Ro 5-4864. Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]FEDAC is a suitable PET ligand for TSPO imaging and quantitative analysis of TSPO binding in rat peripheral tissues. The utilization of [{sup 18}F]FEDAC-PET and the pseudo-equilibrium method can contribute to the study of the TSPO function and evaluate the in vivo binding parameters and receptor occupancy of TSPO therapeutic compounds.

  3. 9.4–14.1 T small-animal PET-MR imaging: Feasibility analysis of LYSO APD readout via long signal lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, J.A., E-mail: janeves@lip.pt [LIP - Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); IST-UTL - Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Laboratory of Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bugalho, R. [LIP - Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); IST-UTL - Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Gruetter, R. [Laboratory of Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Magill, A.W. [Laboratory of Functional and Metabolic Imaging, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Radiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ortigão, C.; Silva, J.C.; Silva, R. [LIP - Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); Varela, J. [LIP - Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics, Lisbon (Portugal); IST-UTL - Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2013-02-21

    In the present work we intend to assess the readout feasibility of Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors via long signal lines for the development of a combined small-animal PET-MR prototype based on the ClearPEM technology. The detection performance of a LYSO-APD module was evaluated reading out the APD charge signals to the front-end ASIC via an 80 mm length flexible flat-cable (FFC). Experimental results showed a time resolution of 5.06 ns for the detector module in double-readout mode, with a nonsignificant degradation of 8.4% with the introduction of the FFC. The energy resolution of the system was not degradated by the FFC.

  4. Wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation for submillimetre 3D list-mode reconstruction data from a high resolution small animal PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus Ochoa Dominguez, Humberto de, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ortega Maynez, Leticia; Osiris Vergara Villegas, Osslan; Gordillo Castillo, Nelly; Guadalupe Cruz Sanchez, Vianey; Gutierrez Casas, Efren David [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2011-10-01

    The data obtained from a PET system tend to be noisy because of the limitations of the current instrumentation and the detector efficiency. This problem is particularly severe in images of small animals as the noise contaminates areas of interest within small organs. Therefore, denoising becomes a challenging task. In this paper, a novel wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation method is proposed to reduce such noise. To demonstrate this method, image reconstruction using a small mouse {sup 18}F NEMA phantom and a {sup 18}F mouse was performed. Investigation on the effects of the image quality was addressed for each reconstruction case. Results show that the proposed method drastically reduces the noise and preserves the image details.

  5. Development of Russian's industrial and technological resources required to produce PET center equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    simultaneous dual beam extraction for accelerating 12 MeV prot