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Sample records for animal pet imaging

  1. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

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    Branco, Susana [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: susana.silva@fc.ul.pt; Jan, Sebastien [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV/DRM, Orsay (France); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-10-01

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using {sup -}F and [{sup 18}F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies.

  2. Development of a PET Scanner for Simultaneously Imaging Small Animals with MRI and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Thompson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positron emission tomography (PET is playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of cancer. Combined PET and X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT scanners are now the modality of choice in cancer treatment planning. More recently, the combination of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is being explored in many sites. Combining PET and MRI has presented many challenges since the photo-multiplier tubes (PMT in PET do not function in high magnetic fields, and conventional PET detectors distort MRI images. Solid state light sensors like avalanche photo-diodes (APDs and more recently silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs are much less sensitive to magnetic fields thus easing the compatibility issues. This paper presents the results of a group of Canadian scientists who are developing a PET detector ring which fits inside a high field small animal MRI scanner with the goal of providing simultaneous PET and MRI images of small rodents used in pre-clinical medical research. We discuss the evolution of both the crystal blocks (which detect annihilation photons from positron decay and the SiPM array performance in the last four years which together combine to deliver significant system performance in terms of speed, energy and timing resolution.

  3. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC for Small Animal PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El Ali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a correction for annihilation photon attenuation in small objects such as mice is necessary. The attenuation recovery for specific organs and subcutaneous tumors was investigated. A comparison between different attenuation correction methods was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II. CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity concentration in the same organ with and without AC revealed an overall attenuation recovery of 9–21% for MAP reconstructed images, i.e., SUV without AC could underestimate the true activity at this level. For subcutaneous tumors, the attenuation was 13 ± 4% (9–17%, for kidneys 20 ± 1% (19–21%, and for bladder 18 ± 3% (15–21%. The FBP reconstructed images showed almost the same attenuation levels as the MAP reconstructed images for all organs. Conclusions: The annihilation photons are suffering attenuation even in small subjects. Both PET-based and CT-based are adequate as AC methods. The amplitude of the AC recovery could be overestimated using the uniform map. Therefore, application of a global attenuation factor on PET data might not be accurate for attenuation correction.

  4. Importance of Attenuation Correction (AC) for Small Animal PET Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Ali, Henrik H.; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær;

    2012-01-01

    was performed. Methods: Ten NMRI nude mice with subcutaneous implantation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were scanned consecutively in small animal PET and CT scanners (MicroPETTM Focus 120 and ImTek’s MicroCATTM II). CT-based AC, PET-based AC and uniform AC methods were compared. Results: The activity...

  5. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  6. Performance evaluation of the microPET P4: a PET system dedicated to animal imaging

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    Tai, Y.C.; Chatziioannou, A.; Cherry, S.R. [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Siegel, S.; Goble, R.N.; Nutt, R.E. [Concorde Microsystems, Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Young, J. [CTI, Inc, Knoxville, TN (United States); Newport, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The microPET Primate 4-ring system (P4) is an animal PET tomograph with a 7.8 cm axial extent, a 19 cm diameter transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 22 cm animal port. The system is composed of 168 detector modules, each with an 8x8 array of 2.2x2.2x10 mm{sup 3} lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals, arranged as 32 crystal rings 26 cm in diameter. The detector crystals are coupled to a Hamamatsu R5900-C8 PS-PMT via a 10 cm long optical fibre bundle. The detectors have a timing resolution of 3.2 ns, an average energy resolution of 26%, and an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.75 mm. The system operates in 3D mode without inter-plane septa, acquiring data in list mode. The reconstructed image spatial resolution ranges from 1.8 mm at the centre to 3 mm at 4 cm radial offset. The tomograph has a peak system sensitivity of 2.25% at the centre of the FOV with a 250-750 keV energy window. The noise equivalent count rate peaks at 100-290 kcps for representative object sizes. Images from two phantoms and three different types of laboratory animal demonstrate the advantage of the P4 system over the original prototype microPET, including its threefold improvement in sensitivity and a large axial FOV sufficient to image an entire mouse in a single bed position. (author)

  7. Performance evaluation of the microPET P4: a PET system dedicated to animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Y. C.; Chatziioannou, A.; Siegel, S.; Young, J.; Newport, D.; Goble, R. N.; Nutt, R. E.; Cherry, S. R.

    2001-07-01

    The microPET Primate 4-ring system (P4) is an animal PET tomograph with a 7.8 cm axial extent, a 19 cm diameter transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 22 cm animal port. The system is composed of 168 detector modules, each with an 8×8 array of 2.2×2.2×10 mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals, arranged as 32 crystal rings 26 cm in diameter. The detector crystals are coupled to a Hamamatsu R5900-C8 PS-PMT via a 10 cm long optical fibre bundle. The detectors have a timing resolution of 3.2 ns, an average energy resolution of 26%, and an average intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.75 mm. The system operates in 3D mode without inter-plane septa, acquiring data in list mode. The reconstructed image spatial resolution ranges from 1.8 mm at the centre to 3 mm at 4 cm radial offset. The tomograph has a peak system sensitivity of 2.25% at the centre of the FOV with a 250-750 keV energy window. The noise equivalent count rate peaks at 100-290 kcps for representative object sizes. Images from two phantoms and three different types of laboratory animal demonstrate the advantage of the P4 system over the original prototype microPET, including its threefold improvement in sensitivity and a large axial FOV sufficient to image an entire mouse in a single bed position.

  8. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

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    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  9. Trends in PET imaging

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    Moses, William W.

    2000-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT).

  10. VrPET/CT: development of a rotating multimodality scanner for small-animal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lage, Eduardo; Vaquero, Juan José; Sisniega, Alejandro; España, Manuel; Tapias, Gustavo; Udías, Ángel; García,Verónica; Rodríguez-Ruano, Alexia; Desco, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work reports on the development and evaluation of the PET component of a PETtCT system for small-animal in-vivo imaging. The PET and CT subsystems are assembled in a rotary gantry in such a way that the center of rotation for both imaging modalities is mechanically aligned. The PET scanner configuration is based on 2 detector modules, each of which consis...

  11. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

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    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ∼14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  12. Simultaneous acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data and positron emission tomography (PET) images with a prototype MR-compatible, small animal PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Lemieux, Susan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2007-06-01

    Multi-modality imaging (such as PET-CT) is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET, fused with anatomical images created by MRI, allow the correlation of form with function. Perhaps more exciting than the combination of anatomical MRI with PET, is the melding of PET with MR spectroscopy (MRS). Thus, two aspects of physiology could be combined in novel ways to produce new insights into the physiology of normal and pathological processes. Our team is developing a system to acquire MRI images and MRS spectra, and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype MR-compatible PET system consists of two opposed detector heads (appropriate in size for small animal imaging), operating in coincidence mode with an active field-of-view of ˜14 cm in diameter. Each detector consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a 2-m long fiber optic light guide to a single position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The use of light guides allows these magnetic field-sensitive elements of the PET imager to be positioned outside the strong magnetic field of our 3T MRI scanner. The PET scanner imager was integrated with a 12-cm diameter, 12-leg custom, birdcage coil. Simultaneous MRS spectra and PET images were successfully acquired from a multi-modality phantom consisting of a sphere filled with 17 brain relevant substances and a positron-emitting radionuclide. There were no significant changes in MRI or PET scanner performance when both were present in the MRI magnet bore. This successful initial test demonstrates the potential for using such a multi-modality to obtain complementary MRS and PET data.

  13. Anatomical standardization of small animal brain FDG-PET images using synthetic functional template: experimental comparison with anatomical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Christopher; Hjornevik, Trine; Courivaud, Frédéric; Willoch, Frode

    2011-07-15

    Anatomical standardization (also called spatial normalization) of positron emission tomography (PET) small animal brain images is required to make statistical comparisons across individuals. Frequently, PET images are co-registered to an individual MR or CT image of the same subject in order to transform the functional images to an anatomical space. In the present work, we evaluate the normalization of synthetic PET (synPET) images to a synthetic PET template. To provide absolute error in terms of pixel misregistration, we created a synthetic PET image from the individual MR image through segmentation of the brain into gray and white matter which produced functional and anatomical images in the same space. When comparing spatial normalization of synPET images to a synPET template with the gold standard (MR images to an MR template), a mean translation error of 0.24mm (±0.20) and a maximal mean rotational error of 0.85° (±0.91) were found. Significant decrease in misregistration error was measured when achieving spatial normalization of functional images to a functional template instead of an anatomical template. This accuracy strengthens the use of standardization methods where individual PET images are registered to a customized PET template in order to statistically assess physiological changes in rat brains.

  14. 小动物PET及PET-CT及其在分子影像学中的应用%Small animal PET and PET-CT its application in molecular imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天然; 田嘉禾

    2008-01-01

    The review article introduce molecular imaging equipment small animal PET and PET-CT's philosophy and technique feature.small animal PET and PET-CT apply many new techniques and images resolution has obviously raising.as same time,small animal PET and small animal CT may come true image fusion.small animal PET and PET-CT permit us to engage molecular level imaging in vivo without invading.so small animal PET and PET-CT are good tool in medical molecular imaging.%阐述小动物PET及PET-CT技术特点及在分子影像学中的应用.小动物PET及PET-CT采用多项新技术,分辨率明显提高,结合小动物CT实现了图像融合.小动物PET及PET-CT实现了在活体上非侵人性分子水平显像,是研究分子影像的尖端设备.

  15. Multi-modality image reconstruction for dual-head small-animal PET

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    Huang, Chang-Han; Chou, Cheng-Ying [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-18

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) or positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has become routine practice in clinics. The applications of multi-modality imaging can also benefit research advances. Consequently, dedicated small-imaging system like dual-head small-animal PET (DHAPET) that possesses the advantages of high detection sensitivity and high resolution can exploit the structural information from CT or MRI. It should be noted that the special detector arrangement in DHAPET leads to severe data truncation, thereby degrading the image quality. We proposed to take advantage of anatomical priors and total variation (TV) minimization methods to reconstruct PET activity distribution form incomplete measurement data. The objective is to solve the penalized least-squares function consisted of data fidelity term, TV norm and medium root priors. In this work, we employed the splitting-based fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm to split smooth and non-smooth functions in the convex optimization problems. Our simulations studies validated that the images reconstructed by use of the proposed method can outperform those obtained by use of conventional expectation maximization algorithms or that without considering the anatomical prior information. Additionally, the convergence rate is also accelerated.

  16. Performance evaluation of a very high resolution small animal PET imager using silicon scatter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-June; Rogers, W. Leslie; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-05-01

    A very high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for small animal imaging based on the idea of inserting a ring of high-granularity solid-state detectors into a conventional PET scanner is under investigation. A particularly interesting configuration of this concept, which takes the form of a degenerate Compton camera, is shown capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution with good sensitivity. We present a Compton PET system and estimate its performance using a proof-of-concept prototype. A prototype single-slice imaging instrument was constructed with two silicon detectors 1 mm thick, each having 512 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads arranged in a 32 × 16 array. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides and flanked by two non-position sensitive BGO detectors. The scanner performance was measured for its sensitivity, energy, timing, spatial resolution and resolution uniformity. Using the experimental scanner, energy resolution for the silicon detectors is 1%. However, system energy resolution is dominated by the 23% FWHM BGO resolution. Timing resolution for silicon is 82.1 ns FWHM due to time-walk in trigger devices. Using the scattered photons, time resolution between the BGO detectors is 19.4 ns FWHM. Image resolution of 980 µm FWHM at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) is obtained from a 1D profile of a 0.254 mm diameter 18F line source image reconstructed using the conventional 2D filtered back-projection (FBP). The 0.4 mm gap between two line sources is resolved in the image reconstructed with both FBP and the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm. The experimental instrument demonstrates sub-millimeter resolution. A prototype having sensitivity high enough for initial small animal images can be used for in vivo studies of small animal models of metabolism, molecular mechanism and the development of new radiotracers.

  17. Evaluation of attenuation and scatter correction requirements in small animal PET and SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konik, Arda Bekir

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are two nuclear emission-imaging modalities that rely on the detection of high-energy photons emitted from radiotracers administered to the subject. The majority of these photons are attenuated (absorbed or scattered) in the body, resulting in count losses or deviations from true detection, which in turn degrades the accuracy of images. In clinical emission tomography, sophisticated correction methods are often required employing additional x-ray CT or radionuclide transmission scans. Having proven their potential in both clinical and research areas, both PET and SPECT are being adapted for small animal imaging. However, despite the growing interest in small animal emission tomography, little scientific information exists about the accuracy of these correction methods on smaller size objects, and what level of correction is required. The purpose of this work is to determine the role of attenuation and scatter corrections as a function of object size through simulations. The simulations were performed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) and a Monte Carlo based package, Geant4 application for emission tomography (GATE). In IDL simulations, PET and SPECT data acquisition were modeled in the presence of attenuation. A mathematical emission and attenuation phantom approximating a thorax slice and slices from real PET/CT data were scaled to 5 different sizes (i.e., human, dog, rabbit, rat and mouse). The simulated emission data collected from these objects were reconstructed. The reconstructed images, with and without attenuation correction, were compared to the ideal (i.e., non-attenuated) reconstruction. Next, using GATE, scatter fraction values (the ratio of the scatter counts to the total counts) of PET and SPECT scanners were measured for various sizes of NEMA (cylindrical phantoms representing small animals and human), MOBY (realistic mouse/rat model) and XCAT (realistic human model

  18. An investigation of the challenges in reconstructing PET images of a freely moving animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mahmood; Kyme, Andre; Zhou, Victor; Fulton, Roger; Meikle, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Imaging the brain of a freely moving small animal using positron emission tomography (PET) while simultaneously observing its behaviour is an important goal for neuroscience. While we have successfully demonstrated the use of line-of-response (LOR) rebinning to correct the head motion of confined animals, a large proportion of events may need to be discarded because they either 'miss' the detector array after transformation or fall out of the acceptance range of a sinogram. The proportion of events that would have been measured had motion not occurred, so-called 'lost events', is expected to be even larger for freely moving animals. Moreover, the data acquisition in the case of a freely moving animal is further complicated by a complex attenuation field. The aims of this study were (a) to characterise the severity of the 'lostevents' problem for the freely moving animal scenario, and(b) to investigate the relative impact of attenuation correction errors on quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. A phantom study was performed to simulate the uncorrelated motion of a target and non-target sourcevolume. A small animal PET scanner was used to acquirelist-mode data for different sets of phantom positions. The list-mode data were processed using the standard LOR rebinning approach, and multiple frame variants of this designed to reduce discarded events. We found that LOR rebinning caused up to 86 % 'lost events', and artifacts that we attribute to incomplete projections, when applied to a freely moving target. This fraction was reduced by up to 18 % using the variant approaches, resulting in slightly reduced image artifacts. The effect of the non-target compartment on attenuation correction of the target volume was surprisingly small. However, for certain poses where the target and non-target volumes are aligned transaxially in the field-of-view, the attenuation problem becomes more complex and sophisticated correction methods will be required. We conclude that

  19. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  20. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  1. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Tianyu, E-mail: maty@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-21

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  2. A microPET/CT system for invivo small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, K.; Wu, Y.; Boone, J. M.; Cherry, S. R.

    2007-07-01

    A microCT scanner was designed, fabricated and integrated with a previously reported microPET II scanner (Tai et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1519, Yang et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2527), forming a dual modality system for in vivo anatomic and molecular imaging of the mouse. The system was designed to achieve high-spatial-resolution and high-sensitivity PET images with adequate CT image quality for anatomic localization and attenuation correction with low x-ray dose. The system also has relatively high throughput for screening, and a flexible gantry and user interface. X-rays were produced by a 50 kVp, 1.5 mA fixed tungsten anode tube, with a focal spot size of 70 µm. The detector was a 5 × 5 cm2 photodiode detector incorporating 48 µm pixels on a CMOS array and a fast gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) intensifying screen. The microCT system has a flexible C-arm gantry design with adjustable detector positioning, which acquires CT projection images around the common microPET/CT bed. The design and the initial characterization of the microCT system is described, and images of the first mouse scans with microPET/CT scanning protocols are shown.

  3. A microPET/CT system for invivo small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, GBSF Building, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Yang, Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, GBSF Building, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Yang, K [Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4701 X Street, X-ray Imaging Laboratory, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Wu, Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, GBSF Building, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Boone, J M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, GBSF Building, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Cherry, S R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, GBSF Building, 451 East Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2007-07-07

    A microCT scanner was designed, fabricated and integrated with a previously reported microPET II scanner (Tai et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 1519, Yang et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2527), forming a dual modality system for in vivo anatomic and molecular imaging of the mouse. The system was designed to achieve high-spatial-resolution and high-sensitivity PET images with adequate CT image quality for anatomic localization and attenuation correction with low x-ray dose. The system also has relatively high throughput for screening, and a flexible gantry and user interface. X-rays were produced by a 50 kVp, 1.5 mA fixed tungsten anode tube, with a focal spot size of 70 {mu}m. The detector was a 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} photodiode detector incorporating 48 {mu}m pixels on a CMOS array and a fast gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) intensifying screen. The microCT system has a flexible C-arm gantry design with adjustable detector positioning, which acquires CT projection images around the common microPET/CT bed. The design and the initial characterization of the microCT system is described, and images of the first mouse scans with microPET/CT scanning protocols are shown.

  4. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  5. The Combination of In vivo (124)I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik H; Eckerwall, Martin; Skovgaard, Dorthe;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that (124)I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid...... physiology and dose calculation. METHODS: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid (124)I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. RESULTS...... indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information...

  6. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  7. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, DMSA, and {sup 18}F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined {sup 99}mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and {sup 18}F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  8. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El-Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small animal image-based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34–70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information is essential for quantitative thyroid imaging and accurate thyroid absorbed dose calculation.

  9. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeputte, Caroline; Casteels, Cindy; Koole, Michel; Gerits, Anneleen [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); Struys, Tom [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Veghel, Daisy van; Evens, Nele; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Lambrichts, Ivo [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 and [{sup 11}C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB{sub 1} binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB{sub 1} immunohistochemical staining. [{sup 11}C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB{sub 2} revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB{sub 1} {sup +} and CB{sub 2} {sup +} cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB{sub 1}, but not CB{sub 2}, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB{sub 1} signalling as the role of CB{sub 2} seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  10. I-124 labeled recombinant human annexin V produced by E. coli for apoptosis image using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. H.; Lee, I. S.; Woo, S. K.; Woo, G. S.; Chung, W. S.; Kang, J. H.; Cheon, G. J.; Choi, C. W.; Urn, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Annexin V labeled with radioisotope and optical probe has been used to detect apoptosis. To evaluate annexin V as a multimodal apoptosis imaging agent, large-scale preparation of Annexin V (AV) is preliminary. The aim of this study is to produce and purify recombinant human Annexin V (rh-AV) in E. coli system and radiolabeled rh-AV evaluate in vitro and in vivo apoptosis model system. Annexin V cDNA was obtained from human placenta and rh-AV cloning vector used fusion E. coli vector. Expression vector was based on the E. coli pET system. Induction of rh-AV was used Isopropyl--D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and purification was used TALON metal affinity resin and T7 - Taq. Purification yield confirmed through SDS-PAGE. In camptothecin (0, 50, 100 uM) induced Jurkat T cell apoptosis model, AV-PI flow cytometry analysis and in vitro binding assay of I-124 labeled rh - AV were performed and compared. Small animal PET images of I-124 labeled rh-AV were obtained in Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model. Optimum expression condition was at 37, 250 rpm, 8 hr in 2X YT media including 1mM IPTG, Through two step purification process, rh-AV confirmed about 35 Kd single band by SDS-PAGE. As camptothecin concentration increasing, annexin V-FITC positive % increased in flow cytometry analysis and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV also increased. Annexin V-FITC positive % was correlated with and uptake of I-124 labeled rh-AV (R{sup 2}=0.99). In Fas-mediated hepatic apoptosis model, I-124 labeled rh-AV was selectively localized in liver region in PET image. Recombinant Human annexin V was produced by E. coli system and purified using two step affinity chromatography. Radiolabeled rh-AV was useful for the evaluation of apoptosis in vitro and in vivo model. Recombinant human annexin V could be used as apoptosis imaging agent with various radiolabel and optical probe.

  11. Non-invasive imaging of acute renal allograft rejection in rats using small animal F-FDG-PET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reuter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At present, renal grafts are the most common solid organ transplants world-wide. Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donor kidneys, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival are important. Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection (AR is still a major risk for graft survival. Nowadays, AR can only be definitively by renal biopsy. However, biopsies carry a risk of renal transplant injury and loss. Most important, they can not be performed in patients taking anticoagulant drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a non-invasive, entirely image-based method to assess AR in an allogeneic rat renal transplantation model using small animal positron emission tomography (PET and (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG. 3 h after i.v. injection of 30 MBq FDG into adult uni-nephrectomized, allogeneically transplanted rats, tissue radioactivity of renal parenchyma was assessed in vivo by a small animal PET-scanner (post operative day (POD 1,2,4, and 7 and post mortem dissection. The mean radioactivity (cps/mm(3 tissue as well as the percent injected dose (%ID was compared between graft and native reference kidney. Results were confirmed by histological and autoradiographic analysis. Healthy rats, rats with acute CSA nephrotoxicity, with acute tubular necrosis, and syngeneically transplanted rats served as controls. FDG-uptake was significantly elevated only in allogeneic grafts from POD 1 on when compared to the native kidney (%ID graft POD 1: 0.54+/-0.06; POD 2: 0.58+/-0.12; POD 4: 0.81+/-0.06; POD 7: 0.77+/-0.1; CTR: 0.22+/-0.01, n = 3-28. Renal FDG-uptake in vivo correlated with the results obtained by micro-autoradiography and the degree of inflammatory infiltrates observed in histology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that graft FDG-PET imaging is a new option to non-invasively, specifically, early detect, and follow

  12. Demonstration of an Axial PET concept for brain and small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Beltrame, P; Clinthorne, N; Meddi, F; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Pauss, F; Djambazov, L; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    Standard Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras need to reach a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity. To overcome this limitation we developed a novel concept of PET. Our AX-PET demonstrator is made of LYSO crystals aligned along the z coordinate (patient's axis) and WLS strips orthogonally placed with respect to the crystals. This concept offers full 3D localization of the photon interaction inside the camera. Thus the spatial resolution and the sensitivity can be simultaneously improved and the reconstruction of Compton interactions inside the detector is also possible. Moreover, by means of G-APDs for reading out the photons, both from LYSO and WLS, the detector is insensitive to magnetic fields and it is then suitable to be used in a combined PET/MRI apparatus. A complete Monte Carlo simulation and dedicated reconstruction software have been developed. The two final modules, each composed of 48 crystals and 156 WLS strips, have been built and fully characterized in a dedicated test se...

  13. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  14. Whole-body skeletal imaging in mice utilizing microPET: optimization of reproducibility and applications in animal models of bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Frank [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Lee, Yu-Po; Lieberman, Jay R. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Loening, Andreas M.; Chatziioannou, Arion [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Freedland, Stephen J.; Belldegrun, Arie S. [Department of Urology, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Leahy, Richard [University of Southern California School of Bioengineering, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sawyers, Charles L. [Department of Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA-Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Biomathematics, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The aims were to optimize reproducibility and establish [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone scanning in mice, using a dedicated small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner (microPET) and to correlate functional findings with anatomical imaging using computed tomography (microCAT). Optimal tracer uptake time for [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion was determined by performing dynamic microPET scans. Quantitative reproducibility was measured using region of interest (ROI)-based counts normalized to (a) the injected dose, (b) integral of the heart time-activity curve, or (c) ROI over the whole skeleton. Bone lesions were repetitively imaged. Functional images were correlated with X-ray and microCAT. The plateau of [{sup 18}F]fluoride uptake occurs 60 min after injection. The highest reproducibility was achieved by normalizing to an ROI over the whole skeleton, with a mean percent coefficient of variation [(SD/mean) x 100] of <15%-20%. Benign and malignant bone lesions were successfully repetitively imaged. Preliminary correlation of microPET with microCAT demonstrated the high sensitivity of microPET and the ability of microCAT to detect small osteolytic lesions. Whole-body [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone imaging using microPET is reproducible and can be used to serially monitor normal and pathological changes to the mouse skeleton. Morphological imaging with microCAT is useful to display correlative changes in anatomy. Detailed in vivo studies of the murine skeleton in various small animal models of bone diseases should now be possible. (orig.)

  15. Small animal PET imaging of TAG-72 expressing tumor using {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-3E8 Fab radioimmunoconjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, S. K.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Kang, J. H.; Cheon, G. J.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M. [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, H. J. [KRIBB, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein TAG-72 is express ed in the majority of human adenocarcinomas but is rarely expressed in most normal tissues, which makes it a potential target for the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of human cancer. 3E8 is anti-TAG-72 humanized antibody. Antibody fragments have some advantages such as improved pharmacokinetics and reduced immunogenicity compared to whole IgG. {sup 68}Ga is a short-lived positron emitter (t{sub 1/2} {sup 68} min; {beta}+, 88%) that is produced, independent from a cyclotron, by a {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator. The parent nuclide {sup 68}Ge has a long half-life (270.8 day), allowing its use as a generator for more than 1 year. A {sup 68}Ga is labeled with antibodies through bifunctional chelators, which allows possible kit formulation and which wide availability of the nuclear imaging agents. In this study, Fab fragment of anti-TAG-72 humanized Ab (3E8) was conjugated with 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and radiolabeled with {sup 68}Ga and acquire small animal PET image.

  16. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Tau Pathology with 18F-THK5117 in 2 Transgenic Mouse Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Matthias; Jaworska, Anna; Probst, Federico; Overhoff, Felix; Korzhova, Viktoria; Lindner, Simon; Carlsen, Janette; Bartenstein, Peter; Harada, Ryuichi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Haass, Christian; Van Leuven, Fred; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Herms, Jochen; Rominger, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal accumulation of tau aggregates in the brain is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. We visualized tau deposition in vivo with the previously developed 2-arylquinoline derivative (18)F-THK5117 using small-animal PET in conjunction with autoradiography and immunohistochemistry gold standard assessment in 2 transgenic mouse models expressing hyperphosphorylated tau. Small-animal PET recordings were obtained in groups of P301S (n = 11) and biGT mice (n = 16) of different ages, with age-matched wild-type (WT) serving as controls. After intravenous administration of 16 ± 2 MBq of (18)F-THK5117, a dynamic 90-min emission recording was initiated for P301S mice and during 20-50 min after injection for biGT mice, followed by a 15-min transmission scan. After coregistration to the MRI atlas and scaling to the cerebellum, we performed volume-of-interest-based analysis (SUV ratio [SUVR]) and statistical parametric mapping. Small-animal PET results were compared with autoradiography ex vivo and in vitro and further validated with AT8 staining for neurofibrillary tangles. SUVRs calculated from static recordings during the interval of 20-50 min after tracer injection correlated highly with estimates of binding potential based on the entire dynamic emission recordings (R = 0.85). SUVR increases were detected in the brain stem of aged P301S mice (+11%; P parametric mapping analysis. Saturable binding of the tracer was verified by autoradiographic blocking studies. In the first dedicated small-animal PET study in 2 different transgenic tauopathy mouse models using the tau tracer (18)F-THK5117, the temporal and spatial progression could be visualized in good correlation with gold standard assessments of tau accumulation. The serial small-animal PET method could afford the means for preclinical testing of novel therapeutic approaches by accommodating interanimal variability at baseline, while detection thresholds in young animals have to be considered.

  17. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gan, B.; Hu, Y.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e- to 180,000e-, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e- at zero farad plus 5.4 e- per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  18. Characteristics of a multichannel low-noise front-end ASIC for CZT-based small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, W., E-mail: gaowu@nwpu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Liu, H., E-mail: newhui.cn@gmail.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Gan, B., E-mail: shadow524@163.com [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Computer S and T, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an (China); Hu, Y., E-mail: Yann.Hu@ires.in2p3.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, IN2P3/CNRS/UDS, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characteristics of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit dedicated to CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for a small animal PET imaging system. A low-noise readout method based on the charge integration and the delayed peak detection is proposed. An eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.3 mm ×2.3 mm. The prototype chip is tested in different methods including electronic test, energy spectrum test and irradiation test. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000e{sup −} to 180,000e{sup −}, reflecting the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 mV/fC at the shaping time of 1 μs. The best test result of the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 58.9 e{sup −} at zero farad plus 5.4 e{sup −} per picofarad. The nonlinearity and the crosstalk are less than 3% and less than 2%, respectively, at the room temperature. The static power dissipation is about 3 mW/channel.

  19. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatziioannou, A.; Qi, J.; Moore, A.; Annala, A.; Nguyen, K.; Leahy, R.M.; Cherry, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior.

  20. IMOTEPAD: A mixed-signal 64-channel front-end ASIC for small-animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaochao; Ollivier-Henry, Nicolas; Gao, Wu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Colledani, Claude; Humbert, Bernard; Brasse, David; Hu, Yann

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the design and characteristics of a mixed-signal 64-channel front-end readout ASIC called IMOTEPAD dedicated to multi-channel plate (MCP) photodetector coupled to LYSO scintillating crystals for small-animal PET imaging. In our configuration, the crystals are oriented in the axial direction readout on both sides by individual photodetector channels allowing the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency to be independent of each other. As a result, both energy signals and timing triggers from the photodetectors are required to be read out by the front-end ASIC. This dedicated ASIC IMOTEPAD comprises two parts: the analog part IMOTEPA and the digital part IMOTEPD. The IMOTEPA is dedicated to energy measurement. And the timing information is digitized by the IMOTEPD in which the key principal element is a time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) with 32 delay cells. The chip is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that for the analog part IMOTEPA, the energy gain is 13.1 mV/pC while the peak time of a CR-RC pulse shaper is 280 ns. The SNR is 39 dB and the RMS noise is 300 μV. The nonlinearity is less than 3%. The crosstalk is less than 0.2%. For the IMOTEPD, the bin size of the TDC is 625 ps with a reference clock of 50 MHz. The RMS jitter of the DLL is less than 42 ps. The DNL of the TDC is equal to about 0.17 LSB and the INL is equal to 0.31 LSB. The power dissipation of each channel is less than 16.8 mW. The design of the ASIC, especially for TDC and the measurement results of the IMOTEPAD will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  1. The influence of the image reconstruction in relative quantification in SPECT/PET/CT animal; A influencia da reconstrucao da imagem na quantificacao relativa em SPECT/PET/CT animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, Sarah; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: sarahsoriano@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ),Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Sergio; Barboza, Thiago [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial resolution of the equipment SPECT/PET/CT animal to different reconstruction methods and the influence of this parameter in the mouse dosimetry C57BL6, aimed at development of new radiopharmaceuticals for use in humans. CT and SPECT images were obtained from a simulator composed of four spheres of different diameters (d), which simulate captating lesions by the equipment FLEX ™ Triumph ™ Pre-Clinical Imaging System used for preclinical studies in the Hospital Universitario (HU/UFRJ). In order to simulate a real study, the total volume of the simulator (body) was filled with a solution of {sup 99m}Tc diluted in water and the spheres were filled with concentrations four time higher than the body of the simulator. From the gross SPECT images it was used filtered backprojection method (FBP) with application of different filters: Hamming, Hann and Ramp, ranging the cutoff frequencies. The resolution of the equipment found in the study was 9.3 to 9.4 mm, very below the value provided by the manufacturer of 1.6mm. Thus, the protocol for mice can be optimized as being the FBP reconstruction method of Hamming filter, cutoff of 0.5 to yield a resolution from 9.3 to 9.4mm. This value indicates that captating regions of diameter below 9.3 mm are not properly quantified.

  2. PET and SPECT imaging in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Amy K; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-01-01

    Veterinarians have gained increasing access to positron emission tomography (PET and PET/CT) imaging facilities, allowing them to use this powerful molecular imaging technique for clinical and research applications. SPECT is currently being used more in Europe than in the United States and has been shown to be useful in veterinary oncology and in the evaluation of orthopedic diseases. SPECT brain perfusion and receptor imaging is used to investigate behavioral disorders in animals that have interesting similarities to human psychiatric disorders. This article provides an overview of the potential applications of PET and SPECT. The use of commercially available and investigational PET radiopharmaceuticals in the management of veterinary disease has been discussed. To date, most of the work in this field has utilized the commercially available PET tracer, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose for oncologic imaging. Normal biodistribution studies in several companion animal species (cats, dogs, and birds) have been published to assist in lesion detection and interpretation for veterinary radiologists and clinicians. Studies evaluating other (18)F-labeled tracers for research applications are underway at several institutions and companion animal models of human diseases are being increasingly recognized for their value in biomarker and therapy development. Although PET and SPECT technologies are in their infancy for clinical veterinary medicine, increasing access to and interest in these applications and other molecular imaging techniques has led to a greater knowledge and collective body of expertise for veterinarians worldwide. Initiation and fostering of physician-veterinarian collaborations are key components to the forward movement of this field.

  3. Assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose by means of Bayesian ICA and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods in small animal PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berradja, Khadidja; Boughanmi, Nabil

    2016-09-01

    In dynamic cardiac PET FDG studies the assessment of myocardial metabolic rate of glucose (MMRG) requires the knowledge of the blood input function (IF). IF can be obtained by manual or automatic blood sampling and cross calibrated with PET. These procedures are cumbersome, invasive and generate uncertainties. The IF is contaminated by spillover of radioactivity from the adjacent myocardium and this could cause important error in the estimated MMRG. In this study, we show that the IF can be extracted from the images in a rat heart study with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) by means of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based on Bayesian theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling method (BICA). Images of the heart from rats were acquired with the Sherbrooke small animal PET scanner. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn around the rat image and decomposed into blood and tissue using BICA. The Statistical study showed that there is a significant difference (p < 0.05) between MMRG obtained with IF extracted by BICA with respect to IF extracted from measured images corrupted with spillover.

  4. PET radiopharmaceuticals for neuroreceptor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Routine clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals for the noninvasive imaging of brain receptors, transporters,and enzymes are commonly labeled with positron emitting nuclides such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Certain minimal conditions need to be fulfilled for these PET ligands to be used as imaging agents in vivo. Some of these prerequisites are discussed and examples of the most useful clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals that have found application in the central nervous system are reviewed.

  5. Evaluation of a virtual pet visit system with live video streaming of patient images over the Internet in a companion animal intensive care unit in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, Joris H.; Melsen, Diede N.; Almalik, Osama; Roomer, Wendy; Endenburg, Nienke

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a virtual pet visit system (“TelePet” System, TPS) on owners and staff of a companion animal ICU. Design Longitudinal interventional study (2010–2013). Setting Companion animal ICU at a university veterinary medical teaching hospital. Study Populations Pet owners,

  6. Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) intrinsic activity correction and minimal detectable target activity study for SPECT imaging with a LSO-based animal PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu; Shao, Yiping

    2008-08-01

    This work is part of a feasibility study to develop SPECT imaging capability on a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) based animal PET system. The SPECT acquisition was enabled by inserting a collimator assembly inside the detector ring and acquiring data in singles mode. The same LSO detectors were used for both PET and SPECT imaging. The intrinsic radioactivity of 176Lu in the LSO crystals, however, contaminates the SPECT data, and can generate image artifacts and introduce quantification error. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of a LSO background subtraction method, and to estimate the minimal detectable target activity (MDTA) of image object for SPECT imaging. For LSO background correction, the LSO contribution in an image study was estimated based on a pre-measured long LSO background scan and subtracted prior to the image reconstruction. The MDTA was estimated in two ways. The empirical MDTA (eMDTA) was estimated from screening the tomographic images at different activity levels. The calculated MDTA (cMDTA) was estimated from using a formula based on applying a modified Currie equation on an average projection dataset. Two simulated and two experimental phantoms with different object activity distributions and levels were used in this study. The results showed that LSO background adds concentric ring artifacts to the reconstructed image, and the simple subtraction method can effectively remove these artifacts—the effect of the correction was more visible when the object activity level was near or above the eMDTA. For the four phantoms studied, the cMDTA was consistently about five times of the corresponding eMDTA. In summary, we implemented a simple LSO background subtraction method and demonstrated its effectiveness. The projection-based calculation formula yielded MDTA results that closely correlate with that obtained empirically and may have predicative value for imaging applications.

  7. Emotional Support Animals, Service Animals, and Pets on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bergen, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, universities have been accommodating physically disabled students who require guide dogs and other types of service animals. Within the past several years, however, mentally disabled students have increasingly petitioned colleges with no-pet policies to permit them to bring their animals on campus because they need a companion or…

  8. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  9. Synthesis and small-animal PET image of 18F-Fallypride%18F-Fallypride的自动化合成与小动物PET显像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨敏; 徐宇平; 潘栋辉; 王颂佩; 唐婕; 黄洪波; 罗世能

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究高效、简单的自动化合成多巴胺D2受体显像剂(S)-(-)-N-(1-烯丙基吡咯烷-2-氨基甲基)-5-(3-18F)-2,3-二甲氧基苯甲酰胺(18F-Fallypride)的方法,并用小动物PET观察其在小鼠活体内的生物分布.方法 采用国产氟标记多功能模块控制整个过程,18F-在乙腈溶液中与前体(s)-(-)-N-(1-烯丙基吡咯烷-2-氨基甲基)-5-(3-磺酰基)-2,3-二甲氧基苯甲酰胺(OTSF)直接反应生成18F-Fallypride,混合物装柱,产品被C18柱吸附,用水冲洗柱,用少量乙醇淋出,加生理盐水稀释.ICR小鼠给药后经小动物PET活体显像.结果 18F-Fallypride放化产率为40.7%(已校正),合成时间为40 min,无需高效液相色谱(HPLC)法分离,放化纯>95%.注射18F-Fallypride后ICR小鼠经小动物PET显像,脑内纹状体区域摄取最高,且双侧放射性浓聚对称,清除较慢.结论 18F-Fallypride自动化合成速度快,效率高.18F-Fallypride适于多巴胺D2受体显像.%Objective Benzamide,5-(3-fluoropropyl)-2,3-dimethoxy-N-[(2S)-1-(2-propenyl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]methyl(Fallypride)is a well-known dopamine D2 and D3 antagonist.18F-Fallypride PET has been used to study D2 and D3 receptor occupancy and density in neuropsychiatric disorders and aging in humans.This study aimed to develop an automated synthesis of the potent dopamine D2 and D3 receptor PET imaging agent and to study the distribution of the mice by small-animal PET.Methods 18F ion Was reacted with precursor(s)-(-)-N-(1-allyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl-5-(3-tolunesulfonyloxypropyl)-2,3-dimethoxy-benzamide in a chemical process control unit(CPCU).The crude product was transported to a C18 column.18F-Fallypride was absorbed on the column.the column Was washed by water.18F-Fallypride was then eluted from the column with small volume of ethanol.The mice were imaged by small-animal PET after in travenous 18F-Fallypride(1.85 MBq).Results It took 40 min for synthesizing 18F-Fallypride at CPCU,the radiochemical yield was 40

  10. Development of a PET Insert for simultaneously small animal PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Daowu; Liu, Shuangquan; Wang, Peilin; Feng, Baotong; Chai, Pei; Wei, Long [Division of Nuclear Technology and Applications, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Radiographic Techniques and Equipment, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2015-05-18

    PET/MR is a new multi-modality imaging system which provide both structural and functional information with good soft tissue imaging ability and no ionizing radiation. In recent years, PET/MR is under major progress because of the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The goal of this study is to develop a MRI compatible PET insert based on SiPM and LYSO scintillator. The PET system was constituted by the detector ring, electronics and software. The detector ring consists of 16 detector module. The inner diameter of the ring was 151 mm, the external diameter was 216 mm, which was big enough for small animal research, e.g. rat, rabbit and tupaia. The sensor of each module was 2*2 SensL SPMArraySL, coupled with an array of 14 x 14 LYSO crystals, each crystal measuring 2 mm x 2 mm 10 mm. The detector was encapsulated in a copper box for light and magnetic shielding. Resister charge multiplexing circuit was used in the front end electronics. Each detector output 8X and 8Y position signals. One summed timing signal was extracted from the common cathode of all 64 channels. All these signals were transmitted to digital electronic board by a 3 m long coaxial cable from inside of the MR to the outside. Each digital electronic board handled 8 detector modules based on FPGA to obtain the timing, position and energy information of a single event. And then these single events were sent to the coincidence processing board to produce coincidence packets which are prepared for further processing. A 0.2mCi 68Ge line source was used to do the preliminary imaging test. The image was reconstructed by 3D-OSEM algorithm. The initial result proved the system to be feasible as a PET. FDG phantom imaging and simultaneous PET/MR imaging are in progress.

