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Sample records for animal investigation program

  1. 1971 Animal Investigation Program. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1975-07-01

    Data are presented that were obtained from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that reside on or near the Nevada Test Site. Cesium-137 and 106 Ru were the only gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the soft tissues of range cattle. Ruthenium-106 was detected only in the lungs of animals sampled in May. Strontium-90 levels in the cattle femurs ranged from 2 to 37 pCi/g of ash. The latter value was found in the bones of a 14-year-old cow that had lived on the Nevada Test Site her entire life. The bones of the same animal also had the highest level of 239 Pu (46 pCi/g of ash) that was reported. Analysis of her 8-month-old fetus revealed the presence of detectable levels of 239 Pu which indicates placental transfer of this radionuclide. The average 90 Sr levels in the bones from deer and desert bighorn sheep were 3.2 and 4.7 pCi/g of ash, respectively. Elevated levels of 106 Ru and 3 H were found in the tissues of two mule deer collected near the drainage ponds that collect runoff waters from mines used for nuclear testing activities. Other animals sampled included Golden eagles, feral horses, coyotes, and chukar. The 137 Cs levels in an eagle collected during 1964 varied only slightly from one collected during 1971. No gross or microscopic lesions were detected that could be attributable to the effects of ionizing radiation. (auth)

  2. Report of Animal Investigation Program activities for the Baneberry Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Black, S.C.; Giles, K.R.; Moghissi, A.A.

    1975-11-01

    On December 18, 1970, an underground nuclear test, conducted at the Nevada Test Site, released radioactive materials into the atmosphere with resultant on-site and off-site contamination. The Animal Investigation Program of the National Environmental Research Center, Las Vegas developed studies to document the distribution of fission and activation products in the tissue of domestic and wild animals residing within contaminated areas on and surrounding the Nevada Test Site. A study of radioiodine secretion in milk from cows at the experimental dairy farm, including urine and fecal excretion from four of them, was started about 24 hours after the venting. A grazing intake study, which utilized fistulated steers, was also carried out. The analytical data collected from these studies are presented in this report

  3. Animal investigation program 1980 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Giles, K.R.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the data collected through the Animal Investigation Program during 1980. A major goal of the Program is to assess the radionuclide burden in the tissues of wild and domesticated animals around the Nevada Test Site and to detect pathological effects resulting from the burdens. Other than naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. Strontium-90 and plutonium concentrations in tissues from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were similar to those found in samples collected during recent years. Lesions found in necropsied animals were similar to those found in animals from other areas of the U.S. and would not be attributable to ionizing radiation exposure. The report also describes other activities of the program, including the deer migration study and census

  4. Animal investigation program 1974 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.R.

    1977-06-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1974. Routine activities and special investigations of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. For example, cesium-137 was found only in the muscle tissues from 3 of the 12 Nevada Test Site cattle sampled during 1974. Tritium concentrations in the tissues from most of the animals sampled are at background levels. Animals from the experimental farm tended to have slightly higher concentrations than those sampled at other locations on the Nevada Test Site. Strontium-90 levels in bones from deer, desert bighorn sheep, and cattle were slightly lower than those reported for the preceding year. A graph depicts the average levels found in the bones of the three species from 1956 through 1974

  5. Animal Investigation Program: Nevada Test Site and Vicinity. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, Jr.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, chukar, golden eagles, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1979. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were lower than those of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within expected environmental limits with the exception of animals exposed to known sources of contamination; e.g., drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels or the Sedan Crater. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation to those levels in samples collected in recent years. Radionuclide tissue concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Hypothetical annual dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogra of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The movements of 25 mule deer outfitted with collars containing a radio transmitter unit were monitored on a weekly basis. No gross or microscopic lesions were found in necropsied animals that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  6. Animal investigation program 1975 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-02-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1975. Routine activities and special investigations of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides are detected infrequently. Tritium concentrations in the tissues from most of the animals sampled were at background levels. Strontium-90 levels in bones from deer and cattle were slightly lower than those reported for the preceding year while levels in desert bighorn sheep bones were elevated. A graph depicts the average levels found in the bones of the three species from 1956 through 1975. The gross and microscopic lesions found in necropsied animals are discussed. In general, these lesions are consistent with the physical condition of the animal and type of population sampled. No gross or microscopic lesions were detected that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  7. Animal investigation program 1978 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D D; Bernhardt, D E; Giles, K R

    1980-12-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, golden eagles, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1978. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring Potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of short-lived radionuclides found in samples from animals collected soon after March 14 (the date of a nuclear test by the People's Republic of China). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were consistent with those of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within expected environmental limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation from recent years. However, cattle tissue sampled in the fall were higher than those collected in the spring. Radionuclide tissue concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The movements of 13 mule deer outfitted with collars containing a radio transmitter unit were monitored on a weekly basis. No gross or microscopic lesions were found in necropsied animals that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation.

  8. Animal investigation program 1980 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1982-08-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, and a horse that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1980. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring 40 K, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. 131 I was found in the thyroid of a deer 3 weeks after a nuclear test by the People's Republic of China. Concentrations of 90 Sr in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were similar to those of recent years. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation from those levels in samples collected in recent years. Radionuclide concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Surface soil samples from the Area 15 farm contained 238 Pu and 239 Pu in nanocurie per kilogram concentrations. Hypothetical annual dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The highest postulated dose was 0.4 millirems to whole body for 137 Cs in muscle obtained from cattle. This dose is about 0.1 percent of the 500 millirems per year radiation protection guide for individuals in the general population. All other postulated doses for consumption of tissues containing other radionuclides were less than 0.1 percent of the standard

  9. Animal Investigation Program 1973 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1977-05-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1973. Routine activities and special investigations are discussed. Iodine-131 was detected in the thyroid of a Nevada Test Site mule deer. The postulated source was worldwide fallout from a nuclear detonation conducted by the People's Republic of China. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, cesium-137 was the only gamma-emitting radionuclide detected with any consistency in soft tissues. Nine muscle samples from the Nevada Test Site beef herd contained levels of cesium-137 ranging from 14 to 50 pCi/kilogram. Muscle from two deer contained 20 and 30 pCi/kilogram. Rabbit muscle contained 200 pCi/kilogram and muscle from a feral horse contained 40 pCi/kilogram. Tritium levels in all animal tissues sampled were at background except for animals residing at the Area 15 farm and for a feral horse. Postulated sources of these exposures are discussed. The strontium content in bones continued the downward trend observed during recent years

  10. Animal Investigation Program 1976 annual report: Nevada test site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-11-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle and mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1976. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of 131 I in animal thyroid samples collected after September 25 (the date of a Chinese nuclear test). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within ambient limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., Sedan Crater, drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels, etc. Analysis of actinide in tissues was emphasized during 1976. Graphs illustrate the 239 P levels in lungs, livers, and femurs from Nevada Test Site beef cattle for the years 1971 through 1976. Femur and lung residue data are nearly identical for each year with liver concentrations being a factor of 2 or 3 lower. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak actinide levels. The highest postulated dose was 11 millirem from tritium from tissues for a mule deer. This dose is about 2% of the 500 millirems/year guide for radiation doses to an individual in the general public. All other postulated doses for consumption of the tissue containing other radionuclides are less than 0.1% of this guide. The food habits of desert bighorn sheep were discussed according to the geographic locations of the animals at time of collection. Grasses made up approximately 60% of the diet at all locations, with shrubs content approaching 30%, and the remainder consisting of various forbs. The movement of 13 mule deer fitted with collars containing a radiotransmitter unit was monitored on a weekly basis

  11. Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) is a comprehensive resource for scientists performing animal-based research to gain a better understanding of cancer,...

  12. Animal Investigation Program (AIP), A.I.P. summary report on and around the Nevada Test Site from 1982--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the Animal Investigation Program conducted from 1982--1995 by the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory (R and IE), formerly Radiation Sciences Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site. The surveillance program was designed to measure levels and trends of radionuclides in animals on and around the Nevada Test Site to ascertain whether world-wide fallout, current radiation levels, and associated doses, to the general public were in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally had the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well-being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results indicated that no significant amounts of biological radionuclides had been detected in the near offsite areas or on the NTS, except in animals drinking water that drains from tunnels in Area 12

  13. Animal Investigation Program 1976 annual report: Nevada test site and vicinity. [Radioanalysis of tissues from animals residing on or near NTS in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-11-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle and mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1976. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of /sup 131/I in animal thyroid samples collected after September 25 (the date of a Chinese nuclear test). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within ambient limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., Sedan Crater, drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels, etc. Analysis of actinide in tissues was emphasized during 1976. Graphs illustrate the /sup 239/P levels in lungs, livers, and femurs from Nevada Test Site beef cattle for the years 1971 through 1976. Femur and lung residue data are nearly identical for each year with liver concentrations being a factor of 2 or 3 lower. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak actinide levels. The highest postulated dose was 11 millirem from tritium from tissues for a mule deer. This dose is about 2% of the 500 millirems/year guide for radiation doses to an individual in the general public. All other postulated doses for consumption of the tissue containing other radionuclides are less than 0.1% of this guide. The food habits of desert bighorn sheep were discussed according to the geographic locations of the animals at time of collection. Grasses made up approximately 60% of the diet at all locations, with shrubs content approaching 30%, and the remainder consisting of various forbs. The movement of 13 mule deer fitted with collars containing a radiotransmitter unit was monitored on a weekly basis.

  14. Animal Resource Program | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR Animal Resource Program The CCR Animal Resource Program plans, develops, and coordinates laboratory animal resources for CCR’s research programs. We also provide training, imaging, and technology development in support of moving basic discoveries to the clinic. The ARP Manager:

  15. Investigation - Derived Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsley, C.; Anderson, R.

    1998-06-01

    The Investigation-Derived Waste Program is a software application that was developed to identify the groundwater monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site that require containerization and treatment for purge water generated during sampling

  16. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    fish responsible for clinical scombroid poisoning. This will be attempted by correlating known patients, fish, specimens, and suspected outbreaks ...by parents, special program, and TAHC staff to evaluate the level of psychotic behavior. After one month, the procedure will be reversed, in that

  17. Two Programs Educating the Public in Animal Learning and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Estep, Daniel Q.

    2002-01-01

    Two educational programs have been developed that teach basic principles of animal learning and behavior and how they can be used in day to day interactions with companion animals. The first program educates violators of animal control laws about animal learning and cat and dog behavior to help them resolve their problems with their animals and avoid future animal control violations. The second educates home service providers concerning basic principles of animal communication, dog behavior, ...

  18. Clinical Investigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-30

    Munson ACH Ft. Leavenworth, KS 66027 (9) Dept/Svc: Ophthalmology (10) Associate Investigators: (11) Key Words: cataract extraction intra ocular lens...determine the occurrence and time of postoperative ocular complications and and adverse reactions for intraocular lens implant; to identify subgroups...designated as "(14)e" (15) Study Objective: To determine if using preoperative chemoradiotherapy will obviate the need for pelvic exenteration in

  19. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-30

    Major Robert Stewart, arrived in January after completing his doctoral research on the immune response to respiratory viruses at the University of... pathogenetic import remain unclear. Drug-ind. ;- d lupis nakes feasible the investigation of poten- tial early immunr) qic abnormalities which would lead...Transmission of Bunyamwera Viruses to Humans by the Biting Midge Culicoides Varripennis (5) Start Date: (6) Est Compl Date: 1986 (7) Principal

  20. Investigating Crickets: Observing Animal Exploratory Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. M.

    2008-01-01

    For curriculum content-related reasons, inquiry activities can be difficult in classrooms unless the activities are approached in a manner that makes variations among student group findings understandable in the context of the study. Studies of individual animals and plant reactions to stimuli, such as insect exploratory behavior, allow the…

  1. Roles of Animation Tools in Understanding Programming Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Andres; Joy, Mike; Sutinen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Computer generated animations are resources used to explain how programs are executed in order to clarify the relevant programming concepts. However, whilst trying to understand new programming concepts it is not clear how and when students benefit from an animation if they are using the tool on their own. To clarify the role of an animation tool…

  2. A framework for investigating animal consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droege, Paula; Braithwaite, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    An assessment of consciousness in nonverbal animals requires a framework for research that extends testing methods beyond subjective report. This chapter proposes a working definition of consciousness in terms of temporal representation that provides the critical link between internal phenomenology and external behavior and neural structure. Our claim is that consciousness represents the present moment as distinct from the past and the future in order to flexibly respond to stimuli. We discuss behavioral and neural evidence that indicates the capacity for both flexible response and temporal representation, and we illustrate these capacities in fish, a taxonomic group that challenges human intuitions about consciousness.

  3. The GLAST Guest Investigator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2007-01-01

    We provide an overview of the GLAST Guest Investigator (GI) program, which will support basic research relevant to the GLAST mission in yearly cycles beginning approximately two months after launch. Current details about the GLAST GI program will always be posted on the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) website: http://glast.gsfc.nasa.gov/ssc/.

  4. The Significance of Animal Cruelty in Child Protection Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Alberta; Pozzulo, Joanna D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency with which child protection workers (CPWs) in Ontario, Canada, seek information about animal cruelty during investigations of child maltreatment and the extent to which they consider information about animal cruelty when making decisions about whether intervention is required. The CPWs (N…

  5. Azabu animal-assisted therapy and activity educational program

    OpenAIRE

    太田, 光明

    2006-01-01

    The Azabu AAT (animal assisted therapy) and AAA (animal assisted activity), educational program has been established for the postgraduate students since April 1, 2002, which is the first endeavor at the universities of the world and the president of IAHAIO (International Associate of Human-Animal Interaction organizations). The program has been developed by Dr. Dennis C. Turner who is the visiting professor at Azabu University. This program is not only admitted as a national license for the A...

  6. Adapting Animal-Assisted Therapy Trials to Prison-Based Animal Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Molly; Ramaswamy, Megha

    2016-09-01

    Prison-based animal programs have shown promise when it comes to increased sociability, responsibility, and levels of patience for inmates who participate in these programs. Yet there remains a dearth of scientific research that demonstrates the impact of prison-based animal programs on inmates' physical and mental health. Trials of animal-assisted therapy interventions, a form of human-animal interaction therapy most often used with populations affected by depression/anxiety, mental illness, and trauma, may provide models of how prison-based animal program research can have widespread implementation in jail and prison settings, whose populations have high rates of mental health problems. This paper reviews the components of prison-based animal programs most commonly practiced in prisons today, presents five animal-assisted therapy case studies, evaluates them based on their adaptability to prison-based animal programs, and discusses the institutional constraints that act as barriers for rigorous prison-based animal program research implementation. This paper can serve to inform the development of a research approach to animal-assisted therapy that nurses and other public health researchers can use in working with correctional populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Investigating User Experiences Through Animation-based Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2016-01-01

    motion graphics and animation to sketch design ideas into diegetic design solutions. Through a deep-dive into two cases studies we discuss how animation-based sketching techniques supported the investigation of user experience aspects in design scenarios, and whether the expression is dependent...

  8. An Approach to Effortless Construction of Program Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel; Pareja-Flores, Cristobal; Urquiza-Fuentes, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Program animation systems have not been as widely adopted by computer science educators as we might expect from the firm belief that they can help in enhancing computer science education. One of the most notable obstacles to their adoption is the considerable effort that the production of program animations represents for the instructor. We…

  9. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  10. Investigation of Pre-Service Science Teachers’ Opinions about Using GoAnimate to Create Animated Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munise Seçkin Kapucu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the process of animated video creation by pre-service science teachers and analyze their opinions about how this technology can be used for science instruction. Fifteen pre-service science teachers participated in this study. During the study, students learned how to prepare animated videos using GoAnimate program, then they were required to prepare their own animations related to their middle school science subjects. This research is designed as a qualitative case study. Sample of the study was selected using criterion and easily accessible sampling methods to determine the participants. The data was collected through the face-to-face individual interviews. A semi-structured interview form that contains the questions related with the animated video creation process and pre-service teachers’ opinions about this technology has been prepared by the researchers. The duration of the interviews was around 15 minutes. Content analysis was used for the data analysis. According to the findings: the pre-service science teachers who participated in the study did not have any prior experience with animation technology, they had some difficulties to use this technology for the first time; most of them stated that animated videos would be engaging and could be endearing, but they had concerns about that students would be more interested in visuals instead of deeper understanding; they perceived animated videos being more helpful for middle school level and also suggested GoAnimate should have more characters available for science animations. In line with the research findings, several suggestions were given for the use of visual materials in science education.

  11. History of the Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    NASA has a rich history of scientific research that has been conducted throughout our numerous manned spaceflight programs. This scientific research has included animal test subjects participating in various spaceflight missions, including most recently, Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The Animal Care Program at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is multi-faceted and unique in scope compared to other centers within the agency. The animal care program at JSC has evolved from strictly research to include a Longhorn facility and the Houston Zoo's Attwater Prairie Chicken refuge, which is used to help repopulate this endangered species. JSC is home to more than 300 species of animals including home of hundreds of white-tailed deer that roam freely throughout the center which pose unique issues in regards to population control and safety of NASA workers, visitors and tourists. We will give a broad overview of our day to day operations, animal research, community outreach and protection of animals at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. Investigating the influence of military actions on animal genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosarcic, S.; Kosarcic, D.; Kljajic, R.

    2002-01-01

    Contemporary world is still faced with misunderstandings between countries and nations that are solved in militant way. Using war a way of solving the problems, brings universal misfortune and deepens injustice. Applying modern arms destroys environment and leaves harmful consequences on contemporary and future world. Of course, the most dangerous influence is manifested on changes in genetic material of human beings. The aim of the investigation was to discover if there were changes in genome of the animals present in the area where the refinery in Novi Sad was bombed. By the means of random sampling we chose 60 cows and 30 pigs from the area where air, water and food was contaminated with a considerate quantity of harmful matters that could be genotoxic. By sterile procedure according to modified Moorhead's method lymphocytes were cultivated, than the technique of G-banding was used (Seobright et al. 1971) According to the International Standards for Karyotyping of Domestic Animals (ISCNDA 1990) the chromosomes were analyzed. In all the investigation 3 cows with numerical and structural changes type aneuploidy and break on chromatids in q-arm were discovered. Analyzing the genome in all the pigs, 2 animals with structural changes of chromosome type r ing , deletion and break on q-arm (reciprocal translocation) were discovered. According to the percentage of the changes on 100 examined metaphases, it was discovered that the changes in genetic material appeared 'de novo' and that there are no constitutional changes in karyotype. Out of 90 animals, 5 with chromosome aberration were discovered, which makes 5.5 %. This shows that the changes in genetic material are a consequence of genotoxic agents

  13. Investigating animal health effects of sour gas acid forming emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of sour gas well blowout emissions on livestock are reviewed. Guidelines for safe drilling operations in hydrogen sulfide environments, general hazards and characteristics of hydrogen sulfide, and guidelines for field investigation into the effects of sour gas and acid emissions on livestock are discussed. A case history involving the Ross No. 2 gas well blowout of July 1985 in Rankin County, Mississippi is presented. The blowout lasted for 72 days, and at peak discharge the 500 ppM radius was ca 3.5 miles. A cattle embryo transplant operation located one half mile from the well was affected by the blowout. Examination by a local veterinarian of the cattle demonstrated eye irritation, epiphora, nasal discharge and coughing. After one and a half months of exposure, most animals showed clinical signs of a severe dry hacking cough, epiphora, dry rales over the thoracic inlet, and a bronchial popping sound over the lateral thorax. All animals had eye irritation. Of 55 animals showing signs of respiratory distress and eye irritations, 15 were still clinically ill in May of 1986. 7 refs., 1 tab

  14. Investigation of Usability Potential Geopolimer Concrete at Animal Barns Abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Memiş

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement, which causes significant energy and raw material consumption, is responsible for about 7% of CO2 emissions. In order to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production, with the aim of using a binder with a lower CO2 release or investigation of different methods, alternative materials to cement are required. In contrast to portland cement (PO, which is used in concrete production; geopolimer is a material that is potentially useful as an alternative to cement and is still being explored provides a very low CO2 emission, a high resistance to salts and acids, and a high temperature and fire resistance. In this study, the effects of geopolymer concrete were investigated in animal barn. For this purpose, samples were prepared using calcite aggregate, alkali activator and activation solution. As alkali activator of geopolymer material ceramic sludge (ST is used at 20% of blast furnace slag (YFC. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO4 and sodium hydroside (NaOH were used as the activation solution in 60-40% mixing ratio. Bending and compressive strengths were determined in 4×4×16 cm specimens and shrinkage ratios were determined on 25×25×285 mm specimens. In order to determine the conditions of the animal shelters of the geopolymer concrete, the strengths of the samples in 10% sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and sulphate (SO4 solution were compared with 28th, 56th and 90th days. It has been seen that the use of geopolymer concrete in animal barn can provide advantages.

  15. Differences in Moral Judgment on Animal and Human Ethics Issues between University Students in Animal-Related, Human Medical and Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrinder, Joy M; Ostini, Remo; Phillips, Clive J C

    2016-01-01

    Moral judgment in relation to animal ethics issues has rarely been investigated. Among the research that has been conducted, studies of veterinary students have shown greater use of reasoning based on universal principles for animal than human ethics issues. This study aimed to identify if this was unique to students of veterinary and other animal-related professions. The moral reasoning of first year students of veterinary medicine, veterinary technology, and production animal science was compared with that of students in non-animal related disciplines of human medicine and arts. All students (n = 531) completed a moral reasoning test, the VetDIT, with animal and human scenarios. When compared with reasoning on human ethics issues, the combined group of students evaluating animal ethics issues showed higher levels of Universal Principles reasoning, lower levels of Personal Interest reasoning and similar levels of Maintaining Norms reasoning. Arts students showed more personal interest reasoning than students in most animal-related programs on both animal and human ethics issues, and less norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues. Medical students showed more norms-based reasoning on animal ethics issues than all of the animal-related groups. There were no differences in principled reasoning on animal ethics issues between program groups. This has implications for animal-related professions and education programs showing that students' preference for principled reasoning on animal ethics issues is not unique to animal-related disciplines, and highlighting the need to develop student (and professional) capacity to apply principled reasoning to address ethics issues in animal industries to reduce the risk of moral distress.

  16. Free the animals? Investigating attitudes toward animal testing in Britain and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Christopher, Andrew N

    2008-06-01

    In this study, 185 British and 143 American undergraduates completed a battery of tests that measured attitudes toward animal testing and various individual difference variables. Attitudes toward animal testing factored into two interpretable factors: general attitudes toward animal testing, and animal welfare and conditions of testing. Overall, there was support for animal testing under the right conditions, although there was also concern for the welfare of animals and the conditions under which testing takes place. There were small but significant national difference on both factors (with Americans more positive about testing and less positive about animal welfare), and a significant sex difference on the first factor (women were more negative about testing). Correlation and regression analyses showed that there were few significant individual difference predictors of both factors. These results are discussed in relation to past and future work on attitudes toward animal testing.

  17. Utility of Small Animal Models of Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Clare M; Vickers, Mark H

    2018-01-01

    Any effective strategy to tackle the global obesity and rising noncommunicable disease epidemic requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie these conditions that manifest as a consequence of complex gene-environment interactions. In this context, it is now well established that alterations in the early life environment, including suboptimal nutrition, can result in an increased risk for a range of metabolic, cardiovascular, and behavioral disorders in later life, a process preferentially termed developmental programming. To date, most of the mechanistic knowledge around the processes underpinning development programming has been derived from preclinical research performed mostly, but not exclusively, in laboratory mouse and rat strains. This review will cover the utility of small animal models in developmental programming, the limitations of such models, and potential future directions that are required to fully maximize information derived from preclinical models in order to effectively translate to clinical use.

  18. Retrospective investigation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome in 146 exotic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Mamoru; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ono, Sadaharu; Murakami, Akiyoshi; Harada, Tomoko; Sano, Tadashi

    2017-09-29

    The outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were retrospectively evaluated in 146 exotic animals including 20 pet birds, 47 rabbits, 34 hamsters, 18 ferrets, 7 turtles and 20 other small mammals in cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at presentation or during hospitalization at an animal clinic. The rates of return of spontaneous circulation, survival after CPR and discharge were 9.3, 2.3 and 1.2%, respectively. The mean success rate of CPR in animals included in this study was lower than those previously reported in dogs and cats. This might have been because of the challenges in effective chest compression, airway management and monitoring as well as establishment of intravenous catheterization route in exotic animals.

  19. Clinical Investigation Program, RCS MED-300 (RI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    was to be the standard of quality for medical botany until well into the medieval period. He accomplished this prodigious task while traveling as a...medical thought until late medieval times. Another little known role of animals in advancing surgery, especially gyne- cologic surgery, in the 16th...Investigation 1. Rothman T:"de Laguna’s commentaries on hallucinogenic drugs and witchcraft in Dioscorides’ materia medica." Bull Hist Med 1972, 46

  20. Bone scintigraphy for the investigation of lameness in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolln, G.; Franke, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy has been used as a helpful method in diagnosing lameness in small animals. It is a sensitive, non-invasive method to evaluate bone lesions and orthopaedic disorders. It provides a functional image of the skeleton and thereby aiding in the localisation and diagnosing of obscure lameness. Compared to human medicine one important difference is the inability of an animal to characterize its pain to the examiner. Another difference is the lacking cooperation of an animal during bone scintigraphy. Before this background are shown on the basis of 5 examples the advantages, the method and the different indication of bone scintigraphy. The technique of this method arrives from a human medicine protocol of a 2-phase-bone-scintigraphy and has to be done under light anaesthesia, to avoid artefacts of movement during acquisitions. The authors are convinced that bone scintigraphy is a very useful and diagnostic method for evaluation of obscure lameness because it can give a quick diagnosis and aimed therapy. Therefore secondary changes and additional costs can be avoided for the animal and its owner. (orig.)

  1. Investigating gender and spatial measurements in instructional animation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wong (Mona); J.C. Castro-Alonso (Juan); P. Ayres (Paul); G.W.C. Paas (Fred)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractInstructional animation research has been extensive but the results are inconsistent. Amongst a number of possible factors to explain these inconclusive results (e.g., the negative influence of transient information), the influence of spatial ability and gender are less explored. This

  2. 21 CFR 516.125 - Investigational use of minor species new animal drugs to support indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for investigational use only in laboratory animals or for tests in vitro in support of index listing... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Investigational use of minor species new animal... DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Index of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor...

  3. Investigations of Pet Animal Breeding Trends in Sivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ziya Oğrak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the present situation and future trends of pet which a member of our home in central Anatolian city of Sivas. For this purpose, 100 people (73 male, 27 female used with face to face interviews in the questionnaire aged 18-72 (mean 32.25, monthly income changed 400-5000 Turkish Liras (average 1841 and, 16 questions except for personal information were asked to participants. Participants, 51% graduated the university, 46% married, 82% lived in apartments, and 64% of the occupied own houses or belonging to their family have been identified. According to the findings, any breeders of pet in the house in Sivas rate were 31%. and, the people's income level , gender , age , marital status , educational level , having a child and the seat of the house with a garden and the lack of this on the ratio statistically not significant was observed. Highest percentage pet in species of breeding animals was the bird and, 48.4% of those pet owners did not go to the veterinarian at all and, 24.6% of non-animal’s previously had a bad incident with animals that have been identified. As a result, in terms of veterinary importance will increase day by day with pet animal breeding priorities for the further dissemination of the determination of the current situation and problems are seen to be important and, larger-scale research to be done will be helpful.

  4. An Empirical Investigation into Programming Language Syntax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Andreas; Siebert, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in the literature have shown that syntax remains a significant barrier to novice computer science students in the field. While this syntax barrier is known to exist, whether and how it varies across programming languages has not been carefully investigated. For this article, we conducted four empirical studies on programming…

  5. Snack foods and dental caries. Investigations using laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenby, T H

    1990-05-05

    The nation's eating habits are undergoing major transformation, with a swing away from traditional meals to a huge increase in snack consumption, but very little is known of the nutritional and dental implications of this change. The research project reported here evaluated a range of snack foods in caries-active laboratory animals, comparing them, as dietary ingredients, with noncariogenic and cariogenic (sugar) diets. The findings showed the very low cariogenicity of salted peanuts, followed by ready-salted and salt and vinegar crisps, extruded maize, mixed-starch and prefabricated/fried potato products, and cheese-filled puffs. Other varieties of crisps (cheese and onion and special shapes) proved to be more cariogenic, not far short of semi-sweet biscuits in some cases. It is concluded that the severity of the processing undergone by the snack foods and the nature of the flavouring agents with which they are coated can influence their dental properties.

  6. Professional Veterinary Programs' Perceptions and Experiences Pertaining to Emotional Support Animals and Service Animals, and Recommendations for Policy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    Given the unique nature of programs in professional veterinary medicine (PVM), the increasing numbers of students requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings is of growing interest to student affairs and administrative staff in PVM settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of support animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities now need to develop new policies and guidelines. Representatives from a sample of 28 PVM programs completed a survey about the prevalence of student requests for ESAs and service animals. PVM associate deans for academic affairs also reported their perceptions of this issue and the challenges these requests might pose within veterinary teaching laboratories and patient treatment areas. Responses indicated that approximately one third of PVM programs have received requests for ESAs (32.1%) in the last 2 years, 17.9% have had requests for psychiatric service animals, and 17.9% for other types of service animals. Despite this, most associate deans reported not having or not being aware of university or college policies pertaining to these issues. Most associate deans are interested in learning more about this topic. This paper provides general recommendations for establishing university or PVM program policies.

  7. Safely Caring for Animals during Inquiry Investigations: Exploring Microecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Edmund A.; Parker, Chad A.

    2010-01-01

    "Science is a process of discovering and exploring the natural world. Exploration occurs in the classroom, laboratory or in the field. As part of your science class, you will be doing many activities and investigations that will involve the use of various materials, equipment, and chemicals…" (NSTA, 2010). Safety is always of utmost…

  8. "Quality Handling" a training program to reduce fear and stress in farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, X.; Ruis, M.A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Research programs such as the European Welfare Quality® program, have attempted to improve animal welfare by developing training programs for improving stockperson behaviour towards the animals. The authors will illustrate different approches in this paper, with a special focus on the Quality

  9. Using Ants, Animal Behavior & the Learning Cycle to Investigate Scientific Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, Russell A.; Dolezal, Adam G.; Hicks, Michael R.; Butler, Michael W.; Morehouse, Nathan I.; Ganesh, Tirupalavanam G.

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of animals is an intrinsically fascinating topic for students from a wide array of backgrounds. We describe a learning experience using animal behavior that we created for middle school students as part of a graduate-student outreach program, Graduate Partners in Science Education, at Arizona State University in collaboration with a…

  10. Investigation of antidepressant mechanisms in an animal model of depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesberger, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The rat olfactory bulbectomy model has recently been found to exhibit good predictive properties when used to screen drugs for antidepressant activity, thereby suggesting that it may have a pathological defect particularly sensitive to the antidepressant activity of drugs. This model, with its well defined behavioral syndrome, was thus used to investigate some neurochemical effects of 4 species of antidepressant drugs and to see if drug actions varied between the normal and pathological states. A major finding in the study was the regional variation in /sup 3/H-imipramine binding and beta receptor density following the lesion. In addition treatment of normal rats with one of the 4 different antidepressant drugs caused changes in the density of /sup 3/H-imipramine recognition sites and beta receptors that varied between the 4 regions examined and with the drug administered such that none of the 4 drugs had identical response profiles. This suggests that the different drugs may be acting on different neurochemical substrates and that the distribution and sensitivity of the substrate varies for the different brain regions. Furthermore, results obtained in this investigation suggests that the effects of some antidepressant drugs on noradrenergic and serotonergic systems are markedly state-dependent and that this varies between different brain regions.

  11. Experimental investigation of buried tritium in plant and animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Workman, W. J. G.; Davis, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Buried exchangeable tritium appears as part of organically bound tritium (OBT) in the traditional experimental determination of OBT. Since buried tritium quickly exchanges with hydrogen atoms in the body following ingestion, assuming that it is part of OBT rather than part of tritiated water (HTO) could result in a significant overestimate of the ingestion dose. This paper documents an experimental investigation into the existence, amount and significance of buried tritium in plant and fish samples. OBT concentrations in the samples were determined in the traditional way and also following denaturing with five chemical solutions that break down large molecules and expose buried tritium to exchange with free hydrogen atoms. A comparison of the OBT concentrations before and after denaturing, together with the concentration of HTO in the supernatant obtained after denaturing, suggests that buried OBT may exist but makes up less than 5% of the OBT concentration in plants and at most 20% of the OBT concentration in fish. The effects of rinse time and rinse water volumes were investigated to optimize the removal of exchangeable OBT from the samples. (authors)

  12. MODELING OF ANIMATED SIMULATIONS BY MAXIMA PROGRAM TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya O. Bugayets

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the methodical features in training of computer simulation of systems and processes using animation. In the article the importance of visibility of educational material that combines sensory and thinking sides of cognition is noted. The concept of modeling and the process of building models has been revealed. Attention is paid to the development of skills that are essential for effective learning of animated simulation by visual aids. The graphical environment tools of the computer mathematics system Maxima for animated simulation are described. The examples of creation of models animated visual aids and their use for the development of research skills are presented.

  13. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P.; Howard, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  14. Animal use and lessons learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Patricia L; Manuppello, Joseph R; Willett, Catherine E; Sandler, Jessica T

    2012-12-01

    Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ≥ 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) to the U.S. EPA. Despite the potential for extensive animal testing, animal welfare guidelines were not provided until after the start of the program. We evaluated compliance with the animal welfare principles that arose from an agreement reached between the U.S. EPA and animal protection organizations and tracked the HPV program's use of animals for testing. Under a worst-case scenario, the HPV program had the potential to consume 3.5 million animals in new testing. After application of animal-saving measures, approximately 127,000 were actually used. Categorization of chemicals based on similar structure-activity and application of read-across, along with use of existing test data, were the most effective means of reducing animal testing. However, animal-saving measures were inconsistently used by both sponsors and the U.S. EPA. Lessons learned from the HPV program can be applied to future programs to minimize animal testing and promote more human-relevant chemical risk assessment.

  15. Assessing Effectiveness of a Nonhuman Animal Welfare Education Program for Primary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Roxanne D; Williams, Joanne M

    2017-01-01

    Nonhuman animal welfare education aims to promote positive relationships between children and animals and thus improve animal welfare, yet few scientific evaluations of these programs exist. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an education program developed by the Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) that included 4 interventions focusing on pets (companion animals), wild animals, farm animals, and general animal rescues. Knowledge, attachment to pets, and attitudes and beliefs about animal minds were assessed at pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest using a questionnaire administered to 1,217 Scottish children aged 7 to 13 years old. Results showed a significant positive impact of the program on knowledge about animals and the Scottish SPCA for all interventions. The pet and farming interventions significantly impacted children's beliefs about animal minds. There were trends toward improvements in a range of other measures. This study highlights the importance of teaching animal welfare education to children for early prevention of animal cruelty, discusses the need to base this education on theory and research to find effective change, and demonstrates how evidence-based practice can inform future education programs.

  16. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  17. Fetal programming of CVD and renal disease: animal models and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2013-08-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis postulates that exposure to a less than optimal maternal environment during fetal development programmes physiological function, and determines risk of disease in adult life. Much evidence of such programming comes from retrospective epidemiological cohorts, which demonstrate associations between birth anthropometry and non-communicable diseases of adulthood. The assertion that variation in maternal nutrition drives these associations is supported by studies using animal models, which demonstrate that maternal under- or over-nutrition during pregnancy can programme offspring development. Typically, the offspring of animals that are undernourished in pregnancy exhibit a relatively narrow range of physiological phenotypes that includes higher blood pressure, glucose intolerance, renal insufficiency and increased adiposity. The observation that common phenotypes arise from very diverse maternal nutritional insults has led to the proposal that programming is driven by a small number of mechanistic processes. The remodelling of tissues during development as a consequence of maternal nutritional status being signalled by endocrine imbalance or key nutrients limiting processes in the fetus may lead to organs having irreversibly altered structures that may limit their function with ageing. It has been proposed that the maternal diet may impact upon epigenetic marks that determine gene expression in fetal tissues, and this may be an important mechanism connecting maternal nutrient intakes to long-term programming of offspring phenotype. The objective for this review is to provide an overview of the mechanistic basis of fetal programming, demonstrating the critical role of animal models as tools for the investigation of programming phenomena.

  18. ISFG: Recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linacre, A.; Gusmão, L.; Hecht, W.

    2010-01-01

    : the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present......The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be......, and the other scenarios can often be addressed by assigning a DNA sample to a particular individual organism. Currently there is little standardization of methodologies used in the forensic analysis of animal DNA or in reporting styles. The recommendations in this document relate specifically to animal DNA...

  19. ISFG: Recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linacre, A.; Gusmão, L.; Hecht, W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be...... in a forensic science investigation. Due to the scope of non-human DNA typing that is possible, the remit of this commission is confined to animal DNA typing only.......: the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present...

  20. The History of the Animal Care Program at NASA Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen; Bassett, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Animal Care Program (ACP). Animals have been used early in space exploration to ascertain if it were possible to launch a manned spacecraft. The program is currently involved in many studies that assist in enhancing the scientific knowledge of the effect of space travel. The responsibilities of the ACP are: (1) Organize and supervise animal care operations & activities (research, testing & demonstration). (2) Maintain full accreditation by the International Association for the Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) (3) Ensure protocol compliance with IACUC recommendations (4) Training astronauts for in-flight animal experiments (5) Maintain accurate & timely records for all animal research testing approved by JSC IACUC (6) Organize IACUC meetings and assist IACUC members (7) Coordinate IACUC review of the Institutional Program for Humane Care and Use of Animals (every 6 mos)

  1. Animal-Assisted Activity: Effects of a Complementary Intervention Program on Psychological and Physiological Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepps, Peggy; Stewart, Charles N; Bruckno, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    Animal-assisted activity is the use of trained animals for the therapeutic, motivational, or educational benefit of patients. Subjects of this study were 218 patients hospitalized on the mental health unit of a community hospital with an existing, complementary animal-assisted activity program. Half of the patients participated in a 1-hour session of animal-assisted activity. The other half, who served as a comparison group, participated in a 1-hour stress management program. It was hypothesized that an animal-assisted activity program would improve ratings of depression, anxiety, and pain and the associated physiological measures of stress and discomfort. Self-report ratings of depression, anxiety, and pain were collected before and after treatment sessions, and blood pressure, pulse, and salivary cortisol were measured. There were significant decreases in depression (P animal-assisted activity program, comparable to those in the more traditional stress management group. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. ADAM: A computer program to simulate selective-breeding schemes for animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L D; Sørensen, A C; Henryon, M

    2009-01-01

    ADAM is a computer program that models selective breeding schemes for animals using stochastic simulation. The program simulates a population of animals and traces the genetic changes in the population under different selective breeding scenarios. It caters to different population structures...

  3. Exploring Animal-Assisted Programs with Children in School and Therapeutic Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Animal-Assisted programs with children are becoming increasingly popular in school and therapeutic settings. This article provides an overview of the benefits accrued by children as well as the concerns with programs which involve animals, and therapy dogs in particular, in these environments. Research over the past 30 years indicates that therapy…

  4. ISFG: recommendations regarding the use of non-human (animal) DNA in forensic genetic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacre, A; Gusmão, L; Hecht, W; Hellmann, A P; Mayr, W R; Parson, W; Prinz, M; Schneider, P M; Morling, N

    2011-11-01

    The use of non-human DNA typing in forensic science investigations, and specifically that from animal DNA, is ever increasing. The term animal DNA in this document refers to animal species encountered in a forensic science examination but does not include human DNA. Non-human DNA may either be: the trade and possession of a species, or products derived from a species, which is contrary to legislation; as evidence where the crime is against a person or property; instances of animal cruelty; or where the animal is the offender. The first instance is addressed by determining the species present, and the other scenarios can often be addressed by assigning a DNA sample to a particular individual organism. Currently there is little standardization of methodologies used in the forensic analysis of animal DNA or in reporting styles. The recommendations in this document relate specifically to animal DNA that is integral to a forensic science investigation and are not relevant to the breeding of animals for commercial purposes. This DNA commission was formed out of discussions at the International Society for Forensic Genetics 23rd Congress in Buenos Aires to outline recommendations on the use of non-human DNA in a forensic science investigation. Due to the scope of non-human DNA typing that is possible, the remit of this commission is confined to animal DNA typing only. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. B.C. Hydro's deficiency investigation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    British Columbia Hydro supplies most of the electrical energy for the province of British Columbia, and most is produced at hydroelectric projects. At the core of the Dam Safety Program are routine inspections, comprehensive inspections and reviews, deficiency investigations and dam safety improvements. The deficiency investigation process follows four basic steps: assess a potential deficiency to determine if a threat to the safety of the dam exists; identify alternate methods to remedy the deficiency; undertake an engineering and economic analysis of the alternatives that provide dam safety, and select the best one; and prepare a preliminary design and cost estimate of the selected alternatives. Bear Creek Dam is a small hydraulic fill in a seismic zone. The fill would likely liquefy and fail under moderate earthquake loading. Options considered to remedy the deficiency included draining the dam, lowering the reservoir level by lowering the spillway crest, and strengthening the dam. Lowering the reservoir level was tentatively selected due to having the lowest cost and providing an acceptable balance of lower incremental risk and maintaining use of the reservoir. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Animal Models for Investigating the Central Control of the Mammalian Diving Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Paul Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Pioneering studies by Per Scholander indicated that the diving response consists of reflexly induced apnea, bradycardia and an alteration of blood flow that maintains perfusion of the heart and brain. More recently field physiological studies have shown that many marine animals can adjust cardiorespiratory aspects of their diving response depending upon the behavioral situation. This could suggest that the very labile heart rate during diving is under direct cortical control. However, the final control of autonomic nervous system functioning resides within the brainstem and not the cortex. Many physiologists regard the brain as a “black box” where important neuronal functioning occurs, but the complexity of such functioning leaves systematic investigation a daunting task. As a consequence the central control of the diving response has been under-investigated. Thus, to further advance the field of diving physiology by understanding its central neuronal control, it would be first necessary to understand the reflex circuitry that exists within the brainstem of diving animals. To do this will require an appropriate animal model. In this review, two animals, the muskrat and rat, will be offered as animal models to investigate the central aspects of the diving response. Firstly, although these rodents are not marine animals, natural histories indicate that both animals can and do exploit aquatic environments. Secondly, physiological recordings during natural and simulated diving indicate that both animals possess the same basic physiological responses to underwater submersion that occur in marine animals. Thirdly, the size and ease of housing of both animals makes them attractive laboratory research animals. Finally, the enormous amount of scientific literature regarding rodent brainstem autonomic control mechanisms, and the availability of brain atlases, makes these animals ideal choices to study the central control of the mammalian diving response. PMID:22661956

  7. Animal models for investigating the central control of the mammalian diving response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eMcculloch

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pioneering studies by Per Scholander indicated that the diving response consists of reflexly induced apnea, bradycardia and an alteration of blood flow that maintains perfusion of the heart and brain. More recently field physiological studies have shown that many marine animals can adjust cardiorespiratory aspects of their diving response depending upon the behavioral situation. This could suggest that the very labile heart rate during diving is under direct cortical control. However, the final control of ANS functioning resides within the brainstem and not the cortex. Many physiologists regard the brain as a black box where important neuronal functioning occurs, but the complexity of such functioning leaves systematic investigation a daunting task. As a consequence the central control of the diving response has been under-investigated. Thus, to further advance the field of diving physiology by understanding its central neuronal control, it would be first necessary to understand the reflex circuitry that exists within the brainstem of diving animals. To do this will require an appropriate animal model. In this review, two animals, the muskrat and rat, will be offered as animal models to investigate the central aspects of the diving response. Firstly, although these rodents are not marine animals, natural histories indicate that both animals can and do exploit aquatic environments. Secondly, physiological recordings during natural and simulated diving indicate that both animals possess the same basic physiological responses to underwater submersion that occur in marine animals. Thirdly, the size and ease of housing of both animals makes them attractive laboratory research animals. Finally, the enormous amount of scientific literature regarding rodent brainstem autonomic control mechanisms, and the availability of brain atlases, makes these animals ideal choices to study the central control of the mammalian diving response.

  8. Clinical Investigation Program Report, RCS MED-300 (R1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-31

    programs on an ad hoc basis. Animal models include: Nissen fundoplication, gastric polyps, antrectomy with Bilroth 1 gastroenterostomy, subtotal gastric...resection with Bilroth 2 gastroenterostomy, vertical banded gastroplasty, cholecystoduodenostomy, gastroenterostomy, right hemicolectomy, colectomy

  9. Mixtures Equation Pilot Program to Reduce Animal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the start of a pilot program to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of a mathematical tool (the GHS Mixtures Equation), which is used in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).

  10. Investigating Integer Restrictions in Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas G.; Chelst, Kenneth R.; Principato, Angela M.; Wilhelm, Thad L.

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is an application of graphing linear systems that appears in many Algebra 2 textbooks. Although not explicitly mentioned in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, linear programming blends seamlessly into modeling with mathematics, the fourth Standard for Mathematical Practice (CCSSI 2010, p. 7). In solving a…

  11. Obese people=Animals? Investigating the implicit “animalization” of obese people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating a dehumanization perspective with the literature on stereotyping of obesity, this paper investigated whether obese people are implicitly categorized as animals rather than humans. Sixty participants were asked to complete an Implicit Association Test in which they had to associate images of thin and obese faces with animal or human characteristics. As predicted, people were more likely to categorize images of obese faces as animal-like and this tendency was more acute amongst thinner participants. Implications of our results for future on research on dehumanization and negative stereotyping of obesity are discussed.

  12. The influence of conservation breeding programs on animal communication and behaviour – a literary review.

    OpenAIRE

    Danial Rioldi, Emmanuela

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This literary review is focused on how conservation breeding programs may influence an animal’s behaviour and communication and if this may affect reintroduction. The expansion of the human population is an increasing threat to all wild animals and their habitats. Animals are forced to survive in smaller areas and the worst case scenario is extinction. Animals communicate with each other using various types of signals to transmit information about their reproductive status, intentio...

  13. An Administrator’s Guide for Animal Facilitated Therapy Programs in Federal Health Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    problems since these are provided by the animalls owner. 2. Species. Dogs, cats, birds, fish, small mammals, and many other types of animals have... biological demands dictate, which usually adds motivation to the owner to maintain a regular regimen. The walking program (without a companion animal...patient into returning to the reality of today, to take care of the animalls needs. The use of animals, even fish, to reduce anxiety and stress, has been

  14. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  15. Animal Models and Bone Histomorphometry: Translational Research for the Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of animal models to research and inform bone morphology, in particular relating to human research in bone loss as a result of low gravity environments. Reasons for use of animal models as tools for human research programs include: time-efficient, cost-effective, invasive measures, and predictability as some model are predictive for drug effects.