  11. Fundamentals of PET and PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Kwee, Thomas C; Surti, Suleman; Akin, Esma A; Yoo, Don; Alavi, Abass

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the fundamental principles of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging have been described. The basic physics of PET instrumentation, radiotracer chemistry, and the artifacts, as well as normal physiological or benign pathological variants, have been described and presented to the readers in a lucid manner to enable them an easy grasp of the fundamentals of the subject. Finally, we have outlined the current developments in quantitative PET imaging, including dual time point and delayed PET imaging, time-of-flight technology in PET imaging and partial volume correction, and global disease assessment with their potential of being incorporated into the assessment of benign and malignant disorders.

  12. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  13. Geo-PET: A novel generic organ-pet for small animal organs and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Levent

    Reconstructed tomographic image resolution of small animal PET imaging systems is improving with advances in radiation detector development. However the trend towards higher resolution systems has come with an increase in price and system complexity. Recent developments in the area of solid-state photomultiplication devices like silicon photomultiplier arrays (SPMA) are creating opportunities for new high performance tools for PET scanner design. Imaging of excised small animal organs and tissues has been used as part of post-mortem studies in order to gain detailed, high-resolution anatomical information on sacrificed animals. However, this kind of ex-vivo specimen imaging has largely been limited to ultra-high resolution muCT. The inherent limitations to PET resolution have, to date, excluded PET imaging from these ex-vivo imaging studies. In this work, we leverage the diminishing physical size of current generation SPMA designs to create a very small, simple, and high-resolution prototype detector system targeting ex-vivo tomographic imaging of small animal organs and tissues. We investigate sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the reconstructed image quality of a prototype small animal PET scanner designed specifically for imaging of excised murine tissue and organs. We aim to demonstrate that a cost-effective silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array based design with thin crystals (2 mm) to minimize depth of interaction errors might be able to achieve sub-millimeter resolution. We hypothesize that the substantial decrease in sensitivity associated with the thin crystals can be compensated for with increased solid angle detection, longer acquisitions, higher activity and wider acceptance energy windows (due to minimal scatter from excised organs). The constructed system has a functional field of view (FoV) of 40 mm diameter, which is adequate for most small animal specimen studies. We perform both analytical (3D-FBP) and iterative (ML-EM) methods in order to

  14. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  15. Early Detection of Tumor Response by FLT/MicroPET Imaging in a C26 Murine Colon Carcinoma Solid Tumor Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET imaging demonstrated the change of glucose consumption of tumor cells, but problems with specificity and difficulties in early detection of tumor response to chemotherapy have led to the development of new PET tracers. Fluorine-18-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT images cellular proliferation by entering the salvage pathway of DNA synthesis. In this study, we evaluate the early response of colon carcinoma to the chemotherapeutic drug, lipo-Dox, in C26 murine colorectal carcinoma-bearing mice by 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. The male BALB/c mice were bilaterally inoculated with 1×105 and 1×106 C26 tumor cells per flank. Mice were intravenously treated with 10 mg/kg lipo-Dox at day 8 after 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT imaging. The biodistribution of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT were followed by the microPET imaging at day 9. For the quantitative measurement of microPET imaging at day 9, 18F-FLT was superior to 18F-FDG for early detection of tumor response to Lipo-DOX at various tumor sizes (<0.05. The data of biodistribution showed similar results with those from the quantification of SUV (standard uptake value by microPET imaging. The study indicates that 18F-FLT/microPET is a useful imaging modality for early detection of chemotherapy in the colorectal mouse model.

  16. Preparation of ⁶⁸Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides using a manual labelling approach for small-animal PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Eduardo; Martínez, Alfonso; Oteo, Marta; García, Angel; Morcillo, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides are a promising PET radiotracers used in the detection of different tumours types due to their ability for binding specifically receptors overexpressed in these. Furthermore, (68)Ga can be produced by a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator on site which is a very good alternative to cyclotron-based PET isotopes. Here, we describe a manual labelling approach for the synthesis of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides based on concentration and purification of the commercial (68)Ga/(68)Ga generator eluate using an anion exchange-cartridge. (68)Ga-DOTA-TATE was used to image a pheochromocytoma xenograft mouse model by a microPET/CT scanner. The method described provides satisfactory results, allowing the subsequent (68)Ga use to label DOTA-peptides. The simplicity of the method along with its implementation reduced cost, makes it useful in preclinical PET studies.

  17. Construction and tests of demonstrator modules for a 3-D axial PET system for brain or small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Pauss, P; Meddi, F; Beltrame, P; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Casella, C; Djambazov, G; Smith, S; Johnson, I; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; Honscheid, K; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Cochran, E; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Huh, S; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    The design and construction of a PET camera module with high sensitivity, full 3-D spatial reconstruction and very good energy resolution is presented. The basic principle consists of an axial arrangement of long scintillation crystals around the Field Of View (FOV), providing a measurement of the transverse coordinates of the interacting 511 keV gamma ray. On top of each layer of crystals, an array of Wave-Length Shifter (WLS) strips, which collect the light leaving the crystals sideways, is positioned orthogonal to the crystal direction. The signals in the WLS strips allow a precise measurement of the z (axial) co-ordinate of the 511 keV gamma-ray gamma impact. The construction of two modules used for demonstration of the concept is described. First preliminary results on spatial and energy resolution from one full module will be shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Image reconstruction techniques for high resolution human brain PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comtat, C.; Bataille, F.; Sureau, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    High resolution PET imaging is now a well established technique not only for small animal, but also for human brain studies. The ECAT HRRT brain PET scanner(Siemens Molecular Imaging) is characterized by an effective isotropic spatial resolution of 2.5 mm, about a factor of 2 better than for state-of-the-art whole-body clinical PET scanners. Although the absolute sensitivity of the HRRT (6.5 %) for point source in the center of the field-of-view is increased relative to whole-body scanner (typically 4.5 %) thanks to a larger co-polar aperture, the sensitivity in terms of volumetric resolution (75 (m{sup 3} at best for whole-body scanners and 16 (m{sup 3} for t he HRRT) is much lower. This constraint has an impact on the performance of image reconstruction techniques, in particular for dynamic studies. Standard reconstruction methods used with clinical whole-body PET scanners are not optimal for this application. Specific methods had to be developed, based on fully 3D iterative techniques. Different refinements can be added in the reconstruction process to improve image quality: more accurate modeling of the acquisition system, more accurate modeling of the statistical properties of the acquired data, anatomical side information to guide the reconstruction . We will present the performances these added developments for neuronal imaging in humans. (author)

  19. Small-animal PET imaging of amyloid-beta plaques with [11C]PiB and its multi-modal validation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Manook

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloid-β plaque (Aβ burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain with [(11C]PiB and specific activities commonly used in human studies. In vivo mouse brain MRI for anatomical reference was acquired with a clinical 1.5 T system. A recently characterized APP/PS1 mouse was employed to measure Aβ at different disease stages in homozygous and hemizygous animals. We performed multi-modal cross-validations for the PET results with ex vivo and in vitro methodologies, including regional brain biodistribution, multi-label digital autoradiography, protein quantification with ELISA, fluorescence microscopy, semi-automated histological quantification and radioligand binding assays. Specific [(11C]PiB uptake in individual brain regions with Aβ deposition was demonstrated and validated in all animals of the study cohort including homozygous AD animals as young as nine months. Corresponding to the extent of Aβ pathology, old homozygous AD animals (21 months showed the highest uptake followed by old hemizygous (23 months and young homozygous mice (9 months. In all AD age groups the cerebellum was shown to be suitable as an intracerebral reference region. PET results were cross-validated and consistent with all applied ex vivo and in vitro methodologies. The results confirm that the experimental setup for non-invasive [(11C]PiB imaging of Aβ in the APP/PS1 mice provides a feasible, reproducible and robust protocol for small-animalimaging. It allows longitudinal imaging studies with follow-up periods of approximately one and a

  20. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  1. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS; Estudios para la optimizaciOn de la calidad de imagen en el escaner ClearPET, modifi cando parametros del algoritmo IMF-OSEM 3D sobre adquisiciones simuladas con GAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, M.; Mendoza, J.; Embid, M.

    2007-09-27

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs.

  2. Characterization of the Ferrara animal PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Di Domenico, G; Damiani, C; Del Guerra, A; Gilardi, M C; Motta, A; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated small animal PET scanner, YAPPET, was designed and built at Ferrara University. Each detector consists of a 20x20 matrix of 2x2x30 mm sup 3 YAP:Ce finger-like crystals glued together and directly coupled to a Hamamatsu position sensitive photomultiplier. The scanner is made from four detectors positioned on a rotating gantry at a distance of 7.5 cm from the center and the field of view (FOV) is 4 cm both in the transaxial direction and in the axial direction. The system operates in 3D acquisition mode. The performance parameters of YAPPET scanner such as spatial, energy and time resolution, as well as its sensitivity and counting rate have been determined. The average spatial resolution over the whole FOV is 1.8 mm at FWHM and 4.2 mm at FWTM. The sensitivity at the center is 640 cps/mu Ci.

  3. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  4. PET/MR Imaging in Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Jensen, Karl Erik; Loft, Annika

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence suggesting that PET/MR imaging will have a role in many aspects of musculoskeletal imaging. The synergistic potential of hybrid PET/MR imaging in terms of acquiring anatomic, molecular, and functional data simultaneously seems advantageous in the diagnostic workup......, treatment planning and monitoring, and follow-up of patients with musculoskeletal malignancies, and may also prove helpful in assessment of musculoskeletal infectious and inflammatory disorders. The application of more sophisticated MR imaging sequences and PET radiotracers other than FDG in the diagnostic...... workup and follow-up of patients with musculoskeletal disorders should be explored....

  5. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  6. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirich, C., E-mail: c.weirich@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany); Byars, L.; Michel, C. [Siemens Healthcare, Molecular Imaging, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine – 4, Juelich (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner.

  7. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  8. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  9. 15 CFR 265.43 - Pets and other animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets and other animals. 265.43 Section... animals. Except in connection with the conduct of official business on the site or with the approval of... person shall bring upon the site any cat, dog, or other animal, provided, however, that blind persons...

  10. A Monte Carlo investigation of the spatial resolution performance of a small-animal PET scanner designed for mouse brain imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Yang, Yongfeng; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Our laboratory has developed PET detectors with depth-encoding accuracy of ∼2 mm based on finely pixelated crystals with a tapered geometry, readout at both ends with position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). These detectors are currently being used in our laboratory to build a one-ring high resolution PET scanner for mouse brain imaging studies. Due to the inactive areas around the PSAPDs, large gaps exist between the detector modules which can degrade the image spatial resolution obtained using analytical reconstruction with filtered backprojection (FBP). In this work, the Geant4-based GATE Monte Carlo package was used to assist in determining whether gantry rotation was necessary and to assess the expected spatial resolution of the system. The following factors were investigated: rotating vs. static gantry modes with and without compensation of missing data using the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method, two levels of depth-encoding, and positron annihilation effects for (18)F. Our results indicate that while the static scanner produces poor quality FBP images with streak and ring artifacts, the image quality was greatly improved after compensation of missing data. The simulation indicates that the expected FWHM system spatial resolution is 0.70 ± 0.05 mm, which approaches the predicted limit of 0.5 mm FWHM due to positron range, photon non-colinearity and physical detector element size effects. We conclude that excellent reconstructed resolution without gantry rotation is possible even using FBP if the gaps are appropriately handled and that this design can approach the resolution limits set by positron annihilation physics.

  11. NEMA NU 4-2008 Comparison of Preclinical PET Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Bao, Qinan; Bergeron, Mélanie; Blankemeyer, Eric; Blinder, Stephan; Cañadas, Mario; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Dinelle, Katherine; Elhami, Esmat; Jans, Hans-Sonke; Lage, Eduardo; Lecomte, Roger; Sossi, Vesna; Surti, Suleman; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Vaquero, Juan José; Vicente, Esther; Williams, Darin A.; Laforest, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard NU 4-2008 for performance measurements of small-animal tomographs was recently published. Before this standard, there were no standard testing procedures for preclinical PET systems, and manufacturers could not provide clear specifications similar to those available for clinical systems under NEMA NU 2-1994 and 2-2001. Consequently, performance evaluation papers used methods that were modified ad hoc from the clinical PET NEMA standard, thus making comparisons between systems difficult. Methods We acquired NEMA NU 4-2008 performance data for a collection of commercial animal PET systems manufactured since 2000: micro- PET P4, microPET R4, microPET Focus 120, microPET Focus 220, Inveon, ClearPET, Mosaic HP, Argus (formerly eXplore Vista), VrPET, LabPET 8, and LabPET 12. The data included spatial resolution, counting-rate performance, scatter fraction, sensitivity, and image quality and were acquired using settings for routine PET. Results The data showed a steady improvement in system performance for newer systems as compared with first-generation systems, with notable improvements in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Conclusion Variation in system design makes direct comparisons between systems from different vendors difficult. When considering the results from NEMA testing, one must also consider the suitability of the PET system for the specific imaging task at hand. PMID:22699999

  12. Positron range in PET imaging: an alternative approach for assessing and correcting the blurring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Le Loirec, Cindy; Champion, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron range impairs resolution in PET imaging, especially for high-energy emitters and for small-animal PET. De-blurring in image reconstruction is possible if the blurring distribution is known. Further, the percentage of annihilation events within a given distance from the point ...

  13. The emerging disease occurrence of pet animals in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umma Habiba

    2016-12-01

    Results: Among the most general pet animals in Bangladesh (dog, cat, rabbit, the mostly occured diseases were scabies (23.07%, feline ascariasis (37.14% and rabbit mange (34.61%, while the less frequent diseases were canine parvovirus enteritis (2.19%, cat scratch disease (5.71% and overgrown teeth (7.69%. Conclusion: The study provides basic information about the current status and the percentage (% of disease occurrence considering the emerging diseases of pet animals in Bangladesh. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 413-419

  14. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  15. PET Imaging of Skull Base Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, Erik S; Iagaru, Andrei; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy

    2007-10-01

    The utility of 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for the evaluation of skull base tumors is incompletely investigated, as a limited number of studies specifically focus on this region with regard to PET imaging. Several patterns can be ascertained, however, by synthesizing the data from various published reports and cases of primary skull base malignancies, as well as head and neck malignancies that extend secondarily to the skull base, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors, parotid cancers, and orbital tumors.

  16. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  17. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...

  18. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Leiner, Tim [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh [Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-18

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  19. The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

  20. Investigations of Pet Animal Breeding Trends in Sivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ziya Oğrak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the present situation and future trends of pet which a member of our home in central Anatolian city of Sivas. For this purpose, 100 people (73 male, 27 female used with face to face interviews in the questionnaire aged 18-72 (mean 32.25, monthly income changed 400-5000 Turkish Liras (average 1841 and, 16 questions except for personal information were asked to participants. Participants, 51% graduated the university, 46% married, 82% lived in apartments, and 64% of the occupied own houses or belonging to their family have been identified. According to the findings, any breeders of pet in the house in Sivas rate were 31%. and, the people's income level , gender , age , marital status , educational level , having a child and the seat of the house with a garden and the lack of this on the ratio statistically not significant was observed. Highest percentage pet in species of breeding animals was the bird and, 48.4% of those pet owners did not go to the veterinarian at all and, 24.6% of non-animal’s previously had a bad incident with animals that have been identified. As a result, in terms of veterinary importance will increase day by day with pet animal breeding priorities for the further dissemination of the determination of the current situation and problems are seen to be important and, larger-scale research to be done will be helpful.

  1. Comparison between Bioluminescent Imaging and Small-animal PET-CT in Xenotransplantation Tumor Model with Luc-expressing Cell%荧光素酶标的人肝癌细胞裸鼠异种移植瘤模型的生物发光成像和PET-CT成像比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小颖; 高凯; 董伟; 张连峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish hepatic carcinoma mouse model with human BEL-7402 cells expressing luciferase and to compare bioluminescence imaging with that by small-animal PET-CT.Method The vector containing luciferase gene was constructed and transfected into human BEL-7402 liver tumor cell line and selected with G418 to obtain stable Luc-expressing clones.5 × l05 cells, constitutively expressing luciferase, were inoculated to liver of BALB/cA-nu through hepatic portal vein for assessment of tumor growth with the whole-body optical imaging system and small-animal PET-CT.Result The stable Luc-expressing BEL-7402 cell lines were abtained, which could grow to tumor mass after implantation.There was high uptake of 18 F-FDG at the edge of liver with small-animal PET-CT.Conclusion Luc-labeled BEL-7402 cell lines and a mouse tumor model based on the cell lines are established, the whole-body optical imaging system combined with small-animal PET-CT provides a new and reliable technology for the in situ tumor model, which is a new tool to further study the mechanism of metastasis and drug discovery.%目的 利用荧光素酶基因标记的人肝癌细胞株BEL-7402建立裸鼠肝原位移植模型,及小鼠肝原位移植模型的生物发光和小动物PET-CT成像的比较.方法 构建表达荧光素酶基因的真核表达载体并将其转人人肝癌细胞BEL-7402,经梯度浓度G418筛选获得稳定表达荧光素酶基因的细胞克隆并扩大培养.BALB/cA-nu裸鼠肝门静脉接种5×10(5),个发光细胞使其成瘤,活体荧光成像和小动物PET-CT成像系统观察肿瘤的生长情况.结果 获得了稳定表达Luc的人肝癌细胞株,将其接种到裸鼠体内,活体荧光成像系统观察发现能够成瘤,小动物PET-CT影像观察发现小鼠肝脏边缘对18F-FDG有高摄取区域.结论 利用荧光素酶基因标记的人肝癌细胞BEL7402成功建立了原位肝癌裸鼠模型,小动物活体成像结合小动物PET-CT技术为原位肿瘤模

  2. Combined PET/MR imaging in neurology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Beyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    reconstructed following CT-based and MR-based AC, respectively. MR-AC was performed based on: (A) standard Dixon-Water-Fat segmentation (DWFS), (B) DWFS with co-registered and segmented CT bone values superimposed, and (C) with co-registered full CT-based attenuation image. All PET images were reconstructed...... on a transaxial T1w-MR image traversing the central basal ganglia. We report the relative difference (%) of the mean ROI values for (A)-(C) in reference to PET/CT (D). In a separate phantom experiment a 2L plastic bottle was layered with approximately 12mm of Gypsum plaster to mimic skull bone. The phantom...... was imaged on PET/CT only and standard MR-AC was performed by replacing hyperdense CT attenuation values corresponding to bone (plaster) with attenuation values of water. PET image reconstruction was performed with CT-AC (D) and CT-AC using the modified CT images corresponding to MR-AC using DWFS (A...

  3. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  4. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; von Schulthess, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET{sub Ge68}) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET{sub CT}) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT}. Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET{sub CT} in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET{sub Ge68} images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT} images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the

  5. PET imaging in patients with Modic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, H.B.; Manniche, C. [Univ. of Southern Denmark, Funen (Denmark). Back Research Centre; Petersen, H.; Hoeilund-Carlsen, P.F. [Odense University Hospital, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was via PET imaging to reveal if any highly metabolic processes were occurring in Modic changes type 1 and/or in the adjacent discs. Modic changes (MC) are signal changes in the vertebral endplate and body visualised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MC are strongly associated with low back pain (LBP). MC type 1 appear to be inflammation on MRI, and histological and biochemical findings make it highly likely that an inflammation is present. Though MC is painful no known treatment is available, and it is unknown which entities affect the progress or regress of MC. The changes observed on MRI are slow and take months to develop, but faster changes in the metabolism might provide a platform for monitoring patients. Patients from The Back Centre Funen, with low back pain in the area of L1 to S1, MC type 1 in L1 to L5, and a previous herniated lumbar disc. All patients had a PET scan using FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) as tracer. Included in the study were 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men, mean age 48.1 year (range 20-65). All MC were situated in the vertebrae both above and below the previously herniated disc/discs. Ten patients had MC at 1 level, and 1 had MC at 2 levels. The affected levels were 1 at L2/L3, 6 at L4 /L5, and 5 at L5/S1. All had a previous disc herniation and MC larger than 4 mm in diameter. Technically satisfactory PET scans were obtained. However, PET imaging showed no increases in metabolism in any vertebra or disc of any patient. Modic type 1 changes do not reveal themselves by showing increased metabolism with ordinary FDG PET imaging. PET tracers illuminating inflammation are being developed and hopefully may become more successful. (orig.)

  6. Exploratory matrix factorization for PET image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodewitz, A; Keck, I R; Tomé, A M; Lang, E W

    2010-01-01

    Features are extracted from PET images employing exploratory matrix factorization techniques such as nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). Appropriate features are fed into classifiers such as a support vector machine or a random forest tree classifier. An automatic feature extraction and classification is achieved with high classification rate which is robust and reliable and can help in an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. LOR-interleaving image reconstruction for PET imaging with fractional-crystal collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yusheng; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S.; Metzler, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important modality in medical and molecular imaging. However, in most PET applications, the resolution is still mainly limited by the physical crystal sizes or the detector’s intrinsic spatial resolution. To achieve images with better spatial resolution in a central region of interest (ROI), we have previously proposed using collimation in PET scanners. The collimator is designed to partially mask detector crystals to detect lines of response (LORs) within fractional crystals. A sequence of collimator-encoded LORs is measured with different collimation configurations. This novel collimated scanner geometry makes the reconstruction problem challenging, as both detector and collimator effects need to be modeled to reconstruct high-resolution images from collimated LORs. In this paper, we present a LOR-interleaving (LORI) algorithm, which incorporates these effects and has the advantage of reusing existing reconstruction software, to reconstruct high-resolution images for PET with fractional-crystal collimation. We also develop a 3D ray-tracing model incorporating both the collimator and crystal penetration for simulations and reconstructions of the collimated PET. By registering the collimator-encoded LORs with the collimator configurations, high-resolution LORs are restored based on the modeled transfer matrices using the non-negative least-squares method and EM algorithm. The resolution-enhanced images are then reconstructed from the high-resolution LORs using the MLEM or OSEM algorithm. For validation, we applied the LORI method to a small-animal PET scanner, A-PET, with a specially designed collimator. We demonstrate through simulated reconstructions with a hot-rod phantom and MOBY phantom that the LORI reconstructions can substantially improve spatial resolution and quantification compared to the uncollimated reconstructions. The LORI algorithm is crucial to improve overall image quality of collimated PET, which

  8. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Máynez, Leticia O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Vergara Villegas, Osslan O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  9. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F. [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  10. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lefevre, T. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Kontaxakis, G. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Santos, A. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Darambara, D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-20

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  11. PET imaging in patients with Modic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Hanne; Pedersen, Henrik; Manniche, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was via PET imaging to reveal if any highly metabolic processes were occurring in Modic changes type 1 and/or in the adjacent discs. Modic changes (MC) are signal changes in the vertebral endplate and body visualised by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MC are strongly...... disc. All patients had a PET scan using FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) as tracer. RESULTS: Included in the study were 11 patients, 4 women and 7 men, mean age 48.1 year (range 20-65). All MC were situated in the vertebrae both above and below the previously herniated disc/discs. Ten patients had MC at 1...... level, and 1 had MC at 2 levels. The affected levels were 1 at L2/L3, 6 at L4 /L5, and 5 at L5/S1. All had a previous disc herniation and MC larger than 4 mm in diameter. Technically satisfactory PET scans were obtained. However, PET imaging showed no increases in metabolism in any vertebra or disc...

  12. Deformation field correction for spatial normalization of PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgel, Murat; Carass, Aaron; Resnick, Susan M.; Wong, Dean F.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential for population studies, yet the current state of the art in PET-to-PET registration is limited to the application of conventional deformable registration methods that were developed for structural images. A method is presented for the spatial normalization of PET images that improves their anatomical alignment over the state of the art. The approach works by correcting the deformable registration result using a model that is learned from training data having both PET and structural images. In particular, viewing the structural registration of training data as ground truth, correction factors are learned by using a generalized ridge regression at each voxel given the PET intensities and voxel locations in a population-based PET template. The trained model can then be used to obtain more accurate registration of PET images to the PET template without the use of a structural image. A cross validation evaluation on 79 subjects shows that the proposed method yields more accurate alignment of the PET images compared to deformable PET-to-PET registration as revealed by 1) a visual examination of the deformed images, 2) a smaller error in the deformation fields, and 3) a greater overlap of the deformed anatomical labels with ground truth segmentations. PMID:26142272

  13. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  14. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  15. [¹⁸F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk of atheros......[(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET ((18)FDG PET) imaging has emerged as a promising tool for assessment of atherosclerosis. By targeting atherosclerotic plaque glycolysis, a marker for plaque inflammation and hypoxia, (18)FDG PET can assess plaque vulnerability and potentially predict risk...... of atherosclerosis-related disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. With excellent reproducibility, (18)FDG PET can be a surrogate end point in clinical drug trials, improving trial efficiency. This article summarizes key findings in the literature, discusses limitations of (18)FDG PET imaging...... of atherosclerosis, and reports recommendations to optimize imaging protocols....

  16. Molecular imaging of cancer using PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    for molecular imaging of cancer. Especially the possibility of a quick transfer of methods developed in animals to patients (translational research) is an important strength. This article will briefly discuss the newest applications and their importance and perspective in relation to the shift in paradigm......Molecular imaging allows for the study of molecular and cellular events in the living intact organism. The nuclear medicine methodologies of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) posses several advantages, which make them particularly suited...

  17. Animal Images and Metaphors in Animal Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In literary works animal images are frequently used as the “source domain” of a metaphor to disclose the natures of the “target domain”, human beings. This is called “cross-domain mapping” or “conceptual metaphor” in cognitive linguistics, which is based on the similar qualities between animals and human beings. Thus the apparent descriptions of the animals are really the deep revelations of the human beings. Animal Farm is one exemplary product of this special expressing way. Diversified animal images are intelligently used by George Orwell to represent the people, so all the characters are animals in appearance, but humans in nature. Starting from the animal images and then the conceptual metaphors, readers can perceive a fresh understanding of this classical book. In this novel, three conceptual metaphors are identified and the special findings can be illustrated as the following: Firstly, the whole story of the animals represents the history and politics of the Soviet Union. Secondly, the pigs symbolize the authorities of the society. Thirdly, the names of the characters in the novel reveal their identities.

  18. SPECT and PET Imaging of Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Valotassiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid membranes. They are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms and represent about 20% of all intracranial tumors. They are usually diagnosed after the third decade of life and they are more frequent in women than in men. According to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, meningiomas can be classified into grade I meningiomas, which are benign, grade II (atypical and grade III (anaplastic meningiomas, which have a much more aggressive clinical behaviour. Computed Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are routinely used in the diagnostic workup of patients with meningiomas. Molecular Nuclear Medicine Imaging with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT and Positron Emission Tomography (PET could provide complementary information to CT and MRI. Various SPECT and PET tracers may provide information about cellular processes and biological characteristics of meningiomas. Therefore, SPECT and PET imaging could be used for the preoperative noninvasive diagnosis and differential diagnosis of meningiomas, prediction of tumor grade and tumor recurrence, response to treatment, target volume delineation for radiation therapy planning, and distinction between residual or recurrent tumour from scar tissue.

  19. Animal Housing: The Secret Life of Students' Pets Is Not Always a Walk in the Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Animals owned by college students are particularly vulnerable to neglect, mistreatment, and abandonment, given the fact that pets are usually prohibited from college dorms and student apartments. Some students, however, persist in keeping pets on campus. (SLD)

  20. Childhood pet ownership, attachment to pets, and subsequent meat avoidance. The mediating role of empathy toward animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgerber, Hank; Mican, Frances

    2014-08-01

    Researchers studying childhood pet ownership outcomes do not typically focus on measures of adult diet, and those studying the psychology of meat consumption do not normally consider early experiences with companion animals. The present research sought to integrate these two areas by examining relationships between childhood pet ownership, pet attachment, empathy toward animals, belief in human-animal similarity, meat avoidance, and justifications for eating meat. Results from 273 individuals responding to a survey on an internet platform revealed that participants with greater childhood attachment to a pet reported greater meat avoidance as adults, an effect that disappeared when controlling for animal empathy. Greater childhood pet attachment was also related to the use of indirect, apologetic justifications for meat consumption, and this effect too, was mediated by empathy toward animals. Child pet ownership itself predicted views toward animals but not dietary behavior or meat-eating justifications. The authors propose a sequence of events by which greater childhood pet attachment leads to increased meat avoidance, focusing on the central role played by empathy toward animals.

  1. The application of PET imaging in psychoneuroimmunology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannestad, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a research tool that allows in vivo measurements of brain metabolism and specific target molecules. PET imaging can be used to measure these brain variables in a variety of species, including human and non-human primates, and rodents. PET imaging can therefore be combined with various experimental and clinical model systems that are commonly used in psychoneuroimmunology research.

  2. Optimizing modelling in iterative image reconstruction for preclinical pinhole PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorden, Marlies C.; van Roosmalen, Jarno; van der Have, Frans; Beekman, Freek J.

    2016-05-01

    The recently developed versatile emission computed tomography (VECTor) technology enables high-energy SPECT and simultaneous SPECT and PET of small animals at sub-mm resolutions. VECTor uses dedicated clustered pinhole collimators mounted in a scanner with three stationary large-area NaI(Tl) gamma detectors. Here, we develop and validate dedicated image reconstruction methods that compensate for image degradation by incorporating accurate models for the transport of high-energy annihilation gamma photons. Ray tracing software was used to calculate photon transport through the collimator structures and into the gamma detector. Input to this code are several geometric parameters estimated from system calibration with a scanning 99mTc point source. Effects on reconstructed images of (i) modelling variable depth-of-interaction (DOI) in the detector, (ii) incorporating photon paths that go through multiple pinholes (‘multiple-pinhole paths’ (MPP)), and (iii) including various amounts of point spread function (PSF) tail were evaluated. Imaging 18F in resolution and uniformity phantoms showed that including large parts of PSFs is essential to obtain good contrast-noise characteristics and that DOI modelling is highly effective in removing deformations of small structures, together leading to 0.75 mm resolution PET images of a hot-rod Derenzo phantom. Moreover, MPP modelling reduced the level of background noise. These improvements were also clearly visible in mouse images. Performance of VECTor can thus be significantly improved by accurately modelling annihilation gamma photon transport.

  3. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, 110 Donner, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla. (author)

  4. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, R; Karp, J S

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  5. Dedicated PET scanners for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.

    1997-12-01

    We have used computer simulations to compare two designs for a PET scanner dedicated to breast imaging with a whole-body PET scanner. The new designs combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, and good energy resolution to detect small, low-contrast masses. The detectors are position sensitive NaI(Tl) scintillators. The first design is a ring scanner surrounding the breast and the second consists of two planar detectors placed on opposite sides of the breast. We have employed standard performance measures to compare the different designs: contrast, percentage standard deviation of the background, and signal-to-noise ratios of reconstructed images. The results of the simulations show that both of the proposed designs have better lesion detectability than a whole-body scanner. The results also show that contrast is higher in the ring breast system but that the noise is lower in the planar breast system. Overall, the ring system yields images with the best signal-to-noise ratios, although the planar system offers practical advantages for imaging the breast and axilla.

  6. Animating facial images with drawings

    OpenAIRE

    Tunali, Gamze Dilek

    1996-01-01

    Ankara : Bilkent Univ., 1996. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1996. Includes bibliographical references leaves 54-56. The work presented here describes the power of 2D animation with texture mai^ping controlled by line drawings. Animation is specifically intended for facial animation and not restricted by the human face. We initially have a sequence of facial images which are taken from a video sequence of the same face and an image of another face to be animated...

  7. Molecular characterization of pneumococcal isolates from pets and laboratory animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van der Linden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Between 1986 and 2008 Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from 41 pets/zoo animals (guinea pigs (n = 17, cats (n = 12, horses (n = 4, dogs (n = 3, dolphins (n = 2, rat (n = 2, gorilla (n = 1 treated in medical veterinary laboratories and zoos, and 44 laboratory animals (mastomys (multimammate mice; n = 32, mice (n = 6, rats (n = 4, guinea pigs (n = 2 during routine health monitoring in an animal facility. S. pneumoniae was isolated from nose, lung and respiratory tract, eye, ear and other sites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carriage of the same isolate of S. pneumoniae over a period of up to 22 weeks was shown for four mastomys. Forty-one animals showed disease symptoms. Pneumococcal isolates were characterized by optochin sensitivity, bile solubility, DNA hybridization, pneumolysin PCR, serotyping and multilocus sequence typing. Eighteen of the 32 mastomys isolates (56% were optochin resistant, all other isolates were optochin susceptible. All mastomys isolates were serotype 14, all guinea pig isolates serotype 19F, all horse isolates serotype 3. Rats had serotypes 14 or 19A, mice 33A or 33F. Dolphins had serotype 23F, the gorilla serotype 14. Cats and dogs had many different serotypes. Four isolates were resistant to macrolides, three isolates also to clindamycin and tetracycline. Mastomys isolates were sequence type (ST 15 (serotype 14, an ST/serotype combination commonly found in human isolates. Cats, dogs, pet rats, gorilla and dolphins showed various human ST/serotype combinations. Lab rats and lab mice showed single locus variants (SLV of human STs, in human ST/serotype combinations. All guinea pig isolates showed the same completely new combination of known alleles. The horse isolates showed an unknown allele combination and three new alleles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The isolates found in mastomys, mice, rats, cats, dogs, gorilla and dolphins are most likely identical to human pneumococcal isolates. Isolates from

  8. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  9. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  10. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  11. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Chu; Melega, William; Barrio, Jorge R.; Phelps, Michael E.

    1996-12-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention.

  12. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment.

  13. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  14. PET FACE: MECHANISMS UNDERLYING HUMAN-ANIMAL RELATIONSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eBorgi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating behavioral and neurophysiological studies support the idea of infantile (cute faces as highly biologically relevant stimuli rapidly and unconsciously capturing attention and eliciting positive/affectionate behaviors, including willingness to care. It has been hypothesized that the presence of infantile physical and behavioral features in companion (or pet animals (i.e. dogs and cats might form the basis of our attraction to these species. Preliminary evidence has indeed shown that the human attentional bias toward the baby schema may extend to animal facial configurations. In this review, the role of facial cues, specifically of infantile traits and facial signals (i.e. eyes gaze as emotional and communicative signals is highlighted and discussed as regulating human-animal bond, similarly to what can be observed in the adult-infant interaction context. Particular emphasis is given to the neuroendocrine regulation of social bond between humans and animals through oxytocin secretion. Instead of considering companion animals as mere baby substitutes for their owners, in this review we highlight the central role of cats and dogs in human lives. Specifically, we consider the ability of companion animals to bond with humans as fulfilling the need for attention and emotional intimacy, thus serving similar psychological and adaptive functions as human-human friendships. In this context, facial cuteness is viewed not just as a releaser of care/parental behavior, but more in general as a trait motivating social engagement. To conclude, the impact of this information for applied disciplines is briefly described, particularly in consideration of the increasing evidence of the beneficial effects of contacts with animals for human health and wellbeing.

  15. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.;

    2008-01-01

    tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in paediatric oncology. The Oncology Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has published excellent procedure guidelines on tumour imaging with (18)F-FDG PET (Bombardieri et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 30:BP115-24, 2003). These guidelines, published...... by the EANM Paediatric Committee, do not intend to compete with the existing guidelines, but rather aim at providing additional information on issues particularly relevant to PET imaging of children with cancer. CONCLUSION: The guidelines summarize the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European...

  16. Application of PET/SPECT imaging in vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, M. G.; Meerwaidt, R.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Tio, R. A.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Nuclear medicine imaging differs from other imaging modalities by showing physiological processes instead of anatomical details. Objective. To describe the current applications of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as a diagnostic to

  17. Dual-Modality Prostate Imaging with PET and Transrectal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Page | 16 Shelley A. Caras Steven L. Ferreira David Fraser Jaspal Gill John S. Haugrud Luster D. Howard Ronald H. Huesman Robert T. Kelley William W...or not a lesion is observed using CT or TRUS imaging, which may not be cancerous). We will perform novel functional PET imaging using [11C]choline...determine the tumor “aggressiveness,” but few anatomical features are visible in the PET images. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging identifies lesions

  18. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  19. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  20. Companion animal welfare and possible implications on the human-pet relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of pets (dogs and cats in particular in human society has changed in recent years. Nowadays pets are an integral part of the human family and this aspect has many social and emotional implications. For their positive effects on human health, pets are also employed in some special and therapeutic activities known by the generic term of “Pet Therapy”. In these programmes the animal becomes an integral part of the therapeutic plan in order to induce some physical, social, emotional, and cognitive improvements in human patients. However, the close bond between companion animals and man is not always the herald of beneficial effects. Sometimes the welfare of pets may be compromised by distress due to many factors, mostly related to the environment and to management by humans. Both behavioural and physiological variables may be analysed in order to evaluate welfare level in pets. Reduced welfare may be indicated by the onset of some behavioural problems, which have usually a multifactorial aetiology, related both to the genetic individual basis and environmental factors. Physiological variables which may be analysed in order to evaluate pet welfare include hormone levels, mainly related to the HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal- axis and to the immune systems activations. Behavioural problems may also lead to the relinquishment of pets to shelters. Animals housed in rescue shelters cannot display their ethogram and show behavioural and physiological signs of distress. Thus it is very important to improve the human-pet relationship both by educating owners and reducing the number of stray animals, in accordance with the indications of the European Convention for the Protection of Pet Animals stated at Strasbourg in 1987, mainly as regards pet breeding and welfare. Humans have to realise that adopting pets implies the responsibility to care for their health and welfare, avoiding undue stress in the living environment and improving the

  1. Twelve automated thresholding methods for segmentation of PET images: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Elena; Lecumberri, Pablo; Pagola, Miguel; Gómez, Marisol; Bilbao, Izaskun; Ecay, Margarita; Peñuelas, Iván; Martí-Climent, Josep M

    2012-06-21

    Tumor volume delineation over positron emission tomography (PET) images is of great interest for proper diagnosis and therapy planning. However, standard segmentation techniques (manual or semi-automated) are operator dependent and time consuming while fully automated procedures are cumbersome or require complex mathematical development. The aim of this study was to segment PET images in a fully automated way by implementing a set of 12 automated thresholding algorithms, classical in the fields of optical character recognition, tissue engineering or non-destructive testing images in high-tech structures. Automated thresholding algorithms select a specific threshold for each image without any a priori spatial information of the segmented object or any special calibration of the tomograph, as opposed to usual thresholding methods for PET. Spherical (18)F-filled objects of different volumes were acquired on clinical PET/CT and on a small animal PET scanner, with three different signal-to-background ratios. Images were segmented with 12 automatic thresholding algorithms and results were compared with the standard segmentation reference, a threshold at 42% of the maximum uptake. Ridler and Ramesh thresholding algorithms based on clustering and histogram-shape information, respectively, provided better results that the classical 42%-based threshold (p < 0.05). We have herein demonstrated that fully automated thresholding algorithms can provide better results than classical PET segmentation tools.

  2. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  3. Sparsity-constrained PET image reconstruction with learned dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Bao; Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    PET imaging plays an important role in scientific and clinical measurement of biochemical and physiological processes. Model-based PET image reconstruction such as the iterative expectation maximization algorithm seeking the maximum likelihood solution leads to increased noise. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate removes divergence at higher iterations. However, a conventional smoothing prior or a total-variation (TV) prior in a MAP reconstruction algorithm causes over smoothing or blocky artifacts in the reconstructed images. We propose to use dictionary learning (DL) based sparse signal representation in the formation of the prior for MAP PET image reconstruction. The dictionary to sparsify the PET images in the reconstruction process is learned from various training images including the corresponding MR structural image and a self-created hollow sphere. Using simulated and patient brain PET data with corresponding MR images, we study the performance of the DL-MAP algorithm and compare it quantitatively with a conventional MAP algorithm, a TV-MAP algorithm, and a patch-based algorithm. The DL-MAP algorithm achieves improved bias and contrast (or regional mean values) at comparable noise to what the other MAP algorithms acquire. The dictionary learned from the hollow sphere leads to similar results as the dictionary learned from the corresponding MR image. Achieving robust performance in various noise-level simulation and patient studies, the DL-MAP algorithm with a general dictionary demonstrates its potential in quantitative PET imaging.

  4. PET/MRI in Oncological Imaging: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Bashir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a hybrid technology which has recently gained interest as a potential cancer imaging tool. Compared with CT, MRI is advantageous due to its lack of ionizing radiation, superior soft-tissue contrast resolution, and wider range of acquisition sequences. Several studies have shown PET/MRI to be equivalent to PET/CT in most oncological applications, possibly superior in certain body parts, e.g., head and neck, pelvis, and in certain situations, e.g., cancer recurrence. This review will update the readers on recent advances in PET/MRI technology and review key literature, while highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of PET/MRI in cancer imaging.

  5. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  6. Contourlet-based active contour model for PET image segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided radiation therapy treatment planning, clinical diagnosis, assessment of tumor growth, and therapy response rely on the accurate delineation of the tumor volume and quantification of tracer uptake. Most PET image segmentation techniques proposed thus far are suboptimal in the pres

  7. PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors have shown rising incidence mainly due to higher clinical awareness and better diagnostic tools over the last 30 years. Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors with PET tracers is an evolving field that is continuously refining the affinity of new tracers in the search...... these PET tracers further....

  8. Full modelling of the MOSAIC animal PET system based on the GATE Monte Carlo simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, C.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J. N.

    2007-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) systems dedicated to animal imaging are now widely used for biological studies. The scanner performance strongly depends on the design and the characteristics of the system. Many parameters must be optimized like the dimensions and type of crystals, geometry and field-of-view (FOV), sampling, electronics, lightguide, shielding, etc. Monte Carlo modelling is a powerful tool to study the effect of each of these parameters on the basis of realistic simulated data. Performance assessment in terms of spatial resolution, count rates, scatter fraction and sensitivity is an important prerequisite before the model can be used instead of real data for a reliable description of the system response function or for optimization of reconstruction algorithms. The aim of this study is to model the performance of the Philips Mosaic™ animal PET system using a comprehensive PET simulation code in order to understand and describe the origin of important factors that influence image quality. We use GATE, a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for a realistic description of the ring PET model, the detectors, shielding, cap, electronic processing and dead times. We incorporate new features to adjust signal processing to the Anger logic underlying the Mosaic™ system. Special attention was paid to dead time and energy spectra descriptions. Sorting of simulated events in a list mode format similar to the system outputs was developed to compare experimental and simulated sensitivity and scatter fractions for different energy thresholds using various models of phantoms describing rat and mouse geometries. Count rates were compared for both cylindrical homogeneous phantoms. Simulated spatial resolution was fitted to experimental data for 18F point sources at different locations within the FOV with an analytical blurring function for electronic processing effects. Simulated and measured sensitivities differed by less than 3%, while scatter fractions agreed

  9. PET IMAGING STUDIES IN DRUG ABUSE RESEARCH.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Ding, Y.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J.

    2001-01-29

    There is overwhelming evidence that addiction is a disease of the brain (Leshner, 1997). Yet public perception that addiction is a reflection of moral weakness or a lack of willpower persists. The insidious consequence of this perception is that we lose sight of the fact that there are enormous medical consequences of addiction including the fact that a large fraction of the total deaths from cancer and heart disease are caused by smoking addiction. Ironically the medical school that educates physicians in addiction medicine and the cancer hospital that has a smoking cessation clinic are vanishingly rare and efforts at harm reduction are frequently met with a public indignation. Meanwhile the number of people addicted to substances is enormous and increasing particularly the addictions to cigarettes and alcohol. It is particularly tragic that addiction usually begins in adolescence and becomes a chronic relapsing problem and there are basically no completely effective treatments. Clearly we need to understand how drugs of abuse affect the brain and we need to be creative in using this information to develop effective treatments. Imaging technologies have played a major role in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain (Fowler et al., 1998a; Fowler et al., 1999a). New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, cancer and heart disease because of the high medical, social and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including and especially the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. In this chapter we will begin by highlighting the important role that chemistry has played in making it possible to quantitatively image the movement of drugs as well as their effects on the human brain

  10. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi [CYRIC, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET

  11. Cardiovascular hybrid imaging using PET/MRI; Kardiovaskulaere Hybridbildgebung mit PET/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nensa, Felix; Schlosser, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2014-12-15

    The following overview provides a summary of the state of the art and research as well as potential clinical applications of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging. PET/MRI systems have been clinically available for a few years, and their use in cardiac imaging has been successfully demonstrated. At this period in time, some of the technical difficulties that arose at the beginning have been solved; in particular with respect to MRI-based attenuation correction, caution should be exercised with PET quantification. In addition, many promising technical options are still in the developmental stage, such as MRI-based motion correction of PET data resulting from simultaneous MR acquisition, and are not yet available for cardiovascular imaging. On the other hand, PET/MRI has been used to demonstrate significant pathologies such as acute and chronic myocardial infarction, myocarditis or cardiac sarcoidosis; future applications in clinical routine or within studies appear to be possible. In coming years additional studies will have to be performed to prove diagnostic gain at a reasonable cost-benefit ratio before valid conclusions are possible regarding the clinical utility and future of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging.

  12. A study of artefacts in simultaneous PET and MR imaging using a prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slates, R B; Farahani, K; Shao, Y; Marsden, P K; Taylor, J; Summers, P E; Williams, S; Beech, J; Cherry, S R

    1999-08-01

    We have assessed the possibility of artefacts that can arise in attempting to perform simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a small prototype MR compatible PET scanner (McPET). In these experiments, we examine MR images for any major artefacts or loss in image quality due to inhomogeneities in the magnetic field, radiofrequency interference or susceptibility effects caused by operation of the PET system inside the MR scanner. In addition, possible artefacts in the PET images caused by the static and time-varying magnetic fields or radiofrequency interference from the MR system were investigated. Biological tissue and a T2-weighted spin echo sequence were used to examine susceptibility artefacts due to components of the McPET scanner (scintillator, optical fibres) situated in the MR field of view. A range of commonly used MR pulse sequences was studied while acquiring PET data to look for possible artefacts in either the PET or MR images. Other than a small loss in signal-to-noise using gradient echo sequences, there was no significant interaction between the two imaging systems. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging of simple phantoms was also carried out in different MR systems with field strengths ranging from 0.2 to 4.7 T. The results of these studies demonstrate that it is possible to acquire PET and MR images simultaneously, without any significant artefacts or loss in image quality, using our prototype MR compatible PET scanner.

  13. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  14. The benefit of pets and animal-assisted therapy to the health of older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniack, E Paul; Cherniack, Ariella R

    2014-01-01

    Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health of older persons, such as relief social isolation and boredom, but these have not been formally studied. Several investigations of the effect of pets on physical health suggest animals can lower blood pressure, and dog walkers partake in more physical activity. Dog walking, in epidemiological studies and few preliminary trials, is associated with lower complication risk among patients with cardiovascular disease. Pets may also have harms: they may be expensive to care for, and their owners are more likely to fall. Theoretically, zoonotic infections and bites can occur, but how often this occurs in the context of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy is unknown. Despite the poor methodological quality of pet research after decades of study, pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are likely to continue due to positive subjective feelings many people have toward animals.

  15. The Benefit of Pets and Animal-Assisted Therapy to the Health of Older Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Paul Cherniack

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health of older persons, such as relief social isolation and boredom, but these have not been formally studied. Several investigations of the effect of pets on physical health suggest animals can lower blood pressure, and dog walkers partake in more physical activity. Dog walking, in epidemiological studies and few preliminary trials, is associated with lower complication risk among patients with cardiovascular disease. Pets may also have harms: they may be expensive to care for, and their owners are more likely to fall. Theoretically, zoonotic infections and bites can occur, but how often this occurs in the context of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy is unknown. Despite the poor methodological quality of pet research after decades of study, pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy are likely to continue due to positive subjective feelings many people have toward animals.

  16. Human-animal bonds II: the role of pets in family systems and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Froma

    2009-12-01

    The vast majority of pet owners regard their companion animals as family members, yet the role of pets in family systems and family therapy has received little attention in research, training, and practice. This article first notes the benefits of family pets and their importance for resilience. It then examines their role in couple and family processes and their involvement in relational dynamics and tensions. Next, it addresses bereavement in the loss of a cherished pet, influences complicating grief, and facilitation of mourning and adaptation. Finally, it explores the ways that clients' pets and the use of therapists' companion animals in animal-assisted therapy can inform and enrich couple and family therapy as valuable resources in healing.

  17. Ultrasonography Fused with PET-CT Hybrid Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Ewertsen, Caroline; Gran, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a method with fusion of images of three modalities 18F-FDG PET, CT, and 3-D ultrasound (US) applied to imaging of the anal canal and the rectum. To obtain comparable geometries in the three imaging modalities, a plexiglas rod, with the same dimensions as the US transducer, is placed...... in the anal canal prior to the PET-CT examination. The method is based on manual co-registration of PET-CT images and 3-D US images. The three-modality imaging of the rectum-anal canal may become useful as a supplement to conventional imaging in the external radiation therapy in the treatment of anal cancer......, where the precise delineation of a tumor is crucial to avoid damage from radiation therapy to the healthy tissue surrounding it. The technique is still in a phase of development, and the demands for integration different company software systems are significant before commercial application. Three...

  18. Dynamic {sup 11}C-methionine PET analysis has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas: an experimental study using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Hatano, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Yi, Min; Kohanawa, Masashi [Hokkaido University, Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Magota, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi [Hokkaido University, Department of Molecular Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    We evaluated whether the dynamic profile of L-{sup 11}C-methionine ({sup 11}C-MET) may have an additional value in differentiating malignant tumors from granulomas in experimental rat models by small animal positron emission tomography (PET). Rhodococcus aurantiacus and allogenic rat C6 glioma cells were inoculated, respectively, into the right and left calf muscles to generate a rat model bearing both granulomas and tumors (n = 6). Ten days after the inoculations, dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET was performed by small animal PET up to 120 min after injection of {sup 11}C-MET. The next day, after overnight fasting, the rats were injected with {sup 18}F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG), and dynamic {sup 18}F-FDG PET was performed up to 180 min. The time-activity curves, static images, and mean standardized uptake value (SUV) in the lesions were calculated. {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma showed a slow exponential clearance after an initial distribution, while the uptake in the tumor gradually increased with time. The dynamic pattern of {sup 11}C-MET uptake in the granuloma was significantly different from that in the tumor (p < 0.001). In the static analysis of {sup 11}C-MET, visual assessment and SUV analysis could not differentiate the tumor from the granuloma in all cases, although the mean SUV in the granuloma (1.48 {+-} 0.09) was significantly lower than that in the tumor (1.72 {+-} 0.18, p < 0.01). The dynamic patterns, static images, and mean SUVs of {sup 18}F-FDG in the granuloma were similar to those in the tumor (p = NS). Dynamic {sup 11}C-MET PET has an additional value for differentiating malignant tumors from granulomatous lesions, which deserves further elucidation in clinical settings. (orig.)

  19. Positron emission tomography (PET) methodology for small animals and its application in radiopharmaceutical preclinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Susan P.; Jones, Terry

    1998-11-01

    The use and usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify the specific and selective in vivo binding of radioligands in small laboratory animals is briefly reviewed up to the end of 1996. Emphasis is placed on practical experience with a dedicated, small diameter, tomograph (built in collaboration with CTI, Knoxville, TN), implementing conventional PET methodology.

  20. 77 FR 28799 - Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... the number of breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals that a person may... as pets are considered retail pet stores: Dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, rats... regulation anyone who sells or negotiates the sale or purchase of any animal, except wild or exotic...

  1. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  2. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Towards optimal imaging with PET: an in silico feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, A. L.; Toghyani, M.; Gillam, J. E.; Wu, K.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging relies fundamentally on the ability of the system to accurately identify true coincidence events. With existing systems, this is currently accomplished with an energy acceptance criterion followed by correction techniques to remove suspected false coincidence events. These corrections generally result in signal and contrast loss and thus limit the PET system’s ability to achieve optimum image quality. A key property of annihilation radiation is that the photons are polarised with respect to each other. This polarisation correlation offers a potentially powerful discriminator, independent of energy, to accurately identify true events. In this proof of concept study, we investigate how photon polarisation information can be exploited in PET imaging by developing a method to discriminate true coincidences using the polarisation correlation of annihilation pairs. We implement this method using a Geant4 PET simulation of a GE Advance/Discovery LS system and demonstrate the potential advantages of the polarisation coincidence selection method over a standard energy criterion method. Current PET ring detectors are not capable of exploiting the polarisation correlation of the photon pairs. Compton PET systems, however are promising candidates for this application. We demonstrate the feasibility of a two-component Compton camera system in identifying true coincidences with Monte Carlo simulations. Our study demonstrates the potential of improving signal gain using polarisation, particularly for high photon emission rates. We also demonstrate the ability of the Compton camera at exploiting this polarisation correlation in PET.

  4. Companion animal welfare and possible implications on the human-pet relationship

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The role of pets (dogs and cats in particular) in human society has changed in recent years. Nowadays pets are an integral part of the human family and this aspect has many social and emotional implications. For their positive effects on human health, pets are also employed in some special and therapeutic activities known by the generic term of “Pet Therapy”. In these programmes the animal becomes an integral part of the therapeutic plan in order to induce some physical, social, e...

  5. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  6. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  7. Quantitative Comparison of Y-90 and Ge-68 PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Kwak, Shin Hye; Lee, Jeong A; Song, Han Kyeol; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo; KIm, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute of Raiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Su Young [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess statistical characteristics and to improve count rate of image for enhancing Y-90 image quality by using non-parametric bootstrap method. The results showed that Y-90 PET image can be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method. PET data was able to be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method and it was verified with showing improved prompts rate. Y-90 PET image quality was improved and bias indicated that the bootstrapped image was more similar to the gold standard than other images. The non-parametric bootstrap method will be useful tool for enhancing Y-90 PET image and it will be expected to reduce time for acquisition and to elevate performance for diagnosis and treatment. Yttrium-90 (Y-90) radioembolization is one of the treatment methods unrespectable stage of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colon cancer to the liver. However, Y-90 radioembolization is a catheter-based therapy that delivers internal radiation to tumors, it results in greater radiation exposure to the tumors than using external radiation. Also, unlike other current therapies for the treatment of unresectable liver tumors, Y-90 radioembolization is much less often associated with toxicities such as abdominal pain, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Therefore Y-90 has been received much interest and studied by many researchers. Imaging of Y-90 has been conducted using most commonly gamma camera but quantitative PET imaging is required due to low sensitivity and resolution. Y-90 imaging is generally performed with SPECT by Bremsstrahlung photons. Unfortunately, the low image quality due to the nature of the Bremsstrahlung photon limits the quantitative accuracy of Y-90 SPECT. To overcome this limitation in SPECT imaging, Y-90 PET has been suggested as an alternative.

  8. Advances in PET imaging of P-glycoprotein function at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvänen, Stina; Eriksson, Jonas

    2013-02-20

    Efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts substrate compounds from entering the brain and may thus contribute to pharmacoresistance observed in patient groups with refractory epilepsy and HIV. Altered P-gp function has also been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET), a molecular imaging modality, has become a promising method to study the role of P-gp at the BBB. The first PET study of P-gp function was conducted in 1998, and during the past 15 years two main categories of P-gp PET tracers have been investigated: tracers that are substrates of P-gp efflux and tracers that are inhibitors of P-gp function. PET, as a noninvasive imaging technique, allows translational research. Examples of this are preclinical investigations of P-gp function before and after administering P-gp modulating drugs, investigations in various animal and disease models, and clinical investigations regarding disease and aging. The objective of the present review is to give an overview of available PET radiotracers for studies of P-gp and to discuss how such studies can be designed. Further, the review summarizes results from PET studies of P-gp function in different central nervous system disorders.

  9. Spatial resolution recovery utilizing multi-ray tracing and graphic processing unit in PET image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2015-02-07

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) poses a major challenge for a PET system to achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view, particularly for small animal and organ-dedicated PET systems. In this work, we implemented an analytical method to model system matrix for resolution recovery, which was then incorporated in PET image reconstruction on a graphical processing unit platform, due to its parallel processing capacity. The method utilizes the concepts of virtual DOI layers and multi-ray tracing to calculate the coincidence detection response function for a given line-of-response. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated for a small-bore PET insert to be used for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging. In addition, the performance comparisons were studied among the following three cases: 1) no physical DOI and no resolution modeling; 2) two physical DOI layers and no resolution modeling; and 3) no physical DOI design but with a different number of virtual DOI layers. The image quality was quantitatively evaluated in terms of spatial resolution (full-width-half-maximum and position offset), contrast recovery coefficient and noise. The results indicate that the proposed method has the potential to be used as an alternative to other physical DOI designs and achieve comparable imaging performances, while reducing detector/system design cost and complexity.

  10. PET imaging of tumor neovascularization in a transgenic mouse model with a novel 64Cu-DOTA-knottin peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Haagen; Kimura, Richard H; Withofs, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    followed by characterization with the use of small animal PET with a novel 64Cu-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-knottin peptide that targets integrins upregulated during angiogenesis on the tumor associated neovasculature. The imaging results obtained with the knottin...... peptide are compared with standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET small animal imaging. Lung nodules as small as 3 mm in diameter were successfully identified in the transgenic mice by small animal CT, and both 64Cu-DOTA-knottin 2.5F and FDG were able to differentiate lung nodules from the surrounding...

  11. Imaging with {sup 124}I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT{sub 2}) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after {sup 124}I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT{sub 2} acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI{sub 2}) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI{sub 30}). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI{sub 2} detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT{sub 2} (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI{sub 30} tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI{sub 2} (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine

  12. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage;

    2011-01-01

    and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.......0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...

  13. Atlas of PET/MR imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratib, Osman [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland). Nuclear Medicine Division; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Beyer, Thomas (eds.) [General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering

    2013-08-01

    Numerous illustrated clinical cases in different oncology domains. Includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. Interactive version based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring the widest compatibility. Edited by three international opinion leaders/imaging experts in the field. This new project on PET/MR imaging in oncology includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. The interactive version of the atlas is based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring compatibility with any computer operating system as well as a dedicated version for Apple iPad and iPhone. The book opens with an introduction to the principles of hybrid imaging that pays particular attention to PET/MR imaging and standard PET/MR acquisition protocols. A wide range of illustrated clinical case reports are then presented. Each case study includes a short clinical history, findings, and teaching points, followed by illustrations, legends, and comments. The multimedia version of the book includes dynamic movies that allow the reader to browse through series of rotating 3D images (MIP or volume rendered), display blending between PET and MR, and dynamic visualization of 3D image volumes. The movies can be played either continuously or sequentially for better exploration of sets of images. The editors of this state-of-the-art publication are key opinion leaders in the field of multimodality imaging. Professor Osman Ratib (Geneva) and Professor Markus Schwaiger (Munich) were the first in Europe to initiate the clinical adoption of PET/MR imaging. Professor Thomas Beyer (Zurich) is an internationally renowned pioneering physicist in the field of hybrid imaging. Individual clinical cases presented in this book are co-authored by leading international radiologists and nuclear physicians experts in the use of PET and MRI.

  14. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Swine with PET/CT and MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantitatively determine the limit of detection of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after cardiac cell therapy (CCT) in swine by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with cell prelabeling. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the institutional administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Seven swine received 23 intracardiac cell injections that contained control MSC and cell mixtures of MSC expressing a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene (MSC-TF) and bearing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) (MSC-TF-NP) or NP alone. Clinical MR imaging and PET reporter gene molecular imaging were performed after intravenous injection of the radiotracer fluorine 18-radiolabeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxyl methyl) butyl] guanine ((18)F-FHBG). Linear regression analysis of both MR imaging and PET data and nonlinear regression analysis of PET data were performed, accounting for multiple injections per animal. Results MR imaging showed a positive correlation between MSC-TF-NP cell number and dephasing (dark) signal (R(2) = 0.72, P = .0001) and a lower detection limit of at least approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells. PET reporter gene imaging demonstrated a significant positive correlation between MSC-TF and target-to-background ratio with the linear model (R(2) = 0.88, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.523) and the nonlinear model (R(2) = 0.99, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.273) and a lower detection limit of 2.5 × 10(8) cells. Conclusion The authors quantitatively determined the limit of detection of MSC after CCT in swine by using clinical PET reporter gene imaging and clinical MR imaging with cell prelabeling. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  15. TSPO imaging in stroke: from animal models to human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Boutin, Hervé; Pinborg, Lars H.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a major health problem in developed countries and neuroinflammation has emerged over the last 2 decades as major contributor to the pathophysiological processes of brain damage following stroke. PET imaging of the translocator 18 kDa protein (TSPO) provides a unique non-invasive point of access to neuroinflammatory processes and more specifically microglial and astrocytic reaction after stroke in both animal models and patients. Here, we are reviewing both the experimental and ...

  16. Small-Animal Imaging Using Clinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Super-Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P. DiFilippo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high cost of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. However, spatial resolution and image quality are of concern. The utility of clinical PET/CT for small-animal research and image quality improvements from super-resolution (spatial subsampling were investigated. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA NU 4 phantom and mouse data were acquired with a clinical PET/CT scanner, as both conventional static and stepped scans. Static scans were reconstructed with and without point spread function (PSF modeling. Stepped images were postprocessed with iterative deconvolution to produce super-resolution images. Image quality was markedly improved using the super-resolution technique, avoiding certain artifacts produced by PSF modeling. The 2 mm rod of the NU 4 phantom was visualized with high contrast, and the major structures of the mouse were well resolved. Although not a perfect substitute for a state-of-the-art small-animal PET/CT scanner, a clinical PET/CT scanner with super-resolution produces acceptable small-animal image quality for many preclinical research studies.

  17. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  18. The Benefit of Pets and Animal-Assisted Therapy to the Health of Older Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Many studies utilizing dogs, cats, birds, fish, and robotic simulations of animals have tried to ascertain the health benefits of pet ownership or animal-assisted therapy in the elderly. Several small unblinded investigations outlined improvements in behavior in demented persons given treatment in the presence of animals. Studies piloting the use of animals in the treatment of depression and schizophrenia have yielded mixed results. Animals may provide intangible benefits to the mental health...

  19. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  20. Healthy animals, healthy people: zoonosis risk from animal contact in pet shops, a systematic review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate D Halsby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Around 67 million pets are owned by households in the United Kingdom, and an increasing number of these are exotic animals. Approximately a third of pets are purchased through retail outlets or direct from breeders. A wide range of infections can be associated with companion animals. OBJECTIVES: This study uses a systematic literature review to describe the transmission of zoonotic disease in humans associated with a pet shop or other location selling pets (incidents of rabies tracebacks and zoonoses from pet food were excluded. DATA SOURCES: PubMed and EMBASE. RESULTS: Fifty seven separate case reports or incidents were described in the 82 papers that were identified by the systematic review. Summary information on each incident is included in this manuscript. The infections include bacterial, viral and fungal diseases and range in severity from mild to life threatening. Infections associated with birds and rodents were the most commonly reported. Over half of the reports describe incidents in the Americas, and three of these were outbreaks involving more than 50 cases. Many of the incidents identified relate to infections in pet shop employees. LIMITATIONS: This review may have been subject to publication bias, where unusual and unexpected zoonotic infections may be over-represented in peer-reviewed publications. It was also restricted to English-language articles so that pathogens that are more common in non-Western countries, or in more exotic animals not common in Europe and the Americas, may have been under-represented. CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS: A wide spectrum of zoonotic infections are acquired from pet shops. Salmonellosis and psittacosis were the most commonly documented diseases, however more unusual infections such as tularemia also appeared in the review. Given their potential to spread zoonotic infection, it is important that pet shops act to minimise the risk as far as possible.

  1. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer.

  2. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuping; España, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Ouyang, Jinsong; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R; El Fakhri, Georges

    2011-07-07

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  3. Jet set pets: examining the zoonosis risk in animal import and travel across the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fooks AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthony R Fooks,1,2 Nicholas Johnson1 1Wildlife Zoonoses and Vector-Borne Diseases Research Group, Animal and Plant Health Agency, Addlestone, Surrey, 2Department of Clinical Infection, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Ownership of companion animals or pets is popular throughout the world. Unfortunately, such animals are susceptible to and potential reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens. Close proximity to and contact with pets can lead to human infections. The distribution of zoonotic diseases associated with companion animals such as dogs and cats is not uniform around the world, and moving animals between regions, countries, and continents carries with it the risk of relocating the pathogens they might harbor. Critical among these zoonotic diseases are rabies, echinococcosis, and leishmania. In addition, the protozoan parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Giardia duodenalis, are also significant agents for human disease of pet origin. Considerable effort is applied to controlling movements of companion animals, particularly dogs, into the European Union. However, free movement of people and their pets within the European Union is a risk factor for the translocation of diseases and their vectors. This review considers the current distribution of some of these diseases, the risks associated with pet travel, and the controls implemented within Europe to prevent the free movement of zoonotic pathogens. Keywords: zoonosis, companion animal, rabies, alveolar echinococcosis, leishmania

  4. Application of MR/PET in oncologic imaging; Einsatz von MR/PET in der onkologischen Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F.; Pfannenberg, C.; Werner, M.K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reischl, G. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie; Schmidt, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Praeklinische Bildgebung und Radiopharmazie

    2012-09-15

    The present review aims to depict the possibilities offered by hybrid imaging with magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR/PET). Recently, new whole-body MR/PET scanners were introduced allowing for the combination of both modalities outside the brain. This is a challenge for both modalities: For MRI, it is essential to provide anatomical images with high resolution. Additionally, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), proton spectroscopy, but also dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging plays an important role. With regard to PET, the technical challenge mainly consists of obtaining an appropriate MR-based attenuation correction for the PET data. Using MR/PET, it is possible to acquire morphological and functional data in one examination. In particular, children and young adults will benefit from this new hybrid technique, especially in oncologic imaging with multiple follow-up examinations. However, it is expected that PET/CT will not be replaced completely by MR/PET because PET/CT is less cost-intensive and more widely available. Moreover, in lung imaging, MRI limitations still have to be accepted. Concerning research, simultaneous MR/PET offers a variety of new possibilities, for example cardiac imaging, functional brain studies or the evaluation of new tracers in correlation with specific MR techniques. (orig.)

  5. PET/SPECT imaging: From carotid vulnerability to brain viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert [Department of Surgery, Isala Clinics, Zwolle (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Dam, Gooitzen M. van [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijckx, Gert-Jan [Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, Clark J. [Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: czeebregts@hotmail.com

    2010-04-15

    Background: Current key issues in ischemic stroke are related to carotid plaque vulnerability, brain viability, and timing of intervention. The treatment of ischemic stroke has evolved into urgent active interventions, as 'time is brain'. Functional imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could improve selection of patients with a vulnerable plaque and evaluation of brain viability in ischemic stroke. Objective: To describe the current applications of PET and SPECT as a diagnostic tool in relation to ischemic stroke. Methods: A literature search using PubMed identified articles. Manual cross-referencing was also performed. Results: Several papers, all observational studies, identified PET/SPECT to be used as a tool to monitor systemic atheroma modifying treatment and to select high-risk patients for surgery regardless of the degree of luminal stenosis in carotid lesions. Furthermore, PET/SPECT is able to quantify the penumbra region during ischemic stroke and in this way may identify those patients who may benefit from timely intervention. Discussion: Functional imaging modalities such as PET/SPECT may become important tools for risk-assessment and evaluation of treatment strategies in carotid plaque vulnerability and brain viability. Prospective clinical studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of PET/SPECT.

  6. Development of a simultaneous optical/PET imaging system for awake mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Shinaji, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of multiple physiological parameters are essential for the study of brain disease mechanisms and the development of suitable therapies to treat them. In this study, we developed a measurement system for simultaneous optical imaging and PET for awake mice. The key elements of this system are the OpenPET, optical imaging and fixation apparatus for an awake mouse. The OpenPET is our original open-type PET geometry, which can be used in combination with another device because of the easily accessible open space of the former. A small prototype of the axial shift single-ring OpenPET was used. The objective lens for optical imaging with a mounted charge-coupled device camera was placed inside the open space of the AS-SROP. Our original fixation apparatus to hold an awake mouse was also applied. As a first application of this system, simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by laser speckle imaging (LSI) and [11C]raclopride-PET were performed under control and 5% CO2 inhalation (hypercapnia) conditions. Our system successfully obtained the CBF and [11C]raclopride radioactivity concentration simultaneously. Accumulation of [11C]raclopride was observed in the striatum where the density of dopamine D2 receptors is high. LSI measurements could be stably performed for more than 60 minutes. Increased CBF induced by hypercapnia was observed while CBF under the control condition was stable. We concluded that our imaging system should be useful for investigating the mechanisms of brain diseases in awake animal models.

  7. Infection imaging using whole-body FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpe, K.D.M.; Schulthess, G.K. von [Department of Medical Radiology: Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Dazzi, H.; Schaffner, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for the detection of soft tissue and bone infections. Forty-five PET examinations in 39 patients (26 male, 13 female, age range 27-86 years) with suspected infectious foci were examined with whole- or partial-body PET scans using FDG. Twenty-seven scans were done in patients with soft tissue and 18 in patients with bone infections. Corrected and uncorrected transaxial PET images were acquired. Seven hundred and twelve body regions in these 45 PET scans were evaluated. Pathological findings were graded using a confidence scale from A to E (A, definitive infection; E, no infection). Disease status was defined in all patients by culture, biopsy or surgery and clinical follow-up. In 45 PET scans there were 40 true-positive, four false-positive and one false-negative findings. Twelve foci suspected to be infectious in nature on the basis of other imaging examinations were identified as negative by PET, thus representing true-negative findings. Sensitivities for the patients with soft tissue (STI) and bone infections (BI) and for the pooled data were 96%, 100% and 98%, respectively. As the calculation of specificity is not straightforward, it was calculated on a per lesion as well as on a per body region basis to permit estimation of an upper and a lower limit. On a per lesion basis, specificities were 70% (STI), 83% (BI) and 75% for the pooled data and on a per body region basis (dividing the body into 22 regions) they were 99% (STI), 99% (BI) and 99% for the pooled data. One false-negative result was found in a patient with cholangitis. It is concluded that PET appears to be a highly sensitive method to detect infectious foci. Specificity is more difficult to estimate, but is probably in the range from 70% to above 90%. (orig.)

  8. A prototype of very high-resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S J; Huh, S; Kagan, H; Honscheid, K; Burdette, D; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Lacasta, C; Llosa, G; Mikuz, M; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P; Clinthorne, N H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A very high-resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET), which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution, is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32×16 array of 1.4×1.4 mm pads readout with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self-triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04×10−3% from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source. Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximizat...

  9. Performance of a DOI-encoding small animal PET system with monolithic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carles, M., E-mail: montcar@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain); Lerche, Ch.W. [Department X-Ray Imaging Systems, Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany); Sanchez, F.; Orero, A.; Moliner, L.; Soriano, A.; Benlloch, J.M. [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular(I3M), Centro mixto CSIC-Universitat Politecnica de Valencia- IEMAT, Camino de Vera s/n, 46020 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-12-11

    PET systems designed for specific applications require high resolution and sensitivity instrumentation. In dedicated system design smaller ring diameters and deeper crystals are widely used in order to increase the system sensitivity. However, this design increases the parallax error, which degrades the spatial image resolution gradually from the center to the edge of the field-of-view (FOV). Our group has designed a depth of interaction(DOI)-encoding small animal PET system based on monolithic crystals. In this work we investigate the restoration of radial resolution for transaxially off-center sources using the DOI information provided by our system. For this purpose we have designed a support for point like sources adapted to our system geometry that allows a spatial compression and resolution response study. For different point source radial positions along vertical and horizontal axes of a FOV transaxial plane we compare the results obtained by three methods: without DOI information, with the DOI provided by our system and with the assumption that all the {gamma}-rays interact at half depth of the crystal thickness. Results show an improvement of the mean resolution of 10% with the half thickness assumption and a 16% achieved using the DOI provided by the system. Furthermore, a 10% restoration of the resolution uniformity is obtained using the half depth assumption and an 18% restoration using measured DOI.

  10. Evaluation of transmission methodology and attenuation correction for the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Wencke [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Meikle, Steven R [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Siegel, Stefan [Siemens Preclinical Solutions, 810 Innovation Drive, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Newport, Danny [Siemens Preclinical Solutions, 810 Innovation Drive, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Banati, Richard B [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825 (Australia); Rosenfeld, Anatoly B [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2006-08-21

    An accurate, low noise estimate of photon attenuation in the subject is required for quantitative microPET studies of molecular tracer distributions in vivo. In this work, several transmission-based measurement techniques were compared, including coincidence mode with and without rod windowing, singles mode with two different energy sources ({sup 68}Ge and {sup 57}Co), and postinjection transmission scanning. In addition, the effectiveness of transmission segmentation and the propagation of transmission bias and noise into the emission images were examined. The {sup 57}Co singles measurements provided the most accurate attenuation coefficients and superior signal-to-noise ratio, while {sup 68}Ge singles measurements were degraded due to scattering from the object. Scatter correction of {sup 68}Ge transmission data improved the accuracy for a 10 cm phantom but over-corrected for a mouse phantom. {sup 57}Co scanning also resulted in low bias and noise in postinjection transmission scans for emission activities up to 20 MBq. Segmentation worked most reliably for transmission data acquired with {sup 57}Co but the minor improvement in accuracy of attenuation coefficients and signal-to-noise may not justify its use, particularly for small subjects. We conclude that {sup 57}Co singles transmission scanning is the most suitable method for measured attenuation correction on the microPET Focus 220 animal scanner.

  11. Application of inulin-type fructans in animal feed and pet food

    OpenAIRE

    Verdonk, J.M.A.J.; Shim, S.B.; Leeuwen, van, M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    The inulin-type fructans are non-digestible oligosaccharides that are fermented in the gastrointestinal tract of farm animals and pets. This review focuses on the various effects of inulin-type fructans in pigs, poultry, calves and companion animals. Effects of the inulin-type fructans on gut microflora, digestion and availability of nutrients, gut morphology, fermentation characteristics and animal performance are discussed. Inulin-type fructans can support animal performance and health by a...

  12. MRI and PET images fusion based on human retina model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by low spatial resolution.For solving this problem we propose a technique for the fusion of PET and MRI images. This fusion is a trade-off between the spectral information extracted from PET images and the spatial information extracted from high spatial resolution MRI. The proposed method can control this trade-off. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to build a multiscale fusion model, based on the retinal cell photoreceptors model. This paper introduces general prospects of this model, and its application in multispectral medical image fusion. Results showed that the proposed method preserves more spectral features with less spatial distortion.transform methods, the best spectral and spatial quality is only achieved simultaneously with the proposed feature-based data fusion method. This method does not require resampling images, which is an advantage over the other methods, and can perform in any aspect ratio between the pixels of MRI and PET images.

  13. Effects of Keeping Animals as Pets on Children's Concepts of Vertebrates and Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Prokop, Matej; Tunnicliffe, Sue D.

    2008-01-01

    Looking after pets provides several benefits in terms of children's social interactions, and factual and conceptual knowledge about these animals. In this study we investigated effects of rearing experiences on children's factual knowledge and alternative conceptions about animals. Data obtained from 1,541 children and 7,705 drawings showed very…

  14. Application of inulin-type fructans in animal feed and pet food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, J.M.A.J.; Shim, S.B.; Leeuwen, van P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    The inulin-type fructans are non-digestible oligosaccharides that are fermented in the gastrointestinal tract of farm animals and pets. This review focuses on the various effects of inulin-type fructans in pigs, poultry, calves and companion animals. Effects of the inulin-type fructans on gut microf

  15. 77 FR 41716 - Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... considered retail pet stores: Dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, rats, mice, gophers... or purchase of any animal, except wild or exotic animals, dogs, or cats, and who derives no more than... three to four the number of breeding female dogs, cats, and/or small exotic or wild mammals that...

  16. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  17. MRI and PET image fusion using fuzzy logic and image local features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Umer; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin; Ghafoor, Abdul; Ali, Syed Sohaib; Cheema, Tanveer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    An image fusion technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using local features and fuzzy logic is presented. The aim of proposed technique is to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  18. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D [Inserm U930, CNRS ERL3106, Universite Francois Rabelais, Tours (France); Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC, IN2P3, UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay (France); Chau, M [ASA-Advanced Solutions Accelerator, Montpellier (France); Spiteri, P, E-mail: clovis.tauber@univ-tours.fr [IRIT-ENSEEIHT, UMR CNRS 5505, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  19. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E;

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  20. Software-based PET-MR image coregistration: combined PET-MRI for the rest of us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Matthew S.; Liu, Xinyang; Vyas, Pranav K.; Safdar, Nabile M. [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); Plishker, William; Zaki, George F. [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, Raj [Children' s National Health System, Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Washington, DC (United States); IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-10-15

    With the introduction of hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), a new imaging option to acquire multimodality images with complementary anatomical and functional information has become available. Compared with hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT), hybrid PET/MRI is capable of providing superior anatomical detail while removing the radiation exposure associated with CT. The early adoption of hybrid PET/MRI, however, has been limited. To provide a viable alternative to the hybrid PET/MRI hardware by validating a software-based solution for PET-MR image coregistration. A fully automated, graphics processing unit-accelerated 3-D deformable image registration technique was used to align PET (acquired as PET/CT) and MR image pairs of 17 patients (age range: 10 months-21 years, mean: 10 years) who underwent PET/CT and body MRI (chest, abdomen or pelvis), which were performed within a 28-day (mean: 10.5 days) interval. MRI data for most of these cases included single-station post-contrast axial T1-weighted images. Following registration, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) values observed in coregistered PET (cPET) and the original PET were compared for 82 volumes of interest. In addition, we calculated the target registration error as a measure of the quality of image coregistration, and evaluated the algorithm's performance in the context of interexpert variability. The coregistration execution time averaged 97±45 s. The overall relative SUV{sub max} difference was 7% between cPET-MRI and PET/CT. The average target registration error was 10.7±6.6 mm, which compared favorably with the typical voxel size (diagonal distance) of 8.0 mm (typical resolution: 0.66 mm x 0.66 mm x 8 mm) for MRI and 6.1 mm (typical resolution: 3.65 mm x 3.65 mm x 3.27 mm) for PET. The variability in landmark identification did not show statistically significant differences between the algorithm and a typical expert. We have presented a software

  1. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J;

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  2. An integrated multimodality image-guided robot system for small-animal imaging research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin [Department of Radiology, Tzu-Chi University and Radiation Oncology, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital Hualien, Taiwan (China); Hsin Wu, Tung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Lin [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yung-Hui, E-mail: yhhuang@isu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    We design and construct an image-guided robot system for use in small-animal imaging research. This device allows the use of co-registered small-animal PET-MRI images to guide the movements of robotic controllers, which will accurately place a needle probe at any predetermined location inside, for example, a mouse tumor, for biological readouts without sacrificing the animal. This system is composed of three major components: an automated robot device, a CCD monitoring mechanism, and a multimodality registration implementation. Specifically, the CCD monitoring mechanism was used for correction and validation of the robot device. To demonstrate the value of the proposed system, we performed a tumor hypoxia study that involved FMISO small-animal PET imaging and the delivering of a pO{sub 2} probe into the mouse tumor using the image-guided robot system. During our evaluation, the needle positioning error was found to be within 0.153{+-}0.042 mm of desired placement; the phantom simulation errors were within 0.693{+-}0.128 mm. In small-animal studies, the pO{sub 2} probe measurements in the corresponding hypoxia areas showed good correlation with significant, low tissue oxygen tensions (less than 6 mmHg). We have confirmed the feasibility of the system and successfully applied it to small-animal investigations. The system could be easily adapted to extend to other biomedical investigations in the future.

  3. A statistical parametric mapping toolbox used for voxel-wise analysis of FDG-PET images of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Nie

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: PET (positron emission tomography imaging researches of functional metabolism using fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG of animal brain are important in neuroscience studies. FDG-PET imaging studies are often performed on groups of rats, so it is desirable to establish an objective voxel-based statistical methodology for group data analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study establishes a statistical parametric mapping (SPM toolbox (plug-ins named spmratIHEP for voxel-wise analysis of FDG-PET images of rat brain, in which an FDG-PET template and an intracranial mask image of rat brain in Paxinos & Watson space were constructed, and the default settings were modified according to features of rat brain. Compared to previous studies, our constructed rat brain template comprises not only the cerebrum and cerebellum, but also the whole olfactory bulb which made the later cognitive studies much more exhaustive. And with an intracranial mask image in the template space, the brain tissues of individuals could be extracted automatically. Moreover, an atlas space is used for anatomically labeling the functional findings in the Paxinos & Watson space. In order to standardize the template image with the atlas accurately, a synthetic FDG-PET image with six main anatomy structures is constructed from the atlas, which performs as a target image in the co-registration. RESULTS: The spatial normalization procedure is evaluated, by which the individual rat brain images could be standardized into the Paxinos & Watson space successfully and the intracranial tissues could also be extracted accurately. The practical usability of this toolbox is evaluated using FDG-PET functional images from rats with left side middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in comparison to normal control rats. And the two-sample t-test statistical result is almost related to the left side MCA. CONCLUSION: We established a toolbox of SPM8 named spmratIHEP for voxel-wise analysis of FDG-PET

  4. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  5. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R. [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States)]. E-mail: rraylman@wvu.edu; Majewski, Stan [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S. Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brain [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wojcik, Randy [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2006-12-20

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5x5x4 cm{sup 3}. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5x2.5x15 mm{sup 3}) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of {approx}60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to {approx}85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy.