  16. Institutional training programs for research personnel conducted by laboratory-animal veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Rush, Howard G

    2012-01-01

    Research institutions are required by federal law and national standards to ensure that individuals involved in animal research are appropriately trained in techniques and procedures used on animals. Meeting these requirements necessitates the support of institutional authorities; policies for the documentation and enforcement of training; resources to support and provide training programs; and high-quality, effective educational material. Because of their expertise, laboratory-animal veterinarians play an essential role in the design, implementation, and provision of educational programs for faculty, staff, and students in biomedical research. At large research institutions, provision of a training program for animal care and use personnel can be challenging because of the animal-research enterprise's size and scope. At the University of Michigan (UM), approximately 3,500 individuals have direct contact with animals used in research. We describe a comprehensive educational program for animal care and use personnel designed and provided by laboratory-animal veterinarians at UM and discuss the challenges associated with its implementation.

  17. Forensic Interviews for Child Sexual Abuse Allegations: An Investigation into the Effects of Animal-Assisted Intervention on Stress Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A; Gulick, Elsie E

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapy animals during forensic interviews for child sexual abuse allegations is a recommendation by the Therapy Animals Supporting Kids Program to help ease children's discomfort during the forensic interview process. Based on this recommendation, this study incorporated a certified therapy canine into the forensic interview process for child sexual abuse allegations. This study investigated changes in salivary cortisol, immunoglobulin A, blood pressure, and heart rate as a result of forensic interview phenomenon (e.g., outcry) incorporating animal-assisted intervention versus a control condition in children (N = 42) interviewed for alleged child sexual abuse. The results supported significantly greater heart rate values for the control group (n = 23) who experienced sexual contact and/or indecency than the experience of aggravated sexual assault compared to no difference in HR for the intervention group (n = 19). The results suggest that the presence of the canine in the forensic interview may have acted as a buffer or safeguard for the children when disclosing details of sexual abuse. In the intervention group, children's HR was lower at the start of the forensic interview compared to the control group. Finding an effect of having a certified handler-canine team available during the forensic interview on physiological measures of stress has real-world value for children, child welfare personnel, and clinical therapists. It is suggested that animal-assisted intervention be expanded to children facing other types of trauma and to treatment programs for child survivors of sexual abuse.

  18. [Perspective of peer helpers regarding their experience animating a self-treatment program for panic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Michel; Bouchard, Stéphane; Lapalme, Micheline; Laverdure, Anick; Audet, Denis; Cusson, Jean-Claude; Zacchia, Camillo; Milton, Diana; Sam Tion, Michaël; Chartier-Otis, Mariko; Marchand, André; Bélanger, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Support groups can help to reach individuals with anxiety disorders who are not or are only partly obtaining health services. The present study is based on a program that involves peer helpers as animators of a self-treatment group (Zéro-ATAQ). Their perspective has been documented in order to identify the aspects of the program which can be improved. Eleven peer helpers led the 12 sessions of the program, which was dispensed in four regions of Quebec for 32 persons having panic disorders with agoraphobia. The perspectives of ten peer animators were documented based on a semi-structured interview that took place at the end of the program, and a focus group that was held over six months later with peer animators from each of the groups. Their comments were transcribed and a thematic content analysis was conducted. All of the peer helper animators reported that they enjoyed participating in the program, that they appreciated being able to help others having an anxiety disorder, and that the program helped them in their role as animators of these types of activities. Nearly all of the peer helpers emphasized the importance of being able to count on the supervision of a professional when needed. This study revealed (1) the feasibility of implementing a program of this kind in partnership with peers, (2) the qualifications necessary to lead this type of program, (3) the requirements in terms of training and available material, and (4) the importance of supervision.

  19. Role of U.S. animal control agencies in equine neglect, cruelty, and abandonment investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, C L; Holcomb, K E

    2014-05-01

    Every state in the United States has regulations prohibiting acts of neglect and cruelty against animals. Local law enforcement and animal control agencies are responsible in many communities to enforce these statutes. As society's perception of horses has changed from their origin as livestock to companion animals in modern times, owners have transitioned their care and management. The goal of this study was to identify the role and capacities of local animal control services in the United States that investigate equine neglect, cruelty, and abandonment investigations and to identify challenges and outcomes of the investigations. A 128-question online survey was accessible for animal agencies to complete. Comprehensive questions included their capacity for investigating equine cases, funding, housing for horses, and causes and outcomes of investigations. Respondents also were asked to select a single case and provide detailed information on the condition of horses, seizure and custody procedures, costs, and prosecution proceedings. A total of 165 respondents from 26 states completed all or the majority of the questions. A total of 6,864 equine investigations were initiated between 2007 and 2009 by 90 agencies, which extrapolates to 38 investigations annually per agency. A typical agency has an average annual budget of $740,000, employs 7 animal control officers, and spends about $10,000 annually on equine cases. Neglect was ranked as the most common reason for investigation. Owner ignorance, economic hardship, and lack of responsibility were the highest ranked causes of neglect and cruelty. Individual cases were provided by 91 agencies concerning 749 equines. The physical condition of the horse was the primary factor of investigation, and low body condition, parasite infestation, and compromised dental condition were present in most seized horses. Over half of the equine owners previously had been investigated or charged with neglect or cruelty of animals or were

  20. The extinct animal show: the paleoimagery tradition and computer generated imagery in factual television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Vincent

    2009-03-01

    Extinct animals have always been popular subjects for the media, in both fiction, and factual output. In recent years, a distinctive new type of factual television program has emerged in which computer generated imagery is used extensively to bring extinct animals back to life. Such has been the commercial audience success of these programs that they have generated some public and academic debates about their relative status as science, documentary, and entertainment, as well as about their reflection of trends in factual television production, and the aesthetic tensions in the application of new media technologies. Such discussions ignore a crucial contextual feature of computer generated extinct animal programs, namely the established tradition of paleoimagery. This paper examines a selection of extinct animal shows in terms of the dominant frames of the paleoimagery genre. The paper suggests that such an examination has two consequences. First, it allows for a more context-sensitive evaluation of extinct animal programs, acknowledging rather than ignoring relevant representational traditions. Second, it allows for an appraisal and evaluation of public and critical reception of extinct animal programs above and beyond the traditional debates about tensions between science, documentary, entertainment, and public understanding.

  1. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baia, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members. PMID:27293226

  2. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Aimee F; Baia, Patricia

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members.

  3. The Effects of a Custom-Designed Animation Program on Learning Chinese Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a custom-designed computer animation program on learning Chinese characters by beginning learners of Chinese as Foreign Language (CFL) in a higher education setting. This study used a matched comparison quasi-experimental design to explore the effects of the customized computer program within…

  4. An on-farm investigation of beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Mickael; Prendiville, Daniel J; Crowe, Mark A; Veissier, Isabelle; Earley, Bernadette

    2010-12-13

    Beef suckler farms (194 farms throughout 13 counties) were assessed once with housed cattle and once with cattle at grass using an animal welfare index (AWI). Twenty-three of the 194 farms were revisited a year later and re-evaluated using the AWI and the Tier-Gerechtheits-Index 35L/2000 (TGI35L/2000). Thirty-three indicators were collected in five categories: locomotion (5 indicators); social interactions (between animals) (7), flooring (5), environment (7) and Stockpersonship (9). Three indicators relating to the size of the farm were also collected.Improving animal welfare is an increasingly important aspect of livestock production systems predominantly due to increased consumer concern about the source of animal products. The objectives were (i) to evaluate animal welfare of Irish beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI), (ii) to examine correlations between parameters, how they influence the AWI and investigate the applicability of the parameters used, (iii) to investigate the impact of the activity of the farmer (full-time or part-time), the interest of the farmer and the number of animals on the AWI. The mean AWI was 65% and ranged from 54% to 83%. The grazing period represented 16.5% of the total points of the AWI. Seventy percent of the farms were rated as "Very Good" or "Excellent". There was no difference (P > 0.05) in AWI between full-time and part-time farmers. Part-time farmers had greater (P = 0.01) "social interactions": calving (P = 0.03) and weaning (P animals (P = 0.03) and their animals had less lameness (P = 0.01). The number of animals on-farm and the interest of the Stockperson were negatively and positively correlated (P = 0.001), respectively, with the AWI. A hierarchical classification was performed to examine how the indicators influenced the AWI. The AWI was easily applicable for an on-farm evaluation of welfare. The Stockpersonship was an important factor in determining the AWI (11% of the total variation) more

  5. Helping War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Incarcerated Individuals' Role in Therapeutic Animal Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Gennifer

    2016-05-01

    A grassroots movement of nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations is creating programs in which incarcerated individuals train rescued shelter dogs as therapeutic canines for Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Driven in part by reports of Veterans not receiving adequate treatment for PTSD, the programs are the latest iteration of prison-based animal programs and are founded on the principles of animal therapy and healing powers of animals. The far-reaching and deleterious collateral consequences of PTSD create social and economic burdens on the country; providing beneficial interventions for Veterans is a pressing social problem. Without oversight, a patchwork of agencies has developed that provides Veterans with dogs with varying levels of training and differing abilities. To best serve the needs of Veterans, the programs need regulation and standardized methods of training. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(5), 49-57.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. An Investigation of Human-Computer Interaction Approaches Beneficial to Weak Learners in Complex Animation Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Animation is one of the useful contemporary educational technologies in teaching complex subjects. There is a growing interest in proper use of learner-technology interaction to promote learning quality for different groups of learner needs. The purpose of this study is to investigate if an interaction approach supports weak learners, who have…

  7. 21 CFR 511.1 - New animal drugs for investigational use exempt from section 512(a) of the act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... drug for investigational use only in laboratory research animals or for tests in vitro. Not for use in... in animals used only for laboratory research purposes under this exemption shall use due diligence to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New animal drugs for investigational use exempt...

  8. Clinical Investigation Program Report FY90

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    relationship to the mandibular second premolar. J Endodon 1990; 16(5):221-223. DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE Johnson SC, Stamm CP, Hicks CB: Tuberculous Psoas ...McPherson JC III: Pluronic polyols added to whole blood alters red blood cell deformability. First World Cong Biomechanics , San Diego, CA, 30 Aug - 4...Clinical Investigation Anatomy Dept, MCG Key Words: Electron microscopy, Cadmium, Teratology Accumulative MEDCASE Est Accumulative Periodic Sep 90

  9. Animal Ambassadors . . . 4-H teens learn to lead science program for kids

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Martin H.; Enfield, Richard P.; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Klingborg, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    To improve science literacy among school-age children in the United States, educators must receive effective training and support, and children must be engaged in science at a young age. Animal Ambassadors is a science-education outreach program of the UC School of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medicine Extension, which focuses on the awareness and understanding of animal-related concepts and emphasizes important critical thinking and life skills. Through a collaboration with UC Cooperative...

  10. An on-farm investigation of beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veissier Isabelle

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beef suckler farms (194 farms throughout 13 counties were assessed once with housed cattle and once with cattle at grass using an animal welfare index (AWI. Twenty-three of the 194 farms were revisited a year later and re-evaluated using the AWI and the Tier-Gerechtheits-Index 35L/2000 (TGI35L/2000. Thirty-three indicators were collected in five categories: locomotion (5 indicators; social interactions (between animals (7, flooring (5, environment (7 and Stockpersonship (9. Three indicators relating to the size of the farm were also collected. Improving animal welfare is an increasingly important aspect of livestock production systems predominantly due to increased consumer concern about the source of animal products. The objectives were (i to evaluate animal welfare of Irish beef suckler herds using an animal welfare index (AWI, (ii to examine correlations between parameters, how they influence the AWI and investigate the applicability of the parameters used, (iii to investigate the impact of the activity of the farmer (full-time or part-time, the interest of the farmer and the number of animals on the AWI. Results The mean AWI was 65% and ranged from 54% to 83%. The grazing period represented 16.5% of the total points of the AWI. Seventy percent of the farms were rated as "Very Good" or "Excellent". There was no difference (P > 0.05 in AWI between full-time and part-time farmers. Part-time farmers had greater (P = 0.01 "social interactions": calving (P = 0.03 and weaning (P Conclusion The AWI was easily applicable for an on-farm evaluation of welfare. The Stockpersonship was an important factor in determining the AWI (11% of the total variation more specifically, the interest of the farmer. Part and full-time farming did not differ (P > 0.05 in AWI scores. This method could, with further development, be used in countries with both intensive and/or extensive production systems and would require substantially less resources

  11. Investigation of thyroid parameters in farm animal by means of 125I in vitro tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinecke, P.; Leuthold, G.

    1988-01-01

    125 I in vitro tests especially thyroid hormone radioimmunoassays rendered it possible to study thyroidal activity of domestic animals even in large random tests. Parameters of thyroidal activity, such as effective T 4 quotient, T 3 value and total T 3 content, were investigated as to their connection to growth and environmental influence. The estimation of the hereditability yielded only low h 2 coefficients except in the T 3 value. All parameters studied depended to a great extent on farm conditions

  12. [Investigation of Cryptosporidium sp. in workers of the Van municipality slaughterhouse and in slaughtered animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciçek, Mutalip; Körkoca, Hanifi; Gül, Abdurrahman

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium sp. in slaughtered animals and workers of the Van municipality slaughterhouse in Van. Animals slaughtered at different times and workers who had been working in different departments of the slaughter house were included in the study for three months. A total of 309 fecal specimens from animals including 167 sheep, 56 goats and 86 cattle and 87 fecal specimens from workers were examined for Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts. In slaughtered animals, the modified acid-fast staining method was used to determine the oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp. The fecal samples of slaughter workers were examined by using RIDA (R) Quick Cryptosporidium Strip Test (R-Biopharm, Germany) and the modified acid-fast staining method. Fecal samples found to be positive by stripe test were also confirmed with the ELISA method (R-Biopharm, Germany). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp. were found in fecal specimens of 22 sheep (13.17%), 6 goats (10.71%) and 7 cattle (8.13%). Intestinal parasites were observed in 34 fecal specimens of workers (39.08%). Cryptosporidium sp., Hymenolepis nana, Chilomastix mesnili, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba bütschlii were found in the specimen of one worker (1.14%), Entamoeba coli in 4 workers (4.59%), Blastocystis hominis (9.19%) in 8 workers, and Giardia intestinalis (19.54%) in 17 workers.

  13. Animal Health Technicians: A Survey of Program Graduates and of Veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsaleau, Richard B.; Walters, Henry R.

    This document compiles the reports of two surveys conducted by Cosumnes River College to determine the status of graduates of its Animal Health Technician program, and to assess the acceptance and use of such paraprofessionals by area veterinarians. Information concerning type of employment, state certification, salaries, types of duties, length…

  14. SNPs genotyping technologies and their applications in farm animals breeding programs: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Kharrati Koopaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are DNA sequence variations that occur when a single nucleotide: adenine (A, thymine (T, cytosine (C or guanine (G in the genome sequence is altered. Traditional and high throughput methods are two main strategies for SNPs genotyping. The SNPs genotyping technologies provide powerful resources for animal breeding programs.Genomic selection using SNPs is a new tool for choosing the best breeding animals. In addition, the high density maps using SNPs can provide useful genetic tools to study quantitative traits genetic variations. There are many sources of SNPs and exhaustive numbers of methods of SNP detection to be considered. For many traits in farm animals, the rate of genetic improvement can be nearly doubled when SNPs information is used compared to the current methods of genetic evaluation. The goal of this review is to characterize the SNPs genotyping methods and their applications in farm animals breeding.

  15. Perceptions of a hospital-based animal assisted intervention program: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Cai, Yun; Richards, Elizabeth; Cline, Krista; O'Haire, Marguerite E

    2016-11-01

    Research has shown that there are multiple benefits of animal assisted interventions for patients. However, the impact of interaction with these animals in staff is understudied, particularly in the acute care setting, and is thus a novel contribution to the literature on human-animal interaction. The purpose of this qualitative pilot study was to contribute to the body of knowledge surrounding the experiences and perceptions of hospital staff who have participated in a hospital-based animal assisted intervention program. Nine face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted (4 staff nurses, 3 support staff members, and 2 hospital volunteers). Five themes emerged from the respondent interviews: (1) descriptions of the therapy dogs; (2) contacts with the dogs at work; (3) connection with the dogs outside of work; (4) benefits; (5) drawbacks. Our findings reflect abundantly positive hospital staff experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ‘More than a feeling’: An empirical investigation of hedonistic accounts of animal welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Becca; von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.

    2018-01-01

    Many scientists studying animal welfare appear to hold a hedonistic concept of welfare -whereby welfare is ultimately reducible to an animal’s subjective experience. The substantial advances in assessing animal’s subjective experience have enabled us to take a step back to consider whether such indicators are all one needs to know if one is interested in the welfare of an individual. To investigate this claim, we randomly assigned participants (n = 502) to read one of four vignettes describing a hypothetical chimpanzee and asked them to make judgments about the animal’s welfare. Vignettes were designed to systematically manipulate the descriptive mental states the chimpanzee was described as experiencing: feels good (FG) vs. feels bad (FB); as well as non-subjective features of the animal’s life: natural living and physical healthy (NH) vs. unnatural life and physically unhealthy (UU); creating a fully-crossed 2 (subjective experience) X 2 (objective life value) experimental design. Multiple regression analysis showed welfare judgments depended on the objective features of the animal’s life more than they did on how the animal was feeling: a chimpanzee living a natural life with negative emotions was rated as having better welfare than a chimpanzee living an unnatural life with positive emotions. We also found that the supposedly more purely psychological concept of happiness was also influenced by normative judgments about the animal’s life. For chimpanzees with positive emotions, those living a more natural life were rated as happier than those living an unnatural life. Insofar as analyses of animal welfare are assumed to be reflective of folk intuitions, these findings raise questions about a strict hedonistic account of animal welfare. More generally, this research demonstrates the potential utility of using empirical methods to address conceptual problems in animal welfare and ethics. PMID:29529090

  17. An investigation of the challenges in reconstructing PET images of a freely moving animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, Mahmood; Kyme, Andre; Meikle, Steven; Zhou, Victor; Fulton, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Imaging the brain of a freely moving small animal using positron emission tomography (PET) while simultaneously observing its behaviour is an important goal for neuroscience. While we have successfully demonstrated the use of line-of-response (LOR) rebinning to correct the head motion of confined animals, a large proportion of events may need to be discarded because they either 'miss' the detector array after transformation or fall out of the acceptance range of a sinogram. The proportion of events that would have been measured had motion not occurred, so-called 'lost events', is expected to be even larger for freely moving animals. Moreover, the data acquisition in the case of a freely moving animal is further complicated by a complex attenuation field. The aims of this study were (a) to characterise the severity of 'lost events' problem for the freely moving animal scenario, and (b) to investigate the relative impact of attenuation correction errors on quantitative accuracy of reconstructed images. A phantom study was performed to simulate the uncorrelated motion of a target and non-target source volume. A small animal PET scanner was used to acquire list-mode data for different sets of phantom positions. The list-mode data were processed using the standard LOR rebinning approach, and multiple frame variants of this designed to reduce discarded events. We found that LOR rebinning caused up to 86 % 'lost events', and artifacts that we attribute to incomplete projections, when applied to a freely moving target. This fraction was reduced by up to 18 % using the variant approaches, resulting in slightly reduced image artifacts. The effect of the non-target compartment on attenuation correction of the target volume was surprisingly small. However, for certain poses where the target and non-target volumes are aligned transaxially in the field-of-view, the attenuation problem becomes more complex and sophisticated correction methods will be required. We conclude that

  18. Multiple Animal Studies for Medical Chemical Defense Program in Soldier/ Patient Decontamination and Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    smear was prepared for each animal by mixing 10 pZ of I sampled blood with a drop of newborn calf serum on a microscope slide. The blood smear wai air...further blood loss. (5) One blood smear per animal is prepared for each animal by quickly mixing 10 microliters of sampled blood with a drop of newborn ... gloves and an apron. A fourth investigator maintains a supply Revised November 12, 1984 -L- Protoccl 18 Medical Research and Evaluation Facility May 1

  19. Use of radiation and radioisotopes for investigating metabolic diseases of animals in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    In the last one decade, radioisotopes are being used to investigate certain metabolic diseases of animals and radiations are being utilized to produce parasitic vaccines to vaccinate animals. Some studies in which radioisotopes have been used to investigate certain metabolic disorders are reviewed. In experiments, where radioimmunoassay technique for the estimation of hormones, has been utilized, the results reveal that the animals on low plane of nutrition show greater oestrous cycle lengths or even long anoestrous periods. On the other hand, irradiation has been used as a tool to produce vaccines as well as degradation of certain dietary molecules for increased utilization. A number of studies wherein 35 S and 15 N isotopes have been used, reveal that sulphur supplementation is essential for optimum utilization of nitrogen in the ratio of 1:10. There are certain antimetabolites in feed ingredients which affect endocrine function. Evidence indicates that high nitrate forages disturb thyroid function when sup(131)I is used to elucidate its secretion rate. Similarly certain toxic substances such as tannins have been shown to affect protein metabolism and phosphorus utilization when sup(32)P isotope is used in such studies. The use of radioisotopes have also been helpful to investigate the cause of ''Degnala'' disease prevalent in village cattle in certain states of India. With the help of sup(75)Se it has been possible to trace out the metabolic disturbances which lead to the onset of this disease. Another deficiency disease, hyperkeratosis, has been shown to be caused not only because of Vitamin A deficiency, but also because of zinc deficiency. The latter helps in the mobilization of normal quantity of vitamin A from the liver into the blood vitamin A pool. There is wide scope to use radioisotopes to investigate other metabolic diseases prevalent in livestock in this country. (auth.)

  20. Investigations of 90 SR activity concentrations in animal bones in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maracic, M.; Franic, Z.; Marovic, G.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes investigations of 90 Sr activity concentrations in long bones of some domestic animals (cows, pigs and lambs) collected over the last ten years in the Republic of Croatia. These investigations are a part of an extended and still ongoing monitoring programme of radioactive contamination of human environment in Croatia. Bone is a critical organ for the accumulation of many radionuclides, including 90 Sr, a highly toxic radionuclide, similar to calcium in its chemical behaviour and metabolic processes. It has been found that the 90 Sr activity concentrations in bones differ between respective animal species, the highest activity concentrations being found in lamb bones. As the decrease of activity concentrations can be generally described by the exponential function, by fitting the measured data to the theoretical curve was estimated the ecological half-life of 90 Sr in bones of respective species. In addition was investigated the relation between 90 Sr activity concentrations in bones and fallout. The transient increases and decreases in 90 Sr activity concentrations in bones can be partially explained by a variety of environmental physical factors that naturally fluctuate. (authors)

  1. Is Animal Cruelty a "Red Flag" for Family Violence? Investigating Co-Occurring Violence toward Children, Partners, and Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGue, Sarah; DiLillo, David

    2009-01-01

    Cross-reporting legislation, which permits child and animal welfare investigators to refer families with substantiated child maltreatment or animal cruelty for investigation by parallel agencies, has recently been adopted in several U.S. jurisdictions. The current study sheds light on the underlying assumption of these policies--that animal…

  2. 21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. 312.160 Section 312.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Drugs for Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312.160 Drugs for...

  3. Spacecraft charging investigation - A joint research and technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, R. R.; Stevens, N. J.; Schober, W.; Pike, C. P.; Lehn, W.

    1976-01-01

    A jointly planned U.S. Air Force-NASA program has been established to investigate the spacecraft charging phenomenon that has caused electronic anomalies in satellites in geosynchronous orbits. The objectives of this program are to provide design criteria, techniques, and test methods to insure control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces. These objectives will be updated continuously over the next four years as data become available from the combined contractual and in-house programs. The geosynchronous altitude environment will be defined, ground and flight tests will be conducted, and materials and charge control techniques will be developed as required. The ultimate output of the program will be a spacecraft charging design criteria and test specification document. The program will be coordinated by a spacecraft charging program review group which has both Air Force and NASA representation.

  4. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  5. Investigations of 90Sr Activity Concentrations in Animal Bones in Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maracic, M.; Franic, Z.; Marovic, G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of 90Sr activity concentrations in long bones of some domestic animals (cows, pigs, lambs) collected over the last ten years in the Republic of Croatia. The investigations are a part of an extended and still ongoing monitoring programme of radioactive contamination of human environment of Croatia. Bone is critical organ for the accumulation of many radionuclides, including 90Sr, a highly toxic radionuclide, similar to calcium in its chemical behaviour and metabolic processes. It has been found that the 90Sr activity concentrations in bones differ between respective animal species, the highest activity concentrations being found in lamb bones in year 2005 (472.61 mBqgCa -1 or 2.14 Bqkg -1 ). In cow bones highest value being found was in 1998, being 611.42 mBqgCa -1 or 69.09 Bqkg -1 90Sr. The transient increases and decreases in 90Sr activity concentrations in bones can be partially explained by a variety of environmental physical and biochemical factors that naturally fluctuate. As the levels of stable strontium in bone tissue is strongly correlated to calcium content of bone, 90Sr can be used as efficient radiotracer of stable strontium, which is itself important since it positively affects bone metabolism promoting bone formation and decreasing bone resorption, leading to normalized bone density.(author)

  6. 40 CFR 122.24 - Concentrated aquatic animal production facilities (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Concentrated aquatic animal production facilities (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25). 122.24 Section 122.24 Protection of... § 122.24 Concentrated aquatic animal production facilities (applicable to State NPDES programs, see...

  7. Animal Use and Lessons Learned in the U.S. High Production Volume Chemicals Challenge Program

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Patricia L.; Manuppello, Joseph R.; Willett, Catherine E.; Sandler, Jessica T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Launched by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1998, the High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program was developed to address the perceived gap in basic hazard information for the 2,800 chemicals produced or imported into the United States in quantities of ? 1 million pounds per year. Health and environmental effects data obtained from either existing information or through new vertebrate animal testing were voluntarily submitted by chemical companies (sponsors) ...

  8. Preliminary Investigations on the Distribution of Leptospira Serovars in Domestic Animals in North-west Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkirane, A; Noury, S; Hartskeerl, R A; Goris, M G A; Ahmed, A; Nally, J E

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected zoonosis of global importance with a complex epidemiology that affects humans, domestic and wild mammals. However, due to the diversity of clinical signs and difficulties of establishing a confirmatory laboratory diagnosis, the disease remains poorly investigated, particularly in the developing world. In Morocco, a descriptive study of the seroprevalence of Leptospira infection in animals has never been undertaken. To fill this gap, the current study was conducted on a subset of animals in north-west Morocco as a preliminary step towards understanding the epidemiological patterns of animal leptospirosis in the country. The study was conducted on 289 serum samples collected between January and April 2012 from dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and donkeys in the areas of Rabat-Temara, Sidi Kacem and Oulmes. All serum samples were tested by the MAT with 14 reference strains of the most prevalent pathogenic serovars of Leptospira and two serovars of non-pathogenic Leptospira. The overall seroprevalence of Leptospira in cattle, sheep, goats, dogs and donkeys was 15%, 18%, 20%, 21% and 20%, respectively. The most prevalent serogroups found in each species were Ballum, Sejroe, and Australis in cattle, Ballum, Australis and Sejroe in sheep, Australis and Ballum in goats, Javanica and Australis in donkey and Australis, Ballum and Canicola in dogs. Of all the serogroups tested in this study, Icterohaemorrhagiae, the only serogroup which has been previously reported in humans in Morocco, was rarely reactive. The majority of reactive sera were collected from low land areas. A large number of sera samples classified as seronegative when tested against pathogenic leptospires were positive when tested against non-pathogenic leptospires; this is suggestive of possible novel, as yet unclassified, Leptospira serovars in Morocco. Eleven of thirteen sheep urine samples were positive by real-time PCR confirming their role as Leptospira carriers in Morocco. © 2014

  9. Animal experimental investigations of the problem of the decorporation of radioactive metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Basically, it is possible to reduce the radiation exposure by excretion intensification of incorporated radioactive materials. Chelate agents have proved to be particularly effective for the accelerated elimination of radioactive metal ions. The kinetics of the distribution and excretion of 57 CoCl 2 , 65 ZnCl 2 and 203 HgCl 2 on the rat under the influence of the chelating agent penicillamin (D-ββ-dimethylcystein) was investigated and the reduction of the radiation exposure in man was calculated from the animal-experimentally gained data. At various times after the incorporation of metal ions, the whole body radioactivity and, after killing the animals, the radioactivity of the organs liver, kidney, spleen, skeleton, muscles and blood, were measured. From the course of the measured radioactivities with time, the biokinetic data of the radioactive metal ions (effective half-lives, selection factors and their components) were determined by means of regression analyses. The chelating agent was applied at different times before or after incorporation of the radioactive metal ions. (EK/LH) [de

  10. An investigation of a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Chen Yuanbao; Long Anwen; Chen Xin; Wu Zhongyi; Zhang Yongxue; Xie Qingguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and design a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner and evaluate its preliminary performance properties. Methods: This coincidence module adopted a coincidence identification mode based on singles data in list-mode.Using digital signal processing technology, energy calibration, crystal identification, timing alignment and coincidence events extraction were performed on singles data in list-mode. The obtained data could be used for image reconstruction. Results: The 13 × 13 crystal array was well recognized by the position histogram of one lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal block. In the coincidence timing histogram of the micro-Derenzo phantom, 1.36 ns full width at half maximum was obtained. The rods with a diameter of 1.2 mm were clearly displayed in the reconstructed image of the micro-Derenzo phantom. Conclusion: The coincidence module can provide satisfactory performance to meet the design needs of an all-digital small animal PET scanner. (authors)

  11. Comparative evaluation of different anchoring techniques for synthetic cruciate ligaments. A biomechanical and animal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsch, R

    1994-01-01

    Under certain well-defined indications alloplastic material may be used in cruciate ligament surgery. The stability and survival of such a synthetic ligament is to a great extent dependent on the anchorage with which it is fastened to the bone. Most fixation methods have proved to be too weak or have revealed other essential drawbacks, resulting in clinical and experimental failure. A new ligament fixation device (LFD) was developed and tested biomechanically and in animal experiments. In the biomechanic investigation the new LFD was compared to single staples, double staples in the belt-buckle technique, and ligament guidance through additional bone tunnels (Z-technique). The tests were carried out on human cadaver knees, plastic bones, and dog stifle joints. The evaluated parameters were linear and maximum load, stiffness, and elongation. In addition, hysteresis tests were performed to assay the long-term resistance of the fixation. The tests showed a significant superiority of the LFD in all measured variables compared to the other anchorages. The pull-out strength, at 1866 +/- 43 N (cadaver knee), was about four times that for the single staple, and about twice as high as that for the double staple and Z-technique. The animal experiments were performed on German shepherd cross-breed dogs. In six animals the anterior cruciate ligaments were excised bilaterally and replaced by a 6-mm Trevira ligament, on one side anchored with staples in the Z-technique, on the other with the LFD. Postoperatively the dogs were allowed to move freely; no additional protection was employed. After 6 months the animals were sacrificed and the knees examined macroscopically, radiologically, microscopically, and by biomechanical testing. After half a year of implantation, the pull-out strength of the alloplastic ligament was 662 +/- 62 N for the LFD and 531 +/- 67 N for the staples. Three ligaments in the staple group and one in the LFD group had ruptured completely, and two ligaments

  12. WFIRST: Science from the Guest Investigator and Parallel Observation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Nataf, David; Furlanetto, Steve; Milam, Stephanie; Robertson, Brant; Williams, Ben; Teplitz, Harry; Moustakas, Leonidas; Geha, Marla; Gilbert, Karoline; Dickinson, Mark; Scolnic, Daniel; Ravindranath, Swara; Strolger, Louis; Peek, Joshua; Marc Postman

    2018-01-01

    The Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission will provide an extremely rich archival dataset that will enable a broad range of scientific investigations beyond the initial objectives of the proposed key survey programs. The scientific impact of WFIRST will thus be significantly expanded by a robust Guest Investigator (GI) archival research program. We will present examples of GI research opportunities ranging from studies of the properties of a variety of Solar System objects, surveys of the outer Milky Way halo, comprehensive studies of cluster galaxies, to unique and new constraints on the epoch of cosmic re-ionization and the assembly of galaxies in the early universe.WFIRST will also support the acquisition of deep wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic data obtained in parallel during campaigns with the coronagraphic instrument (CGI). These parallel wide-field imager (WFI) datasets can provide deep imaging data covering several square degrees at no impact to the scheduling of the CGI program. A competitively selected program of well-designed parallel WFI observation programs will, like the GI science above, maximize the overall scientific impact of WFIRST. We will give two examples of parallel observations that could be conducted during a proposed CGI program centered on a dozen nearby stars.

  13. A framework program for the teaching of alternative methods (replacement, reduction, refinement) to animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Akbarsha, Mohammad A; Blaauboer, Bas; Caloni, Francesca; Cosson, Pierre; Curren, Rodger; Goldberg, Alan; Gruber, Franz; Ohl, Frauke; Pfaller, Walter; van der Valk, Jan; Vinardell, Pilar; Zurlo, Joanne; Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Development of improved communication and education strategies is important to make alternatives to the use of animals, and the broad range of applications of the 3Rs concept better known and understood by different audiences. For this purpose, the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing in Europe (CAAT-Europe) together with the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t(4)) hosted a three-day workshop on "Teaching Alternative Methods to Animal Experimentation". A compilation of the recommendations by a group of international specialists in the field is summarized in this report. Initially, the workshop participants identified the different audience groups to be addressed and also the communication media that may be used. The main outcome of the workshop was a framework for a comprehensive educational program. The modular structure of the teaching program presented here allows adaptation to different audiences with their specific needs; different time schedules can be easily accommodated on this basis. The topics cover the 3Rs principle, basic research, toxicological applications, method development and validation, regulatory aspects, case studies and ethical aspects of 3Rs approaches. This expert consortium agreed to generating teaching materials covering all modules and providing them in an open access online repository.

  14. Campylobacter species in animal, food, and environmental sources, and relevant testing programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongsheng; Brooks, Brian W; Lowman, Ruff; Carrillo, Catherine D

    2015-10-01

    Campylobacter species, particularly thermophilic campylobacters, have emerged as a leading cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter lari responsible for the majority of human infections. Although most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting, campylobacteriosis represents a significant public health burden. Human illness caused by infection with campylobacters has been reported across Canada since the early 1970s. Many studies have shown that dietary sources, including food, particularly raw poultry and other meat products, raw milk, and contaminated water, have contributed to outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Canada. Campylobacter spp. have also been detected in a wide range of animal and environmental sources, including water, in Canada. The purpose of this article is to review (i) the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in animals, food, and the environment, and (ii) the relevant testing programs in Canada with a focus on the potential links between campylobacters and human health in Canada.

  15. Elemental analysis of biological tissues of animal models in muscular dystrophies investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina Metairon; Zamboni, C.B.; Suzuki, M.F.; Bueno, Jr.C.R.; Sant'Anna, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    Element concentrations in biological tissues of Dmd mdx /J and C57BL/6 J mice strains were determined using the neutron activation analysis technique. Samples of whole blood, bones and organs (heart and muscle) of these strains were irradiated in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil). To perform this investigation biological samples of two-month-old adult females (n = 10) and males (n = 9) for Dmd mdx /J (dystrophic mice), and males (n 12) for C57BL/6 J (control group), originally obtained from the Jackson Laboratory (Maine, USA) and further inbred at IPEN-CNEN/SP (Sao Paulo, Brazil), were used. A significant change was observed in the analysis of the heart of dystrophic mice suggesting that this dysfunction affects severely the heart muscle. These data may, in the future, contribute to the healthcare area, in veterinary medicine and in the pharmaceutical industry allowing the evaluation of the best procedures in diagnosis, treatment and investigations of neuromuscular diseases (muscular dystrophy) of patients through the use of animal models. (author)

  16. Three dimensional reconstruction of starling flocks: an empirical investigation of collective animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, Irene

    2009-03-01

    Bird flocking is a striking example of animal collective behaviour: thousands of birds gather above the roosting site, forming sharp-bordered flocks, which wheel and turn with remarkable coherence and synchronization. Despite an increasing theoretical interest, empirical investigations of collective motion have been limited so far by the difficulties of getting data on large systems. By means of stereoscopic photography and using statistical mechanics, optimization theory and computer vision techniques, we have measured for the first time the three-dimensional positions and trajectories of individual birds in groups of up to three thousands elements. This allowed us to analyze global morphological properties of the flocks, as well as structural and dynamical properties. Most notably, we investigated the nature of the inter-individual interaction. We found that the interaction between birds does not depend on their mutual metric distance, as most current models and theories assume, but rather on the topological distance (number of intermediate neighbors). In fact, we discovered that each individual interacts on average with a fixed number of neighbors (six-seven), rather than with all neighbors within a fixed metric distance. We argue that a topological interaction of this kind is indispensable to maintain flock's cohesion against the large density changes caused by external perturbations, typically predation. More recently, we characterized the velocity field, and computed dynamical observables. We showed that flocks exhibit long range correlations, which are a signature of their remarkable collective behavior.

  17. Interactive computerized learning program exposes veterinary students to challenging international animal-health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Patricia A; Hird, Dave; Arzt, Jonathan; Hayes, Rick H; Magliano, Dave; Kasper, Janine; Morfin, Saul; Pinney, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a computerized case-based CD-ROM (CD) on international animal health that was developed to give veterinary students an opportunity to "virtually" work alongside veterinarians and other veterinary students as they try to solve challenging disease problems relating to tuberculosis in South African wildlife, bovine abortion in Mexico, and neurologic disease in horses in Rapa Nui, Chile. Each of the three case modules presents, in a highly interactive format, a problem or mystery that must be solved by the learner. As well as acquiring information via video clips and text about the specific health problem, learners obtain information about the different countries, animal-management practices, diagnostic methods, related disease-control issues, economic factors, and the opinions of local experts. After assimilating this information, the learner must define the problem and formulate an action plan or make a recommendation or diagnosis. The computerized program invokes three principles of adult education: active learning, learner-centered education, and experiential learning. A medium that invokes these principles is a potentially efficient learning tool and template for developing other case-based problem-solving computerized programs. The program is accessible on the World Wide Web at International_web/international_menu.html>. A broadband Internet connection is recommended, since the modules make extensive use of embedded video and audio clips. Information on how to obtain the CD is also provided.

  18. Investigations on the development of an irradiated vaccine for animal schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.F.; Bushara, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    The results are summarized of preliminary experiments on the development of an irradiated larval vaccine for Schistosoma bovis, an important trematode of domestic ruminants in the Sudan. Initial studies on mice demonstrated the inhibitory effects of irradiation on the development of S. bovis, S. mansoni and S. mattheei, and also suggested that irradiated cercariae were highly immunogenic. In calves, it was shown that a single exposure to irradiated S. mansoni cercariae induced a strong partial resistance against S. bovis, even though no adult parasites of the former were produced. The experiment also showed that a stronger immunity occurred at 24 weeks than at 8 weeks post-immunization, indicating the long duration of the immunity produced by these short-lived cercariae. Another experiment, involving sheep, was made using irradiated S. bovis cercariae as the immunizing agents. Marked reduction in worm and especially in tissue egg counts were also reported following challenge infections 37 weeks later with normal S. bovis cercariae. Because of the fragility of the cercariae and difficulties in their administration and storage, trials are being carried out using another larval stage, the schistosomule, as an immunizing agent. In these trials various methods for the transformation of cercariae into schistosomules were evaluated, and the immunogenicity of irradiated schistosomules administered intra-muscularly into animals is now being investigated. At the same time, attempts are in progress to maintain the schistosomules by cryopreservation techniques for a period long enough to ensure an adequate shelf-life before conducting a field test on naturally infected animals in the Sudan. (author)

  19. Comparative investigations on animal cenuses of spruce and deciduous forests and of an old orchard - soil animals as bioindicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funke, W.; Herlitzius, H.; Jans, W.; Kraniz, V.; Lehle, E.; Ratajczak, L.; Stumpp, J.; Vogel, J.; Wanner, M.; Horsch, F.; Filby, W.G.; Fund, N.; Gross, S.; Hanisch, B.; Kilz, E.; Seidel, A.

    1988-04-01

    Investigations were carried out on Protozoa (Testacea, Ciliata) and Metazoa (Nematode, Annelida, Arthropoda) esp. of spruce stands. For comparisons deciduous forests and an old orchard were also used. In enchytraeid worms and in arthropods, esp. in dipterous imagines, liming and fertilizing of soil surface (in 1984/1984) had brought strong negative effects in regard of population density in the last years. Since 1987 these effects seem to turn into the opposite direction. Earth worms are naturally promoted by liming and fertilizing. Contaminations of soil surface by solutions of NaCl or by H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (in 1985) yielded considerable after-effects even 18 months later in a nematod worm coenosis, if comparisons are made with the data of control areas. In edaphic springtails, species numbers, abundances and diversities of coenoses now had nearly normalized (two years after the contaminations). But negative effects after contaminations with the synthetic pyrethroid Cypermethrin (Ripcord) seem to be unchanged up to now.

  20. A program for dynamic noise investigations of reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, N.A.; Yaneva, N.B.

    1980-01-01

    A stochastic process analysis in nuclear reactors is used for the state diagnosis and dynamic characteristic investigation of the reactor system. A program DENSITY adapted and tested on an IBM 360 ES type computer is developed. The program is adjusted for fast processing of long series exploiting a relatively small memory. The testing procedure is discussed and the method of the periodic sequences corresponding to characteristic reactivity perturbations of the reactor systems is considered. The program is written for calculating the auto-power spectral density and the cross-power spectral density, as well as the coherence function of stationary statistical time series using the advantages of the fast Fourier transformation. In particular, it is shown that the multi-frequency binary sequences are very useful with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio and the frequency distribution in view of the frequency reactor test

  1. The Swedish Small Satellite Program for Space Plasma Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Göran; André, Mats; Lundin, Rickard; Grahn, Sven

    2004-04-01

    The success of the Swedish small satellite program, in combination with an active participation by Swedish research groups in major international missions, has placed Sweden in the frontline of experimental space research. The program started with the development of the research satellite Viking which was launched in 1986, for detailed investigations of the aurora. To date, Sweden has developed and launched a total of six research satellites; five for space plasma investigations; and the most recent satellite Odin, for research in astronomy and aeronomy. These fall into three main categories according to their physical dimension, financial cost and level of ambition: nano-satellites, micro-satellites, and mid-size satellites with ambitious scientific goals. In this brief review we focus on five space plasma missions, for which operations have ended and a comprehensive scientific data analysis has been conducted, which allows for a judgement of their role and impact on the progress in auroral research. Viking and Freja, the two most well-known missions of this program, were pioneers in the exploration of the aurora. The more recent satellites, Munin, Astrid, and Astrid-2 (category 1 and 2), proved to be powerful tools, both for testing new technologies and for carrying out advanced science missions. The Swedish small satellite program has been internationally recognized as cost efficient and scientifically very successful.

  2. INVESTIGATION ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM INFECTIONS IN WILD ANIMALS IN A ZOO IN ANHUI PROVINCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Youfang; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Cefan; Li, Peiying; Xu, Qianming; Zhao, Changcheng; Liu, Wei; Xu, Wenlong

    2016-09-01

    To assess Cryptosporidium infections among wild animals in a zoo located in Anhui province, we conducted an investigation on the fecal samples collected from 44 primates, 41 herbivores, 44 carnivores and omnivores, and 103 birds in the zoo with the use of Sheather's sugar flotation technique and modified acid-fast staining. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in the fecal samples from six primates, two herbivores, four carnivores and omnivores, and seven birds by using Sheather's sugar flotation technique; the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in primates, herbivores, carnivores and omnivores and birds was 13.64, 4.88, 9.09, and 6.80%, respectively. Modified acid-fast staining detected the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the fecal samples of one primate, three herbivores, 0 carnivores and omnivores, and one bird, and the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in primates, herbivores, carnivores and omnivores and birds was 2.27, 7.32, 0.00, and 0.97%, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis with the use of the neighbor-joining (NJ) method based on the aligned partial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences showed that the protozoan pathogen isolated from primates was Cryptosporidium hominis and the pathogen isolated from camels ( Camelus dromedarius ) was Cryptosporidium andersoni. Subtyping the Cryptosporidium hominis by 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene phylogenetic analysis showed the Cryptosporidium hominis belongs to the subtype IdA and IbA.

  3. Investigation into the animal species contents of popular wet pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, Isabella R; Atterbury, Robert; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-03-10

    The use of the generic term "meat and animal derivatives" in declared ingredient lists of pet foods in the European Union is virtually universal. In the wake of the 2013 "horse meat scandal" in the human food chain, we examined the presence and authenticity of animal sources (cow, chicken, pig and horse) of proteins in a range of popular wet pet foods in the United Kingdom. Seventeen leading dog and cat foods were sampled for the relative presence of DNA from each of the four animal species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. No horse DNA was detected. However, there was detection at substantial levels of unspecified animal species in most products tested. In 14 out of 17 samples, bovine, porcine and chicken DNA were found in various proportions and combinations but were not explicitly identified on the product labels. Of the 7 products with prominent headline descriptions containing the term "with beef", only 2 were found to contain more bovine DNA (>50%) than pig and chicken DNA combined. There is a need for the pet food industry to show greater transparency to customers in the disclosure of the types of animal proteins (animal species and tissue types) in their products. Full disclosure of animal contents will (a) allow more informed choices to be made on purchases which are particularly important for pets with food allergies, (b) reduce the risk of product misinterpretation by shoppers, and (c) avoid potential religious concerns.

  4. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  5. 40 CFR 122.23 - Concentrated animal feeding operations (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25). 122.23 Section 122.23 Protection of Environment... Concentrated animal feeding operations (applicable to State NPDES programs, see § 123.25). (a) Scope... owner or operator (see § 122.21(b)); (ii) The CAFO name and address, the county name and the latitude...

  6. Whistleblowers ask Congress to investigate TVA's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, E.

    1993-01-01

    Congress should investigate the Tennessee Valley Authority's nuclear power plant construction and operations programs as soon as possible, a coalition of Tennessee environmentalists and whistleblowers told reporters at a press conference in Washington, DC. The Foundation for Global Sustainability and four employees of TVA nuclear plants called for congressional action because they contend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Labor have failed to act to protect whistleblowers who report nuclear safety problems. The foundation contends the economics of nuclear plant construction by TVA do not make sense and in the rush to finish the Watts Bar nuclear plant, which has been under construction for 20 years, TVA has ignored safety issues

  7. Equine-Facilitated Prison-Based Programs within the Context of Prison-Based Animal Programs: State of the Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachi, Keren

    2013-01-01

    Equine-facilitated prison programs have become more prevalent and operate in correctional facilities in 13 states throughout the United States. However, there is a deficit of empirical knowledge to guide them. This article reviews 19 studies of prison-based animal programs and centers on patterns in the literature. It reveals how previous studies…

  8. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) brucellosis eradication program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Valerie E

    2002-12-20

    Efforts to eradicate brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus in the United States began in 1934 as part of an economic recovery program to reduce the cattle population because of the Great Depression and concurrent severe drought conditions. A number of states saw this as an opportunity to reduce the level of brucellosis, which was the most significant livestock disease problem in the US at the time. In 1934 and 1935, the reactor rate in adult cattle tested was 11.5%. In 1954, the magnitude of the brucellosis problem in the United States in terms of economics to the cattle industry and human health prompted Congress to appropriate funds for a comprehensive national effort to eradicate brucellosis. The brucellosis eradication program was designed as a cooperative effort between the federal government, the states, and livestock producers. As the science and technology of brucellosis has developed over the years through research and experience, the eradication program has been modified many times. As of 31 December 2000, there were no affected cattle herds in the United States. This was the first time in the history of the brucellosis program that the United States had no known brucellosis affected herds. However, brucellosis has a variable, sometimes quite lengthy incubation period, so it is expected that additional affected herds will be disclosed. It is likely that additional affected herds will be disclosed before brucellosis is finally eradicated from cattle. Animal health officials remain prepared to aggressively pursue any newly disclosed affected herds to eliminate the disease as quickly as possible. The State-Federal Brucellosis Eradication Program has made tremendous progress since its inception. In an eradication program, it is critically important to recognize that, despite all the tools that are available to eliminate the disease, an effective surveillance system is the critical first step that must be in place in order to be successful. It is imperative

  9. Investigation of triamterene as an inhibitor of the TGR5 receptor: identification in cells and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yingxiao Li,1,2 Kai Chun Cheng,1 Chiang-Shan Niu,3 Shih-Hsiang Lo,3,4 Juei-Tang Cheng,2,5 Ho-Shan Niu31Department of Psychosomatic Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan; 2Department of Medical Research, Chi Mei Medical Center, Yong Kang, Tainan City, 3Department of Nursing, Tzu Chi College of Technology, Hualien City, 4Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Hsing Branch of Taipei City Hospital, 5Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Health Science, Chang-Jung Christian University, Guei-Ren, Tainan City, TaiwanBackground: G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1, also known as TGR5 has been shown to participate in glucose homeostasis. In animal models, a TGR5 agonist increases incretin secretion to reduce hyperglycemia. Many agonists have been developed for clinical use. However, the effects of TGR5 blockade have not been studied extensively, with the exception of studies using TGR5 knockout mice. Therefore, we investigated the potential effect of triamterene on TGR5.Methods: We transfected the TGR5 gene into cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 cells to express TGR5. Then, we applied a fluorescent indicator to examine the glucose uptake of these transfected cells. In addition, NCI-H716 cells that secrete incretin were also evaluated. Fura-2, a fluorescence indicator, was applied to determine the changes in calcium concentrations. The levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1 were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Moreover, rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1-like diabetes were used to investigate the effects in vivo.Results: Triamterene dose dependently inhibits the increase in glucose uptake induced by TGR5 agonists in CHO-K1 cells expressing the TGR5 gene. In cultured NCI-H716 cells, TGR5 activation also increases GLP-1 secretion by increasing calcium levels

  10. A Novel Animal Model for Investigating the Neural Basis of Focal Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    plasticity of the human motor cortex in writer’s cramp . Brain. 2003;126:2586–2596. 46. Quartarone A, Morgante F, Sant’angelo A, Rizzo V, Bagnato S...Evinger C. Animal model explains the origins of the cranial dystonia benign essential blepharospasm. J Neurophysiol. 1997;77:2842–2846. 51. Perlmutter JS

  11. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  12. An Evaluation of the Use of Student-Centred Investigations in Teaching Comparative Animal Physiology to Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John I.; Bonsall, Marie

    1995-01-01

    Taught comparative animal physiology to undergraduates (n=31) using student-centered (open-ended) investigations in small groups. Questionnaires and discussion found that students appeared to value learning through their own experience as highly as they did being taught and valued the opportunity to establish and develop skills less easily…

  13. Animal Assisted Therapy and the Reading Education Assistance Dogs[RTM] (R.E.A.D.) Program as Perceived by Volunteer R.E.A.D. Facilitators: A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Catherine Hayes

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the demographics and perceptions of participants who utilize animals in academic programs, specifically the volunteers who use dogs to work with at-risk children in reading programs. It presented an argument for incorporating research-supported elements of reading tutor skills into the volunteer tutor training for the…

  14. Animal breeding in the age of biotechnology:the investigative pathway behind the cloning of Dolly the sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Sancho, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the 1996 cloning of Dolly the sheep, locating it within a long-standing tradition of animal breeding research in Edinburgh. Far from being an end in itself, the cell-nuclear transfer experiment from which Dolly was born should be seen as a step in an investigative pathway that sought the production of medically relevant transgenic animals. By historicising Dolly, I illustrate how the birth of this sheep captures a dramatic redefinition of the life sciences, when in the 19...

  15. Animal experiments to investigate biological-chemical radiation protection and the therapy of radiolesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, V.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of a combined therapy of radiation protection agents and erythropoetin on the radiation-induced suppression of erythropoiesis in mice is studied with the aid of the radioiron utilization test. After whole-body irradiation with 500 R, the erythropoietic system is so severely affected that erythropoetin application alone does not yield any results. AET (significant) and Cysteamin (insignificant), on the other hand, protect the bone marrow to a certain degree. The protected bone marrow provides a better base for erythropoetin therapy than the bone marrow of the irradiated and unprotected animals. Compared to the application of radiation protection agents alone, the combined therapy with AET and erythropoetin increases the radioiron incorporation in the erythrocytes by 7.5% while the therapy with Cysteamin and erythropoetin results in a 19.3% increase. In spite of these methods, however, the radioiron incorporation rate of the control animals was not reached. (BSC/AK) [de

  16. Investigating maternal effects on production traits in Duroc pigs using animal and sire models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, B; Mulugeta, S D; Dzama, K

    2014-08-01

    Variance components for production traits were estimated using different models to evaluate maternal effects. Data analysed were records from the South African pig performance testing scheme on 22 224 pigs from 18 herds, tested between 1990 and 2008. The traits analysed were backfat thickness (BFAT), test period weight gain (TPG), lifetime weight gain (LTG), test period feed conversion ratio (FCR) and age at slaughter (AGES). Data analyses were performed by REML procedures in ASREML, where random effects were successively fitted into animal and sire models to produce different models. The first animal model had one random effect, the direct genetic effects, while the additional random effects were maternal genetic and maternal permanent environmental effects. In the sire model, the random effects fitted were sire and maternal grand sire effects. The best model considered the covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects or between sire and maternal grand sire effects. Fitting maternal genetic effects into the animal model reduced total additive variance, while the total additive variance increased when maternal grand sire effects were fitted into the sire model. The correlations between direct and maternal genetic effects were all negative, indicating antagonism between these effects, hence the need to consider both effects in selection programmes. Direct genetic correlations were higher than other correlations, except for maternal genetic correlations of FCR with TPG, LTG and AGES. There has been direct genetic improvement and almost constant maternal ability in production traits as shown by trends for estimated (EBVs) and maternal breeding values (MBVs), while phenotypic trends were similar to those for EBVs. These results suggest that maternal genetic effects should be included in selection programmes for these production traits. Therefore, the animal-maternal model may be the most appropriate model to use when estimating genetic parameters for

  17. Investigation of a Translatable Animal Model in Order to Understand the Etiology of Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    pressure wound therapy in multiple animals. Publish data in peer -reviewed journals Li gh t m ic ro sc op y M AR SE M Ra di og ra ph s ...displaces bone fragments, (2) tourniquet and negative pressure wound vacuums usage at the time of injury and (3) a post-traumatic infection signal. Further...demonstrate that using the frame and support brace, the limb remained intact and secured. In addition, it was confirmed that when the AID was pressurized

  18. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Animals 2; Geoboards 2; Transportation; Groups 2; Dinosaurs 2; and Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkoski, Kay

    Six thematic activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented primary-level children. "Animals 2" teaches the concept that animals have a variety of characteristics and attributes, by having students choose an animal, think of a problem the animal might have to solve, picking…

  19. Investigating Differential Learning Outcomes of Students in Physics Using Animation and Textual Information Teaching Strategies in Ondo State Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessing Eguabor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe study investigated the main effects of animation information and textual information on students'performance and improving students' attitude towards physics.Material and methodsThe study adopted the pre-test post-test control group design. The population was made up of SSS 2 students inOndo State. Three Local Government Areas were randomly selected from the 18 Local Government Areas ofOndo State. Simple random technique was used to select three schools in the selected Local Government Areas.The schools were randomly assigned to two experimental groups namely animation and, textual informationstrategy and one control group. Two instruments were used for the study.ResultsOne-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, Scheffe Post-Hoc pair-wise comparison Analysis, and two-way Analysisof Variance was used. The results showed that there was a significant main effect of animation and textual strategieson students performance in physics. The results also showed that there was a significant difference in the post testattitudinal score of students' exposed to the strategies with the effectiveness in the order of animation, textual, andconventional strategiesConclusionsThe study concluded that computer- based instruction such as animation and textual strategies could enhancelearning outcomes in Physics in senior secondary school irrespective of students' sex.

  20. 4.2. Medico-biological investigations and experiments on animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikov, D.Kh.

    2012-01-01

    The hemo compatibility of cross-linked polymers was studied. Experiments were carried out on 18 healthy dogs by means of hemo sorption through hydrogels. The diagram of change of erythrocytes, leucocytes, haemoglobin, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hematocrit rate at hemo sorption of healthy dogs is presented. Changes of peripheral blood after its passing through sorbents were considered. Changes of peripheral blood at extra corporal detoxication were studied as well. The effectiveness of hemo sorption by means of ethynyl piperidol polymers at treatment of acute radiation sickness was studied. It was found that hemo sorption by cross-linked ethynyl piperidol polymers purify the animal blood from peptide toxins.

  1. Developmental programming of metabolic diseases – a review of studies on experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Piotrowska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development in utero is a complex and dynamic process that requires interaction between the mother organism and the fetus. The delivery of macro – and micronutrients, oxygen and endocrine signals has crucial importance for providing a high level of proliferation, growth and differentiation of cells, and a disruption in food intake not only has an influence on the growth of the fetus, but also has negative consequences for the offspring’s health in the future. Diseases that traditionally are linked to inappropriate life style of adults, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arterial hypertension, can be “programmed” in the early stage of life and the disturbed growth of the fetus leads to the symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The structural changes of some organs, such as the brain, pancreas and kidney, modifications of the signaling and metabolic pathways in skeletal muscles and in fatty tissue, epigenetic mechanisms and mitochondrial dysfunction are the basis of the metabolic disruptions. The programming of the metabolic disturbances is connected with the disruption in the intrauterine environment experienced in the early and late gestation period. It causes the changes in deposition of triglycerides, activation of the hormonal “stress axis” and disturbances in the offspring’s glucose tolerance. The present review summarizes experimental results that led to the identification of the above-mentioned links and it underlines the role of animal models in the studies of this important concept.

  2. Using the ferret as an animal model for investigating influenza antiviral effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort towards the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titre of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness.

  3. Investigations of HPA Function and the Enduring Consequences of Stressors in Adolescence in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Cheryl M.; Mathews, Iva Z.; Thomas, Catherine; Waters, Patti

    2010-01-01

    Developmental differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to stressors and ongoing development of glucocorticoid-sensitive brain regions in adolescence suggest that similar to the neonatal period of ontogeny, adolescence may also be a sensitive period for programming effects of stressors on the central nervous system.…

  4. Phenol-croton oil peel: establishing an animal model for scientific investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David L; Karmo, Firas; Hetter, Greg P

    2009-01-01

    Phenol-croton oil formulas for facial peeling contain a mixture of phenol, croton oil, hexachlorophene foam (Septisol; Steris Corp., Mentor, OH), and water. For years, it was felt that the active ingredient of the solution was phenol, with the view that croton oil was little more than an irritant. Hetter reported, based on clinical experience, that the addition of tiny amounts of croton oil to any concentration of phenol caused a deeper peel. He also noted that the number of applications of a phenol-croton oil solution also enhanced the peel effects. To date, there have been no animal studies that confirm these clinical observations. The purpose of this study was to develop an animal model to further evaluate and refine the hypotheses of Hetter regarding the croton oil solution. At the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, using a porcine animal model, 40 different solutions of phenol, water, croton oil, hexachlorophene foam, and ethyl alcohol, in 8 groupings, were applied to the flank according to grids. On days 1, 8, and 22, clinical observations were made and punch biopsies were obtained from all grids, including controls. All tissue samples were examined by a blinded dermatopathologist. The results were analyzed by both clinical and histologic observation. Solutions with any amount of croton oil added had a brisker inflammatory response than solutions without croton oil. The histologic examination of skin biopsies from the phenol-treated cells (with or without croton oil) demonstrated formation of sharply demarcated dermis with parallel collagen fiber bundles arranged horizontally when compared with the elastotic dermis of the control specimens. The depth of peel and time needed for healing were greater with 45 strokes than with 20 or 5 strokes. Replacing water with ethyl alcohol produced a less clinically significant peel. Phenol peels more deeply with increasing concentrations. Peel depth increases with increasing concentration of croton oil. Multiple

  5. Investigating Students' Beliefs about Arabic Language Programs at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaye, Shaye S.

    2009-01-01

    The current study attempted to identify students' of Arabic programs beliefs about their chosen programs. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect the data from randomly selected students in liberal-arts and education-based programs at Kuwait University. The results showed that students were statistically differentiated as a…

  6. Comparison of methods and animal models commonly used for investigation of fecal microbiota: Effects of time, host and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Nørrung, Birgit; Saadbye, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and plating on selective agars were used to study variation in the fecal microbiota of rats over time as well as variation between individuals. Investigated rats were either conventional...... and specific pathogen free (SPF). or human flora associated (HFA). A higher variation (p animals. Analysis of DGGE and T-RFLP profiles of fecal microbiota from SPF and HFA rats revealed that variation over time was less significant than...

  7. Investigation of the diagnostic value of taurineuria status early after irradiation of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezkrovnaya, L.A.; Kostesha, N.Ya.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the features of taurine excretion early after irradiation of animals in comparison with the peripheral blood level of leukocytes is necessary for the development of methods of early diagnosis and prediction of an outcome of radiation disease. The paper is concerned with a study of the correlation between a dose of ionizing radiation and enhanced taurine excretion with urine in rats and dogs as compared to the time course of the blood level of leukocytes, an indicator used for the diagnosis of radiation disease. The doses were 2-10 Gy for rats and 5-15 Gy for dogs. Intensive taurine excretion was shown to be an early (recorded in the first hours after radiation exposure), stable and dose-dependent body reaction. The authors discussed the problem of the appropriateness of the use of this test for the diagnosis and prognosis of an outcome of acute radiation disease in combination with common indices

  8. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs

  9. A prospective pilot study to evaluate an animated home-based physical exercise program as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernicke, Jan; Kedor, Claudia; Müller, Angela; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Reißhauer, Anett; Feist, Eugen

    2016-08-18

    Physical exercises and physiotherapy are of great importance for maintenance of joint function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, many RA patients complain about problems to receive prescriptions or have a lack of access to physiotherapy. Recent reports have shown positive effects of the Wii game console on physical and psychosocial conditions of patients with other underlying diseases. The primary objectives of this prospective controlled pilot study were to investigate feasibility and patients' assessment using an animated home-based exercise program. This pilot study was conducted as a single-center, cross-over trial with two treatment arms over 24 weeks. Eligibility criteria included patients with RA reaching low disease activity under therapy with a biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD). After detailed instruction, 15 patients started with a conventional home-based physical exercise program and 15 patients began with a predefined animated exercise program by using the Wii game console for 12 weeks. Afterwards, patients were crossed-over to the other treatment arm for another period of 12 weeks. Multi-methodical assessments were performed by qualitative analysis of the interview-data as well as statistical analysis of functional tests and patient reported outcomes (PRO's). Evaluation of the interviews indicated feasibility and usefulness of the chosen animated home-based exercise program. Forefoot disabilities were identified as a main limiting factor for performing some of the animated exercises. After 12 weeks, both treatment arms showed improvement of functional tests without significant differences between groups: Overall muscle strength improved for a mean value of 10 Newton (+12 %) and the mean 6-min walk test (6-MWT) distance increased for 28 meters (+5 %). This study showed that an animated home-based exercise program by using a Wii game console was feasible and beneficial for RA patients. Compared to standard

  10. Preliminary Investigations on the Distribution of Leptospira Serovars in Domestic Animals in North-west Morocco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benkirane, A.; Noury, S.; Hartskeerl, R. A.; Goris, M. G. A.; Ahmed, A.; Nally, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected zoonosis of global importance with a complex epidemiology that affects humans, domestic and wild mammals. However, due to the diversity of clinical signs and difficulties of establishing a confirmatory laboratory diagnosis, the disease remains poorly investigated,

  11. Animal breeding in the age of biotechnology: the investigative pathway behind the cloning of Dolly the sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sancho, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses the 1996 cloning of Dolly the sheep, locating it within a long-standing tradition of animal breeding research in Edinburgh. Far from being an end in itself, the cell-nuclear transfer experiment from which Dolly was born should be seen as a step in an investigative pathway that sought the production of medically relevant transgenic animals. By historicising Dolly, I illustrate how the birth of this sheep captures a dramatic redefinition of the life sciences, when in the 1970s and 1980s the rise of neo-liberal governments and the emergence of the biotechnology market pushed research institutions to show tangible applications of their work. Through this broader interpretative framework, the Dolly story emerges as a case study of the deep transformations of agricultural experimentation during the last third of the twentieth century. The reorganisation of laboratory practice, human resources and institutional settings required by the production of transgenic animals had unanticipated consequences. One of these unanticipated effects was that the boundaries between animal and human health became blurred. As a result of this, new professional spaces emerged and the identity of Dolly the sheep was reconfigured, from an instrument for livestock improvement in the farm to a more universal symbol of the new cloning age.

  12. Microworlds, Games, Animations, Mobile Apps, Puzzle Editors and More: What Is Important for an Introductory Programming Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinogalos, Stelios; Satratzemi, Maya; Malliarakis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Teaching and learning programming constitutes a challenge. Although several teaching approaches and programming tools have been proposed, it seems that they have limited impact on classroom practice. This article investigates students' perceptions on five educational programming environments that are widely used and the features that any…

  13. [Investigation of the healing process of invaginated anastomoses in animal experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szücs, Géza; Barna, Tibor; Tóth, Imre; Bráth, Endre; Gyáni, Károly; Incze, Dénes; Mikó, Irén

    2003-04-01

    The telescopic anastomosis technique is not frequently used method, but its history could have been followed in the surgical literature since the beginning of the XXth century. Authors can use this technique successfully in their clinical practice performing esophago-gastrostomies, esophago-jejunostomies and ileo-colostomies. They would like to show the healing process of these kind of anastomoses in experimental work, using animal subjects, as data regarding this aspect is not found in the literature. The healing process of esophago-gastrostomies, and ileo-colostomies performed on dogs have been examined. 1. The invaginated esophageal or ileal segment (up to 30 mm length of submerged part) has not suffered from ischaemic damage. 2. The invaginated esophageal or ileal segment has been covered by the mucosa of the stomach or colon. 3. The physical strength of the anastomosis has arised gradually based this on the measured bursting pressure values. 4. The quality of the healing process has not depended on the length of the invaginated esophageal or ileal segment (up to 30 mm length of submerged part).

  14. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phospholipids and proteins investigated by spectroscopic techniques in animal depression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J.; Sowa-Kucma, M.; Nowak, G.; Papp, M.; Gruca, P.; Misztak, P.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Depression becomes nowadays a high mortality civilization disease with one of the major causes being chronic stress. Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies were used to determine the changes in the quantity and structure of phospholipids and proteins in the blood serum of rats subjected to chronic mild stress, which is a common animal depression model. Moreover, the efficiency of the imipramine treatment was evaluated. It was found that chronic mild stress not only damages the structure of the phospholipids and proteins, but also decreases their level in the blood serum. A 5 weeks imipramine treatment did increase slightly the quantity of proteins, leaving the damaged phospholipids unchanged. Structural information from phospholipids and proteins was obtained by UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative of the FTIR spectra. Indeed, the structure of proteins in blood serum of stressed rats was normalized after imipramine therapy, while the impaired structure of phospholipids remained unaffected. These findings strongly suggest that the depression factor, which is chronic mild stress, may induce permanent (irreversible) damages into the phospholipid structure identified as shortened carbon chains. This study shows a possible new application of spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of depression.

  15. The role of veterinary epidemiology in combating infectious animal diseases on a global scale: the impact of training and outreach programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, M D

    2009-12-01

    The effectiveness of detection and control of highly contagious animal diseases is dependent on a solid understanding of their nature and implementation of scientifically sound methods by people who are well trained. The implementation of specific detection methods and tools requires training and application in natural as well as field conditions. The aim of this paper is to present the design and implementation of training in disease investigation and basic veterinary epidemiology in selected countries using the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 Asia strain as a disease detection model. Indonesia, Egypt, Nigeria, Turkey, and Vietnam were each identified as either a priority country where AI was spreading rapidly or a country at risk for infection. In each of these countries, a training program on epidemiological concepts, field investigation methodology, and detection of H5N1 Asia strain cases was conducted. This report includes the impact of these training sessions on national animal health programs, including follow-up activities of animal health officers who went through these training sessions.

  16. Selecting Television Programs for Language Learning: Investigating Television Programs from the Same Genre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Webb

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The scripts of 288 television episodes were analysed to determine the extent to which vocabulary reoccurs in television programs from the same subgenres and unrelated television programs from different genres. Episodes from two programs from each of the following three subgenres of the American drama genre: medical, spy/action, and criminal forensic investigation were compared with different sets of random episodes. The results showed that although there were an equivalent number of running words in each set of episodes, the episodes from programs within the same subgenre contained fewer word families than random programs. The findings also showed that low frequency word families (4000-14,000 levels reoccur more often in programs within the same subgenre. Together the results indicate that watching programs within the same subgenre may be an effective approach to language learning with television because it reduces the lexical demands of viewing and increases the potential for vocabulary learning.Los guiones de 288 episodios televisivos se analizaron para determinar el alcance de la recursividad del vocabulario en programas de televisión del mismo subgénero y en programas no relacionados de géneros diferentes. Se compararon episodios de tres subgéneros del drama americano: médico, de espías/acción y de investigación forense, con varios grupos de episodios elegidos al azar. Los resultados muestran que, aunque el número de palabras en cada grupo de episodios era equivalente, los episodios del mismo subgénero contienen menos familias de palabras que aquellos elegidos al azar. Los hallazgos mostraron que las familias de baja frecuencia (niveles de 4.000-14.000 se repiten con más frecuencia en los programas del mismo subgénero. En conjunto, los resultados indican que el visionado de programas del mismo subgénero puede ser un método efectivo para aprender el lenguaje por medio de la televisión porque reduce la demanda léxica de la

  17. Investigation of Biogas Production Process by the Mixture of Landfill Leachate and Animal Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hossein alidadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: Energy consumption is on a rapidly growing trend in the world. Accordingly, the non-renewable energy sources are expected to be run out in the future. This issue has resulted in the establishment of efforts targeted toward the development of new energy-generating methods around the world. Biogas energy is one of the new and clean energies that is produced from the anaerobic digestion of biomass wastes. Anaerobic digestion is a cost-effective and environment-friendly method, which facilitates fertilizer and biogas production as well as landfill leachate treatment. Given the high environmental hazards of leachate and its mixture with animal wastes, the present study aimed to estimate the possibility of producing biogas in various mixture ratios. Methods: In this pilot-scale experimental study, the landfill leachate of Mashhad, Iran, were mixed with caw fresh dung in different ratios, but same conditions, under anaerobic digestion. This was conducted to consider the ability to produce methane gas in different proportions and landfill leachate. At the beginning and end of the project, the parameters of EC, pH, VS, TS, COD, TOC, P, K, N, and Na were measured. Additionally, the composition of the gases produced under different operating conditions was analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Results: Gas production began three weeks after uploading and continued for five weeks. The analysis of gas production in three ratios was indicative of the CH4 production in all three proportions. In this regard, 1/1 ratio produced the highest percentage of CH4. No gas production was observed in the two months of study. Other physical and chemical parameters, such as COD, TS, TKN, and TOC were reduced in the given mixtures during the biogas production procedure. For instance, the case with 1/1 ratio, which showed the best results, had almost 80% decrease in the given parameters. However, no gas

  18. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  19. Further investigation of exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild and feral animals captured on horse properties with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild birds, mice, rabbits, raccoons, coyotes and squirrels, and feral cats and pigs on 10 farms with confirmed equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Serum samples from all resident foals (417 samples) as well as fecal (461) and serum (106) samples from wild and feral animals were collected for serological and molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. A total of three cats from two farms, three mice from two farms and eight cottontail rabbits from one farm had evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. These animals may be an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as a potential reservoir/amplifier host. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Cannabidiol in Animal Seizure Models by the Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Brian D; Jacobson, Catherine A; Metcalf, Cameron S; Smith, Misty D; Wilcox, Karen S; Hampson, Aidan J; Kehne, John H

    2017-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid component of marijuana that has no significant activity at cannabinoid receptors or psychoactive effects. There is considerable interest in CBD as a therapy for epilepsy. Almost a third of epilepsy patients are not adequately controlled by clinically available anti-seizure drugs (ASDs). Initial studies appear to demonstrate that CBD preparations may be a useful treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP) investigated CBD in a battery of seizure models using a refocused screening protocol aimed at identifying pharmacotherapies to address the unmet need in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Applying this new screening workflow, CBD was investigated in mouse 6 Hz 44 mA, maximal electroshock (MES), corneal kindling models and rat MES and lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindling models. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the acute seizure models; mouse 6 Hz 44 mA (ED 50 164 mg/kg), mouse MES (ED 50 83.5 mg/kg) and rat MES (ED 50 88.9 mg/kg). In chronic models, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the corneal kindled mouse (ED 50 119 mg/kg) but CBD (up to 300 mg/kg) was not protective in the lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindled rat. Motor impairment assessed in conjunction with the acute seizure models showed that CBD exerted seizure protection at non-impairing doses. The ETSP investigation demonstrates that CBD exhibits anti-seizure properties in acute seizure models and the corneal kindled mouse. However, further preclinical and clinical studies are needed to determine the potential for CBD to address the unmet needs in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  1. An Investigation into the Effects of the Hangar Queen Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Kelly

    2002-01-01

    .... By consolidating the studies performed on cannibalizations (CANNs) and the HQ program, this paper attempts to provide an understanding of the rationale and effects/benefits of the different HQ thresholds...

  2. Investigation of independence in inter-animal tumor-type occurrences within the NTP rodent-bioassay database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Seilkop, S. [Analytical Sciences, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Statistically significant elevation in tumor incidence at multiple histologically distinct sites is occasionally observed among rodent bioassays of chemically induced carcinogenesis. If such data are to be relied on (as they have, e.g., by the US EPA) for quantitative cancer potency assessment, their proper analysis requires a knowledge of the extent to which multiple tumor-type occurrences are independent or uncorrelated within individual bioassay animals. Although difficult to assess in a statistically rigorous fashion, a few significant associations among tumor-type occurrences in rodent bioassays have been reported. However, no comprehensive studies of animal-specific tumor-type occurrences at death or sacrifice have been conducted using the extensive set of available NTP rodent-bioassay data, on which most cancer-potency assessment for environmental chemicals is currently based. This report presents the results of such an analysis conducted on behalf of the National Research Council`s Committee on Risk Assessment for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Tumor-type associations among individual animals were examined for {approximately}2500 to 3000 control and {approximately}200 to 600 treated animals using pathology data from 62 B6C3F1 mouse studies and 61 F/344N rat studies obtained from a readily available subset of the NTP carcinogenesis bioassay database. No evidence was found for any large correlation in either the onset probability or the prevalence-at-death or sacrifice of any tumor-type pair investigated in control and treated rats and niece, although a few of the small correlations present were statistically significant. Tumor-type occurrences were in most cases nearly independent, and departures from independence, where they did occur, were small. This finding is qualified in that tumor-type onset correlations were measured only indirectly, given the limited nature of the data analyzed.

  3. An Investigation of Microbial Contamination of Animal Butter at the Market Level in Zanjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanzadazar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Butter is one of the oldest dairy products known in the world and plays an important role in human nutrition. The aim of this study was evaluating of the microbial quality of traditional and industrial butter marketed in Zanjan. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a total of 29 samples of butter were investigated in 2 groups which 24 samples were of traditionally producedl butter and 5 industrially produced butter samples, randomly collected from the market in Zanjan, Iran. All samples were evaluated for total bacterial count, Staphylococci, coliform, fungi and mold. Results: Fourteen samples of traditional butter had higher coliform load than allowed in standards. Eighteen samples were contaminated with Staphylococcus, and mold was found in 8 samples. Also, fifteen samples were contaminated with Escherichia coli. Among the industrial samples, one was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus but no contamination by coliform, Escherichia coli and mold and mold was observed. Conclusion: 58.33%, 75%, 33.33% and 62.5% of the traditional butter samples had higher coliform, Staphylococcus, mold and E. coli contamination, respectively than standard limit. One of the industrial samples was contaminated with Staphylococcus. It is recommended that higher supervision on the production and distribution of these products is applied.

  4. The GEOTREF program, a new approach for geothermal investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Frédéric; Viard, Simon; Garcia, Michel

    2017-04-01

    The GEOTREF is an R&D program supported by the ADEME, French environmental agency and by the «Investissement d'Avenir », a French government program to found innovative projects. The GEOTREF program aims to develop an integrated analysis of high temperature geothermal reservoir in volcanic context. It is a collaborative program between nine research laboratories and two industrial partners. This program is supported for four years and funds 12 PhDs and 5 post-doctoral grants in various fields: geology, petrography, petrophysics, geophysics, geochemistry, reservoir modelling. The first three years are dedicated to the exploration phases that will lead to the drilling implantation. The project has two main objectives. 1.- Developing innovative and interactive methods and workflows leading to develop prospection and exploration in per volcanic geothermal target. This objective implicates: Optimization of the targeting to mitigate financial risks Adapting oil and gas exploration methods to geothermal energy, especially in peri-volcanic context. 2.- Applying this concept to different prospects in the Caribbean and South America The first target zone is located in Guadeloupe, an island of the active arc of the subduction zone where the Atlantic plate subducts under the Caribbean one. The GEOTREF prospect zone is on the Basse Terre Island in its south part closed to the Soufriere volcano, the active volcanic system. On the same island a geothermal field is exploited in Bouillante, just northward from the GEOTREF targeting area.

  5. Use of animals with partially known ancestries in scientifically managed breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Kevin; Lacy, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    Animals with only partially known ancestry present a problem for population managers because it can be difficult to determine their relative genetic value to the population. So long as their ancestry is not completely unknown, population management software such as PMx can calculate a mean kinship for these animals, but that mean kinship is calculated such that there is no decrease in relative genetic value or "penalty" for only partially known ancestry. However, there is a longer-term genetic cost to having animals with only partially known ancestry in the population, and thus it is appropriate to "penalize" animals with partially known ancestry to some extent. The challenge is determining the correct "penalty" which will serve to decrease the percent unknown ancestry in subsequent generations while not causing excessive selection against the known ancestry of the animal. A new parameter of relative genetic value is developed which takes into account both an animal's mean kinship as well as its percent known ancestry. The method used in PMx to calculate the mean kinships also in general overestimates the inbreeding coefficients of offspring of animals with partially known ancestry when the known parents share a common ancestor, but can underestimate inbreeding if common ancestors exist within the unknown portion of the pedigree. This may result in population managers selecting less suitable pairs for breeding in an attempt to avoid an apparent higher level of inbreeding. A parameter is developed that adjusts the inbreeding coefficient to more accurately reflect the likely inbreeding coefficient of potential offspring. Zoo Biol. 35:319-325, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Segmented fuel irradiation program: investigation on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, H.; Goto, K.; Sabate, R.; Abeta, S.; Baba, T.; Matias, E. de; Alonso, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Segmented Fuel Irradiation Program, started in 1991, is a collaboration between the Japanese organisations Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) representing other Japanese utilities, and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI); and the Spanish Organisations Empresa Nacional de Electricidad, S.A. (ENDESA) representing A.N. Vandellos 2, and Empresa Nacional Uranio, S.A. (ENUSA); with the collaboration of Westinghouse. The objective of the Program is to make substantial contribution to the development of advanced cladding and fuel materials for better performance at high burn-up and under operational power transients. For this Program, segmented fuel rods were selected as the most appropriate vehicle to accomplish the aforementioned objective. Thus, a large number of fuel and cladding combinations are provided while minimising the total amount of new material, at the same time, facilitating an eventual irradiation extension in a test reactor. The Program consists of three major phases: phase I: design, licensing, fabrication and characterisation of the assemblies carrying the segmented rods (1991 - 1994); phase II: base irradiation of the assemblies at Vandellos 2 NPP, and on-site examination at the end of four cycles (1994-1999). Phase III: ramp testing at the Studsvik facilities and hot cell PIE (1996-2001). The main fuel design features whose effects on fuel behaviour are being analysed are: alloy composition (MDA and ZIRLO vs. Zircaloy-4); tubing texture; pellet grain size. The Program is progressing satisfactorily as planned. The base irradiation is completed in the first quarter of 1999, and so far, tests and inspections already carried out are providing useful information on the behaviour of the new materials. Also, the Program is delivering a well characterized fuel material, irradiated in a commercial reactor, which can be further used in other fuel behaviour experiments. The paper presents the main

  7. A preliminary investigation of the environmental Control and Life Support Subsystems (EC/LSS) for animal and plant experiment payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary study of the environmental control and life support subsystems (EC/LSS) necessary for an earth orbital spacecraft to conduct biological experiments is presented. The primary spacecraft models available for conducting these biological experiments are the space shuttle and modular space station. The experiments would be housed in a separate module that would be contained in either the shuttle payload bay or attached to the modular space station. This module would be manned only for experiment-related tasks, and would contain a separate EC/LSS for the crew and animals. Metabolic data were tabulated on various animals that are considered useful for a typical experiment program. The minimum payload for the 30-day space shuttle module was found to require about the equivalent of a one-man EC/LSS; however, the selected two-man shuttle assemblies will give a growth and contingency factor of about 50 percent. The maximum payloads for the space station mission will require at least a seven-man EC/LSS for the laboratory colony and a nine-man EC/LSS for the centrifuge colony. There is practically no room for growth or contingencies in these areas.

  8. Developing Children's Awareness of the Human-Animal Bond: An Assessment of the Experiences and Benefits that Children Receive in the United Animal Nation's Humane Education Ambassador Readers (HEAR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the United Animal Nations (UAN) launched the Humane Education Ambassador Readers (HEAR), an innovation that focused on mitigation of animal suffering through education. In the HEAR program, adult volunteers read carefully selected story books to children in grades 3-6 in schools or other educational settings, and hold discussions with the…

  9. Erythropoietin attenuates motor neuron programmed cell death in a burn animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    Full Text Available Burn-induced neuromuscular dysfunction may contribute to long-term morbidity; therefore, it is imperative to develop novel treatments. The present study investigated whether erythropoietin (EPO administration attenuates burn-induced motor neuron apoptosis and neuroinflammatory response. To validate our hypothesis, a third-degree hind paw burn rat model was developed by bringing the paw into contact with a metal surface at 75°C for 10 s. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group A, sham-control; Group B, burn-induced; Group C, burn + single EPO dose (5000 IU/kg i.p. at D0; and Group D, burn + daily EPO dosage (3000 IU/kg/day i.p. at D0-D6. Two treatment regimens were used to evaluate single versus multiple doses treatment effects. Before sacrifice, blood samples were collected for hematological parameter examination. The histological analyses of microglia activation, iNOS, and COX-2 in the spinal cord ventral horn were performed at week 1 post-burn. In addition, we examined autophagy changes by biomarkers of LC3B and ATG5. The expression of BCL-2, BAX, cleaved caspase-3, phospho-AKT, and mTOR was assessed simultaneously through Western blotting. EPO administration after burn injury attenuated neuroinflammation through various mechanisms, including the reduction of microglia activity as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression in the spinal cord ventral horn. In addition, the expression of phospho-AKT, mTOR and apoptotic indicators, such as BAX, BCL-2, and cleaved caspase-3, was modulated. Furthermore, the activity of burn-induced autophagy in the spinal cord ventral horn characterized by the expression of autophagic biomarkers, LC3B and ATG5, was reduced after EPO administration. The present results indicate that EPO inhibits the AKT-mTOR pathway to attenuate burn-induced motor neuron programmed cell death and microglia activation. EPO can modulate neuroinflammation and programmed cell death and may be a

  10. Pointer Animation Implementation at Development of Multimedia Learning of Java Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Muhammad; Atmojo, Yohanes Priyo

    2015-01-01

    This research represents the development research using the references of previous research results related to the development of interactive multimedia learning (learner controlled), specially about the effectiveness and efficiency of multimedia learning of a content that developed by pointer animation implementation showing the content in…

  11. The USDA Animal Improvement Programs Laboratory: A century old and just getting started

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1908, USDA's Bureau of Animal Industry began national organization of regional cow testing associations, which led to the development of national Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA). Data recording and progeny testing were closely connected, and early USDA work helped introduce and advance ...

  12. Counseling with Pocket Pets: Using Small Animals in Elementary Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flom, Barbara L.

    2005-01-01

    The power of the human-animal bond has been described in sources as diverse as ancient literature, modern fiction, and research reports in the professional literature (Chandler, 2001; Mallon, 1992; Parshall, 2003; Siegel, 1993). Educators have used classic examples, such as those found in the children's books Old Yeller and Where the Red Fern…

  13. Conservation of Swine Genetics by the National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) after One Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the continued threats to genetic diversity, and that this is the 10th year NAGP has been operating, it is useful to assess the progress made to date in securing animal genetic resources in general and swine genetic resources specifically. In 1999 the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) es...

  14. ACM SIGGRAPH Video Review Issue 152, SIGGRAPH 2005 Animation Theater Program PART 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Pre-operative evaluation of surgical strategies is of utmost importancein many areas of surgery. This is especially true for surgeryin congenital heart disease, where the complex morphology variesfrom individual to individual. This animation shows how interactive,real-time computer graphics...

  15. Adulthood Animal Abuse among Women Court-Referred to Batterer Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Shorey, Ryan C.; Brasfield, Hope; Zucosky, Heather C.; Ninnemann, Andrew; Elmquist, Joanna; Bucossi, Meggan M.; Andersen, Shawna M.; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    The substantial increase in the enrollment of women in batterer intervention programs (BIPs) over the past 30 years has greatly outpaced research on women who perpetrate intimate partner violence (IPV). As a result, it is unknown whether existing programs, which were originally designed to treat male perpetrators, are effective at preventing…

  16. Aquatic Species Program review: proceedings of principal investigators meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of the Aquatic Species Program is to improve the productivity, conversion to fuels, and cost efficiency of aquatic plant culture technologies. The emphasis of the program is on developing a mass culture technology for cultivating oil-yielding microalgae in the American southwest. A technical and economic analysis indicated that such a concept would be feasible if (1) lipid yields from microalgae are improved, (2) there is sufficient saline water for large-scale development, and (3) microalgal lipids can be economically converted to conventional fuels. It was determined that fuels from microalgal lipids presented better options than converting the microalgal biomass to either alcohols or methane. All lipids can potentially be catalytically converted to gasoline, or the fatty acids can be converted to substitute diesel fuels. The Southwest has the necessary low, flat, underutilized lands, and carbon dioxide is available from either natural deposits or flue gas from industrial plants. The amount of saline water available will probably determine how much fuel can be produced from aquatic species, and this question should be answered during 1985. The largest constraint of this technology is the economical production of an oil-rich microalgal feedstock. The agenda for the review was divided into four sections: species selection and characterization, applied physiological studies, outdoor mass cultivation, and systems design and analysis. Papers from these presentations are included in these proceedings. Program advances were reported in the areas of species collection and selection, modulated light physiology, mass culture yields, harvesting of microalgae, mass culture facility design and analysis, and assessments on fuel options from microalgae. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  17. Selecting Television Programs for Language Learning: Investigating Television Programs from the Same Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The scripts of 288 television episodes were analysed to determine the extent to which vocabulary reoccurs in television programs from the same subgenres and unrelated television programs from different genres. Episodes from two programs from each of the following three subgenres of the American drama genre: medical, spy/action, and criminal…

  18. Benefits and Challenges of Developing a Customized Rubric for Curricular Review of a Residency Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    Rigorous curricular review of post-graduate veterinary medical residency programs is in the best interest of program directors in light of the requirements and needs of specialty colleges, graduate school administrations, and other stakeholders including prospective students and employers. Although minimum standards for training are typically provided by specialty colleges, mechanisms for evaluation are left to the discretion of program directors. The paucity of information available describing best practices for curricular assessment of veterinary medical specialty training programs makes resources from other medical fields essential to informing the assessment process. Here we describe the development of a rubric used to evaluate courses in a 3-year American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM)-recognized residency training program culminating in a Master of Science degree. This rubric, based on examples from medical education and other fields of graduate study, provided transparent criteria for evaluation that were consistent with stakeholder needs and institutional initiatives. However, its use caused delays in the curricular review process as two significant obstacles to refinement were brought to light: variation in formal education in curriculum design and significant differences in teaching philosophies among faculty. The evaluation process was able to move forward after institutional resources were used to provide faculty development in curriculum design. The use of a customized rubric is recommended as a best practice for curricular refinement for residency programs because it results in transparency of the review process and can reveal obstacles to change that would otherwise remain unaddressed.

  19. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, John M; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian; Powell, Wayne

    2017-08-30

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic prediction of breeding values has the potential to improve selection, reduce costs and provide a platform that unifies breeding approaches, biological discovery, and tools and methods. Here we compare and contrast some animal and plant breeding approaches to make a case for bringing the two together through the application of genomic selection. We propose a strategy for the use of genomic selection as a unifying approach to deliver innovative 'step changes' in the rate of genetic gain at scale.

  20. Genomic prediction unifies animal and plant breeding programs to form platforms for biological discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, John M; Chiurugwi, Tinashe; Mackay, Ian; Powell, Wayne; Implementing Genomic Selection in CGIAR Breeding Programs Workshop Participants

    2017-01-01

    The rate of annual yield increases for major staple crops must more than double relative to current levels in order to feed a predicted global population of 9 billion by 2050. Controlled hybridization and selective breeding have been used for centuries to adapt plant and animal species for human use. However, achieving higher, sustainable rates of improvement in yields in various species will require renewed genetic interventions and dramatic improvement of agricultural practices. Genomic pre...

  1. EPA Releases Guidance on a Voluntary Pilot Program to Reduce Animal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the start of a voluntary pilot program to evaluate the usefulness and acceptability of a mathematical tool that estimates the toxicological classification of a chemical, which is used in the GHS.

  2. Clinical Investigation Program, RCS MED-300 (R1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-31

    1981 Correlations Between Amount of Information Feedback and Success of Biofeedback Treatments. (C) 21 1981 Investigations of Chronic Phantom Pain. (C...the Hamster Embryo. (0) (PR) (P) 24 1986 Computer Assisted Infrared Imaging in the Diagnosis and Management of Military Basic Training Injuries. (0...II). (C) 93 1986 Ultrasound Evaluation of the Rotator Cuff. (0) 94 1986 Omental Splenic Autotransplantation: Optimal Transplant Size for Maximal

  3. I Scratch and Sense but Can I Program? An Investigation of Learning with a Block Based Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports an investigation into undergraduate student experiences and views of a visual or "blocks" based programming language and its environment. An additional and central aspect of this enquiry is to substantiate the perceived degree of transferability of programming skills learnt within the visual environment to a typical…

  4. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation Sounding Rocket Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the unique optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. A sounding rocket payload has been developed to test the feasibility of magnetic field measurements in the Sun's transition region. The optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic sensitive lines formed in the transition region (CIV at 1550 A and MgII at 2800 A). This paper will concentrate on the polarization properties SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space (TVLS) gratings and its system level testing as we prepare to launch in the Summer of 2008.

  5. Using a Participatory Approach to Investigate a Leadership Program's Theory of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaugh, Bradley; Seibel, Seibel,; Archibald, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The linkages between interventions and outcomes of leadership initiatives have been insufficiently studied. To better understand these links, the Virginia agricultural leadership program conducted a pathway mapping session to investigate the program's theory of change. In this novel process, program participants engaged in collaborative…

  6. Quantifying preferences of farmers and veterinarians for national animal health programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den Bart H.P.; Soest, van Felix J.S.; Reist, Martin; Hogeveen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Bovine udder health in Switzerland is of a relatively high level. However, antimicrobial usage (AMU) seems high in comparison to other European countries also. A new udder health and AMU improvement program could improve this situation but it is uncertain whether there is support from the field.

  7. A Survey of Successful Evaluations of Program Visualization and Algorithm Animation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza-Fuentes, Jaime; Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews successful educational experiences in using program and algorithm visualizations (PAVs). First, we survey a total of 18 PAV systems that were subject to 33 evaluations. We found that half of the systems have only been tested for usability, and those were shallow inspections. The rest were evaluated with respect to their…

  8. Seismic investigations of the HDR Safety Program. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D.; Steinhilber, H.; Kot, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The primary objective of the seismic investigations, performed at the HDR facility in Kahl/Main, FRG was to validate calculational methods for the seismic evaluation of nuclear-reactor systems, using experimental data from an actual nuclear plant. Using eccentric mass shaker excitation the HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure, exhibiting highly nonlinear response and demonstrating that structures not seismically designed can sustain loads equivalent to a design basin earthquake (DBE). Load transmission from the structure to piping/equipment indicated significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies, while the response of tanks/vessels depended mainly on their support conditions. The evaluation of various piping support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is important to limiting pipe greens. Piping at loads exceeding the DBE eightfold still had significant margins and failure is improbable inspite of multiple support failures. The mean value for pipe damping, even under extreme loads, was found to be about 4%. Comparison of linear and nonlinear computational results with piping response measurements showed that predictions have a wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces. For the soil/structure system the quality of the predictions did not depend so much on the complexity of the modeling, but rather on whether the model captured the salient features and nonlinearities of the system

  9. Seismic investigations of the HDR Safety Program. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcher, L.; Schrammel, D. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Steinhilber, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit (LBF), Darmstadt (Germany); Kot, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The primary objective of the seismic investigations, performed at the HDR facility in Kahl/Main, FRG was to validate calculational methods for the seismic evaluation of nuclear-reactor systems, using experimental data from an actual nuclear plant. Using eccentric mass shaker excitation the HDR soil/structure system was tested to incipient failure, exhibiting highly nonlinear response and demonstrating that structures not seismically designed can sustain loads equivalent to a design basin earthquake (DBE). Load transmission from the structure to piping/equipment indicated significant response amplifications and shifts to higher frequencies, while the response of tanks/vessels depended mainly on their support conditions. The evaluation of various piping support configurations demonstrated that proper system design (for a given spectrum) rather than number of supports or system stiffness is important to limiting pipe greens. Piping at loads exceeding the DBE eightfold still had significant margins and failure is improbable inspite of multiple support failures. The mean value for pipe damping, even under extreme loads, was found to be about 4%. Comparison of linear and nonlinear computational results with piping response measurements showed that predictions have a wide scatter and do not necessarily yield conservative responses underpredicting, in particular, peak support forces. For the soil/structure system the quality of the predictions did not depend so much on the complexity of the modeling, but rather on whether the model captured the salient features and nonlinearities of the system.