  6. PET/SPECT imaging : From carotid vulnerability to brain viability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Tio, Rene A.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Current key issues in ischemic stroke are related to carotid plaque vulnerability, brain viability, and timing of intervention. The treatment of ischemic stroke has evolved into urgent active interventions, as 'time is brain'. Functional imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET)

  7. 89Zr-bevacizumab PET imaging in primary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaykema, Sietske B M; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Pleijhuis, Rick G; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Pot, Linda; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Meulen, Sibylle B; de Jong, Johan R; Bart, Joost; de Vries, Jakob; Jansen, Liesbeth; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Schröder, Carolien P; de Vries, J

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is overexpressed in most malignant and premalignant breast lesions. VEGF-A can be visualized noninvasively with PET imaging and using the tracer (89)Zr-labeled bevacizumab. In this clinical feasibility study, we assessed whether VEGF-A in prima

  8. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  9. COMPANION ANIMALS SYMPOSIUM: Rendered ingredients significantly influence sustainability, quality, and safety of pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, D L; Meisinger, J L

    2015-03-01

    The rendering industry collects and safely processes approximately 25 million t of animal byproducts each year in the United States. Rendering plants process a variety of raw materials from food animal production, principally offal from slaughterhouses, but include whole animals that die on farms or in transit and other materials such as bone, feathers, and blood. By recycling these byproducts into various protein, fat, and mineral products, including meat and bone meal, hydrolyzed feather meal, blood meal, and various types of animal fats and greases, the sustainability of food animal production is greatly enhanced. The rendering industry is conscious of its role in the prevention of disease and microbiological control and providing safe feed ingredients for livestock, poultry, aquaculture, and pets. The processing of otherwise low-value OM from the livestock production and meat processing industries through rendering drastically reduces the amount of waste. If not rendered, biological materials would be deposited in landfills, burned, buried, or inappropriately dumped with large amounts of carbon dioxide, ammonia, and other compounds polluting air and water. The majority of rendered protein products are used as animal feed. Rendered products are especially valuable to the livestock and pet food industries because of their high protein content, digestible AA levels (especially lysine), mineral availability (especially calcium and phosphorous), and relatively low cost in relation to their nutrient value. The use of these reclaimed and recycled materials in pet food is a much more sustainable model than using human food for pets.

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Campylobacter spp. Prevalence and Concentration in Household Pets and Petting Zoo Animals for Use in Exposure Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Katarina D M; Christidis, Tanya; Thomas, M Kate; Anderson, Maureen; Nesbitt, Andrea; Keithlin, Jessica; Marshall, Barbara; Pollari, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Animal contact is a potential transmission route for campylobacteriosis, and both domestic household pet and petting zoo exposures have been identified as potential sources of exposure. Research has typically focussed on the prevalence, concentration, and transmission of zoonoses from farm animals to humans, yet there are gaps in our understanding of these factors among animals in contact with the public who don't live on or visit farms. This study aims to quantify, through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter carriage in household pets and petting zoo animals. Four databases were accessed for the systematic review (PubMed, CAB direct, ProQuest, and Web of Science) for papers published in English from 1992-2012, and studies were included if they examined the animal population of interest, assessed prevalence or concentration with fecal, hair coat, oral, or urine exposure routes (although only articles that examined fecal routes were found), and if the research was based in Canada, USA, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Studies were reviewed for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis by two reviewers, compiled into a database, and relevant studies were used to create a weighted mean prevalence value. There were insufficient data to run a meta-analysis of concentration values, a noted study limitation. The mean prevalence of Campylobacter in petting zoo animals is 6.5% based on 7 studies, and in household pets the mean is 24.7% based on 34 studies. Our estimated concentration values were: 7.65x103cfu/g for petting zoo animals, and 2.9x105cfu/g for household pets. These results indicate that Campylobacter prevalence and concentration are lower in petting zoo animals compared with household pets and that both of these animal sources have a lower prevalence compared with farm animals that do not come into contact with the public. There is a lack of studies on Campylobacter in petting zoos and/or fair animals in

  11. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Campylobacter spp. Prevalence and Concentration in Household Pets and Petting Zoo Animals for Use in Exposure Assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina D M Pintar

    Full Text Available Animal contact is a potential transmission route for campylobacteriosis, and both domestic household pet and petting zoo exposures have been identified as potential sources of exposure. Research has typically focussed on the prevalence, concentration, and transmission of zoonoses from farm animals to humans, yet there are gaps in our understanding of these factors among animals in contact with the public who don't live on or visit farms. This study aims to quantify, through a systematic review and meta-analysis, the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter carriage in household pets and petting zoo animals. Four databases were accessed for the systematic review (PubMed, CAB direct, ProQuest, and Web of Science for papers published in English from 1992-2012, and studies were included if they examined the animal population of interest, assessed prevalence or concentration with fecal, hair coat, oral, or urine exposure routes (although only articles that examined fecal routes were found, and if the research was based in Canada, USA, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Studies were reviewed for qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis by two reviewers, compiled into a database, and relevant studies were used to create a weighted mean prevalence value. There were insufficient data to run a meta-analysis of concentration values, a noted study limitation. The mean prevalence of Campylobacter in petting zoo animals is 6.5% based on 7 studies, and in household pets the mean is 24.7% based on 34 studies. Our estimated concentration values were: 7.65x103cfu/g for petting zoo animals, and 2.9x105cfu/g for household pets. These results indicate that Campylobacter prevalence and concentration are lower in petting zoo animals compared with household pets and that both of these animal sources have a lower prevalence compared with farm animals that do not come into contact with the public. There is a lack of studies on Campylobacter in petting zoos and

  12. Innovative LuYAP:Ce array for PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinti, M. N.; Scafe, R.; Bennati, P.; Lo Meo, S.; Frantellizzi, V.; Pellegrini, R.; De Vincentis, G.; Sacco, D.; Fabbri, A.; Pani, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an imaging characterization of a 10 × 10 LuYAP array (2 × 2 × 10 mm3 pixels) with an innovative dielectric coating insulation (0.015 mm thick), in view of its possible use in a gamma camera for imaging positron emission tomography (PET) or in similar applications, e.g. as γ -prompt detector in hadron therapy. The particular assembly of this array was realized in order to obtain a packing fraction of 98%, improving detection efficiency and light collection. For imaging purpose, the array has been coupled with a selected Hamamatsu H10966-100 Multi Anode Photomultiplier read out by a customized 64 independent channels electronics. This tube presents a superbialkali photocathode with 38% of quantum efficiency, permitting to enhance energy resolution and consequently image quality. A pixel identification of about 0.5 mm at 662 keV was obtained, highlighting the potentiality of this detector in PET applications.

  13. Profiling EGFR in Triple Negative Breast Tumor Using Affibody PET Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingding Xu; Gang Ren; Shibo Qi; Zhen Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Triple negative breast cancer(TNBC) represents a group of refractory breast cancers with aggressive clinical manifestations as well as poor prognoses.Human epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) expression is strongly associated with TNBC progression and it may serve as a therapeutic target for TNBC.We aimed to evaluate EGFR affibody-based PET imaging to profile EGFR expression in small animal models.Methods 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid(DOTA) conjugated Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 was chemically synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesizer and then radiolabeled with 64Cu.The in vitro cell uptake study was performed using SUM159 and MCF7 cells.The biodistribution and small animal PET imaging using 64Cu-DOTA-ZEGFR:1907 were further carried out with nude mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 and SUM159 tumors.Results DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 was successfully synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu.Biodistribution study showed that tumor uptake value of 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 remained at(4.07±0.93)%ID/g at 24 h in nude mice(n=4) bearing SUM159 xenografts.Furthermore,small animal PET imaging study clearly showed that 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 specifically delineated the EGFR positive TNBC tumors at 4 h or later.Conclusion The study demonstrates that 64Cu-DOTA-Ac-Cys-ZEGFR:1907 is a promising molecular probe for PET imaging of EGFR positive TNBC.EGFR based small protein scaffold holds great promise as a novel platform that can be used for EGFR profiling of TNBC.

  14. A dedicated high resolution PET imager for plant sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; Wen, Jie; Komarov, Sergey; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    PET provides in vivo molecular and functional imaging capability that is crucial to studying the interaction of plant with changing environment at the whole-plant level. We have developed a dedicated plant PET imager that features high spatial resolution, housed in a fully controlled environment provided by a plant growth chamber (PGC). The system currently contains two types of detector modules: 84 microPET R4 block detectors with 2.2 mm crystals to provide a large detecting area; and 32 Inveon block detectors with 1.5 mm crystals to provide higher spatial resolution. Outputs of the four microPET block detectors in a modular housing are concatenated by a custom printed circuit board to match the output characteristics of an Inveon detector. All the detectors are read out by QuickSilver electronics. The detector modules are configured to full rings with a 15 cm diameter trans-axial field of view (FOV) for dynamic tomographic imaging of small plants. Potentially, the Inveon detectors can be reconfigured to qua...

  15. Analysis of 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose PET imaging data captured before and after Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy of U87 tumors in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Spring-Robinson, Chandra; Sharma, Rahul; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, D.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: Several workers have proposed the use of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) imaging for the outcome assessment of photodynamic therapy (PDT), especially for deep-seated tumors. We report on our study of 18Ffluorodeoxy- glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging following brain tumor Pc4-PDT. Our working hypothesis was that the tumor's metabolic activity would decline dramatically following Pc 4-PDT owing to tumor necrosis. Methods: Seven days after intraparenchymal implantation of U87 cells, the brains of 12 athymic nude rats were imaged by micro-CT and/or micro-MR. These animals were also 18F-FDG micro-PETPET) scanned before and after Pc 4-PDT. 18F-FDG was used to trace metabolic activity that was monitored via μPET. Occurrence of PDT was confirmed on histology. The analysis of 18F-FDG dose and animal weight normalized μPET activity was studied over the 90 minute µPET scan. Results: Currently, μPET data have been studied for: (1) three of the animals that did not indicate tumor necrosis on histology and were assigned to a "Non-PDT" group, and (2) six animals that exhibited tumor necrosis on histology and were assigned to a "PDT" group. The μPET-detected 18F-FDG uptake activity in the tumor region before and after photoirradiation increased in the Non-PDT group an average of 2.28 times, and in the PDT group it increased an average of 1.15 times. Discussion: We are investigating the cause of the increase in 18F-FDG μPET activity that we observed in the PDT group. The methodology used in this study should be useful in determining whether this or other PET, SPECT, or MR functional imaging protocols will detect both the specificity and sensitivity of brain tumor necrosis following Pc 4-PDT.

  16. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  17. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola O. Sogbein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed.

  18. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  19. Designing Image Operators for MRI-PET Image Fusion of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Jorge; Gastélum, Alfonso; Padilla, Miguel A.

    2006-09-01

    Our goal is to obtain images combining in a useful and precise way the information from 3D volumes of medical imaging sets. We address two modalities combining anatomy (Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MRI) and functional information (Positron Emission Tomography or PET). Commercial imaging software offers image fusion tools based on fixed blending or color-channel combination of two modalities, and color Look-Up Tables (LUTs), without considering the anatomical and functional character of the image features. We used a sensible approach for image fusion taking advantage mainly from the HSL (Hue, Saturation and Luminosity) color space, in order to enhance the fusion results. We further tested operators for gradient and contour extraction to enhance anatomical details, plus other spatial-domain filters for functional features corresponding to wide point-spread-function responses in PET images. A set of image-fusion operators was formulated and tested on PET and MRI acquisitions.

  20. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging in a human brain PET/MR system in 50 patients-Current state of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F., E-mail: nina.schwenzer@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Stegger, L., E-mail: stegger@gmx.net [Department of Nuclear Medicine and European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Bisdas, S., E-mail: sbisdas@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Schraml, C., E-mail: christina.schraml@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kolb, A., E-mail: armin.kolb@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, A., E-mail: Andreas.Boss@usz.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mueller, M., E-mail: mark.mueller@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: The present work illustrates the current state of image quality and diagnostic accuracy in a new hybrid BrainPET/MR. Materials and methods: 50 patients with intracranial masses, head and upper neck tumors or neurodegenerative diseases were examined with a hybrid BrainPET/MR consisting of a conventional 3T MR system and an MR-compatible PET insert. Directly before PET/MR, all patients underwent a PET/CT examination with either [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-methionine or [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. In addition to anatomical MR scans, functional sequences were performed including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and proton-spectroscopy. Image quality score of MR imaging was evaluated using a 4-point-scale. PET data quality was assessed by evaluating FDG-uptake and tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. FDG uptake quantification accuracy was evaluated by means of ROI analysis (right and left frontal and temporo-occipital lobes). The asymmetry indices and ratios between frontal and occipital ROIs were compared. Results: In 45/50 patients, PET/MR examination was successful. Visual analysis revealed a diagnostic image quality of anatomical MR imaging (mean quality score T2 FSE: 1.27 {+-} 0.54; FLAIR: 1.38 {+-} 0.61). ASL and proton-spectroscopy was possible in all cases. In DTI, dental artifacts lead to one non-diagnostic dataset (mean quality score DTI: 1.32 {+-} 0.69; ASL: 1.10 {+-} 0.31). PET datasets of PET/MR and PET/CT offered comparable tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine; additional lesions were found in 2/8 [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET in the PET/MR. Mean asymmetry index revealed a high accordance between PET/MR and PET/CT (1.5 {+-} 2.2% vs. 0.9 {+-} 3.6%; mean ratio (frontal/parieto-occipital) 0.93 {+-} 0.08 vs. 0.96 {+-} 0.05), respectively. Conclusions: The hybrid BrainPET/MR allows for molecular, anatomical and functional imaging with uncompromised MR image quality and a high accordance

  1. Pitfalls and Limitations of PET/CT in Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Eric; Bernard Ir, Claire; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Neurologic applications were at the forefront of PET imaging when the technique was developed in the mid-1970s. Although oncologic indications have become prominent in terms of number of studies performed worldwide, neurology remains a major field in which functional imaging provides unique information, both for clinical and research purposes. The evaluation of glucose metabolism using FDG remains the most frequent exploration, but in recent years, alternative radiotracers have been developed, including fluorinated amino acid analogues for primary brain tumor imaging and fluorinated compounds for assessing the amyloid deposits in patients with suspected Alzheimer disease. As the brain is enclosed in the skull, which presents fixed landmarks, it is relatively easy to coregister images obtained with various cross-sectional imaging methods, either functional or anatomical, with a relatively high accuracy and robustness. Nevertheless, PET in neurology has fully benefited from the advent of hybrid imaging. Attenuation and scatter correction is now much faster and equally accurate, using CT as compared with the traditional transmission scan using an external radioactive source. The perfect coregistration with the CT data, which is now systematically performed, also provides its own set of valuable information, for instance regarding cerebral atrophy. However, hybrid imaging in neurology comes with pitfalls and limitations, in addition to those that are well known, for example, blood glucose levels or psychotropic drugs that greatly affect the physiological FDG uptake. Movements of the patient's head, either during the PET acquisition or between the PET and the CT acquisitions will generate artifacts that may be very subtle yet lead to erroneous interpretation of the study. Similarly, quantitative analysis, such as voxel-based analyses, may prove very helpful in improving the diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of the reading, but a wide variety of artifacts may

  2. Value of C-11-methionine PET in imaging brain tumours and metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Enting, Roeline; Heesters, Martinus; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; van Rheenen, Ronald W J; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E; Slart, Riemer H J A

    2013-01-01

    C-11-methionine (MET) is the most popular amino acid tracer used in PET imaging of brain tumours. Because of its characteristics, MET PET provides a high detection rate of brain tumours and good lesion delineation. This review focuses on the role of MET PET in imaging cerebral gliomas. The Introduct

  3. A micro-PET/CT approach using O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine in an experimental animal model of F98 glioma for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, L., E-mail: luca.menichetti@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Petroni, D.; Panetta, D. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Burchielli, S. [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana G. Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Bortolussi, Silva [Dept. Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Matteucci, M. [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Pascali, G.; Del Turco, S. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Altieri, S. [Dept. Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, University of Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Salvadori, P.A. [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The present study focuses on a micro-PET/CT application to be used for experimental Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), which integrates, in the same frame, micro-CT derived anatomy and PET radiotracer distribution. Preliminary results have demonstrated that {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine (FET)/PET allows the identification of the extent of cerebral lesions in F98 tumor bearing rat. Neutron autoradiography and {alpha}-spectrometry on axial tissues slices confirmed the tumor localization and extraction, after the administration of fructose-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Therefore, FET-PET approach can be used to assess the transport, the net influx, and the accumulation of FET, as an aromatic amino acid analog of BPA, in experimental animal model. Coregistered micro-CT images allowed the accurate morphological localization of the radiotracer distribution and its potential use for experimental BNCT.

  4. Gallium-68 Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Iravani, Amir

    2017-04-01

    The role of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET imaging is evolving and finding its place in the imaging armamentarium for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite the progress of conventional imaging strategies, significant limitations remain, including identification of small-volume disease and assessment of bone. Clinical studies have demonstrated that (68)Ga-PSMA is a promising tracer for detection of PCa metastases, even in patients with low prostate-specific antigen. To provide an accurate interpretation of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/computed tomography, nuclear medicine specialists and radiologists should be familiar with physiologic (68)Ga-PSMA uptake, common variants, patterns of locoregional and distant spread of PCa, and inherent pitfalls.

  5. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  6. Diseases in pet guinea pigs: a retrospective study in 1000 animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarikova, A; Hauptman, K; Jeklova, E; Knotek, Z; Jekl, V

    2015-08-22

    Guinea pigs are commonly kept as pet animals; however, information about particular disease prevalence is lacking. The objective of this article was to present disease prevalence in 1000 pet guinea pigs from private owners divided into three age groups: under two years; between two and five years; and above five years. Medical records of guinea pigs (Cavia aperea f. porcellus) that were presented to the authors' clinic in the period from January 2008 to August 2013 were reviewed. The most commonly diagnosed disease in guinea pigs was dental disease (36.3 per cent), with higher prevalence in the middle age group (Pguinea pigs (Pguinea pigs from a total of 1000 animals were healthy. This is the first study to describe the disease prevalence in three age groups of pet guinea pigs.

  7. PET Imaging of the AT{sub 1} receptor with [{sup 11}C]KR31173

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zober, Tamas G. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Mathews, William B. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Seckin, Esen [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Yoo, Sung-eun [Center for Biological Modulators, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Hilton, John [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Xia Jinsong [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Sandberg, Kathryn [Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States); Szabo, Zsolt [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States)]. E-mail: zszabo@jhmi.edu

    2006-01-15

    Aim: The goal of this study was to investigate the binding characteristics of [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and its applicability for PET studies of the AT{sub 1} receptor (AT{sub 1}R). Methods: Ex vivo biodistribution and pharmacology were tested in mice. PET imaging was performed in mice, beagle dogs and a baboon. To assess nonspecific binding, PET imaging was performed both before and after pretreatment with a potent AT{sub 1}R antagonist. In the baboon, PET imaging was also performed with the previously developed radioligand [{sup 11}C]L-159,884 for comparison. Results: Ex vivo biodistribution studies in mice showed specific binding rates of 80-90% in the adrenals, kidneys, lungs and heart. Specific binding was confirmed in mice using small animal PET. In dogs, renal cortex tissue concentration at 75-95 min postinjection (pi) was 63 nCi/ml per millicurie at a specific binding rate of 95%. In the baboon renal cortex, tissue activity at 55-75 min pi was 345 nCi/ml per millicurie. In the baboon the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]KR31173 was higher (81%) than the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]L-159,884 (34%). Conclusion: [{sup 11}C]KR31173 shows accumulation and significant specific binding to the AT{sub 1}R in the kidneys of mice, dogs and baboon. These findings suggest that this radioligand is suited for imaging the renal cortical AT{sub 1}R in multiple species.

  8. 78 FR 27303 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ...) in part 579 Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food (21...--IRRADIATION IN THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, AND HANDLING OF ANIMAL FEED AND PET FOOD 0 1. The authority... / Friday, May 10, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food...

  9. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  10. NEMA NU 2-2007 performance measurements of the Siemens Inveon™ preclinical small animal PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brad J.; Hruska, Carrie B.; McFarland, Aaron R.; Lenox, Mark W.; Lowe, Val J.

    2009-04-01

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 performance measurements were conducted on the Inveon™ preclinical small animal PET system developed by Siemens Medical Solutions. The scanner uses 1.51 × 1.51 × 10 mm LSO crystals grouped in 20 × 20 blocks; a tapered light guide couples the LSO crystals of a block to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. There are 80 rings with 320 crystals per ring and the ring diameter is 161 mm. The transaxial and axial fields of view (FOVs) are 100 and 127 mm, respectively. The scanner can be docked to a CT scanner; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. Performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance were obtained for different energy windows and coincidence timing window widths. For brevity, the results described here are for an energy window of 350-650 keV and a coincidence timing window of 3.43 ns. The spatial resolution at the center of the transaxial and axial FOVs was 1.56, 1.62 and 2.12 mm in the tangential, radial and axial directions, respectively, and the system sensitivity was 36.2 cps kBq-1 for a line source (7.2% for a point source). For mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, the scatter fraction was 5.7% and 14.6%, respectively. The peak noise equivalent count rate with a noisy randoms estimate was 1475 kcps at 130 MBq for the mouse-sized phantom and 583 kcps at 74 MBq for the rat-sized phantom. The performance measurements indicate that the Inveon™ PET scanner is a high-resolution tomograph with excellent sensitivity that is capable of imaging at a high count rate.

  11. NEMA NU 2-2007 performance measurements of the Siemens Inveon preclinical small animal PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Brad J; Hruska, Carrie B; McFarland, Aaron R; Lenox, Mark W; Lowe, Val J

    2009-04-21

    National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 performance measurements were conducted on the Inveon preclinical small animal PET system developed by Siemens Medical Solutions. The scanner uses 1.51 x 1.51 x 10 mm LSO crystals grouped in 20 x 20 blocks; a tapered light guide couples the LSO crystals of a block to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. There are 80 rings with 320 crystals per ring and the ring diameter is 161 mm. The transaxial and axial fields of view (FOVs) are 100 and 127 mm, respectively. The scanner can be docked to a CT scanner; the performance characteristics of the CT component are not included herein. Performance measurements of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance were obtained for different energy windows and coincidence timing window widths. For brevity, the results described here are for an energy window of 350-650 keV and a coincidence timing window of 3.43 ns. The spatial resolution at the center of the transaxial and axial FOVs was 1.56, 1.62 and 2.12 mm in the tangential, radial and axial directions, respectively, and the system sensitivity was 36.2 cps kBq(-1) for a line source (7.2% for a point source). For mouse- and rat-sized phantoms, the scatter fraction was 5.7% and 14.6%, respectively. The peak noise equivalent count rate with a noisy randoms estimate was 1475 kcps at 130 MBq for the mouse-sized phantom and 583 kcps at 74 MBq for the rat-sized phantom. The performance measurements indicate that the Inveon PET scanner is a high-resolution tomograph with excellent sensitivity that is capable of imaging at a high count rate.

  12. Small animal imaging. Basics and practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Fabian [Aachen Univ. (RWTH) (Germany). Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging; Pichler, Bernd J. (eds.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Lab. for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation

    2011-07-01

    Small animal imaging has been recognized as an important tool in preclinical research. Nevertheless, the results of non-invasive imaging are often disappointing owing to choice of a suboptimal imaging modality and/or shortcomings in study design, experimental setup, and data evaluation. This textbook is a practical guide to the use of non-invasive imaging in preclinical research. Each of the available imaging modalities is discussed in detail, with the assistance of numerous informative illustrations. In addition, many useful hints are provided on the installation of a small animal unit, study planning, animal handling, and the cost-effective performance of small animal imaging. Cross-calibration methods, data postprocessing, and special imaging applications are also considered in depth. This is the first book to cover all the practical basics in small animal imaging, and it will prove an invaluable aid for researchers, students, and technicians. (orig.)

  13. Spatial resolution and sensitivity of the Inveon small-animal PET scanner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, E.P.; Disselhorst, J.; Brom, M.; Laverman, P.; Gotthardt, M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Inveon small-animal PET scanner is characterized by a large, 127-mm axial length and a 161-mm crystal ring diameter. The associated high sensitivity is obtained by using all lines of response (LORs) up to the maximum ring difference (MRD) of 79, for which the most oblique LORs form acceptance an

  14. 食蟹猴动物实验在PET/CT扫描检查中的注意事项%Guidelines for PET/CT scanography in animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨洪文; 秦朝军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To search for the best scanning parameters of PET/CT scanning examination in animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis, and to obtain the best images. Methods One male and one female monkeys respectively received the CT multiparameter scanning and PET multi - time period dynamic tomoscan. Results When the scanning conditions were 420 mAs and 120 kV,the best resolution ratio and the lightest constructed defect could be obtained. In the images of PET multi - time period dynamic tomoscan, the best image effects could be obtained from the images within 40-60 min. Conclusion Before the animal experiment of Macaca fascicularis on the PET/CT machine, the monkeys should receive the pre - scanning. And the best scanning parameters should be selected in order to obtain satisfactory results in the experiment.%目的 寻找食蟹猴动物实验在PET/CT扫描检查中最佳的扫描参数,获得最佳图像.方法 两只食蟹猴为一雄一雌,对两只食蟹猴分别采用CT多参数扫描和PET的多时段动态断层扫描.结果 扫描条件采用420 mAs、120 kV时,可以获得最佳的图像分辨率和最轻的伪影.PET扫描多时段动态断层扫描的图像中,40~60 min的图像可以获得最佳图像效果.结论 食蟹猴在PET/CT机上行动物实验前,应进行预扫描,选择最佳的扫描参数,才能获得满意的实验结果.

  15. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/pathology image coregistration in primary localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Prokic, Vesna [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Wendl, Christina; Geinitz, Hans; Molls, Michael [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Kirste, Simon [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gschwend, Juergen E.; Treiber, Uwe [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States); Krause, Bernd Joachim [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the comparison of pathology specimens after prostatectomy (post-S) with PET images obtained before surgery (pre-S). This method was used to evaluate the merit of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in prostate cancer (PC). In 28 PC patients, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was performed before surgery. PET/CT data were coregistered with the pathology specimens. GTV on PET images (GTV-PET) was outlined automatically and corrected manually. Tumour volume in the prostate (TVP) was delineated manually on the pathology specimens. Based on the coregistered PET/pathology images, the following parameters were assessed: SUVmax and SUVmean in the tumoral and nontumoral prostate (NP), GTV-PET (millilitres) and TVP (millilitres). PET/pathology image coregistration was satisfactory. Mean SUVmax in the TVP was lower than in the NP: 5.0 and 5.5, respectively (p = 0.093). Considering the entire prostate, SUVmax was located in the TVP in two patients, in the TVP and NP in 12 patients and exclusively in NP in 14 patients. Partial overlap the TVP and GTV-PET was seen in 71 % of patients, and complete overlap in 4 %. PET/pathology image coregistration can be used for evaluation of different imaging modalities. {sup 11}C-Choline PET failed to distinguish tumour from nontumour tissue. (orig.)

  16. Application of inulin-type fructans in animal feed and pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, J M A J; Shim, S B; van Leeuwen, P; Verstegen, M W A

    2005-04-01

    The inulin-type fructans are non-digestible oligosaccharides that are fermented in the gastrointestinal tract of farm animals and pets. This review focuses on the various effects of inulin-type fructans in pigs, poultry, calves and companion animals. Effects of the inulin-type fructans on gut microflora, digestion and availability of nutrients, gut morphology, fermentation characteristics and animal performance are discussed. Inulin-type fructans can support animal performance and health by affecting nutrient digestion, gut microflora and gut morphology, although results vary depending on composition of the basal diet, inclusion level, type of fructan, adaptation period and experimental hygienic conditions.

  17. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  18. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janek, S [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, R [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, C [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Brahme, A [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O but also {sup 13}N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery

  19. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek, S.; Svensson, R.; Jonsson, C.; Brahme, A.

    2006-11-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  20. [Br-76]bromodeoxyuridine PET in tumor-bearing animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardelle, O; Roelcke, U; Vontobel, P; Crompton, NEA; Guenther, [No Value; Blauenstein, P; Schubiger, AP; Blattmann, H; Ryser, JE; Leenders, KL; Kaser-Hotz, B

    2001-01-01

    5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) provides in vitro measures of tumor cell proliferation. We used positron emission tomography to study tissue and plasma kinetics of [Br-76]BUdR in tumor-bearing animals. In order to account for the slow washout of the major plasma metabolite, [Br-76]bromide, a mathematical

  1. Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Paulus, Michael J.; Gleason, Shaun S.

    2007-04-24

    A novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired. The apparatus comprises a combination of an IR laser profilometry system and gamma, PET and/or SPECT, imaging system, all mounted on a rotating gantry, that permits simultaneous acquisition of positional and orientational information and functional images of an unrestrained subject that are registered, i.e. integrated, using image processing software to produce a functional image of the subject without the use of restraints or anesthesia. The functional image thus obtained can be registered with a previously or subsequently obtained X-ray CT image of the subject. The use of the system described herein permits functional imaging of a subject in an unrestrained/non-anesthetized condition thereby reducing the stress on the subject and eliminating any potential interference with the functional testing that such stress might induce.

  2. Enclosure for small animals during awake animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jr., James S

    2013-11-26

    An enclosure or burrow restrains an awake animal during an imaging procedure. A tubular body, made from a radiolucent material that does not attenuate x-rays or gamma rays, accepts an awake animal. A proximal end of the body includes an attachment surface that corresponds to an attachment surface of an optically transparent and optically uniform window. An anti-reflective coating may be applied to an inner surface, an outer surface, or both surfaces of the window. Since the window is a separate element of the enclosure and it is not integrally formed as part of the body, it can be made with optically uniform thickness properties for improved motion tracking of markers on the animal with a camera during the imaging procedure. The motion tracking information is then used to compensate for animal movement in the image.

  3. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  4. Performance evaluation of SiPM photodetectors for PET imaging in the presence of magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S., E-mail: samuel@nuclear.fis.ucm.e [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L.M.; Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M.; Vaquero, J.J. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) or silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), recently introduced as a solid-state photodetector, consists of an array of Geiger-mode photodiodes (microcells). It is a promising device for PET due to its potential for high photon detection efficiency (PDE) and its foreseeable immunity to magnetic fields. It is also easy to use with simple read-outs, has a high gain and a small size. In this work we evaluate the in field performance of three 1x1 mm{sup 2} (with 100, 400 and 1600 microcells, respectively) and one 6x6 mm{sup 2} (arranged as a 2x2 array) Hamamatsu MPPCs for their use in PET imaging. We examine the dependence of the energy resolution and the gain of these devices on the temperature and reverse bias voltage, when coupled to LYSO scintillator crystals under conditions that one would find in a PET system. We find that the 400 and 1600 microcells models and the 2x2 array are suitable for small-size crystals, like those employed in high resolution small animal scanners. We have confirmed the good performance of these devices up to magnetic fields of 7 T as well as their suitability for performing PET acquisitions in the presence of fast switching gradients and high duty radiofrequency MRI sequences.

  5. Short-lived positron emitters in beam-on PET imaging during proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H. J. T.; Diblen, F.; Heeres, P. N.; Biegun, A. K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2015-01-01

    The only method for in vivo dose delivery verification in proton beam radiotherapy in clinical use today is positron emission tomography (PET) of the positron emitters produced in the patient during irradiation. PET imaging while the beam is on (so called beam-on PET) is an attractive option, provid

  6. Pretargeted PET Imaging Using a Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brendon E; Adumeau, Pierre; Membreno, Rosemery; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Brand, Christian; Reiner, Thomas; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, both site-specific bioconjugation techniques and bioorthogonal pretargeting strategies have emerged as exciting technologies with the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of antibody-based nuclear imaging. In the work at hand, we have combined these two approaches to create a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the rapid and bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between a (64)Cu-labeled tetrazine radioligand ((64)Cu-Tz-SarAr) and a site-specifically modified huA33-trans-cyclooctene immunoconjugate ((ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO). A bioconjugation strategy that harnesses enzymatic transformations and strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry was used to site-specifically append PEGylated TCO moieties to the heavy chain glycans of the colorectal cancer-targeting huA33 antibody. Preclinical in vivo validation studies were performed in athymic nude mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts. To this end, mice were administered (ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO via tail vein injection and-following accumulation intervals of 24 or 48 h-(64)Cu-Tz-SarAr. PET imaging and biodistribution studies reveal that this strategy clearly delineates tumor tissue as early as 1 h post-injection (6.7 ± 1.7%ID/g at 1 h p.i.), producing images with excellent contrast and high tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios (tumor:muscle = 21.5 ± 5.6 at 24 h p.i.). Furthermore, dosimetric calculations illustrate that this pretargeting approach produces only a fraction of the overall effective dose (0.0214 mSv/MBq; 0.079 rem/mCi) of directly labeled radioimmunoconjugates. Ultimately, this method effectively facilitates the high contrast pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma using a site-specifically modified immunoconjugate.

  7. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  8. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dregely, Isabel [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F. [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar (Germany); Metz, Stephan [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Munich (Germany); Kuschan, Marika [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Bundschuh, Ralph A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik, Bonn (Germany); Haase, Axel [IMETUM, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative {sup 18} F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  9. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong, E-mail: ouyang.jinsong@mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Ackerman, Jerome L. [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  10. A PET imaging system dedicated to mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is presented. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD) and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger and data acquisition system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and negligible dead-time. The detector module performance was characterized in detail.

  11. Comparison between two super-resolution implementations in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Qiao, Feng; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2009-04-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this article, the authors propose a novel implementation of the SR technique whereby the required multiple low-resolution images are generated by shifting the reconstruction pixel grid during the image reconstruction process rather than being acquired from different POVs. The objective of this article is to compare the performances of the two SR implementations using theoretical and experimental studies. A mathematical framework is first provided to support the hypothesis that the two SR implementations have similar performance in current PET/CT scanners that use block detectors. Based on this framework, a simulation study, a point source study, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted to compare the performance of these two SR implementations with respect to contrast, resolution, noise, and SNR. For reference purposes, a comparison with a native reconstruction (NR) image using a high-resolution pixel grid was also performed. The mathematical framework showed that the two SR implementations are expected to achieve similar contrast and resolution but different noise contents. These results were confirmed by the simulation and experimental studies. The simulation study showed that the two SR implementations have an average contrast difference of 2.3%, while the point source study showed that their average differences in contrast and resolution were 0.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Comparisons between the SR and NR images for the point source study showed that the NR image exhibited averages of 30% and 8% lower contrast and resolution, respectively. The NEMA/IEC phantom study showed that the three images (two SR and NR) exhibited different noise structures. The SNR of the new SR implementation was, on average, 21.5% lower than the original implementation largely due to an

  12. MR-compatibility of a high-resolution small animal PET insert operating inside a 7 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, J. D.; Shams, E.; Stortz, G.; Schellenberg, G.; Bishop, D.; Khan, M. S.; Kozlowski, P.; Retière, F.; Sossi, V.; Thompson, C. J.; Goertzen, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    A full-ring PET insert consisting of 16 PET detector modules was designed and constructed to fit within the 114 mm diameter gradient bore of a Bruker 7 T MRI. The individual detector modules contain two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays, dual-layer offset LYSO crystal arrays, and high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) cables for both signal and power transmission. Several different RF shielding configurations were assessed prior to construction of a fully assembled PET insert using a combination of carbon fibre and copper foil for RF shielding. MR-compatibility measurements included field mapping of the static magnetic field (B 0) and the time-varying excitation field (B 1) as well as acquisitions with multiple pulse sequences: spin echo (SE), rapid imaging with refocused echoes (RARE), fast low angle shot (FLASH) gradient echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI). B 0 field maps revealed a small degradation in the mean homogeneity (+0.1 ppm) when the PET insert was installed and operating. No significant change was observed in the B 1 field maps or the image homogeneity of various MR images, with a 9% decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) observed only in EPI images acquired with the PET insert installed and operating. PET detector flood histograms, photopeak amplitudes, and energy resolutions were unchanged in individual PET detector modules when acquired during MRI operation. There was a small baseline shift on the PET detector signals due to the switching amplifiers used to power MRI gradient pulses. This baseline shift was observable when measured with an oscilloscope and varied as a function of the gradient duty cycle, but had no noticeable effect on the performance of the PET detector modules. Compact front-end electronics and effective RF shielding led to minimal cross-interference between the PET and MRI systems. Both PET detector and MRI performance was excellent, whether operating as a standalone system or a hybrid PET/MRI.

  13. RGD-based PET tracers for imaging receptor integrin αv β3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hancheng; Conti, Peter S

    2013-05-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of receptor integrin αv β3 expression may play a key role in the early detection of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, monitoring disease progression, evaluating therapeutic response, and aiding anti-angiogenic drugs discovery and development. The last decade has seen the development of new PET tracers for in vivo imaging of integrin αv β3 expression along with advances in PET chemistry. In this review, we will focus on the radiochemistry development of PET tracers based on arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide, present an overview of general strategies for preparing RGD-based PET tracers, and review the recent advances in preparations of (18) F-labeled, (64) Cu-labeled, and (68) Ga-labeled RGD tracers, RGD-based PET multivalent probes, and RGD-based PET multimodality probes for imaging receptor integrin αv β3 expression.

  14. MRI and PET Image Fusion Using Fuzzy Logic and Image Local Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Javed

    2014-01-01

    to maximally combine useful information present in MRI and PET images. Image local features are extracted and combined with fuzzy logic to compute weights for each pixel. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme produces significantly better results compared to state-of-art schemes.

  15. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  16. Imaging results and TOF studies with axial PET detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a fully operational PET demonstrator setup which allows true 3D reconstruction of the 511 keV photons and therefore leads to practically parallax free images. The AX-PET concept is based on thin 100 mm long scintillation crystals (LYSO), axially oriented and arranged in layers around the held of view. Layers of wavelength shifting plastic strips mounted in between the crystal layers give the axial coordinate. Both crystals and WLS strips are individually read out by G-APD (SiPM) photodetectors. The Fully scalable concept overcomes the dilemma of sensitivity versus spatial resolution which is inherent to classical PET designs. A demonstrator set-up based on two axial modules was exhaustively characterized using point-like sources, phantoms filled with radiotracer and finally rats and a mouse. The results entirely meet the performance expectations ( <2 mm FWHM in all three coordinates over the complete held of view) and also demonstrated the ability to include Compton interactions (inter-cr...

  17. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagust, W.J. (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rodt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice develop disseminated and circumscribed lung adenocarcinoma respectively, allowing for assessment of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility, the correlation of initial findings to histology and the administered radiation dose of combined micro-PET/micro-CT in these animal models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 14 C57BL/6 mice (4 nontransgenic, 4 SPC-raf transgenic, 6 SPC-myc transgenic were examined using micro-CT and (18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose micro-PET in-vivo. Micro-PET data was corrected for random events and scatter prior to reconstruction with a 3D-FORE/2D-OSEM iterative algorithm. Rigid micro-PET/micro-CT registration was performed. Tumour-to-non-tumour ratios were calculated for different lung regions and focal lesions. Diffuse tumour growth was quantified using a semiautomated micro-CT segmentation routine reported earlier. Regional histologic tumour load was assessed using a 4-point rating scale. Gamma radiation dose was determined using thermoluminescence dosimeters. RESULTS: Micro-CT allowed visualisation of diffuse and circumscribed tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic animals along with morphology, while micro-PET provided information on metabolism, but lacked morphologic detail. Mean tumour-to-non-tumour ratio was 2.47 for circumscribed lesions. No significant correlation could be shown between histological tumour load and tumour-to-nontumour ratio for diffuse tumours in SPC-raf transgenic animals. Calculation of the expected dose based on gamma dosimetry yielded approximately 140 mGy/micro-PET examination additional to approximately 200 mGy due to micro-CT. CONCLUSIONS: Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging allows for in-vivo assessment of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice. The technique has potential for the evaluation of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies in circumscribed lung tumours.

  19. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of 124I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ram Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%, because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV, which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for 124I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs, and the spillover ratios (SORs of 124I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of 124I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in 124I PET. In terms of the image quality of 124I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal.

  20. Segmentation of dynamic PET images with kinetic spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouysset, S.; Zbib, H.; Stute, S.; Girault, J. M.; Charara, J.; Noailles, J.; Chalon, S.; Buvat, I.; Tauber, C.

    2013-10-01

    Segmentation is often required for the analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, noise and low spatial resolution make it a difficult task and several supervised and unsupervised methods have been proposed in the literature to perform the segmentation based on semi-automatic clustering of the time activity curves of voxels. In this paper we propose a new method based on spectral clustering that does not require any prior information on the shape of clusters in the space in which they are identified. In our approach, the p-dimensional data, where p is the number of time frames, is first mapped into a high dimensional space and then clustering is performed in a low-dimensional space of the Laplacian matrix. An estimation of the bounds for the scale parameter involved in the spectral clustering is derived. The method is assessed using dynamic brain PET images simulated with GATE and results on real images are presented. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over three other clustering methods from the literature. The proposed approach appears as a promising pre-processing tool before parametric map calculation or ROI-based quantification tasks.