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation ... Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  11. Geophysical investigation program Northern Switzerland: Refraction-seismic measurements 84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, G.; Driessen, L.; Lehnen, I.

    1985-01-01

    Acting on instructions from the SGPK/Nagra working group (Baden, Switzerland), PRAKLA-SEISMOS GmbH, Hanover, planned, processed and interpreted seismic refraction measurements in northern Switzerland; CGG, Massy (France) was responsible for carrying out the field work. The aim of the survey was to investigate the shape and depth of a regional, WSW-ENE striking Permocarboniferous trough which underlays the mesozoic sediments of the Tabular Jura. The crystalline basement surface and possibly other geological boundaries were to be identified on the basis of refractor velocities. The recording arrangement included a 36 km spread in the assumed trough axis and four 12 km long spreads perpendicular to the axis (broad side 'T') which covered the trough edges. The resulting good quality data indicated two refractors: horizon H5 which is attributable to the lower Permocarboniferous could only be detected in the western half of the spread with any certainty. Horizon H6 probably represents the crystalline basement surface. If anisotropy is taken into account, the refractor velocity closely corresponds to the Gneiss of the WEIACH- and the Granite 3 of the BOETTSTEIN-borehole. This horizon was clearly discernible on all recordings and allowed the approximate mapping of the trough's shape. The assumed strike direction and depth was largely confirmed. In the WSW section the trough is more than 3300 m deep, it rises to - 3000 m in the ESE section and shows only in the east of the survey area a tendency towards a narrower width and shallower depth (depth data relate to the seismic reference datum at 500 m above MSL). (author)

  12. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  13. Object Oriented Programming Systems (OOPS) and frame representations: An investigation of programming paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, David

    1988-01-01

    The project was initiated to research Object Oriented Programming Systems (OOPS) and frame representation systems, their significance and applicability, and their implementation in or relationship to Ada. Object orientated is currently a very popular conceptual adjective. Object oriented programming, in particular, is promoted as a particularly productive approach to programming; an approach which maximizes opportunities for code reuse and lends itself to the definition of convenient and well-developed units. Such units are thus expected to be usable in a variety of situations, beyond the typical highly specific unit development of other approaches. Frame represenation systems share a common heritage and similar conceptual foundations. Together they represent a quickly emerging alternative approach to programming. The approach is to first define the terms, starting with relevant concepts and using these to put bounds on what is meant by OOPS and Frames. From this the possibilities were pursued to merge OOPS with Ada which will further elucidate the significant characteristics which make up this programming approach. Finally, some of the merits and demerits of OOPS were briefly considered as a way of addressing the applicability of OOPS to various programming tasks.

  14. Maternal Obesity and Developmental Programming of Metabolic Disorders in Offspring: Evidence from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity and overweight has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world as well as in those countries transitioning to first world economies, and this represents a major global health problem. Concern is rising over the rapid increases in childhood obesity and metabolic disease that will translate into later adult obesity. Although an obesogenic nutritional environment and increasingly sedentary lifestyle contribute to our risk of developing obesity, a growing body of evidence links early life nutritional adversity to the development of long-term metabolic disorders. In particular, the increasing prevalence of maternal obesity and excess maternal weight gain has been associated with a heightened risk of obesity development in offspring in addition to an increased risk of pregnancy-related complications. The mechanisms that link maternal obesity to obesity in offspring and the level of gene-environment interactions are not well understood, but the early life environment may represent a critical window for which intervention strategies could be developed to curb the current obesity epidemic. This paper will discuss the various animal models of maternal overnutrition and their importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered obesity risk in offspring.

  15. Animated Asphalt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2015-01-01

    “animation”, defined as “an innate (and learnable) ability of our bodies to discover life in inanimate images” (Belting 2012, 188). In this essay I investigate the animation of pictures in dialogue with Mitchell, both by addressing general questions such as: how is animation of otherwise static pictures...... to be understood? How does animation differ in different media? And in particular by focusing on and questioning the gender positions inherent in Mitchell’s theory. Animation has an erotic component of seduction and desire, and what pictures want, becomes for Mitchell, what women want. There is of course no simple...

  16. Paws for a Study Break: Running an Animal-Assisted Therapy Program at the Gerstein Science Information Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Bell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gerstein Science Information Centre is the Science and Health Sciences library serving the University of Toronto community. As the second largest library on campus, Gerstein is a mecca for studying and can accommodate 1100 students. Research has shown that high levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders are prevalent among both medical students and the student population as a whole. In recent years, Gerstein staff members have seen evidence of the rising levels of student stress in their dealings with the public while providing reference and research help. Animal-assisted therapy (AAT is often used in hospital and rehabilitation settings and, most recently, to help young children learn to read by providing a stress-free learning environment in public libraries and schools. Studies on animal-assisted therapy have shown that AAT decreases blood pressure, cortisol, and reduces anxiety overall. In response to these findings, staff at Gerstein decided to implement an AAT program, “Paws for a Study Break,” comprised of several sessions when a therapy dog and her handler would visit the library to hold ‘office hours’ and give students a break from their studying during the Winter 2012 exam period. Through a total of six visits of ninety minutes each, 417 visitors were received. Best practices and lessons learned are discussed, including steps involved in coordination of the event, working with volunteers, publicity avenues, dealing with media requests, costs involved, and evaluation techniques. Based on the completed evaluation forms, the response to the therapy dog program at Gerstein was overwhelmingly positive; students were very appreciative, and there are plans underway to repeat this program on an ongoing basis.

  17. Variation in External Representations as Part of the Classroom Lecture: An Investigation of Virtual Cell Animations in Introductory Photosynthesis Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Eric E.; Reindl, Katie M.; Johnson, Christina; McClean, Phillip; Offerdahl, Erika G.; Schroeder, Noah L.; White, Alan R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of external representations (ERs) to introduce concepts in undergraduate biology has become increasingly common. Two of the most prevalent are static images and dynamic animations. While previous studies comparing static images and dynamic animations have resulted in somewhat conflicting findings in regards to learning outcomes, the…

  18. An Investigation of the Effects of Different Types of Activities during Pauses in a Segmented Instructional Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jongpil; Chung, Sungwon; Crooks, Steven M.; Song, Jaeki; Kim, Jeakyeong

    2014-01-01

    Since the complex and transient information in instructional animations requires more cognitive resources, the segmenting principle has been proposed to reduce cognitive overload by providing smaller chunks with pauses between segments. This study examined the effects of different types of activities during pauses in a segmented animation. Four…

  19. Facilitating programming comprehension for novice learners with multimedia approach: A preliminary investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Subashini; Salam, Sobihatun Nur Abdul

    2017-10-01

    This research paper presents the preliminary investigation on the use of an interactive multimedia courseware named MAFPro, to facilitate C Programming lessons for novice learners. The courseware utilizes the elements of multimedia that focus on enhancing learners' programming comprehension. Among the aspects that were examined were the students' programming comprehension and their perceived motivation of MAFPro. This study was carried out in a survey design method with the participation of 30 undergraduates who are novice learners. The data analysis indicates that the multimedia courseware, MAFPro that has been used in the C programming classroom has a significant difference on the undergraduates' programming comprehension. The students also perceived MAFPro as motivating and engaging.

  20. Program SPACECAP: software for estimating animal density using spatially explicit capture-recapture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, James E.; Singh, Pallavi; Jathanna, Devcharan; Kumar, N. Samba; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2012-01-01

    1. The advent of spatially explicit capture-recapture models is changing the way ecologists analyse capture-recapture data. However, the advantages offered by these new models are not fully exploited because they can be difficult to implement. 2. To address this need, we developed a user-friendly software package, created within the R programming environment, called SPACECAP. This package implements Bayesian spatially explicit hierarchical models to analyse spatial capture-recapture data. 3. Given that a large number of field biologists prefer software with graphical user interfaces for analysing their data, SPACECAP is particularly useful as a tool to increase the adoption of Bayesian spatially explicit capture-recapture methods in practice.

  1. Analysis of 15 years of the National Program for the Control and Eradication of Animal Brucellosis and Tuberculosis, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Soares Ferreira Neto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2001, Brazil launched the National Program for Control and Eradication of Animal Brucellosis and Tuberculosis (PNCEBT. After 15 years, After 15 years, it can be checked that there was mistakes and successes in driving the program, but it is undeniable that in this period, a series of structuring actions was initiated. In addition, a large volume of high-quality epidemiological data were produced, which will allow the country to move forward more rationally and safely in combating these two diseases. Today, Brazil have a sufficient contingent of veterinarians to develop the accreditation of farms and vaccination against brucellosis in all States; all batches of vaccines against brucellosis produced by private laboratories are controlled by an official laboratory; the brucellosis vaccination program is well established in most States and it has produced a decrease in prevalence in Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Rondônia and Minas Gerais; there are two ongoing eradication experiences: of brucellosis in Santa Catarina and of tuberculosis in Mato Grosso; nowadays there is a culture to combat brucellosis and tuberculosis in the Brazilian Official Veterinary Services. The epidemiological situation of bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis is well known in the major part of the country. However, progress has been limited by the difficulty in engaging the beef and dairy productive chains as true partners in the process.

  2. Serotype diversity and reassortment between human and animal rotavirus strains: implications for rotavirus vaccine programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Jon R; Laird, Ashley R; Bielfelt, Brittany; Griffin, Dixie D; Banyai, Krisztian; Ramachandran, Madhu; Jain, Vivek; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Nakagomi, Osamu; Kirkwood, Carl D; Fischer, Thea K; Parashar, Umesh D; Bresee, Joseph S; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I

    2005-09-01

    The development of rotavirus vaccines that are based on heterotypic or serotype-specific immunity has prompted many countries to establish programs to assess the disease burden associated with rotavirus infection and the distribution of rotavirus strains. Strain surveillance helps to determine whether the most prevalent local strains are likely to be covered by the serotype antigens found in current vaccines. After introduction of a vaccine, this surveillance could detect which strains might not be covered by the vaccine. Almost 2 decades ago, studies demonstrated that 4 globally common rotavirus serotypes (G1-G4) represent >90% of the rotavirus strains in circulation. Subsequently, these 4 serotypes were used in the development of reassortant vaccines predicated on serotype-specific immunity. More recently, the application of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction genotyping, nucleotide sequencing, and antigenic characterization methods has confirmed the importance of the 4 globally common types, but a much greater strain diversity has also been identified (we now recognize strains with at least 42 P-G combinations). These studies also identified globally (G9) or regionally (G5, G8, and P2A[6]) common serotype antigens not covered by the reassortant vaccines that have undergone efficacy trials. The enormous diversity and capacity of human rotaviruses for change suggest that rotavirus vaccines must provide good heterotypic protection to be optimally effective.

  3. The effects of animal-assisted therapy on wounded warriors in an Occupational Therapy Life Skills program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christine E; Gonzales, Florie; Sells, Carol Haertlein; Jones, Cynthia; Reer, Theresa; Zhu, Yao Yao

    2012-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has gained much attention in civilian and military health care. Evidence supports its benefits with varied populations with diseases and disabilities, but no research has been done with injured or ill service members. This pretest, posttest nonrandomized control group study evaluated the effects of AAT on Warriors in transition (N=24) attending an Occupational Therapy Life Skills program with the long-term goal of improving their successful reintegration. Although significant differences were not found between the groups on most measures, anecdotal reports by participants and observers indicate that participants eagerly anticipated being with the therapy dogs, expressed pleasure and satisfaction with the experience, and regretted seeing it end. There were significant correlations between mood, stress, resilience, fatigue, and function at various measurement points. This is the first study to formally assess the benefits of AAT with wounded service members in garrison. Suggestions for future research are provided.

  4. A Self-Ethnographic Investigation of Continuing Education Program in Engineering Arising from Economic Structural Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihlavirta, Auri; Isomöttönen, Ville; Kärkkäinen, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a self-ethnographic investigation of a continuing education program in engineering in Central Finland. The program was initiated as a response to local economic structural change, in order to offer re-education possibilities for a higher educated workforce currently under unemployment threat. We encountered considerable…

  5. An Investigation into the Faculty Development Practices in Chiropractic Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringe, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive case study design using a cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used to investigate the impact of faculty development programs on teaching effectiveness perceived by faculty teaching at chiropractic colleges in the United States. The availability of faculty development programs related to teaching and student learning was…

  6. Lessons Learned from the First Two Years of Nature's Notebook, the USA National Phenology Network's Plant and Animal Observation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Rosemartin, A.; Denny, E. G.; Weltzin, J. F.; Marsh, L.

    2010-12-01

    Nature’s Notebook is the USA National Phenology Network’s (USA-NPN) national-scale plant and animal phenology observation program. The program was launched in March 2009 focusing only on plants; 2010 saw the addition of animals and the name and identity “Nature’s Notebook.” Over these two years, we have learned much about how to effectively recruit, train, and retain participants. We have engaged several thousand participants and can report a retention rate, reflected in the number of registered individuals that report observations, of approximately 25%. In 2009, participants reported observations on 133 species of plants on an average of nine days of the year, resulting in over 151,000 records in the USA-NPN phenology database. Results for the 2010 growing season are still being reported. Some of our most valuable lessons learned have been gleaned from communications with our observers. Through an informal survey, participants indicated that they would like to see more regular and consistent communications from USA-NPN program staff; clear, concise, and readily available training materials; mechanisms to keep them engaged and continuing to participate; and quick turn-around on data summaries. We are using this feedback to shape our program into the future. Another key observation we’ve made about our program is the value of locally and regionally-based efforts to implement Nature’s Notebook; some of our most committed observers are participating through partner programs such as the University of California-Santa Barbara Phenology Stewardship Program, Arbor Day Foundation, and the Great Sunflower Project. Future plans include reaching out to more partner organizations and improving our support for locally-based implementations of the Nature’s Notebook program. We have also recognized that the means for reaching and retaining potential participants in Nature’s Notebook vary greatly across generations. As the majority of our participants to

  7. Successes and Short Comings in Four Years of an International External Quality Assurance Program for Animal Influenza Surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Spackman

    Full Text Available The US National institutes of Health-Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance is a research consortium that funds numerous labs worldwide to conduct influenza A surveillance in diverse animal species. There is no harmonization of testing procedures among these labs; therefore an external quality assurance (EQA program was implemented to evaluate testing accuracy among labs in the program in 2012. Accurate detection of novel influenza A variants is crucial because of the broad host range and potentially high virulence of the virus in diverse species. Two molecular detection sample sets and 2 serology sample sets (one with avian origin isolates, and one with mammalian origin isolates each were made available at approximately six month intervals. Participating labs tested the material in accordance with their own protocols. During a five year period a total of 41 labs from 23 countries ordered a total of 132 avian molecular, 121 mammalian molecular and 90 serology sample sets. Testing was completed by 111 individuals. Detection of type A influenza by RT-PCR was reliable with a pass rate (80% or greater agreement with expected results of 86.6% for avian and 86.2% for mammalian origin isolates. However, identification of subtype by RT-PCR was relatively poor with 54.1% and 75.9% accuracy for avian and mammalian influenza isolates respectively. Serological testing had an overall pass rate of 86.9% and 22/23 labs used commercial ELISA kits. Based on the results of this EQA program six labs modified their procedures to improve accuracy and one lab identified an unknown equipment problem. These data represent the successful implementation of an international EQA program for an infectious disease; insights into the logistics and test design are also discussed.

  8. Successes and Short Comings in Four Years of an International External Quality Assurance Program for Animal Influenza Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Cardona, Carol; Muñoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Fleming, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The US National institutes of Health-Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance is a research consortium that funds numerous labs worldwide to conduct influenza A surveillance in diverse animal species. There is no harmonization of testing procedures among these labs; therefore an external quality assurance (EQA) program was implemented to evaluate testing accuracy among labs in the program in 2012. Accurate detection of novel influenza A variants is crucial because of the broad host range and potentially high virulence of the virus in diverse species. Two molecular detection sample sets and 2 serology sample sets (one with avian origin isolates, and one with mammalian origin isolates each) were made available at approximately six month intervals. Participating labs tested the material in accordance with their own protocols. During a five year period a total of 41 labs from 23 countries ordered a total of 132 avian molecular, 121 mammalian molecular and 90 serology sample sets. Testing was completed by 111 individuals. Detection of type A influenza by RT-PCR was reliable with a pass rate (80% or greater agreement with expected results) of 86.6% for avian and 86.2% for mammalian origin isolates. However, identification of subtype by RT-PCR was relatively poor with 54.1% and 75.9% accuracy for avian and mammalian influenza isolates respectively. Serological testing had an overall pass rate of 86.9% and 22/23 labs used commercial ELISA kits. Based on the results of this EQA program six labs modified their procedures to improve accuracy and one lab identified an unknown equipment problem. These data represent the successful implementation of an international EQA program for an infectious disease; insights into the logistics and test design are also discussed.

  9. Successes and Short Comings in Four Years of an International External Quality Assurance Program for Animal Influenza Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Cardona, Carol; Muñoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Fleming, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The US National institutes of Health-Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance is a research consortium that funds numerous labs worldwide to conduct influenza A surveillance in diverse animal species. There is no harmonization of testing procedures among these labs; therefore an external quality assurance (EQA) program was implemented to evaluate testing accuracy among labs in the program in 2012. Accurate detection of novel influenza A variants is crucial because of the broad host range and potentially high virulence of the virus in diverse species. Two molecular detection sample sets and 2 serology sample sets (one with avian origin isolates, and one with mammalian origin isolates each) were made available at approximately six month intervals. Participating labs tested the material in accordance with their own protocols. During a five year period a total of 41 labs from 23 countries ordered a total of 132 avian molecular, 121 mammalian molecular and 90 serology sample sets. Testing was completed by 111 individuals. Detection of type A influenza by RT-PCR was reliable with a pass rate (80% or greater agreement with expected results) of 86.6% for avian and 86.2% for mammalian origin isolates. However, identification of subtype by RT-PCR was relatively poor with 54.1% and 75.9% accuracy for avian and mammalian influenza isolates respectively. Serological testing had an overall pass rate of 86.9% and 22/23 labs used commercial ELISA kits. Based on the results of this EQA program six labs modified their procedures to improve accuracy and one lab identified an unknown equipment problem. These data represent the successful implementation of an international EQA program for an infectious disease; insights into the logistics and test design are also discussed. PMID:27788155

  10. An investigation of scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A James

    2010-07-05

    This short report investigates scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs. In Massachusetts, the family substance abuse treatment programs were much more costly than other adult residential treatment models. State officials were concerned that the "scale" or size of these programs (averaging just eight families) was too small to be economical. Although the sample size (just nine programs) was too small to permit reliable inference, the data clearly signalled the importance of "scale effects" in these family substance abuse treatment programs. To further investigate scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs, data from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's) Residential Women and Children and Pregnant and Postpartum Women (RWC-PPW) Demonstration were re-analyzed, focusing on the relationship between cost per family-day and the estimated average family census. This analysis indicates strong economies of scale up until an average family census of about 14, and less apparent scale effects beyond that point. In consideration of these and other study findings, a multidisciplinary interagency team redesigned the Massachusetts' family treatment program model. The new programs are larger than the former family treatment programs, with each new program having capacity to treat 11 to 15 families depending on family makeup.

  11. An investigation of scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A James

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This short report investigates scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs. In Massachusetts, the family substance abuse treatment programs were much more costly than other adult residential treatment models. State officials were concerned that the "scale" or size of these programs (averaging just eight families was too small to be economical. Although the sample size (just nine programs was too small to permit reliable inference, the data clearly signalled the importance of "scale effects" in these family substance abuse treatment programs. To further investigate scale effects in family substance abuse treatment programs, data from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's Residential Women and Children and Pregnant and Postpartum Women (RWC-PPW Demonstration were re-analyzed, focusing on the relationship between cost per family-day and the estimated average family census. This analysis indicates strong economies of scale up until an average family census of about 14, and less apparent scale effects beyond that point. In consideration of these and other study findings, a multidisciplinary interagency team redesigned the Massachusetts' family treatment program model. The new programs are larger than the former family treatment programs, with each new program having capacity to treat 11 to 15 families depending on family makeup.

  12. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis for investigation of the genetic association of Clostridium difficile isolates from food, food animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jane W; Tulenko, Mary M; Shutt, Kathleen A; Thompson, Angela D; Weese, J Scott; Songer, J Glenn; Limbago, Brandi M; Harrison, Lee H

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary known cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Diarrheal disease in food animals due to C. difficile infection has been well documented. Recently, reports of C. difficile infections in patients with no known risk factors for disease have raised concern of community acquisition through food animals and food. In this study, multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was performed on a collection of 97C. difficile isolates of human, animal and food origin belonging to either the North American pulsed-field type (NAP) 1 or NAP7/NAP8. MLVA discriminated between NAP1 and NAP7/NAP8 populations. Three clusters of food, food animal and human NAP1 isolates were highly related by MLVA. These data suggest the possibility of either laboratory contamination or widespread distribution of clonal C. difficile populations. Community-associated NAP1 isolates were unrelated to NAP1 food and food animal isolates. Two MLVA loci were absent and 1 was invariant in all NAP7/NAP8 isolates. Therefore, MLVA discrimination was not sufficient to make assessments regarding the genetic associations among food, food animal and human isolates belonging to the NAP7/NAP8 pulsovar. Rigorous epidemiologic and laboratory investigations that employ highly discriminatory genotyping methods are necessary to compare C. difficile isolates from food and food animals to those from humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The CTSA mentored career development program: supporting the careers of child health investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Carrie L; Higgins, Sarah; Kaskel, Fredrick J; Purucker, Mary; Davis, Jonathan M; Smoyer, William E

    2014-02-01

    Training translational scientists is a priority of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) consortium. 1) Describe the landscape of CTSA Mentored Research Career Development Awards (CDA) and 2) evaluate participation and outcomes of child health investigators in these programs. Survey of the CTSA Child Health Oversight Committee (CC-CHOC) and review of nonresponders' CTSA Websites. Thirty-two of 53 CC-CHOC members (60%) responded and all nonresponder Websites were reviewed. Institutions supported 1,166 CDA positions from 2006 to 2011, with 134 awarded to child health investigators (11.5%). Respondents reported a mean of 29.8 KL2 positions (95% CI 17.5-42.2) during their award period, with a mean of 2.8 (95% CI 1.8-3.8) awarded to child health investigators. The proportion of child health awardees varied from 0% to 50% across institutions. We identified 45 subsequent National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards to the 134 child health investigators (34%). The CTSA program contributes substantially to training the next generation of translational investigators. One-third of child health investigators obtained subsequent NIH awards in the short follow-up period demonstrating success of the CTSA CDA programs. Child health investigators are represented variably across the consortium. Pediatric institutions can partner with the CTSA program to further support training child health investigators. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. 77 FR 41316 - Federal Bureau of Investigation Anti-Piracy Warning Seal Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... the APW Seal in evoking the FBI's involvement in enforcement of anti-piracy laws. Two comments... Investigation Anti-Piracy Warning Seal Program AGENCY: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Justice. ACTION... regulation regarding the FBI Anti-Piracy Warning Seal (APW Seal). The final rule provides a general...

  15. Interdisciplinary Interactions within a Small-Scale Research Initiative Investigating Animation Creation as a Means of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, J. M.; Wakley, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an interdisciplinary research (IDR) initiative conducted by two lecturers from different university faculties who found they shared an interest in using animations to support teaching and learning. The research comprised an exploratory pilot to test the feasibility, and to explore the impact on learning, of having undergraduates…

  16. Association of Animal and Plant Proteins Intake with Hypertension in Iranian Adult Population: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mehrabani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is evidence regarding the relationship between dietary proteins intake and blood pressure (BP, but they had inconsistent results. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the association between different kinds of protein intake (animal and plant protein and BP. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program. We performed a cross-sectional study among 9660 randomly selected Iranian adults aged ≥19-year-old that they were selected from three large Iranian regions in 2007. A simplified validated 48-item-food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake including all kinds of protein. Systolic and diastolic BPs were measured in duplicate by trained personnel using a standard protocol. Multivariable regressions were applied to assess the relationship between protein intake and BP levels and the presence of hypertension (HTN. Results: More frequent consumption of animal, plant, and total protein intake were inversely associated with BP in a crude model (P < 0.001; however, after adjustment for potential confounders this relationship remained only for plant protein (P = 0.04. The risk of HTN occurrence decreased in the highest quintile of total and plant protein consumption by 19% (odds ratio [OR] = 0.81; confidence interval [CI]: [0.65–0.96]; P for trend = 0.004 and 18% (OR = 0.82; [CI: (0.67–0.94]; P for trend = 0.03, respectively. Conclusions: More frequent protein intake, especially plant protein consumption was inversely associated with BP and risk of HTN among Iranian adults.

  17. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  18. Legal audits and investigations: a key component of healthcare corporate compliance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, M A

    1999-01-01

    In today's complex legal environment, healthcare organizations are increasingly implementing voluntary compliance programs as a means of avoiding severe penalties for violations of the law. The Office of the Inspector General has identified legal audits and investigations as key components of effective compliance programs. The author demonstrates the applicability of legal audits and investigations to healthcare organizations by examining the audit and investigation process from beginning to end. The author also examines the role of attorneys in legal audits and investigations, and explains how information communicated from the healthcare organization to its attorneys can be protected from disclosure. As this Article indicates, the monetary and human resource costs of such compliance audits and investigations are insignificant when compared to the potential costs of defending a legal action or paying monetary penalties.

  19. Investigation of farmers' perspectives on the disposal of fallen livestock and animal by-products in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M; Brizuela, C; Wilkinson, R

    2010-10-16

    Two questionnaires were completed by a selection of farms in Great Britain during 2008 and 2009 to ascertain the role of the National Fallen Stock Company (NFSCo) in fallen livestock disposal, the current disposal methods used for fallen livestock and other animal by-products (ABPs), and factors determining use of a particular method. The results demonstrated a significant difference (Pfallen livestock carcases and other ABPs.

  20. Animated Asphalt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2015-01-01

    In What do pictures want? The lives and loves of images (2005) J. W. T. Mitchell writes about pictures as “vital signs”, not signs for living things, but signs as living things (Mitchell 6). With a notion from the German art historian and media theorist Hans Belting this symbolic act can be called...... “animation”, defined as “an innate (and learnable) ability of our bodies to discover life in inanimate images” (Belting 2012, 188). In this essay I investigate the animation of pictures in dialogue with Mitchell, both by addressing general questions such as: how is animation of otherwise static pictures...... to be understood? How does animation differ in different media? And in particular by focusing on and questioning the gender positions inherent in Mitchell’s theory. Animation has an erotic component of seduction and desire, and what pictures want, becomes for Mitchell, what women want. There is of course no simple...

  1. Student Planetary Investigators: A Program to Engage Students in Authentic Research Using NASA Mission Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallau, K.; Turney, D.; Beisser, K.; Edmonds, J.; Grigsby, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Student Planetary Investigator (PI) Program engages students in authentic scientific research using NASA mission data. This student-focused STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) program combines problem-based learning modules, Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned curriculum, and live interactive webinars with mission scientists to create authentic research opportunities and career-ready experiences that prepare and inspire students to pursue STEM occupations. Primarily for high school students, the program employs distance-learning technologies to stream live presentations from mission scientists, archive those presentations to accommodate varied schedules, and collaborate with other student teams and scientists. Like its predecessor, the Mars Exploration Student Data Team (MESDT) program, the Student PI is free and open to teams across the country. To date, students have drafted research-based reports using data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mini-RF instrument and the MESSENGER Mercury orbiter, with plans to offer similar programs aligned with additional NASA missions in the future pending available funding. Overall, the program has reached about 600 students and their educators. Assessments based on qualitative and quantitative data gathered for each Student PI program have shown that students gain new understanding about the scientific process used by real-world scientists as well as gaining enthusiasm for STEM. Additionally, it is highly adaptable to other disciplines and fields. The Student PI program was created by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) Space Department Education and Public Outreach office with support from NASA mission and instrument science and engineering teams.

  2. Access to Investigational Drugs: FDA Expanded Access Programs or “Right‐to‐Try” Legislation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Jelena P.; Weatherwax, Kevin; Gerber, David E.; Adamo, Joan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The Food and Drug Administration Expanded Access (EA) program and “Right‐to‐Try” legislation aim to provide seriously ill patients who have no other comparable treatment options to gain access to investigational drugs and biological agents. Physicians and institutions need to understand these programs to respond to questions and requests for access. Methods FDA EA programs and state and federal legislative efforts to provide investigational products to patients by circumventing FDA regulations were summarized and compared. Results The FDA EA program includes Single Patient‐Investigational New Drug (SP‐IND), Emergency SP‐IND, Intermediate Sized Population IND, and Treatment IND. Approval rates for all categories exceed 99%. Approval requires FDA and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, and cooperation of the pharmaceutical partner is essential. “Right‐to‐Try” legislation bypasses some of these steps, but provides no regulatory or safety oversight. Conclusion The FDA EA program is a reasonable option for patients for whom all other therapeutic interventions have failed. The SP‐IND not only provides patient access to new drugs, but also maintains a balance between immediacy and necessary patient protection. Rather than circumventing existing FDA regulations through proposed legislation, it seems more judicious to provide the knowledge and means to meet the EA requirements. PMID:25588691

  3. Access to Investigational Drugs: FDA Expanded Access Programs or "Right-to-Try" Legislation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, M E Blair; Berglund, Jelena P; Weatherwax, Kevin; Gerber, David E; Adamo, Joan E

    2015-10-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Expanded Access (EA) program and "Right-to-Try" legislation aim to provide seriously ill patients who have no other comparable treatment options to gain access to investigational drugs and biological agents. Physicians and institutions need to understand these programs to respond to questions and requests for access. FDA EA programs and state and federal legislative efforts to provide investigational products to patients by circumventing FDA regulations were summarized and compared. The FDA EA program includes Single Patient-Investigational New Drug (SP-IND), Emergency SP-IND, Intermediate Sized Population IND, and Treatment IND. Approval rates for all categories exceed 99%. Approval requires FDA and Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, and cooperation of the pharmaceutical partner is essential. "Right-to-Try" legislation bypasses some of these steps, but provides no regulatory or safety oversight. The FDA EA program is a reasonable option for patients for whom all other therapeutic interventions have failed. The SP-IND not only provides patient access to new drugs, but also maintains a balance between immediacy and necessary patient protection. Rather than circumventing existing FDA regulations through proposed legislation, it seems more judicious to provide the knowledge and means to meet the EA requirements. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Investigation of pharmaceuticals in processed animal by-products by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Ibáñez, María; Serrano, Roque; Boix, Clara; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Lunestad, Bjørn Tore; Hannisdal, Rita; Alm, Martin; Hernández, Félix; Berntssen, Marc H G

    2016-07-01

    There is an on-going trend for developing more sustainable salmon feed in which traditionally applied marine feed ingredients are replaced with alternatives. Processed animal products (PAPs) have been re-authorized as novel high quality protein ingredients in 2013. These PAPs may harbor undesirable substances such as pharmaceuticals and metabolites which are not previously associated with salmon farming, but might cause a potential risk for feed and food safety. To control these contaminants, an analytical strategy based on a generic extraction followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) using quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer (QTOF MS) was applied for wide scope screening. Quality control samples, consisting of PAP commodities spiked at 0.02, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg with 150 analytes, were injected in every sample batch to verify the overall method performance. The methodology was applied to 19 commercially available PAP samples from six different types of matrices from the EU animal rendering industry. This strategy allows assessing possible emergent risk exposition of the salmon farming industry to 1005 undesirables, including pharmaceuticals, several dyes and relevant metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metal metabolism in laboratory animals and human tissues as investigated by neutron activation analysis: current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbioni, E.; Pietra, R.; Marafante, E.

    1982-01-01

    The definition of dose-response relationships in man is the essential requisite to set scientifically health protection standards for the evaluation of a safe level exposure of humans to heavy metals. The derivation of these relationships requires sequential multidisciplinary informations including data on metabolic patterns and biochemical effects in mammals. Unfortunately, sufficient data are not available to establish dose-response curves expecially in long term-low level exposure conditions and a need exists to gather such informations for each metal on absorption, distribution and excretion in laboratory animals and humans. This paper: (1) discuss main problems related to the use of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in metallobiochemistry of present levels of trace elements; (2) report data on the current applications of NAA in metallobiochemistry in relation to the work carried out in the context of a project Heavy Metal Pollution of CEC JRC - Ispra. Applications deal with in vivo studies on laboratory animals, in vitro studies on biochemical systems and experiments on tissues of human origin; (3) discuss the perspectives of the use of the nuclear techniques in the environmental toxicology. (author)

  6. [Investigation of pathogenic phenotypes and virulence determinants of food-borne Salmonella enterica strains in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Deniz; Şen, Ece

    2015-10-01

    Salmonellosis, caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars with the consumption of contaminated food, is one of the leading food-borne disease that makes microbial food safety an important public health issue. This study was performed in order to determine the antibiotic resistance, serotyping, plasmid profiles and pathogenicity potentials of food-borne Salmonella isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans animal model system in Edirne province, located at Thrace region of Turkey. In this study, 32 Salmonella isolates, of which 26 belonged to Infantis, four to Enteritidis, one to Telaviv and one to Kentucky serovars, isolated from chicken carcasses were used. Antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods. A new C.elegans nematode animal model system was used to determine the pathogenicity potential of the isolates. The antibiotic resistance profiles revealed that one (3.1%) isolate was resistant to gentamicin, two (6.2%) to ciprofloxacin, three (9.4%) to ampicillin, 18 (56.3%) to kanamycin, 19 (60.8%) to neomycin, 25 (78.1%) to tetracycline, 25 (78.1%) to trimethoprim, 26 (81.25%) to nalidixic acid, 27 (84.4%) to streptomycin and 32 (100%) to sulfonamide. All of the 32 strains were susceptible to chloramphenicol and ampicillin/sulbactam. High levels of resistance to streptomycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, sulfonamide, kanamycin and neomycin was determined. According to the plasmid analysis, six isolates (18.75%) harboured 1-3 plasmids with sizes between 1.2 and 42.4 kb. In C.elegans nematode animal model system, the time (in days) required to kill 50% (TD50) of nematodes was calculated for each experimental group. TD50 values of the nematode group fed with S.Typhimurium ATCC 14028 that was used as the positive control and another group fed with E.coli OP50 as the negative control were 4.2 ± 0.5 days and 8.0 ± 0.02 days, respectively. TD50 of the groups fed with Salmonella isolates ranged

  7. Investigating STM in Haskell as an Alternative to Programming Systems with Shared Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernâni Teixeira Liberali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes to investigate the use of Software Transactional Memory (STM as a programming alternative for parallel architectures with shared memory. First, we study the concept of parallel programming and its main characteristics. Then we describe the STM approach for parallel programming, as well its application in the context of functional programming languages, in special Haskell. As a case study to illustrate the advantages of using STM, we show the implementation in Haskell of the classic problem of synchronization, the dining philosophers problem. Finally, aiming to demonstrate the simplicity and elegance of codes with STM in Haskell, it compares this implementation with another implementation of the same problem using the mechanism of synchronization monitors in Java.

  8. Teaching Hypothesis-Oriented Thinking to Medical Students: The University of Florida's Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacpoole, Peter W.; Fisher, Waldo R.; Flotte, Terence R.; Geiser, Edward A.; Theriaque, Douglas W.; Hutson, Alan D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes student-led research projects conducted at the University of Florida's General Clinical Research Center. First-year medical and M.D.-Ph.D. students collaborate on a hypothesis-driven experiment involving students as volunteer subjects and investigators. Feedback indicates students find the program useful and that it encourages pursuit of…

  9. Investigating the Role of Mobile Devices in a Blended Pre-Service Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Norman; Lawrence, Kimberley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate if and how mobile devices could be used to support the required program outcomes in a blended pre-service teacher education degree. All students enrolled in an educational technology course during the fall 2011 semester were provided with ViewSonic tablets. Through faculty interviews, student…

  10. An Investigation of Classroom Practices in Teaching Listening Comprehension at English Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Nurhafni

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the classroom practice in teaching listening comprehension at English Education Program of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 Academic Year is. The informants of this research were all of second semester students of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 academic year and a lecturer of listening…

  11. Investigating the Relationship between Iranian EFL Teachers' Autonomy and Their Neuro-Linguistic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Ehsan; Baradaran, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the relationship between English Language Teachers' autonomy and their Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP). To this end, a group of 200 experienced English language teachers at various language schools in Tehran, inter alia, Asre Zaban Language Academy, were given two questionnaires namely Teaching…

  12. INVESTIGATING THE OPINIONS OF MoNE STAFF ABOUT INSET PROGRAMS VIA DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasit OZEN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the opinions of the Ministry of National Education (MoNE staff about in-service training (INSET programs via distance education. The subjects of this study were the staff (n=15 of the Inservice Training Department of MoNE in 2008. During the study, the qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews held with the (MoNE staff by the researcher. The results of the interviews revealed the importance of needs assessment, the relationship between INSET program course content and participants’ school curriculum, support mechanism in INSET programs via distance education, the application of what is learned and providing various opportunities to them that lead to their active involvement to the application of these programs, the characteristics of learning environments for these programs, INSET instructors’ teaching competencies and skills to fulfill various roles in online learning environments, of measuring and evaluating the performance of teachers during INSET programs via distance education and of the effectiveness of INSET programs via distance education.

  13. Investigating audiences’ attitudes towards local radio programs: A case study of city of Esfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Taghipour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For almost a century, radio stations have been some primary sources for presenting arts, entertainment, news, etc. and the primary concern on many studies is to understand audience attitude on this media. This paper attempts to investigate audience attitude on radio programs broadcasted in city of Esfahan, Iran. The proposed study selects random sample of 600 out of 1,745,428 residence of this city where 345 people actively were listening to these programs, actively. All questions were designed in Likert scale and Cronbach alpha was 0.941, which was well above the desirable level and validated the survey. According our survey, the most popular part of radio programs was associated with news where 78.3% of the audiences were listening to these programs. According to our survey, audiences were mostly satisfied with family oriented programs and the mean score was 4.05. The other observation indicates that people have good attitude towards educational guidance programs (mean=3.37 and programs related to people and officials (mean=3.41. The results of Freedman test with Chi-Square value of 52.507 determines that there is meaningful difference among different components (mean difference = -0.23 and P-value =0.022. We have also performed an investigation to find out whether there is any difference between different components of this survey in terms of participants’ personal characteristics such as age, gender, educational background and job. Our survey only confirms the mean difference in terms of job specifications and other personal characteristics did not have any impact on people’s attitude. The other observation in our survey indicates that there is a difference between students and people with no job or housekeeper on their attitudes towards educational programs.

  14. Investigation to determine staff exposure and describe animal bite surveillance after detection of a rabid zebra in a safari lodge in Kenya, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Obonyo, Mark; Arvelo, Wences; Kadivane, Samuel; Orundu, Moses; Lankau, Emily; Gakuya, Francis; Munyua, Peninah; Githinji, Jane; Marano, Nina; Njenga, Kariuki; Omolo, Jared; Montgomery, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rabies is a fatal viral infection, resulting in >55,000 deaths globally each year. In August 2011, a young orphaned zebra at a Kenyan safari lodge acquired rabies and potentially exposed >150 tourists and local staff. An investigation was initiated to determine exposures among the local staff, and to describe animal bite surveillance in the affected district. Methods We interviewed lodge staff on circumstances surrounding the zebra's illness and assessed their exposure status. We...

  15. Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Companion-Animal Veterinarians: A Pilot Study Using RIAS Coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Michelle; Fitzgerald, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Effective veterinarian communication skills training and the related key outcomes provided the impetus for this study. We implemented a pre-experimental pre-test/post-test single-group design with a sample of 13 veterinarians and their 71 clients to evaluate the effects of a 6.5-hour communication skills intervention for veterinarians. Consultations were audiotaped and analyzed with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Clients completed the Consultation and Relational Care Measure, a global satisfaction scale, a Parent Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale, and the Adherence Intent measure. Veterinarians completed a communication confidence measure and a workshop satisfaction scale. Contrary to expectation, neither veterinarian communication skills nor their confidence improved post-training. Despite client satisfaction and perceptions of veterinarians' relational communication skills not increasing, clients nevertheless reported an increased intent to adhere to veterinarian recommendations. This result is important because client adherence is critical to managing and enhancing the health and well-being of animals. The results of the study suggest that while the workshop was highly regarded, either the duration of the training or practice opportunities were insufficient or a booster session was required to increase veterinarian confidence and integration of new skills. Future research should utilize a randomized control study design to investigate the appropriate intervention with which to achieve change in veterinarian communication skills. Such change could translate to more effective interactions in veterinarians' daily lives.

  16. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program adopted a Pollution Prevention Program in March 1991. The program's mission is to minimize waste and prevent pollution in remedial investigations (RI), feasibility studies (FS), decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D), and surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) site program activities. Mission success will result in volume and/or toxicity reduction of generated waste. Energy Systems is producing a fully developed a Numerical Scoring System (NSS) and actually scoring the generators of Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) at six ER sites: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge K-25 site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), and Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (Portsmouth). This report summarizes the findings of this initial numerical scoring evaluation and shows where improvements in the overall ER Pollution prevention program may be required. This report identifies a number of recommendations that, if implemented, would help to improve site-performance measures. The continued development of the NSS will support generators in maximizing their Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization efforts. Further refinements of the NSS, as applicable suggest comments and/or recommendations for improvement

  17. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Modular General English Language Teaching Preparatory Program at a Turkish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating existing foreign language programs on a regular basis is essential because program evaluation leads to more effective programs. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the modular intensive general English language teaching program applied at a university in Turkey by investigating students' and English instructors' perceptions of…

  18. 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Implementation Plan - Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knepp, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Implementation Plan - Environmental Restoration Program (Implementation Plan) addresses approximately 700 soil waste sites (and associated structures such as pipelines) resulting from the discharge of liquids and solids from processing facilities to the ground (e.g., ponds, ditches, cribs,burial grounds) in the 200 Areas and assigned to the Environmental Restoration Program. The Implementation Plan outlines the framework for implementing assessment activities in the 200 Areas to ensure consistency in documentation, level of characterization, and decision making. The Implementation Plan also consolidates background information and other typical work plan materials, to serve as a single referenceable source for this type of information

  19. Variation in external representations as part of the classroom lecture:An investigation of virtual cell animations in introductory photosynthesis instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Eric E; Reindl, Katie M; Johnson, Christina; McClean, Phillip; Offerdahl, Erika G; Schroeder, Noah L; White, Alan R

    2017-05-01

    The use of external representations (ERs) to introduce concepts in undergraduate biology has become increasingly common. Two of the most prevalent are static images and dynamic animations. While previous studies comparing static images and dynamic animations have resulted in somewhat conflicting findings in regards to learning outcomes, the benefits of each have been shown individually. Using ERs developed by the Virtual Cell Animation project, we aim to further investigate student learning using different ERs as part of an introductory biology lecture. We focus our study on the topic of photosynthesis as reports have noted that students struggle with a number of basic photosynthesis concepts. Students (n = 167) in ten sections of introductory biology laboratory were introduced to photosynthesis concepts by instructional lectures differing only in the format of the embedded ERs. Normalized gain scores were calculated, showing that students who learned with dynamic animations outperformed students who learned from static images on the posttest. The results of this study provide possible instructional guidelines for those delivering photosynthesis instruction in the introductory biology classroom. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):226-234, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. A survey of Australian dairy farmers to investigate animal welfare risks associated with increasing scale of production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, D S; Fisher, A D; Jongman, E C; Hemsworth, P E

    2015-08-01

    Although large herds (more than 500 cows) only represent 13% of Australian dairy farms, they represent more than 35% of the cows milked. A survey of Australian dairy farmers was conducted to assess relationships between herd size and known or proposed risk factors for adverse animal welfare outcomes in Australian dairy herds in relation to increasing scale of production. Responses from 863 Australian dairy farms (13% of Australian dairy farms) were received. Increasing herd size was associated with increases in stocking density, stock per labor unit, and grain fed per day-all of which could reasonably be hypothesized to increase the risk of adverse welfare outcomes unless carefully managed. However, increasing herd size was also associated with an increased likelihood of staff with formal and industry-based training qualifications. Herd size was not associated with reported increases in mastitis or lameness treatments. Some disease conditions, such as milk fever, gut problems, and down cows, were reported less in larger herds. Larger herds were more likely to have routine veterinary herd health visits, separate milking of the main herd and the sick herd, transition diets before calving, and written protocols for disease treatment. They were more likely to use monitoring systems such as electronic identification in the dairy, computerized records, daily milk yield or cell count monitoring, and pedometers or activity meters. Euthanasia methods were consistent between herds of varying sizes, and it was noted that less than 3% of farms make use of captive-bolt devices despite their effectiveness and ready availability. Increasing herd size was related to increased herd milking time, increased time away from the paddock, and increased distance walked. If the milking order of cows is consistent, this may result in reduced feed access for late-milking-order cows because of a difference in time away from the paddock. More than 95% of farmers believed that their cows were

  1. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf [Heinrich-Heine University, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schramm, Nils [Research Center Juelich, Central Laboratory for Electronics, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-DPD and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V''{sub 3}) of 0.24{+-}0.26 (mean {+-} SD) and 1.09{+-}0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p<0.0001). Cortical V''{sub 3} values amounted to 0.05{+-}0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3{+-}0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and

  2. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [123I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf; Schramm, Nils

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [ 123 I]FP-CIT. [ 123 I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with 99m Tc-DPD and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with 99m Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V '' 3 ) of 0.24±0.26 (mean ± SD) and 1.09±0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p '' 3 values amounted to 0.05±0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3±0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [ 123 I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and small animal imaging systems. (orig.)