  1. Noise and physical limits to maximum resolution of PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vicente, E.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital GU ' Gregorio Maranon' , E-28007 Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2007-10-01

    In this work we show that there is a limit for the maximum resolution achievable with a high resolution PET scanner, as well as for the best signal-to-noise ratio, which are ultimately related to the physical effects involved in the emission and detection of the radiation and thus they cannot be overcome with any particular reconstruction method. These effects prevent the spatial high frequency components of the imaged structures to be recorded by the scanner. Therefore, the information encoded in these high frequencies cannot be recovered by any reconstruction technique. Within this framework, we have determined the maximum resolution achievable for a given acquisition as a function of data statistics and scanner parameters, like the size of the crystals or the inter-crystal scatter. In particular, the noise level in the data as a limitation factor to yield high-resolution images in tomographs with small crystal sizes is outlined. These results have implications regarding how to decide the optimal number of voxels of the reconstructed image or how to design better PET scanners.

  2. Pediatric oncologic imaging. A key application of combined PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatidis, Sergios; La Fougere, C.; Schaefer, J.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-04-15

    Pediatric imaging has been identified as a key application of combined whole-body PET/MRI. First studies have revealed the clinical feasibility and possible advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT and MRI. Besides a significant reduction in radiation exposure of about 50 - 75 %, combined whole-body PET/MRI offers the diagnostic advantage of the multiparametric characterization of pathophysiologic processes and helps reduce the number of necessary imaging studies. However, very few studies focusing on pediatric PET/MRI have been published to date. Additional studies are necessary in order to fully appreciate the clinical impact of this novel method. This review article shall summarize the existing literature concerning pediatric PET/MRI and give insight into the practical experience derived from over 160 pediatric PET/MRI examinations that were performed in Tuebingen.

  3. Monitoring Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy of U87 tumors with 18F- fluorodeoxy-glucose PET imaging in the Athymic Nude Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghai, Davood; Cross, Nathan; Spring-Robinson, Chandra; Sharma, Rahul; Feyes, Denise K.; Ahmad, Yusra; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Dean, David

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: We have previously demonstrated the use of phthalocyanine Pc 4 for the photodynamic therapy (PDT) of ectopic human glial tumors in the athymic nude rat brain. We wish to determine whether 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose ( 18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging can detect the reduction in tumor metabolism that must occur after Pc 4-PDT-induced necrosis. Methods: 2.5 x 10 5 U87 cells were injected into the brains of 12 athymic nude rats. After 7 days of tumor growth, all 12 animals were imaged functionally by 18F-FDG micro-PETPET) and structurally by micro-CT and/or micro-MR. These animals received 0.5 mg/kg b.w. Pc 4 via tail-vein injection. One day later the scalp was re-incised and the tumor illuminated with 30 J/cm2 of 672-nm light from a diode laser. The next day these animals were again 18F-FDG μPET imaged. Next, the animals were euthanized and their brains were explanted for H&E histology. Results: Histology showed that tumors in the 6 Pc 4-PDT-treated animals demonstrated necrosis ranging from full to frank (severe). Preliminary analysis showed that 18F-FDG μPET activity in 3 of the 6 non-PDT group (i.e., no tumor necrosis observed) animals was seen to increase 2.28 times following tumor photoirradiation, whereas 18F-FDG μPET activity in 5 of the 6 PDT group (i.e., tumor necrosis observed) animals was seen to increase 1.15 times following tumor photoirradiation. Discussion: The increased 18F-FDG μPET activity in the PDT group was unexpected. We had expected this activity to decrease and are presently investigating the cause of this observation.

  4. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J; Weber, Wolfgang A;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography......-computed tomography (PET/CT) and is provided to help the physician and physicist to assist to carrying out,interpret, and document quantitative FDG PET/CT examinations,but will concentrate on the optimisation of diagnostic quality and quantitative information....

  5. PET imaging of neurogenic activity in the adult brain: Toward in vivo imaging of human neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasuhisa; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    Neural stem cells are present in 2 neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), and continue to generate new neurons throughout life. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to a variety of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, and to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants, as well as learning and memory. In vivo imaging for hippocampal neurogenic activity may be used to diagnose psychiatric disorders and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. However, these imaging techniques remain to be established until now. Recently, we established a quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique for neurogenic activity in the adult brain with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluoro-L-thymidine ([(18)F]FLT) and probenecid, a drug transporter inhibitor in blood-brain barrier. Moreover, we showed that this PET imaging technique can monitor alterations in neurogenic activity in the hippocampus of adult rats with depression and following treatment with an antidepressant. This PET imaging method may assist in diagnosing depression and in monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. In this commentary, we discuss the possibility of in vivo PET imaging for neurogenic activity in adult non-human primates and humans.

  6. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-09-09

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it.

  7. PET imaging reveals brain functional changes in internet gaming disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Mei; Zhang, Ying; Du, Fenglei; Hou, Haifeng; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-07-15

    Internet gaming disorder is an increasing problem worldwide, resulting in critical academic, social, and occupational impairment. However, the neurobiological mechanism of internet gaming disorder remains unknown. The aim of this study is to assess brain dopamine D{sub 2} (D{sub 2})/Serotonin 2A (5-HT{sub 2A}) receptor function and glucose metabolism in the same subjects by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach, and investigate whether the correlation exists between D{sub 2} receptor and glucose metabolism. Twelve drug-naive adult males who met criteria for internet gaming disorder and 14 matched controls were studied with PET and {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) to assess the availability of D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptors and with {sup 18}F-fluoro-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) to assess regional brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain function. {sup 11}C-NMSP and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging data were acquired in the same individuals under both resting and internet gaming task states. In internet gaming disorder subjects, a significant decrease in glucose metabolism was observed in the prefrontal, temporal, and limbic systems. Dysregulation of D{sub 2} receptors was observed in the striatum, and was correlated to years of overuse. A low level of D{sub 2} receptors in the striatum was significantly associated with decreased glucose metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex. For the first time, we report the evidence that D{sub 2} receptor level is significantly associated with glucose metabolism in the same individuals with internet gaming disorder, which indicates that D{sub 2}/5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex could underlie a mechanism for loss of control and compulsive behavior in internet gaming disorder subjects. (orig.)

  8. PET/SPECT/CT multimodal imaging in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisgard, R.; Alberini, J.L.; Jego, B.; Siquier, K.; Theze, B.; Guillermet, S.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Inserm, U803, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Background. - In the therapy monitoring of breast cancer, conventional imaging methods include ultrasound, mammography, CT and MRI, which are essentially based on tumor size modifications. However these modifications represent a late consequence of the biological response and fail to differentiate scar or necrotic tissue from residual viable tumoral tissue. Therefore, a current objective is to develop tools able to predict early response to treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) are imaging modalities able to provide extremely sensitive quantitative molecular data and are widely used in humans and animals. Results. - Mammary epithelial cells of female transgenic mice expressing the polyoma middle T onco-protein (Py M.T.), undergo four distinct stages of tumour progression, from pre malignant to malignant stages. Stages are identifiable in the mammary tissue and can lead to the development of distant metastases Longitudinal studies by dynamic whole body acquisitions by multimodal imaging including PET, SPECT and Computed Tomography (CT) allow following the tumoral evolution in Py M.T. mice in comparison with the histopathological analysis. At four weeks of age, mammary hyperplasia was identified by histopathology, but no abnormalities were found by palpation or detected by PET with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose. Such as in some human mammary cancers, the sodium iodide sym-porter (N.I.S.) in tumoral mammary epithelial cells is expressed in this mouse model. In order to investigate the expression of N.I.S. in the Py M.T. mice mammary tumours, [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} imaging was performed with a dedicated SPECT/CT system camera (B.I.O.S.P.A.C.E. Gamma Imager/CT). Local uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} was detected as early as four weeks of age. The efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated in this mouse model using a conventional regimen (Doxorubicine, 100 mg/ kg) administered weekly from nine to

  9. A comparison of PET imaging characteristics of various copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Heather Ann [North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Robinson, Simon; Julyan, Peter; Hastings, David [North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Zweit, Jamal [University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    PET radiotracers which incorporate longer-lived radionuclides enable biological processes to be studied over many hours, at centres remote from a cyclotron. This paper examines the radioisotope characteristics, imaging performance, radiation dosimetry and production modes of the four copper radioisotopes, {sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu,{sup 62}Cu and{sup 64}Cu, to assess their merits for different PET imaging applications. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and noise-equivalent count rate (NEC) are predicted for{sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu,{sup 62}Cu and{sup 64}Cu using a model incorporating radionuclide decay properties and scanner parameters for the GE Advance scanner. Dosimetry for{sup 60}Cu,{sup 61}Cu and{sup 64}Cu is performed using the MIRD model and published biodistribution data for copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N{sup 4}-methyl)thiosemicarbazone (Cu-PTSM). {sup 60}Cu and{sup 62}Cu are characterised by shorter half-lives and higher sensitivity and NEC, making them more suitable for studying the faster kinetics of small molecules, such as Cu-PTSM.{sup 61}Cu and{sup 64}Cu have longer half-lives, enabling studies of the slower kinetics of cells and peptides and prolonged imaging to compensate for lower sensitivity, together with better spatial resolution, which partially compensates for loss of image contrast.{sup 61}Cu-PTSM and{sup 64}Cu-PTSM are associated with radiation doses similar to [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose, whilst the doses for{sup 60}Cu-PTSM and{sup 62}Cu-PTSM are lower and more comparable with H{sub 2}{sup 15}O. The physical and radiochemical characteristics of the four copper isotopes make each more suited to some imaging tasks than others. The results presented here assist in selecting the preferred radioisotope for a given imaging application, and illustrate a strategy which can be extended to the majority of novel PET tracers. (orig.)

  10. Impact of motion and partial volume effects correction on PET myocardial perfusion imaging using simultaneous PET-MR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Yoann; Guehl, Nicolas J.; Reese, Timothy G.; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Normandin, Marc D.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    PET is an established modality for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) which enables quantification of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using dynamic imaging and kinetic modeling. However, heart motion and partial volume effects (PVE) significantly limit the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of PET MPI. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a solution to the motion problem in PET by enabling MR-based motion correction of PET data. The aim of this study was to develop a motion and PVE correction methodology for PET MPI using simultaneous PET-MR, and to assess its impact on both static and dynamic PET MPI using 18F-Flurpiridaz, a novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracer. Two dynamic 18F-Flurpiridaz MPI scans were performed on healthy pigs using a PET-MR scanner. Cardiac motion was tracked using a dedicated tagged-MRI (tMR) sequence. Motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of tMR images and used to calculate motion-dependent attenuation maps. Motion correction of PET data was achieved by incorporating tMR-based motion fields and motion-dependent attenuation coefficients into image reconstruction. Dynamic and static PET datasets were created for each scan. Each dataset was reconstructed as (i) Ungated, (ii) Gated (end-diastolic phase), and (iii) Motion-Corrected (MoCo), each without and with point spread function (PSF) modeling for PVE correction. Myocardium-to-blood concentration ratios (MBR) and apparent wall thickness were calculated to assess image quality for static MPI. For dynamic MPI, segment- and voxel-wise MBF values were estimated by non-linear fitting of a 2-tissue compartment model to tissue time-activity-curves. MoCo and Gating respectively decreased mean apparent wall thickness by 15.1% and 14.4% and increased MBR by 20.3% and 13.6% compared to Ungated images (P  dynamic PET, mean MBF across all segments were comparable for MoCo (0.72  ±  0.21 ml/min/ml) and Gating (0.69  ±  0.18 ml/min/ml). Ungated data yielded

  11. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Sykes, J; Butler, J [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom); Wisenberg, G; Prato, F [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  12. Animal health care seeking behavior of pets or livestock owners and knowledge and awareness on zoonoses in a university community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel J. Awosanya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We investigated the attitude of pets or livestock owning households in a university community to animal health care services and assessed the knowledge and awareness level of the residents on zoonoses. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information on demography, pet or livestock ownership, animal health care seeking behavior, awareness and knowledge of zoonoses from 246 households. We did descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis to determine the level of association in discrete variables between owners and non-owners of pets or livestock at a significant level of p<0.05. Results: Of the 246 respondents, 80 (32.5% were either pet or livestock owners. The animal health care seeking behavior of the 80 pets or livestock owners in terms of treatment and vaccination was 70%. Of the 56 (70% who provided health care services for their animals, about 48 (85.7% engaged the services of a veterinarian. Dog owning households (42 had the highest frequency of treating their pets against endoparasites (97.6%; ectoparasites (81% and vaccination against diseases (73.8%. Of the 246 respondents, only 47 (19.1% have heard of the term zoonoses. Of the considered zoonoses; their awareness of rabies (79.3% was the highest, followed by Lassa fever (66.3%, the least was pasteurellosis with 18.7%. Having pets or livestock was significantly associated (p=0.04 with rabies awareness. However, there is no significant difference in the level of awareness of zoonoses; knowledge of zoonoses, knowledge of prevention of zoonoses and knowledge of risk of zoonoses between owners and non-owners of pets or livestock. Conclusion: The animal health care seeking behavior of households with pets or livestock is good and should be encouraged. Public education should be created for other zoonoses aside from rabies, Lassa fever, and avian influenza.

  13. PET imaging predicts future body weight and cocaine preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides M.; Wang G.; Michaelides M.; Thanos P.K. Kim R.; Cho J.; Ananth M.; Wang G.-J.; Volkow N.D.

    2011-08-28

    Deficits in dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2R/D3R) binding availability using PET imaging have been reported in obese humans and rodents. Similar deficits have been reported in cocaine-addicts and cocaine-exposed primates. We found that D2R/D3R binding availability negatively correlated with measures of body weight at the time of scan (ventral striatum), at 1 (ventral striatum) and 2 months (dorsal and ventral striatum) post scan in rats. Cocaine preference was negatively correlated with D2R/D3R binding availability 2 months (ventral striatum) post scan. Our findings suggest that inherent deficits in striatal D2R/D3R signaling are related to obesity and drug addiction susceptibility and that ventral and dorsal striatum serve dissociable roles in maintaining weight gain and cocaine preference. Measuring D2R/D3R binding availability provides a way for assessing susceptibility to weight gain and cocaine abuse in rodents and given the translational nature of PET imaging, potentially primates and humans.

  14. PET imaging with the non-pure positron emitters: 55Co, 86Y and 124I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Hansen, S B; Thisgaard, H;

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT with non-pure positron emitters is a highly valuable tool in immuno-PET and for pretherapeutic dosimetry. However, imaging is complicated by prompt gamma coincidences (PGCs) that add an undesired background activity to the images. Time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction improves lesion detecta...

  15. FDG PET/CT : EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Giammarile, Francesco; Tatsch, Klaus; Eschner, Wolfgang; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Stroobants, Sigrid; Delbeke, Dominique; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Holbrook, Scott; Graham, Michael M.; Testanera, Giorgio; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Zijlstra, Josee; Visser, Eric; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon; Arends, Bertjan; Kotzerke, Joerg; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) pro

  16. PET and PET/CT imaging for the earliest detection and treatment of colorectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Kevin [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Kotlyarov, Eduard [Michigan State Univ., Pontiac, MI (United States). POH Medical Center; Georgetown Univ. (United States)

    2005-10-15

    Approximately 150,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed each year with the life time risk of developing colon caner in developed nations being 4.6% in men and 3.2% in women. Screening patients is essential early detection of colon carcinoma to aid in complete resection. Unfortunately current screening methods carry with them poor patient compliance. PET and PET/CT may be a significant part of this screening solution. The authors reviewed and analyzed the English language articles and case reports identified on Medline during the last 10 years. PET and PET/CT results for colorectal carcinoma were tabulated and presented for the fifth Scientific Meeting of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Though most studies have been retrospective analysis in using PET for staging for other malignant processes the cases that have identified additional uptake in the colon are important. The accuracy when utilizing PET and PET/CT in this screening method has a sensitivity between 65 and 90% with a specificity of 84 to 90% and a positive predictive value 71 to 78%. Early stages of malignancies and pre-cancerous polyps avidly accumulates F-18 Deoxyfluoro glucose allowing us to conclude that whole body PET and PET/CT is an essential component in the work up, staging or treatment monitoring in colon carcinoma. We have to continue to accumulate data for possible introduction for whole body PET and PET/CT scanning for colon carcinoma and precancerous polyps.(author)

  17. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  18. Scatter correction for large non-human primate brain imaging using microPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S; Lehnert, W; Banati, R B; Meikle, S R, E-mail: snai3212@uni.sydney.edu.au [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia)

    2011-04-07

    The baboon is well suited to pre-clinical evaluation of novel radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET). We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of using a high resolution animal PET scanner for this application in the baboon brain. However, the non-homogenous distribution of tissue density within the head may give rise to photon scattering effects that reduce contrast and compromise quantitative accuracy. In this study, we investigated the magnitude and distribution of scatter contributing to the final reconstructed image and its variability throughout the baboon brain using phantoms and Monte Carlo simulated data. The scatter fraction is measured up to 36% at the centre of the brain for a wide energy window (350-650 keV) and 19% for a narrow (450-650 keV) window. We observed less than 3% variation in the scatter fraction throughout the brain and found that scattered events arising from radioactivity outside the field of view contribute less than 1% of measured coincidences. In a contrast phantom, scatter and attenuation correction improved contrast recovery compared with attenuation correction on its own and reduced bias to less than 10% at the expense of the reduced signal-to-noise ratio. We conclude that scatter correction is a necessary step for ensuring high quality measurements of the radiotracer distribution in the baboon brain with a microPET scanner, while it is not necessary to model out of field of view scatter or a spatially variant scatter function.

  19. Polyglucose nanoparticles with renal elimination and macrophage avidity facilitate PET imaging in ischaemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keliher, Edmund J.; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Tricot, Benoit; Senders, Max L.; Groenen, Hannah; Fay, Francois; Perez-Medina, Carlos; Calcagno, Claudia; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Reiner, Thomas; Sun, Yuan; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Wang, Cuihua; Chen, John W.; Swirski, Filip K.; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Hooker, Jacob; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophage numbers vary during health versus disease. Abundant inflammatory macrophages destruct tissues, leading to atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Emerging therapeutic options create interest in monitoring macrophages in patients. Here we describe positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18F-Macroflor, a modified polyglucose nanoparticle with high avidity for macrophages. Due to its small size, Macroflor is excreted renally, a prerequisite for imaging with the isotope flourine-18. The particle's short blood half-life, measured in three species, including a primate, enables macrophage imaging in inflamed cardiovascular tissues. Macroflor enriches in cardiac and plaque macrophages, thereby increasing PET signal in murine infarcts and both mouse and rabbit atherosclerotic plaques. In PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments, Macroflor PET imaging detects changes in macrophage population size while molecular MRI reports on increasing or resolving inflammation. These data suggest that Macroflor PET/MRI could be a clinical tool to non-invasively monitor macrophage biology. PMID:28091604

  20. Non rigid respiratory motion correction in whole body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Schmidt, Holger [Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Wuerslin, Christian [University Hospital of Tübingen (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2014-07-29

    Respiratory motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies include the use of respiratory synchronized gated frames which lead to low signal to noise ratio (SNR) given that each frame contains only part of the count available throughout an average PET acquisition. In this work, 4D MRI extracted elastic transformations were applied to list-mode data either inside the image reconstruction or to the reconstructed respiratory synchronized images to obtain respiration corrected PET images.

  1. Public health ethics and a status for pets as person-things : revisiting the place of animals in urbanized societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie; Degeling, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Within the field of medical ethics, discussions related to public health have mainly concentrated on issues that are closely tied to research and practice involving technologies and professional services, including vaccination, screening, and insurance coverage. Broader determinants of population health have received less attention, although this situation is rapidly changing. Against this backdrop, our specific contribution to the literature on ethics and law vis-à-vis promoting population health is to open up the ubiquitous presence of pets within cities and towns for further discussion. An expanding body of research suggests that pet animals are deeply relevant to people's health (negatively and positively). Pet bylaws adopted by town and city councils have largely escaped notice, yet they are meaningful to consider in relation to everyday practices, social norms, and cultural values, and thus in relation to population health. Nevertheless, not least because they pivot on defining pets as private property belonging to individual people, pet bylaws raise emotionally charged ethical issues that have yet to be tackled in any of the health research on pet ownership. The literature in moral philosophy on animals is vast, and we do not claim to advance this field here. Rather, we pragmatically seek to reconcile philosophical objections to pet ownership with both animal welfare and public health. In doing so, we foreground theorizations of personhood and property from sociocultural anthropology.

  2. Quantitative PET Imaging of Tissue Factor Expression Using 18F-labled Active Site Inhibited Factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten H; Erlandsson, Maria; Jeppesen, Troels E;

    2016-01-01

    report the development of a new PET tracer for specific imaging of TF using an (18)F-labeled derivative of FVII. METHODS: Active site inhibited factor VIIa (FVIIai) was obtained by inactivation with phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine-chloromethyl ketone. FVIIai was radiolabeled with N-succinimidyl 4......-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB) and purified. The corresponding product, [(18)F]FVIIai, was injected into nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic xenograft tumors (BxPC-3) and investigated using small animal PET/CT imaging 1, 2 and 4 hours after injection. Ex vivo biodistribution was performed...... and correlated with the uptake of [(18)F]FVIIai in the tumors measured in vivo by PET imaging. RESULTS: The PET images showed high uptake of [(18)F]FVIIai in the tumor regions with a mean uptake of 2.54 ± 0.27 %ID/g (Mean ± SEM) 4 hours after injection of 7.29-9.29 MBq [(18)F]FVIIai and with an average maximum...

  3. An update on novel quantitative techniques in the context of evolving whole-body PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Hess, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    Since its foundation PET has established itself as one of the standard imaging modalities enabling the quantitative assessment of molecular targets in vivo. In the past two decades, quantitative PET has become a necessity in clinical oncology. Despite introduction of various measures...... for quantification and correction of PET parameters, there is debate on the selection of the appropriate methodology in specific diseases and conditions. In this review, we have focused on these techniques with special attention to topics such as static and dynamic whole body PET imaging, tracer kinetic modeling...

  4. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R; Badawi, Ramsey D; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-21

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq (18)F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  5. Molecular imaging of head and neck cancers. Perspectives of PET/MRI; Molekulare Bildgebung bei Kopf-ï]¿Hals-Tumoren. Perspektive der PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Purz, S.; Sabri, O. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) procedure is a cornerstone in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. Several years ago PET-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) also became available as an alternative hybrid multimodal imaging method. Does PET/MRI have advantages over PET/CT in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers ?The diagnostic accuracy of the standard imaging methods CT, MRI and PET/CT is depicted according to currently available meta-analyses and studies concerning the use of PET/MRI for these indications are summarized. In all studies published up to now PET/MRI did not show superiority regarding the diagnostic accuracy in head and neck cancers; however, there is some evidence that in the future PET/MRI can contribute to tumor characterization and possibly be used to predict tumor response to therapy with the use of multiparametric imaging. Currently, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT is not outperformed by PET/MRI in the diagnostics of head and neck cancers. The additive value of PET/MRI due to the use of multiparametric imaging needs to be investigated in future research. (orig.) [German] Die {sup 18}F-Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie-Computertomographie ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT) hat ihren festen Stellenwert in der Diagnostik von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Seit einigen Jahren ist die PET-MRT als weitere hybride Bildgebungsmodalitaet verfuegbar. Bringt die PET-MRT Fortschritte bei der Diagnostik von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren ?Darstellung der diagnostischen Genauigkeit der bisherigen Bildgebungsmethoden CT, MRT und PET-CT anhand von Metaanalysen und Zusammenfassung der bisherigen Publikationen zur PET-MRT auf diesem Gebiet. Die PET-MRT zeigt in allen bisherigen Studien keine Ueberlegenheit bzgl. der diagnostischen Genauigkeit von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Sie kann jedoch durch die multiparametrische Diagnostik perspektivisch Beitraege zur Tumorcharakterisierung und damit moeglicherweise Voraussagen zum

  6. Automatic cardiac gating of small-animal PET from list-mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Nuclear; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Aeroespacial; Cusso, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain). Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a method to obtain automatically the cardiac gating signal in a PET study of rats, by employing the variation with time of the counts in the cardiac region, that can be extracted from list-mode data. In an initial step, the cardiac region is identified in the image space by backward-projecting a small fraction of the acquired data and studying the variation with time of the counts in each voxel inside said region, with frequencies within 2 and 8 Hz. The region obtained corresponds accurately to the left-ventricle of the heart of the rat. In a second step, the lines-of-response (LORs) connected with this region are found by forward-projecting this region. The time variation of the number of counts in these LORs contains the cardiac motion information that we want to extract. This variation of counts with time is band-pass filtered to reduce noise, and the time signal so obtained is used to create the gating signal. The result was compared with a cardiac gating signal obtained from an ECG acquired simultaneously to the PET study. Reconstructed gated images obtained from both gating information are similar. The method proposed demonstrates that valid cardiac gating signals can be obtained for rats from PET list-mode data. (orig.)

  7. A Comparison of Imaging Techniques to Monitor Tumor Growth and Cancer Progression in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Puaux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose. Monitoring solid tumor growth and metastasis in small animals is important for cancer research. Noninvasive techniques make longitudinal studies possible, require fewer animals, and have greater statistical power. Such techniques include FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and optical imaging, comprising bioluminescence imaging (BLI and fluorescence imaging (FLI. This study compared the performance and usability of these methods in the context of mouse tumor studies. Methods. B16 tumor-bearing mice (n=4 for each study were used to compare practicality, performance for small tumor detection and tumor burden measurement. Using RETAAD mice, which develop spontaneous melanomas, we examined the performance of MRI (n=6 mice and FDG-PET (n=10 mice for tumor identification. Results. Overall, BLI and FLI were the most practical techniques tested. Both BLI and FDG-PET identified small nonpalpable tumors, whereas MRI and FLI only detected macroscopic, clinically evident tumors. FDG-PET and MRI performed well in the identification of tumors in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value. Conclusion. Each of the four methods has different strengths that must be understood before selecting them for use.

  8. PET Evidence of the Effect of Donepezil on Cognitive Performance in an Animal Model of Chemobrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of patients with breast cancer complain of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy. In this study, we showed that donepezil enhanced memory function and increased brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy using behavioral analysis and positron emission tomography (PET. We found that chemotherapy affected spatial learning ability, reference memory, and working memory and that donepezil improved these cognitive impairments. According to PET analysis, chemotherapy reduced glucose metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and donepezil increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and hippocampus. Reduced glucose metabolism was more prominent after treatment with doxorubicin than cyclophosphamide. Our results demonstrated the neural mechanisms for cognitive impairment after chemotherapy and show that cognition was improved after donepezil intervention using both behavioral and imaging methods. Our results suggested that donepezil can be employed clinically for the treatment of cognitive deficits after chemotherapy.

  9. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [CHU Morvan, U650 INSERM, Laboratoire de Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), Brest (France); Griffiths, D. [Lister Healthcare, London PET Centre, London (United Kingdom); Costa, D.C. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom); HPP Medicina Molecular, SA Porto (Portugal); Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  10. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  11. Automatic extraction of myocardial mass and volumes using parametric images from dynamic non-gated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hans; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen;

    2016-01-01

    -gated dynamic cardiac PET. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls (HC) underwent a 27-min 11C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). HC were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were......LV and WT only and an overestimation for LVEF at lower values. Intra- and inter-observer correlations were >0.95 for all PET measurements. PET repeatability accuracy in HC was comparable to CMR. CONCLUSION: LV mass and volumes are accurately and automatically generated from dynamic 11C-acetate PET without...... ECG-gating. This method can be incorporated in a standard routine without any additional workload and can, in theory, be extended to other PET tracers....

  12. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  13. A CT-, PET- and MR-imaging-compatible hyperbaric pressure chamber for baromedical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Tolbod, Lars P;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We describe the development of a novel preclinical rodent-sized pressure chamber system compatible with computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows continuous uncompromised and minimally invasive data acquisition...... different tissues in the MRI phantoms. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates a pressure chamber system compatible with CT, PET and MRI. We found that no correction in image intensity was required with pressurisation up to 1.013 mPa for any imaging modality. CT, PET or MRI can be used to obtain anatomical...... throughout hyperbaric exposures. The effect of various pressures on the acquired image intensity obtained with different CT, PET and MRI phantoms are characterised. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tissue-representative phantom models were examined with CT, PET or MRI at normobaric pressure and hyperbaric pressures up...

  14. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tingting; Chang, Guoping; Kohlmyer, Steve; Clark, John W; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-08-21

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m(-2)) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD® fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better count rate

  15. Bioluminescence imaging in live cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Jack K; Berglund, Ken; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Gross, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The use of bioluminescent reporters in neuroscience research continues to grow at a rapid pace as their applications and unique advantages over conventional fluorescent reporters become more appreciated. Here, we describe practical methods and principles for detecting and imaging bioluminescence from live cells and animals. We systematically tested various components of our conventional fluorescence microscope to optimize it for long-term bioluminescence imaging. High-resolution bioluminescence images from live neurons were obtained with our microscope setup, which could be continuously captured for several hours with no signs of phototoxicity. Bioluminescence from the mouse brain was also imaged noninvasively through the intact skull with a conventional luminescence imager. These methods demonstrate how bioluminescence can be routinely detected and measured from live cells and animals in a cost-effective way with common reagents and equipment.

  16. How Phoenix Creates Color Images (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This simple animation shows how a color image is made from images taken by Phoenix. The Surface Stereo Imager captures the same scene with three different filters. The images are sent to Earth in black and white and the color is added by mission scientists. By contrast, consumer digital cameras and cell phones have filters built in and do all of the color processing within the camera itself. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Heterogeneity in stabilization phenomena in FLT PET images of canines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncic, Urban; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-12-01

    3ʹ-(18F)fluoro-3ʹ-deoxy-L-thymidine (FLT) is a PET marker of cellular proliferation. Its tissue uptake rate is often quantified with a Standardized Uptake Value (SUV), although kinetic analysis provides a more accurate quantification. The purpose of this study is to investigate the heterogeneity in FLT stabilization phenomena. The study was done on 15 canines with spontaneously occurring sinonasal tumours. They were imaged dynamically for 90 min with FLT PET/CT twice; before and during the radiotherapy. Images were analyzed for kinetics on a voxel basis through compartmental analysis. Stabilization curves were calculated as a time-dependant correlation between the time-dependant SUV and the kinetic parameters (voxel values within the tumour were correlated). Stabilization curves were analyzed for stabilization speed, maximal correlation and correlation decrease following the maximal correlation. These stabilization parameters were correlated with the region-averaged kinetic parameters. The FLT SUV was highly correlated with vasculature fraction immediately post-injection, followed by maximum in correlation with the perfusion/permeability. At later times post-injection the FLT SUV was highly correlated (Pearson correlation coefficient above 0.95) with the FLT influx parameter for cases with tumour-averaged SUV30-50 min above 2, while others were indeterminate (correlation coefficients from 0.1 to 0.97). All cases with highly correlated SUV and FLT influx parameter had correlation coefficient within 0.5% of its maximum in the period of 30-50 min post-injection. Stabilization time was inversely proportional to the FLT influx rate. Correlation between the FLT SUV and FLT influx parameter dropped at later times post-injection with drop being proportional to the dephosphorylation rate. The FLT was found to be metabolically stable in canines. FLT PET imaging protocol should define minimal and maximal FLT uptake period, which would be 30-50 min for our patients

  18. In vivo PET imaging of brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottlaender, M.; Valette, H.; Saba, W.; Schollhorn-Peyronneau, M.A.; Dolle, F.; Syrota, A. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system where they modulate a number of CNS functions including neurotransmitter release, cognitive function, anxiety, analgesia and control of cerebral blood flow. In the brain, a major subtype is composed of the {alpha}4{beta}2 subunit combination. Density of this subtype has been shown to be decreased in patients with neuro-degenerative disease such as Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD), and mutated receptors has been described in some familial epilepsy. Thus, in vivo mapping of the nicotinic nAChRs by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are of great interest to monitor the evolution of these pathologies and changes in the neuronal biochemistry induced by therapeutic agents. Recently, a new compound, 3-[2(S)-2-azetidinyl-methoxy]pyridine (A-85380) has been synthesised and labelled with fluorine-18, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (Dolle et al., 1999). The [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 has been shown to bind with high affinity t o nAChRs in vitro (Saba et al., 2004), and its toxicity was low and compatible with it s use at tracer dose in human PET studies (Valette, 2002). PET studies in baboons showed that, after in vivo administration of [ {sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 at a tracer dose, the distribution of the radioactivity in the brain reflect the distribution of the < 4R2 nAChRs. Competition and pre-blocking studies, using nicotinic agonists, confirm that the radiotracer binds specifically to the heteromeric nAChRs in the brain (Valette et al., 1999). The in vivo, characteristics of the [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-8538 0 combined with its low toxicity make possible the imaging of the nicotinic receptor s in human by PET (Bottlaender 2003). Studies were performed in healthy non-smoker volunteers to evaluate the brain kinetics of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 and to assess the quantification of its nAChRs binding in the human brain with PET (Gallezot et a., 2005). The [{sup 18}F

  19. Image reconstruction of mMR PET data using the open source software STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Pawel [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgos, Ninon [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Manber, Richard [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Jiao, Jieqing [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Barnes, Anna [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Arridge, Simon R [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Hutton, Brian F [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Dementia Research Centre, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Simultaneous PET and MR acquisitions have now become possible with the new hybrid Biograph Molecular MR (mMR) scanner from Siemens. The purpose of this work is to create a platform for mMR 3D and 4D PET image reconstruction which would be freely accessible to the community as well as fully adjustable in order to obtain optimal images for a given research task in PET imaging. The proposed platform is envisaged to prove useful in developing novel and robust image bio-markers which could then be adapted for use on the mMR scanner.

  20. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit imaging of a 15-25 cm segment of the body at one time. Given the limited sensitive region, whole-body imaging with clinical PET scanners requires relatively long scan times and subjects the patient to higher than necessary radiation doses. The EXPLORER initiative aims to build a 2-meter axial length PET scanner to allow imaging the entire subject at once, capturing nearly the entire available PET signal. EXPLORER will acquire data with ~40-fold greater sensitivity leading to a six-fold increase in reconstructed signal-to-noise ratio for imaging the total body. Alternatively, total-body images with the EXPLORER scanner will be able to be acquired in ~30 seconds or with ~0.15 mSv injected dose, while maintaining current PET image quality. The superior sensitivity will open many new avenues for biomedical research. Specifically for cancer applications, high sensitivity PET will enable detection of smaller lesions. Additionally, greater sensitivity will allow imaging out to 10 half-lives of positron emitting radiotracers. This will enable 1) metabolic ultra-staging with FDG by extending the uptake and clearance time to 3-5 hours to significantly improve contrast and 2) improved kinetic imaging with short-lived radioisotopes such as C-11, crucial for drug development studies. Frequent imaging studies of the same subject to study disease progression or to track response to therapy will be possible with the low dose capabilities of the EXPLORER scanner. The low dose capabilities will also open up new imaging possibilities in pediatrics and adolescents to better study developmental disorders. This talk will review the basis for developing total-body PET, potential applications, and review progress to date in developing EXPLORER, the first total-body PET scanner.

  1. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K;

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... uptake in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated.......Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters.  Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  2. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K;

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated.......Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... We investigate the feasibility of introducing a deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) strategy in PET/CT imaging of Hodgkin lymphoma patients and its impact on image quantification parameters. Methods: Three patients with suspicion of large mediastinal tumour burden were selected for this study...

  3. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-02-23

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATACpatientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATACboneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P atlas bone, the overall difference of PET with ATACpatientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Loft, Annika;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: PET image resolution is variable across the measured field-of-view and described by the point spread function (PSF). When accounting for the PSF during PET image reconstruction image resolution is improved and partial volume effects are reduced. Here, we evaluate the effect of PSF......-based reconstruction on lesion quantification in routine clinical whole-body (WB) PET/CT imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 41 oncology patients were referred for a WB-PET/CT examination (Biograph 40 TruePoint). Emission data were acquired at 2.5min/bed at 1hpi of 400 MBq [18F]-FDG. Attenuation-corrected PET images were...... of view (FOV). There was no significant difference in SUV(mean) in homogenous liver tissue between R1 and R2. CONCLUSION: In whole-body FDG-PET/CT using routine clinical protocols, PSF-based PET reconstruction increases lesion detection and affects SUV(max) measurements compared to standard AW-OSEM PET...

  5. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  6. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villien, Marjorie [CERMEP (France)

    2015-05-18

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  7. Assessment of oxidative metabolism in Brown Fat using PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eMuzik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although it has been believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT depots disappear shortly after the perinatal period in humans, PET imaging using the glucose analog FDG has shown unequivocally the existence of functional BAT in humans. The objective of this study was to determine, using dynamic oxygen-15 (15O PET imaging, to what extent BAT thermogenesis is activated in adults during cold stress and to establish the relationship between BAT oxidative metabolism and FDG tracer uptake.Methods: Fourteen adult normal subjects (9F/5M, 30+7 years underwent triple oxygen scans (H215O, C15O, 15O2 as well as indirect calorimetric measurements at rest and following exposure to mild cold (60F. Subjects were divided into two groups (BAT+ and BAT- based on the presence or absence of FDG tracer uptake (SUV > 2 in supraclavicular BAT. Blood flow (BF and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF was calculated from dynamic PET scans at the location of BAT, muscle and white adipose tissue (WAT. The metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2 in BAT was determined and used to calculate the contribution of activated BAT to daily energy expenditure (DEE.Results: The median mass of activated BAT in the BAT+ group (5F, 31+8yrs was 52.4 g (14-68g and was 1.7 g (0-6.3g in the BAT- group (5M/4F, 29+6yrs. SUV values were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (7.4+3.7 vs 1.9+0.9; p=0.03. BF values in BAT were significantly higher in the BAT+ as compared to the BAT- group (13.1+4.4 vs 5.7+1.1 ml/100g/min, p=0.03, but were similar in WAT (4.1+1.6 vs 4.2+1.8 ml/100g/min and muscle (3.7+0.8 vs 3.3+1.2 ml/100g/min. Calculated MRO2 values in BAT increased from 0.95+0.74 to 1.62+0.82 ml/100g/min in the BAT+ group and were significantly higher than those determined in the BAT- group (0.43+0.27 vs 0.56+0.24; p=0.67. The DEE associated with BAT oxidative metabolism was highly variable in the BAT+ group, with an average of 5.5+6.4 kcal/day (range 0.57–15.3 kcal/day.

  8. Development of an instrument for time activity curve measurements during PET imaging of rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Marc; Guez, David; Kerhoas, Sophie; Mangeot, Philippe; Boisgard, Raphaël; Jan, Sébastien; Tavitian, Bertrand; Trebossen, Régine

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging using PET in small rodents requires commonly the knowledge of the input function of the tracer (quantitative and kinetic studies of the metabolism, development of new drugs or new tracers, etc.). In this paper, we report the status and the performances of the prototype of a counting system that is under development at DAPNIA a in collaboration with SHFJ b. The detection device is made of silicon diodes of 0.3 mm thickness proper to measure the positrons emitted by the radiotracer contained in arterial blood flowing in a thin-wall microtube. Such diodes are poorly efficient for the 511 keV gammas from the rodent and thus require a rather light lead shielding and allow operating very close by to the animal. The detectors, the front-end electronics (for signal preamplification, shaping, and discrimination) and the acquisition circuits are mounted on a single card. The device is connected directly to a portable computer via an USB port. Such a design provides a compact, rugged and portable device for working close to a small animal PET camera. Preliminary results show the performances of this counting system with 18F solution and a time-activity curve for FDG blood samples (with ∣˜30 μL/samples) from a rat.

  9. Development of an instrument for time-activity curve measurements during PET imaging of rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymond, Jean-Marc [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA, Saclay (France)]. E-mail: jean-marc.reymond@cea.fr; Guez, David [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA, Saclay (France); Kerhoas, Sophie [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA, Saclay (France); Mangeot, Philippe [CEA/DSM/DAPNIA, Saclay (France); Boisgard, Raphael [CEA/DSV/DRM/SHFJ, Orsay (France); Jan, Sebastien [CEA/DSV/DRM/SHFJ, Orsay (France); Tavitian, Bertrand [CEA/DSV/DRM/SHFJ, Orsay (France); Trebossen, Regine [CEA/DSV/DRM/SHFJ, Orsay (France)

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging using PET in small rodents requires commonly the knowledge of the input function of the tracer (quantitative and kinetic studies of the metabolism, development of new drugs or new tracers, etc.). In this paper, we report the status and the performances of the prototype of a counting system that is under development at DAPNIA{sup a} in collaboration with SHFJ{sup b}. The detection device is made of silicon diodes of 0.3 mm thickness proper to measure the positrons emitted by the radiotracer contained in arterial blood flowing in a thin-wall microtube. Such diodes are poorly efficient for the 511 keV gammas from the rodent and thus require a rather light lead shielding and allow operating very close by to the animal. The detectors, the front-end electronics (for signal preamplification, shaping, and discrimination) and the acquisition circuits are mounted on a single card. The device is connected directly to a portable computer via an USB port. Such a design provides a compact, rugged and portable device for working close to a small animal PET camera. Preliminary results show the performances of this counting system with 18F solution and a time-activity curve for FDG blood samples (with vertical bar {approx}30 {mu}L/samples) from a rat.

  10. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  11. Symposium on Housing and Diseases of Rabbits, furbearing animals and pet animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, J.M.; Jong, de I.C.; Greef, de K.H.

    2015-01-01

    Within the Welfare Quality® project protocols have been developed to assess animal welfare on-farm in an objective, science based and practically applicable way. For various species like broilers and laying hens, sows and growing pigs, dairy cattle and veal calves, welfare assessment protocols have

  12. Strategies for improving the Voxel-based statistical analysis for animal PET studies: assessment of cerebral glucose metabolism in cat deafness model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Hyun; Kang, Hye Jin; Im, Ki Chun; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lim, Sang Moo; Oh, Seung Ha; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In imaging studies of the human brain, voxel-based statistical analysis method was widely used, since these methods were originally developed for the analysis of the human brain data, they are not optimal for the animal brain data. The aim of this study is to optimize the procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of cat FDG PET brain images. A microPET Focus 120 scanner was used. Eight cats underwent FDG PET scans twice before and after inducing the deafness. Only the brain and adjacent regions were extracted from each data set by manual masking. Individual PET image at normal and deaf state was realigned to each other to remove the confounding effects by the different spatial normalization parameters on the results of statistical analyses. Distance between the sampling points on the reference image and kernel size of Gaussian filter applied to the images before estimating the realignment parameters were adjusted to 0.5 mm and 2 mm. Both data was then spatial normalized onto study-specific cat brain template. Spatially normalized PET data were smoothed and voxel-based paired t-test was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism decreased significantly after the loss of hearing capability in parietal lobes, postcentral gyri, STG, MTG, lTG, and IC at both hemisphere and left SC (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). Cerebral glucose metabolism in deaf cats was found to be significantly higher than in controls in the right cingulate (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). The ROI analysis also showed significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the same areas as in the SPM analysis, except for some regions (P < 0.05). Method for the voxel-based analysis of cat brain PET data was optimized for analysis of cat brain PET. This result was also confirmed by ROI analysis. The results obtained demonstrated the high localization accuracy and specificity of the developed method, and were found to be useful for examining cerebral glucose metabolism in a cat cortical deafness model.

  13. Optimization, evaluation, and comparison of standard algorithms for image reconstruction with the VIP-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhaylova, E.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel positron emission tomography (PET) scanner design based on a room-temperature pixelated CdTe solid-state detector is being developed within the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project [1]. The simulation results show a great potential of the VIP to produce high-resolution images even in extremely challenging conditions such as the screening of a human head [2]. With unprecedented high channel density (450 channels/cm3) image reconstruction is a challenge. Therefore...

  14. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo. However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005. The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes.

  15. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Philip H; Johnson, Karen L; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992-2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994-2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes.

  16. Comparative methods for PET image segmentation in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaidi, Habib; Abdoli, Mehrsima; Fuentes, Carolina Llina; El Naqa, Issam M.

    2012-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed for the segmentation of F-18-FDG uptake in PET. In this study, we assessed the performance of four categories of F-18-FDG PET image segmentation techniques in pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma using clinical studies where the surgical specimen served as the

  17. Influence of Arm Movement on Lesion Detection in PET/CT Imaging: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Parlak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arm movement after the CT scan is a common artifact in PET/CT scanning. Motion artifacts may lead to difficulties in interpreting PET/CT images accurately. We report a 66 year old male patient with gastric cancer who underwent PET/CT for primary staging. He had a previous history of papillary thyroid cancer. In PET scan, there were striking cold artifacts at the level of arms. This is a classical sign of an accidental arm motion. A second scan was performed with the arms down due to the history of papillary thyroid cancer. The results were discussed.

  18. Hardware, software, and scanning issues encountered during small animal imaging of photodynamic therapy in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Sharma, Rahul; Varghai, Davood; Spring-Robinson, Chandra; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Dean, David

    2007-02-01

    Small animal imaging devices are now commonly used to study gene activation and model the effects of potential therapies. We are attempting to develop a protocol that non-invasively tracks the affect of Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a human glioma model using structural image data from micro-CT and/or micro-MR scanning and functional data from 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) micro-PET imaging. Methods: Athymic nude rat U87-derived glioma was imaged by micro-PET and either micro-CT or micro-MR prior to Pc 4-PDT. Difficulty insuring animal anesthesia and anatomic position during the micro-PET, micro-CT, and micro-MR scans required adaptation of the scanning bed hardware. Following Pc 4-PDT the animals were again 18F-FDG micro-PET scanned, euthanized one day later, and their brains were explanted and prepared for H&E histology. Histology provided the gold standard for tumor location and necrosis. The tumor and surrounding brain functional and structural image data were then isolated and coregistered. Results: Surprisingly, both the non-PDT and PDT groups showed an increase in tumor functional activity when we expected this signal to disappear in the group receiving PDT. Co-registration of the functional and structural image data was done manually. Discussion: As expected, micro-MR imaging provided better structural discrimination of the brain tumor than micro-CT. Contrary to expectations, in our preliminary analysis 18F-FDG micro-PET imaging does not readily discriminate the U87 tumors that received Pc 4-PDT. We continue to investigate the utility of micro-PET and other methods of functional imaging to remotely detect the specificity and sensitivity of Pc 4-PDT in deeply placed tumors.

  19. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  20. Initial studies using the RatCAP conscious animal PET tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)]. E-mail: woody@bnl.gov; Vaska, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schlyer, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Pratte, J.-F. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Junnarkar, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Park, S.-J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Southekal, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Kriplani, A. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Krishnamoorthy, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Maramraju, S. [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lee, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schiffer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Dewey, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Neill, J. [Long Island University, Brookville, NY (United States); Kandasamy, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); O' Connor, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Radeka, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Fontaine, R. [Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Que. (Canada); Lecomte, R. [Sherbrooke University, Sherbrooke, Que. (Canada)

    2007-02-01

    The RatCAP is a small, head-mounted PET tomograph designed to image the brain of a conscious rat without the use of anesthesia. The detector is a complete, high-performance 3D tomograph consisting of a 3.8 cm inside-diameter ring containing 12 block detectors, each of which is comprised of a 4x8 array of 2.2x2.2x5 mm{sup 3} LSO crystals readout with a matching APD array and custom ASIC, and has a 1.8 cm axial field of view. Construction of the first working prototype detector has been completed and its performance characteristics have been measured. The results show an intrinsic spatial resolution of 2.1 mm, a time resolution of {approx}14 ns FWHM, and a sensitivity of 0.7% at an energy threshold of 150 keV. First preliminary images have been obtained using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-methamphetamine, which show comparable image quality to those obtained from a commercial MicroPET R4 scanner. Initial studies have also been carried out to study stress levels in rats wearing the RatCAP.

  1. Rare Thyroid Cartilage and Diaphragm Metastases from Lung Cancer Visualized on F-18 FDG-PET/CT Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Özcan Kara

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG has evolved as a useful imaging modality in the assessment of a variety of cancers, especially for tumor staging and post treatment monitoring. It provides metabolic information. Although, when used alone, relative lack of anatomic landmarks, is a major limitation of PET imaging, this limitation of PET imaging is overcome by the availability of integrated PET/CT imaging. PET and CT images are acquired in one procedure, yielding fused anatomical and functional data sets. Studies with integrated PET/CT imaging have shown promising results. In this case, we present an interesting integrated PET/CT imaging in a lung cancer patient with rare, diaphragm and thyroid cartilage metastases. (MIRT 2011;20:70-72

  2. Transmission imaging for integrated PET-MR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L; Fuin, Niccolò; Levine, Michael A; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-08-07

    Attenuation correction for PET-MR systems continues to be a challenging problem, particularly for body regions outside the head. The simultaneous acquisition of transmission scan based μ-maps and MR images on integrated PET-MR systems may significantly increase the performance of and offer validation for new MR-based μ-map algorithms. For the Biograph mMR (Siemens Healthcare), however, use of conventional transmission schemes is not practical as the patient table and relatively small diameter scanner bore significantly restrict radioactive source motion and limit source placement. We propose a method for emission-free coincidence transmission imaging on the Biograph mMR. The intended application is not for routine subject imaging, but rather to improve and validate MR-based μ-map algorithms; particularly for patient implant and scanner hardware attenuation correction. In this study we optimized source geometry and assessed the method's performance with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom scans. We utilized a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm, which directly generates μ-map estimates from multiple bed positions, combined with a robust scatter correction method. For simulations with a pelvis phantom a single torus produced peak noise equivalent count rates (34.8 kcps) dramatically larger than a full axial length ring (11.32 kcps) and conventional rotating source configurations. Bias in reconstructed μ-maps for head and pelvis simulations was  ⩽4% for soft tissue and  ⩽11% for bone ROIs. An implementation of the single torus source was filled with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and the proposed method quantified for several test cases alone or in comparison with CT-derived μ-maps. A volume average of 0.095 cm(-1) was recorded for an experimental uniform cylinder phantom scan, while a bias of  <2% was measured for the cortical bone equivalent insert of the multi-compartment phantom. Single torus μ-maps of a hip implant phantom showed significantly

  3. Transmission imaging for integrated PET-MR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Spencer L.; Fuin, Niccolò; Levine, Michael A.; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-08-01

    Attenuation correction for PET-MR systems continues to be a challenging problem, particularly for body regions outside the head. The simultaneous acquisition of transmission scan based μ-maps and MR images on integrated PET-MR systems may significantly increase the performance of and offer validation for new MR-based μ-map algorithms. For the Biograph mMR (Siemens Healthcare), however, use of conventional transmission schemes is not practical as the patient table and relatively small diameter scanner bore significantly restrict radioactive source motion and limit source placement. We propose a method for emission-free coincidence transmission imaging on the Biograph mMR. The intended application is not for routine subject imaging, but rather to improve and validate MR-based μ-map algorithms; particularly for patient implant and scanner hardware attenuation correction. In this study we optimized source geometry and assessed the method’s performance with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom scans. We utilized a Bayesian reconstruction algorithm, which directly generates μ-map estimates from multiple bed positions, combined with a robust scatter correction method. For simulations with a pelvis phantom a single torus produced peak noise equivalent count rates (34.8 kcps) dramatically larger than a full axial length ring (11.32 kcps) and conventional rotating source configurations. Bias in reconstructed μ-maps for head and pelvis simulations was  ⩽4% for soft tissue and  ⩽11% for bone ROIs. An implementation of the single torus source was filled with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and the proposed method quantified for several test cases alone or in comparison with CT-derived μ-maps. A volume average of 0.095 cm-1 was recorded for an experimental uniform cylinder phantom scan, while a bias of  translation of the patient table to perform complete tomographic sampling, generated highly quantitative measured μ-maps and is expected to produce images with

  4. 18F-FDG PET Imaging of Murine Atherosclerosis: Association with Gene Expression of Key Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice. METHODS: Nine groups of apoE(-/-) mice were given normal chow or high-fat diet. At different time-points, (18)F-FDG PET/contrast-enhanced CT scans were performed on dedicated animal scanners. After scans, animals were euthanized, aortas removed, gamma counted, RNA extracted from...

  5. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia; SPECT und PET in der Diagnostik von Epilepsien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landvogt, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-09-15

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, {sup 11}C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed.

  6. In vivo amyloid imaging with PET in frontotemporal dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, Henry [Uruguay University Hospital of Clinics and Faculty of Science, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Montevideo (Uruguay); Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); GE Healthcare, Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala (Sweden); Santillo, Alexander F.; Lindau, Maria; Lannfelt, Lars; Kilander, Lena [Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala (Sweden); Wang, Shu Xia [Guangdong Provincial People' s Hospital, Weilun PET Centre, Guangzhou (China); Savitcheva, Irina [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institute, Division of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Laangstroem, Bengt [GE Healthcare, Uppsala Imanet, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Departments of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    N-methyl[11C]2-(4'methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole (PIB) is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer with amyloid binding properties which allows in vivo measurement of cerebral amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a syndrome that can be clinically difficult to distinguish from AD, but in FTD amyloid deposition is not a characteristic pathological finding. The aim of this study is to investigate PIB retention in FTD. Ten patients with the diagnosis of FTD participated. The diagnosis was based on clinical and neuropsychological examination, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan, and PET with 18Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG). The PIB retention, measured in regions of interest, was normalised to a reference region (cerebellum). The results were compared with PIB retention data previously obtained from 17 AD patients with positive PIB retention and eight healthy controls (HC) with negative PIB retention. Statistical analysis was performed with a students t-test with significance level set to 0.00625 after Bonferroni correction. Eight FTD patients showed significantly lower PIB retention compared to AD in frontal (p < 0.0001), parietal (p < 0.0001), temporal (p = 0.0001), and occipital (p = 0.0003) cortices as well as in putamina (p < 0.0001). The PIB uptake in these FTD patients did not differ significantly from the HC in any region. However, two of the 10 FTD patients showed PIB retention similar to AD patients. The majority of FTD patients displayed no PIB retention. Thus, PIB could potentially aid in differentiating between FTD and AD. (orig.)

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  9. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Kurt R; Chaudhuri, Tandra R; Szafran, April Adams; O'Quinn, Darrell; Weaver, Casey; Dugger, Kari; Lamar, Dale; Kesterson, Robert A; Wang, Xiangdong; Frank, Stuart J

    2008-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth of bioluminescence imaging applications in small animal models in recent years, propelled by the availability of instruments, analysis software, reagents, and creative approaches to apply the technology in molecular imaging. Advantages include the sensitivity of the technique as well as its efficiency, relatively low cost, and versatility. Bioluminescence imaging is accomplished by sensitive detection of light emitted following chemical reaction of the luciferase enzyme with its substrate. Most imaging systems provide 2-dimensional (2D) information in rodents, showing the locations and intensity of light emitted from the animal in pseudo-color scaling. A 3-dimensional (3D) capability for bioluminescence imaging is now available, but is more expensive and less efficient; other disadvantages include the requirement for genetically encoded luciferase, the injection of the substrate to enable light emission, and the dependence of light signal on tissue depth. All of these problems make it unlikely that the method will be extended to human studies. However, in small animal models, bioluminescence imaging is now routinely applied to serially detect the location and burden of xenografted tumors, or identify and measure the number of immune or stem cells after an adoptive transfer. Bioluminescence imaging also makes it possible to track the relative amounts and locations of bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens over time. Specialized applications of bioluminescence also follow tissue-specific luciferase expression in transgenic mice, and monitor biological processes such as signaling or protein interactions in real time. In summary, bioluminescence imaging has become an important component of biomedical research that will continue in the future.

  10. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  11. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia [Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital (CHUS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  12. A Survey of FDG- and Amyloid-PET Imaging in Dementia and GRADE Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perani Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PET based tools can improve the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and differential diagnosis of dementia. The importance of identifying individuals at risk of developing dementia among people with subjective cognitive complaints or mild cognitive impairment has clinical, social, and therapeutic implications. Within the two major classes of AD biomarkers currently identified, that is, markers of pathology and neurodegeneration, amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging represent decisive tools for their measurement. As a consequence, the PET tools have been recognized to be of crucial value in the recent guidelines for the early diagnosis of AD and other dementia conditions. The references based recommendations, however, include large PET imaging literature based on visual methods that greatly reduces sensitivity and specificity and lacks a clear cut-off between normal and pathological findings. PET imaging can be assessed using parametric or voxel-wise analyses by comparing the subject’s scan with a normative data set, significantly increasing the diagnostic accuracy. This paper is a survey of the relevant literature on FDG and amyloid-PET imaging aimed at providing the value of quantification for the early and differential diagnosis of AD. This allowed a meta-analysis and GRADE analysis revealing high values for PET imaging that might be useful in considering recommendations.

  13. Evolving role of FDG PET imaging in assessing joint disorders: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, Kathleen; Saboury, Babak; Basu, Sandip; Brothers, Alex; Ogdie, Alexis; Werner, Tom; Torigian, Drew A. [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Assessing joint disorders has been a relatively recent and evolving application of {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. FDG is taken up by inflammatory cells, particularly when they are active as part of an ongoing inflammatory process. Hence FDG PET has been employed to assess a wide array of arthritic disorders. FDG PET imaging has been investigated in various joint diseases for diagnostic purposes, treatment monitoring, and as a prognostic indicator as in other disorders. In some of the diseases the ancillary findings in FDG PET have provided important clues about the underlying pathophysiology and pathogenesis processes. While substantial promise has been demonstrated in a number of studies, it is clear that the potential utility of PET in this clinical realm far outweighs that which has been established to date. (orig.)

  14. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal samples of healthy farm animals and pets in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsa, Haythem; Ben Slama, Karim; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Messadi, Lilia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A total of 261 healthy farm and pet animals (75 cattle, 52 goats, 100 dogs, and 34 cats) from different regions of Tunisia were screened for Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage. Molecular typing of isolates (by spa- and multilocus sequence-typing) was performed, and their antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes were determined by PCR and sequencing. S. aureus isolates were detected in 17 of 261 tested samples (6.5%). All S. aureus isolates recovered were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA), and one isolate/sample was further studied. Eight different spa types were detected (t189, t279, t582, t701, t1166, t1268, t1534, and t1773), and eight different sequence types were identified (ST6, ST15, ST45, ST133, ST188, ST700 [clonal complex CC130], ST2057, and a new ST2121). MSSA from pets (six isolates) showed resistance to (number of isolates, resistance gene): penicillin (six, blaZ), tetracycline (one, tet[M]), erythromycin one, erm[A]), streptomycin (one, ant[6]-Ia), and ciprofloxacin (one). All isolates from farm animals showed susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, except for two penicillin-resistant isolates. Five S. aureus isolates from goats and cats harbored the lukF/lukS-PV genes, encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, and six isolates from goats harbored the tst virulence gene. In addition, diverse combinations of enterotoxin genes were detected, including two variants of the egc cluster. Goats and cats could represent a reservoir of important toxin genes, with potential implications in animal and human health.

  15. PET imaging of neuroinflammation in a rat traumatic brain injury model with radiolabeled TSPO ligand DPA-714

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu [Medical School of Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China); National Institutes of Health - NIH, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine - LOMIN, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering - NIBIB, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yue, Xuyi; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health - NIH, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine - LOMIN, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering - NIBIB, Bethesda, MD (United States); Teng, Gaojun [Medical School of Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing (China)

    2014-07-15

    The inflammatory response in injured brain parenchyma after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is crucial in the pathological process. In order to follow microglia activation and neuroinflammation after TBI, we performed PET imaging in a rat model of TBI using {sup 18}F-labeled DPA-714, a ligand of the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO). TBI was induced in male SD rats by a controlled cortical impact. The success of the TBI model was confirmed by MRI. [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 was synthesized using a slightly modified TRACERLab FX-FN module and an automated procedure. In vivo PET imaging was performed at different time points after surgery using an Inveon small-animal PET scanner. The specificity of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 was confirmed by a displacement study with an unlabeled competitive TSPO ligand, PK11195. Ex vivo autoradiography as well as immunofluorescence staining was carried out to confirm the in vivo PET results. Both in vivo T{sub 2}-weighted MR images and ex vivo TTC staining results revealed successful establishment of the TBI model. Compared with the sham-treated group, [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 uptake was significantly higher in the injured brain area on PET images. Increased lesion-to-normal ratios of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 were observed in the brain of TBI rats on day 2 after surgery. Ratios peaked around day 6 (2.65 ± 0.36) and then decreased gradually to nearly normal levels on day 28. The displacement study using PK11195 confirmed the specific binding of [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 to TSPO. The results of ex vivo autoradiography were consistent with in vivo PET results. Immunofluorescence staining showed the time course of TSPO expression after TBI and the temporal and the spatial distribution of microglia in the damaged brain area. TSPO-targeted PET using [{sup 18}F]DPA-714 as the imaging probe can be used to dynamically monitor the inflammatory response after TBI in a noninvasive manner. This method will not only facilitate a better understanding of the inflammatory process

  16. A Review on Motion Correction Methods in Pet/Ct Images for Detection of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyeri F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET is an important cancer imaging tool, both for diagnosing and staging, as well as offering predictive information based on response. PET is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a three-dimensional image of functional processes in the body. While PET is commonly used to detect the tumors, especially in breast, colon, lung and for lymphoma, as well in the last decade it is verified as considerably more accurate than Computed Tomography (CT in the distinction between benign and malignant lesions. PET is not only more accurate than conventional imaging for the assessment of therapy response, but also it is useful to detect some viable tumor cells after treatment. However, motion is a source of artifacts in the medical imaging and results in reducing the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the image. In general during the procedure of PET scanning, a few types of motion can occur that should be corrected and compensated. Different body motions are classified as brain motion, cardiac motion and respiratory motion. In this study, some of the most important motion correction and compensation methods using PET imaging system are compared.

  17. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  18. Robust framework for PET image reconstruction incorporating system and measurement uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Liu

    Full Text Available In Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an optimal estimate of the radioactivity concentration is obtained from the measured emission data under certain criteria. So far, all the well-known statistical reconstruction algorithms require exactly known system probability matrix a priori, and the quality of such system model largely determines the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for PET image reconstruction for the real world case where the PET system model is subject to uncertainties. The method counts PET reconstruction as a regularization problem and the image estimation is achieved by means of an uncertainty weighted least squares framework. The performance of our work is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan simulated and real phantom data, which demonstrates significant improvements in image quality over the least squares reconstruction efforts.

  19. Development of new peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands for SPECT and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsifis, A.; Fookes, C.; Pham, T.; Holmes, T.; Mattner, F.; Berghoffer, P.; Gregoire, M.C.; Loc' h, C.; Greguric, I. [Radiopharmaceuticas Research Institute, ANSTO, Menai, N.S.W. Sydney (Australia); Thominiaux, C.; Boutin, H.; Chauveau, F.; Gregoire, M.C.; Hantraye, Ph.; Tavitain, B.; Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Arlicot, N.; Chalon, S.; Guilloteau, D. [Universite Francois Rabelais, Inserm U619, 37 - Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    This study aims to demonstrate that a number of radiolabelled ({sup 123}I,{sup 11}C, {sup 18}F) imidazo pyridines, imidazo pyridazines and indolglyoxylamides can be developed as potential tracers for SPECT and PET imaging. (N.C.)

  20. Introduction to the physics of molecular imaging with radioactive tracers in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael A; Pretorius, P Hendrik; Farncombe, Troy; Beekman, Freek J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances have greatly enhanced the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of radioactive tracers in living animals. this article introduces the physics of imaging behind the imaging methods. The article first discusses the selection of the radiation emitted from the tracer and then the process of tomographic reconstruction or how 3D images are made from imaging around the outside of the animal. The technique of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in which the detection of one X-ray or gamma ray at a time is employed for image formation is then described. Finally, positron emission tomography (PET) which relies on the simultaneous detection of the pair of gamma-rays formed when the positron annihilates is presented.

  1. PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine and {sup 11}C-choline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Tenley, Nathan [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); Corn, David J.; Wu, Chunying; Tian, Haibin; Wang, Yanming [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lee, Zhenghong [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Choline-based radiotracers have been studied for PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using an {sup 18}F-labeled choline analog, instead of the {sup 11}C-labeled native choline, would facilitate its widespread use in the clinic. In this study, PET with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) and {sup 11}C-choline (CHOL) were compared using an animal model of HCC. The effects of fasting on the performance of choline-based tracers were also investigated. A woodchuck model of HCC was used to compare the two tracers, which were administered and imaged in sequence during the same imaging session. Dynamic PET images were generated spanning 50 min starting from tracer injection. Time-activity curves and tracer contrast were calculated in liver regions with tracer accumulation, and the contrast at a late time-point with the two tracers, and between fasted and nonfasted states, were compared. Foci of HCC with increased uptake ranged in size from 1.0 to 1.6 cm, with mean tumor-to-background contrast of 1.3 with FEC and 1.5 with CHOL at 50 min after injection. The tracers show similar patterns of uptake immediately following administration, and both activities plateaued at 10 min after injection. No significant differences in uptake dynamics or final contrast were observed between the fasted and nonfasted states. PET imaging of HCC is possible with both CHOL and FEC. Fasting was not found to affect accumulation of either tracer. These results encourage further investigation into the clinical utility of FEC for HCC imaging. (orig.)

  2. Modern CT and PET/CT imaging of the liver; Moderne CT- und PET/CT-Bildgebung der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, J.; Heusner, T.A.; Riegger, C.; Reichelt, D.; Kuhlemann, J.; Antoch, G.; Blondin, D. [Medizinische Fakultaet, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is now widely available and represents an important and rapid method for the diagnostics of acute liver disease, characterization of focal liver lesions, planning of interventional therapy measures and postintervention control. In recent years CT has not become less important despite the increasing value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By the use of different contrast medium phases good characterization of space-occupying lesions can be achieved. For the diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) a triphasic examination protocol should always be implemented. The introduction of dual energy CT increased the sensitivity of imaging of hypervascularized and hypovascularized liver lesions and by the use of virtual native imaging it has become possible to avoid additional native imaging which reduces the x-ray exposition of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) has an advantage for imaging in oncology because nearly the complete body of the patient can be screened and this is the main indication for PET/CT (whole-body staging). For purely hepatic problems 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT using diagnostic CT data has a higher precision than CT alone but is inferior to MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Computertomographie (CT) ist heute breit verfuegbar und stellt eine wichtige und schnelle Methode zur Diagnostik akuter Lebererkrankungen, der Artdiagnostik fokaler Leberlaesionen und der Planung interventioneller Therapiemassnahmen sowie der postinterventionellen Kontrolle dar. In den letzten Jahren hat die CT trotz des zunehmenden Stellenwerts der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) nicht an Bedeutung verloren. Durch den Einsatz unterschiedlicher Kontrastmittelphasen kann meist eine gute Charakterisierung von Raumforderungen erfolgen. Bei der Diagnostik des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms (HCC) sollte beispielsweise immer ein triphasisches Untersuchungsprotokoll angewendet werden. Mit Einfuehrung der Dual-energy-CT hat die Sensitivitaet in der

  3. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  4. Small animal PET based on 16x16 TSV-MPPCs and monolithic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguilar, Albert Talens; Conde, Pablo; Hernadez, Liczandro Hernadez; Vidal San Sebastian, Luis Fernando [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Salbador, Carlos Correcher; Solsona, Cesar Molinos [Oncovision, Valencia (Spain); Junge, Sven; Lankes, Konrad [Bruker BioSpin (Germany); Benlloch, Jose Maria [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    In this work we present the design of a small animal PET based on 8 high-density arrays of MPPCs and monolithic scintillators. The MPPCs arrays are composed of 16x16 TSV-type (3x3 mm{sup 2}) elements covering a rough active area of 5x5 cm{sup 2}. A single LYSO block with a thickness of 10mm has been mounted on each detector. Black paint has been applied to the entrance and lateral faces of the crystal to preserve the scintillation light distribution. The axial and transaxial FOVs of one ring are 48 mm and 80 mm, respectively. Each MPPC array has been directly attached to a resistive readout circuit that provides outputs for each row and column of the array. These 32 signals are read with flexible boards 30 cm apart from the PET detector without any additional connectors in between. The PET-system is intended for in-line acquisition in front of MR scanners and as PET-insert inside the sensitive MRI volume. For this purpose, it is necessary to avoid magnetic sensible materials, such as nickel, and to prevent eddy currents in metallic structures induced by the MRI gradients. All detectors are air cooled and kept at temperatures of approximately 20{sup o}C with a variation below 0.05{sup o}C. The intrinsic resolution is 2.2 mm at the crystal center (averaged over all 2.6 mm) when Center of Gravity methods are used to resolve the impact position. This value is about a factor 1.5 better than results obtained with the H8500 PSPMT (64 PADs) and similar scintillators. With an improved collimator with holes with only 0.8mm diameter and a length of 70 mm, an intrinsic detector resolution of 1.1mm was reached. The energy resolutions of ROIs of 1x1 cm{sup 2} showed FWHM values in the range of 14%.

  5. Pet in the therapy room: an attachment perspective on Animal-Assisted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; Mikulincer, Mario; Shaver, Phillip R

    2011-11-01

    John Bowlby's ( 1973, 1980, 1982) attachment theory is one of the most influential theories in personality and developmental psychology and provides insights into adjustment and psychopathology across the lifespan. The theory is also helpful in defining the target of change in psychotherapy, understanding the processes by which change occurs, and conceptualizing cases and planning treatment (Daniel, 2006; Obegi & Berant, 2008; Sable, 2004 ; Wallin, 2007). Here, we propose a model of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) based on attachment theory and on the unique characteristics of human-pet relationships. The model includes clients' unmet attachment needs, individual differences in attachment insecurity, coping, and responsiveness to therapy. It also suggests ways to foster the development of more adaptive patterns of attachment and healthier modes of relating to others.

  6. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covello, M., E-mail: echoplanare@gmail.com [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Cavaliere, C.; Aiello, M.; Cianelli, M.S. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Mesolella, M.; Iorio, B. [Department of Otorhinolaryngoiatry, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Rossi, A.; Nicolai, E. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET data with morpho-functional parameters derived by MRI in patients with head–neck cancer. Methods: Forty-four patients, with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancy (22 primary tumors and 22 follow-up) were studied. Patients initially received a clinical exam and endoscopy with direct biopsy. Next patients underwent whole body PET/CT followed by PET/MR of the head/neck region. PET and MRI studies were separately evaluated by two blinded groups (both included one radiologist and one nuclear physician) in order to define the presence or absence of lesions/recurrences. Regions of interest (ROIs) analysis was conducted on the primary lesion at the level of maximum size on metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K{sup trans}, V{sub e}, k{sub ep} and iAUC) parameters. Results: PET/MR examinations were successfully performed on all 44 patients. Agreement between the two blinded groups was found in anatomic allocation of lesions by PET/MR (Primary tumors: Cohen's kappa 0.93; Follow-up: Cohen's kappa 0.89). There was a significant correlation between CT-SUV measures and MR (e.g., CT-SUV VOI vs. MR-SUV VOI: ρ = 0.97, p < 0.001 for the entire sample). There was also significant positive correlations between the ROI area, SUV measures, and the metabolic parameters (SUV and MTV) obtained during both PET/CT and PET/MR. A significant negative correlation was observed between ADC and K{sup trans} values in the primary tumors. In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between MR SUV and ADC in

  7. A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON COMPARISON AND FUSION OF METABOLIC IMAGES OF PET WITH ANATOMIC IMAGES OF CT AND MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To compare and match metabolic images of PET with anatomic images of CT and MRI. Methods. The CT or MRI images of the patients were obtained through a photo scanner, and then transferred to the remote workstation of PET scanner with a floppy disk. A fusion method was developed to match the 2-dimensional CT or MRI slices with the correlative slices of 3-dimensional volume PET images. Results. Twenty- nine metabolically changed foci were accurately localized in 21 epilepsy patients' MRI images, while MRI alone had only 6 true positive findings. In 53 cancer or suspicious cancer patients, 53 positive lesions detected by PET were compared and matched with the corresponding lesions in CT or MRI images, in which 10 lesions were missed. On the other hand, 23 lesions detected from the patients' CT or MRI images were negative or with low uptake in the PET images, and they were finally proved as benign. Conclusions. Comparing and matching metabolic images with anatomic images helped obtain a full understanding about the lesion and its peripheral structures. The fusion method was simple, practical and useful for localizing metabolically changed lesions.

  8. The influence of pets on infants' processing of cat and dog images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Karinna B; Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A; Oakes, Lisa M

    2010-12-01

    We examined how experience at home with pets is related to infants' processing of animal stimuli in a standard laboratory procedure. We presented 6-month-old infants with photographs of cats or dogs and found that infants with pets at home (N=40) responded differently to the pictures than infants without pets (N=40). These results suggest that infants' experience in one context (at home) contributes to their processing of similar stimuli in a different context (the laboratory), and have implications for how infants' early experience shapes basic cognitive processing.

  9. The engagement of FDG PET/CT image quality and harmonized quantification: from competitive to complementary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    The use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a quantitative imaging biomarker requires standardization and harmonization of imaging procedures and PET/CT system performance to obtain repeatable and reproducible quantitative data. However, a PET/CT system optimized to meet international quantitative standards is not necessarily optimized for use as a diagnostic tool (i.e. for lesion detectability). Several solutions have been proposed and validated, but until recently none of them had been implemented commercially. Vendor-provided solutions allowing the use of PET/CT both as a diagnostic tool and as a quantitative imaging biomarker are therefore greatly needed and would be highly appreciated. In this invited perspective one such solution is highlighted. (orig.)

  10. Motion correction in simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging using sparsely sampled MR navigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Hansen, Casper; Hansen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a study performing motion correction (MC) of PET using MR navigators sampled between other protocolled MR sequences during simultaneous PET/MR brain scanning with the purpose of evaluating its clinical feasibility and the potential improvement of image quality. FINDINGS......: Twenty-nine human subjects had a 30-min [(11)C]-PiB PET scan with simultaneous MR including 3D navigators sampled at six time points, which were used to correct the PET image for rigid head motion. Five subjects with motion greater than 4 mm were reconstructed into six frames (one for each navigator....... CONCLUSIONS: Sparsely sampled navigators can be used for characterization and correction of head motion. A slight, overall decrease in blurring and an increase in image quality with MC was found, but without impact on clinical interpretation. In future studies with noteworthy motion artifacts, our method...

  11. Folic acid derivatives for PET imaging and therapy addressing folate receptor positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieferstein, Hanno

    2013-07-01

    conducted. The synthesis of the folate-boron clusters was straightforward. At first, a linker molecule based on maleic acid was synthesized, which was coupled to the boron cluster via Michael Addition of a thiol and alkene and subsequently coupled to the targeting moiety using CuAAC. The new conjugates of folate and boron clusters led to a significant increase of boron concentration in the cell of about 5-times compared to currently used and approved boron pharmaceuticals. Moreover, azido-folate derivatives were coupled to macromolecular carrier systems (pHPMA), which showed an enhanced and specific accumulation at target sites (up to 2.5-times) during in vivo experiments. A specific blockade could be observed up to 30% indicating an efficient targeting effect. A new kind of nanoparticles consisting of a PDLLA core and p((HPMA)-b-(LMA)) as surfactants were developed and successfully radiolabeled via {sup 18}F-click chemistry in good RCYs of 8±3%. The nanoparticles were obtained via the miniemulsion technique in combination with solvent evaporation. The {sup 18}F-labeled nanoparticles were applied to in vivo testing using a mouse model. PET imaging showed a ''mixed'' biodistribution of low molecular weight as well as high molecular weight systems, indicating a partial loss of the {sup 18}F-labeled surfactant. In conclusion, the presented work successfully utilized the FR-targeting concept in both, the diagnostic field (PET imaging) and for therapeutic approaches (BNCT, drug delivery systems). As a result, the high potential of FR-targeting in oncological applications has been shown and was confirmed by small animal PET imaging.

  12. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); El Naqa, Issam [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  13. 78 FR 34565 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 579 Irradiation in the Production, Processing... THE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, AND HANDLING OF ANIMAL FEED AND PET FOOD 0 1. The authority citation for... generated from machine sources at energy levels not to exceed 10 million electron volts (MeV); (3)...

  14. PET/MR imaging of head/neck in the presence of dental implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes; Beyer, Thomas; Keller, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Aim: In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC (MR-AC). We evaluate the accuracy of MR-AC in PET/MR in patients with metallic dental...... void. Conclusion: Metallic dental work causes severe MR signal voids and PET/MR artifacts that exceed the actual implant volume. The resulting bias in AC-PET is severe in regions in and near the signal voids. Notably, the bias is present also in areas further away from the implants. In selected cases...... implants or braces, and propose a clinically feasible correction method. Materials and Methods: This study includes subjects selected retrospectively from our routine PET/MR referral base of patients with neurological disorders. Seven patients with metallic implants and implant-induced signal voids > 100 m...

  15. Apoptosis imaging studies in various animal models using radio-iodinated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Wonjung; Ha, Yeong Su; Soni, Nisarg; Lee, Woonghee; Park, Se-Il; Ahn, Heesu; An, Gwang Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has a role in many medical disorders and treatments; hence, its non-invasive evaluation is one of the most riveting research topics. Currently annexin V is used as gold standard for imaging apoptosis. However, several drawbacks, including high background, slow body clearance, make it a suboptimum marker for apoptosis imaging. In this study, we radiolabeled the recently identified histone H1 targeting peptide (ApoPep-1) and evaluated its potential as a new apoptosis imaging agent in various animal models. ApoPep-1 (CQRPPR) was synthesized, and an extra tyrosine residue was added to its N-terminal end for radiolabeling. This peptide was radiolabeled with (124)I and (131)I and was tested for its serum stability. Surgery- and drug-induced apoptotic rat models were prepared for apoptosis evaluation, and PET imaging was performed. Doxorubicin was used for xenograft tumor treatment in mice, and the induced apoptosis was studied. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET imaging and compared with ApoPep-1 after doxorubicin treatment. The peptide was radiolabeled at high purity, and it showed reasonably good stability in serum. Cell death was easily imaged by radiolabeled ApoPep-1 in an ischemia surgery model. And, liver apoptosis was more clearly identified by ApoPep-1 rather than [(124)I]annexin V in cycloheximide-treated models. Three doxorubicin doses inhibited tumor growth, which was evaluated by 30-40% decreases of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET uptake in the tumor area. However, ApoPep-1 demonstrated more than 200% increase in tumor uptake after chemotherapy, while annexin V did not show any meaningful uptake in the tumor compared with the background. Biodistribution data were also in good agreement with the microPET imaging results. All of the experimental data clearly demonstrated high potential of the radiolabeled ApoPep-1 for in vivo apoptosis imaging.

  16. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: Comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesguich, Charles, E-mail: charles.mesguich@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar [Department of Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Kostakoglu, Lale, E-mail: lale.kostakoglu@mssm.edu [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Metabolic changes on FDG PET/CT offer an earlier response evaluation than MRI. • PET/CT is less sensitive than MRI for diffuse bone marrow involvement. • PET/CT is a highly sensitive modality to determine extra-medullary disease. • Red marrow expansion: false positive findings on both FDG PET/CT and MRI. • Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI. - Abstract: 18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie–Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUV{sub max} and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  17. Wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation for submillimetre 3D list-mode reconstruction data from a high resolution small animal PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus Ochoa Dominguez, Humberto de, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ortega Maynez, Leticia; Osiris Vergara Villegas, Osslan; Gordillo Castillo, Nelly; Guadalupe Cruz Sanchez, Vianey; Gutierrez Casas, Efren David [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2011-10-01

    The data obtained from a PET system tend to be noisy because of the limitations of the current instrumentation and the detector efficiency. This problem is particularly severe in images of small animals as the noise contaminates areas of interest within small organs. Therefore, denoising becomes a challenging task. In this paper, a novel wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation method is proposed to reduce such noise. To demonstrate this method, image reconstruction using a small mouse {sup 18}F NEMA phantom and a {sup 18}F mouse was performed. Investigation on the effects of the image quality was addressed for each reconstruction case. Results show that the proposed method drastically reduces the noise and preserves the image details.