  3. Investigation of the Concussion Goggle™ Education Program with Secondary School Athletic Teams: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen K. Payne

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Researchers have investigated different types of concussion education programs within various populations with mixed results. To date, no research has been published using the Concussion Goggles™ educational program Objective: To compare secondary school student-athletes’ knowledge about concussions before and after attending a concussion education program using the Concussion Goggles™. Design: Pre- posttest. Setting: Public secondary school. Patients or Other Participants: 41 secondary school students (14 girls soccer players, 14 boys basketball players, and 13 girls basketball players with a mean age of 15.37 ± 1.22 years. Intervention(s: Participants completed the Concussion Goggles™ concussion educational program consisting of PowerPoint slides with 3 activities and short video segments within the presentation. Participants completed a test developed by the manufacturers of the Concussion Goggles™ educational program prior to and following the intervention to measure change in concussion knowledge. Main Outcome Measure(s: A 3-way mixed factorial analysis of variance (sport x grade level x gender for repeated measures was utilized to determine statistical significance. Results: A statistically significant difference between the overall pretest (9.37 ± 1.20 and posttest (9.63 ± 1.04 scores was not found (p = 0.28. Repeated measures analysis did not indicate significant interaction effects for test score x grade (p = 0.18, test score x sport (p = 0.63, nor test score x grade x sport (p = 0.96. Conclusion: The Concussion Goggle™ education program did not affect participant knowledge of concussions in the posttest. In its current form, the Concussion Goggle™ program may not be an effective concussion education program.

  4. Tendinopathy: Investigating the Intersection of Clinical and Animal Research to Identify Progress and Hurdles in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titan, Ashley; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2017-01-01

    Biological treatments, surgical interventions, and rehabilitation exercises have been successfully used to treat tendinopathy, but the development of effective treatments has been hindered by the lack of mechanistic data regarding the pathogenesis of the disease.While insightful, clinical studies are limited in their capacity to provide data regarding the pathogenesis of tendinopathies, emphasizing the value of animal models and cell culture studies to fill this essential gap in knowledge.Clinical pathological findings from imaging studies or histological analysis are not universal across patients with tendinopathy and have not been clearly associated with the onset of symptoms.There are several unresolved controversies, including the cellular changes that accompany the tendinopathic disease state and the role of inflammation.Additional research is needed to correlate the manifestations of the disease with its pathogenesis, with the goal of reaching a field-wide consensus on the pathology of the disease state. Such a consensus will allow standardized clinical practices to more effectively diagnose and treat tendinopathy. PMID:27792676

  5. Computational investigation of feedback loop as a potential source of neuromechanical wave speed discrepancy in swimming animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Namu; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2017-11-01

    Aquatic locomotion relies on feedback loops to generate the flexural muscle moment needed to attain the reference shape. Experimentalists have consistently reported a difference between the electromyogram (EMG) and curvature wave speeds. The EMG wave speed has been found to correlate with the cross-sectional moment wave. The correlation, however, remains unexplained. Using feedback dependent controller models, we demonstrate two scenarios - one at higher passive elastic stiffness and another at lower passive elastic stiffness of the body. The former case becomes equivalent to the penalty type mathematical model for swimming used in prior literature and it does not reproduce neuromechanical wave speed discrepancy. The latter case at lower elastic stiffness does reproduce the wave speed discrepancy and appears to be biologically most relevant. These findings are applied to develop testable hypotheses about control mechanisms that animals might be using at during low and high Reynolds number swimming. This work is supported by NSF Grants DMS-1547394, CBET-1066575, ACI-1460334, and IOS-1456830. Travel for NP is supported by Institute for Defense Analyses.

  6. Animal toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdur, M.

    1996-12-31

    The chapter evaluates results of toxicological studies on experimental animals to investigate health effects of air pollutants and examines the animal data have predicted the response to human subject. Data are presented on the comparative toxicity of sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid. The animal data obtained by measurement of airway resistance in guinea pigs and of bronchial clearance of particles in donkeys predicted clearly that sulfuric acid was more irritant than sulfur dioxide. Data obtained on human subjects confirmed this prediction. These acute studies also correctly predicted the comparative toxicity of the two compounds in two year studies of monkeys. Such chronic studies are not possible in human subjects but it is a reasonable to assume that sulfuric acid would be more toxic than sulfur dioxide. Current findings in epidemiological studies certainly support this assumption.

  7. Hybrid evolutionary optimization of two-stage stochastic integer programming problems: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tometzki, Thomas; Engell, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution, we consider decision problems on a moving horizon with significant uncertainties in parameters. The information and decision structure on moving horizons enables recourse actions which correct the here-and-now decisions whenever the horizon is moved a step forward. This situation is reflected by a mixed-integer recourse model with a finite number of uncertainty scenarios in the form of a two-stage stochastic integer program. A stage decomposition-based hybrid evolutionary algorithm for two-stage stochastic integer programs is proposed that employs an evolutionary algorithm to determine the here-and-now decisions and a standard mathematical programming method to optimize the recourse decisions. An empirical investigation of the scale-up behavior of the algorithms with respect to the number of scenarios exhibits that the new hybrid algorithm generates good feasible solutions more quickly than a state of the art exact algorithm for problem instances with a high number of scenarios.

  8. Laboratory investigation of triple marking the parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) with a fluorescent dye and two animal proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault, a parasitoid of Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), was used as a model insect to investigate triple marking a minute hymenopteran for potential use for monitoring dispersal patterns of natural enemies in the field. The triple mark contained egg albumin in chicken eggs, c...

  9. What Do Secondary Students Really Learn during Investigations with Living Animals? Parameters for Effective Learning with Social Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammet, Rebecca; Dreesmann, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Exemplary for social insects, "Temnothorax" ants allow for various hands-on investigations in biology classes. The aim of this study was to provide a quantitative and qualitative analysis of secondary school students' learning achievement after teaching units with ants lasting between one and six weeks. The questionnaires included…

  10. Dietary intake of total, animal, and vegetable protein and risk of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-NL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Beulens, Joline W J; van der A, Daphne L; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Grobbee, Diederick E; van der Schouw, Yvonne T

    2010-01-01

    Dietary recommendations are focused mainly on relative dietary fat and carbohydrate content in relation to diabetes risk. Meanwhile, high-protein diets may contribute to disturbance of glucose metabolism, but evidence from prospective studies is scarce. We examined the association among dietary total, vegetable, and animal protein intake and diabetes incidence and whether consuming 5 energy % from protein at the expense of 5 energy % from either carbohydrates or fat was associated with diabetes risk. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 38,094 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-NL study. Dietary protein intake was measured with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Incident diabetes was verified against medical records. During 10 years of follow-up, 918 incident cases of diabetes were documented. Diabetes risk increased with higher total protein (hazard ratio 2.15 [95% CI 1.77-2.60] highest vs. lowest quartile) and animal protein (2.18 [1.80-2.63]) intake. Adjustment for confounders did not materially change these results. Further adjustment for adiposity measures attenuated the associations. Vegetable protein was not related to diabetes. Consuming 5 energy % from total or animal protein at the expense of 5 energy % from carbohydrates or fat increased diabetes risk. Diets high in animal protein are associated with an increased diabetes risk. Our findings also suggest a similar association for total protein itself instead of only animal sources. Consumption of energy from protein at the expense of energy from either carbohydrates or fat may similarly increase diabetes risk. This finding indicates that accounting for protein content in dietary recommendations for diabetes prevention may be useful.

  11. [Strategic considerations on the design and choice of animal models for non-clinical investigations of cell-based medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Schulz, Ronny M; Sanzenbacher, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    For the development of medicinal products animal models are still indispensable to demonstrate efficacy and safety prior to first use in humans. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), which include cell-based medicinal products (CBMP), differ in their pharmacology and toxicology compared to conventional pharmaceuticals, and thus, require an adapted regime for non-clinical development. Developers are, therefore, challenged to develop particular individual concepts and to reconcile these with regulatory agencies. Guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other sources can provide direction.The published approaches for non-clinical testing of efficacy document that homologous animal models where the therapeutic effect is investigated in a disease-relevant animal model utilizing cells derived from the same species are commonly used. The challenge is that the selected model should reflect the human disease in all critical features and that the cells should be comparable to the investigated human medicinal product in terms of quality and biological activity. This is not achievable in all cases. In these cases, alternative methods may provide supplemental information. To demonstrate the scientific proof-of-concept (PoC), small animal models such as mice or rats are preferred. During the subsequent product development phase, large animal models (i.e. sheep, minipigs, dogs) must be considered, as they may better reflect the anatomical or physiological situation in humans. In addition to efficacy, those models may also be suitable to prove some safety aspects of ATMP (e.g. regarding dose finding, local tolerance, or undesired interactions and effects of the administered cells in the target tissue). In contrast, for evaluation of the two prominent endpoints for characterizing the safety of ATMP (i.e. biodistribution, tumorigenicity) heterologous small animal models, especially immunodeficient mouse strains

  12. Investigation of administrative obstacles to family physician program in urban areas of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Javan noughabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Health is regarded as one of the basic rights of each person in society; so governments are obligated to provide it equally for everyone. The best way to achieve this goal is the establishment of health insurance with the orientation of family physician and the strategic referral system. Yet, such programs will not be successful without encouraging people to participate and changing social behaviors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the administrative obstacles and problems to family physician program in urban areas of Iran. This study was a qualitative research conducted. A purposive sampling method was employed and the data were gathered via semi-structured interview with open-ended questions and document examination. All the interviews were recorded digitally and immediately transcribed verbatim. They were finally analyzed based on framework analysis. The participants' detailed descriptions showed that systemic, environmental, and human related factors were the main obstacles to the implementation of family physician plan. Since the success and performance of each program effectively cannot be obtained without people’s acceptance and collaboration, the necessity of training and giving information rapidly and timely to the residents in urban areas is felt more than ever. Also, making authorities aware of the obstacles expressed by people can be helpful in harmonizing the program with people’s requests; and can result in overcoming the challenges and obstacles facing the program.

  13. Multispecies animal investigation on biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and toxicity of 177Lu-EDTMP, a potential bone pain palliation agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, Domokos; Balogh, Lajos; Polyak, Andras; Kiraly, Reka; Marian, Terez; Pawlak, Dariusz; Zaknun, John J.; Pillai, Maroor R.A.; Janoki, Gyozo A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Radionuclide therapy (RNT) is an effective method for bone pain palliation in patients suffering from bone metastasis. Due to the long half-life, easy production and relatively low β- energy, 177 Lu [T 1/2 =6.73 days, E βmax =497 keV, E γ =113 keV (6.4%), 208 keV (11%)]-based radiopharmaceuticals offer logistical advantage for wider use. This paper reports the results of a multispecies biodistribution and toxicity studies of 177 Lu-EDTMP to collect preclinical data for starting human clinical trials. Methods: 177 Lu-EDTMP with radiochemical purity greater than 99% was formulated by using a lyophilized kit of EDTMP (35 mg of EDTMP, 5.72 g of CaO and 14.1 mg of NaOH). Biodistribution studies were conducted in mice and rabbits. Small animal imaging was performed using NanoSPECT/CT (Mediso, Ltd., Hungary) and digital autoradiography. Gamma camera imaging was done in rabbits and dogs. Four levels of activity (9.25 through 37 MBq/kg body weight) of 177 Lu-EDTMP were injected in four groups of three dogs each to study the toxicological effects. Results: 177 Lu-EDTMP accumulated almost exclusively in the skeletal system (peak ca. 41% of the injected activity in bone with terminal elimination half-life of 2130 and 1870 h in mice and rabbits, respectively) with a peak uptake during 1-3 h. Excretion of the radiopharmaceutical was through the urinary system. Imaging studies showed that all species (mouse, rat, rabbit and dog) take up the compound in regions of remodeling bone, while kidney retention is not visible after 1 day postinjection (pi). In dogs, the highest applied activity (37 MBq/kg body weight) led to a moderate decrease in platelet concentration (mean, 160 g/L) at 1 week pi with no toxicity. Conclusion: The protracted effective half-life of 177 Lu-EDTMP in bone supports that modifying the EDTMP molecule by introducing 177 Lu does not alter its biological behaviour as a specific bone-seeking tracer. Species-specific pharmacokinetic behavior

  14. Multispecies animal investigation on biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and toxicity of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP, a potential bone pain palliation agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathe, Domokos [Department of Applied Radioisotopes and Animal Experimentation, National ' Frederic Joliot-Curie' Institute of Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: mdomokos@hp.osski.hu; Balogh, Lajos; Polyak, Andras; Kiraly, Reka [Department of Applied Radioisotopes and Animal Experimentation, National ' Frederic Joliot-Curie' Institute of Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary); Marian, Terez [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Debrecen University, Debrecen (Hungary); Pawlak, Dariusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Radioisotope Centre POLATOM, Swierk-Otwock (Poland); Zaknun, John J.; Pillai, Maroor R.A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Janoki, Gyozo A. [Department of Applied Radioisotopes and Animal Experimentation, National ' Frederic Joliot-Curie' Institute of Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, H-1221 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Radionuclide therapy (RNT) is an effective method for bone pain palliation in patients suffering from bone metastasis. Due to the long half-life, easy production and relatively low {beta}- energy, {sup 177}Lu [T{sub 1/2}=6.73 days, E{sub {beta}}{sub max}=497 keV, E{sub {gamma}}=113 keV (6.4%), 208 keV (11%)]-based radiopharmaceuticals offer logistical advantage for wider use. This paper reports the results of a multispecies biodistribution and toxicity studies of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP to collect preclinical data for starting human clinical trials. Methods: {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP with radiochemical purity greater than 99% was formulated by using a lyophilized kit of EDTMP (35 mg of EDTMP, 5.72 g of CaO and 14.1 mg of NaOH). Biodistribution studies were conducted in mice and rabbits. Small animal imaging was performed using NanoSPECT/CT (Mediso, Ltd., Hungary) and digital autoradiography. Gamma camera imaging was done in rabbits and dogs. Four levels of activity (9.25 through 37 MBq/kg body weight) of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP were injected in four groups of three dogs each to study the toxicological effects. Results: {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP accumulated almost exclusively in the skeletal system (peak ca. 41% of the injected activity in bone with terminal elimination half-life of 2130 and 1870 h in mice and rabbits, respectively) with a peak uptake during 1-3 h. Excretion of the radiopharmaceutical was through the urinary system. Imaging studies showed that all species (mouse, rat, rabbit and dog) take up the compound in regions of remodeling bone, while kidney retention is not visible after 1 day postinjection (pi). In dogs, the highest applied activity (37 MBq/kg body weight) led to a moderate decrease in platelet concentration (mean, 160 g/L) at 1 week pi with no toxicity. Conclusion: The protracted effective half-life of {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP in bone supports that modifying the EDTMP molecule by introducing {sup 177}Lu does not alter its biological behaviour as a specific bone

  15. An animal model simulating acute infective upper airway obstruction of childhood and its use in the investigation of croup therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsdorf, J; Swift, D L

    1978-11-01

    Twelve heartworm-free mongrel dogs (10 males, 2 females) mean weight 22.2 kg (range 17.7--28.2 kg) were sedated and placed in a supine position with the neck extended. A double tracheotomy was performed under sterile conditions. The first tracheotomy tube was inserted 2 cm above the sternum in the direction of the carina using a shortened Silastic American tracheotomy tube (id 10 mm); the second was inserted two cartilage rings proximal to the first and approximately 5 cm distal to the larynx. All animals were kept deeply anesthesized by repeated iv injections of 3--6 mg/kg pentobarbitone sodium so that all reflexes (in particular laryngeal and palatal) were abolished. After control translaryngeal pressure measurements were obtained, the vocal cords were visualized, and steam was introduced onto the through the cords for a mean of 10 sec from above. For 2 hr after this, repeat pressure measurements, as described above, were made. After an overnight stabilizing period, two to three of five randomly chosen air environments were passed over the larynx at 10 liters/min via the proximal tracheotomy, and four half-hourly pressure measurements taken with control periods of at least 2 hr, as described above, separating each experiment. Environments utilized were as follows: i) "cold dry" air, i.e., air at a mean temperature of 9 degrees, obtained by passing compressed air through a coil placed in a solution of alcohol/Dry Ice; ii) "cold moist" air, i.e., air as above, subsequently passed over cold water at a mean temperature of 11 degrees; iii) "warm dry" air, i.e., air at a mean temperature of 36.5 degrees, obtained by passing compressed air through a copper coil, immersed in hot water; iv) "warm moist" air at a mean temperature of 36 degrees, obtained by passing compressed air through a heated Puritan humidifier; v) "ultrasonically produced mist" at room temperature (24 degrees), produced by a De Vilbiss ultrasonic nebulizer 900, set at maximum output. Six 2-hr

  16. Animal assisted therapy (AAT program as a useful adjunct to conventional psychosocial rehabilitation for patients with schizophrenia: results of a small-scale randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula eCalvo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal-assisted therapy (AAT for specific profiles of patients or participants.The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D, pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program.We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning, a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration and a family program. Each member of the control group (n=8 participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n=14 participated in twice-weekly 1-hour sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  17. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  18. Investigation to determine staff exposure and describe animal bite surveillance after detection of a rabid zebra in a safari lodge in Kenya, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obonyo, Mark; Arvelo, Wences; Kadivane, Samuel; Orundu, Moses; Lankau, Emily; Gakuya, Francis; Munyua, Peninah; Githinji, Jane; Marano, Nina; Njenga, Kariuki; Omolo, Jared; Montgomery, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal viral infection, resulting in >55,000 deaths globally each year. In August 2011, a young orphaned zebra at a Kenyan safari lodge acquired rabies and potentially exposed >150 tourists and local staff. An investigation was initiated to determine exposures among the local staff, and to describe animal bite surveillance in the affected district. We interviewed lodge staff on circumstances surrounding the zebra's illness and assessed their exposure status. We reviewed animal bite report forms from the outpatient department at the district hospital. The zebra was reported bitten by a dog on 31(st) July 2011, became ill on 23(rd)August, and died three days later. There were 22 employees working at the lodge during that time. Six (27%) had high exposure due to contact with saliva (bottle feeding, veterinary care) and received four doses of rabies vaccine and one of immune-globulin, and 16 (73%) had low exposure due to casual contact and received only four doses of rabies vaccine. From January 2010 to September 2011, 118 cases of animal bites were reported in the district; 67 (57%) occurred among males, 65 (57%) in children dogs accounted for 98% of reported bites. Dog bites remains the main source of rabies exposure in the district, but exposure can result from wildlife. This highlights the importance of a one health approach with strong communication between wildlife, veterinary, and human health sectors to improve rabies prevention and control.

  19. Investigation of roughing machining simulation by using visual basic programming in NX CAM system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Mohamad, Mohamad; Nafis Osman Zahid, Muhammed

    2018-03-01

    This paper outlines a simulation study to investigate the characteristic of roughing machining simulation in 4th axis milling processes by utilizing visual basic programming in NX CAM systems. The selection and optimization of cutting orientation in rough milling operation is critical in 4th axis machining. The main purpose of roughing operation is to approximately shape the machined parts into finished form by removing the bulk of material from workpieces. In this paper, the simulations are executed by manipulating a set of different cutting orientation to generate estimated volume removed from the machine parts. The cutting orientation with high volume removal is denoted as an optimum value and chosen to execute a roughing operation. In order to run the simulation, customized software is developed to assist the routines. Operations build-up instructions in NX CAM interface are translated into programming codes via advanced tool available in the Visual Basic Studio. The codes is customized and equipped with decision making tools to run and control the simulations. It permits the integration with any independent program files to execute specific operations. This paper aims to discuss about the simulation program and identifies optimum cutting orientations for roughing processes. The output of this study will broaden up the simulation routines performed in NX CAM systems.

  20. Technology advancing the study of animal cognition: using virtual reality to present virtually simulated environments to investigate nonhuman primate spatial cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolins, Francine L; Schweller, Kenneth; Milne, Scott

    2017-02-01

    Virtual simulated environments provide multiple ways of testing cognitive function and evaluating problem solving with humans (e.g., Woollett et al. 2009). The use of such interactive technology has increasingly become an essential part of modern life (e.g., autonomously driving vehicles, global positioning systems (GPS), and touchscreen computers; Chinn and Fairlie 2007; Brown 2011). While many nonhuman animals have their own forms of "technology", such as chimpanzees who create and use tools, in captive animal environments the opportunity to actively participate with interactive technology is not often made available. Exceptions can be found in some state-of-the-art zoos and laboratory facilities (e.g., Mallavarapu and Kuhar 2005). When interactive technology is available, captive animals often selectively choose to engage with it. This enhances the animal's sense of control over their immediate surroundings (e.g., Clay et al. 2011; Ackerman 2012). Such self-efficacy may help to fulfill basic requirements in a species' daily activities using problem solving that can involve foraging and other goal-oriented behaviors. It also assists in fulfilling the strong underlying motivation for contrafreeloading and exploration expressed behaviorally by many species in captivity (Young 1999). Moreover, being able to present nonhuman primates virtual reality environments under experimental conditions provides the opportunity to gain insight into their navigational abilities and spatial cognition. It allows for insight into the generation and application of internal mental representations of landmarks and environments under multiple conditions (e.g., small- and large-scale space) and subsequent spatial behavior. This paper reviews methods using virtual reality developed to investigate the spatial cognitive abilities of nonhuman primates, and great apes in particular, in comparison with that of humans of multiple age groups. We make recommendations about training, best

  1. Investigating an Intervention Program Linking Writing and Vocabulary Development for Homeless Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sinatra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented study investigated the effects of a four-week academic and activity – enriched summer program on vocabulary development and writing achievement of homeless children residing in traditional shelter facilities. When compared to controls the experimental students did not reveal gains in vocabulary and spelling as measured by two norm referenced tests. They did however demonstrate highly significant gains in writing ability based on the New York State standards criteria, reflecting five qualities of writing. On two project-developed instruments designed to measure improvement in book vocabulary and tennis skills, they showed significant increases based on analyses of their pre- and posttest scores. The program closed achievement gaps, fulfilled standards criteria, and may be the first of its kind in the homeless literature whereby students’ writing development was compared to matched controls as vocabulary development occurred based on literary readings.

  2. Investigating the Utilization of Research Evidence in the 4-H Youth Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette H. Bikos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the acquisition, interpretation, and utilization of research evidence in the 4-H Youth Development Program from the frame of Social Cognitive Theory. Utilizing Consensual Qualitative Research, we interviewed twenty 4-H faculty, staff, and volunteers from seven states. Results indicated four domains, which covered participants’ definitions of research utilization, their experiences utilizing research, the process of acquiring and distributing research, and barriers and facilitators to research utilization. Participants described research use primarily in terms of improving 4-H programs. They discussed their level of confidence (i.e. self-efficacy in finding and applying research evidence and their beliefs about the outcomes of research utilization (i.e. outcomes expectancy. Participants mentioned such barriers as not knowing where to look for research, lack of time, lack of funding, and difficulty applying research findings to their work. The facilitators included support from other 4-H colleagues and availability of 4-H specific conferences, publications, and curriculum databases.

  3. Investigation of chronic efficacy and safety profile of two potential anti-inflammatory bipyrazole-based compounds in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domiati S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Souraya Domiati,1 Mohammed Mehanna,2,3 Hanan Ragab,4 Hania Nakkash Chmaisse,1 Ahmed El Mallah5 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beirut Arab University, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Department of Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 5Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt Purpose: Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used to treat a variety of disorders, their administration is associated with gastrointestinal side effects, acute kidney injury and liver enzymes’ elevation. Accordingly, researchers are encouraged to create novel agents with better safety profile. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the chronic efficacy and safety profile of two compounds previously proven to have acceptable acute anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.Materials and methods: Doses were determined through formalin-induced mice paw edema-based dose–response curves. Granuloma weight was used to assess the chronic effect of the investigated compounds as compared to the vehicle and diclofenac representing the positive and the negative controls, respectively. Mice kidneys, livers and stomachs were histologically examined. Moreover, troponin I, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels were measured. Results: The results highlight that the granulomas and exudates developed in mice after 7 days of treatment, with compound I and compound II were significantly lower than that of the negative control group. Moreover, compound I showed significantly better anti-inflammatory effect than diclofenac. Troponin level was undetected in all groups. Histopathological

  4. Investigating the Efficacy of an Intensive English Program and the L2 Learners’ Learning Styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lee Su Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has found that many pre-university L2 learners, having completed an Intensive English Program (IEP still have difficulty in undertaking various disciplines in English-speaking tertiary institutions and continue to exhibit numerous linguistic problems (Bialystok, 2001, Celce Murcia 2001. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings on the investigation of L2 learners’ English proficiency in reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking upon their completion of an Intensive English (IE program using their IELTS (Academic, in-house exams and English Placement Tests (EPT scores, and the efficacy of IE program.  IELTS test is chosen for this study due to its increasing popularity in Malaysia and its internationally recognised value and quality.  The study was conducted in two parts. In Part One, all 72 Level 4 IE students were given an in-house EPT (English Placement Test pre-test on their entry and another EPT post-test on their exit, and then their pre-test and post-test results were compared.  In Part Two, 22 volunteers sat the IELTS test at the end of the program. The IELTS results of the 22 volunteers were compared with those who did not.  Data were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. This paper hopes to shed some light on (i whether or not L2 learners’ English language proficiency can be significantly enhanced and influenced by an intensive English program and (ii how leaners’ perception of their own learning strategies influence their learning progress.

  5. Biotecnologia animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    identification of the genomic region that contains the genes, but the confidence interval of the regions is usually large and may contain several genes. Candidate gene approach is limited to our restricted knowledge of the biological function of the genes. Sequencing of genomes and expressed sequences tags can provide identifying gene position and metabolic pathways associated with phenotypic trait. Integrating these strategies using bioinformatics software will allow identifying of novel genes for animal production. Then, animal breeding programs will include the information from DNA directly on evaluation of genetic value of livestock production.

  6. Dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program: a preliminary dismantling investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Megan; Thompson, J Kevin; Brannick, Michael; van den Berg, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    A dissonance-based program aimed at reducing thin-ideal internalization has been found to significantly decrease levels of bulimic symptoms in young adult and adolescent females. Because this program is multifaceted, containing psychoeducation, counterattitudinal advocacy, and behavioral exposure components, the current study sought to investigate the mechanisms involved in symptom reduction. The current study compared the original treatment program with a dismantled version of the full package, which consisted solely of the specific dissonance component (i.e., the counterattitudinal advocacy procedure). Seventy-eight women were randomly assigned to either the full treatment condition or the counterattitudinal advocacy condition. Findings suggest that both interventions significantly reduced established risk factors for eating pathology as well as bulimic symptoms at termination and at 1-month follow-up. Both treatments appear to be equally effective at reducing eating pathology in at-risk college women. Limitations of the study are discussed, and directions for future research are offered. 2005 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Animal production and health newsletter. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    The Newsletter announces meetings and training programs in animal husbandry and animal health related activities undertaken by the IAEA. Short communications on coordinated research programs in animal production and health are included

  8. The Role of Ethnographic Interviewing in Climate Change Evaluation Research: Investigating Intended and Unintended program effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloro-Bidart, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ethnographic interviewing is an under-utilized tool in climate change evaluation research, even though it has the potential to serve as a powerful method of data collection. The utility of the ethnographic interview lies in its ability to elicit responses from program participants describing what a program is in practice, shedding light on both intended and unintended program impacts. Drawing on evaluation work involving a federally-funded climate change grant at the University of California, Riverside, I will discuss how to design an ethnographic interview protocol in an effort to share "best practices" with other climate change evaluators. Particular attention will be given to applying ethnographic approaches to various program types, even those differing from the one discussed. I will share some of the concrete findings from my work on this grant, to serve as examples of the kinds of data evaluators can collect when employing an ethnographic approach to interviewing. UC Riverside's climate change grant is multi-faceted, however the component studied ethnographically was a science fair mentoring program. About twenty K-12 students from high poverty, ethnically diverse schools who expressed an interest in participating in science fair were paired up with graduate student mentors to simultaneously research climate change and design authentic science fair projects to compete at various levels. Since one of the stated goals of the grant is to "stimulate…students to consider climate science as a career track through experiential education activities" I was particularly interested in how student experiences with the project might differ from school science which has historically "pushed out" ethnically diverse students like those in many of Riverside's schools. (In the program students are able to interact one-on-one with a mentor and in school settings there is typically one teacher for more than thirty students). I also sought to understand student perceptions of

  9. Technology advancing the study of animal cognition: using virtual reality to present virtually simulated environments to investigate nonhuman primate spatial cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweller, Kenneth; Milne, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Virtual simulated environments provide multiple ways of testing cognitive function and evaluating problem solving with humans (e.g., Woollett et al. 2009). The use of such interactive technology has increasingly become an essential part of modern life (e.g., autonomously driving vehicles, global positioning systems (GPS), and touchscreen computers; Chinn and Fairlie 2007; Brown 2011). While many nonhuman animals have their own forms of "technology", such as chimpanzees who create and use tools, in captive animal environments the opportunity to actively participate with interactive technology is not often made available. Exceptions can be found in some state-of-the-art zoos and laboratory facilities (e.g., Mallavarapu and Kuhar 2005). When interactive technology is available, captive animals often selectively choose to engage with it. This enhances the animal’s sense of control over their immediate surroundings (e.g., Clay et al. 2011; Ackerman 2012). Such self-efficacy may help to fulfill basic requirements in a species’ daily activities using problem solving that can involve foraging and other goal-oriented behaviors. It also assists in fulfilling the strong underlying motivation for contrafreeloading and exploration expressed behaviorally by many species in captivity (Young 1999). Moreover, being able to present nonhuman primates virtual reality environments under experimental conditions provides the opportunity to gain insight into their navigational abilities and spatial cognition. It allows for insight into the generation and application of internal mental representations of landmarks and environments under multiple conditions (e.g., small- and large-scale space) and subsequent spatial behavior. This paper reviews methods using virtual reality developed to investigate the spatial cognitive abilities of nonhuman primates, and great apes in particular, in comparison with that of humans of multiple age groups. We make recommendations about training

  10. Metal chelates of 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid in animal feeding. Part 2: Further characterizations, in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predieri, Giovanni; Elviri, Lisa; Tegoni, Matteo; Zagnoni, Ingrid; Cinti, Enrico; Biagi, Giacomo; Ferruzza, Simonetta; Leonardi, Giuliano

    2005-02-01

    The alpha-hydroxyacid 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutanoic acid (the so-called methionine hydroxy-analogue, MHA), largely used in animal nutrition as a source of methionine, forms stable metal chelates with divalent metals of formula [{CH(3)SCH(2) CH(2)CH(OH)COO}(2)M].nH(2)O. Protonation and iron(III) and copper(II) complex formation constants have been determined by potentiometry at 25 degrees C. Distribution diagrams show that no free Fe(3+) cations are present in solution at pH>2.5. ESI-MS (Electron-Spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry) investigations carried out both on iron and zinc complexes in solution have evidenced various species with different MHA/metal ratios. In vivo trials were carried out with rats. After receiving a zinc-deficient diet for 3 weeks, animals were fed the same diet added with zinc sulfate or zinc/MHA chelate; the zinc content of faeces was higher (+45%; P<0.05) in sulfate fed rats, whereas zinc retention was higher (+61%; P<0.05) in the Zn/MHA diet. Experiments in vitro with human intestinal Caco-2 cells indicated that the MHA/Fe chelate was taken up by the cells without any apparent toxic effect. The iron uptake was higher than that of iron nitrilotriacetate (Fe(3+)NTA), an effective chelate for delivering iron to milk diets. In conclusion, these data indicate that the use of MHA chelates could be a valuable tool to increase bioavailability of trace minerals and reduce the environmental impact of animal manure.

  11. Bio F1B hamster: a unique animal model with reduced lipoprotein lipase activity to investigate nutrient mediated regulation of lipoprotein metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornish Marion L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bio F1B hamster is an inbred hybrid strain that is highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We previously reported that feeding a high fat fish oil diet to Bio F1B hamster caused severe hyperlipidaemia. In this study we compared the effects of various diets in the Bio F1B hamster and the Golden Syrian hamster, which is an outbred hamster strain to investigate whether genetic background plays an important role in dietary fat mediated regulation of lipoprotein metabolism. We further investigated the mechanisms behind diet-induced hyperlipidaemia in F1B hamster. Methods The Bio F1B and Golden Syrian hamsters, 8 weeks old, were fed high fat diets rich in either monounsaturated fatty acids, an n-6: n-3 ratio of 5 or a fish oil diet for 4 weeks. Animals were fasted overnight and blood and tissue samples were collected. Plasma was fractionated into various lipoprotein fractions and assayed for triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations. Plasma lipoprotein lipase activity was measured using radioisotope method. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity was measured in the liver and intestine. Plasma apolipoproteinB48, -B100 and apolipoprotein E was measured using Western blots. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine the effect of diet type and animal strain. Results The fish oil fed F1B hamsters showed milky plasma after a 14-hour fast. Fish oil feeding caused accumulation of apolipoproteinB48 containing lipoprotein particles suggesting hindrance of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein clearance. There was no significant effect of diet or strain on hepatic or intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity indicating that hyperlipidaemia is not due to an increase in the assembly or secretion of lipoprotein particles. F1B hamsters showed significantly reduced levels of lipoprotein lipase activity, which was inhibited by fish oil feeding. Conclusion Evidence is presented for the first time that alterations in

  12. River and river-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K.; Brydsten, L.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a determination of the function of running waters as transport channels for material from the continents to the sea are presented. We have assumed that retention mechanisms of material in the river and in the riparian zone will be covered by special investigations but tried to create a platform for such investigations by quantification of the extension of different main habitats. The choice of parameters has been made so that also the nature conservation value of the river can be preliminary established, and includes a general description of the river type and the inherent ecosystem. The material links directly to that presented in a previous report concerning site investigation programmes for lakes. The parameters have been divided into five groups: 1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; 2) The river catchment area and its major constituents; 3) The river morphometry; 4) The river ecosystem; 5) Human-induced damages to the river ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area, represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the system, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the river morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the river, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, nutrient status, distribution of different habitats, and presence of fish in the system. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and

  13. River and river-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology; Brydsten, L. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a determination of the function of running waters as transport channels for material from the continents to the sea are presented. We have assumed that retention mechanisms of material in the river and in the riparian zone will be covered by special investigations but tried to create a platform for such investigations by quantification of the extension of different main habitats. The choice of parameters has been made so that also the nature conservation value of the river can be preliminary established, and includes a general description of the river type and the inherent ecosystem. The material links directly to that presented in a previous report concerning site investigation programmes for lakes. The parameters have been divided into five groups: 1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; 2) The river catchment area and its major constituents; 3) The river morphometry; 4) The river ecosystem; 5) Human-induced damages to the river ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area, represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the system, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the river morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the river, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, nutrient status, distribution of different habitats, and presence of fish in the system. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and

  14. Investigating predictors of visiting, using, and revisiting an online health-communication program: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van 't Riet, Jonathan; Crutzen, Rik; De Vries, Hein

    2010-09-02

    Online health communication has the potential to reach large audiences, with the additional advantages that it can be operational at all times and that the costs per visitor are low. Furthermore, research shows that Internet-delivered interventions can be effective in changing health behaviors. However, exposure to Internet-delivered health-communication programs is generally low. Research investigating predictors of exposure is needed to be able to effectively disseminate online interventions. In the present study, the authors used a longitudinal design with the aim of identifying demographic, psychological, and behavioral predictors of visiting, using, and revisiting an online program promoting physical activity in the general population. A webpage was created providing the public with information about health and healthy behavior. The website included a "physical activity check," which consisted of a physical activity computer-tailoring expert system where visitors could check whether their physical activity levels were in line with recommendations. Visitors who consented to participate in the present study (n = 489) filled in a questionnaire that assessed demographics, mode of recruitment, current physical activity levels, and health motivation. Immediately after, participants received tailored feedback concerning their current physical activity levels and completed a questionnaire assessing affective and cognitive user experience, attitude toward being sufficiently physically active, and intention to be sufficiently physically active. Three months later, participants received an email inviting them once more to check whether their physical activity level had changed. Analyses of visiting showed that more women (67.5%) than men (32.5%) visited the program. With regard to continued use, native Dutch participants (odds ratio [OR] = 2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16-6.81, P = .02) and participants with a strong motivation to be healthy (OR = 1.46, CI = 1

  15. An investigation of high-temperature irradiation test program of new ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori; Terai, Takayuki; Oku, Tatsuo

    1999-08-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute entrusted the Atomic Energy Society of Japan with an investigation into the trend of irradiation processing/damage research on new ceramic materials. The present report describes the result of the investigation, which was aimed at effective execution of irradiation programs using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) by examining preferential research subjects and their concrete research methods. Objects of the investigation were currently on-going preliminary tests of functional materials (high-temperature oxide superconductor and high-temperature semiconductor) and structural materials (carbon/carbon and SiC/SiC composite materials), together with newly proposed subjects of, e.g., radiation effects on ceramics-coated materials and super-plastic ceramic materials as well as microscopic computer simulation of deformation and fracture of ceramics. These works have revealed 1) the background of each research subject, 2) its objective and significance from viewpoints of science and engineering, 3) research methodology in stages from preliminary tests to real HTTR irradiation, and 4) concrete HTTR-irradiation methods which include main specifications of test specimens, irradiation facilities and post-irradiation examination facilities and apparatuses. The present efforts have constructed the important fundamentals in the new ceramic materials field for further planning and execution of the innovative basic research on high-temperature engineering. (author)

  16. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals...

  17. Investigating Employee-Reported Benefits of Participation in a Comprehensive Australian Workplace Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Michelle; Blizzard, Leigh; Sanderson, Kristy; Teale, Brook; Nelson, Mark; Chappell, Kate; Venn, Alison

    2016-05-01

    To investigate employee-reported benefits of participation, employee organizational commitment, and health-related behaviors and body mass index (BMI) following implementation of a comprehensive workplace health promotion (WHP) program. State government employees from Tasmania, Australia, completed surveys in 2010 (n = 3408) and 2013 (n = 3228). Repeated cross-sectional data were collected on sociodemographic, health, and work characteristics. Participation in WHP activities, employee-reported organizational commitment, and benefits of participation were collected in 2013. Respondents who participated in multiple activities were more likely to agree that participation had motivated them, or helped them to address a range of health and work factors (trends: P employee organizational commitment. No differences were observed in health-related behaviors and BMI between 2010 and 2013. Healthy@Work (pH@W) was either ineffective, or insufficient time had elapsed to detect a population-level change in employee lifestyle factors.

  18. The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign: Empowering Students to Measure, Investigate, and Understand Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaro, J.; Andersen, T.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Wegner, K.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) is a two-year campaign focused on empowering students to measure, investigate, and understand the climate system in their local community and around the world. Schools can participate in the campaign via three mechanisms: climate foundations, intensive observing periods (IOPs), and research investigations. Participation in the first year of the SCRC focused on increasing student understanding and awareness of climate. Students in 49 countries participated by joining a quarterly webinar, completing the online climate learning activity, collecting and entering data during IOPs, or completing an online join survey. The year also included a video competition with the theme of Earth Day 2012, as well as a virtual student conference in conjunction with The GLOBE Program's From Learning to Research Project. As the SCRC continues into its second year, the goal is for students to increase their understanding of and ability to conduct scientific research focused on climate. Furthermore, year two of the SCRC seeks to improve students' global awareness by encouraging collaborations among students, teachers and scientists focused on understanding the Earth as a system. In addition to the continuation of activities from year one, year two will have even more webinars offered, two competitions, the introduction of two new IOPs, and a culminating virtual student conference. It is anticipated that this virtual conference will showcase research by students who are enthusiastic and dedicated to understanding climate and mitigating impacts of climate change in their communities. This presentation will highlight examples of how the SCRC is engaging students all over the world in hands-on and locally relevant climate research.

  19. Animal ethics dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Trine; Hansen, Tina; Algers, Anne

    2006-01-01

    'Animal Ethics Dilemma' is a freely available computer-supported learning tool (www.animalethicsdilemma.net or www.aedilemma.net) which has been developed primarily for veterinary undergraduates but is applicable also to students in other fields of animal science. The objectives of the computer...... program are to promote students' understanding of the ethics related to animal use, to illustrate ethical dilemmas that arise in animal use, to broaden students' moral imagination, and to enable students to differentiate between types of ethical argument. The program comprises five case studies: (1......) the blind hens; (2) ANDi the genetically modified monkey; (3) euthanasia of a healthy dog; (4) animal slaughter; and (5) rehabilitation of seals. Special consideration has been given to enhancing the pedagogic value of the program. Students can control their learning by selecting a variety of ways...

  20. Animal behavior and well-being symposium: Farm animal welfare assurance: science and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushen, J; Butterworth, A; Swanson, J C

    2011-04-01

    Public and consumer pressure for assurances that farm animals are raised humanely has led to a range of private and public animal welfare standards, and for methods to assess compliance with these standards. The standards usually claim to be science based, but even though researchers have developed measures of animal welfare and have tested the effects of housing and management variables on welfare within controlled laboratory settings, there are challenges in extending this research to develop on-site animal welfare standards. The standards need to be validated against a definition of welfare that has broad support and which is amenable to scientific investigation. Ensuring that such standards acknowledge scientific uncertainty is also challenging, and balanced input from all scientific disciplines dealing with animal welfare is needed. Agencies providing animal welfare audit services need to integrate these scientific standards and legal requirements into successful programs that effectively measure and objectively report compliance. On-farm assessment of animal welfare requires a combination of animal-based measures to assess the actual state of welfare and resource-based measures to identify risk factors. We illustrate this by referring to a method of assessing welfare in broiler flocks. Compliance with animal welfare standards requires buy-in from all stakeholders, and this will be best achieved by a process of inclusion in the development of pragmatic assessment methods and the development of audit programs verifying the conditions and continuous improvement of farm animal welfare.

  1. Animal Telemetry Network (ATN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data (updated daily) are from the Animal Telemetry Network (ATN) program. Begun as one of the field projects in the international Census of Marine Life, the...

  2. Early-life adversity-induced long-term epigenetic programming associated with early onset of chronic physical aggression: Studies in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Chekhonin, Vladimir P

    2017-06-05

    To examine whether chronic physical aggression (CPA) in adulthood can be epigenetically programmed early in life due to exposure to early-life adversity. Literature search of public databases such as PubMed/MEDLINE and Scopus. Children/adolescents susceptible for CPA and exposed to early-life abuse fail to efficiently cope with stress that in turn results in the development of CPA later in life. This phenomenon was observed in humans and animal models of aggression. The susceptibility to aggression is a complex trait that is regulated by the interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms mediate this interaction. Subjects exposed to stress early in life exhibited long-term epigenetic programming that can influence their behaviour in adulthood. This programming affects expression of many genes not only in the brain but also in other systems such as neuroendocrine and immune. The propensity to adult CPA behaviour in subjects experienced to early-life adversity is mediated by epigenetic programming that involves long-term systemic epigenetic alterations in a whole genome.

  3. Lake and lake-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K.; Brydsten, L

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a preliminary determination of the ecological function of lakes are presented. The choice of parameters have been made with respect to a model for the determination of the nature conservation values of lakes which is currently being developed by the authors of this report, but is also well suited for a general description of the lake type and the functioning of the inherent ecosystem. The parameters have been divided into five groups: 1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; 2) The lake catchment area and its major constituents; 3) The lake morphometry; 4) The lake ecosystem; 5) Human-induced damages to the lake ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the lake, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the lake morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of different key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the lake, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the stratification pattern, light climate, influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, trophic status, distribution of key habitats, and presence of fish and rare fauna and flora in the lake. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and material in the system. The fifth group, finally, describes the degree on anthropogenic influence on the ecosystem and will in the context of site investigation programmes be used to judge eventual malfunctioning within the entire, or parts of, the lake ecosystem

  4. Lake and lake-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology; Brydsten, L [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a preliminary determination of the ecological function of lakes are presented. The choice of parameters have been made with respect to a model for the determination of the nature conservation values of lakes which is currently being developed by the authors of this report, but is also well suited for a general description of the lake type and the functioning of the inherent ecosystem. The parameters have been divided into five groups: (1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; (2) The lake catchment area and its major constituents; (3) The lake morphometry; (4) The lake ecosystem; (5) Human-induced damages to the lake ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the lake, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the lake morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of different key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the lake, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the stratification pattern, light climate, influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, trophic status, distribution of key habitats, and presence of fish and rare fauna and flora in the lake. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and material in the system. The fifth group, finally, describes the degree on anthropogenic influence on the ecosystem and will in the context of site investigation programmes be used to judge eventual malfunctioning within the entire, or parts of, the lake

  5. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the soil and sediment task. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, V.L.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    This document is a site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist (WP/HSC) for a task of the Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI). Title 29 CFR Part 1910.120 requires that a health and safety program plan that includes site- and task-specific information be completed to ensure conformance with health- and safety-related requirements. To meet this requirement, the health and safety program plan for each WAG 2 RI&SI field task must include (1) the general health and safety program plan for all WAG 2 RI&SI field activities and (2) a WP/HSC for that particular field task. These two components, along with all applicable referenced procedures, must be kept together at the work site and distributed to field personnel as required. The general health and safety program plan is the Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169). The WP/HSCs are being issued as supplements to ORNL/ER-169.

  6. Suppression of Locomotor Activity in Female C57Bl/6J Mice Treated with Interleukin-1β: Investigating a Method for the Study of Fatigue in Laboratory Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Bonsall

    Full Text Available Fatigue is a disabling symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease, and is also common in patients with traumatic brain injury, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Little is known about the neurobiology of fatigue, in part due to the lack of an approach to induce fatigue in laboratory animals. Fatigue is a common response to systemic challenge by pathogens, a response in part mediated through action of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. We investigated the behavioral responses of mice to IL-1β. Female C57Bl/6J mice of 3 ages were administered IL-1β at various doses i.p. Interleukin-1β reduced locomotor activity, and sensitivity increased with age. Further experiments were conducted with middle-aged females. Centrally administered IL-1β dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity. Using doses of IL-1β that caused suppression of locomotor activity, we measured minimal signs of sickness, such as hyperthermia, pain or anhedonia (as measured with abdominal temperature probes, pre-treatment with the analgesic buprenorphine and through sucrose preference, respectively, all of which are responses commonly reported with higher doses. We found that middle-aged orexin-/- mice showed equivalent effects of IL-1β on locomotor activity as seen in wild-type controls, suggesting that orexins are not necessary for IL-1β -induced reductions in wheel-running. Given that the availability and success of therapeutic treatments for fatigue is currently limited, we examined the effectiveness of two potential clinical treatments, modafinil and methylphenidate. We found that these treatments were variably successful in restoring locomotor activity after IL-1β administration. This provides one step toward development of a satisfactory animal model of the multidimensional experience of fatigue, a model that could allow us to determine possible pathways through which inflammation induces fatigue, and could lead to novel

  7. Annual Progress Report FY 93 (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Department of Clinical Investigation). Clinical Investigation Program. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Previous FYs: $ 0 Total: $ 0 STUDY OBJECTIVE To study the effects of intravenous regional guanethidine on oain resulting from reflex sympathetic dystrophy ... sympathetic dystrophy ( sympathetically maintained pain), burning peripheral neuropathies, or other non-specified neuropathic (burning) pain. TECHNICAL... Sympathetic Dystrophy , Causalgia or Raynaud’s Phenomenon/Disease Amendment II KEY’ORDS: guanethidine. pain PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Phillips, William

  8. 7 CFR 2.80 - Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under the International Plant Protection Convention. (6) (Laboratory) Animal Welfare Act, as amended (7...; inspection, testing, treatment, and certification of animals; and a program to investigate and develop... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection...

  9. Optimizing Implementation of Obesity Prevention Programs: A Qualitative Investigation Within a Large-Scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozica, Samantha L; Teede, Helena J; Harrison, Cheryce L; Klein, Ruth; Lombard, Catherine B

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in rural and remote areas is elevated in comparison to urban populations, highlighting the need for interventions targeting obesity prevention in these settings. Implementing evidence-based obesity prevention programs is challenging. This study aimed to investigate factors influencing the implementation of obesity prevention programs, including adoption, program delivery, community uptake, and continuation, specifically within rural settings. Nested within a large-scale randomized controlled trial, a qualitative exploratory approach was adopted, with purposive sampling techniques utilized, to recruit stakeholders from 41 small rural towns in Australia. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with clinical health professionals, health service managers, and local government employees. Open coding was completed independently by 2 investigators and thematic analysis undertaken. In-depth interviews revealed that obesity prevention programs were valued by the rural workforce. Program implementation is influenced by interrelated factors across: (1) contextual factors and (2) organizational capacity. Key recommendations to manage the challenges of implementing evidence-based programs focused on reducing program delivery costs, aided by the provision of a suite of implementation and evaluation resources. Informing the scale-up of future prevention programs, stakeholders highlighted the need to build local rural capacity through developing supportive university partnerships, generating local program ownership and promoting active feedback to all program partners. We demonstrate that the rural workforce places a high value on obesity prevention programs. Our results inform the future scale-up of obesity prevention programs, providing an improved understanding of strategies to optimize implementation of evidence-based prevention programs. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  10. Biodiesel production from inedible animal tallow and an experimental investigation of its use as alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oener, Cengiz [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Firat University, 23119 Elazig (Turkey); Altun, Sehmus [Technical Education Faculty, Automotive Division, Batman University, 72060 Batman (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    In this study, a substitute fuel for diesel engines was produced from inedible animal tallow and its usability was investigated as pure biodiesel and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel in a diesel engine. Tallow methyl ester as biodiesel fuel was prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification of the fat with methanol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. Fuel properties of methyl ester, diesel fuel and blends of them (5%, 20% and 50% by volume) were determined. Viscosity and density of fatty acid methyl ester have been found to meet ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications. Viscosity and density of tallow methyl esters are found to be very close to that of diesel. The calorific value of biodiesel is found to be slightly lower than that of diesel. An experimental study was carried out in order to investigate of its usability as alternative fuel of tallow methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. It was observed that the addition of biodiesel to the diesel fuel decreases the effective efficiency of engine and increases the specific fuel consumption. This is due to the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. However, the effective engine power was comparable by biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and smoke opacity were reduced around 15%, 38.5%, 72.7% and 56.8%, respectively, in case of tallow methyl esters (B100) compared to diesel fuel. Besides, the lowest CO, NO{sub x} emissions and the highest exhaust temperature were obtained for B20 among all other fuels. The reductions in exhaust emissions made tallow methyl esters and its blends, especially B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. Based on this study, animal tallow methyl esters and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel can be used a substitute for diesel in direct injection diesel engines without any engine modification. (author)

  11. Biodiesel production from inedible animal tallow and an experimental investigation of its use as alternative fuel in a direct injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oener, Cengiz; Altun, Sehmus

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a substitute fuel for diesel engines was produced from inedible animal tallow and its usability was investigated as pure biodiesel and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel in a diesel engine. Tallow methyl ester as biodiesel fuel was prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification of the fat with methanol in the presence of NaOH as catalyst. Fuel properties of methyl ester, diesel fuel and blends of them (5%, 20% and 50% by volume) were determined. Viscosity and density of fatty acid methyl ester have been found to meet ASTM D6751 and EN 14214 specifications. Viscosity and density of tallow methyl esters are found to be very close to that of diesel. The calorific value of biodiesel is found to be slightly lower than that of diesel. An experimental study was carried out in order to investigate of its usability as alternative fuel of tallow methyl ester in a direct injection diesel engine. It was observed that the addition of biodiesel to the diesel fuel decreases the effective efficiency of engine and increases the specific fuel consumption. This is due to the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to diesel fuel. However, the effective engine power was comparable by biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO x ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and smoke opacity were reduced around 15%, 38.5%, 72.7% and 56.8%, respectively, in case of tallow methyl esters (B100) compared to diesel fuel. Besides, the lowest CO, NO x emissions and the highest exhaust temperature were obtained for B20 among all other fuels. The reductions in exhaust emissions made tallow methyl esters and its blends, especially B20 a suitable alternative fuel for diesel and thus could help in controlling air pollution. Based on this study, animal tallow methyl esters and its blends with petroleum diesel fuel can be used a substitute for diesel in direct injection diesel engines without any engine modification. (author)

  12. Health and safety plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cofer, G.H.; Holt, V.L.; Roupe, G.W.

    1993-11-01

    This health and safety plan (HASP) was developed by the members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health Science Research Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared to ensure that health and safety related items for the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study and Site Investigation projects conform with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 (April 18, 1992). The RI Plan calls for the characterization, monitoring, risk assessment, and identification of remedial needs and alternatives that have been structured and staged with short-term and long-term objectives. In early FY 1992, the WAG 2 RI was integrated with the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Site Investigations program in order to achieve the complimentary objectives of the projects more effectively by providing an integrated basis of support. The combined effort was named the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigations Program (WAG 2 RI&SI). The Site Investigation activities are a series of monitoring efforts and directed investigations that support other ER activities by providing information about (1) watershed hydrogeology; (2) contaminants, pathways, and fluxes for groundwater at ORNL; (3) shallow subsurface areas that can act as secondary sources of contaminants; and (4) biological populations and contaminants in biota, in addition to other support and coordination activities.

  13. An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the…

  14. Coordinated experimental/analytical program for investigating margins to failure of Category I reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endebrock, E.; Dove, R.; Anderson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The material presented in this paper deals with a coordinated experimental/analytical program designed to provide information needed for making margins to failure assessments of seismic Category I reinforced concrete structures. The experimental program is emphasized and background information that lead to this particular experimental approach is presented. Analytical tools being developed to supplement the experimental program are discussed. 16 figures

  15. Director, Laboratory Animal Care and Use Section

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIAMS Laboratory Animal Care and Use Section (LACU) provides support to all NIAMS Intramural Research Program (IRP) Branches and Laboratories using animals. The...

  16. GRAFEC: A New Spanish Program to Investigate Waste Management Options for Radioactive Graphite - 12399

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Eva; Pina, Gabriel; Rodriguez, Marina [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22, 28040-MADRID (Spain); Fachinger, Johannes; Grosse, Karl-Heinz [Furnaces Nuclear Application Grenoble SAS (FNAG), 4, avenue Charles de Gaulle, 38800 Le Pont de Claix (France); Leganes Nieto, Jose Luis; Quiros Gracian, Maria [ENRESA, C/ Emilio Vargas,7 - 28043 - MADRID (Spain); Seemann, Richard [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Wilhelm-Rohn-Strasse 35, 63450 Hanau (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Spain has to manage about 3700 tons of irradiated graphite from the reactor Vandellos I as radioactive waste. 2700 tons are the stack of the reactor and are still in the reactor core waiting for retrieval. The rest of the quantities, 1000 tons, are the graphite sleeves which have been already retrieved from the reactor. During operation the graphite sleeves were stored in a silo and during the dismantling stage a retrieval process was carried out separating the wires from the graphite, which were crushed and introduced into 220 cubic containers of 6 m{sup 3} each and placed in interim storage. The graphite is an intermediate level radioactive waste but it contains long lived radionuclides like {sup 14}C which disqualifies disposal at the low level waste repository of El Cabril. Therefore, a new project has been started in order to investigate two new options for the management of this waste type. The first one is based on a selective decontamination of {sup 14}C by thermal methods. This method is based on results obtained at the Research Centre Juelich (FZJ) in the Frame of the EC programs 'Raphael' and 'Carbowaste'. The process developed at FZJ is based on a preferential oxidation of {sup 14}C in comparison to the bulk {sup 12}C. Explanations for this effect are the inhomogeneous distribution and a weaker bounding of {sup 14}C which is not incorporated in the graphite lattice. However these investigations have only been performed with graphite from the high temperature reactor Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor Juelich AVR which has been operated in a non-oxidising condition or research reactor graphite operated at room temperature. The reactor Vandellos I has been operated with CO{sub 2} as coolant and significant amounts of graphite have been already oxidised. The aim of the project is to validate whether a {sup 14}C decontamination can also been achieved with graphite from Vandellos I. A second possibility under investigation is the

  17. The Solar-Stellar Connection (NAG5-6124: SOHO Guest Investigator Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    The following is a final report from the SOHO Guest Investigator program to use the SUMER far-UV spectrometer to obtain imaging spectroscopy in support of the goals of the so-called "solar-stellar connection." In particular, a major emphasis was utilization of the long-slit time-resolved maps of the solar surface in bright far-UV emission lines to deduce how particular aspects of the temporally and spatially averaged line profiles trace back to individual structural features of the magnetically disturbed outer atmosphere; to help interpret the unresolved line profiles from high quality stellar observations (say, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). The researchers served two tours of duty in the SOHO Operations Center as SUMER planners, during which time we conducted an extensive series of observing programs. These can be divided into three general categories: surface mapping, translimb spectroscopy, and active region diagnostics. We have analyzed some of the large volumes of data to the point where we have presented them in poster papers, and in invited papers at national and international meetings. Listed below are the titles of the preliminary publications we have written, including brief abstracts to indicate the main results. (1) Chromospheric structure and Dynamics-- Observations -- The chromosphere is a highly structured dynamic 'layer' of the solar outer atmosphere. Here, not only are the effects of mechanical heating first evident (moving upward in altitude from the deep photosphere), but also the amount of nonradiative energy deposited is far greater than in the albeit much hotter overlying transition region and corona. Further, the chromosphere is by far the thickest zone of the solar atmosphere with respect to the pressure scale height. A major goal of stellar astrophysics is to understand how the chromosphere is heated and why it adopts its peculiar structure. A cursory examination of solar filtergrams and high-resolution movies demonstrates

  18. LJUNGSKILE 1.0 A Computer Program for Investigation of Uncertainties in Chemical Speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, Christian; Oedegaard-Jensen, Arvid

    2002-11-01

    In analysing the long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal, there is a need to investigate uncertainties in chemical speciation calculations. Chemical speciation is of importance in evaluating the solubility of radionuclides, the chemical degradation of engineering materials, and chemical processes controlling groundwater composition. The uncertainties in chemical speciation may for instance be related to uncertainties in thermodynamic data, the groundwater composition, or the extrapolation to the actual temperature and ionic strength. The magnitude of such uncertainties and its implications are seldom explicitly evaluated in any detail. Commonly available chemical speciation programmes normally do not have a build-in option to include uncertainty ranges. The program developed within this project has the capability of incorporating uncertainty ranges in speciation calculations and can be used for graphical presentation of uncertainty ranges for dominant species. The program should be regarded as a starting point for assessing uncertainties in chemical speciation, since it is not yet comprehensive in its capabilities. There may be limitations in its usefulness to address various geochemical problems. The LJUNGSKILE code allows the user to select two approaches: the Monte Carlo (MC) approach and the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). LHS allows to produce a satisfactory statistics with a minimum of CPU time. It is, in general, possible to do a simple theoretical speciation calculation within seconds. There are, admittedly, alternatives to LHS and there is criticism towards the uncritical use of LHS output because commonly correlation between some of the input variables exists. LHS, like MC, is not capable to take these correlations into account. Such a correlation can, i.e. exist between the pH of a solution and the partial pressure of CO 2 : higher pH solutions may absorb larger amounts of CO 2 and can reduce the CO 2 partial pressure. It is therefore of advantage to

  19. Investigations of the natural fission reactor program. Progress report, October 1977--September 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, G.A.; Norris, A.E.

    1978-10-01

    The U.S. study of the Oklo natural reactor began in 1973 with the principal objectives of understanding the processes that produced the reactor and that led to the retention of many of its products. Major facets of the program have been the chemical separation and mass spectrometric analysis of the reactor components and products, the petrological and mineralogical examination of samples taken from the reactor zones, and an interdisciplinary modeling of possible processes consistent with reactor physics, geophysics, and geochemistry. Most of the past work has been on samples taken within the reactor zones. Presently, these studies give greater emphasis to the measurement of mobile products in additional suites of samples collected peripherally and ''downstream'' from the reactor zones. This report summarizes the current status of research and the views of U.S. investigators, with particular reference to the extensive work of the French scientists, concerning the main features of the Oklo natural fission reactor. Also mentioned briefly is the U.S. search for natural fission reactors at other locations

  20. Developing effective professional bus driver health programs: an investigation of self-rated health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Shih; Wong, Jinn-Tsai

    2011-11-01

    The health of professional bus drivers is a critical factor in their driving performance; any impairment may lead to undesired consequences. In an attempt to develop and prioritize health and wellness programs, this study investigates the factors significantly affecting the health conditions of professional bus drivers, as well as the strength of these factors. This study uses self-rated health as the examination measurement. This simple assessment is an inclusive measure of health status for judging health trajectory, and is highly associated with changes in functional ability, including perceived control over driving. This study evaluates driver responses of self-rated health with ordered response models that consider factors such as the driver reported health problems, physical and psychological conditions, demographic factors, driving experience, and working environment. Analysis of a sample of 785 drivers shows that age, body mass index, depression, daily working hours, perceived company safety culture, and health problems are the factors significantly affecting self-rated health. Depression has the greatest effect among all factors except health problems. Unlike the linear relationships for the other factors, the relationships between depression levels and perceived health are S-shaped. The results of ordered response models suggest that these influential factors have distinct effects on the self-rated health of individual drivers and on the different levels of self-rated health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An investigation to evaluate the analgesic and central nervous system depressant activities of Solanum nigrum (Linn. in Homoeopathic potencies in experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echur Natarajan Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: In Homoeopathy, Solanum nigrum is clinically used in the treatment of ergotism, meningitis, irritation during dentition and some of the symptoms of neurological disorders but its Central Nervous System (CNS potential has not been explored experimentally yet. Therefore, a preliminary study was conducted with an objective to evaluate the analgesic and CNS depressant effects of homoeopathic potencies of S. nigrum in experimental animal models. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Wistar albino rats using a hot plate, ice plate and Randall-Selitto assay for analgesic; rota-rod and open field test for CNS depressant activities. The different potencies (3X, 6X, 12X and 30C of Solanum nigrum were administered orally (0.5 ml/rat/day for 30 days and response was assessed after 30 minutes of drug administration on 10 th , 20 th and 30 th day. Results: The result shows that all the four potencies of Solanum nigrum has increased the latency time required to raise and lick the paws for thermal sensation on hot plate test and for cold sensation on ice plate test and also increased the degree of threshold pressure to mechanically induced pain on Randall-Selitto assay but depressed the motor coordination and locomotor activities. Conclusion: The result obtained from this preliminary study suggests that homoeopathic preparation of Solanum nigrum in different potencies possess analgesic and CNS depressant activities. Further detailed investigations are required for its possible human use.

  2. Foundations of layer-specific fMRI and investigations of neurophysiological activity in the laminarized neocortex and olfactory bulb of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawsky, Alexander John; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2017-05-12

    Laminar organization of neuronal circuits is a recurring feature of how the brain processes information. For instance, different layers compartmentalize different cell types, synaptic activities, and have unique intrinsic and extrinsic connections that serve as units for specialized signal processing. Functional MRI is an invaluable tool to investigate laminar processing in the in vivo human brain, but it measures neuronal activity indirectly by way of the hemodynamic response. Therefore, the accuracy of high-resolution laminar fMRI depends on how precisely it can measure localized microvascular changes nearest to the site of evoked activity. To determine the specificity of fMRI responses to the true neurophysiological responses across layers, the flexibility to invasive procedures in animal models has been necessary. In this review, we will examine different fMRI contrasts and their appropriate uses for layer-specific fMRI, and how localized laminar processing was examined in the neocortex and olfactory bulb. Through collective efforts, it was determined that microvessels, including capillaries, are regulated within single layers and that several endogenous and contrast-enhanced fMRI contrast mechanisms can separate these neural-specific vascular changes from the nonspecific, especially cerebral blood volume-weighted fMRI with intravenous contrast agent injection. We will also propose some open questions that are relevant for the successful implementation of layer-specific fMRI and its potential future directions to study laminar processing when combined with optogenetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the differences between the "Cold" and "Hot" nature of Coptis chinensis Franch and its processed materials based on animal's temperature tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, CanPing; Wang, JiaBo; Zhang, XueRu; Zhao, YanLing; Xia, XinHua; Zhao, HaiPing; Ren, YongShen; Xiao, XiaoHe

    2009-11-01

    The description and differentiation of the so-called "Cold" and "Hot" natures, the primary "Drug Naure" of Chinese medicine, is the focus of theoretical research. In this study, the divergency between the "Cold" and the "Hot" natures was investigated through examining the temperature tropism of mice affected by Coptis chinensis Franch and its processed materials by using a cold/hot plate differentiating technology. After exposure to C. chinensis Franch, the macroscopic behavioral index of the remaining rate (RR) on a warm pad (40 degrees C) significantly increased (Ptropism. The internal indexes of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and oxygen consuming volume decreased significantly (Ptropism might reflect the internal Cold nature of C. chinensis Franch. However, the processed materials of C. chinensis Franch exhibited a different Cold nature in temperature tropism compared with crude C. chinensis Franch (CC): the Cold nature of bile-processed C. chinensis Franch (BC) enhanced while the ginger-processed C. chinensis Franch (GC) changed inversely. The changing sequence was consistent with the theoretical prognostication. It is indicated that the external Cold & Hot natures of Chinese medicine may possibly reflect in an ethological way for the changes of animal's temperature tropism which might be internally regulated by the body's energy metabolism.

  4. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  5. Animal experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Laz, Alak; Cholakova, Tanya Stefanova; Vrablova, Sofia; Arshad, Naverawaheed

    2016-01-01

    Animal experimentation is a crucial part of medical science. One of the ways to define it is any scientific experiment conducted for research purposes that cause any kind of pain or suffering to animals. Over the years, the new discovered drugs or treatments are first applied on animals to test their positive outcomes to be later used by humans. There is a debate about violating ethical considerations by exploiting animals for human benefits. However, different ethical theories have been made...

  6. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political

  7. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  8. Devil is in the details: Using logic models to investigate program process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, David J; Scicchitano, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Theory-based logic models are commonly developed as part of requirements for grant funding. As a tool to communicate complex social programs, theory based logic models are an effective visual communication. However, after initial development, theory based logic models are often abandoned and remain in their initial form despite changes in the program process. This paper examines the potential benefits of committing time and resources to revising the initial theory driven logic model and developing detailed logic models that describe key activities to accurately reflect the program and assist in effective program management. The authors use a funded special education teacher preparation program to exemplify the utility of drill down logic models. The paper concludes with lessons learned from the iterative revision process and suggests how the process can lead to more flexible and calibrated program management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hope for Animals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It discusses how captive breed- ing programs are trying hard to reintroduce the species in the wild so that they will be back to their rightful homes. It also brings out various problems associated with each of the programs and how smart and dedicated people eventually overcome these problems. Captive-bred animals are ...

  10. [The investigation of blood cells of middle and old age in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by atomic force microscopy. Similarities and differences with the biological animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabiniakov, N A; Prashchayeu, K I; Ryzhak, G A; Poltorackij, A N; Anosova, E I; Azarow, K S

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of reactive changes of blood cells in such diseases as COPD or asthma in people of different age groups is the very difficult problem. Simulating the same conditions in animals that occur in humans with these diseases can serve as a reliable practical model. It is possible because the changes which take places at the cellular level in animals might reflect a similar trend in the human body.

  11. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial Investigation Report. Volk Field Air National Guard, Camp Douglas, Wisconsin. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    transition elements, with atomic weights greater than 50. Many of these elements are required for plant and animal nutrition in trace concentrations but are...vomiting, hemorrhagic gastritis , diarrhea, and pain. Chronic toxic effects due to copper are rarely seen except for individuals with Wilson’s Disease

  12. [Investigation on immunization program coverage rate and its safety in children with tuberous sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Zou, L P; Zhang, M N; Pang, L Y; Wang, Y Y; Ma, S F; Huang, L L

    2017-01-02

    Objective: To investigate the status of immunization of National Immunization Program (NIP) and its adverse reaction rate in children with tuberous sclerosis. Method: Questionnaire survey was adopted to identify the vaccination coverage and its adverse events; 72 cases of children with tuberous sclerosis and 78 normal controls (healthy children completing age-appropriate NIP) admitted to Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from December 2014 to November 2015 were involved into this study. Result: The age-appropriate NIP coverage rate of tuberous sclerosis was 36%(26/72). The coverage rate of bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG), hepatitis B vaccine 1 st to 3 rd doses (HepB1-3), oral poliovaccine 1 st dose (OPV1), diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus 1 st dose (DPT1), DPT1-3, meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine group A (MPVA), measles amd rubella vaccine/measles vaccine 1 st dose (MRV/MCV1), and Japanese encephalitis vaccine 1 st dose (JEV1) were 100%(72 cases), 75%(51 cases), 97%(66 cases), 91%(62 cases), 82%(56 cases), 66%(45 cases), 69%(42 cases), and 61%(37 cases) respectively. The reasons why the children did not complete the vaccination plan were that parents were concerned about vaccination-induced seizures or seizures had not been controlled. Among 72 children with TSC, the rate of adverse events or suspected adverse events after vaccination was 17% (12 cases), which was higher than the normal control children (2 cases, 3%) (χ 2 =8.799, P children with tuberous sclerosis is low. The high incidence of adverse events may be associated with a fact that there are some nervous system abnormalities in cases with tuberous sclerosis. TSC children vaccination is relatively safe, with no serious adverse events.

  13. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Quality-Assurance Program Plan: management and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) defines the quality assurance program in effect for those activities of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage (NNWSI) that are directly controlled by: DOE/NV, the Technical Overview Contractor, and the Quality Assurance Overview Contractor. It is intended as a supplement to the NNWSI-QAP

  14. Beyond Cognitive Increase: Investigating the Influence of Computer Programming on Perception and Application of Mathematical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Peter J.; Bly, Neil; Leatham, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide first-hand accounts of the perceived long-term effects of learning computer programming on a learner's approach to mathematics. These phenomenological accounts, garnered from individual interviews of seven different programmers, illustrate four specific areas of interest: (1) programming provides context for many…

  15. Experiences and Outcomes of a Women's Leadership Development Program: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2016-01-01

    Women's leadership training programs provide organizations opportunities to value women leaders as organizational resources. This qualitative research utilized phenomenological methodology to examine lived experiences of seven alumni of a women's-only leadership program. We conducted semi-structured interviews to clarify what learning elements…

  16. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  17. Investigating Positive Psychology Approaches in Case Management and Residential Programming with Incarcerated Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Lara E.; Morrison, William; Peterson, Patricia; Domene, Jose F.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how a rural Canadian secure custody facility for youth implemented positive psychology principles in its case management protocols and residential programming. A directed content analysis design was utilized to identify specific factors of positive psychology in the facility's policy and programming manual, as well as in…

  18. Aquatic Species Program Review: Proceedings of the March 1983 Principal Investigators Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the utilization of plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas. Processes are being developed through this program to make use of such aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  19. A program for transition research. [nature and details of NASA project on boundary layer investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, E.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the nature and goals of the NASA Transition Study program aimed at developing procedures yielding information relevant to anomalies in boundary layer transition data and future estimation of transition Reynolds numbers. Specific experimental programs have been formulated that emphasize careful and redundant measurements, documentation of the disturbance environment, and elimination of facility induced transition, whenever possible.

  20. New evidence of animal consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Donald R; Speck, Gayle B

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence that increases the probability that many animals experience at least simple levels of consciousness. First, the search for neural correlates of consciousness has not found any consciousness-producing structure or process that is limited to human brains. Second, appropriate responses to novel challenges for which the animal has not been prepared by genetic programming or previous experience provide suggestive evidence of animal consciousness because such versatility is most effectively organized by conscious thinking. For example, certain types of classical conditioning require awareness of the learned contingency in human subjects, suggesting comparable awareness in similarly conditioned animals. Other significant examples of versatile behavior suggestive of conscious thinking are scrub jays that exhibit all the objective attributes of episodic memory, evidence that monkeys sometimes know what they know, creative tool-making by crows, and recent interpretation of goal-directed behavior of rats as requiring simple nonreflexive consciousness. Third, animal communication often reports subjective experiences. Apes have demonstrated increased ability to use gestures or keyboard symbols to make requests and answer questions; and parrots have refined their ability to use the imitation of human words to ask for things they want and answer moderately complex questions. New data have demonstrated increased flexibility in the gestural communication of swarming honey bees that leads to vitally important group decisions as to which cavity a swarm should select as its new home. Although no single piece of evidence provides absolute proof of consciousness, this accumulation of strongly suggestive evidence increases significantly the likelihood that some animals experience at least simple conscious thoughts and feelings. The next challenge for cognitive ethologists is to investigate for particular animals the content of their awareness and what life is

  1. Designing and Implementing INTREPID, an Intensive Program in Translational Research Methodologies for New Investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphinyanaphongs, Yindalon; Shao, Yongzhao; Micoli, Keith J.; Fang, Yixin; Goldberg, Judith D.; Galeano, Claudia R.; Stangel, Jessica H.; Chavis‐Keeling, Deborah; Hochman, Judith S.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Pillinger, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Senior housestaff and junior faculty are often expected to perform clinical research, yet may not always have the requisite knowledge and skills to do so successfully. Formal degree programs provide such knowledge, but require a significant commitment of time and money. Short‐term training programs (days to weeks) provide alternative ways to accrue essential information and acquire fundamental methodological skills. Unfortunately, published information about short‐term programs is sparse. To encourage discussion and exchange of ideas regarding such programs, we here share our experience developing and implementing INtensive Training in Research Statistics, Ethics, and Protocol Informatics and Design (INTREPID), a 24‐day immersion training program in clinical research methodologies. Designing, planning, and offering INTREPID was feasible, and required significant faculty commitment, support personnel and infrastructure, as well as committed trainees. PMID:25066862

  2. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Bailleul

    Full Text Available The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO. Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project. Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour.

  3. Which Individuals To Choose To Update the Reference Population? Minimizing the Loss of Genetic Diversity in Animal Genomic Selection Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynard, Sonia E; Croiseau, Pascal; Laloë, Denis; Fritz, Sebastien; Calus, Mario P L; Restoux, Gwendal

    2018-01-04

    Genomic selection (GS) is commonly used in livestock and increasingly in plant breeding. Relying on phenotypes and genotypes of a reference population, GS allows performance prediction for young individuals having only genotypes. This is expected to achieve fast high genetic gain but with a potential loss of genetic diversity. Existing methods to conserve genetic diversity depend mostly on the choice of the breeding individuals. In this study, we propose a modification of the reference population composition to mitigate diversity loss. Since the high cost of phenotyping is the limiting factor for GS, our findings are of major economic interest. This study aims to answer the following questions: how would decisions on the reference population affect the breeding population, and how to best select individuals to update the reference population and balance maximizing genetic gain and minimizing loss of genetic diversity? We investigated three updating strategies for the reference population: random, truncation, and optimal contribution (OC) strategies. OC maximizes genetic merit for a fixed loss of genetic diversity. A French Montbéliarde dairy cattle population with 50K SNP chip genotypes and simulations over 10 generations were used to compare these different strategies using milk production as the trait of interest. Candidates were selected to update the reference population. Prediction bias and both genetic merit and diversity were measured. Changes in the reference population composition slightly affected the breeding population. Optimal contribution strategy appeared to be an acceptable compromise to maintain both genetic gain and diversity in the reference and the breeding populations. Copyright © 2018 Eynard et al.

  4. Which Individuals To Choose To Update the Reference Population? Minimizing the Loss of Genetic Diversity in Animal Genomic Selection Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia E. Eynard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection (GS is commonly used in livestock and increasingly in plant breeding. Relying on phenotypes and genotypes of a reference population, GS allows performance prediction for young individuals having only genotypes. This is expected to achieve fast high genetic gain but with a potential loss of genetic diversity. Existing methods to conserve genetic diversity depend mostly on the choice of the breeding individuals. In this study, we propose a modification of the reference population composition to mitigate diversity loss. Since the high cost of phenotyping is the limiting factor for GS, our findings are of major economic interest. This study aims to answer the following questions: how would decisions on the reference population affect the breeding population, and how to best select individuals to update the reference population and balance maximizing genetic gain and minimizing loss of genetic diversity? We investigated three updating strategies for the reference population: random, truncation, and optimal contribution (OC strategies. OC maximizes genetic merit for a fixed loss of genetic diversity. A French Montbéliarde dairy cattle population with 50K SNP chip genotypes and simulations over 10 generations were used to compare these different strategies using milk production as the trait of interest. Candidates were selected to update the reference population. Prediction bias and both genetic merit and diversity were measured. Changes in the reference population composition slightly affected the breeding population. Optimal contribution strategy appeared to be an acceptable compromise to maintain both genetic gain and diversity in the reference and the breeding populations.

  5. Investigation of the Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Mobile Genetic Elements in Salmonella associated with U.S. Food Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance (AR), multidrug resistance (MDR), and carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), the specter of widespread untreatable bacterial infections threatens human and animal health. The ability of these emerging resistances to transfer between bacteria on mob...

  6. Life lessons after classes: investigating the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents' life skills development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon; Park, Mirim; Jang, Kyunghwan; Park, Yongnam

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents' life skills development and to identify which characteristics of the program would have an influence on their life skills acquisition. The participants were six children (4 boys, 2 girls) who participated in a 12-week afterschool program implemented in two elementary schools, as well as the two program instructors who implemented the afterschool sport program. Data were collected from individual interviews with program participants and instructors. The inductive analysis of data revealed four categories of life skills developed through program participation: (1) playing well and being more active, (2) connecting well and having better social skills, (3) coping well and becoming a better problem solver, and (4) dreaming well and having a better sense of purpose. Regarding the characteristics of the program that influenced life skills development, three themes emerged: (1) having a clear goal and building consensus with stakeholders, (2) establishing a firm yet flexible structure, and (3) instructors' use of effective strategies for teaching life skills.

  7. Life lessons after classes: investigating the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents’ life skills development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okseon; Park, Mirim; Jang, Kyunghwan; Park, Yongnam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an afterschool sport program on adolescents’ life skills development and to identify which characteristics of the program would have an influence on their life skills acquisition. The participants were six children (4 boys, 2 girls) who participated in a 12-week afterschool program implemented in two elementary schools, as well as the two program instructors who implemented the afterschool sport program. Data were collected from individual interviews with program participants and instructors. The inductive analysis of data revealed four categories of life skills developed through program participation: (1) playing well and being more active, (2) connecting well and having better social skills, (3) coping well and becoming a better problem solver, and (4) dreaming well and having a better sense of purpose. Regarding the characteristics of the program that influenced life skills development, three themes emerged: (1) having a clear goal and building consensus with stakeholders, (2) establishing a firm yet flexible structure, and (3) instructors’ use of effective strategies for teaching life skills. PMID:28367697

  8. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, manages archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. The SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1994.

  9. Investigation of the resistance gene presence in plasmids isolated from e. Coli and salmonella strains originating from domestic animals by the method of plasmid DNA transformation into competent cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mišić D.; Ašanin Ružica

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of the presence of plasmids was performed on E. coli and Salmonella strains, originating from dogs, cats, cattle, pigs and poultry. The investigated bacterial strains were isolated from ear and skin swabs vaginal swabs, faeces and urine, obtained from healthy and diseased animals of various age and breed categories. Up to now 45 E. coli and 35 Salmonella strains have been isolated, but the presence of plasmids was investigated in 42 strains of bacteria resistant to at least ...

  10. Investigating the Optimal Management Strategy for a Healthcare Facility Maintenance Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaillard, Daria

    2004-01-01

    ...: strategic partnering with an equipment management firm. The objective of this study is to create a decision-model for selecting the optimal management strategy for a healthcare organization's facility maintenance program...

  11. Animal consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Emilie; Boissy, Alain; Boivin, Xavier; Calandreau, Ludovic; Delon, Nicolas; Deputte, Bertrand; Desmoulin‐Canselier, Sonia; Dunier, Muriel; Faivre, Nathan; Giurfa, Martin; Guichet, Jean‐Luc; Lansade, Léa; Larrère, Raphaël; Mormède, Pierre; Prunet, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    After reviewing the literature on current knowledge about consciousness in humans, we present a state-of-the art discussion on consciousness and related key concepts in animals. Obviously much fewer publications are available on non-human species than on humans, most of them relating to laboratory or wild animal species, and only few to livestock species. Human consciousness is by definition subjective and private. Animal consciousness is usually assessed through behavioural performance. Beha...

  12. An investigation of the colorectal cancer experience and receptivity to family-based cancer prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Asiedu, Gladys B; Egginton, Jason; Sinicrope, Pamela; Opyrchal, Seung M L; Howell, Lisa A; Patten, Christi; Boardman, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a shared family experience and may provide a "teachable moment" to motivate at-risk family members to adopt cancer prevention and health promotion behaviors. This study explored how a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is experienced by family members and may be used to develop a family-based CRC prevention program. Preferences regarding content, timing, and modes of program delivery were examined. Social cognitive theory provided the conceptual framework for the study. This study employed mixed methodology (semi-structured interviews and self-report questionnaires). Participants included 73 adults (21 patients, 52 family members) from 23 families (two patients were deceased prior to being interviewed). Most patients (n = 14; 67 %) were interviewed 1-5 years post-diagnosis. Individual interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed. For many, a CRC diagnosis was described as a shared family experience. Family members supported each other's efforts to prevent CRC through screening, exercising, and maintaining a healthy diet. Teachable moments for introducing a family-based program included the time of the patient's initial cancer surgery and post-chemotherapy. Reported willingness to participate in a family-based program was associated with risk perception, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and the social/community context in which the program would be embedded. Program preferences included cancer screening, diet/nutrition, weight management, stress reduction, and exercise. Challenges included geographic dispersion, variation in education levels, generational differences, and scheduling. CRC patients and family members are receptive to family-based programs. Feasibility concerns, which may be mitigated but not eliminated with technological advances, must be addressed for successful family-based programs.

  13. Borehole plugging program (waste disposal). report 1. initial investigations and preliminary data. Miscellaneous paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boa, J.A. Jr

    1978-01-01

    This report covers efforts during the first year of the program. A study was initiated to find competent grouts to be used in stemming boreholes associated with radioactive waste disposal. The grouts must be durable for several thousand years and be essentially impermeable. In addition, the grouts should be pumpable to depths of several thousand feet into environments of high temperature. Grouts for use in both salt and nonsalt formations are to be studied. This program is still underway.

  14. Investigation into Risk and Uncertainty: Identifying Coefficient of Variation Benchmarks for Air Force ACAT I Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Inc IV ESC Computer Sys 24 GPS III SMC Satellite 25 SBIRS GEO 1-2 SMC Satellite 26 SBIRS SFP GEO 3 SMC Satellite 27 SBIRS SFP GEO 4 SMC Satellite 28...SBIRS GEO 1-2 SMC 2011 Satellite Program Office MDAP SDD 0.00 SBIRS SFP GEO 3 SMC 2010 Satellite Program Office MDAP SDD -0.01 SBIRS SFP GEO 4 SMC 2010

  15. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  16. Endangered Animals. Second Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Marcia

    This second grade teaching unit centers on endangered animal species around the world. Questions addressed are: What is an endangered species? Why do animals become extinct? How do I feel about the problem? and What can I do? Students study the definition of endangered species and investigate whether it is a natural process. They explore topics…

  17. Animal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D A

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the concept of animal therapy. The discussion includes a brief history of animal therapy, its importance, its relationship to rehabilitation, and its usefulness as a tool to influence adaptation, change, power, communication, advocacy, teaching, accountability, responsibility, and locus of control. This theoretical concept is important because of the joy and unconditional love animals can provide their owners. Relationships with animals can promote feelings of self-worth, help offset loneliness, reduce anxiety, provide contact, comfort, security, and the feeling of being needed.

  18. Animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the ...... the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possible to combine elements from the presented views, and how to make up one’s mind....

  19. Multidisciplinary scientific program of investigation of the structure and evolution of the Demerara marginal plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Roest, Walter; Graindorge, David; Mercier de Lépinay, Marion; Klinghelhoefer, Frauke; Heuret, Arnauld; Pattier, France; Tallobre, Cedric; Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric; Poetisi, Ewald; Loubrieu, Benoît; Iguanes, Dradem, Margats Scientific Parties, Plus

    2017-04-01

    Mercier de Lépinay et al. published in 2016 an updated inventory of transform passive margins in the world. This inventory shows that those margins represent 30% of continental passive margins and a cumulative length of 16% of non-convergent margins. It also highlights the fact that many submarine plateaus prolong transform continental margins, systematically at the junction of oceanic domains of different ages. In the world, we identified twenty of those continental submarine plateaus (Falklands, Voring, Demerara, Tasman, etc). Those marginal plateaus systematically experiment two phases of deformation: a first extensional phase and a second transform phase that allows the individualization of those submarine reliefs appearing on bathymetry as seaward continental-like salients. The understanding of the origin, nature, evolution of those marginal plateaus has many scientific and economic issues. The Demerara marginal plateau located off French Guiana and Surinam belongs to this category of submarine provinces. The French part of this plateau has been the locus of a first investigation in 2003 in the framework of the GUYAPLAC cruise dedicated to support French submissions about extension of the limit of the continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles. This cruise was the starting point of a scientific program dedicated to geological investigations of the Demerara plateau that was sustained by different cruises and collaborations (1) IGUANES (2013) that completed the mapping of this plateau including off Surinam, allowed to better understand the segmentation of the Northern edge of this plateau, and to evidence the combined importance of contourite and mass-wasting processes in the recent sedimentary evolution of this domain, (2) Collaboration with TOTAL (Mercier de Lépinay's PhD thesis) that allowed to better qualify the two main phases of structural evolution of the plateau respectively during Jurassic times for its Western border, Cretaceous times for its

  20. An Investigation of the Relationships between Mathematics and Music Skills of Students Participating in Successful High School Instrumental Music Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory phenomenological study was designed to investigate the relationships between mathematics and music skills of students participating in successful high school instrumental music programs. The participants of this study were purposefully selected and included one math educator or math department chairperson and the band or orchestra…

  1. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  2. Profiles of Pre-Service Teacher Education: An Investigation into the Nature of Selected Exemplary Programs in Jamaica and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sherwood, Heather

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative multi-case study investigated three exemplary pre-service teacher education programs in Jamaica and Michigan in order to provide an account of how they are structured in different contexts of tertiary institutions and, to identify how they ensure that their graduates are prepared to function effectively in today's schools. Five…

  3. A Qualitative Investigation into the Experience of Neuro-Linguistic Programming Certification Training among Japanese Career Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Although the application of neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) has been reported worldwide, its scientific investigation is limited. Career consulting is one of the fields where NLP has been increasingly applied in Japan. This study explored why career consultants undertake NLP training, and what they find most useful to their practice. Thematic…

  4. ANIMAL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1979-02-28

    This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables.

  5. ANIMAL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables

  6. Kindergarten Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Animation is one of the last lessons that come to mind when thinking of kindergarten art. The necessary understanding of sequencing, attention to small, often detailed drawings, and the use of technology all seem more suitable to upper elementary. With today's emphasis on condensing and integrating curriculum, consider developing animation lessons…

  7. Animal magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Writing a popular-science book about animal biophysics is hard work. Authors must read through hundreds of research papers as the subject is so multidisciplinary. On both counts of research and writing, Matin Durrani and Liz Kalaugher have done a good to excellent job with their book Furry Logic: the Physics of Animal Life

  8. Animal Detectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  9. Serological investigation of wild boars (Sus scrofa) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as indicator animals for circulation of Francisella tularensis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Peter; Chaignat, Valerie; Klimpel, Diana; Diller, Roland; Melzer, Falk; Müller, Wolfgang; Tomaso, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia outbreaks in humans have recently been reported in many European countries, but data on the occurrence in the animal population are scarce. In North America, seroconversion of omnivores and carnivores was used as indicator for the presence of tularemia, for the European fauna, however, data are barely available. Therefore, the suitability of wild boars (Sus scrofa) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as indicators for the circulation of F. tularensis in Germany was evaluated. Serum samples from 566 wild boars and 457 red foxes were collected between 1995 and 2012 in three federal states in Central Germany (Hesse, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia). The overall rate of seropositive animals was 1.1% in wild boars and 7.4% in red foxes. In conclusion, serological examination of red foxes is recommended, because they can be reliably used as indicator animals for the presence of F. tularensis in the environment.

  10. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program, fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Mark J.; Brooks, Richard D.; Sassaman, Kenneth E.; Crass, David C.; Lewis, George S.; Stephenson, D. Keith; Green, William; Anderson, David G.; Fuglseth, Ty

    1990-11-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, is funded through a direct contract with the United States Department of Energy to provide services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of most archaeological resources is dependent upon research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An on-going research program provides the problems, methods and means of assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In addition, the SRARP maintains an active program of public education to disseminate knowledge about prehistory and history, and to enhance public awareness about historic preservation. The following report summarizes the management, research and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1990.

  11. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    A cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy provides the necessary funding for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to render services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of archaeological resources is usually determined by research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological, and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In accordance with the spirit of the law, the SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research, and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1993.

  12. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program: Fiscal year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    A cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy provides the necessary funding for the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of South Carolina, to render services required under federal law for the protection and management of archaeological resources on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because the significance of archaeological resources is usually determined by research potential, the SRARP is guided by research objectives. An ongoing research program provides the theoretical, methodological and empirical basis for assessing site significance within the compliance process specified by law. In accordance with the spirit of the law, the SRARP maintains an active public education program for disseminating knowledge about prehistory and history, and for enhancing awareness of historic preservation. This report summarizes the management, research and public education activities of the SRARP during Fiscal Year 1991.

  13. Recommendations from the Investigational New Drug/Investigational Device Exemption Task Force of the clInical and Translational Science Award Consortium: developing and implementing a sponsor-investigators training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, M E Blair; Berglund, Jelena Petrovic; O'Reilly, Erin K; Hartman, Karen; Speicher, Lisa A; Adamo, Joan E; O'Riordan, Gerri; Brown, Jennifer Swanton; Schuff, Kathryn G

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recommendations for provision of training for sponsor and investigators at Academic Health Centers. A subgroup of the Investigational New Drug/Investigational Device Exemption (IND/IDE) Task Force of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program Regulatory Knowledge Key Function Committee was assembled to specifically address how clinical investigators who hold an IND/IDE and thus assume the role of sponsor-investigators are adequately trained to meet the additional regulatory requirements of this role. The participants who developed the recommendations were representatives of institutions with IND/IDE support programs. Through an informal survey, the task force determined that a variety and mix of models are used to provide support for IND/IDE holders within CTSA institutions. In addition, a CTSA consortium-wide resources survey was used. The participants worked from the models and survey results to develop consensus recommendations to address institutional support, training content, and implementation. The CTSA IND/IDE Task Force recommendations are as follows: (1) Institutions should assess the scope of Food and Drug Administration-regulated research, perform a needs analysis, and provide resources to implement a suitable training program; (2) The model of training program should be tailored to each institution; (3) The training should specifically address the unique role of sponsor-investigators, and the effectiveness of training should be evaluated regularly by methods that fit the model adopted by the institution; and (4) Institutional leadership should mandate sponsor-investigator training and effectively communicate the necessity and availability of training.

  14. An astrophysics data program investigation of a synoptic study of quasar continua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the program is presented. The major product of the program, an atlas of quasar energy distributions, is presented in the appendices along with papers written as a result of this research. The topics covered in the papers include: (1) accurate galactic N(sub h) values toward quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN); (2) weak bump quasars; (3) millimeter measurements of hard x ray selected active galaxies- implications for the nature of the continuous spectrum; (3) persistence and change in the soft x ray spectrum of the quasar PG1211+143; (4) the soft x ray excess in einstein quasar spectra; and (5) EXOSAT x ray spectra of quasars.

  15. Office of Inspector General report on inspection of selected issues regarding the Department of Energy accident investigation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    One method used by the Department of Energy (DOE) to promote worker safety is through the Department`s accident investigation program. The objectives of the program are, among other things, to enhance safety and health of employees, to prevent the recurrence of accidents, and to reduce accident fatality rates and promote a downward trend in the number and severity of accidents. The Assistant Secretary, Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH), through the EH Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, is responsible for implementation of the Department`s accident investigation program. As part of the inspection, the authors reviewed an April 1997 EH accident investigation report regarding an accident involving a Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) welder, who suffered fatal burns when his clothing caught fire while he was using a cutting torch at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. They also reviewed reports of other accident investigations conducted by EH and DOE field organizations. Based on the review of these reports, the authors identified issues concerning the adequacy of the examination and reporting by accident investigation boards of specific management systems and organizations as a possible accident root cause. The inspection also identified issues concerning worker safety that they determined required immediate management attention, such as whether occurrences were being reported in the appropriate management systems and whether prompt consideration was being given to implementing revisions of national standards when the revisions increased worker safety.

  16. Pilot study investigating the utility of a specialized online symptom management program for individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome as compared to an online meditation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arroll MA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan A Arroll, Elizabeth A Attree, Claire L Marshall, Christine P DanceyChronic Illness Research Team, School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UKBackground: Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS is a long-term, debilitating condition that impacts numerous areas of individuals' lives. The two predominant treatment options for ME/CFS are cognitive behavioral therapy and graded exercise therapy; however, many people have found these techniques unacceptable or even damaging. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the utility of a specialized online symptom management program for ME/CFS in comparison to an online meditation program in an effort to ascertain whether this tool could be a further option for those with ME/CFS.Methods: This experimental design consisted of two interventions: a specialized online symptoms management program (N=19 and a control intervention based on an online meditation website (N=9. A battery of questionnaires, including measures of multidimensional fatigue, illness-specific symptoms, perceived control, and mindful awareness, were completed before the participants commenced use of the programs and following 8 weeks' use.Results: Significant differences were found in the areas of chance and powerful others' locus of control, and sleeping difficulties, but not in ME/CFS symptomatology overall.Conclusion: The specialized online program described in this study warrants further investigation, as it appears to influence perceived control and key ME/CFS symptoms over time.Keywords: ME/CFS, perceived control, sleep, outcomes, online intervention

  17. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  18. Investigating a Developmentally Focused Youth Sports Program for Girls in Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feathers, Rebecca Zarzycki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the impact the Girls on the Run (GOTR) program had on the New Castle County, Delaware, third, fourth, and fifth grade girls who participated in the spring 2011 season. Specifically, this study examined short-term changes in the participants as they related to self-esteem, body image, physical activity…

  19. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, Fiorela L.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Giordano, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences…

  20. Investigation on structural analysis computer program of spent nuclear fuel shipping cask, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Ganki; Ikushima, Takeshi.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the results (II) done by the Sub-Committee of Research Cooperation Committee (RC-62) of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers under the trust of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The principal fulfilments and accomplishments are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the survey of structural analysis methods of spent fuel shipping cask, several documents, which explain the features and applications of the exclusive computer programs for impact analysis on the basis of 2 or 3 dimensional finite element or difference methods, were reviewed. (2) In comparative evaluation of the existing computer programs, the common benchmark test problems for drop impact of the axisymmetric cylinder and plate were adopted the calculational evaluations for taking into account the strain rate effect of material properties, effect of artificial viscosity and effect of time integration step size were carried out. (3) Evaluation of impact analysis algorithm of computer programs were conducted and the requirements for computer programs to be developed in future and an index for further studies have been clarified. (author)

  1. An Investigation of the Relative Effectiveness of the Basic Mathematics Review Program at Essex Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jerome

    Basic Mathematics Review (BMR) is a remedial non-credit course at Essex Community College (Maryland) being taught on an individualized basis. Following diagnostic testing and placement, instruction utilizes programmed materials, tutors, and self-tests. Evaluation of the new individualized BMR and comparison with the traditional remedial course…

  2. Learning by Experience in a Standardized Testing Culture: Investigation of a Middle School Experiential Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Kruger, Christopher J.; Jekkals, Regan E.; Steinfeldt, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Standardized testing pressure sometimes discourages schools from broadly implementing experiential learning opportunities. However, some K-12 schools are challenging the trend with greater commitment to learning by experience. STREAM (science, technology, reading, engineering, arts, mathematics) school is a project-based program providing students…

  3. Notification: Background Investigation Services Project Notification US Virgin Islands Environmental Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Projects #OPE-FY14-0004, OPE-FY14-0005 and OPE-FY14-0006, October 30, 2013. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on October 30, 2013 into the environmental programs the US Virgin Islands (USVI) has implemented on EPA’s behalf.

  4. Family Matters: An Investigation of Family Coursework in School Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, J. Richelle; Harris, Pamela N.

    2016-01-01

    School counselors are expected to form collaborative relationships with the families of students. Yet, school counselors have limited knowledge about families to form these partnerships, as a descriptive content analysis of the family coursework requirements in CACREP-accredited school counseling programs in the southern region revealed that most…

  5. Investigation on structural analysis computer program of spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Ganki; Ikushima, Takeshi.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the results done by the Sub-Committee of Research Cooperation Committee (RC-62) of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers under the trust of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The principal fulfilments and accomplishments are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the survey of structural analysis methods of spent fuel shipping cask, several documents, which explain the features and applications of the exclusive computer programs for impact analysis on the basis of 2 or 3 dimensional finite element or difference methods such as HONDO, STEALTH and DYNA-3D, were reviewed. (2) In comparative evaluation of the existing computer programs, the common benchmark test problems for 9 m vertical drop impact of the axisymmetric lead cylinder with and without stainless steel clads were adopted where the calculational evaluations for taking into account the strain rate effect were carried out. (3) Evaluation of impact analysis algorithm of computer programs were conducted and the requirements for computer programs to be developed in future and an index for further studies have been clarified. (author)

  6. Animal Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ludrovcová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The research is aimed to the animal transports issue, from two points of view – first is the animal cruelty and second is the policy and economic consideration. The goal is to acquaint the readers with the transports risks and its cruelty and evaluation of the economic, political aspects for he involved countries. The study is oriented on more points of view, what is rare in works with a similar theme. Method: This paper examines many issues and examinations from different authors and subsequently summarized the findings with authors own knowledge to one expanded unit. Results: Results proves, that livestock transports have negative impact on animal´s health, environment. Number of transported animals is rising every year. Society: Research familiarize the society with the animal transports, cruelty against animals during them, and influence of transports on some countries, their economy, policy. People get better informed and can form their own opinion on this topic. They may start acting, undertaking some steps to improve the present situation, what could help a lot to animals and environment. Limitations / further research: Future research could show progress and improvement of transports, quality of food supply and economics.

  7. Animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  8. Animal Bioacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Neville H.

    Animals rely upon their acoustic and vibrational senses and abilities to detect the presence of both predators and prey and to communicate with members of the same species. This chapter surveys the physical bases of these abilities and their evolutionary optimization in insects, birds, and other land animals, and in a variety of aquatic animals other than cetaceans, which are treated in Chap. 20. While there are many individual variations, and some animals devote an immense fraction of their time and energy to acoustic communication, there are also many common features in their sound production and in the detection of sounds and vibrations. Excellent treatments of these matters from a biological viewpoint are given in several notable books [19.1,2] and collections of papers [19.3,4,5,6,7,8], together with other more specialized books to be mentioned in the following sections, but treatments from an acoustical viewpoint [19.9] are rare. The main difference between these two approaches is that biological books tend to concentrate on anatomical and physiological details and on behavioral outcomes, while acoustical books use simplified anatomical models and quantitative analysis to model vocalization frequency scaling in animals hearing sound production animal animal biological biological bioacoustics whole-system behavior. This latter is the approach to be adopted here.

  9. The Investigation of Physical Performance Status of Visually and Hearing Impaired Applying Judo Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Onder

    2016-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the physical performances of visually and hearing impaired doing judo training in this study. 32 male athletes, who were doing judo training, volunteer and, visually and hearing impaired, participated in this study. The investigation was applied to visually impaired (N = 12, mean ± SD; age: 25.75 ± 3.55 years, height:…

  10. Investigating the key factors in designing a communication skills program for medical students: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Hazavehei, Seyyed M.; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Moeini, Babak; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medical students have a serious need to acquire communication skills with others. In many medical schools, special curriculums are developed to improve such skills. Effective training of communication skills requires expert curriculum design. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and views of experts and stakeholders in order to design a suitable training program in communication skills for medical students. Methods The content analysis approach was used in this qualitative study. Forty-three participants were selected from the faculty, nurses, physicians, residents, and medical students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using purposive sampling. The data were collected through focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. To ensure the accuracy of the data, the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability, and conformability were met. The data were analyzed by MAXQDA software using the Graneheim & Lundman model. Results The findings of this study consisted of two main themes, i.e., “The vast nature of the present communication skills training” and “administrative requirements of the training program regarding communication skills.” The first theme included the educational needs of students, the problems associated with training people to have good communication skills, the importance of good communication skills in performing professional duties, communication skills and job requirements, the learning environment of communication skills, and the status of existing training programs for communication skills. Strategies and suitable methods for teaching communication skills and methods of evaluating the students in this regard also were obtained. Conclusion The findings of this study were the elements required to design a proper and local model to teach communication skills to medical students through analyzing the concepts of effective communication. The results of this study can be useful for medical

  11. Investigating the key factors in designing a communication skills program for medical students: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Hazavehei, Seyyed M; Karimi Moonaghi, Hossein; Moeini, Babak; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Medical students have a serious need to acquire communication skills with others. In many medical schools, special curriculums are developed to improve such skills. Effective training of communication skills requires expert curriculum design. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and views of experts and stakeholders in order to design a suitable training program in communication skills for medical students. The content analysis approach was used in this qualitative study. Forty-three participants were selected from the faculty, nurses, physicians, residents, and medical students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences using purposive sampling. The data were collected through focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. To ensure the accuracy of the data, the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability, and conformability were met. The data were analyzed by MAXQDA software using the Graneheim & Lundman model. The findings of this study consisted of two main themes, i.e., "The vast nature of the present communication skills training" and "administrative requirements of the training program regarding communication skills." The first theme included the educational needs of students, the problems associated with training people to have good communication skills, the importance of good communication skills in performing professional duties, communication skills and job requirements, the learning environment of communication skills, and the status of existing training programs for communication skills. Strategies and suitable methods for teaching communication skills and methods of evaluating the students in this regard also were obtained. The findings of this study were the elements required to design a proper and local model to teach communication skills to medical students through analyzing the concepts of effective communication. The results of this study can be useful for medical faculties in designing a proper program for

  12. Experiences of burnout among drug counselors in a large opioid treatment program: A qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Mark; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Muthulingam, Dharushana; Oberleitner, David; Madden, Lynn M; Marcus, Ruthanne; Eller, Anthony; Bono, Madeline H; Barry, Declan T

    2018-03-09

    Little is known about possible experiences of burnout among drug counselors in opioid treatment programs that are scaling up capacity to address the current opioid treatment gap. Participants in this quality improvement study were 31 drug counselors employed by large opioid treatment programs whose treatment capacities were expanding. Experiences of burnout and approaches for managing and/or preventing burnout were examined using individual semi-structured interviews, which were audiotaped, transcribed, and systematically coded by a multidisciplinary team using grounded theory. Rates of reported burnout (in response to an open-ended question) were lower than expected, with approximately 26% of participants reporting burnout. Counselor descriptions of burnout included cognitive, affective, behavioral, and physiological symptoms; and job-related demands were identified as a frequent cause. Participants described both self-initiated (e.g., engaging in pleasurable activities, exercising, taking breaks during workday) and system-supported strategies for managing or preventing burnout (e.g., availing of supervision and paid time off). Counselors provided recommendations for system-level changes to attenuate counselor risk of burnout (e.g., increased staff-wide encounters, improved communication, accessible paid time off, and increased clinical supervision). Findings suggest that drug counselor burnout is not inevitable, even in opioid treatment program settings whose treatment capacities are expanding. Organizations might benefit from routinely assessing counselor feedback about burnout and implementing feasible recommendations to attenuate burnout and promote work engagement.

  13. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens Jr., Wayne W.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-12-23

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium.

  14. Wild Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and other resources focuses on wild animals. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, and professional resources, as well as a class activity. (LRW)

  15. Mentalizing animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Ethicists have tended to treat the psychology of attributing mental states to animals as an entirely separate issue from the moral importance of animals’ mental states. In this paper I bring these two issues together. I argue for two theses, one descriptive and one normative. The descriptive thesis...... holds that ordinary human agents use what are generally called phenomenal mental states (e.g., pain and other emotions) to assign moral considerability to animals. I examine recent empirical research on the attribution of phenomenal states and agential states (e.g., memory and intelligence) to argue...... that phenomenal mental states are the primary factor, psychologically, for judging an animal to be morally considerable. I further argue that, given the role of phenomenal states in assigning moral considerability, certain theories in animal ethics will meet significant psychological resistance. The normative...

  16. Animation & Neurocinematics*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción

    2015-01-01

    machines that think”-(Damasio, A. Descartes error). Such feelings come from the interpretation of the emotions in our bodies. Emotions are our universal language, the motivation of living, the key to what makes a movie successful and truly an art piece that you will remember because moves you. Animation......, indeed, can be considered a social/ emotional learning media, which goes beyond the limitations of live action movies. This is due to the diversity of techniques, and its visual plasticity that constructs the impossible. Animators are not real actors but more like the midwife who brings the anima...... into aliveness, which requires knowing how emotions work. Ed Hooks as an expert in training animators and actors, always remarks: “emotions tend to lead to action”. In this paper we want to argue that by producing animated films, as we watch them, cause a stronger effect, not only in our brains, but also in our...

  17. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  18. Cross-Training Laboratory Animal Care Personnel in Physically Separate Animal Facilities at a Land-Grant Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Tonja M; Allison, Sarah O; Criley, Jennifer M; Myers, Sara J; Goodly, Lyndon J

    2016-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign maintains physically separated animal care facilities under centralized management by the Division of Animal Resources. As part of a land-grant institution, the animal care and use program operates several animal units in key locations for specific disciplines within the campus, all of which have the core mission to teach, conduct research, and engage in public service. Populations of research animals vary with the levels of research funding, the number of research investigators on staff, research direction, and animal availability. Accordingly, the requirement for animal care staffing in each unit may vary widely also. To best use the existing animal care staff and remain fiscally responsible, cross-training of staff was implemented to allow staff to travel from units with small animal populations to units with larger populations or short-term staffing shortages. Here we detail and describe the system we used to assess the needs for cross-training, identify the staff to train, and implement the training plan. We believe this information will assist other programs, particularly those with large or complex organization (for example, land-grant institutions) that experience similar fluctuations in animal use.

  19. Groundwater animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurice, Louise; Bloomfield, John; Robertson, Anne; Allen, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater animals are adapted to live in environments with no light and limited nutrients, They can provide insights into fundamental questions of evolution, ecology and biodiversity. They also have an important role to play in informing the reconstruction of past changes in geomorphology and climate, and can be used for characterising aquifers. The BGS is undertaking a systematic survey of selected areas and lithologies in the UK where groundwater animals have not been inves...

  20. Wearable Sensors in Transportation - Exploratory Advanced Research Program Initial Stage Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes an initial stage investigation into wearable sensors for transportation research : applications. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has observed significant activity in this area and : seeks to obtain an understanding of...

  1. Clinical Investigation Program, Reports Control Symbol MED-300(R1), Fiscal Year 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Investigator: MAJ Gregory W. Boice, DC Associate Investigators: Department/Section: Dental Activity Key Words: osseointegrated implants Funding: FY 87...Utilizing Osseointegrated Implants (0) 27A87 Dootson, J. Earliest Optimal Prosthetic Loading 32 Time for IMZ, Titanium Sprayed, Implants in the Mandible and...K: "Hydroxyapatite-Coated Dental Implants Used for the Treatment of Edentulous Mandibles" IN Compendium of Continuing Education. May 1988. KRAUT R

  2. Gold nanoparticle labeling of cells is a sensitive method to investigate cell distribution and migration in animal models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Schültke, Elisabeth; Hall, Christopher; Arfelli, Fulvia; Astolfo, Alberto; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Adam; Ataelmannan, Khalid; MacDonald, Sarah Rigley; Juurlink, Bernhard H J

    2011-10-01

    The ability to track cells in small-animal models of human disease is important because it gives the potential to improve our understanding of the processes of disease progression as well as our understanding of the therapeutic effects of interventions. In this study gold nanoparticles have been used as a permanent marker of implanted normal and malignant cell grafts in combination with a suitable x-ray apparatus. Using x-ray computed tomography the micrometric three-dimensional distribution of these marked cells could be displayed with penetration depth, high cell sensitivity and high spatial resolution in rodent models of human diseases. In principle the method allows quantification of cell numbers at any anatomical location over time in small animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of the web-based site investigation flow diagram in repository development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Ohuchi, Jin; Tsuboya, Takao; Ando, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    In siting a repository for high level radioactive wastes (HLW), it is essential for consensus building intelligibly and visually present why and how the area is selected as a suitable site. However 'information asymmetry' exists especially between society and an implementation body because various types of investigation, analysis and assessment are implemented in site characterization on the basis of a wide variety of advanced science and technology. Communication between experts (e.g. surveyors and modelers) is also important for efficient and reliable site investigation/ characterization. The Web-based Site Investigation Flow Diagram (SIFD) has been developed as a tool for information sharing among stake holders and society-jointed decision making. To test applicability of the SIFD, virtual site characterization ('dry run') is performed using the existing site investigation data. It is concluded that the web-based SIFD enhance traceability and transparency of the site investigation/ characterization, and therefore it would be a powerful communication tool among experts for efficient and reliable site investigation/characterization and among stake holders for consensus building

  4. Investigation of proteolytic enzymes expression in brain tissue and cultivated retinal pigment epithelial cells at transgenic animal model of Hintington´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ardan, Taras; Kocurová, Gabriela; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 12-12 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. 08.11.2015-10.11.2015, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington´s disease * transgenic porcine model * proteolytic enzymes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Inadvertently programmed bits in Samsung 128 Mbit flash devices: a flaky investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, G.

    2002-01-01

    JPL's X2000 avionics design pioneers new territory by specifying a non-volatile memory (NVM) board based on flash memories. The Samsung 128Mb device chosen was found to demonstrate bit errors (mostly program disturbs) and block-erase failures that increase with cycling. Low temperature, certain pseudo- random patterns, and, probably, higher bias increase the observable bit errors. An experiment was conducted to determine the wearout dependence of the bit errors to 100k cycles at cold temperature using flight-lot devices (some pre-irradiated). The results show an exponential growth rate, a wide part-to-part variation, and some annealing behavior.

  6. Study protocol: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Kirsten; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Tick, Nouchka T.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Maras, Athanasios; van der Vegt, Esther J. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research shows that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) run several risks in their psychosexual development and that these adolescents can have limited access to reliable information on puberty and sexuality, emphasizing the need for specific guidance of adolescents with ASD in their psychosexual development. Few studies have investigated the effects of psychosexual training programs for adolescents with ASD and to date no randomized controlled trials are avai...

  7. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C. [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  8. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1978. Volume II. Principal investigator progress reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The topics covered in this report include: geologic siting considerations for the disposal of radioactive wastes into submarine geologic formations; geologic assessment of the MPG-1 regions Central North Pacific; site mapping; geotechnical aspects of subsurface seabed disposal; heat transfer, thermal and fluid physics in the deep ocean sediments; mechanical response predictive capability; sediment-seawater interaction at 300 0 C, 500 bars; stability of actinides in chloride media; cannister corrosion studies; nuclide sorption and migration; development of apparatus and measurement of thermal conductivity of seabed illite and smectite at temperatures to 500 0 C at simulated depths to 15,000 ft (9000 psi); in-situ heat transfer experiments; preliminary seabed disposal transport modeling studies; radionuclide migration studies; radionuclide distributions in deep ocean cores; benthic biological studies; deep sea microbial studies; activity rates of abyssal communities; Deep-towed RUM III (Sandia Seabed working platform): a third-generation remote underwater manipulator; long coring facility program; transportation; legal, political, and institutional implications of the Seabed Program for radioactive waste disposal

  9. Bereavement and Companion Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Avery D.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a bereavement counseling program at a humane society and reports findings that confirm parallels between human and animal bonding and bereavements. The act of consenting to euthanasia was particularly disturbing. Most of the bereaved owners reported depths of feeling that were unique and in most cases beyond those experienced in other…

  10. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-11-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing (and now indispensable) component of their industry. Art students are keenly aware of these trends and understand that their future careers require them to have a broader exposure to science than in the past. Unfortunately, at present there is little overlap between art and science in the typical high school or college curriculum. This article describes our experience in bridging this gap at San Jose State University, with the hope that readers will find ideas that can be used in their own schools.

  11. Investigating the Language Learning Strategies of Students in the Foundation Program of United Arab Emirates University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Sadiq Abdulwahed Ahmed; Al Khatib, Ahmad Z.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, language learning strategies have gained a lot of importance in different parts of the world, including the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Successful foreign or second language learning attempts are viewed in the light of using appropriate and effective language learning strategies. This study investigated the patterns of language learning…

  12. Learning Mathematics by Designing, Programming, and Investigating with Interactive, Dynamic Computer-Based Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Neil; Buteau, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    As part of their undergraduate mathematics curriculum, students at Brock University learn to create and use computer-based tools with dynamic, visual interfaces, called Exploratory Objects, developed for the purpose of conducting pure or applied mathematical investigations. A student's Development Process Model of creating and using an Exploratory…

  13. Investigations on the efficacy of routinely used phenotypic methods compared to genotypic approaches for the identification of staphylococcal species isolated from companion animals in Irish veterinary hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of Staphylococci to species level in veterinary microbiology is important to inform therapeutic intervention and management. We report on the efficacy of three routinely used commercial phenotypic methods for staphylococcal species identification, namely API Staph 32 (bioMérieux), RapID (Remel) and Staph-Zym (Rosco Diagnostica) compared to genotyping as a reference method to identify 52 staphylococcal clinical isolates (23 coagulase positive; 29 coagulase negative) from companion animals in Irish veterinary hospitals. Results Genotyping of a 412 bp fragment of the staphylococcal tuf gene and coagulase testing were carried out on all 52 veterinary samples along with 7 reference strains. In addition, genotyping of the staphylococcal rpoB gene, as well as PCR-RFLP of the pta gene, were performed to definitively identify members of the Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG). The API Staph 32 correctly identified all S. aureus isolates (11/11), 83% (10/12) of the SIG species, and 66% (19/29) of the coagulase negative species. RapID and Staph-Zym correctly identified 61% (14/23) and 0% (0/23) respectively of the coagulase-positives, and 10% (3/29) and 3% (1/29) respectively of the coagulase-negative species. Conclusions Commercially available phenotypic species identification tests are inadequate for the correct identification of both coagulase negative and coagulase positive staphylococcal species from companion animals. Genotyping using the tuf gene sequence is superior to phenotyping for identification of staphylococcal species of animal origin. However, use of PCR-RFLP of pta gene or rpoB sequencing is recommended as a confirmatory method for discriminating between SIG isolates. PMID:23635328

  14. 9 CFR 54.3 - Animals eligible for indemnity payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Animals eligible for indemnity payments. 54.3 Section 54.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.3 Animals eligible for indemnity payments. (a) Indemnity may...

  15. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a) Scrapie-positive...

  16. 9 CFR 55.6 - Mortgage against animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mortgage against animals. 55.6 Section 55.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... DISEASE Chronic Wasting Disease Indemnification Program § 55.6 Mortgage against animals. When cervids have...

  17. Partition and poliomyelitis: an investigation of the polio disparity affecting Muslims during India's eradication program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid S Hussain

    Full Text Available Significant disparities in the incidence of polio existed during its eradication campaign in India. In 2006, Muslims, who comprise 16% of the population in affected states, comprised 70% of paralytic polio cases. This disparity was initially blamed on the Muslims and a rumor that the vaccination program was a plot to sterilize their children. Using the framework of structural violence, this paper describes how the socio-political and historical context of Muslim populations in India shaped the polio disparity.A qualitative study utilizing methods of rapid ethnography was conducted from May-August 2009 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. Field methods included participant observation of vaccination teams, historical document research, and 107 interviews with both Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI stakeholders and families with vaccine-eligible children. Almost all respondents agreed that Aligarh was a highly segregated city, mostly due to riots after Partition and during the 1990s. Since the formation of segregated neighborhoods, most respondents described that "Muslim areas" had been underdeveloped compared to "Hindu areas," facilitating the physical transmission of poliovirus. Distrust of the government and resistance to vaccination were linked to this disparate development and fears of sterilization influenced by the "Family Planning Program" from 1976-1977.Ethnic violence and social marginalization since the Partition and during the rise of Hindu nationalism led to distrust of the government, the formation of segregated slums, and has made Muslims victims of structural violence. This led to the creation of disease-spreading physical environments, lowered vaccine efficacy, and disproportionately higher levels of resistance to vaccination. The causes of the polio disparity found in this study elucidate the nature of possible other health disparities affecting minorities in India.This study is limited by the manual coding of the

  18. Animated symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on data about animation film production by 18-year-old students in a Danish upper secondary school. The optic is the on-going potential for learning and development of reflection. The purpose is to clarify what might support young people's reflection on media. I propose...... an analytic working model called Animated Symbols concerning critical reflection in a dialogic learning process. The model shows dialogue as interactions that involve two types of transformation: inner ‘learning processes' and outer signs and symbols. The classroom-based research study is part of a Ph...

  19. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes it possi......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  20. An investigation of student satisfaction from hospitality internship programs in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Giousmpasoglou, Charalampos; Marinakou, Evangelia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate internships in the hospitality sector and identify factors that contribute to student satisfaction from this working and learning experience. One hundred and sixteen students who had completed their internships from both public and private higher education institutions in Greece participated in this study with a survey questionnaire that required participants to rate their internship experience and identify challenges and benefits. The findings sug...

  1. Investigation for integration of the German Public Health Service in catastrophe and disaster prevention programs in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfenninger, E.; Koenig, S.; Himmelseher, S.

    2004-01-01

    This research project aimed at investigating the integration of the GPHS into the plans for civil defence and protection as well as catastrophe prevention of the Federal Republic of Germany. Following a comprehensive analysis of the current situation, potential proposals for an improved integrative approach will be presented. In view of the lack of topics relevant for medical care in disaster medicine in educational curricula and training programs for medical students and postgraduate board programs for public health physicians, a working group of the Civil Protection Board of the German Federal Ministry of the Interior already complained in their 'Report on execution of legal rules for protection and rescue of human life as well as restitution of public health after disaster' in 1999, that the integration of the GPHS into catastrophe and disaster prevention programs has insufficiently been solved. On a point-by-point approach, our project analysed the following issues: - Legislative acts for integration of the German Public Health Service into medical care in catastrophes and disasters to protect the civilian population of Germany and their implementation and execution. - Administrative rules and directives on state and district levels that show relationship to integration of the German Public Health Service into preparedness programs for catastrophe prevention and management and their implementation and execution. - Education and postgraduate training options for physicians and non-physician employees of the German Public health Service to prepare for medical care in catastrophes and disasters. - State of knowledge and experience of the German Public Health Service personnel in emergency and disaster medicine. - Evaluation of the German administrative catastrophe prevention authorities with regard to their integration of the German Public Health Service into preparedness programs for catastrophe prevention and management. - Development of a concept to remedy the

  2. Rapid Determination of Ractopamine Residues in Edible Animal Products by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: Development and Investigation of Matrix Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine ractopamine residues in animal food products (chicken muscle, pettitoes, pig muscle, and pig liver, we established a rapid direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using a polyclonal antibody generated from ractopamine-linker-BSA. The antibody showed high sensitivity and specificity in phosphate buffer, with an IC50 of 0.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 0.04 ng/mL. The matrix effect of the samples was easily eliminated by one-step extraction with PBS, without any organic solution or clean-up procedure such as SPE or liquid-liquid extraction, making it a much more simple and rapid method than previously reported ones. The detection limit in blank samples was 0.2 μg/kg. To validate this new RAC (ractopamine hydrochloride ELISA, a RAC-free pig liver sample spiked at three different concentrations was prepared and analyzed by HPLC and ELISA. The results showed a good correlation between the data of ELISA and HPLC (R2>0.95, which proves that the established ELISA is accurate enough to quantify the residue of RAC in the animal derived foods.

  3. Rapid Determination of Ractopamine Residues in Edible Animal Products by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: Development and Investigation of Matrix Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, FengXia; Fang, Li; Wang, Shuo; Fang, GuoZhen

    2009-01-01

    To determine ractopamine residues in animal food products (chicken muscle, pettitoes, pig muscle, and pig liver), we established a rapid direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a polyclonal antibody generated from ractopamine-linker-BSA. The antibody showed high sensitivity and specificity in phosphate buffer, with an IC50 of 0.6 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 0.04 ng/mL. The matrix effect of the samples was easily eliminated by one-step extraction with PBS, without any organic solution or clean-up procedure such as SPE or liquid-liquid extraction, making it a much more simple and rapid method than previously reported ones. The detection limit in blank samples was 0.2 μg/kg. To validate this new RAC (ractopamine hydrochloride) ELISA, a RAC-free pig liver sample spiked at three different concentrations was prepared and analyzed by HPLC and ELISA. The results showed a good correlation between the data of ELISA and HPLC (R2 > 0.95), which proves that the established ELISA is accurate enough to quantify the residue of RAC in the animal derived foods. PMID:19826637

  4. Investigation of newborns with abnormal results in a newborn screening program for four lysosomal storage diseases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydy Bravo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are genetic disorders, clinically heterogeneous, mainly caused by defects in genes encoding lysosomal enzymes that degrade macromolecules. Several LSDs already have specific therapies that may improve clinical outcomes, especially if introduced early in life. With this aim, screening methods have been established and newborn screening (NBS for some LSDs has been developed. Such programs should include additional procedures for the confirmation (or not of the cases that had an abnormal result in the initial screening. We present here the methods and results of the additional investigation performed in four babies with positive initial screening results in a program of NBS for LSDs performed by a private laboratory in over 10,000 newborns in Brazil. The suspicion in these cases was of Mucopolysaccharidosis I - MPS I (in two babies, Pompe disease and Gaucher disease (one baby each. One case of pseudodeficiency for MPS I, 1 carrier for MPS I, 1 case of pseudodeficiency for Pompe disease and 1 carrier for Gaucher disease were identified. This report illustrates the challenges that may be encountered by NBS programs for LSDs, and the need of a comprehensive protocol for the rapid and precise investigation of the babies who have an abnormal screening result.

  5. Animal impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    The aspen ecosystem is rich in number and species of animals, especially in comparison to associated coniferous forest types. This natural species diversity and richness has been both increased and influenced by the introduction of domestic livestock. The high value of the aspen type as a forage resource for livestock and as forage and cover for wildlife makes the...

  6. Animated Symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frolunde, Lisbeth

    ' processer af fem udvalgte elever er gennemgået i forhold til tre opdelinger: filmskabere, filmskabelse processen og film. Den teoretiske tilgang er pragmatisme, social semiotik og diskursanalyse. Modellen "Animating Symbols" er udviklet og diskuteret som forsøg på at forstå reflektion og design som en slags...

  7. An Exploratory Investigation of the Assessment Practices of Selected Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business--Accredited Business Programs and Linkages with General Education Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitullo, Elizabeth; Jones, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    This research study investigated the assessment practices of five different undergraduate business programs. It examines the learning outcomes required for the business programs and their linkages with general education outcomes. Specific assessment methods, the results from assessments, and how business program faculty use assessment findings to…

  8. Present investigations of radioactive raw materials by the Geological Survey and a recommended program for future work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A.P.; Stead, F.W.

    1947-01-01

    The Geological Survey's program of investigation of radioactive raw materials is presented herewith under present investigations, plans for future investigations, plan of operation, and cost of operation. This report was prepared at the request of the Atomic Energy Commission. Present investigations are summarized to show the scope of the present Trace Elements program, grouping individual projects into related types of investigations. Plans for future investigations on an expanded scale are outlined. These should provide sufficient data and knowledge of the occurrence and availability of uranium, thorium, and related elements, to permit a more complete evaluation of domestic resources. Reconnaissance projects are designed to discover possible new sources of uranium and thorium and to select areas and materials warranting further investigation. Typical projects leading to the estimation of reserves are the investigation of the carnotite ores of the Colorado Plateau by geologic mapping, exploratory drilling, and related research, and investigation of asphaltic sandstone in Emery County, Utah. Extensive research will be undertaken to establish the principles governing the geological and geochemical relations of uranium, thorium, and associated elements as an essential guide in appraising domestic resources. Particular emphasis will be placed on phosphatic rocks and black shales which offer ultimate resources of uranium far greater than carnotite ores. All the foregoing investigations will be accompanied by chemical, gephysical, and mineralogical research and analytical work. Under plan of operation is discussed the organization of the Trace Elements Unit, space requirements for laboratory and office, the scheduling of investigations, and other related problems. The proposed scheduling of work calls for approximately 109, 173, and 203 man years in fiscal years 1948, 1949, and 1950 respectively. Definite plans have been formulated only for the next three fiscal years

  9. Investigating the connectivity between emissions of BVOC and rainfall formation in Amazonia using Genetic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Randow, Celso; Sanches, Marcos B.; Santos, Rosa Maria N.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Fuentes, Jose D.

    2017-04-01

    A detailed field experiment measuring turbulent properties, trace gases and BVOCs was carried out from April 2014 to January 2015 within and above a central Amazonian rainforest, with the objective of understanding the role of emissions and reactions of BVOCs, formation and transport of aerosols out of the boundary layer on cloud formation and precipitation triggers. Our measurements show two-way aspects of connectivity: mesoscale convective systems transport ozone down from the middle troposphere, enriching the atmospheric boundary layer as well as the forest canopy and surface layer, and, through multiple chemical transformations, an ozone-enriched atmospheric surface layer that can oxidize rainforest-emitted hydrocarbons and generate aerosols that subsequently activate into cloud condensation nuclei, thereby possibly influencing the formation of new convective precipitation. Qualitatively, we address the connectivity between emissions of BVOCs near the surface and rainfall generation, using the technique of Genetic Programing (GP), introduced by Koza (1992), based on the concepts of natural selection and genetics. The technique involves finding a mathematical expression that fits a given set of data, and constructing a population of mathematical models from different combinations of variables, constants and operators. An advantage of GP is that it can flexibly incorporate multivariate non-linear relations, and obtained numeric solutions are possibly interpreted and checked for physical consistency. A number of state variables (for example, surface fluxes, meteorological conditions, boundary layer stability conditions, BVOC and Ozone vertical profiles, etc), representing possible influences on BVOC emissions and their interrelations along the way through secondary organic aerosol and CCN formation to rainfall will be used.

  10. Investigation of Pedagogical Formation Certification Program Students’ Attitudes Towards Teaching Profession in Terms Of Some Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep DEMİRTAŞ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to determine the attitudes of students who have training on pedagogical formation in order to be assigned as a teacher towards teaching profession. Within the scope of this general aim the following question is sought an answer: Do pedagogical formation certification program students’ attitudes towards teaching profession change significantly in terms of (1 gender, (2 level of education (grade or graduation (3 department (studying or graduated, (4 faculty/ high school (studying or graduated variables? The present study has the characteristics of descriptive survey model. The participants include 644 students who take pedagogical formation at 2010- 2011 Academic year Spring term at Sakarya University’s Faculty of Education and who are studying at or graduated from Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Faculty of Fine Arts, Faculty of Theology, School of Physical Education and Sports, Health High School, and School of State Conservatory. Attitude Scale towards Teaching Profession (ASTP, developed by Üstüner (2006, is used as a data collection tool. In order to determine whether total scores obtained from data collection tools differ in terms of variables or not T test, analysis of variance, Mann Whitney U Test and Kruskal Wallis H-test are conducted. According to results, the attitudes of students, taking pedagogical formation, towards teaching profession show significant differences in the sense of faculty/ high school variable and do not show a significant difference with regard to gender and level of education variables. Moreover, attitude scores of students differ in accordance with Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Health High School and do not differ with regards to other departments in other faculties or high schools.

  11. Investigation of performance of programming approaches and languages used for numerical simulation of granular material by the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevičius, R.; Džiugys, A.; Kačianauskas, R.; Maknickas, A.; Vislavičius, K.

    2006-09-01

    Performance of programming approaches and languages used for the development of software codes for numerical simulation of granular material dynamics by the discrete element method (DEM) is investigated. The granular material considered represents a space filled with discrete spherical visco-elastic particles, and the behaviour of material under imposed conditions is simulated using the DEM. The object-oriented programming approach (implemented via C++) was compared with the procedural approach (using FORTRAN 90 and OBJECT PASCAL) in order to test their efficiency. The identical neighbour-searching algorithm, contact forces model and time integration method were implemented in all versions of codes. Two identical representative examples of the dynamic behaviour of granular material on a personal computer (compatible with IBM PC) were solved. The results show that software based on procedural approach runs faster in compare with software based on OOP, and software developed by FORTRAN 90 runs faster in compare with software developed by OBJECT PASCAL.

  12. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score...... with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns...... Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope -0...

  13. MX Siting Investigation. Water Resources Program. Technical Summary Report. Volume IIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    DIY N STATE EN 79 6 8N/S3E-16ACZ NtC 1969 6036 20 586;, 1t196T 474 5388 INTVL TESTE-7201 ENWIDDf IT AL 71 7 SWI5SE-168C2 ,L3i EE S 1935 29 38 5560 6...l 3/191 -- DRY 085. WELL ENTEC $3 34/AE-1596D :EA wN 110 6 57530 7/1979 75 5o75 ERTEC 791vsEg 66 69°3101 8N/,AI P360 1990 !?2 3 5856 /1981 176 5660...ENTEC 60 10 1SN1561-16CCA SP SULPHUR SPRING 1111980 1.0 6400 ERTEC $0 11 1NI57f-I5AC Sp 1111940 4.6 6430 [ NTC s0 MXSITING INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT OF

  14. Status of NEPA activities in the (Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, in the role of Technical Overview Contractor for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) is, among other things, responsible for: (1) coordinating the development and integration of technical data and criteria for environmental documentation; (2) performing repository environmental analyses; and (3) preparing environmental documentation as required by the National Siting Plan and the NWTS Licensing Plan. The objective of the FY 81 studies was to prepare an Environmental Area Characterization Report (EACR) that will be the initial data base for subsequent impact analyses and to identify environmental factors and information significant for area-to-location screening. A comprehensive literature survey and evaluation was performed for each of eight topics: biology, meteorology/air quality, cultural resources, water resources, background radiation, socioeconomics, energy and mineral resources and paleontology

  15. Nye County nuclear waste repository project office independent scientific investigations program. Summary annual report, May 1996--April 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by Multimedia Environmental Technology, Inc. (MET) on behalf of Nye County Nuclear Waste Project Office, summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1996 to April 30, 1997. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO's on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: (1) Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment. (2) Identifying areas not being addressed adequately by DOE Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues

  16. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997 - April 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO's on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County

  17. Study protocol: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Kirsten; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Tick, Nouchka T; Verhulst, Frank C; Maras, Athanasios; van der Vegt, Esther J M

    2015-08-28

    Previous research shows that adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) run several risks in their psychosexual development and that these adolescents can have limited access to reliable information on puberty and sexuality, emphasizing the need for specific guidance of adolescents with ASD in their psychosexual development. Few studies have investigated the effects of psychosexual training programs for adolescents with ASD and to date no randomized controlled trials are available to study the effects of psychosexual interventions for this target group. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) described in this study protocol aims to investigate the effects of the Tackling Teenage Training (TTT) program on the psychosexual development of adolescents with ASD. This parallel clinical trial, conducted in the South-West of the Netherlands, has a simple equal randomization design with an intervention and a waiting-list control condition. Two hundred adolescents and their parents participate in this study. We assess the participants in both conditions using self-report as well as parent-report questionnaires at three time points during 1 year: at baseline (T1), post-treatment (T2), and for follow-up (T3). To our knowledge, the current study is the first that uses a randomized controlled design to study the effects of a psychosexual training program for adolescents with ASD. It has a number of methodological strengths, namely a large sample size, a wide range of functionally relevant outcome measures, the use of multiple informants, and a standardized research and intervention protocol. Also some limitations of the described study are identified, for instance not making a comparison between two treatment conditions, and no use of blinded observational measures to investigate the ecological validity of the research results. Dutch Trial Register NTR2860. Registered on 20 April 2011.

  18. Animal Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Graham K; Tropea, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a wide-ranging snapshot of the state-of-the-art in experimental research on the physics of swimming and flying animals. The resulting picture reflects not only upon the questions that are of interest in current pure and applied research, but also upon the experimental techniques that are available to answer them. Doubtless, many new questions will present themselves as the scope and performance of our experimental toolbox develops over the coming years.

  19. Consumption of animal products and frauds: DNA-based methods for the investigation of authenticity and traceability in dairy and meat-derived products – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina da Silva Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available O aumento do poder de compra da população, especialmente em países emergentes como o Brasil, foi seguido pelo crescente consumo de carnes, leites e seus derivados, assim como pela maior exigência por padrões de qualidade destes produtos. Os diferentes tipos de fraude podem comprometer a qualidade e ferir os direitos do consumidor, sendo relevante a aplicação de métodos mais sensíveis e específicos para investigação da autenticidade de gêneros alimentícios de origem animal. A substituição total ou parcial de carne, leite ou derivados, de outra espécie animal que não a declarada no rótulo dos produtos, compromete a natureza e a qualidade destes produtos, prejudicando os direitos de escolha dos consumidores, que podem estar relacionados a recomendações médicas e nutricionais, ao valor econômico do produto ou sobre os hábitos e/ou restrições alimentares específicos de cada cultura. A identificação das espécies animais que deram origem aos produtos cárneos e lácteos e importante para a rastreabilidade dos alimentos. Embora matrizes alimentares tenham composição complexa e variável, técnicas biomoleculares têm sido cada vez mais utilizadas para a identificação de espécies animais, uma vez que tem sido demonstrada a confiabilidade, especificidade, rapidez e alta sensibilidade, mesmo quando utilizadas em amostras mistas. Esta revisão teve como objetivo apresentar os principais métodos moleculares que podem ser utilizados para a detecção da adulteração de espécies em derivados cárneos e lácteos, incluindo métodos já bem estabelecidos, tais como a reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR, bem como as tecnologias mais avançadas, como a PCR em tempo real, os métodos de sequenciamento de DNA de ultima geração e o biochip de DNA ou DNA microarray. Esses métodos moleculares vêm sendo utilizados, com sucesso, na detecção e quantificação de DNA exógeno em amostras de alimentos, mesmo que este DNA esteja

  20. Lapse in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Continuing Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Fu Tsan

    Full Text Available The United States federal animal welfare regulations and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals require that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs conduct continuing reviews of all animal research activities. However, little is known about the lapse rate of IACUC continuing reviews, and how frequently investigators continue research activities during the lapse. It is also not clear what factors may contribute to an institution's lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. As part of the quality assurance program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has collected performance metric data for animal care and use programs since 2011. We analyzed IACUC continuing review performance data at 74-75 VA research facilities from 2011 through 2015. The IACUC continuing review lapse rates improved from 5.6% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2015. The rate of investigators continuing research activities during the lapse also decreased from 47.2% in 2012 to 7.4% in 2015. The type of IACUCs used and the size of animal research programs appeared to have no effect in facility's rates of lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. While approximately 80% of facilities reported no lapse in IACUC continuing reviews, approximately 14% of facilities had lapse rates of >10% each year. Some facilities appeared to be repeat offenders. Four facilities had IACUC lapse rates of >10% in at least 3 out of 5 years, suggesting a system problem in these facilities requiring remedial actions to improve their IACUC continuing review processes.

  1. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic activities of the extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea membranacea Pierre in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisit Bouking

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the ethanol and aqueous extracts from the rhizome of Dioscorea membranacea Pierre (D. membranacea on inflammatory response using carrageenin-induced paw edema in rats, were examined. Antinociceptive activity using writhing, hot plate and formalin test in mice and the antipyretic activity in yeast-induced fever in rats, were also examined. Oral administration of the ethanol extract at the dose of 1600 mg/kg significantly decreased the paw edema induced by carrageenin in rats. The aqueous extract (1600 mg/kg also significantly suppressed the carrageenin-induced paw edema in rats. The ethanol extract had no significant effects on antinociceptive response in writhing, formalin and hot plate tests and antipyretic activities in yeast-induced fever in rats. No significant effects on writhing test and yeast-induced fever were observed after oral administration of the aqueous extract in experimental animals. These results suggest that the ethanol and aqueous extracts of D. membranacea rhizome possess anti-inflammatory action but no analgesic or antipyretic actions and their anti-inflammatory action may act at some site(s of action or inhibit of some inflammatory mediators, which is different from the action of aspirin.

  2. Modeling Investigation of Spring Chinook Salmon Habitat in San Joaquin River Restoration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Ramires, J.

    2013-12-01

    -averaged mathematic model is developed to simulate and predict the hydrodynamic conditions (e.g., current velocity, water surface elevation, etc.) of different alternatives and incorporate the disengaged portion of the SJR. The 2-D model will facilitate to better investigate flow features which are essential to the SJRRP. Flow simulations will allow for the exploration of flow patterns and enable the users to compare each alternative. By simulating and predicting flow conditions of each alternative, this project may offer an insightful understanding of the hydrodynamic occurrence of river alterations and aid in analyzing the passage for Chinook salmon. Key words: modeling; habitat; restoration

  3. Theoretical investigation on the performance of DNA electrophoresis under programmed step electric field strength: Two-step condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yi; Liu, Chenchen; Chen, Qinmiao; Zhu, Xifang; Dou, Xiaoming

    2015-10-01

    Programmed step electric field strength is a simple-to-use technique that has already been reported to be effective to enhance the efficiency or speed of DNA electrophoresis. However, a global understanding and the details of this technique are still vague. In this paper, we investigated the influence of programmed step electric field strength by theoretical calculation and concentrated on a basic format named as two-step electric field strength. Both subtypes of two-step electric field strength conditions were considered. The important parameters, such as peak spacing, peak width, resolution, and migration time, were calculated in theory to understand the performance of DNA electrophoresis under programmed step electric field strength. The influence of two-step electric field strength on DNA electrophoresis was clearly revealed on a diagram of resolution versus migration time. Both resolution and speed of DNA electrophoresis under two-step electric field strength conditions are simply expressed by the shape of curves in the diagram. The possible shapes of curve were explored by calculation and shown in this paper. The subtype II of two-step electric field strength brings drastic variation on the resolution. Its limitations of enhancement and deterioration of resolution were predicted in theory. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Investigating the effects of a multidimensional exercise program on symptoms and antiinflammatory status in female patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisacik, Pinar; Unal, Edibe; Akman, Umit; Yapali, Gokmen; Karabulut, Erdem; Akdogan, Ali

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a multidimensional exercise program on symptoms and antiinflammatory status in female patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The BATH Indexes, Dougados Functional Index (DFI), Health Assessment Questionnaire in Spondyloarthopathies (HAQ-S), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to evaluate twenty-four female AS patients. ESR, CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 were also analyzed. All patients were assessed at baseline and with 3 weeks intervals till 12 week. A multidimensional exercise program was applied for three times a week. There were significant differences in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Index (BAS-G) and Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), HAQ-S, ASQoL and BDI scores (p < 0.05). The level of the ESR, CRP and IL-6 fluctuated slightly. There was only significant difference at 3 and 12 weeks as compared to baseline levels in TNF-α values (p = 0.048, p < 0.001). We concluded that multidimensional exercise program should be taken into consideration for AS patients due to its positive effects on symptoms and antiinflammatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. "To Be a Scientist Sometimes You Have to Break Down Stuff about Animals": Examining the Normative Scientific Practices of a Summer Herpetological Program for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Catherine Marie

    2016-01-01

    When studying informal science programs, researchers often overlook the opportunities enabled and constrained in each program and the practices reinforced for participants. In this case study, I examined the normative scientific practices reinforced in one-week-long "Herpetology" (the study of reptiles and amphibians) program for…

  6. Animal production and health newsletter. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The news letter reports workshops and training events in the areas of animal diseases and application of ELISA and radioimmunoassay techniques. It also describes existing and future coordinated research programs in animal production and health

  7. Investigations of multiresistance to antibiotics and chemotherapeutics and extended spectrum beta: Lactamase effect (ESBL test in strains E.coli and salmonella originating from domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of multiresistance to the effects of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics and extended spectrum beta-lactamase were examined in 45 strains of E. coli and 35 strains of Salmonella. The strains of E. coli originated from several species of domestic animals: dogs, cats, poultry, and cattle, and 30 strains of Salmonella originated from poultry, 4 strains from cattle, and 1 strain from swine. The presence of the following serovarieties was established using serological examinations: Salmonella Enteritidis 17 strains, Salmonella Gallinarum 1 strain, Salmonella Hartford 5 strains, Salmonella Anatum 1 strain, Salmonella Typhimurium 4 strains, Salmonella Agona 1 strain, Salmonella Infantis 1 strain, Salmonella Thompson var. Berlin 1 strain, Salmonella Tennessee 1 strain, Salmonella Senftenberg 1 strain, Salmonella Glostrup 1 strain, and Salmonella Hadar 1 strain. In the examinations of the listed strains we used antibiogram discs of ampicillin, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, cephalexin, cephtriaxon, cephotaxim, cephtazidime, aztreonam, gentamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, cyprofloxacine, and a combination of sulphamethoxasole and trimethoprim. The lowest prevalence of multiresistance in E. Coli strains to 3 or more antibiotics was established in dogs 20%, and the highest in 60% strains originating from swine. In 62.88% strains of Salmonella we established sensitivity to all applied antibiotics. Resistance was also established in a small number of the examined strains to ampicillin (11 strains, to tetracycline (5 strains, to amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (5 strains, to sulphamethoxasole with trimethoprim (5 strains, to gentamycin (3 strains, and to cloramphenicol (1 strain. Of all the examined strains of Salmonella, 6 strains originating from poultry exhibited multiresistence. The presence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase effects examined using the ESBL test, was not established in strains of E. coli and Salmonella strains.

  8. Two-photon microscopy imaging of thy1GFP-M transgenic mice: a novel animal model to investigate brain dendritic cell subsets in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    Full Text Available Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins in specific cell populations are widely used for in vivo brain studies with two-photon fluorescence (TPF microscopy. Mice of the thy1GFP-M line have been engineered for selective expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP in neuronal populations. Here, we report that TPF microscopy reveals, at the brain surface of these mice, also motile non-neuronal GFP+ cells. We have analyzed the behavior of these cells in vivo and characterized in brain sections their immunophenotype.With TPF imaging, motile GFP+ cells were found in the meninges, subarachnoid space and upper cortical layers. The striking feature of these cells was their ability to move across the brain parenchyma, exhibiting evident shape changes during their scanning-like motion. In brain sections, GFP+ cells were immunonegative to antigens recognizing motile cells such as migratory neuroblasts, neuronal and glial precursors, mast cells, and fibroblasts. GFP+ non-neuronal cells exhibited instead the characteristic features and immunophenotype (CD11c and major histocompatibility complex molecule class II immunopositivity of dendritic cells (DCs, and were immunonegative to the microglial marker Iba-1. GFP+ cells were also identified in lymph nodes and blood of thy1GFP-M mice, supporting their identity as DCs. Thus, TPF microscopy has here allowed the visualization for the first time of the motile behavior of brain DCs in situ. The results indicate that the thy1GFP-M mouse line provides a novel animal model for the study of subsets of these professional antigen-presenting cells in the brain. Information on brain DCs is still very limited and imaging in thy1GFP-M mice has a great potential for analyses of DC-neuron interaction in normal and pathological conditions.

  9. Animal behavior and animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, K A

    1991-04-15

    The value of behavioral techniques in assessing animal welfare, and in particular assessing the psychological well being of animals, is reviewed. Using cats and horses as examples, 3 behavioral methods are presented: (1) comparison of behavior patterns and time budgets; (2) choice tests; and (3) operant conditioning. The behaviors of intact and declawed cats were compared in order to determine if declawing led to behavioral problems or to a change in personality. Apparently it did not. The behavior of free ranging horses was compared with that of stabled horses. Using two-choice preference tests, the preference of horses for visual contact with other horses and the preference for bedding were determined. Horses show no significant preference for locations from which they can make visual contact with other horses, but they do prefer bedding, especially when lying down. Horses will perform an operant response in order to obtain light in a darkened barn or heat in an outside shed. These same techniques can be used to answer a variety of questions about an animal's motivation for a particular attribute of its environment.

  10. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    , and even whole genomes, has brought a new stability to the field. The book brings together the information from these varied fields, and demonstrates that it is indeed now possible to build a phylogenetic tree from a combination of both morphology and gene sequences. This thoroughly revised third edition......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  11. Animated war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    in production: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011) by Knutte Wester, and In-World War (USA, expected 2011) by DJ Bad Vegan. These films have themes of war and include film scenes that are ‘machinima’ (real-time animation made in 3D graphic environments) within live action film scenes. Machinima harnesses...... DIY multimedia storytellers explore new ways to tell and to ‘animate’ stories. The article contains four parts: introduction to machinima and the notions of resemiosis and authorial practice, presentation of DIY filmmaking as a practice that intertwines with new networked economics, analysis...

  12. Effects of prepartal body condition score and peripartal energy supply of dairy cows on postpartal lipolysis, energy balance and ketogenesis: an animal model to investigate subclinical ketosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kirsten; Frahm, Jana; Meyer, Ulrich; Kersten, Susanne; Reiche, Dania; Rehage, Jürgen; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-08-01

    Subclinical ketosis is a metabolic disorder which often goes undiagnosed and leads to constricted performance and an impairment of general condition. In the current study subclinical ketosis was characterised by a β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentration of >1·2 mmol/l in blood serum. To generate this metabolic situation, an animal model was created. The model, based on group-specific interaction of dietary energy supply and body condition, is appropriate for testing the medical effectiveness of treating this kind of ketosis and its concomitants. During the trial, 18 dairy cows (primiparous and pluriparous) were assigned, according to their body condition score (BCS) 6 weeks before expected parturition, to a normal [6.78 MJ net energy for lactation (NEL)/kg dry matter; 20% concentrate] or to a high-energy feeding group (7·71 MJ NEL/kg dry matter; 60% concentrate). Therefore cows with the highest BCS were allocated to the high-energy group to enhance the contrast with the control group. Statistical analysis was done using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Effects were declared significant when P-values were ⩽0.05. Owing to the higher energy concentration and dry matter intake, the energy intake and balance was significantly higher in the high-energy feeding group, with strong effects on lipid metabolism and health in blood and liver post partum. Within the first 2 weeks after calving, 8 out of 9 cows (89%) of the high-energy group had BHB values indicative of subclinical ketosis. These cows also had significantly higher values of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), aspartate transaminase (AST) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) post partum, as well as a raised total lipid content of the liver. RQUICKI, a calculated parameter which is based on serum concentrations of glucose, insulin and NEFA to assess the insulin sensitivity, was not affected by treatment. Therefore, RQUICKI does not seem to be the right parameter for diagnosing decreased insulin sensitivity in cows

  13. Clinical Investigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    Readiness. Pr Pope Air Force Base Dental Officers, Pope Air Force Base, October, 1992. Shields W: Regenerative Periodontal Therapy - Part I and II Pr...Fayetteville Dental Hygiene Society, April 1992. Shields W: Mucogingival Therapy, Adjunctive Therapy and Regenerative Therapy, Pr Fort Riley, Kansas, May...1992. Shields W: Adjunctive Periodontal Therapy, Pope Air Force Base Pr Dental Officers, June, 1992. Shields W: Mock Boards, Fort Gordon, Georgia, June

  14. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-30

    Amiodarone for the Therapy of Cardiac Arrhythmias .(O) ............................................ 076 80/117 Correlation of Clinical Signs and...Immediate Prenatal Period as a Predictor of Perinatal Newborn Infections.(T).. 216 79/406 Intergroup Ewing’s Sarcoma of Pelvic and Sacral Bones.(T).. 217 79...Diagnosis of Hepatobiliary Disease.(T) .... 238 80/601 Comparison of Growth Adjusted Sonographic Age (GASA) with the Clinical Newborn Aging Examination

  15. Clinical Investigation Program Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    have been collected and frozen. Assays for testosterone , estrone, estradiol, androstenediol and SHBG binding capacity will be performed when 50 samples...total joint replacement. Image results will be quantified by a 1+ to 4+ scale relating various regions of peni -prosthetic bone activity to normal bone...34 . -.-.-. ... . . . . * ..-.-.. .. ,.. .- . - - - . . . .. . . .- - - - . . . , . - ." -, .- . .. . - parathion, DDT, progesterone and testosterone . The human skin grafted nude mouse shows

  16. Clinical Investigation Program Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Burden Multiple Myeloma . NCOG Prot. No. 9M91. (0) .0 1981 H-81-38 Incidence of the Preleukemic Syndrome in the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors. (C) 1981...interest in performing pretreatment cytogenetic studies on the bone marrow and blood of patients with smoldering leukemia and refractory anemia with...Phase 2 Trial of Prednimustine in Smoldering Leukemia and Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts". 2. The NCOG headquarters was used as the hub for

  17. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    0. Cold Pressor Test as a Predictor 44t of Pregnancy-Induced I;ypertension. (0) 7181 Read, J. A. Randomized Trial of Ambulation vs Oxytocin 4~ for...Sant, T. E. External (Combination) Rhinoplasty 104 Approach: Access to the Problem Nasal Deformity. (0) (PR) 13/(;0 W. an, S. P. Ureterogastric...During Restricted Intervals of S Phase in Hepatoma Cells. J Cell biol 84: 629-632, Dec 1980. (C) 0𔃻Prien, J. C. and Cucinell, S. A.: Lactate Consumption

  18. Clinical Investigation Program Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    17(10):491-494. Ivanhoe JR, Adrian ED, Krantz WA: Counteracting the darkening effect of a metal framework on acrylic resin denture b’se material. J...Changes in Coronary Artery Vasodilating 74 90-27 Properties . (T) 1990 A Treatment IND Protocol for the Use of VIDEX (2’,3’- 75 91-1 Dideoxyinosine, ddI) in...laboratory to have membrane protective properties . Progress: Supplies necessary to complete this protocol have been purchased. 23 DETAIL SUMMARY SHEET Date

  19. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    VA, March 1985 (C) Taormina MK: Splenic Vein Thrombosis - The T.A.M.C. Experience. 38th Parallel Society Meeting, Seoul, Korea, October 1984. ,.-1...1985 (C) Mahan VL, Peake JB: Traumatic Pneumothorax: The Tripler Experience. 1985 Shogun Medical Society, Tokyo, Japan Olson DW: Mesenteric Venous... Thrombosis . Hawaii Surgical Association Annual Meeting, Oahu, HI, August 1985 Schuchmann GD, Lee Y-TM: Newer Diagnostic Technology: Limitations and

  20. Criminal Investigation Program Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-31

    Freeze-Dried Bone. (0) 35 1988 Evaluation of Osseointegration of Titanium Dental 88-11 Implants in Micro Swine. (0) 36 1988 Experimental Periodontitis...reactions. 35 Detail Summary Sheet Date: 30 Sep 88 Prot No.: 88-11 Status: Ongoini Title: Evaluation of Osseointegration of Titanium Dental Implants in Micro...48 Cotinine - 44 Crutches - 43 Dental implants - 36 Electron microscopy - 21 ELISA - 76 Family psychodynamics - 81 Fibroblast - 35 Fibroblasts

  1. Clinical Investigation Program Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Bruxism. Learning Subluxation of Patella Information __T_ Ac-umulative MEDCASE Est Accumulztive Periodic Cost: IOMA Cost: _ Revie-, Results Study...addition of receiving feedback from the night monitor when they begin tensing their jaws. For patients with subluxation of the patella, muscle tension...12 trial subjects are in various stages of the laboratory treatment. A total of 120 treatment sessions have been run to date. The subluxation portion

  2. Clinical Investigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    To compare allergy immunotherapy with alum-precipitated extracts of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) and/or D. farinae (Df) in a double-blind...mucosa, posterior and anterior tongue, sublingual area, anterior sulcus and palate. A specimen of the patient’s saliva was also obtained. The degree of

  3. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Investigating the Impact of a Workplace Resilience Program During a Time of Significant Organizational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Shane; Meir, Rudi; Crowley-McHattan, Zac; McEwen, Kathryn; Pastoors, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a short-term resilience intervention as measured by the Resilience at Work (RAW) scale. A 5-week resilience program was implemented with 28 volunteers and assessed by the 20-item RAW scale. The scale was administered electronically and participants were match paired into either a treatment or control group. Statistical analysis was conducted using a 2 × 2 group (Treatment, control) × time (pre, post) analysis of variance with repeated measures. Postintervention time point RAW total score was significantly greater in the treatment group (P < 0.01) and statistical significance was also achieved for four of the seven subscales. Employee resilience can be improved via specific educational and skills training requiring a total time commitment of just 5 hours, making this intervention feasible for most working environments.

  4. First intercomparison exercise in the frame of the coordinated investigation program of the IAEA on regional intercomparison of personal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massera, G.; Papadopulos, S.B.; Gregori, B.N.; DaSilva, T.; Griffith, R.; )

    1998-01-01

    During the days 7 and 11 of October of 1996 took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the first Meeting of the Coordinated Investigation program of the IAEA on Regional Intercomparison of Personal Dosimetry for Latin American. In this meeting participated nine representatives of reference laboratories and of personal dosimetry of the region. Fundamental aspect of personal dosimetry relates with the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp application and the implementation of intercomparison exercise in order to improve the quality of the dose estimation have been discussed. Also lectures carried out by the specialist on Hp and practical aspects of it implementation; answer and calibration according to the ISO 4037; intercomparison methods: procedures and organizations. It was carried out the first intercomparison exercise where the participants collaborated in the preparations and irradiations of personal dosemeters they have brought. (author)

  5. INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF THE HEALTH TRANSFORMATION PROGRAM ON PUBLIC HOSPITALS AND HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (RESEARCH IN ANKARA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal TEKİN

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of health applications of the Health Transformation Program (HTP on public hospitals and health professionals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This descriptive and seeking relations study was conducted with the health professionals who were working in 4 public hospitals located in Ankara province. The survey was administered to 335 health professionals by using stratified sampling method. Frequency analysis, factor analysis, correlation, and regression analysis methods were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Independent variables were infrastructure, health care delivery, and management. Dependent variables were digital displays and health professional variables. Two different regression models were developed. Multiple regression models which were designed for independent and dependent variables were statistically significant. Independent variables explained almost 14% of the total variance of the digital displays and 33% of the variance of the health professionals. CONCLUSION: The management and the representation of the health services are important forecasting tools for digital displays. However, the infrastructure of the health care does not have a significant effect. On the other hand, all of the independent variables are significant forecasting tools for health professionals and the Health Transformation Program (HTP affects the health professionals more than public hospitals.

  6. Ten years of investigation on radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Incorporation, by marine algae and animals, of hydrogen-3 and other radionuclides present in effluents of nuclear or industrial origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Colard, J.; Koch, G.; Kirchmann, R.; Strack, S.; Luettke, A.; Carraro, G.

    1981-01-01

    Several marine plants and animals were investigated for their capability of incorporating the main radionuclides present in selected effluents. Accumulation factors are reported for 3 H, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 58 Co, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 131 I 226 Ra and 124 Sb. Marine algae, which are involved in food chains leading to man, show the highest accumulation factors. The stable element composition of the alga Acetabularia was determined by gamma-activation analysis. The preferential accumulation of particular radionuclides by marine organisms suggests that they may have a significant role in the turnover rate of elements in the marine environment. (author)

  7. Quality assurance/quality control summary report for Phase 1 of the Clinch River remedial investigation. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, S.K.; Bevelhimer, M.S.; Brandt, C.C.

    1994-07-01

    The Clinch River Remedial Investigation (CRRI) is designed to address the transport, fate, and distribution of waterborne contaminants released from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation and to assess potential risks to human health and the environment associated with these contaminants. Primary areas of investigation are Melton Hill Reservoir, the Clinch River from Melton Hill Dam to its confluence with the Tennessee River, Poplar Creek, and Watts Bar Reservoir. Phase 1 of the CRRI was a preliminary study in selected areas of the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir. Fish, sediment, and water samples were collected and analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radiological parameters. Phase 1 was designed to (1) obtain high-quality data to confirm existing historical data for contaminant levels; (2) determine the range of contaminant concentrations present in the river-reservoir system; (3) identify specific contaminants of concern; and (4) establish the reference (background) concentrations for those contaminants. Quality assurance (QA) objectives for Phase I were that (1) scientific data generated would withstand scientific scrutiny; (2) data would be gathered using appropriate procedures for field sampling, chain-of-custody, laboratory analyses, and data reporting; and (3) data would be of known precision and accuracy. These objectives were met through the development and implementation of (1) a QA oversight program of audits and surveillances; (2) standard operating procedures accompanied by a training program; (3) field sampling and analytical laboratory quality control requirements; (4) data and records management systems; and (5) validation of the data by an independent reviewer. Approximately 1700 inorganic samples, 1500 organic samples, and 2200 radiological samples were analyzed and validated. The QA completeness objective for the project was to obtain valid analytical results for at least 95% of the samples collected

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of Antimicrobial ...

  9. Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies. (orig.)

  10. Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, M A

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies.

  11. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  12. In vivo and in vitro animal investigation of the effect of a mixture of herbal extracts from Tribulus terrestris and Cornus officinalis on penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Sung Chul; Do, Jung Mo; Choi, Jae Hwi; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Roh, Gu Seob; Hyun, Jae Seog

    2012-10-01

    Herbal preparations have long been used as folk remedies for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study examined the effects of Tribulus terrestris and Cornus officinalis extracts on relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpus cavernosum (CC), their mechanisms of action, and the effects of oral administration of a mixture of the herbal extracts on penile erection. The relaxation effects and the mechanisms of action of T. terrestris extract, C. officinalis extract, and the mixture of both extracts on the rabbit CC were investigated in an organ bath. To evaluate whether the relaxation response of the CC shown in an organ bath occurs in vivo, intracavernous pressure (ICP) was calculated in rats after oral administration for a month. Additionally, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in the CC were measured using immunoassay. Smooth muscle relaxation was expressed as the percent decrease in precontraction induced by phenylephrine. ICP was assessed in rats after the oral administration of a mixture of both extracts for 1 month and changes in cGMP and cAMP concentrations were measured based on the concentration of the mixture of both extracts. T. terrestris extract, C. officinalis extract, and the mixture of both extracts showed concentration-dependent relaxation effects of the CC. In both the endothelium-removed group and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester pretreatment group, T. terrestris extract inhibited relaxation. ICP measured after oral administration of the extract mixture for a month was higher than that measured in the control group, and a significant increase in cAMP was observed in the mixture group. T. terrestris extract and C. officinalis extract exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation in an organ bath. In the in vivo study of the extract mixture, ICP and cAMP was significantly potentiated. Accordingly, the mixture of T. terrestris extract and C. officinalis extract may improve erectile function.

  13. An investigation of factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among computer science education students

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Wesley Govender; Sujit Kumar Basak

    2015-01-01

    Students usually perceived computer programming courses as one of the most difficult courses since learning to program is perceived as a difficult task. Quite often students’ negative perceptions on computer programming results in poor results and high drop-out rates. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of factors that affect computer science education students’ Java programming self-efficacy and the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and students’ age and gend...

  14. Selected aquatic biological investigations in the Great Salt Lake basins, 1875-1998, National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, Elise M.P.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes previous investigations of aquatic biological communities, habitat, and contaminants in streams and selected large lakes within the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). The Great Salt Lake Basins study unit is one of 59 such units designed to characterize water quality through the examination of chemical, physical, and biological factors in surface and ground waters across the country. The data will be used to aid in the planning, collection, and analysis of biological information for the NAWQA study unit and to aid other researchers concerned with water quality of the study unit. A total of 234 investigations conducted during 1875-1998 are summarized in this report. The studies are grouped into three major subjects: (1) aquatic communities and habitat, (2) contamination of streambed sediments and biological tissues, and (3) lakes. The location and a general description of each study is listed. The majority of the studies focus on fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Studies of algal communities, aquatic habitat, riparian wetlands, and contamination of streambed sediment or biological tissues are less common. Areas close to the major population centers of Salt Lake City, Provo, and Logan, Utah, are generally well studied, but more rural areas and much of the Bear River Basin are lacking in detailed information, except for fish populations..

  15. A curated transcriptome dataset collection to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Cugno, Chiara; Chaussabel, Damien; Marr, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Compendia of large-scale datasets made available in public repositories provide an opportunity to identify and fill gaps in biomedical knowledge. But first, these data need to be made readily accessible to research investigators for interpretation. Here we make available a collection of transcriptome datasets to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life. Thirty two datasets were retrieved from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and loaded in a custom web application called the Gene Expression Browser (GXB), which was designed for interactive query and visualization of integrated large-scale data. Quality control checks were performed. Multiple sample groupings and gene rank lists were created allowing users to reveal age-related differences in transcriptome profiles, changes in the gene expression of neonatal hematopoietic cells to a variety of immune stimulators and modulators, as well as during cell differentiation. Available demographic, clinical, and cell phenotypic information can be overlaid with the gene expression data and used to sort samples. Web links to customized graphical views can be generated and subsequently inserted in manuscripts to report novel findings. GXB also enables browsing of a single gene across projects, thereby providing new perspectives on age- and developmental stage-specific expression of a given gene across the human hematopoietic system. This dataset collection is available at: http://developmentalimmunology.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list.

  16. A human and animal model-based approach to investigating the anti-inflammatory profile and potential of the 5-HT2B receptor antagonist AM1030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmqvist, Niklas; Siller, Max; Klint, Cecilia; Sjödin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by highly pruritic eczematous lesions that are commonly treated with topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. Side-effects and safety concerns associated with these agents restrict their use, and new, safe treatment options are therefore needed. Recent reports suggest that serotonin, i.e. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor family may contribute to inflammation and pruritus in the skin. The objective of this particular study was to investigate the 5HT2B receptor antagonist AM1030 with respect to its anti-inflammatory profile and potential. AM1030 was tested in a set of distinct human and rodent in vitro and in vivo models, differing with respect to e.g. T cell involvement, triggering stimulus, main read-outs and route of drug administration. The in vitro systems used were staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human primary monocytes, LPS-stimulated human THP-1 monocytes and LPS-stimulated mouse primary macrophages. The in vivo systems used were LPS- and SEA-induced cytokine production in the mouse, antigen-induced arthritis in the rat, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis in the mouse and delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in the mouse. In addition, different cell populations were analyzed with respect to their expression of the 5-HT2B receptor at the mRNA level. AM1030 significantly reduced both T cell-dependent and T cell-independent inflammatory responses, in vivo and in vitro. Due to the low or absent expression of the 5-HT2B receptor on T cell populations, the influence of AM1030 in T cell-dependent systems is suggested to be mediated via an indirect effect involving antigen-presenting cell types, such as monocytes and macrophages. Based on the wide range of model systems used in this study, differing e.g. with respect to species, T cell involvement, triggering

  17. Intimate Partner Violence and Animal Abuse in an Immigrant-Rich Sample of Mother-Child Dyads Recruited From Domestic Violence Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christie A; Hageman, Tina; Williams, James Herbert; Ascione, Frank R

    2018-03-01

    We examined rates of animal abuse in pet-owning families experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). We also examined whether higher levels of IPV (as measured by subscales from the Conflict Tactics Scales) predicted increased risk for partner-perpetrated animal abuse. Our sample included 291 mother-child dyads, where the mothers sought services from domestic violence agencies. Nearly half the sample is comprised of Mexican immigrants. Mothers reported that 11.7% of partners threatened to harm a pet and 26.1% actually harmed a pet, the latter of which represents a lower rate than in similar studies. When examining animal abuse by "Hispanic status," follow-up analyses revealed significant omnibus differences between groups, in that non-Hispanic U.S.-born partners (mostly White) displayed higher rates of harming pets (41%) than either U.S.-born or Mexican-born Hispanic groups (27% and 12.5%, respectively). Differences in rates for only threatening (but not harming) pets were not significant, possibly due to a small number of partners ( n = 32) in this group. When examining whether partners' IPV predicted only threatening to harm pets, no IPV subscale variables (Physical Assault, Psychological Aggression, Injury, or Sexual Coercion) were significant after controlling for income, education, and Hispanic status. When examining actual harm to pets, more Psychological Aggression and less Physical Assault significantly predicted slightly higher risk of harm. However, Mexican-born partners had nearly 4 times lower risk of harming a pet. Overall, these results suggest that Hispanic men who are perpetrators of IPV are less likely to harm pets than non-Hispanic perpetrators of IPV, particularly if Mexican-born. Considering that the United States has a significant proportion of Mexican immigrants, it may be worthwhile to explore the topics of IPV and animal abuse within this group.

  18. Animal production and health newsletter. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In addition to announcements of forthcoming training and meeting programs, as well as status of coordinated research programs, this issue highlights application of molecular biology in diagnosis of animal diseases in developing countries

  19. Investigating science teacher knowledge of learners and learning and sequence of instruction in an alternative certification program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick L.

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been designed to address the teacher shortage and still meet the goals of science literacy by creating highly qualified teachers. However, science education researchers know little about the development of teacher knowledge during an ACP. The purpose of this study was to investigate how science teacher knowledge of learners and lesson structure develops in an ACP. Data sources included a lesson planning task at the beginning of the program, interviews after the first summer of ACP coursework, and an interview-observation cycle during the teacher's first semester teaching. I constructed profiles of four individuals and generated a set of assertions from a cross-case analysis. The four prospective teachers developed knowledge of learners from their experiences in the Secondary Science Methods courses, from their mentor teacher, and from working with students. Their ideas about the requirements for learning science and areas of student difficulties expanded from teaching and experiences in the Science Methods courses. The teachers consistently sequenced instruction in ways that gave priority to "inform" types of instruction. They used lectures and teacher-led discussions during inform types of instruction to transmit knowledge to students. Over time, teachers integrated their knowledge of learners and sequence of science instruction. For the teachers, the integration of knowledge of instructional sequences and learners meant that they purposefully added "practice" types of activities to help students learn terms and concepts. ACP teachers' science teaching orientations were complex, consisting of multiple dimensions. Although each teacher added goals and/or views of the teacher's role, their science teaching orientations were highly resistant to change. Prospective teachers' science teaching orientations acted as a filter for making sense of experiences in the ACP. Three of the teachers embraced experiences and knowledge

  20. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Generator training manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle.

  1. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention performance measures for FY 1993 and 1994 remedial investigations: Generator training manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This computer-based program is designed to help waste generators in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program prevent pollution at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) facilities in Oak Ridge, Paducah, and Portsmouth. The Numerical Scoring System (NSS) is an interactive system designed to maintain data on ER Program pollution prevention efforts and to measure the success of these efforts through the ER Program life cycle

  2. Curriculum Lessons from the Animal School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Maggie A.; Willems, Arnold L.

    1996-01-01

    Uses a metaphor of an animal school (where teachers, students, administrators, and parents are represented by various species of animals) to address the nature of school curriculum. Synthesizes, from the description of the animal school, fundamental principles of curriculum that should be considered when improving school programs. (PA)

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  4. Proceedings of the SERI Biomass Program Principal Investigators' Review Meeting: Aquatic Species Program Reports; 23-25 June 1982, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-12-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) is concerned with how plant biomass that naturally occurs in wetland or submerged areas is utilized. Processes are being developed in this program to make use of those aquatic species, capitalizing on their inherent capacity for rapid growth as well as on their extraordinary chemical compositions.

  5. An Investigation of How Culture Shapes Curriculum in Early Care and Education Programs on a Native American Indian Reservation: "The Drum Is Considered the Heartbeat of the Community"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliard, Jennifer L.; Moore, Rita A.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates how culture shapes instruction in three early care and education programs on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Interviews with eight early childhood teachers as well as classroom observations were conducted. The investigation is framed by the following research question: How does the culture of the family and community…

  6. Investigation of the void coefficient and other integral parameters in the PROTEUS-LWHCR phase II program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, R.; Chawla, R.; Gmur, K.; Hager, H.; Berger, H.D.; Bohme, R.

    1988-01-01

    Comparisons of calculated and measured neutron balance components are reported for the 7.5% fissile plutonium reference test lattice of the PROTEUS-light water high conversion reactor (LWHCR) phase II program, both wet (with H/sub 2/O) and dry (100% void). Special experimental techniques have been developed and applied, particularly for κ/sub ∞/, and the range of directly measured reaction rate ratios has been extended. For the two cell codes tested, WIMS-D/1981 library and KARBUS/KEDAK-4, specific shortcomings have been identified; the new measurements have been found to be significantly more representative and accurate than the earlier phase I experiments. The κ/sub ∞/ void coefficient for the phase II reference lattice between 0 and 100% void has been found to be qualitatively different from those assessed for the earlier phase I test lattices. Consideration of the individual void coefficient components show this to be largely a consequence of the more LWHCR-representative fuel rod diameter and plutonium isotopic composition of the fuel currently being used. Results of control rod studies conducted for the phase II reference lattice - both wet and dry - serve to illustrate the efforts being made toward investigations of special power reactor features

  7. SEARCH: Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Benjamin P; McCann, Nicholas P; Zollner, Patrick A; Cummings, Robert; Gilbert, Jonathan H; Gustafson, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Complex decisions dramatically affect animal dispersal and space use. Dispersing individuals respond to a combination of fine-scale environmental stimuli and internal attributes. Individual-based modeling offers a valuable approach for the investigation of such interactions because it combines the heterogeneity of animal behaviors with spatial detail. Most individual-based models (IBMs), however, vastly oversimplify animal behavior and such behavioral minimalism diminishes the value of these models. We present program SEARCH (Spatially Explicit Animal Response to Composition of Habitat), a spatially explicit, individual-based, population model of animal dispersal through realistic landscapes. SEARCH uses values in Geographic Information System (GIS) maps to apply rules that animals follow during dispersal, thus allowing virtual animals to respond to fine-scale features of the landscape and maintain a detailed memory of areas sensed during movement. SEARCH also incorporates temporally dynamic landscapes so that the environment to which virtual animals respond can change during the course of a simulation. Animals in SEARCH are behaviorally dynamic and able to respond to stimuli based upon their individual experiences. Therefore, SEARCH is able to model behavioral traits of dispersing animals at fine scales and with many dynamic aspects. Such added complexity allows investigation of unique ecological questions. To illustrate SEARCH's capabilities, we simulated case studies using three mammals. We examined the impact of seasonally variable food resources on the weight distribution of dispersing raccoons (Procyon lotor), the effect of temporally dynamic mortality pressure in combination with various levels of behavioral responsiveness in eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), and the impact of behavioral plasticity and home range selection on disperser mortality and weight change in virtual American martens (Martes americana). These simulations highlight the relevance of

  8. The wild animal as a research animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA

    2004-01-01

    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e. g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to

  9. Joint Distraction Treatments of Intra-Articular Fracture-Induced Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis in a Large Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    effects of immediate joint distraction on PTOA development after an IAF, and maximize changes of successful live animal experimentation in Aim 2...Large Animal Model PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jessica E. Goetz, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242 REPORT DATE...Large Animal Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0642 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jessica E. Goetz, PhD 5d

  10. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share ...

  13. An investigation of factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among computer science education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Wesley Govender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Students usually perceived computer programming courses as one of the most difficult courses since learning to program is perceived as a difficult task. Quite often students’ negative perceptions on computer programming results in poor results and high drop-out rates. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of factors that affect computer science education students’ Java programming self-efficacy and the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and students’ age and gender. A questionnaire was used to gather data. A scale with thirty-two items assessing Java programming self-efficacy was adapted from Askar and Davenport’s (2009 computer programming self-efficacy scale. A total of twenty students from a Computer Science Education Discipline participated in this study. Collected data were analysed using SPSS version 22.0. Descriptive statistics, reliability test, mean, standard deviation, and rotated component matrix were utilized to analyze the resulting data. Results indicated that there is not much difference between males (45% and females (55% Java programming self-efficacy. Furthermore, the results also indicated that programming skills and Java constructs have higher influence on the self-efficacy for Java programming among computer science education students followed by non-complexity, time consciousness, ability to recode for better understanding and self-motivation.

  14. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  15. Society’s attitude towards animals

    OpenAIRE

    Brčinović, Brigita

    2014-01-01

    In my diploma thesis I decided to write about relationship between society and animals, mostly because I love animals very much. Although slow, I think that relationship between society and animals is changing to better in last few years. In lots of cases a child is growing up with an animal since his young ages, animals are included in preschool programs in different ways, and not rarely children have animals on visit or even in their own group in kindergarden. Also, in specialized literatur...

  16. Animal models of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains a common, serious, and heterogeneous clinical entity that is difficult to define adequately. Despite its importance as a public health problem, efforts to develop and gain regulatory approval for a specific therapeutic agent for the adjuvant treatment of sepsis have been remarkably unsuccessful. One step in the critical pathway for the development of a new agent for adjuvant treatment of sepsis is evaluation in an appropriate animal model of the human condition. Unfortunately, the animal models that have been used for this purpose have often yielded misleading findings. It is likely that there are multiple reasons for the discrepancies between the results obtained in tests of pharmacological agents in animal models of sepsis and the outcomes of human clinical trials. One of important reason may be that the changes in gene expression, which are triggered by trauma or infection, are different in mice, a commonly used species for preclinical testing, and humans. Additionally, many species, including mice and baboons, are remarkably resistant to the toxic effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, whereas humans are exquisitely sensitive. New approaches toward the use of animals for sepsis research are being investigated. But, at present, results from preclinical studies of new therapeutic agents for sepsis must be viewed with a degree of skepticism.

  17. A meta-analytic study investigating the efficiency of socio-emotional learning programs on the development of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Boncu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of Social Emotional Learning (SEL programs on different youth behavioral outcomes. The previous meta-analysis on school-based SEL programs reported a small but significant effect of SEL on the emotional and behavioral outcomes. We found 33 articles with 37 studies, with 32 742 subjects, comparing an intervention with a control group to assess the effect of SEL program. Results have shown a statistically significant effect size for programs delivering SEL (g = .31. Significant effect sizes were reported for specific outcomes involved in the analysis. Concluding, our meta-analysis supports the previous findings from the scientific literature regarding the impact of SEL programs. Practical implications are discussed.

  18. Investigating the experiences in a school-based occupational therapy program to inform community-based paediatric occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens, Lezahn; Joosten, Annette

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative approach with teachers is required when providing community-based occupational therapy to educationally at risk children. Collaborators share common goals and interact and support each other but challenges arise in providing collaborative occupational therapy in settings outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to capture experiences of teachers and occupational therapists working within a school-based occupational therapy program to determine if their experiences could inform collaborative practice. In this pilot study, participant responses to questionnaires (n = 32) about their experiences formed the basis for focus groups and individual interviews. Two focus group were conducted, one with teachers (n = 11) and one with occupational therapy participants (n = 6). Individual interviews were conducted with the supervising occupational therapist, school principal and two leading teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data from closed questions, and thematic analysis using a constant comparison approach was used to analyse open ended questions, focus groups and interviews. Three main themes emerged: (i) the need for occupational therapists to spend time in the school, to explain their role, build relationships, understand classroom routines and the teacher role; (ii) occupational therapists need to not see themselves as the expert but develop equal partnerships to set collaborative goals and (iii) occupational therapists advocating for all parties to be informed throughout the occupational therapy process. The pilot study findings identified teacher and therapist experiences within the school setting that could inform improved collaborative practice with teachers and community-based occupational therapists and these findings warrant further investigation. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  19. Seismic structural fragility investigation for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. Seismic safety margins research program (phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1981-10-01

    An evaluation of the seismic capacity of the essential structures for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was conducted as part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The structures included the reactor containment building, the turbine/auxiliary building, and the crib house (intake structure). The evaluation was devoted to seismically induced failures rather than those resulting from combined Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) or other extreme load combinations. The seismic loads used in the investigation were based on elastic analyses. The loads for the reactor containment and turbine/auxiliary buildings were developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using time history analyses. The loads used for the crib house were the original seismic design loads developed by Sargent and Lundy. No non-linear seismic analyses were conducted. The seismic capacity of the structures accounted for the actual concrete and steel material properties including the aging of the concrete. Median centered properties were used throughout the evaluation including levels of damping considered appropriate for structures close to collapse as compared to the more conservative values used for design. The inelastic effects were accounted for using ductility modified response spectrum techniques based on system ductility ratios expected for structures near collapse. Sources of both inherent randomness and uncertainties resulting from lack of knowledge or approximations in analytical modelling were considered in developing the dispersion of the structural dynamic characteristics. Coefficients of variation were developed assuming lognormal distributions for all variables. The earthquake levels for many of the seismically induced failure modes are so high as to be considered physically incredible. (author)

  20. The endogenous circadian clock programs animals to eat at certain times of the 24-hour day: What if we ignore the clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Turek, Fred W

    2018-04-16

    The discovery of the molecular mechanisms underlying the circadian clock, which functions in virtually every cell throughout the body to coordinate biological processes to anticipate and better adapt to daily rhythmic changes in the environment, is one of the major biomedical breakthroughs in the 20th century. Twenty years after this breakthrough, the biomedical community is now at a new frontier to incorporate the circadian clock mechanisms into many areas of biomedical research, as studies continue to reveal an important role of the circadian clock in a wide range of biological functions and diseases. A forefront of this exciting area is the research of interactions between the clock and energy metabolism. In this review, we summarize animal and human studies linking disruptions of the circadian clock, either environmental or genetic, to metabolic dysfunctions associated with obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic disorders. We also discuss how these advances in circadian biology may pave the way to revolutionize clinical practice in the era of precision medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship in small animal veterinary practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guardabassi, Luca; Prescott, John F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the critical role for antimicrobial stewardship in preventing the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, examples of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs are rare in small animal veterinary practice. This article highlights the basic requirements...... for establishing stewardship programs at the clinic level. The authors provide suggestions and approaches to overcome constraints and to move from theoretic concepts toward implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs in small animal clinics....

  2. Perceived Impact of a Land and Property Rights Program on Violence Against Women in Rural Kenya: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Starr; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Grabe, Shelly; Lu, Tiffany; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kwena, Zachary; Mwaura-Muiru, Esther; Dworkin, Shari L

    2016-03-06

    The current study focuses on a community-led land and property rights program in two rural provinces in western Kenya. The program was designed to respond to women's property rights violations to reduce violence against women and HIV risks at the community level. Through in-depth interviews with 30 women, we examine the perceived impact that this community-level property rights program had on violence against women at the individual and community level. We also examine perceptions as to how reductions in violence were achieved. Finally, we consider how our findings may aid researchers in the design of structural violence-prevention strategies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Perceived Impact of a Land and Property Rights Program on Violence Against Women in Rural Kenya: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Starr; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Grabe, Shelly; Lu, Tiffany; Hatcher, Abigail M.; Kwena, Zachary; Mwaura-Muiru, Esther; Dworkin, Shari L.

    2017-01-01

    The current study focuses on a community-led land and property rights program in two rural provinces in western Kenya. The program was designed to respond to women’s property rights violations to reduce violence against women and HIV risks at the community level. Through in-depth interviews with 30 women, we examine the perceived impact that this community-level property rights program had on violence against women at the individual and community level. We also examine perceptions as to how reductions in violence were achieved. Finally, we consider how our findings may aid researchers in the design of structural violence-prevention strategies. PMID:26951306

  4. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading

    OpenAIRE

    Mameli, M; Bortolotti, L

    2006-01-01

    Do non‐human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non‐human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the s...

  5. Animal Protection and Animal 'Rights' in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Zoltan J.

    2012-01-01

    In Hungary, the first Act on Animal Protection, which aimed at handling and respecting animals as living creatures capable of feelings and suffering and thus deserving and entitled to protection, was adopted in 1998. Based on this, the Act contains several regulations which ensure that animals are protected against all possible kinds of avoidable physical or mental harm. Furthermore, it prohibits and imposes sanctions for any treatment that causes animals unnecessary suffering. The present st...

  6. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals.

  7. An investigation of the role of parental request for self-correction of stuttering in the Lidcombe Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Michelle; Harrison, Elisabeth; O'Brian, Sue; Menzies, Ross; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Jones, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Lidcombe Program is a behavioural treatment for stuttering in children younger than 6 years that is supported by evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The treatment incorporates parent verbal contingencies for stutter-free speech and for stuttering. However, the contribution of those contingencies to reductions in stuttering in the program is unclear. Thirty-four parent-child dyads were randomized to two treatment groups. The control group received standard Lidcombe Program and the experimental group received Lidcombe Program without instruction to parents to use the verbal contingency request for self-correction. Treatment responsiveness was measured as time to 50% stuttering severity reduction. No differences were found between groups on primary outcome measures of the number of weeks and clinic visits to 50% reduction in stuttering severity. This clinical experiment challenges the assumption that the verbal contingency request for self-correction contributes to treatment efficacy. Results suggest the need for further research to explore this issue.

  8. Modern pulsed spectrometer EPR for longitudinal relaxation time (T1) investigation - computer programs for measurement and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilnicki, J.; Koziol, J.; Galinski, W.; Oles, T.; Kostrzewa, J.; Froncisz, W.

    1994-01-01

    The computerized control and data processing systems for new spectrometer designed for nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological samples are presented. Both programs were written for INTEL 386 processor and they works under the Windows 3.0 environment

  9. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  10. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment

  11. Investigation and Design of U-Frame Structures Using Program CUFRBC. Volume B. User’s Guide for Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    directly by the program. Also, the special loads can be used to "correct" any loading that the program computes in a diffoerent manner than that normally ...basud on the proportional distribucion of potential maximum passive values, primarily for nonsymmetric loadings. 19 Hydraulic Loading 45. The hydraulic...for the wall b3 finding the hydraulic pressure at the middle of the element. The resultant hydraulic force acts normal to the wall, and the vertical and

  12. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual‐Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S.; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Gold‐von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU‐NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU‐HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual‐degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5‐year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010–2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time‐limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual‐degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow‐up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. PMID:26365704

  13. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual-Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU-NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU-HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual-degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5-year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010-2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time-limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual-degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow-up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Rejecting empathy for animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2015-01-01

    evidence that could confirm or disconfirm this thesis comes from research on empathizing with animals. However, this evidence has not been discussed in any of the prominent critiques of empathy. In this paper, I investigate six different empirical claims commonly made about empathy toward animals. I find...... all six claims to be problematic, though some are more plausible than others, and argue that empathy is indeed not psychologically central to producing moral concern for animals. I also review evidence indicating that other moral emotions, particularly anger, are more strongly engaged with producing...... moral concern for animals, and are thus more capable of achieving various normative aims in animal ethics. The conclusion of my argument is that empathy should lose its currently privileged place....

  15. Animal cruelty and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleyzer, Roman; Felthous, Alan R; Holzer, Charles E

    2002-01-01

    Animal cruelty in childhood, although generally viewed as abnormal or deviant, for years was not considered symptomatic of any particular psychiatric disorder. Although animal cruelty is currently used as a diagnostic criterion for conduct disorder, research establishing the diagnostic significance of this behavior is essentially nonexistent. In the current study, investigators tested the hypothesis that a history of substantial animal cruelty is associated with a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (APD) and looked for associations with other disorders commonly diagnosed in a population of criminal defendants. Forty-eight subjects, criminal defendants who had histories of substantial animal cruelty, were matched with defendants without this history. Data were systematically obtained from the files by using four specifically designed data retrieval outlines. A history of animal cruelty during childhood was significantly associated with APD, antisocial personality traits, and polysubstance abuse. Mental retardation, psychotic disorders, and alcohol abuse showed no such association.

  16. [Poultry husbandry and animal health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, U

    2003-08-01

    Close interactions are existing between poultry husbandry and poultry health. The more housing systems and the environment of the animals can be controlled, the less the general risk of disorders in poultry flocks--especially of diseases which are caused by the introduction of microoganisms. Resulting deterimental effects will affect not only the animals themselves, but also pose a risk indirectly for humans via food originating from animals under production. Also, by keeping the risk of infections as low as possible, the use of therapeutics can be avoided. This will reduce the risk of residues in food of animal origin. In summary, with all probability open poultry husbandry systems, especially those including free range systems pose increased risks for poultry health and consequently for the quality of food originating from poultry production. At least, those systems require highest standards of biosecurity, defined as management, location, farm layout, cleaning and desinfection incl. pest control programs, immunization and specific veterinary monitoring concepts to prevent infections.

  17. Systems Biology in Animal Production and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for improved animal production and health. The book will contain online resources where additional data and programs can be accessed. Some chapters also come with computer programming codes and example datasets to provide readers hands-on (computer) exercises. This second volume deals with integrated modeling...... and analyses of multi-omics datasets from theoretical and computational approaches and presents their applications in animal production and health as well as veterinary medicine to improve diagnosis, prevention and treatment of animal diseases. This book is suitable for both students and teachers in animal...

  18. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C. M.; El-Messidi, O. E.; Cowser, D. K.; Kannard, J. R.; Carvin, R. T.; Will, III, A. S.; Clark, Jr., C.; Garland, S. B.

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  19. Predictors of intensive care unit admission and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke: investigating the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngen, Belma Doğan; Tunç, Abdulkadir; Aras, Yeşim Güzey; Gündoğdu, Aslı Aksoy; Güngen, Adil Can; Bal, Serdar

    2017-07-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality among stroke patients and the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation program on stroke patients. This prospective study enrolled 181 acute ischemic stroke patients aged between 40 and 90 years. Demographical characteristics, laboratory tests, diffusion-weighed magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) time, nutritional status, vascular risk factors, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and modified Rankin scale (MRS) scores were recorded for all patients. One-hundred patients participated in the pulmonary rehabilitation program, 81 of whom served as a control group. Statistically, one- and three-month mortality was associated with NIHSS and MRS scores at admission and three months (pstroke patients. We believe that a pulmonary rehabilitation program, in addition to general stroke rehabilitation programs, can play a critical role in improving survival and functional outcomes. NCT03195907 . Trial registration date: 21.06.2017 'Retrospectively registered'.

  20. Game-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (GB-CBT) Group Program for Children Who Have Experienced Sexual Abuse: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misurell, Justin R.; Springer, Craig; Tryon, Warren W.

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary investigation examined the efficacy of a game-based cognitive-behavioral therapy group program for elementary school-aged children who have experienced sexual abuse. Treatment aimed to improve: (a) internalizing symptoms, (b) externalizing behaviors, (c) sexually inappropriate behaviors, (d) social skills deficits, (e) self-esteem…