  18. Evaluation of Matrix9 silicon photomultiplier array for small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Junwei, E-mail: jwdu@ucdavis.edu; Schmall, Jeffrey P.; Yang, Yongfeng; Di, Kun; Roncali, Emilie; Mitchell, Gregory S. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Buckley, Steve; Jackson, Carl [SensL Technologies Ltd., 6800 Airport Business Park, Cork (Ireland); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California, 95616 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The MatrixSL-9-30035-OEM (Matrix9) from SensL is a large-area silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) photodetector module consisting of a 3 × 3 array of 4 × 4 element SiPM arrays (total of 144 SiPM pixels) and incorporates SensL’s front-end electronics board and coincidence board. Each SiPM pixel measures 3.16 × 3.16 mm{sup 2} and the total size of the detector head is 47.8 × 46.3 mm{sup 2}. Using 8 × 8 polished LSO/LYSO arrays (pitch 1.5 mm) the performance of this detector system (SiPM array and readout electronics) was evaluated with a view for its eventual use in small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Measurements of noise, signal, signal-to-noise ratio, energy resolution, flood histogram quality, timing resolution, and array trigger error were obtained at different bias voltages (28.0–32.5 V in 0.5 V intervals) and at different temperatures (5 °C–25 °C in 5 °C degree steps) to find the optimal operating conditions. Results: The best measured signal-to-noise ratio and flood histogram quality for 511 keV gamma photons were obtained at a bias voltage of 30.0 V and a temperature of 5 °C. The energy resolution and timing resolution under these conditions were 14.2% ± 0.1% and 4.2 ± 0.1 ns, respectively. The flood histograms show that all the crystals in the 1.5 mm pitch LSO array can be clearly identified and that smaller crystal pitches can also be resolved. Flood histogram quality was also calculated using different center of gravity based positioning algorithms. Improved and more robust results were achieved using the local 9 pixels for positioning along with an energy offset calibration. To evaluate the front-end detector readout, and multiplexing efficiency, an array trigger error metric is introduced and measured at different lower energy thresholds. Using a lower energy threshold greater than 150 keV effectively eliminates any mispositioning between SiPM arrays. Conclusions: In summary, the Matrix9 detector system

  19. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pets can add fun, companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for ... is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  20. FDG-PET imaging in lung cancer: how sensitive is it for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Cecelia S.; Schiepers, Christiaan; Phelps, Michael E.; Czernin, Johannes [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Ahmanson Biological Imaging Center/Nuclear Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, AR-259 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6948 (United States); Fishbein, Michael C. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2002-09-01

    While characterization of lung lesions and staging of lung cancer with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is an established clinical procedure, a lower diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET for diagnosis and staging of so-called bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) has been reported. Therefore, the accuracy of PET for diagnosing and staging of BAC was investigated. We studied 41 patients eventually found to have adenocarcinoma with a bronchioloalveolar growth pattern who were referred for characterization or staging of lung lesions with whole-body FDG-PET between January 1998 and March 2001: there were 11 males (27%) and 30 females (73%), with a mean age of 66.0{+-}10.9 (range =44-84 years). Patients were imaged using ECAT EXACT or HR+ systems. All patients had non-attenuation-corrected scans, while transmission data for attenuation correction were also available for 12 patients (29%). PET correctly identified BAC in 41 of the 46 (89%) lesions and 39 of the 41 patients (95%). By pathology, 25 patients (61%) were found to have unifocal or nodular lesions; this pattern was correctly identified by PET in 20 patients (80%) and by CT in 18 (72%). PET correctly identified 7 (44%) of 16 patients (39%) who had multicentric or diffuse BAC, and CT identified 11 (69%). Of the 35 patients whose lymph node status was verified pathologically, PET was correct in 27 (77%) and CT in 24 (69%). PET missed 67% of the rare tumors that had a pure BAC pattern with no invasive component. It is concluded that the diagnostic performance of whole-body FDG-PET is similar in most patients with lesions with a BAC pattern and in other non-small cell lung cancer types. PET is less accurate in patients with rare BAC tumors that have no invasive component. (orig.)

  1. Fully automated calculation of image-derived input function in simultaneous PET/MRI in a sheep model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochimsen, Thies H.; Zeisig, Vilia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig University Hospital, Liebigstr. 18, Leipzig (Germany); Schulz, Jessica [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Stephanstr. 1a, Leipzig, D-04103 (Germany); Werner, Peter; Patt, Marianne; Patt, Jörg [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig University Hospital, Liebigstr. 18, Leipzig (Germany); Dreyer, Antje Y. [Fraunhofer Institute of Cell Therapy and Immunology, Perlickstr. 1, Leipzig, D-04103 (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Leipzig, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 55, Leipzig, D-04103 (Germany); Boltze, Johannes [Fraunhofer Institute of Cell Therapy and Immunology, Perlickstr. 1, Leipzig, D-04103 (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University Leipzig, Philipp-Rosenthal-Str. 55, Leipzig, D-04103 (Germany); Fraunhofer Research Institution of Marine Biotechnology and Institute for Medical and Marine Biotechnology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Sattler, Bernhard [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig University Hospital, Liebigstr. 18, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-02-13

    Obtaining the arterial input function (AIF) from image data in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) examinations is a non-invasive alternative to arterial blood sampling. In simultaneous PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), high-resolution MRI angiographies can be used to define major arteries for correction of partial-volume effects (PVE) and point spread function (PSF) response in the PET data. The present study describes a fully automated method to obtain the image-derived input function (IDIF) in PET/MRI. Results are compared to those obtained by arterial blood sampling. To segment the trunk of the major arteries in the neck, a high-resolution time-of-flight MRI angiography was postprocessed by a vessel-enhancement filter based on the inertia tensor. Together with the measured PSF of the PET subsystem, the arterial mask was used for geometrical deconvolution, yielding the time-resolved activity concentration averaged over a major artery. The method was compared to manual arterial blood sampling at the hind leg of 21 sheep (animal stroke model) during measurement of blood flow with O15-water. Absolute quantification of activity concentration was compared after bolus passage during steady state, i.e., between 2.5- and 5-min post injection. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values from blood sampling and IDIF were also compared. The cross-calibration factor obtained by comparing activity concentrations in blood samples and IDIF during steady state is 0.98 ± 0.10. In all examinations, the IDIF provided a much earlier and sharper bolus peak than in the time course of activity concentration obtained by arterial blood sampling. CBF using the IDIF was 22 % higher than CBF obtained by using the AIF yielded by blood sampling. The small deviation between arterial blood sampling and IDIF during steady state indicates that correction of PVE and PSF is possible with the method presented. The differences in bolus dynamics and, hence, CBF values can be explained by the

  2. High-resolution imaging of the large non-human primate brain using microPET: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo-Variawa, S [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Hey-Cunningham, A J [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Lehnert, W [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Kench, P L [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Kassiou, M [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Banati, R [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia); Meikle, S R [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Sydney (Australia)

    2007-11-21

    The neuroanatomy and physiology of the baboon brain closely resembles that of the human brain and is well suited for evaluating promising new radioligands in non-human primates by PET and SPECT prior to their use in humans. These studies are commonly performed on clinical scanners with 5 mm spatial resolution at best, resulting in sub-optimal images for quantitative analysis. This study assessed the feasibility of using a microPET animal scanner to image the brains of large non-human primates, i.e. papio hamadryas (baboon) at high resolution. Factors affecting image accuracy, including scatter, attenuation and spatial resolution, were measured under conditions approximating a baboon brain and using different reconstruction strategies. Scatter fraction measured 32% at the centre of a 10 cm diameter phantom. Scatter correction increased image contrast by up to 21% but reduced the signal-to-noise ratio. Volume resolution was superior and more uniform using maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstructed images (3.2-3.6 mm{sup 3} FWHM from centre to 4 cm offset) compared to both 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) (5.6-8.3 mm{sup 3}) and 3D reprojection (3DRP) (5.9-9.1 mm{sup 3}). A pilot {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) scan was performed on a healthy female adult baboon. The pilot study demonstrated the ability to adequately resolve cortical and sub-cortical grey matter structures in the baboon brain and improved contrast when images were corrected for attenuation and scatter and reconstructed by MAP. We conclude that high resolution imaging of the baboon brain with microPET is feasible with appropriate choices of reconstruction strategy and corrections for degrading physical effects. Further work to develop suitable correction algorithms for high-resolution large primate imaging is warranted.

  3. Assessment of metastatic colorectal cancer with hybrid imaging: comparison of reading performance using different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT in a short case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendle, C.; Schwenzer, N.F.; Rempp, H.; Schmidt, H.; Pfannenberg, C.; Nikolaou, K.; Schraml, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose was to investigate the diagnostic performance of different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT for the evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer lesions. Image data of 15 colorectal cancer patients (FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MRI) were retrospectively evaluated by two readers in five reading sessions: MRI (morphology) alone, MRI/diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), MRI/PET, MRI/DWI/PET; and PET/CT. Diagnostic performance of lesion detection with each combination was assessed in general and organ-based. The reference standard was given by histology and/or follow-up imaging. Separate analysis of mucinous tumours was performed. One hundred and eighty lesions (110 malignant) were evaluated (intestine n = 6, liver n = 37, lymph nodes n = 55, lung n = 4, and peritoneal n = 74). The overall lesion-based diagnostic accuracy was 0.46 for MRI, 0.47 for MRI/DWI, 0.57 for MRI/PET, 0.69 for MRI/DWI/PET and 0.66 for PET/CT. In the organ-based assessment, MRI/DWI/PET showed the highest accuracy for liver metastases (0.74), a comparable accuracy to PET/CT in peritoneal lesions (0.55), and in lymph node metastases (0.84). The accuracy in mucinous tumour lesions was limited in all modalities (MRI/DWI/PET = 0.52). PET/MRI including DWI is comparable to PET/CT in the evaluation of colorectal cancer metastases, with a markedly higher accuracy when using combined imaging data than the modalities separately. Further improvement is needed in the imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis and mucinous tumours. (orig.)

  4. Performance simulation of a compact PET insert for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao, E-mail: penghao@mcmaster.ca

    2014-07-01

    We studied performance metrics of a small PET ring designed to be integrated with a breast MRI coil. Its performance was characterized using a Monte Carlo simulation of a system with the best possible design features we believe are technically available, with respect to system geometry, spatial resolution, shielding, and lesion detectability. The results indicate that the proposed system is able to achieve about 6.2% photon detection sensitivity at the center of field-of-view (FOV) (crystal design: 2.2×2.2×20 mm{sup 3}, height: 3.4 cm). The peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) is found to be 7886 cps with a time resolution of 250 ps (time window: 500 ps). With the presence of lead shielding, the NECR increases by a factor of 1.7 for high activity concentrations within the breast (>0.9 μCi/mL), while no noticeable benefit is observed in the range of activities currently being used in the clinical setting. In addition, the system is able to achieve spatial resolution of ∼1.6 mm (2.2×2.2×20 mm{sup 3} crystal) and ∼0.77 mm (1×1×20 mm{sup 3} crystal) at the center of FOV, respectively. The incorporation of 10 mm DOI resolution can help mitigate parallax error towards the edge of FOV. For both 2.2 mm and 1 mm crystal designs, the spatial resolution is around 3.2–3.5 mm at 5 cm away from the center. Finally, time-of-flight (TOF) helps in improving image quality, reduces the required number of iteration numbers and the scan time. The TOF effect was studied with 3 different time resolution settings (1 ns, 500 ps and 250 ps). With a TOF of 500 ps time resolution, we expect 3 mm diameter spheres where 5:1 activity concentration ratio will be detectable within 5 min achieving contrast to noise ratio (CNR) above 4.

  5. Performance simulation of a compact PET insert for simultaneous PET/MR breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yicheng; Peng, Hao

    2014-07-01

    We studied performance metrics of a small PET ring designed to be integrated with a breast MRI coil. Its performance was characterized using a Monte Carlo simulation of a system with the best possible design features we believe are technically available, with respect to system geometry, spatial resolution, shielding, and lesion detectability. The results indicate that the proposed system is able to achieve about 6.2% photon detection sensitivity at the center of field-of-view (FOV) (crystal design: 2.2×2.2×20 mm3, height: 3.4 cm). The peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) is found to be 7886 cps with a time resolution of 250 ps (time window: 500 ps). With the presence of lead shielding, the NECR increases by a factor of 1.7 for high activity concentrations within the breast (>0.9 μCi/mL), while no noticeable benefit is observed in the range of activities currently being used in the clinical setting. In addition, the system is able to achieve spatial resolution of 1.6 mm (2.2×2.2×20 mm3 crystal) and 0.77 mm (1×1×20 mm3 crystal) at the center of FOV, respectively. The incorporation of 10 mm DOI resolution can help mitigate parallax error towards the edge of FOV. For both 2.2 mm and 1 mm crystal designs, the spatial resolution is around 3.2-3.5 mm at 5 cm away from the center. Finally, time-of-flight (TOF) helps in improving image quality, reduces the required number of iteration numbers and the scan time. The TOF effect was studied with 3 different time resolution settings (1 ns, 500 ps and 250 ps). With a TOF of 500 ps time resolution, we expect 3 mm diameter spheres where 5:1 activity concentration ratio will be detectable within 5 min achieving contrast to noise ratio (CNR) above 4.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid recepto

  7. PET imaging of cannabinoid type 2 receptors with [(11)C]A-836339 did not evidence changes following neuroinflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, Geraldine; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Padro, Daniel; Boisgard, Raphaël; Dollé, Frédéric; Llop, Jordi; Winkeler, Alexandra; Martín, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2R) have emerged as promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of brain pathologies. However, no suitable radiotracers for accurate CB2R mapping have been found to date, limiting the investigation of the CB2 receptor expression using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. In this work, we report the evaluation of the in vivo expression of CB2R with [(11)C]A-836339 PET after cerebral ischemia and in two rat models of neuroinflammation, first by intrastriatal LPS and then by AMPA injection. PET images and in vitro autoradiography showed a lack of specific [(11)C]A-836339 uptake in these animal models demonstrating the limitation of this radiotracer to image CB2 receptor under neuroinflammatory conditions. Further, using immunohistochemistry, the CB2 receptor displayed a modest expression increase after cerebral ischemia, LPS and AMPA models. Finally, [(18)F]DPA-714-PET and immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased neuroinflammation by a selective CB2R agonist, JWH133. Taken together, these findings suggest that [(11)C]A-836339 is not a suitable radiotracer to monitor in vivo CB2R expression by using PET imaging. Future studies will have to investigate alternative radiotracers that could provide an accurate binding to CB2 receptors following brain inflammation.

  8. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  9. In-vivo human brain molecular imaging with a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang Hee; Son, Young Don; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Hang Keun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ogawa, Seiji; Kim, Young Bo

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the new-generation of ultra-high-resolution, brain-dedicated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems have begun to provide many interesting insights into the molecular dynamics of the brain. First, the finely delineated structural information from ultra-high-field MRI can help us to identify accurate landmark structures, thereby making it easier to locate PET activation sites that are anatomically well-correlated with metabolic or ligand-specific organs in the neural structures in the brain. This synergistic potential of PET/MRI imaging is discussed in terms of neuroscience and neurological research from both translational and basic research perspectives. Experimental results from the hippocampus, thalamus, and brainstem obtained with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile are used to demonstrate the potential of this new brain PET/MRI system.

  10. PET-MRI: a review of challenges and solutions in the development of integrated multimodality imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-01-01

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been an ongoing research topic for the last 20 years. This paper gives an overview of the different developments and the technical problems associated with combining PET and MRI in one system. After explaining the different detector concepts for integrating PET-MRI and minimising interference the limitations and advantages of different solutions for the detector and system are described for preclinical and clinical imaging systems. The different integrated PET-MRI systems are described in detail. Besides detector concepts and system integration the challenges and proposed solutions for attenuation correction and the potential for motion correction and resolution recovery are also discussed in this topical review.

  11. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  12. Multimodal imaging utilising integrated MR-PET for human brain tumour assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuner, Irene [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kaffanke, Joachim B. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); MR-Transfer e.K., Wuppertal (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef; Kops, Elena Rota; Tellmann, Lutz; Stoffels, Gabriele; Weirich, Christoph; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Herzog, Hans [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine 4, INM 4, Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); JARA-BRAIN-Translational Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The development of integrated magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (PET) hybrid imaging opens up new horizons for imaging in neuro-oncology. In cerebral gliomas the definition of tumour extent may be difficult to ascertain using standard MR imaging (MRI) only. The differentiation of post-therapeutic scar tissue, tumour rests and tumour recurrence is challenging. The relationship to structures such as the pyramidal tract to the tumour mass influences the therapeutic neurosurgical approach. The diagnostic information may be enriched by sophisticated MR techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), multiple-volume proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and functional MRI (fMRI). Metabolic imaging with PET, especially using amino acid tracers such as {sup 18}F-fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET) or {sup 11}C-l-methionine (MET) will indicate tumour extent and response to treatment. The new technologies comprising MR-PET hybrid systems have the advantage of providing comprehensive answers by a one-stop-job of 40-50 min. The combined approach provides data of different modalities using the same iso-centre, resulting in optimal spatial and temporal realignment. All images are acquired exactly under the same physiological conditions. We describe the imaging protocol in detail and provide patient examples for the different imaging modalities such as FET-PET, standard structural imaging (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1-weighted contrast agent enhanced), DTI, MRSI and fMRI. (orig.)

  13. Quality control for quantitative multicenter whole-body PET/MR studies: A NEMA image quality phantom study with three current PET/MR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, Ronald, E-mail: r.boellaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); European Association of Nuclear Medicine Research Ltd., Vienna 1060 (Austria); European Association of Nuclear Medicine Physics Committee, Vienna 1060 (Austria); Rausch, Ivo; Beyer, Thomas [Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare and University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich 8091 (Switzerland); Yaqub, Maqsood [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MRI, University of Duisburg–Essen, Essen 45141 (Germany); High Field and Hybrid MR-Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany); Sattler, Bernhard [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig 04103 (Germany); European Association of Nuclear Medicine Physics Committee, Vienna 1060 (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems derive the PET attenuation correction (AC) from dedicated MR sequences. While MR-AC performs reasonably well in clinical patient imaging, it may fail for phantom-based quality control (QC). The authors assess the applicability of different protocols for PET QC in multicenter PET/MR imaging. Methods: The National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU 2 2007 image quality phantom was imaged on three combined PET/MR systems: a Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MR, a Siemens Biograph mMR, and a GE SIGNA PET/MR (prototype) system. The phantom was filled according to the EANM FDG-PET/CT guideline 1.0 and scanned for 5 min over 1 bed. Two MR-AC imaging protocols were tested: standard clinical procedures and a dedicated protocol for phantom tests. Depending on the system, the dedicated phantom protocol employs a two-class (water and air) segmentation of the MR data or a CT-based template. Differences in attenuation- and SUV recovery coefficients (RC) are reported. PET/CT-based simulations were performed to simulate the various artifacts seen in the AC maps (μ-map) and their impact on the accuracy of phantom-based QC. Results: Clinical MR-AC protocols caused substantial errors and artifacts in the AC maps, resulting in underestimations of the reconstructed PET activity of up to 27%, depending on the PET/MR system. Using dedicated phantom MR-AC protocols, PET bias was reduced to −8%. Mean and max SUV RC met EARL multicenter PET performance specifications for most contrast objects, but only when using the dedicated phantom protocol. Simulations confirmed the bias in experimental data to be caused by incorrect AC maps resulting from the use of clinical MR-AC protocols. Conclusions: Phantom-based quality control of PET/MR systems in a multicenter, multivendor setting may be performed with sufficient accuracy, but only when dedicated phantom acquisition and processing protocols are used for

  14. Automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images using fuzzy Markov random field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Wang; Sa, Yu; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF) model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  15. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of positron emission tomography (PET and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  16. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...... significantly. The results were similar to motion correction using an integrated commercial marker-based system. Furthermore, phantom studies were performed supporting the system’s abilities for PET motion correction....

  17. An Internet-Based “Kinetic Imaging System” (KIS) for MicroPET

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sung-Cheng; Truong, David; Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Shao, Weber; Anna M. Wu; Phelps, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Many considerations, involving understanding and selection of multiple experimental parameters, are required to perform MicroPET studies properly. The large number of these parameters/variables and their complicated interdependence make their optimal choice nontrivial. We have a developed kinetic imaging system (KIS), an integrated software system, to assist the planning, design, and data analysis of MicroPET studies. The system serves multiple functions–education, virtual experimentation, ex...

  18. Learning by playing, animating words and images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción; Pedersen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    of thoughts and emotions. We work from the constructivism of Vygotsky, taking into account student's opinions to enhance the learning experience, by guiding the pupils in finding their own way to express themselves. Furthermore, to regulate emotions and work on human values such as: resilience, tolerance...... writing at schools. "I believe we need to stress visual literacy in our schools. We need to educate (young people) to understand the difference between moving images that engage their humanity and their intelligence, and moving images that are just selling them something" (Scorsese, Martin. 2013....... The persisting vision). We are aware of the resistance that alternative learning tools suffer from the most traditional school systems, as Sir Ken Robinson claims; we need to change the old teachings paradigms. At the Animated Learning Lab, together, with some of the newest results from other schools...

  19. Use and recommendations of image fusion methods for the integration of PET-image data into radiotherapy planning; Ueberblick ueber verschiedene Bildfusionstechniken und Empfehlungen fuer deren Verwendung bei der Integration von PET-Bilddaten in die Bestrahlungsplanung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Soehn, M. [LMU Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen, Grosshadern (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2011-07-15

    The introduction of PET data into the treatment planning process has been the focus of intense development over the past few years. The availability of multi-modality devices such as PET/CT has clearly played a major role in intensifying the interest in this application. However, many issues remain and this article deals in particular with those concerning the accurate spatial fusion of PET and planning CT images. Associated issues include the effects of respiratory motion and the acquisition protocol used, particularly if the PET/CT acquisition does not correspond to a truly treatment planning acquisition, which is most frequently the case in clinical practice today. Respiratory synchronized PET/CT acquisitions can on the one hand minimize respiratory motion effects in PET datasets while on the other hand improve the spatial fusion of PET and CT images acquired in a multi-modality device. Deformable ('elastic') registration algorithms have been shown to allow accurate respiratory motion modeling from '4D' PET or CT images. In addition, spatial matching between PET and planning CT images can be achieved through the use of 3D displacement fields obtained using such image registration algorithms to align the CT image obtained from a multi-modality PET/CT acquisition to the planning CT image. Deformable models are clearly necessary for thoracic, abdominal as well as head and neck regions, while rigid body registration may be used in brain imaging applications. Unfortunately, although well established in clinical research studies deformable image registration algorithms are not widely implemented in multi-modality image analysis or treatment planning software platforms, therefore minimizing their use in routine clinical practice. More clinical validation as well as high throughput software solutions are necessary in order to envisage the use of deformable image registration algorithms in clinical PET/CT imaging and associated applications in

  20. FDG and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the imaging of prosthetic joint infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Asa, Sertac; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, M.S.; Halac, Metin; Kabasakal, Levent; Soenmezoglu, Kerim; Kanmaz, Bedii [University of Istanbul, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [University of Istanbul, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul (Turkey); Erkan, Melih Engin [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Duzce (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing as a result of the ageing of the population. Although complications such as heterotrophic ossification, fracture and dislocation are relatively rare, differentiating aseptic loosening, the most common complication of arthroplasty from infection, is a major challenge for clinicians. Radionuclide imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice since it is not affected by orthopaedic hardware. Whereas FDG PET/CT imaging has been widely used in periprosthetic infection, it cannot discriminate aseptic from septic inflammation. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of FDG PET/CT and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. Of 54 patients with painful joint arthroplasty who were imaged by FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection examined, 46 (36 women, 10 men; mean age 61.04 ± 12.2 years, range 32 - 89 years) with 54 painful joint prostheses (19 hip, 35 knee) with grade 2 (above liver uptake) FDG accumulation on FDG PET/CT were included in the study and these 46 patients also underwent FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT. Final diagnoses were made by histopathological-microbiological culture or clinical follow-up. The final diagnosis showed infection in 15 (28 %) and aseptic loosening in 39 (72 %) of the 54 prostheses. FDG PET/CT was found to have a positive predictive value of 28 % (15/54). Since patients with no FDG uptake on FDG PET/CT were excluded from the study, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy could not be calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT were 93.3 % (14/15), 97.4 % (38/39), 93.3 % and 97.4 %, respectively. Since FDG is not specific to infection, the specificity of FDG PET/CT was very low. FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT with its high specificity may be a useful method and better than labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in periprosthetic infection

  1. Construction of gender images in Japanese pornographic anime

    OpenAIRE

    Barancovaitė-Skindaravičienė, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The article explores the means of gender image construction in Japanese pornographic animation (hentai anime). Alongside other genres of Japanese animation, during the last decades hentai anime has gained enormous popularity all over the world. Gender as a category is especially emphasised in the animation of sexually explicit content, therefore hentai anime plays an important role as a visual medium representing the images of Japanese masculinity and femininity on the international level. Ba...

  2. Synergistic role of simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS in soft tissue sarcoma metabolism imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Lim, Ruth; Huang, Chuan; Chebib, Ivan A; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop and validate simultaneous PET/MRI-MRS as a novel biological image-guided approach to neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemoradiation (chemoRT) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). A patient with sarcoma of the right thigh underwent PET/MRI scan before and after neoadjuvant (preoperative) radiotherapy. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-D-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) scans were performed simultaneously. In the post-radiation scan, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was subsequently acquired with volume of interest positioned in a residual hyper-metabolic region detected by PET. Post-radiation PET/MRI showed a residual T2-hyperintense mass with significantly reduced (18)F-FDG-uptake, compatible with near complete response to radiotherapy. However, a small region of residual high (18)F-FDG uptake was detected at the tumor margin. MRS of this region had similar metabolite profile as normal tissue, and was thus considered false positive on PET scan. Pathology results were obtained after surgery for confirmation of imaging findings.

  3. PET guidance in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Quantitative imaging to predict response and guide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, G M; Bettinardi, V; Mapelli, P; Picchio, M

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows a monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of molecular/cellular processes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this review is to describe the current applications and to explore the role of PET in prostate cancer management, mainly in the radiation therapy (RT) scenario. The state-of-the art of PET for prostate cancer will be presented together with the impact of new specific PET tracers and technological developments aiming at obtaining better imaging quality, increased tumor detectability and more accurate volume delineation. An increased number of studies have been focusing on PET quantification methods as predictive biomarkers capable of guiding individualized treatment and improving patient outcome; the sophisticated advanced intensity modulated and imaged guided radiation therapy techniques (IMRT/IGRT) are capable of boosting more radioresistant tumor (sub)volumes. The use of advanced feature analyses of PET images is an approach that holds great promise with regard to several oncological diseases, but needs further validation in managing prostate diseases.

  4. Tri-modality small animal imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, B.K.; Stolin, A.V.; Pole, J.; Baumgart, L.; Fontaine, M.; Wojcik, R.; Kross, B.; Zorn, C.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M.B.

    2006-02-01

    Our group is developing a scanner that combines x-ray, single gamma, and optical imaging on the same rotating gantry. Two functional modalities (SPECT and optical) are included because they have different strengths and weaknesses in terms of spatial and temporal decay lengths in the context of in vivo imaging, and because of the recent advent of multiple reporter gene constructs. The effect of attenuation by biological tissue on the detected intensity of the emitted signal was measured for both gamma and optical imaging. Attenuation by biological tissue was quantified for both the bioluminescent emission of luciferace and for the emission light of the near infrared fluorophore cyanine 5.5, using a fixed excitation light intensity. Experiments were performed to test the feasibility of using either single gamma or x-ray imaging to make depth-dependent corrections to the measured optical signal. Our results suggest that significant improvements in quantitation of optical emission are possible using straightforward correction techniques based on information from other modalities. Development of an integrated scanner in which data from each modality are obtained with the animal in a common configuration will greatly simplify this process.

  5. Optimization of super-resolution processing using incomplete image sets in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2008-12-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POVs). The number of low-resolution images used defines the processing time and memory storage necessary to generate the SR image. In this paper, the authors propose two optimized SR implementations (ISR-1 and ISR-2) that require only a subset of the low-resolution images (two sides and diagonal of the image matrix, respectively), thereby reducing the overall processing time and memory storage. In an N x N matrix of low-resolution images, ISR-1 would be generated using images from the two sides of the N x N matrix, while ISR-2 would be generated from images across the diagonal of the image matrix. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether the two proposed SR methods can achieve similar performance in contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the SR image generated from a complete set of low-resolution images (CSR) using simulation and experimental studies. A simulation, a point source, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted for this investigation. In each study, 4 (2 x 2) or 16 (4 x 4) low-resolution images were reconstructed from the same acquired data set while shifting the reconstruction grid to generate images from different POVs. SR processing was then applied in each study to combine all as well as two different subsets of the low-resolution images to generate the CSR, ISR-1, and ISR-2 images, respectively. For reference purpose, a native reconstruction (NR) image using the same matrix size as the three SR images was also generated. The resultant images (CSR, ISR-1, ISR-2, and NR) were then analyzed using visual inspection, line profiles, SNR plots, and background noise spectra. The simulation study showed that the contrast and the SNR difference between the two ISR images and the CSR image were on average 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Line profiles of

  6. Four-dimensional (4D) image reconstruction strategies in dynamic PET: beyond conventional independent frame reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmim, Arman; Tang, Jing; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-08-01

    In this article, the authors review novel techniques in the emerging field of spatiotemporal four-dimensional (4D) positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. The conventional approach to dynamic PET imaging, involving independent reconstruction of individual PET frames, can suffer from limited temporal resolution, high noise (especially when higher frame sampling is introduced to better capture fast dynamics), as well as complex reconstructed image noise distributions that can be very difficult and time consuming to model in kinetic parameter estimation tasks. Various approaches that seek to address some or all of these limitations are described, including techniques that utilize (a) iterative temporal smoothing, (b) advanced temporal basis functions, (c) principal components transformation of the dynamic data, (d) wavelet-based techniques, as well as (e) direct kinetic parameter estimation methods. Future opportunities and challenges with regards to the adoption of 4D and higher dimensional image reconstruction techniques are also outlined.

  7. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  8. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likar, Yury; Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shenker, Larissa; Hricak, Hedvig; Ponomarev, Vladimir [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cai, Shangde [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high {sup 3}H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low {sup 3}H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high {sup 18}F-FEAU and low {sup 18}F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based {sup 18}F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based {sup 18}F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject. (orig.)

  9. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    AIDS patients and pets; Bone marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... systems may be advised to give up their pets to avoid getting diseases from the animals. People ...

  10. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  11. Neuronal pathology in deep grey matter structures: a multimodal imaging analysis combining PET and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosque-Freeman, L.; Leroy, C.; Galanaud, D.; Sureau, F.; Assouad, R.; Tourbah, A.; Papeix, C.; Comtat, C.; Trebossen, R.; Lubetzki, C.; Delforge, J.; Bottlaender, M.; Stankoff, B. [Serv. Hosp. Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2009-07-01

    Objective: To assess neuronal damage in deep gray matter structures by positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 11}C]-flumazenil (FMZ), a specific central benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which reflects neuronal metabolism. To compare results obtained by PET and those with multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Background: It is now accepted that neuronal injury plays a crucial role in the occurrence and progression of neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, available MRI techniques do not specifically assess neuronal damage, but early abnormalities, such as iron deposition or atrophy, have been described in deep gray matter structures. Whether those MRI modifications correspond to neuronal damage remains to be further investigated. Materials and methods: Nine healthy volunteers were compared to 10 progressive and 9 relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients. Each subject performed two PET examinations with [{sup 11}C]-FMZ and [{sup 18}F]-FDG, on a high resolution research tomograph dedicated to brain imaging (Siemens Medical Solution, spatial resolution of 2.5 mm). Deep gray matter regions were manually segmented on T1-weighted MR images with the mutual information algorithm (www.brainvisa.info), and co-registered with PET images. A multimodal MRI including T1 pre and post gadolinium, T2-proton density sequences, magnetization transfer, diffusion tensor, and protonic spectroscopy was also performed for each subject. Results: On PET with [{sup 11}C]-FMZ, there was a pronounced decrease in receptor density for RR patients in all deep gray matter structures investigated, whereas the density was unchanged or even increased in the same regions for progressive patients. Whether the different patterns between RR and progressive patients reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms is currently investigated by comparing PET and multimodal MRI results. Conclusion: Combination of PET and multimodal MR imaging

  12. {sup 11}C-Acetate PET imaging for renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Nobuyuki; Kusukawa, Naoya; Kaneda, Taisei; Miwa, Yoshiji; Akino, Hironobu; Yokoyama, Osamu [University of Fukui, Department of Urology, Fukui (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Welch, Michael J. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 11}C-acetate (AC) for evaluation of renal cell carcinoma. Enrolled in the study were 20 patients with suspected renal tumour, one of whom had three renal lesions. In all, 22 renal lesions were evaluated. Following administration of 350 MBq (10 mCi) of AC, whole-body PET images were obtained. Based on these PET findings, kidney lesions were scored as positive or negative. The PET results were correlated with the CT findings and histological diagnosis after surgery. In 18 patients, 20 tumours were diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma. Lesions in the remaining two patients were diagnosed as complicated cyst without malignant tissue. Of the 20 renal cell carcinomas. 14 (70%) showed positive AC PET findings; 6 were negative. The two patients with complicated cyst had negative AC PET findings. Of the 20 renal cell carcinomas, 19 were clear-cell carcinoma and 1 was a papillary cell carcinoma. This papillary cell carcinoma showed high AC uptake. AC demonstrates marked uptake in renal cell carcinoma. These preliminary data show that AC is a possible PET tracer for detection of renal cancer. (orig.)

  13. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N; Schonhaut, Daniel R; O'Neil, James P; Janabi, Mustafa; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Baker, Suzanne L; Vogel, Jacob W; Faria, Jamie; Schwimmer, Henry D; Rabinovici, Gil D; Jagust, William J

    2016-03-02

    Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. Using the tau PET agent (18)F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid and was associated with decline in global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. The present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition.

  14. Diagnostic evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) using PET-FDG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.; Chandramouli, B.; Reeb, S. [Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have reported high sensitivity of PET-FDG imaging in detecting malignancy in SPNs. We now report clinical utility of PET-FDG imaging in pre-intervention workup of 66 pts (age 24-89 yrs) with radiographically indeterminate SPNs (0.5-3 cm) in size. All pts had PET imaging performed 1 hr after injection of 10 mCi of F-18 FDG. Images were analyzed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively to compute DUR indices using ROI analysis. Final diagnosis was established by histology in 65/66 pts (thoracotomy 47, needle biopsy 13, bronchoscopy 5, stable nodule 1). PET-FDG imaging demonstrates sensitivity, specificity and predictive accuracy of 94%, 87% and 92% respectively. All 3 false negative cases were SPNs <1.5 cm in size and histologically adenoca. True positive malignant SPNs were adenoca 18, small cell 5, squamous cell 12, nonsmall cell 7, and others 6. Among 15 benign lesions (granuloma 6, histoplasmosis 4, nonspecific inflammation 2, hamartoma 1, stable nodule 1, organizing pneumonia 1), 2 false positive cases were seen in histoplasmosis. In 10 patients hilar/mediastinal lymph node lesions were accurately classified as benign (5) or malignant (5). Mean DUR in malignant lesions (5.41{plus_minus}2.63) was significantly greater (p value <0.001) than benign lesions (1.12{plus_minus}0.78). In conclusion, PET-FDG imaging is highly accurate in differentiating benign from malignant lung modules and lymph node lesions. PET-FDG imaging may thus optimize surgical management of pts with radiographically SPNs.

  15. FDG-PET imaging in mild traumatic brain injury: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly R Byrnes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI affects an estimated 1.7 million people in the United States and is a contributing factor to one third of all injury related deaths annually. According to the CDC, approximately 75% of all reported TBIs are concussions or considered mild in form, although the number of unreported mild TBIs and patients not seeking medical attention is unknown. Currently, classification of mild TBI (mTBI or concussion is a clinical assessment since diagnostic imaging is typically inconclusive due to subtle, obscure, or absent changes in anatomical or physiological parameters measured using standard magnetic resonance (MR or computed tomography (CT imaging protocols. Molecular imaging techniques that examine functional processes within the brain, such as measurement of glucose uptake and metabolism using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, have the ability to detect changes after mild TBI. Recent technological improvements in the resolution of PET systems, the integration of PET with MRI, and the availability of normal healthy human databases and commercial image analysis software contribute to the growing use of molecular imaging in basic science research and advances in clinical imaging. This review will discuss the technological considerations and limitations of FDG-PET, including differentiation between glucose uptake and glucose metabolism and the significance of these measurements. In addition, the current state of FDG-PET imaging in assessing mild TBI in clinical and preclinical research will be considered. Finally, this review will provide insight into potential critical data elements and recommended standardization to improve the application of FDG-PET to mild TBI research and clinical practice.

  16. Carbon-11 radiolabeling of iron-oxide nanoparticles for dual-modality PET/MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh; Xu, Youwen; Kim, Sung Won; Schueller, Michael J.; Alexoff, David; Smith, S. David; Wang, Wei; Schlyer, David

    2013-07-01

    Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled SPIO NPs was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.Dual-modality imaging, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simultaneously, is a powerful tool to gain valuable information correlating structure with function in biomedicine. The advantage of this dual approach is that the strengths of one modality can balance the weaknesses of the other. However, success of this technique requires developing imaging probes suitable for both. Here, we report on the development of a nanoparticle labeling procedure via covalent bonding with carbon-11 PET isotope. Carbon-11 in the form of [11C]methyl iodide was used as a methylation agent to react with carboxylic acid (-COOH) and amine (-NH2) functional groups of ligands bound to the nanoparticles (NPs). The surface coating ligands present on superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIO NPs) were radiolabeled to achieve dual-modality PET/MR imaging capabilities. The proof-of-concept dual-modality PET/MR imaging using the radiolabeled

  17. Quantitative comparison of PET and Bremsstrahlung SPECT for imaging the in vivo yttrium-90 microsphere distribution after liver radioembolization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattijs Elschot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After yttrium-90 ((90Y microsphere radioembolization (RE, evaluation of extrahepatic activity and liver dosimetry is typically performed on (90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT images. Since these images demonstrate a low quantitative accuracy, (90Y PET has been suggested as an alternative. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare SPECT and state-of-the-art PET on the ability to detect small accumulations of (90Y and on the accuracy of liver dosimetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom data were acquired using several acquisition and reconstruction protocols, including resolution recovery and Time-Of-Flight (TOF PET. Image contrast and noise were compared using a torso-shaped phantom containing six hot spheres of various sizes. The ability to detect extra- and intrahepatic accumulations of activity was tested by quantitative evaluation of the visibility and unique detectability of the phantom hot spheres. Image-based dose estimates of the phantom were compared to the true dose. For clinical illustration, the SPECT and PET-based estimated liver dose distributions of five RE patients were compared. At equal noise level, PET showed higher contrast recovery coefficients than SPECT. The highest contrast recovery coefficients were obtained with TOF PET reconstruction including resolution recovery. All six spheres were consistently visible on SPECT and PET images, but PET was able to uniquely detect smaller spheres than SPECT. TOF PET-based estimates of the dose in the phantom spheres were more accurate than SPECT-based dose estimates, with underestimations ranging from 45% (10-mm sphere to 11% (37-mm sphere for PET, and 75% to 58% for SPECT, respectively. The differences between TOF PET and SPECT dose-estimates were supported by the patient data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we quantitatively demonstrated that the image quality of state-of-the-art PET is superior over Bremsstrahlung SPECT for the

  18. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aerts, Hugo J. W. L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  19. Proposed helmet PET geometries with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-10-01

    For dedicated brain PET, we can significantly improve sensitivity for the cerebrum region by arranging detectors in a compact hemisphere. The geometrical sensitivity for the top region of the hemisphere is increased compared with conventional cylindrical PET consisting of the same number of detectors. However, the geometrical sensitivity at the center region of the hemisphere is still low because the bottom edge of the field-of-view is open, the same as for the cylindrical PET. In this paper, we proposed a helmet PET with add-on detectors for high sensitivity brain PET imaging for both center and top regions. The key point is the add-on detectors covering some portion of the spherical surface in addition to the hemisphere. As the location of the add-on detectors, we proposed three choices: a chin detector, ear detectors, and a neck detector. For example, the geometrical sensitivity for the region-of-interest at the center was increased by 200% by adding the chin detector which increased the size by 12% of the size of the hemisphere detector. The other add-on detectors gave almost the same increased sensitivity effect as the chin detector did. Compared with standard whole-body-cylindrical PET, the proposed geometries can achieve 2.6 times higher sensitivity for brain region even with less than 1/4 detectors. In addition, we conducted imaging simulations for geometries with a diameter of 250 mm and with high resolution depth-of-interaction detectors. The simulation results showed that the proposed geometries increased image quality, and all of the add-on detectors were equivalently effective. In conclusion, the proposed geometries have high potential for widespread applications in high-sensitivity, high-resolution, and low-cost brain PET imaging.

  20. 3D PET image reconstruction based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM) algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Słomski, Artur; Bednarski, Tomasz; Białas, Piotr; Czerwiński, Eryk; Kapłon, Łukasz; Kochanowski, Andrzej; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Paweł; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemień, Wojciech; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Paweł; Niedźwiecki, Szymon; Pałka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczyński, Lech; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Michał; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wiślicki, Wojciech; Zieliński, Marcin; Zoń, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) do not measure an image directly. Instead, they measure at the boundary of the field-of-view (FOV) of PET tomograph a sinogram that consists of measurements of the sums of all the counts along the lines connecting two detectors. As there is a multitude of detectors build-in typical PET tomograph structure, there are many possible detector pairs that pertain to the measurement. The problem is how to turn this measurement into an image (this is called imaging). Decisive improvement in PET image quality was reached with the introduction of iterative reconstruction techniques. This stage was reached already twenty years ago (with the advent of new powerful computing processors). However, three dimensional (3D) imaging remains still a challenge. The purpose of the image reconstruction algorithm is to process this imperfect count data for a large number (many millions) of lines-of-responce (LOR) and millions of detected photons to produce an image showing the distribution of the l...

  1. Statistical image reconstruction methods in PET with compensation for missing data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinahan, P.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fessler, J.A.; Karp, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    We present the results of combining volume imaging with the PENN-PET scanner with statistical image reconstruction methods such as the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method. The goal of this particular combination is to improve both classification and estimation tasks in PET imaging protocols where image quality is dominated by spatially-variant system responses and/or measurement statistics. The PENN-PET scanner has strongly spatially-varying system behavior due to its volume imaging design and the presence of detector gaps. Statistical methods are easily adapted to this scanner geometry, including the detector gaps, and have also been shown to have improved bias/variance trade-offs compared to the standard filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The PWLS method requires fewer iterations and may be more tolerant of errors in the system model than other statistical methods. We present results demonstrating the improvement in image quality for PWLS image reconstructions of data from the PENN-PET scanner.

  2. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  3. Cyclotron production of {sup 43}Sc for PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walczak, Rafał [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Krajewski, Seweryn [Synektik S.A., Research and Development Center, Warsaw (Poland); Szkliniarz, Katarzyna [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Sitarz, Mateusz [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Abbas, Kamel [Nuclear Security Unit, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Ispra (Italy); Choiński, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Andrzej; Jastrzębski, Jerzy [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Majkowska, Agnieszka [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Simonelli, Federica [Nuclear Decommissioning Unit, Joint Research Centre, Ispra Site Management Directorate, European Commission, Ispra (Italy); Stolarz, Anna; Trzcińska, Agnieszka [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Zipper, Wiktor [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Bilewicz, Aleksander [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-12-04

    Recently, significant interest in {sup 44}Sc as a tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been observed. Unfortunately, the co-emission by {sup 44}Sc of high-energy γ rays (E{sub γ} = 1157, 1499 keV) causes a dangerous increase of the radiation dose to the patients and clinical staff. However, it is possible to produce another radionuclide of scandium—{sup 43}Sc—having properties similar to {sup 44}Sc but is characterized by much lower energy of the concurrent gamma emissions. This work presents the production route of {sup 43}Sc by α irradiation of natural calcium, its separation and purification processes, and the labeling of [DOTA,Tyr3] octreotate (DOTATATE) bioconjugate. Natural CaCO{sub 3} and enriched [{sup 40}Ca]CaCO{sub 3} were irradiated with alpha particles for 1 h in an energy range of 14.8–30 MeV at a beam current of 0.5 or 0.25 μA. In order to find the optimum method for the separation of {sup 43}Sc from irradiated calcium targets, three processes previously developed for {sup 44}Sc were tested. Radiolabeling experiments were performed with DOTATATE radiobioconjugate, and the stability of the obtained {sup 43}Sc-DOTATATE was tested in human serum. Studies of {sup nat}CaCO{sub 3} target irradiation by alpha particles show that the optimum alpha particle energies are in the range of 24–27 MeV, giving 102 MBq/μA/h of {sup 43}Sc radioactivity which creates the opportunity to produce several GBq of {sup 43}Sc. The separation experiments performed indicate that, as with {sup 44}Sc, due to the simplicity of the operations and because of the chemical purity of the {sup 43}Sc obtained, the best separation process is when UTEVA resin is used. The DOTATATE conjugate was labeled by the obtained {sup 43}Sc with a yield >98 % at elevated temperature. Tens of GBq activities of {sup 43}Sc of high radionuclidic purity can be obtainable for clinical applications by irradiation of natural calcium with an alpha beam.

  4. Role of F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Kang; Xiaojie Xu; Hongwei Sun; Rongfu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) is a series of rare neurologic disorders which happen with an underlying malignancy. It has various clinical symptoms proceding to the diagnosis of tumors. Although the abnormality of anti-neuronal antibodies is suggestive of PNS and tumors, there exist many false positive and false negative cases. The diagnosis of PNS is usualy a chalenge in clinic. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging is an anatomical and functional fusion imaging method, which provides the whole-body information by single scan. Fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) PET/CT imaging can not only detect potential malignant lesions in the whole body, but also assess functional abnormality in the brain. In this review, the mechanism, clinical manifestation, diagnostic procedure and the recent progress of the utility of FDG PET/CT in PNS are introduced respectively.

  5. A Potential Dubin-Johnson Syndrome Imaging Agent: Synthesis, Biodistribution, and MicroPET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongsoo Yoo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Dubin-Johnson syndrome (DJS is caused by a deficiency of the human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT. A new lipophilic copper-64 complex of 1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl-10-(tetradecyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane (5 was prepared and evaluated for potential as a diagnostic tool for DJS. The prepared ligand was labeled with 64Cu citrate in high radiochemical purity. In vivo uptake and clearance of the complex was determined through biodistribution studies using normal Sprague-Dawley rats and mutant cMOAT-deficient (TR− rats. In normal rats, the radioactive copper complex was cleared quickly from the body exclusively through the hepatic pathway. The 64Cu complex was taken up rapidly by the liver and quickly excreted into the small intestine and then the upper large intestine, whereas < 1% ID/organ was found in the kidney at all time points post injection. Whereas activity was accumulated continuously in the liver of TR− rats, it was not excreted into the small intestine. MicroPET studies of normal and TR rats were consistent with biodistribution data and showed dramatically different images. This study strongly suggests that cMOAT is involved in excretion of 64Cu-5. The significant difference between the biodistribution data and microPET images of the normal and TR− rats demonstrates that this new 64Cu complex may allow noninvasive diagnosis of DJS in humans.

  6. Dual-time-point Imaging and Delayed-time-point Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography Imaging in Various Clinical Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Antonsen Segtnan, Eivind;

    2016-01-01

    The techniques of dual-time-point imaging (DTPI) and delayed-time-point imaging, which are mostly being used for distinction between inflammatory and malignant diseases, has increased the specificity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET for diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases. A gradually...

  7. 78 FR 57227 - Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and Licensing Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... narrowing the definition of retail pet store to mean a place of business or residence at which the seller... our proposed definition of retail pet store so that it means a place of business or residence (not...'' and added the words ``place of business or residence.'' ``Outlet'' as used in the definition...

  8. Detection of the esp gene in high-level gentamicin resistant Enterococcus faecalis strains from pet animals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Noboru; Otsuki, Koichi; Murase, Toshiyuki

    2005-03-20

    We investigated the prevalence of the esp gene and the susceptibility to gentamicin in Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium strains obtained from pet animals. Nine of 30 E. faecalis and 2 of 38 E. faecium strains from the pet animals had the esp gene. Three esp-positive E. faecalis strains, which were isolated from two dogs and a cat, showed gentamicin MICs of > or =256 microg/ml and harbored the high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) gene, aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia. Of the nine esp-positive E. faecalis strains, five, including the three strains with the HLGR gene, were closely related by numerical analysis of PFGE patterns. Longitudinal investigation needs to elucidate whether the HLGR gene was incorporated into a subpopulation of the esp-positive E. faecalis.

  9. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of [{sup 11}C]PAQ as a PET imaging tracer for VEGFR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samen, Erik; Stone-Elander, Sharon [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Pharmacy, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neurosciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Thorell, Jan-Olov [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Pharmacy, Stockholm (Sweden); Lu, Li [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neurosciences, Stockholm (Sweden); Tegnebratt, Tetyana; Holmgren, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska, Oncology-Pathology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-08-15

    (R,S)-N-(4-Bromo-2-fluorophenyl)-6-methoxy-7-((1-methyl-3-piperidinyl)methoxy)-4-quinazolinamine (PAQ) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with high affinity for the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), which plays an important role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate in mice the {sup 11}C-labelled analogue as an in vivo tracer for VEGFR-2 expression in solid tumours. [{sup 11}C]PAQ was synthesized by an N-methylation of desmethyl-PAQ using [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. The tracer's pharmacokinetic properties and its distribution in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumour models were evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 18}F]FDG was used as a reference tracer for tumour growth. PET results were corroborated by ex vivo and in vitro phosphor imaging and immunohistochemical analyses. In vitro assays and PET in healthy animals revealed low tracer metabolism, limited excretion over 60 min and a saturable and irreversible binding. Radiotracer uptake in subcutaneous tumour masses was low, while focal areas of high uptake (up to 8% ID/g) were observed in regions connecting the tumour to the host. Uptake was similarly high but more distributed in tumours growing within the peritoneum. The pattern of radiotracer uptake was generally different from that of the metabolic tracer [{sup 18}F]FDG and correlated well with variations in VEGFR-2 expression determined ex vivo by immunohistochemical analysis. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]PAQ has potential as a noninvasive PET tracer for in vivo imaging of VEGFR-2 expression in angiogenic ''hot spots''. (orig.)

  10. Application of fusion of coincidence PET/CT image and dual source CT image in diagnosis of tumors%经济型PET/CT与双源CT异机融合在肿瘤诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏雪娟; 鲍红梅; 刘帆; 李运奇; 高琼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of fusion of coincidence PET/CT image and dual source CT image in comparison of fused imaging quality. Methods Integration of coincidence PET/CT PET images with dual source CT images was performed in 29 cases with suspected tumor or tumor recurrence or metastasis, and the image quality was compared with that of PET/CT in fused images. Results Forty-six primary or metastic tumors were detected by both methods. The image quality in fused imaging of stand-alone coincidence PET/CT with dual source CT was better than that of coincidence PET/CT in fused images (X2 = 14. 743, P<0. 001). Conclusion The integration of stand-alone coincidence PET/CT and dual source CT is convenient and practical,having complementary advantages, which may improve image quality and help clinical diagnosis and treatment of tumors.%目的 通过对比分析经济型PET/CT与双源CT异机融合的图像质量,探讨异机融合的临床应用价值.方法 对29例可疑肿瘤或肿瘤复发转移患者行经济型PET/CT的PET与双源CT图像融合,并与同机融合图像质量进行对比分析.结果 两种方法均检出原发灶和转移灶共46个,异机融合图像质量优于同机融合(x2=14.743,P<0.001).结论 双源CT与经济型PET/CT异机融合,方便实用,优势互补,可提高图像质量,对临床诊断和治疗肿瘤有重要价值.

  11. uPAR-targeted optical near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and PET for image-guided surgery in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Juhl, Karina; Persson, Morten

    2017-01-01

    xenograft tongue cancer model. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND RESULTS: Tumor growth of tongue cancer was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and MRI. Either ICG-Glu-Glu-AE105 (fluorescent agent) or 64Cu-DOTA-AE105 (PET agent) was injected systemically, and fluorescence imaging or PET/CT imaging...

  12. Patch-based image reconstruction for PET using prior-image derived dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahaei, Marzieh S.; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    In PET image reconstruction, regularization is often needed to reduce the noise in the resulting images. Patch-based image processing techniques have recently been successfully used for regularization in medical image reconstruction through a penalized likelihood framework. Re-parameterization within reconstruction is another powerful regularization technique in which the object in the scanner is re-parameterized using coefficients for spatially-extensive basis vectors. In this work, a method for extracting patch-based basis vectors from the subject’s MR image is proposed. The coefficients for these basis vectors are then estimated using the conventional MLEM algorithm. Furthermore, using the alternating direction method of multipliers, an algorithm for optimizing the Poisson log-likelihood while imposing sparsity on the parameters is also proposed. This novel method is then utilized to find sparse coefficients for the patch-based basis vectors extracted from the MR image. The results indicate the superiority of the proposed methods to patch-based regularization using the penalized likelihood framework.

  13. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light...... with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure...

  14. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Izquierdo, David [Athinoula A Martinos Centre, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Methner, Carmen [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, Rob C [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ansorge, Richard E [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kreig, Thomas [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Carpenter, T Adrian [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sawiak, Stephen J [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Kinetic modelling in PET requires the arterial input function (AIF), defined as the time-activity curve (TAC) in plasma. This measure is challenging to obtain in mice due to low blood volumes, resulting in a reliance on image-based methods for AIF derivation. We present a comparison of PET- and MR-based region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain image-derived AIFs from the left ventricle (LV) of a mouse model. ROI-based partial volume correction (PVC) was performed to improve quantification.

  15. MR constrained simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation maps in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-29

    The maximum likelihood estimation of attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm has been proposed to jointly estimate activity and attenuation from emission data only. Salomon et al employed the MLAA to estimate activity and attenuation from time-of-flight PET data with spatial MR prior information on attenuation. Recently, we proposed a novel algorithm to impose both spatial and statistical constraints on attenuation estimation within the MLAA algorithm using Dixon MR images and a constrained Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In this study, we compare the proposed algorithm with MLAA and MLAA-Salomon in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging.

  16. Neuroradiological advances detect abnormal neuroanatomy underlying neuropsychological impairments: the power of PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayempour, Benjamin Jacob; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Medical imaging has made a major contribution to cerebral dysfunction due to inherited diseases, as well as injuries sustained with modern living, such as car accidents, falling down, and work-related injuries. These injuries, up until the introduction of sensitive techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), were overlooked because of heavy reliance on structural imaging techniques such as MRI and CT. These techniques are extremely insensitive for dysfunction caused by such underlying disorders. We believe that the use of these highly powerful functional neuroimaging technologies, such as PET, has substantially improved our ability to assess these patients properly in the clinical setting, to determine their natural course, and to assess the efficacy of various interventional detections. As such the contribution from the evolution of PET technology has substantially improved our knowledge and ability over the past 3 decades to help patients who are the victims of serious deficiencies due to these injuries. In particular, in recent years the use of PET/CT and soon PET/MRI will provide the best option for a structure-function relationship in these patients. We are of the belief that the clinical effectiveness of PET in managing these patients can be translated to the use of this important approach in bringing justice to the victims of many patients who are otherwise uncompensated for disorders that they have suffered without any justification. Therefore, legally opposing views about the relevance of PET in the court system by some research groups may not be justifiable. This has proven to be the case in many court cases, where such imaging techniques have been employed either for criminal or financial compensation purposes in the past 2 decades. (orig.)

  17. Towards coronary plaque imaging using simultaneous PET-MR: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Y.; El Fakhri, G.; Nezafat, R.; Johnson, N.; Brady, T.; Ouyang, J.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the main cause of myocardial infarction and the leading killer in the US. Inflammation is a known bio-marker of plaque vulnerability and can be assessed non-invasively using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging (FDG-PET). However, cardiac and respiratory motion of the heart makes PET detection of coronary plaque very challenging. Fat surrounding coronary arteries allows the use of MRI to track plaque motion during simultaneous PET-MR examination. In this study, we proposed and assessed the performance of a fat-MR based coronary motion correction technique for improved FDG-PET coronary plaque imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. The proposed methods were evaluated in a realistic four-dimensional PET-MR simulation study obtained by combining patient water-fat separated MRI and XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Five small lesions were digitally inserted inside the patients coronary vessels to mimic coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The heart of the XCAT phantom was digitally replaced with the patient's heart. Motion-dependent activity distributions, attenuation maps, and fat-MR volumes of the heart, were generated using the XCAT cardiac and respiratory motion fields. A full Monte Carlo simulation using Siemens mMR's geometry was performed for each motion phase. Cardiac/respiratory motion fields were estimated using non-rigid registration of the transformed fat-MR volumes and incorporated directly into the system matrix of PET reconstruction along with motion-dependent attenuation maps. The proposed motion correction method was compared to conventional PET reconstruction techniques such as no motion correction, cardiac gating, and dual cardiac-respiratory gating. Compared to uncorrected reconstructions, fat-MR based motion compensation yielded an average improvement of plaque-to-background contrast of 29.6%, 43.7%, 57.2%, and 70.6% for true plaque-to-blood ratios of 10, 15, 20 and 25:1, respectively. Channelized

  18. FDG PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto [University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), Logrono, La Rioja (Spain); Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Giammarile, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lyon, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France); Tatsch, Klaus [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe Inc., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); Eschner, Wolfgang [University of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Verzijlbergen, Fred J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C. [King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, PET Imaging Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stroobants, Sigrid [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp (Belgium); Delbeke, Dominique [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Donohoe, Kevin J. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Holbrook, Scott [Invivo Molecular Imaging LLC, Gray, TN (United States); Graham, Michael M. [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Testanera, Giorgio; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zijlstra, Josee [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Hematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Corneline J. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Den Bosch (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Arends, Bertjan [Catharina Hospital, Department of Clinical Physics, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kotzerke, Joerg [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Outpatient Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Vienna (Austria); Krause, Bernd J. [University Hospital Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-12-02

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) procedure to maintain the accuracy and precision of quantitation. Repeatability and reproducibility are two essential requirements for any quantitative measurement and/or imaging biomarker. Repeatability relates to the uncertainty in obtaining the same result in the same patient when he or she is examined more than once on the same system. However, imaging biomarkers should also have adequate reproducibility, i.e. the ability to yield the same result in the same patient when that patient is examined on different systems and at different imaging sites. Adequate repeatability and reproducibility are essential for the clinical management of patients and the use of FDG PET/CT within multicentre trials. A common standardised imaging procedure will help promote the appropriate use of FDG PET/CT imaging and increase the value of publications and, therefore, their contribution to evidence-based medicine. Moreover, consistency in numerical values between platforms and institutes that acquire the data will potentially enhance the role of semiquantitative and quantitative image interpretation. Precision and accuracy are additionally important as FDG PET/CT is used to evaluate tumour response as well as for diagnosis, prognosis and staging. Therefore both the previous and these new guidelines specifically aim to achieve standardised uptake value harmonisation in multicentre settings. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of the response to preoperative chemotherapy with PET image in osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Dae Geun

    2001-01-01

    F18 FDG PET scan has an advantage in evaluating the biologic status of the tumors. The purpose of this study is evaluate the role of PET scan in pre- and postchemotherapeutic osteosarcomas and correlate the findings with pathologic examination. 18 cases of osteosarcomas had biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy at our department. All case had initial MRI and PET scan and those were repeated after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Under PET image parameters such as VOI(volume of interest), total activity(SUV), ratio of pre- and postchemotherapy SUV, T/N(tumor/normal tissue) ratio were analyzed. There was a significant correlation between the calculated necrosis in PET and observed one on pathologic specimen(r2=0.78, P<0.05). Cross correlation among identified variables revealed meaningful result between SUV2/SUV1 ratio and tumor necrosis(r2=0.57, P=0.025). As the SUV2/SUV1 decrease, so much more the tumor necrosis was. F18 FDG PET scan could get objective data such as volume, degree of necrosis and total activity and was also useful in estimating the contribution of chemotherapy in tumor necrosis over the innate necrosis before treatment.

  20. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pogam, Adrien, E-mail: adrien.lepogam@univ-brest.fr [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Lamare, Frederic [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Hatt, Mathieu [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Fernandez, Philippe [Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Le Rest, Catherine Cheze [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France); Academic Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [INSERM UMR 1101, LaTIM, Brest (France)

    2013-02-21

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical {sup 18}F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  1. PET quantitation and imaging of the non-pure positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, H; Tellman, L; Qaim, S M; Spellerberg, S; Schmid, A; Coenen, H H

    2002-05-01

    A series of PET studies using phantoms is presented to characterize the imaging and quantitative performance of the positron-emitting iodine isotope 124I. Measurements were performed on the 2D-PET scanner GE 4096+ as well as on the Siemens PET scanner HRR+ operated in both 2D and 3D modes. No specific correction was applied for the gamma-rays emitted together with the positrons. As compared to 18F, in studies with 124I there is a small loss of image resolution and contrast, and an increase in background. The quantitative results varied between different scanners and various acquisition as well as reconstruction modes, with an average relative difference of -6 +/- 13% (mean+/-SD) in respect of the phantom radioactivity as measured with gamma-ray spectroscopy. We conclude that quantitation of a radiopharmaceutical labelled with 124I is feasible and may be improved by the development of specific corrections.

  2. Y-90 PET imaging for radiation theragnosis using bootstrap event re sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Taewon; Woo, Sangkeun; Min, Gyungju; Kim, Jimin; Kang, Joohyun; Lim, Sangmoo; Kim, Kyeongmin [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Surgical resection is the most effective method to recover the liver function. However, Yttrium-90 (Y-90) has been used as a new treatment due to the fact that it can be delivered to the tumors and results in greater radiation exposure to the tumors than using external radiation nowadays since most treatment is palliative in case of unresectable stage of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, Y-90 has been received much interest and studied by many researchers. Imaging of Y-90 has been conducted using most commonly gamma camera but PET imaging is required due to low sensitivity and resolution. The purpose of this study was to assess statistical characteristics and to improve count rate of image for enhancing image quality by using nonparametric bootstrap method. PET data was able to be improved using non-parametric bootstrap method and it was verified with showing improved uniformity and SNR. Uniformity showed more improvement under the condition of low count rate, i.e. Y-90, in case of phantom and also uniformity and SNR showed improvement of 15.6% and 33.8% in case of mouse, respectively. Bootstrap method performed in this study for PET data increased count rate of PET image and consequentially time for acquisition time can be reduced. It will be expected to improve performance for diagnosis.

  3. F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging of primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Mitamura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs are extremely rare neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with a hepatic mass. The non-contrast computed tomography (CT image showed a low-density mass, and dynamic CT images indicated the enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase and early washout in the late phase. F18- fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET and fused PET/CT images showed increased uptake in the hepatic mass. Whole-body 18F-FDG PET images showed no abnormal activity except for the liver lesion. Presence of an extrahepatic tumor was also ruled out by performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, total colonoscopy, and chest and abdominal CT. A posterior segmentectomy was performed, and histologic examination confirmed a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 1. The patient was followed up for about 2 years after the resection, and no extrahepatic lesions were radiologically found. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with PHNET. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of PHNET have been detected by 18F-FDG PET imaging.

  4. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Radiolabeled Kinase Inhibitors for PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, intensive investigation and multiple clinical successes targeting protein kinases, mostly for cancer treatment, have identified small molecule kinase inhibitors as a prominent therapeutic class. In the course of those investigations, radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for positron emission tomography (PET imaging have been synthesized and evaluated as diagnostic imaging probes for cancer characterization. Given that inhibitor coverage of the kinome is continuously expanding, in vivo PET imaging will likely find increasing applications for therapy monitoring and receptor density studies both in- and outside of oncological conditions. Early investigated radiolabeled inhibitors, which are mostly based on clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI isotopologues, have now entered clinical trials. Novel radioligands for cancer and PET neuroimaging originating from novel but relevant target kinases are currently being explored in preclinical studies. This article reviews the literature involving radiotracer design, radiochemistry approaches, biological tracer evaluation and nuclear imaging results of radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for PET reported between 2010 and mid-2015. Aspects regarding the usefulness of pursuing selective vs. promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds and the inherent challenges associated with intracellular enzyme imaging will be discussed.

  5. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Hematology, Bologna (Italy); Versari, Annibale [IRCSS, Nuclear Medicine, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Cuneo (Italy); Bianchi, Andrea [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Cuneo (Italy); Rensi, Marco [AOU S.Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Udine (Italy); Bello, Marilena [AO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Nuclear Medicine, Torino (Italy); Gallamini, Andrea [A Lacassagne Cancer Center, Research and Innovation Department, Nice (France); Patriarca, Francesca [Udine University, Hematologic Clinic, Udine (Italy); Gay, Francesca [University of Torino, Myeloma Unit, Division of Hematology, Torino (Italy); Gamberi, Barbara [IRCCS, Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    were 0.09 and 0.43, 0.22 and 0.21, respectively, and on PET-EoT, the alpha coefficients were 0.07, 0.28, 0.25 and 0.21, respectively. BM was generally difficult to score since grades 2 and 3 are difficult to discriminate. However, since neither of the two grades is related to BM myelomatous involvement, the difference was not clinically relevant. Agreement on focal lesion scores and on the number of focal lesions was good. The new visual criteria for interpreting FDG PET/CT imaging in MM patients, IMPeTUs, were found to be feasible in clinical practice. (orig.)

  6. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros-Pavlos Ypsilantis

    Full Text Available Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  7. Predicting Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with PET Imaging Using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Siddique, Musib; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Davies, Andrew; Cook, Gary; Goh, Vicky; Montana, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) has become a standard component of diagnosis and staging in oncology, and is becoming more important as a quantitative monitor of individual response to therapy. In this article we investigate the challenging problem of predicting a patient's response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy from a single 18F-FDG PET scan taken prior to treatment. We take a "radiomics" approach whereby a large amount of quantitative features is automatically extracted from pretherapy PET images in order to build a comprehensive quantification of the tumor phenotype. While the dominant methodology relies on hand-crafted texture features, we explore the potential of automatically learning low- to high-level features directly from PET scans. We report on a study that compares the performance of two competing radiomics strategies: an approach based on state-of-the-art statistical classifiers using over 100 quantitative imaging descriptors, including texture features as well as standardized uptake values, and a convolutional neural network, 3S-CNN, trained directly from PET scans by taking sets of adjacent intra-tumor slices. Our experimental results, based on a sample of 107 patients with esophageal cancer, provide initial evidence that convolutional neural networks have the potential to extract PET imaging representations that are highly predictive of response to therapy. On this dataset, 3S-CNN achieves an average 80.7% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity in predicting non-responders, and outperforms other competing predictive models.

  8. Detection of bladder metabolic artifacts in (18)F-FDG PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Jimenez, Geoffrey; Crevoisier, Renaud De; Leseur, Julie; Devillers, Anne; Ospina, Juan David; Simon, Antoine; Terve, Pierre; Acosta, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-PET) is a widely used imaging modality in oncology. It enables significant functional information to be included in analyses of anatomical data provided by other image modalities. Although PET offers high sensitivity in detecting suspected malignant metabolism, (18)F-FDG uptake is not tumor-specific and can also be fixed in surrounding healthy tissue, which may consequently be mistaken as cancerous. PET analyses may be particularly hampered in pelvic-located cancers by the bladder׳s physiological uptake potentially obliterating the tumor uptake. In this paper, we propose a novel method for detecting (18)F-FDG bladder artifacts based on a multi-feature double-step classification approach. Using two manually defined seeds (tumor and bladder), the method consists of a semi-automated double-step clustering strategy that simultaneously takes into consideration standard uptake values (SUV) on PET, Hounsfield values on computed tomography (CT), and the distance to the seeds. This method was performed on 52 PET/CT images from patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer. Manual delineations of the bladder on CT images were used in order to evaluate bladder uptake detection capability. Tumor preservation was evaluated using a manual segmentation of the tumor, with a threshold of 42% of the maximal uptake within the tumor. Robustness was assessed by randomly selecting different initial seeds. The classification averages were 0.94±0.09 for sensitivity, 0.98±0.01 specificity, and 0.98±0.01 accuracy. These results suggest that this method is able to detect most (18)F-FDG bladder metabolism artifacts while preserving tumor uptake, and could thus be used as a pre-processing step for further non-parasitized PET analyses.

  9. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  10. PET/CT imaging of delayed radiation encephalopathy following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-lu; YIN Ji-lin; LI Hua; LI Xiang-dong; QUAN Jiang-tao

    2007-01-01

    Background With the significant improvement in the survival of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)undergoing radiotherapy and the growing availability of the sophisticated imaging modalities, the number of radiation encephalopathy (RE) cases relating to NPC radiotherapy is increasing. In this study, we investigated the metabolic and density changes of the compromised brain tissues during delayed RE using a positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) to provide clinical evidences for the diagnosis of delayed RE following radiotherapy for NPC.Methods The PET/CT manifestations and the clinical data of 53 pathologically confirmed NPC patients with delayed RE following radical radiotherapy and 15 healthy volunteers were investigated. The standardized uptake values (SUV) of the bilateral temporal lobes, the occipital lobe and the brain stem were measured respectively; and then the metabolic reduction rate of 88 temporal lobes and 13 brain stems were calculated for a statistical comparison between the two groups.Results The earliest case of delayed RE in the investigated patients occurred 1.5 years after radiotherapy. Delayed RE frequently involved the inferior temporal lobe. For patients with delayed RE confirmed by clinical symptoms and imaging findings, PET maintained a 100% coincidence rate with CT; however, in the 25 temporal lobes of the 35 delayed RE patients, PET revealed obvious hypometabolic changes whereas CT displayed normal density. The incidence of brain stem metabolic reductions was 24.5% (13/53) in the investigated patients, including 4 patients with hypometabolic changes shown by PET and negative finding shown by CT. The incidence of granuloma adjacent to the hypometabolic region in the temporal lobe was 12.5% (11/88).Conclusion Delayed RE patients exhibit significant hypometabolic changes in the inferior temporal lobe, captured by PET much earlier than by CT. PET/CT offers a valuable means for the diagnosis of delayed RE in

  11. A strategy for multimodal deformable image registration to integrate PET/MR into radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibfarth, Sara; Moennich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela [Section for Biomedical Physics, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)], e-mail: Sara.Leibfarth@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Welz, Stefan; Siegel, Christine; Zips, Daniel [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Holger Schmidt, Holger [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Lab. for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Dept. of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Background: Combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly promising for biologically individualized radiotherapy (RT). Hence, the purpose of this work was to develop an accurate and robust registration strategy to integrate combined PET/MR data into RT treatment planning. Material and methods: Eight patient datasets consisting of an FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) and a subsequently acquired PET/MR of the head and neck (HN) region were available. Registration strategies were developed based on CT and MR data only, whereas the PET components were fused with the resulting deformation field. Following a rigid registration, deformable registration was performed with a transform parametrized by B-splines. Three different optimization metrics were investigated: global mutual information (GMI), GMI combined with a bending energy penalty (BEP) for regularization (GMI + BEP) and localized mutual information with BEP (LMI + BEP). Different quantitative registration quality measures were developed, including volumetric overlap and mean distance measures for structures segmented on CT and MR as well as anatomical landmark distances. Moreover, the local registration quality in the tumor region was assessed by the normalized cross correlation (NCC) of the two PET datasets. Results: LMI + BEP yielded the most robust and accurate registration results. For GMI, GMI + BEP and LMI + BEP, mean landmark distances (standard deviations) were 23.9 mm (15.5 mm), 4.8 mm (4.0 mm) and 3.0 mm (1.0 mm), and mean NCC values (standard deviations) were 0.29 (0.29), 0.84 (0.14) and 0.88 (0.06), respectively. Conclusion: Accurate and robust multimodal deformable image registration of CT and MR in the HN region can be performed using a B-spline parametrized transform and LMI + BEP as optimization metric. With this strategy, biologically individualized RT based on combined PET/MRI in terms of dose painting is possible.

  12. A MEDICAL MULTI-MODALITY IMAGE FUSION OF CT/PET WITH PCA, DWT METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guruprasad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a view on the fusion of different modality images like PET and CT (Positron Emission Tomography & Computed Tomography by two domain methods PCA and DWT methods. The spatial domain is PCA method, and another transformation domain method (DWT. In dwt decomposed coefficients of DWT (discrete wavelet transformation are applied with the IDWT to get fused image information. Before that, choose a detailed part of decomposed coefficients by maximum selection and averaging the approximated part of DWT coefficients. In applying the PCA using eigen values and eigen vector of larger values as principal components and after to reconstruct using addition to these to get the fussed image of two modalities CT & PET. So that adds complimentary features of both anatomic, physiological and metabolic information in one image, provides better visual information in single image of patients in medical field. The analytic parameters like, MSE, PSNR, ENTROPY results are better enough to prove the methods each other.

  13. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus;

    2010-01-01

    , especially when transferring data across the (network-) borders of different hospitals. Overall, the most important precondition for successful integration of functional imaging in RT treatment planning is the goal orientated as well as close and thorough communication between nuclear medicine......The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non......-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy...

  14. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana G. Marcu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour.

  15. FDG PET and other imaging modalities in the primary diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Seemann, M.D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675, Munich (Germany); Walter, C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Brueder, Trier (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging modality for screening of breast cancer and evaluation of breast lesions (T staging). Ultrasonography is an adjunctive tool for mammographically suspicious lesions, in patients with mastopathy and as guidance for reliable histological diagnosis with percutaneous biopsy. Dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) has a high sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer, but also a high false positive diagnosis rate. In the literature, MRM is reported to have a sensitivity of 86-96%, a specificity of 64-91%, an accuracy of 79-93%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 77-92% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 75-94%. In unclarified cases, metabolic imaging using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) can be performed. In the literature, FDG PET is reported to have a sensitivity of 64-96%, a specificity of 73-100%, an accuracy of 70-97%, a PPV of 81-100% and an NPV of 52-89%. Furthermore, PET or PET/CT using FDG has an important role in the assessment of N and M staging of breast cancer, the prediction of tumour response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and the differentiation of scar and cancer recurrence. Other functional radionuclide-based diagnostic tools, such as scintimammography with sestamibi, peptide scintigraphy or immunoscintigraphy, have a lower accuracy than FDG PET and, therefore, are appropriate only for exceptional indications. (orig.)

  16. A statistical method for lung tumor segmentation uncertainty in PET images based on user inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaojie; Wang, Xiuying; Feng, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    PET has been widely accepted as an effective imaging modality for lung tumor diagnosis and treatment. However, standard criteria for delineating tumor boundary from PET are yet to develop largely due to relatively low quality of PET images, uncertain tumor boundary definition, and variety of tumor characteristics. In this paper, we propose a statistical solution to segmentation uncertainty on the basis of user inference. We firstly define the uncertainty segmentation band on the basis of segmentation probability map constructed from Random Walks (RW) algorithm; and then based on the extracted features of the user inference, we use Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to formulate the statistical model for labeling the uncertainty band. We validated our method on 10 lung PET-CT phantom studies from the public RIDER collections [1] and 16 clinical PET studies where tumors were manually delineated by two experienced radiologists. The methods were validated using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.878 ± 0.078 on phantom studies and 0.835 ± 0.039 on clinical studies.

  17. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  18. F-18 FDG PET Images of the Cervix at Various Time Points after the Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Shin Young [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    F-18 FDG PET is useful for monitoring residual or recurrent tumors after surgical resection. We describe five F-18 FDG PET images of three patients who had cervical carcinoma and then underwent a loop electro surgical excision procedure (LEEP). Two of the images were taken within 15 days and three at least 2 months after LEEP. The earlier F-18 FDG PET images revealed linear hypermetabolic lesions in the cervix that were produced by inflammation. This was confirmed by pathological analysis. The later F-18 FDG PET images did not reveal any remarkable hypermetabolism in the cervix without any treatment. These observations suggest that, to determine the response to LEEP therapy, F-18 FDG PET should not be performed within 15 days of the procedure.

  19. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun [Molecular Imaging Research and Education Laboratory, Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system.

  20. High Resolution PET Imaging Probe for the Detection, Molecular Characterization and Treatment Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    State Detector Stack for ToF-PET/MR. Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference Record, 2009; 2798-2799. 27. V.C. Spanoudaki, et al...M. K., McFarlane, N., Lemon , J. A., Boreham, D. R., Maresca, K. P., Brennan, J. D., Babich, J. W., Zubieta, J., and Valliant, J. F. (2004) Bridging

  1. PET imaging of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    (intact/cleaved forms)-provides independent additional clinical information to that contributed by PSA, Gleason score, and other relevant pathological and clinical parameters. In this respect, non-invasive molecular imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) offers a very attractive technology platform...

  2. PET/MR imaging of the pelvis in the presence of endoprostheses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes Nøhr; Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Keller, Sune Høgild;

    2013-01-01

    In combined whole-body PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly using the available MR image information and subsequent segmentation. Implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids may challenge MR-based AC (MR-AC). We evaluated the accuracy of MR-AC in PE...

  3. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution of radiolabeled gold nanoshells in rats with tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huan; Wang, Zheng Jim; Bao, Ande; Goins, Beth; Phillips, William T

    2010-08-16

    Here we report the radiolabeling of gold nanoshells (NSs) for PET imaging in rat tumor model. A conjugation method was developed to attach NSs with the radionuclide, (64)Cu. The resulting conjugates showed good labeling efficiency and stability in PBS and serum. The pharmacokinetics of (64)Cu-NS and the controls ((64)Cu-DOTA and (64)Cu-DOTA-PEG2K) were determined in nude rats with a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft by radioactive counting. Using PET/CT imaging, we monitored the in vivo distribution of (64)Cu-NS and the controls in the tumor-bearing rats at various time points after their intravenous injection. PET images of the rats showed accumulation of (64)Cu-NSs in the tumors and other organs with significant difference from the controls. The organ biodistribution of rats at 46h post-injection was analyzed by radioactive counting and compared between the (64)Cu-NS and the controls. Different clearance kinetics was indicated. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) of gold concentration was performed to quantify the amount of NSs in major tissues of the dosed rats and the results showed similar distribution. Overall, PET images with (64)Cu had good resolution and therefore can be further applied to guide photothermal treatment of cancer.

  4. Chelator-Free Labeling of Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoparticles for in Vivo PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Fliss, Brianne C.; Gu, Zi; Zhu, Yian; Hong, Hao; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Goel, Shreya; Luo, Haiming; Chen, Feng; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Xu, Zhi Ping; Cai, Weibo

    2015-11-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanomaterial has emerged as a novel delivery agent for biomedical applications due to its unique structure and properties. However, in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with LDH nanoparticles has not been achieved. The aim of this study is to explore chelator-free labeling of LDH nanoparticles with radioisotopes for in vivo PET imaging. Bivalent cation 64Cu2+ and trivalent cation 44Sc3+ were found to readily label LDH nanoparticles with excellent labeling efficiency and stability, whereas tetravalent cation 89Zr4+ could not label LDH since it does not fit into the LDH crystal structure. PET imaging shows that prominent tumor uptake was achieved in 4T1 breast cancer with 64Cu-LDH-BSA via passive targeting alone (7.7 ± 0.1%ID/g at 16 h post-injection; n = 3). These results support that LDH is a versatile platform that can be labeled with various bivalent and trivalent radiometals without comprising the native properties, highly desirable for PET image-guided drug delivery.

  5. Automatic Thresholding for Frame-Repositioning Using External Tracking in PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Keller, Sune; Sibomana, Merence

    2010-01-01

    present an automated algorithm for dividing PET acquisitions into subframes based on the registered head motion to correct for intra-frame motion with the frame repositioning MC method. The method is tested on real patient data (five 11C-SB studies and five 11C-PIB studies) and compared with an image...

  6. Short-lived Positron Emitters in Beam-on PET Imaging During Proton Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, P.; Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Diblen, F.; Biegun, A.K.; Fiedler, F.; van Goethem, M.-Jan; van der Graaf, E.R.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is so far the only method for in-vivo dose delivery verification in hadron therapy that is in clinical use. PET imaging during irradiation maximizes the number of detected counts and minimizes washout. In such a scenario, also short-lived positron emitters will be observ

  7. Radiolabelling and PET brain imaging of the a1-adrenoceptor antagonist Lu AE43936

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Rune; Ettrup, Anders Janusz; Balle, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral α₁-adrenoceptors are a common target for many antipsychotic drugs. Thus, access to positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging of α₁-adrenoceptors could make important contributions to the understanding of psychotic disorders as well as to the pharmacokinetics and occupancy of drugs...

  8. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S; Visvikis, D; Roux, C; Hatt, M, E-mail: simon.david@etudiant.univ-brest.fr [INSERM U650, LaTIM, Brest, F-29200 (France)

    2011-09-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumor volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumor metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using a stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on clinical datasets it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracer datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumor volume definition for radiotherapy applications.

  9. Chelator-Free Labeling of Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoparticles for in Vivo PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Fliss, Brianne C; Gu, Zi; Zhu, Yian; Hong, Hao; Valdovinos, Hector F; Hernandez, Reinier; Goel, Shreya; Luo, Haiming; Chen, Feng; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, Robert J; Xu, Zhi Ping; Cai, Weibo

    2015-11-20

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanomaterial has emerged as a novel delivery agent for biomedical applications due to its unique structure and properties. However, in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with LDH nanoparticles has not been achieved. The aim of this study is to explore chelator-free labeling of LDH nanoparticles with radioisotopes for in vivo PET imaging. Bivalent cation (64)Cu(2+) and trivalent cation (44)Sc(3+) were found to readily label LDH nanoparticles with excellent labeling efficiency and stability, whereas tetravalent cation (89)Zr(4+) could not label LDH since it does not fit into the LDH crystal structure. PET imaging shows that prominent tumor uptake was achieved in 4T1 breast cancer with (64)Cu-LDH-BSA via passive targeting alone (7.7 ± 0.1%ID/g at 16 h post-injection; n = 3). These results support that LDH is a versatile platform that can be labeled with various bivalent and trivalent radiometals without comprising the native properties, highly desirable for PET image-guided drug delivery.

  10. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT imaging of insulinoma revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange