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Sample records for anhydrous interplanetary dust

  1. Correlated Nitrogen And Carbon Anomalies In An Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J; Dai, Z; Graham, G

    2003-10-31

    Given the ubiquitous presence of H and N isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their probable association with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar isotopic anomalies in C has been a major conundrum. We report here the first observation of correlated N and C isotopic anomalies in organic matter from an anhydrous non-cluster IDP. The {sup 15}N composition of the anomalous region is the highest seen to date in an IDP and is accompanied by a moderate depletion in {sup 13}C. Theoretical models suggest that low temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds does produce C and N fractionations, but it remains to be seen if these models can reproduce the specific effects we observe here.

  2. Combined Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen XANES Spectroscopy on Hydrated and Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, M.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth s stratosphere generally contain percent-level concentrations of organic matter. This organic matter in IDPs is important for several reasons: 1) some IDPs contain interstellar organic matter, identified by high D/H or N-15, providing the opportunity to characterize this interstellar material, 2) comparison of the organic matter in anhydrous IDPs to that in hydrated IDPs can help establish the effects of parent body aqueous alteration, and, 3) IDPs are believed to have delivered to the surface of the early Earth pre-biotic organic matter important for the origin of life. X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy provides information on the functional groups present in a sample, and XANES can be performed on the nano-scale, comparable to the size of some of the sub-units of the IDPs. The energies of the XANES transitions are diagnostic of the type of bonding of the C, N, and O, allowing identification of the functional groups present in the sample. As part of our ongoing effort to characterize the organic matter in the IDPs, we have performed carbon- and oxygen- and the first nitrogen-XANES spectroscopy on two IDPs and acid-insoluble residue from the CM2 meteorite Murchison.

  3. Correlated Nitrogen and Carbon Anomalies in an Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle - Implications for Extraterrestrial Organic Matter Accreted by the Prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z; Bajt, S; Graham, G

    2003-12-17

    Given the ubiquitous presence of H and N isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their probable association with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar isotopic anomalies in C has been a major conundrum. We report here the first observation of correlated N and C isotopic anomalies in organic matter within an anhydrous IDP. The {sup 15}N composition of the anomalous region is the highest seen to date in an IDP and is accompanied by a moderate depletion in {sup 13}C. Our observations establish the presence of hetero-atomic organic compounds of presolar origin among the constant flux of carbonaceous material accreting to the terrestrial planets within IDPs. Theoretical models suggest that low temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds does produce C and N fractionations, but it remains to be seen if these models can reproduce the specific effects we observe here.

  4. Migration of Interplanetary Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.; Taylor, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    We numerically investigate the migration of dust particles with initial orbits close to those of the numbered asteroids, observed trans-Neptunian objects, and Comet Encke. The fraction of silicate asteroidal particles that collided with the Earth during their lifetime varied from 1.1% for 100 micron particles to 0.008% for 1 micron particles. Almost all asteroidal particles with diameter d>4 microns collided with the Sun. The peaks in the migrating asteroidal dust particles' semi-major axis d...

  5. Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Watanabe, J.; Jenniskens, P.; Spurný, Pavel; Borovička, Jiří; Campbell-Brown, M.; Consolmagno, G.; Jopek, T.; Vaubaillon, J.; Williams, I.P.; Zhu, J.

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010 - (Corbett, I.), s. 177-179. (Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union. IAU Transactions. 27B). ISBN 978-0-521-76831-3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : meteors * meteorites * interplanetary dust Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  6. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  7. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  8. Nitrogen in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Thomas, K. L.; Bradley, J. P.; McKay, D. S.

    1995-09-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution and chemical state of nitrogen in IDPs with the exceptions of the isotopic enrichment in 15N displayed by many particles [1-3], and the inferred association of nitrogen with polyaromatic hydrocarbons in some IDPs [4]. Like carbon, nitrogen is strongly fractionated among meteoritic materials and it is well known that the most primitive carbon-rich meteorites also tend to have high nitrogen abundances [5]. Nitrogen-bearing compounds are also a significant component of the carbonaceous material (CHON particles) sampled during the comet Halley encounter [e.g. 6]. We describe here the first reported detection and location of nitrogen concentrations in several IDPs using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Three chondritic, anhydrous IDPs (L2011R11, L2008F13, and a fragment from L2006, cluster 14) were embedded in sulfur [7] and tranmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens were prepared by ultramicrotomy. The IDP thin sections were placed on copper TEM grids with SiO thin film substrates and analyzed using a JEOL 2010 TEM equipped with a thin-window energy-dispersive X-ray detector and a Gatan 666 parallel EELS spectrometer. We also analyzed W7027H14, a carbon-rich, chondritic-porous IDP that was embedded in epoxy. The EELS data from carbon-rich amorphous regions of the analyzed IDPs typically show a small, but distinct nitrogen edge at ~400 eV (Figure 1). The nitrogen is not homogeneously distributed in the carbonaceous material in the four IDPs analyzed to date, but occurs in "hot spots". However, these "hot spots" do not appear to be associated with a distinct N-bearing mineral (e.g. nitrides); the nitrogen is indigenous to the carbonaceous material in these IDPs. Although the quantitative N analyses using EELS are still in progress, the preliminary data from one IDP (L2011R11) indicates an upper N/C atom ratio of ~0.1, which is comparable to the chondritic value (N/C ~0.08, [8]). It should be noted however, that the

  9. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (less than um) assemblages of anhydrous amorphous and crystalline silicates, oxides and sulfides bound together by abundant carbonaceous material. Ancient silicate, oxide, and SiC stardust grains exhibiting highly anomalous isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission.

  10. Origin of Interplanetary Dust through Optical Properties of Zodiacal Light

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) through the optical properties, albedo and spectral gradient, of zodiacal light. The optical properties were compared with those of potential parent bodies in the solar system, which include D-type (as analogue of cometary nuclei), C-type, S-type, X-type, and B-type asteroids. We applied Bayesian inference on the mixture model made from the distribution of these sources, and found that >90% of the interplanetary dust particles originate from comets (or its spectral analogues, D-type asteroids). Although some classes of asteroids (C-type and X-type) may make a moderate contribution, ordinary chondrite-like particles from S-type asteroids occupy a negligible fraction of the interplanetary dust cloud complex. The overall optical properties of the zodiacal light were similar to those of chondritic porous IDPs, supporting the dominance of cometary particles in zodiacal cloud.

  11. GEO debris and interplanetary dust: fluxes and charging behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Graps, A L; McBride, N; McDonnell, J A M; Bunte, K; Svedhem, H; Drolshagen, G; Graps, Amara L.; Green, Simon F.; Bride, Neil Mc; Bunte, Kalle; Svedhem, Hakan; Drolshagen, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into the geostationary (GEO) region as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris to interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. While the physical characteristics of the GORID impacts alone are insufficient for a reliable distinction between debris and interplanetary dust, the temporal behavior of the impacts are strong enough indicators to separate the populations based on clustering. Non-cluster events are predominantly interplanetary, while cluster events are debris. The GORID mean flux distributions (at mass thresholds which are impact speed dependent) for IDPs, corrected for dead time, are 1.35x10^{-4} m^{-2} s^{-1} using a...

  12. GEO debris and interplanetary dust: fluxes and charging behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Graps, A. L.; Green, S.F.; McBride, N. M.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Drolshagen, G.; H. Svedhem; Bunte, K. D.

    2005-01-01

    In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into the geostationary (GEO) region as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris to interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to der...

  13. Coordinates Analyses of Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles: Samples of Primitive Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere fall into two major groups: an anhydrous group termed the "chondritic-porous (CP) IDPs and a hydrated group, the "chondritic-smooth (CS) IDPs, although rare IDPs with mineralogies intermediate between these two groups are known [1]. The CP-IDPs are widely believed to be derived from cometary sources [e.g. 2]. The hydrated CS-IDPs show mineralogical similarities to heavily aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites (e.g. CI chondrites), but only a few have been directly linked to carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies [e.g. 3, 4]. Most CS-IDPs show distinct chemical [5] and oxygen isotopic composition differences [6-8] from primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Here, we report on our coordinated analyses of a suite of carbon-rich CS-IDPs focusing on their bulk compositions, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and isotopic compositions.

  14. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a O-16-rich reservoir and a O-17,O-18-rich reservoir produced via mass-independent fractionation. The composition of the O-16-rich reservoir is reasonably well constrained, but material representing the O-17,O-18-rich end-member is rare. Self-shielding models predict that cometary water, presumed to represent this reservoir, should be enriched in O-17 and O-18 18O by > 200%. Hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) rich in carbonaceous matter may be derived from comets; such particles likely contain the products of reaction between O-16-poor water and anhydrous silicates that formed in the inner solar system. Here we present mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of two C-rich hydrated IDPs, L2083E47 and L2071E35.

  15. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Simonia; Sh. Nabiyev

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  16. Capture of interplanetary and interstellar dust by the jovian magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J E; Horányi, M; Grün, E

    1998-04-01

    Interplanetary and interstellar dust grains entering Jupiter's magnetosphere form a detectable diffuse faint ring of exogenic material. This ring is composed of particles in the size range of 0. 5 to 1.5 micrometers on retrograde and prograde orbits in a 4:1 ratio, with semimajor axes 3 jovian radii, eccentricities 0. 1 < e < 0.3, and inclinations i less, similar 20 degrees or i greater, similar 160 degrees. The size range and the orbital characteristics are consistent with in situ detections of micrometer-sized grains by the Galileo dust detector, and the measured rates match the number densities predicted from numerical trajectory integrations. PMID:9525863

  17. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  18. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  19. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  20. Fractal Signatures in Analogs of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earth's stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. \\cite{volten2007}, to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension $d_{m} \\simeq 1.75$. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from {\\it diffusion limited aggregation} (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically-transported silicate particles

  1. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  2. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  3. Stochastic diffusion of dust grains by the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the sectored Interplanetary Magnetic Field on charged dust grains orbiting around the sun under radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag forces are examined for initially circular and non-inclined orbits. The distribution function of the charged grains satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation in which the sectored field is taken as a source of stochastic impulses. By adopting the integrals of the impulse-free motion as variable parameters, the Fokker-Planck equation can be properly treated as a diffusion equation. Analytic solutions of the resulting diffusion equation show that dust grains injected near the ecliptic plane are scattered strongly to high helio-latitudes. The scattering is more pronounced for small grains injected at large distances from the Sun. (author)

  4. New Manganese Silicide Mineral Phase in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.; Kloeck, W.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, S.

    2008-01-01

    Comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup was identified as a source of an Earth-crossing dust stream with low Earth-encounter velocities, with peak anticipated fluxes during April in 2003 and 2004 [1]. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections using high altitude aircraft to target potential interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream in April 2003. Several IDPs from this collection have shown unusually low noble gas abundances [2] consistent with the predicted short space exposure ages of Grigg-Skjellerup dust particles [1]. High abundances of large D enrichments [3] and presolar grains [4] in IDPs from this collection are also consistent with an origin from the comet Grigg-Skjellerup. Here we report a new mineral from one of the cluster IDPs of the "Grigg-Skjellerup" collection, L2055. Our report focuses on an unusual manganese-iron-chromium silicide phase that, to our knowledge, has not been observed previously in nature. This unique phase may also shed light on the genesis of the enigmatic low-Fe,Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine that has been previously reported in IDPs and meteorites [5].

  5. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Keller, L. P.

    1991-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period of the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites (near solar composition) of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. The former are subdivided (according to bulk composition and petrology) into CI, CM, CV, CO, CR, and ungrouped classes. IDPs are extraterrestrial particulates, collected in stratosphere, which have chemical compositions indicative of a primitive origin; they are typically distinct from the primitive meteorites. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is a high priority because of the important physico-chemical information they hold. The most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentine-group minerals, smectites, and micas. We discuss these phyllosilicates and describe the interpretation of their occurrence in meteorites and IDPs and what this indicates about history of their parent bodies, which are probably the hydrous asteroids.

  6. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  7. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The prelaunch photograph shows the six (6) inch deep Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) master control tray. The tray has three (3) mounting/cover plates elevated on fiberglass stand-offs to provide clearance and protection for hardware and electronics located underneath. The stand-offs also raise the plates to a level that minimizes shading of detectors by the tray sidewalls. The mounting plate located at the left hand end of the tray is populated with eighty (80) metaloxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-type impact sensors and one (1) solar sensor that is located approximately in the center of the mounting plate. The IDE sensors are two (2) inch diameter MOS capacitor structures approximately 250 um thick. The detectors are formed by growing either 0.4um or 1.0um thick silicon oxide, SiO2, layer on the 250um thick, B-doped polished silicon wafer. The top metal contact, the visible surface, was formed by vapor deposition of 1000A of aluminum on the SiO2 surface. Aluminum was also vapor deposited on the backside to form the contact with the silicon substrate. Gold wires are bonded to the front and back aluminum layers for use in connecting the detectors to the circuits. The complete wafers, IDE detectors, are mounted on chromic anodized aluminum frames by bonding the detector backside to the aluminum frame with a space qualified RTV silicon adhesive, de-volatized RTV-511. The difference in colors of the detectors is caused by reflections in the metallized surfaces. A reflection of one of the technicians is visible in the three (3) rows of detector on the left hand side of the mounting plate. The solar sensor, located at the mounting plate center, consist of four (4) silicon solar cells connected in series and associated circuity bonded to an aluminum baseplate. The solar sensor registered each orbital sunrise independant of LDEF orientation at the time of sunrise. When IDE solar sensor data from the six

  8. An improved model for interplanetary dust fluxes in the outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer Solar System constrained by in situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer Solar System for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. Finally, we compare the model predictions of interplanetary dust oxygen influx to the giant planet atmospheres with various observational and photochemical constraints and generally find good agreement, with the exception of Jupiter, which suggests the possibility of additional chemical pathways for exogenous oxygen in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  9. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  10. Physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the micrometeoroid experiment on board of Helios allowed the measurement of physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles between 0.3AU and 1AU solar distance. During the first 10 orbits of Helios 1,235 impacts of micrometeoroids have been detected. 83 particles have been registered by the ecliptic sensor and 152 by the south sensor. Most of the particles detected by the ecliptic sensor had masses 10-13g -10g and impacted the sensor from the apex direction. The particles observed by the south sensor had masses 10-15g -9g and impacted the sensor from all directions with a slightly enhanced flux from solar direction. The average impact speed of particles with masses 10-13g -10g was 15km/s. From 1AU to.3AU, the observed paritcle flux increased by a factor 5-10. The orbits of the registered particles are highly eccentric, e approx. >= 0.6, and some are hyperbolic. The mass spectra measured upon impact allow the classification of chondritic and iron-rich particles. Approx. 20% of the particles had low densities rho 3. On 4 particles, a positive electric charge has been observed. (orig.)

  11. Mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles from the 'olivine' infrared class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy observations establish that olivine is abundant and the predominant silicate phase in three interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from the 'olivine' infrared spectra category. Two of the particles have microstructures resembling those of most nonhydrous chondritic IDPs, consisting of micron to submicron grains together with a matrix composed of amorphous carbonaceous material and sub-500 A grains. In addition to olivine these particles respectively contain enstatite and magnetite, and pentlandite plus Ca-rich clinopyroxene. The third IDP consists mostly of olivine and pyrrhotite with little or no matrix material. Olivine grains in this particle contain prominent solar-flare ion tracks with densities corresponding to a space-exposure age between 1000 to 100,000 years. Although the three particles have olivine-rich mineralogies in common, other aspects of their mineralogies and microstructures suggest that they experienced different formation histories. The differences between the particles indicate that the olivine infrared spectral category is a diverse collection of IDPs that probably incorporates several genetic groups.

  12. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth’s stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission. We will present an overview of the current state of understanding of the properties and origins of organic matter in primitive IDPs.

  13. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The postflight photograph shows little change of the exposed surfaces when compared with the prelaunch photograph. Although not noticable in the photograph, a light coating of contamination was seen on all experiment surfaces in this location. The difference in colors of the IDE detectors, located on the right hand mounting plate, is a result of the reflected surroundings and not related to space exposure. A close observation of the detector surfaces reveal that some damage has occured from meteroid and/or debris impacts. One impact crater can be seen, upper right quadrant, on the detector located in the sixth (6th) row down from the top and the fifth (5th) row from the right. Other impacts, smaller in size, show as small white dots on the detector surface. The solar sensor seems to have changed little, if any. However, the color of the solar array baseplate, showing indications of contamination, appears to be darker than the detector mounting plate. The center section cover plate shows little change when compared with the pre-launch photograph. However, during inspection, a light coat of the brown contamination has been observed on all surfaces. The color of the bonding material (RTV) used to secure several thin specimen, sapphire, to individual mounting plates has changed from pink to gold. At one location, that of a single specimen, the bonding material is more gray than gold in color. This has been attributed to the specimen being considerably thicker. The EPDS thermal cover in the right hand side of the tray shows a light coating of brown contamination on the Chemglaze II A-276 white paint.

  14. An improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes to the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer solar system constrained by in-situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer solar system for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in-situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. We present modeled mass fluxes to various moons, atmospheres, and ring systems of the outer planets.

  15. Link between interplanetary & cometary dust: Polarimetric observations and space studies with Rosetta & Eye-Sat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Gaboriaud, Alain; Buil, Christian; Ressouche, Antoine; Lasue, J.; Palun, Adrien; Apper, Fabien; Elmaleh, Marc

    Intensity and linear polarization observations of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust, the so-called zodiacal light, provide information on properties of the dust particles, such as their spatial density, local changes, morphology and albedo. Earth-based polarimetric observations, with a resolution of 5° or more, have been used to derive the polarization phase curve of interplanetary dust particles and to establish that the polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance, at least up to 1.5 au in the ecliptic, while the albedo decreases [1, 2]. Analysis of such studies will be revisited. Numerical simulations of the polarimetric behavior of interplanetary dust particles strongly suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of absorbing (e.g., organic compounds) and less absorbing (e.g., silicates) materials, that radial changes originate in a decrease of organics with decreasing solar distance (probably due to alteration processes), and that a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is of cometary origin, in agreement with dynamical studies [3, 4]. The polarimetric behaviors of interplanetary dust and cometary dust particles seem to present striking similarities. The properties of cometary dust particles, as derived from remote polarimetric observations of comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the Rosetta rendezvous mission, at various wavelengths, will be summarized [5, 6]. The ground truth expected from Rosetta dust experiments, i.e., MIDAS, COSIMA, GIADA, about dust particles’ morphology, composition, and evolution (with distance to the nucleus before Philae release and with distance to the Sun before and after perihelion passage) over the year and a half of nominal mission, will be discussed. Finally, the Eye-Sat nanosatellite will be presented. This triple cubesat, developed by students from engineering schools working as interns at CNES, is to be launched

  16. The Origin of Organic Matter in the Solar System: Evidence from Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the organic matter in interplanetary materials has not been established. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed, with two extreme cases being a Fisher-Tropsch type process operating in the gas phase of the solar nebula or a Miller-Urey type process, which requires interaction with an aqueous fluid, presumably occurring on an asteroid. In the Fisher-Tropsch case, we might expect similar organic matter in hydrated and anhydrous interplanetary materials. However, aqueous alteration is required in the case of the Miller-Urey process, and we would expect to see organic matter preferentially in interplanetary materials that exhibit evidence of aqueous activity, such as the presence of hydrated silicates. The types and abundance of organic matter in meteorites have been used as an indicator of the origin of organic matter in the Solar System. Indigenous complex organic matter, including amino acids, has been found in hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Murchison. Much lower amounts of complex organic matter, possibly only terrestrial contamination, have been found in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Allende, that contain most of their carbon in elemental form. These results seem to favor production of the bulk of the organic matter in the Solar System by aqueous processing on parent bodies such as asteroids, a Miller-Urey process. However, the hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have approximately solar abundances of the moderately volatile elements, while all anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have significantly lower contents of these moderately volatile elements. Two mechanisms, incomplete condensation or evaporation, both of which involve processing at approx. 1200 C, have been suggested to explain the lower content of the moderately volatile elements in all anhydrous meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  19. Suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium for interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, R. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Hoerz, F.; Lindstrom, D. J.; Gibson, E. K.

    1992-01-01

    Impact experiments using silica aerogel as a deceleration and capture medium for interplanetary dust are reported. A rough correlation is noted between increasing particle track lengths and decreasing aerogel density, and there is a poor correlation of track lengths with impact velocity at laboratory attainable velocities of 5-7 km/s. It is concluded that aerogel track lengths should not be used as velocity indicators. Chemical analyses are also reported of aerogel samples used in this study in order to assess the risks concerning contamination of interplanetary dust particles by the silica aerogel capture medium. It is demonstrated that this material is impressively clean.

  20. Polarimetry of Dust in Optically Thin Clouds: Observations and Experimental Simulations of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Lasue, J.

    2013-12-01

    Remote polarimetric observations are used to tentatively infer the physical properties of the dust particles in cometary and interplanetary environments. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental simulations are necessary. Light scattering measurements on levitating particles with the PROGRA2 experiment -in dedicated microgravity flights or in the laboratory for low-density particles- provide relevant simulations of the scattering properties of real particles, which can present large size distributions and a large variety of structures and materials (Renard et al., 2002; Hadamcik et al., 2009). Previous systematic experiments, together with numerical models and laboratory analysis of cosmic particles (e.g. Stardust samples) allow to optimize dust particles' properties -such as their structures, sizes, size distributions, and silicate to organics ratios- (Hadamcik et al. 2007a; Zubko et al., 2009; Lasue et al., 2010). We present intensity and polarization images of cometary comae providing evidence for changes in the polarization properties in the internal regions of the coma, linked to the variation of particles properties with nucleus distance and/or rotation phase (Hadamcik et al., 2007a; Hadamcik et al., 2013a; 2013b) and preliminary results of 2013 observations. Associated experimental simulations help us to interpret how particles evolve within different coma regions and at different solar distances (Hadamcik et al. 2007b; 2009; 2011). We expect in situ confirmation of our results during the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014-2015 (Hadamcik et al., 2010). Analyses of observations of the zodiacal light scattered by the interplanetary dust cloud particles have shown local polarisation changes with the solar distance (Levasseur-Regourd et al., 2001). Such changes are interpreted through numerical models to be related to variations in the composition and physical properties of the particles through various processes including

  1. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  2. Organic matter on the early surface of Mars: An assessment of the contribution by interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations by Anders and Chyba et al. have recently revived interest in the suggestion that organic compounds important to the development of life were delivered to the primitive surface of the Earth by comets, asteroids or the interplanetary dust derived from these two sources. Anders has shown that the major post-accretion contribution of extraterrestrial organic matter to the surface of the Earth is from interplanetary dust. Since Mars is a much more favorable site for the gentle deceleration of interplanetary dust particles than is Earth, model calculations show that biologically important organic compounds are likely to have been delivered to the early surface of Mars by the interplanetary dust in an order-of-magnitude higher surface density than onto the early Earth. Using the method described by Flynn and McKay, the size frequency distribution, and the atmospheric entry velocity distribution of IDP's at Mars were calculated. The entry velocity distribution, coupled with the atmospheric entry heating model developed by Whipple and extended by Fraundorf was used to calculate the fraction of the particles in each mass decade which survives atmospheric entry without melting (i.e., those not heated above 1600K). The incident mass and surviving mass in each mass decade are shown for both Earth and Mars.

  3. Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbon in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Wopenka, B.

    1987-01-01

    Raman spectra of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteorites containing material similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) show features that are similar in position and relative strength to interstellar IR emission features attributable to vibrational transitions in free molecular-sized PAHs. In addition, these spectra sometimes show red photoluminescence that has elsewhere been attributed to PAHs, and a part of the carbonaceous phase in IDPs and meteorites contain a degree of deuterium enrichment anticipated in small, free PAHs that are exposed to ISM UV radiation. These observations suggest that some of the IDPs' carbonaceous material may have been produced in circumstellar dust shells, and only slightly modified in interstellar space.

  4. The use of silica aerogel to collect interplanetary dust in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Hoerz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We report on impact experiments to evaluate the suitability of silica aerogel as a capture medium for interplanetary dust particles in space. The structure of silica aerogel is such that even micrometer-sized hypervelocity particles may sense it as a target of very low density; consequently shock stresses and temperatures due to impact should be minimized. We performed impact experiments in a light gas gun that employed projectiles manufactured from forsterite, pyrrhotite, and calcite. From these experiments we have developed techniques that will permit the successful extrication of interplanetary dust particles from aerogel. We note a rough correlation between increasing particle penetration lengths and decreasing aerogel density, and there is a poor correlation of track lengths with impact velocity at laboratory-attainable velocities of 5-7 km/s. We conclude that aerogel track length should not be used even as (crude) velocity indicators. Transmission electron microscope studies show the re covered particulate residues are encased in melted silica aerogel, which possibly protects the residue from some impact damage. Individual minerals within interplanetary dust are expected to exhibit differential survival, and may be vaporized, melted, dehydrated, or structurally reordered. However, some mineral grains should successfully be captured in an unmelted state at encounter velocities less than 8 km/s.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE GEGENSCHEIN AND THE GEOMETRIC ALBEDO OF INTERPLANETARY DUST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed optical observations of the Gegenschein using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled wide-field camera, the Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector (WIZARD), between 2003 March and 2006 November. We found a narrow brightness enhancement superimposed on the smooth gradient of the Gegenschein at the exact position of the antisolar point. Whereas the Gegenschein morphology changed according to the orbital motion of the Earth, the maximum brightness coincided with the antisolar direction throughout the year. We compared the observed morphology of the Gegenschein with those of models in which the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was considered and found that the volume scattering phase function had a narrow backscattering enhancement. The morphology was reproducible with a spatial distribution model for infrared zodiacal emission. It is likely that the zero-phase peak (the so-called opposition effect) was caused by coherent backscattering and/or shadow-hiding effects on the rough surfaces of individual dust particles. These results suggest that big particles are responsible for both zodiacal light and zodiacal emission. Finally, we derived the geometric albedo of the smooth component of interplanetary dust, assuming big particles, and obtained a geometric albedo of 0.06 ± 0.01. The derived albedo is in accordance with collected dark micrometeorites and observed cometary dust particles. We concluded that chondritic particles are dominant near Earth space, supporting the recent theoretical study by dynamical simulation.

  6. Pristine stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust on an oil-free polyurethane foam substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay P.; Clemett, Simon J.

    2015-08-01

    We performed chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic studies of the first interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere without the use of silicone oil. The collection substrate, polyurethane foam, effectively traps impacting particles, but the lack of an embedding medium results in significant particle fragmentation. Two dust particles found on the collector exhibit the typical compositional and mineralogical properties of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic imaging revealed isotopic anomalies of typical magnitude and spatial variability observed in previous CP-IDP studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows that individual mineral grains and glass with embedded metal and sulfide (GEMS) grains are dominated by solar system materials. No systematic differences are observed in element abundance patterns of GEMS grains from the dry collection versus silicone oil-collected IDPs. This initial study establishes the validity of a new IDP collection substrate that avoids the use of silicone oil as a collection medium, removing the need for this problematic contaminant and the organic solvents necessary to remove it. Additional silicone oil-free collections of this type are needed to determine more accurate bulk element abundances of IDPs and to examine the indigenous soluble organic components of IDPs.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  8. Analysis of volatiles present in interplanetary dust and stratospheric particles collected on large area collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    Results are presented from an analysis of six chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and 22 other stratospheric particles collected on large-area collector, carried out in order to obtain information on the nature, distribution, and form of volatiles in IDPs. A laser microprobe/mass spectrometer (LMMS) was used to extract volatile elements and molecules from particles larger than 10 microns, and an improved hexane rinsing technique was developed for the removal of contaminants. Results show that, because of contamination from silicone oil, freon, and hexane, most of the LMMS signal from IDPs can be interpreted as arising from contamination. Therefore, a species was not considered indigenous unless the signal was an order of magnitude greater in abundance than that released from a pure contaminant coated on gold.

  9. Arecibo radar micrometeor studies: Interplanetary dust in the solar system and the atmospheric fate of this dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J.; Briczinski, S.; Meisel, D.; Zhou, Q.; Janches, D.

    Radar (head-echo) observations of micrometeors at Arecibo uniquely yield velocity, deceleration, radiant, and scattering mechanism information of large numbers of interplanetary dust particles. The resulting high accuracy meteoroid orbit determinations indicate that most of these particles are in heliocentric orbits with about 5% in hyperbolic, usually extrasolar orbits, and with a comparable fraction appearing to enter the atmosphere from highly eccentric geocentric orbits. Heliocentric orbits range from low/high inclination, prograde/retrograde, and interstellar particles are readily discerned even in the large flux of ecliptic and near-ecliptic particles. Observed particle masses range from a few micrograms to a small fraction of a nanogram, a size range that requires taking into account radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, as well as dusty plasma effects in the solar wind---particle charging and motion in the solar wind magnetic field. The atmospheric fate of these meteoroids is also of interest with 10-20% of all particles disappearing in ``terminal'' events and with perhaps 5% of the slow (15-25 km/sec) particles displaying evidence of trail-scattering with implications for the atmospheric interaction process. Terminal events are presumed to deposit the meteoroid mass as ``smoke'' particles rather than in atomic form that results from ablation. We give the micrometeoroid altitude, speed, deceleration, mass, and orbital distributions from February 2001, the first data set for which a completely automated analysis approach was employed.

  10. Charged dust grain dynamics subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the interplanetary magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Lhotka, Christoph; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the un-averaged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semi-major axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces unde...

  11. The thermal history of interplanetary dust particles collected in the Earth's stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Fragments of 24 individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere were obtained from NASA's Johnson Space Center collection and subjected to pulse-heating sequences to extract He and Ne and to learn about the thermal history of the particles. A motivation for the investigation was to see if the procedure would help distinguish between IDPs of asteroidal and cometary origin. The use of a sequence of short-duration heat pulses to perform the extractions is an improvement over the employment of a step-heating sequence, as was used in a previous investigation. The particles studied were fragments of larger parent IDPs, other fragments of which, in coordinated experiments, are undergoing studies of elemental and mineralogical composition in other laboratories. While the present investigation will provide useful temperature history data for the particles, the relatively large size of the parent IDPs (approximately 40 micrometers in diameter) resulted in high entry deceleration temperatures. This limited the usefulness of the study for distinguishing between particles of asteroidal and cometary origin.

  12. Isotopic diversity in interplanetary dust particles and preservation of extreme 16O-depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Lee, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    Two interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) investigated by NanoSIMS reveal diverse oxygen isotope compositions at the micrometre-scale. The oxygen isotope values recorded at different locations across the single IDP fragments cover a wider range than the bulk values available from all IDPs and bulk meteorites measured to date. Measurement of H, C, and N isotopes by NanoSIMS, and the use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to determine elemental compositions and textural information allows for a better understanding of the lithologies and organic signatures associated with the oxygen isotope features. IDP Balmoral, a ∼15 μm-sized fragment with a chondritic porous (CP)-IDP-like texture, contains a region a few micrometres in size characterised by 16O-depleted isotope signatures in the range δ17O, δ18O = +80‰ to +200‰. The remainder of the fragment has a more 16O-rich composition (δ18O = 0-20‰), similar to many other IDPs and bulk meteorites. Other than in discrete pre-solar grains, such extreme 16O-depletions have only been observed previously in rare components within the matrix of the Acfer 094 meteorite. However, TEM imaging and FeO/MgO/Si ion ratios indicate that the 16O-depleted regions in Balmoral did not form by the same mechanism as that proposed for the 16O-depleted phases in Acfer 094. As the level of 16O depletion is consistent with that expected from isotope selective self-shielding, it is likely that the 16O-depleted reservoir was located close to that where oxygen self-shielding effects were most pronounced (i.e., the outer solar nebula or even interstellar medium). Individual regions within IDP Lumley cover a range in δ18O from -30‰ to +19‰, with the oxygen isotope values broadly co-varying with δD, δ13C, δ15N, light-element ratios and texture. The relationships observed in Lumley indicate that the parent body incorporated material at the micrometre-scale from discrete diverse isotopic reservoirs, some of

  13. Structure of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust, a Clue to the Formation and Early Evolution of Dust Particles in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.; Hadamcik, E.; Botet, R.

    2007-10-01

    Cometary dust particles have been suspected to be fragile since the Giotto and Vega missions to comet Halley. More recently, numerous observations of the solar light scattered by dust particles in comet Hale-Bopp coma, together with versatile numerical simulations, have allowed us to suggest that these particles are likely to be built of both very fluffy aggregates and of more compact grains, with (to the first order) equivalent proportions in mass of absorbing material and transparent silicates [1,2]. The same approach, used to fit zodiacal light observations, indicates that a significant proportion of fluffy absorbing particles is found in the interplanetary dust cloud [3]. Laboratory simulations also lead to similar results, with e.g. polarimetric phase curves obtained for agglomerates of magnesio-ferrosilica comparable to those observed for cometary dust [4]. These estimations are now confirmed by the analysis of Stardust samples, with, e.g. evidence for both dense grains and aggregates with low bulk density within the coma of comet Wild 2 [5]. The relevance of such a structure for the formation and early evolution of dust particles in the solar system will be discussed. [1] Lasue & Levasseur-Regourd, JQSRT 100, 220-236, 2006. [2] Levasseur-Regourd, Mukai, Lasue, Okada, PSS, 55, 1010-1020, 2007. [3] Lasue, Levasseur-Regourd, Fray, Cottin, A&A, in press, 2007 [4] Hadamcik, Renard, Rietmeijer, Levasseur-Regourd et al., Icarus, in press, 2007 [5] Hoerz, Bastien, Borg, Bradley et al., Science 314, 1716 - 1719, 2006

  14. Interplanetary matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the total number of 57 presented papers 56 have been submitted to INIS. One paper was out of INIS scope. List of sessions (in brackets is the number of papers presented in the respective session and incorporated in the INIS): Preface (2), Comets (17), Asteroids (7), Meteors (19), Interplanetary dust (9), Other bodies (2). (Z.S.). 155 figs., 68 tabs., 1140 refs

  15. Precision Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; Keller, L. P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chondritic-smooth IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles) are low porosity objects whose mineralogy is dominated by aqueous alteration products such as Mg-rich phyllosilicates (smectite and serpentine group) and Mg-Fe carbonate minerals. Their hydrated mineralogy combined with low atmospheric entry velocities have been used to infer an origin largely from asteroidal sources. Spectroscopic studies show that the types and abundance of organic matter in CS IDPs is similar to that in CP IDPs. Although CS IDPs show broad similarities to primitive carbonaceous chondrites, only a few particles have been directly linked to specific meteorite groups such as CM and CI chondrites based on the presence of diagnostic minerals. Many CS IDPs however, have carbon contents that greatly exceed that of known meteorite groups suggesting that they either may derive from comets or represent samples of more primitive parent bodies than do meteorites. It is now recognized that many large, dark primitive asteroids in the outer main belt, as well as some trans-Neptunian objects, show spectroscopic evidence for aqueous alteration products on their surfaces. Some CS IDPs exhibit large bulk D enrichments similar to those observed in the cometary CP IDPs. While hydrated minerals in comets have not been unambiguously identified to date, the presence of the smectite group mineral nontronite has been inferred from infrared spectra obtained from the ejecta from comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact mission. Recent observations of low temperature sulfide minerals in Stardust mission samples suggest that limited aqueous activity occurred on comet Wild-2. All of these observations, taken together, suggest that the high-carbon hydrated IDPs are abundant and important samples of primitive solar system objects not represented in meteorite collections. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a 16O-rich reservoir and a 17O,18O-rich reservoir produced via mass

  16. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  17. Coordinated Analyses of Mineral-organic Matter Associations in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Smith, T.; Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.; Khodja, H.; Taylor, S.; Wirick, S.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the timing and processes involved in the incorporation of organic matter with inorganic materials in early Solar System bodies. Recently, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) studies showed carbon-rich rims surrounding individual mineral grains in anhydrous IDPs [1,2]. These carbonaceous rims are believed to have formed prior to parent body formation and likely served to bond mineral grains during accretion into larger aggregates. We are exploring the nature of these carbonaceous rims through coordinated analyses of their chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy and isotopic characteristics. Here we report our preliminary mineralogical observations.

  18. Analysis of the Organic Matter in Interplanetary Dust Particles: Clues to the Organic Matter in Comets, Asteroids, and Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection spectroscopy suggests the C- , P-, and D-types of asteroids contain abundant carbon, but these Vis-nearIR spectra are featureless, providing no information on the type(s) of carbonaceous matter. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrates that organic carbon is a significant component in comets and as grains or grain coatings in the interstellar medium. Most of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) recovered from the Earth s stratosphere are believed to be fragments from asteroids or comets, thus characterization of the carbon in IDPs provides the opportunity to determine the type(s) and abundance of organic matter in asteroids and comets. Some IDPs exhibit isotopic excesses of D and N-15, indicating the presence of interstellar material. The characterization of the carbon in these IDPs, and particularly any carbon spatially associated with the isotopic anomalies, provides the opportunity to characterize interstellar organic matter.

  19. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  20. Dust properties determined from backscattering in the interplanetary and interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and composition of comet dust were investigated through the dependence of polarization and angular albedo as a function of phase angle. The investigations concentrated on small phase angles (comet near opposition). Polarization measurements over wide ranges of phase angle were made for three comets. The polarization data showed no color dependence from 0.5 μm to 0.8 μm. Data from two comets confirmed that the position angle of the polarization lies parallel to the scattering plane at small phase angles. All polarization data of comets at small phase angles were merged to show that the angular dependence of polarization repeats from comet to comet. Mie models were unable to explain the polarization observations, even though the parameters were varied over wide ranges. Infrared observations of the reflected solar spectrum and the dust thermal spectrum allowed a determination of the angular albedo of comet dust. The angular albedo at all phase angles describes the dust phase functions. A large phase coefficient is characteristic of class C asteroids, asteroids of low albedo. The comet infrared data supports the conclusions of the polarization study. An attempt to observe a polarization signature of comet dust in the Orion Nebula could not be completed because of instrumental problems. Instrumental improvements are suggested

  1. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 2. Smectites and micas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    The classification is briefly summarized of stony meteorites and cosmic dust, and the mineralogy and chemistry is described of serpentine group minerals. The occurrence of smectites and micas in extraterrestrial materials is examined. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDPs relies heavily on electron beam instruments, especially the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites lose their interlayer water and the interlayer partly collapse in the high vacuum of the TEM.

  2. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel w...

  3. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  4. Creation of fully vectorized FORTRAN code for integrating the movement of dust grains in interplanetary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, Walter

    1989-01-01

    The main objective is to improve the performance of a specific FORTRAN computer code from the Planetary Sciences Division of NASA/Johnson Space Center when used on a modern vectorizing supercomputer. The code is used to calculate orbits of dust grains that separate from comets and asteroids. This code accounts for influences of the sun and 8 planets (neglecting Pluto), solar wind, and solar light pressure including Poynting-Robertson drag. Calculations allow one to study the motion of these particles as they are influenced by the Earth or one of the other planets. Some of these particles become trapped just beyond the Earth for long periods of time. These integer period resonances vary from 3 orbits of the Earth and 2 orbits of the particles to as high as 14 to 13.

  5. Creation of fully vectorized FORTRAN code for integrating the movement of dust grains in interplanetary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective is to improve the performance of a specific FORTRAN computer code from the Planetary Sciences Division of NASA/Johnson Space Center when used on a modern vectorizing supercomputer. The code is used to calculate orbits of dust grains that separate from comets and asteroids. This code accounts for influences of the sun and 8 planets (neglecting Pluto), solar wind, and solar light pressure including Poynting-Robertson drag. Calculations allow one to study the motion of these particles as they are influenced by the Earth or one of the other planets. Some of these particles become trapped just beyond the Earth for long periods of time. These integer period resonances vary from 3 orbits of the Earth and 2 orbits of the particles to as high as 14 to 13

  6. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm(3) developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment. PMID:25794831

  7. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  8. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  9. Comparison of the Oxidation State of Fe in Comet 81P/Wild 2 and Chondritic-Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ogliore, R C; Fakra, S C; Gainsforth, Z; Marcus, M A; Westphal, A J

    2010-01-01

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP- IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alteration have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed ~300 nanograms of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are >2{\\sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all J...

  10. Iron, magnesium, and silicon in dust from Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highest-quality impact mass spectrometer data from the Vega-1 and Giotto spacecraft are presently used to study the Mg, Si, and Fe composition of dust grains in Comet Halley. The results thus obtained are in general agreement with previously reported data, but differ with respect to ion ratio dispersions. A lack of sharp clustering in the data indicates that none of the detected particles can be characterized as single mineral grains; an abundant glass content in the solids may be indicated. The best match of the distribution of Fe/(Fe+Mg) is with interplanetary particles containing high temperature, Mg-rich silicates dominated by anhydrous minerals, so that Comet Halley may be a mixture of ice and high-temperature anhydrous minerals. 18 refs

  11. Interplanetary Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) has been used as a diagnostic of solar wind speed and interplanetary plasma turbulence, allowing inference of speed and electron density power spectrum close to the Sun and out of the ecliptic. In that context, IPS is 'signal' and provides scientifically interesting data. IPS is also of interest because amplitude and phase perturbations imposed on radio waves are 'noise' for telemetry and precision Doppler tracking of deep space probes and for some radio astronomical observations. This paper briefly reviews the connection between scattering observables and the electron density power spectrum. Interplanetary phase scintillation on time scales of 100 to 10 000 seconds is an important noise in mass determinations of small solar system bodies during space-probe fly-bys and in searches for low-frequency gravitational radiation.

  12. Dust in the Solar System - Properties and Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    Interplanetary dust pervades the inner Solar System, giving rise to a prominent glow above the horizon at sunrise and sunset known as the zodiacal light. This dust derives from the disintegration of comets as they approach the Sun and from collisions among main-belt asteroids. The Earth accretes roughly 4x10(exp 6) kg/year of 1 - 1,000 micron dust particles as they spiral into the Sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag. Samples of these grains have been collected from deep sea sediments, Antarctic ice and by high-altitude aircraft and balloon flights. Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere have been classified by their IR spectra into olivine, pyroxene, and hydrated silicate-dominated classes. Most IDPs have bulk major and minor element abundances that are similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Hydrated silicate-rich IDPs are thought to derive from asteroids based on their mineralogy and low atmospheric entry velocities estimated from peak temperatures reached during atmospheric entry. Anhydrous IDPs are typically aggregates of 0.1 - approx. 1 micron Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, amorphous silicates (GEMS), Fe, Nisulfides and rare spinel and oxides bound together by carbonaceous material. These IDPs are often argued to derive from comets based on compositional similarities and high atmospheric entry velocities that imply high eccentricity orbits. Infrared spectra obtained from anhydrous IDPs closely match remote IR spectra obtained from comets. The most primitive (anhydrous) IDPs appear to have escaped the parent-body thermal and aqueous alteration that has affected meteorites. These samples thus consist entirely of grains that formed in the ancient solar nebula and pre-solar interstellar and circumstellar environments. Isotopic studies of IDPs have identified silicate stardust grains that formed in the outflows of red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae]. These stardust grains

  13. 21 CFR 168.110 - Dextrose anhydrous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dextrose anhydrous. 168.110 Section 168.110 Food... Table Sirups § 168.110 Dextrose anhydrous. (a) Dextrose anhydrous is purified and crystallized D-glucose... solids content is not less than 98.0 percent m/m. (b) The name of the food is “Dextrose anhydrous”...

  14. The distribution of interplanetary dust between 0.96 and 1.04 AU as inferred from impacts on the STEREO spacecraft observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, C J; Cyr, O C St; Campbell-Brown, M; Skelt, A; Kaiser, M; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S; Lintott, C; Smith, A; Bamford, S; Baeten, E M L

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 AU has been inferred from impacts on the two STEREO spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the Heliospheric Imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed web-based project, Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A, indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera these d...

  15. Anhydrous Taphole Mix for Blast Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the term,definition,brand,label,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of anhydrous taphole mix for blast furnace.

  16. Lunar and interplanetary trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Biesbroek, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a clear description of the types of lunar and interplanetary trajectories, and how they influence satellite-system design. The description follows an engineering rather than a mathematical approach and includes many examples of lunar trajectories, based on real missions. It helps readers gain an understanding of the driving subsystems of interplanetary and lunar satellites. The tables and graphs showing features of trajectories make the book easy to understand. .

  17. Transport of anhydrous ammoniac - risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This risk analysis of anhydrous ammonia transport in France was done within a study initiated by the Department of dangerous goods of the Ministry of transport. The study deals with the road and rail transportation of bulk anhydrous ammonia. After analysis of transport system and traffic, the transport accident risks are estimated, as well as their distribution on the French territory. Finally after a synthesis of results, a number of safety measures to be undertaken were identified. This is a joint study of SMC-CEPN, with a specific role of SEMA-METRA-CONSEIL concerning the traffic frequency, and the center for risk evaluation concerning nuclear safety

  18. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  19. NQR frequencies of anhydrous carbamazepine polymorphic phases

    CERN Document Server

    Bonin, C J; Pusiol, D J

    2010-01-01

    In this work we propose the Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) technique as an analytical method suitable for polymorphism detection in active parts (or active principles) of pharmaceuticals with high pharmacological risk. Samples of powder carbamazepine (5H-dibenz(b,f)-azepine-5-carboxamide) are studied. In its anhydrous state, this compound presents at least three different polymorphic forms: form III, the commercial one, form II, and form I. Of these, only form III possesses desirable therapeutic effects. By using the NQR technique, it was possible to characterize two of the three polymorphic phases (I and III) for anhydrous carbamazepine in few minutes at room temperature, detecting the characteristic frequencies of 14N nuclei (I=1) present in their chemical composition and in the frequency range 2.820-3.935 MHz. For form II, characteristic lines were not detected within this range of frequencies. The lines detected for form III are centered at the frequencies \

  20. High-Nickel Iron-Sulfides in Anhydrous, Gems-Rich CP IDPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Wirick, S.; Hu, W.; Li, L.; Yan, H.; Huang, X.; Nazaretski, E.; Lauer, K.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) that were not severly heated during atmospheric deceleration are the best preserved samples of the solids that condensed from the Solar protoplanetary disk, as well as pre-Solar grains thatr survived incorporation into the disk, currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. These CP IDPs never experienced the aqueous and/or thermal processing, gravitational compaction, and shock effects that overprinted the record of Solar nebula processes in meteorites.

  1. Techniques for Galactic Dust Measurements in the Heliosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Grün, Eberhard; Landgraf, Markus; Horány, Mihaly; Kissel, Jochen; Krüger, Harald; Srama, Ralf; Svedhem, Håkan; Withnell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Galactic interstellar dust (ISD) is the major ingredient in planetary formation. However, information on this important material has been extremely limited. Recently the Ulysses dust detector has identified and measured interstellar dust outside 1.8~AU from the Sun at ecliptic latitudes above $50^{\\circ}$. Inside this distance it could not reliably distinguish interstellar from interplanetary dust. Modeling the Ulysses data suggests that up to 30 % of dust flux with masses above $10^{-16}\\rm ...

  2. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  3. 2002 Kuiper prize lecture: Dust Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Krüger, Harald; Kempf, Sascha; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg

    2005-03-01

    Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and their bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is called "Dust Astronomy" which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a Dust Observatory in space. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids. Dust from interstellar and interplanetary sources is distinguished by accurately sensing their trajectories. Trajectory sensors may use the electric charge signals that are induced when charged grains fly through the detector. Modern in-situ dust impact detectors are capable of providing mass, speed, physical and chemical information of dust grains in space. A Dust Observatory mission is feasible with state-of-the-art technology. It will (1) provide the distinction between interstellar dust and interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, (2) determine the elemental composition of impacting dust particles, and (3) monitor the fluxes of various dust components as a function of direction and particle masses.

  4. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  5. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Weber, T. D.; Malaspina, D.; Crary, F.; Ergun, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Fowler, C. M.; Morooka, M. W.; McEnulty, T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Andrews, D. J.; Horanyi, M.; Collette, A.; Yelle, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars’s atmosphere.

  6. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere. PMID:26542578

  7. Gyrosynchrotron Radiation of Interplanetary CMEs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Weiying; WU Ji; WANG Chuanbing; WANG Shui

    2012-01-01

    CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections) are an important means of energy release in the solar corona. Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a mission being proposed for observing the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload onboard SPORT is a synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer, which receives radio emission of interplanetary CMEs. It is identified that there are mainly three radio emission mechanisms of CMEs, i.e., bremsstrahlung, gyrosynchrotron emission and plasma emission. Among these emission types, bremsstrahlung emission is the main emission mechanism of the high-density plasma clouds of interplanetary CMEs. Gyrosynchrotron emission is the continuous emission generated by high-energy electrons from CMEs, while plasma emission is the main mechanism of transient radio bursts from CMEs. In this paper, the gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs is focused on. Firstly, the mechanism of gyrosynchrotron emission is reviewed. Secondly, a review of the physical parameter models of background solar wind and interplanetary CMEs is presented. After these, the brightness temperature and polarization of gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs are calculated and analyzed. Finally, the detectability of gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs by radio meters is discussed briefly.

  8. Functional polymers for anhydrous proton transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkannagari, Nagamani

    Anhydrous proton conducting polymers are highly sought after for applications in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). N-heterocycles (eg. imidazole, triazole, and benzimidazole), owing to their amphoteric nature, have been widely studied to develop efficient anhydrous proton transporting polymers. The proton conductivity of N-heterocyclic polymers is influenced by several factors and the design and development of polymers with a delicate balance among various synergistic and competing factors to provide appreciable proton conductivities has been a challenging task. In this thesis, the proton transport (PT) characteristics of polymers functionalized with two diverse classes of functional groups--- N-heterocycles and phenols have been investigated and efforts have been made to develop the molecular design criteria for the design and development of efficient proton transporting functional groups and polymers. The proton conduction pathway in 1H-1,2,3-triazole polymers is probed by employing structurally analogous N-heterocyclic (triazole, imidazole, and pyrazole) and benz-N-heterocyclic (benzotriazole, benzimidazole, and benzopyrazole) polymers. Imidazole-like pathway was found to dominate the proton conductivity of triazole and pyrazole-like pathway makes only a negligible contribution, if any. Polymers containing benz-N-heterocycles exhibited higher proton conductivity than those with the corresponding N-heterocycles. Pyrazole-like functional groups, i.e. the molecules with two nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other, were found not to be good candidates for PT applications. A new class of proton transporting functional groups, phenols, has been introduced for anhydrous PT. One of the highlighting features of phenols over N-heterocycles is that the hydrogen bond donor/acceptor reorientation can happen on a single -OH site, allowing for facile reorientational dynamics in Grotthuss PT and enhanced proton conductivities in phenolic polymers

  9. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>∼2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  10. Radiolytic preparation of anhydrous tin (2) chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Anhydrous tin (2) chloride (SnCl2) is prepared by radiolysis with high energy electrons of a tin (4) chloride (SnCl4) solution in heptane. The SnCl4 is reduced to insoluble SNCl2. The energy yield, G(SnCl2), molecules of SnCl2, produced per 100 eV, increases with SnCl4 concentration from 1.6 at 0.15 M SnCl4 to 3.1 at 3.0 M SnCl4. Other parameters such as temperature total dose and beam current have little influence on G(SnCl2). The method may be used to prepare other metal halides if the higher valence, more covalent metal halide is soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbons and the lower more ionic metal halide is insoluble. The reaction mechanism is discussed; the radiolysis of both heptane and SnCl4 is involved. At high SnCl4 concentration G(SnCl2) appears to be limited by the yield of SnC13 radicals.

  11. Chromium solubility in anhydrous Phase B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Luca; Sirotkina, Ekaterina A.; Bobrov, Andrey V.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure and chemical composition of a crystal of (Mg14- x Cr x )(Si5- x Cr x )O24 ( x ≈ 0.30) anhydrous Phase B (Anh-B) synthesized in the model system MgCr2O4-Mg2SiO4 at 12 GPa and 1600 °C have been investigated. The compound was found to be orthorhombic, space group Pmcb, with lattice parameters a = 5.900(1), b = 14.218(2), c = 10.029(2) Å, V = 841.3(2) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R 1 = 0.065 using 1492 independent reflections. Chromium was found to substitute for both Mg at the M3 site (with a mean bond distance of 2.145 Å) and Si at the octahedral Si1 site (mean bond distance: 1.856 Å), according to the reaction Mg2+ + Si4+ = 2Cr3+. Such substitutions cause a reduction in the volume of the M3 site and an increase in the volume of the Si-dominant octahedron with respect to the values typically observed for pure Anh-B and Fe2+-bearing Anh-B. Taking into account that Cr3+ is not expected to be Jahn-Teller active, it appears that both the Cr3+-for-Mg and Cr3+-for-Si substitutions in the Anh-B structure decrease the distortion of the octahedra. Electron microprobe analysis gave the Mg13.66(8)Si4.70(6)Cr0.62(4)O24 stoichiometry for the studied phase. The successful synthesis of this phase provides new information for the possible mineral assemblages occurring in the Earth's deep upper mantle and shed new light on the so-called X discontinuity that has been observed at 275-345 km depth in several subcontinental and subduction zone environments.

  12. Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model Based on Long-Term Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikarev, V.; Grün, E.; Landgraf, M.

    2001-11-01

    We construct a new meteoroid model that replaces the models by Divine (1993, JGR 98(E9), 17029--17048, ``Five population of interplanetary meteoroids'') and Staubach & Grün (1995, Advances in Space Research 16(11), 103--106, ``Development of an upgraded meteoroid model''). Our approach of describing the interplanetary dust cloud, however, is different from that of our predecessors. Instead of empirically found distribution functions, we use distributions that are determined by orbital evolution of various dust populations. The populations correspond to expected structures in zodiacal cloud. We determine the distributions of meteoroid-sized debris dispersed along the orbits of the parent bodies, comets and asteroids, meteoroids residing in the torus of debris scattered by Jupiter, and the distributions of small dust grains spiraling towards the Sun under the Poynting-Robertson drag from their parent bodies, including scattered meteoroids. The interstellar dust particles are represented by a physical model as well. Each distribution function has an arbitrary normalization factor corresponding to the unknown dust production rate for the population. We use several data sets to validate the approach and to infer the population normalisation factors minimizing model residuals: interplanetary meteoroid size distribution observed at 1 AU, COBE DIRBE infrared observations, Galileo & Ulysses DDS in-situ impact counts, particle fluxes derived from the Helios 1 and Pioneer 10 and 11 dust experiments, and AMOR radar meteor survey.

  13. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  14. Maintenance of Bacterial Cultures on Anhydrous Silica Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, John E.

    1977-01-01

    Suspensions of 20 different cultures were grown on appropriate media, then pipetted into sterile anhydrous silica gel. Silica gel cultures after incubation and refrigerated storage were tested for viability. Results showed little mutation, low replication, low contamination, minimal expenses, and survival up to two years. (CS)

  15. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (b) Both forms of the ingredient meet the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated). 184.1845 Section 184.1845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  16. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m<3>, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of

  17. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  18. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  19. Lipid-sugar interaction: Relevance to anhydrous biology

    OpenAIRE

    Caffrey, Martin

    1988-01-01

    PUBLISHED The ability of seeds and other anhydrous plant forms to survive the withdrawal of water must involve a mechanism for protecting the integrity of cellular membranes. Evidence from animal systems implicates sugars as protective components, and we have tested the changes in mesomorphic phase state of phospholipid model membranes upon hydration and dehydration in the presence of sucrose and/or sucrose plus raffinose. X-ray diffraction studies of dry dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DM...

  20. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Molecular structure and vibration spectra of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magnesium acetate by density functional theory and ab initio hartree fock calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magnesium acetate in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree- Fock and density functional method (B3LYP) with Lan2dz basic set. calculated data were compared with experimental ones

  3. Distribution of Water in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals during Metamorphic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lankvelt, A.; Seaman, S. J.; Williams, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals are a reservoir for water in otherwise dry rocks. This water may play a role in facilitating metamorphic reactions and enhancing deformation. In this study, we examined orthopyroxene-bearing granites from the Athabasca Granulite terrane in northern Saskatchewan. These rocks intruded the lower crust (pressures of 1 GPa) at circa 2.6 Ga at temperatures of > 900 ºC and were subsequently metamorphosed at granulite facies conditions (700 ºC and 1 GPa) in the Paleoproterozoic (Williams et al., 2000). One of the primary reactions recorded by these rocks is locally known as the "Mary" reaction and involves the anhydrous reaction: orthopyroxene + Ca-plagioclase = clinopyroxene + garnet + Na-plagioclase. Measurements of water concentrations in both product and reactant assemblages were performed using a Bruker Vertex 70 Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and revealed that there is a slight excess of water in product minerals over reactant minerals. There are two possible explanations for this. The first is that water was derived from an external source, possibly hydrous, likely contemporaneous, mafic dikes. This interpretation is supported by higher concentrations of K, which is essentially absent from the reactant minerals, in the Na-rich rims of plagioclase. However, only modest amounts of external fluids could have been introduced, or amphiboles would have been stabilized at the expense of clinopyroxene (Moore & Carmichael, 1998). An alternative interpretation is that slightly more water-rich minerals reacted more readily, releasing water that was then incorporated into their products, whereas the water-poorer minerals failed to react. Support for this interpretation comes from very low water concentrations in orthopyroxene and plagioclase from an unreacted and undeformed sample. This interpretation suggests that water in anhydrous minerals may catalyze metamorphic reactions, and a lack of water may be critical for preserving metastable

  4. Rheological Study of Mutarotation of Fructose in Anhydrous State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yangyang [ORNL; Wlodarczyk, Patryk [Institute ofNon-Ferrous Metals, Sowinskiego Gliwice, POLAND; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Paluch, Marian W [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Rheological measurement was employed to study the mutarotation of D-fructose in anhydrous state. By monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity with time, rate constants for mutarotation were estimated, and two different stages of this reaction were identified. One of the mutarotation stages is rapid and has a low activation energy, whereas the other is much slower and has a much higher activation energy. Possible conversions corresponding to these two phases are discussed. This work demonstrates that, in addition to the routine techniques such polarimetry and gas liquid chromatography, rheological measurement can be used as an alternative method to continuously monitor the mutarotation of sugars.

  5. Crystallo-chemistry of boric anhydride and of anhydrous borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an overview of various aspects related to the atomic structure of boron and of its three-bind and four-bind compounds, this report briefly presents the different forms of boric anhydride (in solid, liquid, glassy and gaseous state), presents and comments the structure of these different forms, and addresses the molten boric anhydride which is used as oxide solvent. The next part addresses the structure of anhydrous borates. It presents some generalities on their structure, and describes examples of known structures: dimers, trimers, polymers with a degree higher than three like calcium metaborate, caesium tri-borate, lithium tetraborate, or potassium pentaborate

  6. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content...

  7. A New Thickener for CO2 Anhydrous Fracturing Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 dry fracturing technology is well-known for its advantages. Little water is used in this technology, which is able to ease the pressure of consumption on water resources. Many abroad theoretical researches, laboratory experiments and field tests have been taken to explore the yield mechanism, the adaptability and the technology of pure liquid CO2 fracturing. These achievements have been applied to a variety of reservoirs transformation and improven the effectiveness of stimulation treatment in a degree. The researches and studies in the domestic didn’t get popular until recent years. Thus, this article firstly introduces the main development and application about pure CO2 anhydrous fracturing technology, and sums up the effect and evaluation of its fluid through application examples both in the domestic and abroad. However, although this technology has many excellent qualities, but systematic studies indicate that its proppant-carrying capacity is less competitive because of the low viscosity of pure CO2 liquid and other reasons. In a consequence, it is necessary to develop an appropriate thickener for CO2 anhydrous fracturing fluid to improve its carrying capacity. Then this article describes some studies of previous scholars about CO2 thickener. Then we put forward our own research ideas and transform it into actual experiments. Thanks to the valid performances of these tests, we successfully develop a thickener X and cosolvent B.

  8. Formulation and in vitro evaluation of theophylline anhydrous bioadhesive tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshmukh V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to design oral controlled release (CR theophylline anhydrous bioadhesive tablets and to optimize the drug release profile and in vitro bioadhesion strength. Different types of natural hydrophilic polymers such as xanthun gum, locust bean gum, guar gum, karaya gum, and their combinations were used to formulate matrix tablets. Tablets of anhydrous theophylline were prepared by the direct compression method and were subjected to in vitro drug dissolution for 12 hours using the USP dissolution apparatus basket type at a speed of 100 rpm and temperature of 37 ± 0.5°C using gastric fluid (pH 1.2. The bioadhesive strength of the tablets was measured as the force of detachment against the porcine gastric mucosa. The in vitro release study as well as the retention time of the bioadhesive tablets on the mucous membrane were investigated to develop a bioadhesive polymer-based CR delivery system and to evaluate the performance of such a delivery device. The combination of karaya gum:guar gum (6:4 tablet showed a greater bioadhesive strength as compared with a single gum and other gum combination tablets. Karaya gum:guar gum-loaded tablets were not discharged from the mucous membrane and were dissolved in the gastric fluid. An increase in the gum concentration increases the drug release profile beyond 12 hours whereas there is no significant effect of gum concentration on the bioadhesive strength of the tablet.

  9. Anhydrous crystals of DNA bases are wide gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, F. F.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Azevedo, D. L.; Sales, F. A. M.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2011-05-01

    We present the structural, electronic, and optical properties of anhydrous crystals of DNA nucleobases (guanine, adenine, cytosine, and thymine) found after DFT (Density Functional Theory) calculations within the local density approximation, as well as experimental measurements of optical absorption for powders of these crystals. Guanine and cytosine (adenine and thymine) anhydrous crystals are predicted from the DFT simulations to be direct (indirect) band gap semiconductors, with values 2.68 eV and 3.30 eV (2.83 eV and 3.22 eV), respectively, while the experimentally estimated band gaps we have measured are 3.83 eV and 3.84 eV (3.89 eV and 4.07 eV), in the same order. The electronic effective masses we have obtained at band extremes show that, at low temperatures, these crystals behave like wide gap semiconductors for electrons moving along the nucleobases stacking direction, while the hole transport are somewhat limited. Lastly, the calculated electronic dielectric functions of DNA nucleobases crystals in the parallel and perpendicular directions to the stacking planes exhibit a high degree of anisotropy (except cytosine), in agreement with published experimental results.

  10. Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (IPL): A concept for an interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Feldman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A concept for a near-earth interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties is described. The proposed objectives would be to determine the composition of the interplanetary constituents and its dependence on source-conditions and to investigate energy and momentum transfer processes in the interplanetary medium. Such a mission would accomplish three secondary objectives: (1) provide a baseline for deep space missions, (2) investigate variations of the solar wind with solar activity, and (3) provide input functions for magnetospheric studies.

  11. The microphysics of the Saharan dust and its implications on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong influence of Saharan dust plumes on the microphysics of cumulus clouds, especially along their long-distance transport trajectories into cloudy regions of the world, has been discussed and illustrated. This climate-related influence is primarily based on the observed anhydrous non-hygroscopic property of the Saharan dust, otherwise known as the Harmattan dust haze in Nigeria. An observational feature of the dust-cloud interaction which is strongly climate-related is the rapid clearance of cumulus clouds on arrival of a dust plume. This is because aeolian dust particles and water droplets cannot coexist comfortably. A useful practical application of this influence of the dust on clouds by means of atmospheric teleconnection principles for fine-weather prediction in cloudy remote regions seasonally affected by dust plumes from the Sahara, has therefore been suggested. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs, 3 plates

  12. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  13. The Microwave Thermal Emission from the Zodiacal Dust Cloud Predicted with Contemporary Meteoroid Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dikarev, Valery V

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the microwave thermal emission from the interplanetary dust cloud are made using several contemporary meteoroid models to construct the distributions of cross-section area of dust in space, and applying the Mie light-scattering theory to estimate the temperatures and emissivities of dust particles in broad size and heliocentric distance ranges. In particular, the model of the interplanetary dust cloud by Kelsall et al. (1998, ApJ 508: 44-73), the five populations of interplanetary meteoroids of Divine (1993, JGR 98(E9): 17,029-17,048) and the Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM) by Dikarev et al. (2004, EMP 95: 109-122) are used in combination with the optical properties of olivine, carbonaceous and iron spherical particles. The Kelsall model has been widely accepted by the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) community. We show, however, that it predicts the microwave emission from interplanetary dust remarkably different from the results of application of the meteoroid engineering m...

  14. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  15. Are the stratospheric dust particles meteor ablation debris or interplanetary dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Kyte, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Natural and laboratory created fusion crusts and debris from artificial meteor samples were used to develop criteria for recognizing meteor ablation debris in a collection of 5 to 50 micron particles from the stratosphere. These laboratory studies indicate that meteor ablation debris from nickel-iron meteoroids produce spherules containing taenite, wuestite, magnetite, and hematite. These same studies also indicate that ablation debris from chondritic meteoroids produce spheres and fragmentary debris. The spheres may be either silicate rich, containing zoned olivine, magnetite, and glass, or sulfide rich, containing iron oxides (e.g., magnetite, wuestite) and iron sulfides (e.g., pyrrhotite, pentlandite). The fragmentary debris may be either fine-grained aggregates of olivine, magnetite, pyroxene, and occasionally pyrrhotite (derived from the meteorite matrix) or individual olivine and pyroxene grains (derived from meteorite inclusions).

  16. Effects of Coffee and Caffeine Anhydrous Intake During Creatine Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Persky, Adam M; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-05-01

    Trexler, ET, Smith-Ryan, AE, Roelofs, EJ, Hirsch, KR, Persky, AM, and Mock, MG. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous intake during creatine loading. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1438-1446, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 5 days of creatine (CRE) loading alone or in combination with caffeine anhydrous (CAF) or coffee (COF) on upper-body and lower-body strength and sprint performance. Physically active males (n = 54; mean ± SD; age = 20.1 ± 2.1 years; weight = 78.8 ± 8.8 kg) completed baseline testing, consisting of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue with 80% 1RM for bench press and leg press, followed by a repeated sprint test of five, 10-second sprints separated by 60-second rest on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power (PP) and total power (TP). At least 72 hours later, subjects were randomly assigned to supplement with CRE (5 g of CRE monohydrate, 4 times per day; n = 14), CRE + CAF (CRE +300 mg·d of CAF; n = 13), CRE + COF (CRE +8.9 g of COF, yielding 303 mg of CAF; n = 13), or placebo (PLA; n = 14) for 5 days. Serum creatinine (CRN) was measured before and after supplementation, and on day 6, participants repeated pretesting procedures. Strength measures were improved in all groups (p ≤ 0.05), with no significant time × treatment interactions. No significant interaction or main effects were observed for PP. For TP, a time × sprint interaction was observed (p ≤ 0.05), with no significant interactions among treatment groups. A time × treatment interaction was observed for serum CRN values (p ≤ 0.05) that showed increases in all groups except PLA. Four subjects reported mild gastrointestinal discomfort with CRE + CAF, with no side effects reported in other groups. These findings suggest that neither CRE alone nor in combination with CAF or COF significantly affected performance compared with PLA. PMID:26439785

  17. Laryngeal sequelae due to accidental inhalation of anhydrous ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz, Walter Paiva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anhydrous Ammonia (AA is a caustic compound commonly used in the industry that can cause burns, even with brief contact. As with other alkali burns, the early washing to remove the AA from burnt areas is crucial to limit tissue damage. The concentration of toxic agent and duration of its contact determine the degree of skin and mucosa destruction. A tanker truck carrying AA (NH3 fell off a highway, and released a dense cloud of AA gas. Fifty-four people inhaled the gas and after ninety days, three people were still experiencing hoarseness and were examined. Case Report: We assessed three patients with laryngeal sequelae due to AA inhalation burn. We found a case of hyperemia and edema, one case of granuloma of the posterior third portion of the left vocal cord, and one case of vocal cord adhesion. Necropsy findings are commented both macroscopically and microscopically. The sequelae and the best treatments for them are discussed herein.

  18. Formation of β-cyclodextrin complexes in an anhydrous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaoui, Hocine; Modarressi, Ali; Magri, Pierre; Stachowicz-Kuśnierz, Anna; Korchowiec, Jacek; Rogalski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The formation of inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin was studied at the melting temperature of guest compounds by differential scanning calorimetry. The complexes of long-chain n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids were investigated by calorimetry and IR spectroscopy. The complexation ratio of β-cyclodextrin was compared with results obtained in an aqueous environment. The stability and structure of inclusion complexes with various stoichiometries were estimated by quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirmed the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds. This finding gives new insight into the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes and shows that hydrophobic interactions play a secondary role in this case. Graphical abstract The formation of complexes of β-cyclodextrin with selected n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids in an anhydrous environment is studied by differential scanning calorimetry, IR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling. The results obtained confirm the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds and give a new perspective on the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes. PMID:27518085

  19. Activation of Anhydrate Phosphogypsmn by K2SO4 and Hemihydrate Gypsum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; QIAN Jueshi

    2011-01-01

    Lime pretreated phosphogypsum(PG) was calcined at 500 ℃ to produce anhydrate gypsum cement.Due to the slow hydration of anhydrate gypsum,additives,K2SO4 and hemihydrate gypsum were selected to accelerate the hydration of anhydrate.The hydration characteristics,the resistance to hydrodynamic water,and the mineralogical studies were investigated.The experimental results suggest that activated by K2SO4 and hemihydrate,anhydrate PG hydrates much more rapidly than that in the presence of only K2SO4 or in the absence of additives.The binder has proper setting time,good strength development,and relatively better resistance to water.The hardened binder has hydrated products of rod or stick like shaped dihydrate gypsum crystals.

  20. Molecular structure and vibration spectra of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magnesium acetate by density functional theory and AB initio hartree-fock calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magesium acetate in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree-Fock and density functional method with 6-31G basic set. The optimized geometric band tengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT show the best agreement with the experimental data. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of melamine diborate with calculated results by density functional B3LYP and Hatree-Fock methods indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled Hatree-Fock approach for molecular vibrational problems

  1. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  2. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Cid, C.; Dobrica, V.; Hejda, Pavel; Nenovski, P.; Stauning, P.; Bochníček, Josef; Danov, D.; Demetrescu, C.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Maris, G.; Teodosiev, D.; Valach, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, July (2013), A26/1-A26/20. ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solar activity * interplanetary medium * indices * ionosphere (general) * ring current Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013

  3. Commission 49: Interplanetary Plasma and Heliosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Webb, D.F.; Bougeret, J. L.; Cane, H.; Cramer, N.F.; Kahler, S. W.; Kojima, M.; Sanahuja, B.; Vandas, Marek; Verheest, F.; von Steiger, R.

    Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2007 - (Engvold, O.), s. 103-120 ISBN 978-0-521-85604-1. - (Proceedings of the IAU. IAU Transactions. 26A) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : interplanetary medium * coronal mass ejections * solar-terrestrial relations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  4. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu-Wen Chen; Shu-Mei Lee; Yi-Shyan Chen; Pey-Shiuan Wu; Nai-Fang Chang; Chao-Hsun Yang; Chih-Chien Lin

    2011-01-01

    The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w) or water-in-oil (w/o) systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive ...

  5. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals and some rare earths in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth and some rare earth metals in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid is studied. For each type of fluoride solubility depends on the ionic radius of the cation. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals grows from magnesium to barium. All the fluorides in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid form solvates. Solvates of strontium and scandium fluorides are shown to decompose at 110 and 150 deg C respectively

  6. Dust trajectory sensor: Accuracy and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Gruen, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Gruen, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1 deg. in direction.

  7. Dust trajectory sensor: accuracy and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J; Sternovsky, Z; Grün, E; Auer, S; Duncan, N; Drake, K; Le, H; Horanyi, M; Srama, R

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction. PMID:22047326

  8. Preparation, analysis, and release of simulated interplanetary grains into low earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astronomical observations which reflect the optical and dynamical properties of interstellar and interplanetary grains are the primary means of identifying the shape, size, and the chemistry of extraterrestrial grain materials and is a major subject of this workshop. Except for recent samplings of extraterrestrial particles in near-Earth orbit and in the stratosphere, observations have been the only method of deducing the properties of extraterrestrial particles. Terrestrial laboratory experiments typically seek not to reproduce astrophysical conditions but to illuminate fundamental dust processes and properties which must be extrapolated to interesting astrophysical conditions. In this report, we discuss the formation and optical characterization of simulated interstellar and interplanetary dust with particular emphasis on studying the properties on irregularly shaped particles. We also discuss efforts to develop the techniques to allow dust experiments to be carried out in low-Earth orbit, thus extending the conditions under which dust experiments may be performed. The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Elucidate the optical properties, including scattering and absorption, of simulated interstellar grains including SiC, silicates, and carbon grains produced in the laboratory. (2) Develop the capabilities to release grains and volatile materials into the near-Earth environment and study their dynamics and optical properties. (3) Study the interaction of released materials with the near-Earth environment to elucidate grain behavior in astrophysical environments. Interaction of grains with their environment may, for example, lead to grain alignment or coagulation, which results in observable phenomena such as polarization of lighter or a change of the scattering properties of the grains

  9. Interplanetary energy flux associated with magnetospheric substorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the interplanetary quantity epsilon(t), obtained by Perreault and Akasofu (Geophys. J.R. Astr. Soc.; 54: 547 (1978)) for intense geomagnetic storms, also correlates well with individual magnetospheric substorms. This quantity is given by epsilon(t)= VB2sin4 (theta/2) l02, where V and B denote the solar wind speed and the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), respectively, and theta denotes the polar angle of the IMF; l0 is a constant approximately 7 Earth radii. The AE index is used in this correlation study. The correlation is good enough to predict both the occurrence and intensity of magnetospheric substorms observed in the auroral zone, by monitoring the quantity epsilon(T) upstream of the solar wind. (author)

  10. Summary of the results from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment (LADEE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly

    2016-07-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission (9/2013 - 4/2014) discovered a permanently present dust cloud engulfing the Moon. The size, velocity, and density distributions of the dust particles are consistent with ejecta clouds generated from the continual bombardment of the lunar surface by sporadic interplanetary dust particles. Intermittent density enhancements were observed during several of the annual meteoroid streams, especially during the Geminids. LDEX found no evidence of the expected density enhancements over the terminators where electrostatic processes were predicted to efficiently loft small grains. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector, it captures coincident signals and full waveforms to reliably identify dust impacts. LDEX recorded average impact rates of approximately 1 and 0.1 hits/minute of particles with impact charges of q > 0.5 and q > 5 fC, corresponding to particles with radii of a > 0.3 and a> 0.7~μm, respectively. Several of the yearly meteor showers generated sustained elevated levels of impact rates, especially if their radiant direction intersected the lunar surface near the equatorial plane, greatly enhancing the probability of crossing their ejecta plumes. The characteristic velocities of dust particles in the cloud are on the order of ~100 m/s which we neglect compared to the typical spacecraft speeds of 1.6 km/s. Hence, with the knowledge of the spacecraft orbit and attitude, impact rates can be directly turned into particle densities as functions of time and position. LDEX observations are the first to identify the ejecta clouds around the Moon sustained by the continual bombardment of interplanetary dust particles. Most of the dust particles generated in impacts have insufficient energy to escape and follow ballistic orbits, returning to the surface, 'gardening' the regolith. Similar ejecta clouds are expected to engulf all airless planetary objects, including

  11. Modelling interplanetary CMEs using magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available The dynamics of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs are discussed from the viewpoint of numerical modelling. Hydrodynamic models are shown to give a good zero-order picture of the plasma properties of ICMEs, but they cannot model the important magnetic field effects. Results from MHD simulations are shown for a number of cases of interest. It is demonstrated that the strong interaction of the ICME with the solar wind leads to the ICME and solar wind velocities being close to each other at 1 AU, despite their having very different speeds near the Sun. It is also pointed out that this interaction leads to a distortion of the ICME geometry, making cylindrical symmetry a dubious assumption for the CME field at 1 AU. In the presence of a significant solar wind magnetic field, the magnetic fields of the ICME and solar wind can reconnect with each other, leading to an ICME that has solar wind-like field lines. This effect is especially important when an ICME with the right sense of rotation propagates down the heliospheric current sheet. It is also noted that a lack of knowledge of the coronal magnetic field makes such simulations of little use in space weather forecasts that require knowledge of the ICME magnetic field strength.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (interplanetary magnetic fields Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (flares and mass ejections Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  12. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion Systemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Wen Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w or water-in-oil (w/o systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future.

  13. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  14. Impact ionization experiments with porous cosmic dust particle analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibration of cosmic dust instruments using a linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Such an accelerator can accelerate conductive dust particles of sizes between ca. a few tens of microns, and a micron in size to speeds up to 80 km/s depending on particle size. Many different materials have been used for instrument calibration, from iron in the earlier days to carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, no comparative analysis has been made yet of compact particles versus porous or fluffy particles of the same material. Porous or fluffy particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system, e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko or aggregate grains from the plumes of Enceladus and recently also indications were found for low-density interstellar dust (ISD) from ISD data and trajectory simulations. These recalibrations are thus relevant for estimations of the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this talk we report about the calibrations being performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge after impact. We use the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser as an impact target. We then explain the experiment set-up, the preparation of the materials and the materials used. We elaborate on the technical challenges, and finally about the current status of the research at this stage. We conclude the talk with the relevance of the study, being the potential influence of such calibrations on the estimates of the mass distributions of interstellar and interplanetary dust.

  15. The importance of monopole antennas for dust observations: why Wind/WAVES does not detect nanodust

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer-Vernet, N; Issautier, K; Lecacheux, A

    2014-01-01

    The charge released by impact ionization of fast dust grains impinging on spacecraft is at the basis of a well-known technique for dust detection by wave instruments. Since most of the impact charges are recollected by the spacecraft, monopole antennas generally detect a much greater signal than dipoles. This is illustrated by comparing dust signals in monopole and dipole mode on different spacecraft and environments. It explains the weak sensitivity of Wind/WAVES dipole antennas for dust detection, so that it is not surprising that this instrument did not detect the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO/WAVES. We propose an interpretation of the Wind dust data, elsewhere discussed by Malaspina et al. (2014), which explains the observed pulse amplitude and polarity for interstellar dust impacts, as well as the non-detection of nanodust. This proposed mechanism might be the dominant dust detection mechanism by some wave instruments using dipole antennas.

  16. Impact ionization mass spectra of anorthite cosmic dust analogue particles

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Sestak, S.; R. Srama; Kempf, S.; Trieloff, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Green, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Anorthite, the Ca-rich end-member of plagioclase feldspar, is a dominant mineral component of the Lunar highlands. Plagioclase feldspar is also found in comets, meteorites and stony asteroids. It is therefore expected to contribute to the population of interplanetary (and circumplanetary) dust grains within the solar system. After coating micron- and submicron-sized grains of Anorthite with a conductive layer of Platinum, the mineral was successfully accelerated to hypervelocity speeds in the...

  17. An unrealistic drift in assay on anhydrous basis towards content limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivram K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The assay on anhydrous basis is a mathematically derived value from an experimental results of assay and water content tests. The results of assay and water content tests are determined, separately, on as-is basis. The industry-accepted formula for assay on anhydrous basis = (assay on as-is basis×100/(100-%water. Statistically, the two variables involved in accepted formula are assay on as-is basis and water to obtain assay on anhydrous basis. The experimental errors associated with these two variables propagate in assay on anhydrous basis. The error propagates either in constructive or destructive mode. The constructive mode of error propagation is combination of positive error of assay on as-is basis and positive error of water or negative error of assay on as-is basis and negative error of water. The constructive mode of error propagation has more impact on assay on anhydrous basis values and its confidence interval. The destructive mode of error propagation is combination of a positive error of assay on as-is basis and a negative error of water or vice versa. The destructive mode of error propagation has lesser impact on assay on anhydrous basis values and its confidence interval in comparison to the constructive mode of error propagation. In accepted formula said above, the constructive or destructive error propagation causes unrealistic drift of assay on anhydrous basis towards either lower or higher side of content limit of substance. The risk of rejection of pharmaceutical use substance is higher based on assay test results that results are calculated from industry-accepted formula. The purpose of the study is to propose an alternative formula to overcome limitations of accepted formula and justify the propagation of errors in realistic way. We have given three examples of pharmaceutical use substances to emphasise the above proposition. The proposed formula for assay on anhydrous basis= (assay on as-is basis×F/(F-%water in which F is

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  19. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed

  20. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost to the user of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed.

  1. Problems of Interplanetary and Interstellar Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, John

    2008-01-01

    If and when interplanetary and interstellar trade develops, it will be novel in two respects. First, the distances and time spans involved will reduce all or nearly all trade to the exchange of intangible goods. That threatens the possibility of conducting business in a genuinely common currency and of enforcing debt agreements, especially those involving sovereign debt. Second, interstellar trade suggests trade between humans and aliens. Cultural distance is a probable obstacle to initiating and sustaining such trade. Such exchange also threatens the release of new and potentially toxic memes.

  2. The interplanetary transport of solar cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical solutions are presented for the propagation of solar cosmic rays in interplanetary space, including the effects of pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic focusing. The intensity-time profiles can be well fitted by a simple radial spatial diffusion equation with scattering mean-free path lambdasub(fit). The radial mean-free path so obtained is significantly larger than the true scattering mean-free path for low-rigidity particles due to both adiabatic focusing and the inapplicability of the diffusive approximation early in the event. The well-known discrepancy between lambdasub(fit) and the theoretical predictions may be resolved by these calculations. (author)

  3. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  4. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to the upstream case. It is possible that downstream fluctuations are generated by ion relaxation as suggested in previous hybrid simulation shocks.

  5. A cosmic dust influx model. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinets, V. N.; Begkhanov, M.

    A model of cosmic dust influx is developed using results of radar and photographic studies of meteors and bolides, micrometeor impact data obtained during space missions, and the available experimental data on dust particles as small as 10 to the -17th g. It is shown, in particular, that particles of all sizes occurring above 30 km are mainly of meteor origin. Above 140 km, the earth atmosphere contains only primary cosmic particles of all sizes whose concentrations are equal to those observed in the interplanetary space but whose flux densities are twice as high. Above 30 km and below 100 km, the atmosphere contains primary micrometeor particles with masses less than 10 to the -8th g and particles of the same mass formed as a result of the fragmentation of large meteoric bodies.

  6. Interplanetary Physics Research in China: 2006-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chi; FENG Xueshang

    2008-01-01

    This brief report summarized the latest advances of the interplanetary physics research in China during the period of 2006-2007,made independently by Chinese space physicists and through international collaboration.The report covers all aspects of the interplanetary physics,including theoretical studies,numerical simulation and data analysis.

  7. Interplanetary Physics Research in China During 2004 - 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chi; WANG Shui

    2006-01-01

    This brief report summarized the latest advances of the interplanetary physics research in China during the period of 2004-2005, made independently by Chinese space physicists and through international collaboration. The report covers all aspects of the interplanetary physics, including theoretical studies, numerical simulation and data analysis.

  8. The three-dimensional structure of the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general structure of the interplanetary medium, especially in three-dimensions, is reviewed with special emphasis being given to the solar wind, the interplanetary magnetic field, the modulation of galactic cosmic rays and the propagation of energetic solar particles. (Auth.)

  9. 29 CFR 1910.111 - Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pipe shall be at least schedule 80 when joints are threaded. Threaded connections shall not be back... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) under 42 CFR part 84 for use with anhydrous...—Regulations of the Department of Transportation published in 49 CFR Chapter I. (b) Basic rules. This...

  10. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems. PMID:26976718

  11. Effect of enzyme dehydration on alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of enzyme dehydration by molecular sieves on the coupling of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran was investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Co

  12. Process design for enzymatic peptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a case study on a process design for enzymatic peptide synthesis, which is based on and inspired by previously established data about the Alcalase-catalyzed coupling of an amino acid amide and a chemically synthesized activated N-protected amino acid carbamoylmethyl ester in near-anhydr

  13. Kinetics of Alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling kinetics of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran were investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads; these immobilized enzymes were hydrated prior to

  14. Influence of amorphous content on compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziffels, S; Steckel, H

    2010-03-15

    Modified lactoses are widely used as filler-binders in direct compression of tablets. Until today, little about the compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose is known. In this study, a new method to prepare anhydrous alpha-lactose from alpha-lactose monohydrate by desiccation with heated ethanol was evaluated and the influence of amorphous content in the lactose powder prior to modification on powder properties, compaction behaviour and storage stability was determined. The modification process led to anhydrous alpha-lactose with decreased bulk and tapped density, increased flow rate and significantly higher specific surface area. Due to the higher specific surface area, the compaction behaviour of the anhydrous alpha-lactose was found to be significantly better than the compaction behaviour of powder blends consisting of alpha-lactose monohydrate and amorphous lactose. An influence of the amorphous content prior to modification could be observed only at higher compaction forces. In general, tablets of modified powders needed longer time to disintegrate directly after compression. However, the storage stability of modified tablets was found to be better compared to the amorphous-crystalline tablets which were influenced by storage conditions, initial crushing strength as well as amorphous content due to the re-crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage. PMID:20005927

  15. Catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil by hydrated and anhydrous fluoroantimonic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring-opening polymerization of epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) catalyzed by the super acid, fluroantimonic acid hexahydrate (HSbF6-6H2O), and the anhydrous form (HSbF6) in ethyl acetate was conducted in an effort to develop useful biodegradable polymers. The resulting polymerized ESO (SA-RPESO and SAA-...

  16. Dust pollution solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-09-15

    Cimbria Moduflex is a leading manufacturer of dust-free loading chutes and accessories to the bulk handling industry. The Moduflex chute of modular construction can precisely match customer needs. Dust Control Technology recently launched its DustBoss DB-45 which controls airborne particles and surface dust with low water usage. DustScan Ltd., provides a range of equipment for nuisance and PM10 dust monitoring. Donaldson Torit supplies the Torit PowerCore dust collector. 1 photo.

  17. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  18. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  19. Tracking heliospheric disturbances by interplanetary scintillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokumaru

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal mass ejections are known as a solar cause of significant geospace disturbances, and a fuller elucidation of their physical properties and propagation dynamics is needed for space weather predictions. The scintillation of cosmic radio sources caused by turbulence in the solar wind (interplanetary scintillation; IPS serves as an effective ground-based method for monitoring disturbances in the heliosphere. We studied global properties of transient solar wind streams driven by CMEs using 327-MHz IPS observations of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL of Nagoya University. In this study, we reconstructed three-dimensional features of the interplanetary (IP counterpart of the CME from the IPS data by applying the model fitting technique. As a result, loop-shaped density enhancements were deduced for some CME events, whereas shell-shaped high-density regions were observed for the other events. In addition, CME speeds were found to evolve significantly during the propagation between the corona and 1 AU.

  20. Division E Commission 49: Interplanetary Plasma and Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Manoharan, P. K.; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Briand, Carine; Chashei, Igor V.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Lario, David; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Malandraki, Olga; Kontar, Eduard; Richardson, John D.

    2016-04-01

    After a little more than forty years of work related to the interplanetary plasma and the heliosphere the IAU's Commission 49 was formally discontinued in 2015. The commission started its work when the first spacecraft were launched to measure the solar wind in-situ away from Earth orbit, both inward and outward from 1 AU. It now hands over its activities to a new commission during an era of space research when Voyager 1 measures in-situ the parameters of the local interstellar medium at the edge of the heliosphere. The commission will be succeeded by C.E3 with a similar area of responsibility but with more focused specific tasks that the community intends to address during the coming several years. This report includes a short description of the motivation for this commission and of the historical context. It then describes work from 2012 to 2015 during the present solar cycle 24 that has been the weakest in the space era so far. It gave rise to a large number of studies on solar energetic particles and cosmic rays. Other studies addressed e.g. the variation of the solar wind structure and energetic particle fluxes on long time scales, the detection of dust in the solar wind and the Voyager measurements at the edge of the heliosphere. The research is based on measurements from spacecraft that are at present operational and motivated by the upcoming Solar Probe + and Solar Orbiter missions to explore the vicinity of the Sun. We also report here the progress on new and planned radio instruments and their importance for heliospheric studies. Contributors to this report are Carine Briand, Yoichiro Hanaoka, Eduard Kontar, David Lario, Ingrid Mann, John D. Richardson.

  1. Solar wind and motion of dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J; Pastor, P; Komar, L

    2009-01-01

    Action of solar wind on arbitrarily shaped interplanetary dust particle is investigated. The final relativistically covariant equation of motion of the particle contains both orbital evolution and change of particle's mass. Non-radial solar wind velocity vector is also included. The covariant equation of motion reduces to the Poynting-Robertson effect in the limiting case when spherical particle is treated, the speed of the incident solar wind corpuscles tends to the speed of light and the corpuscles spread radially from the Sun. The results of quantum mechanics have to be incorporated into the physical considerations, in order to obtain the limiting case. The condition for the solar wind effect on motion of spherical interplanetary dust particle is $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ $=$ (1 $-$ $\\sigma'_{pr} / \\sigma'_{tot}$) $\\vec{p}'_{in}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{in}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle; $\\sigma'_{pr}$ and $\\sigm...

  2. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  3. Prototype detector development for measurement of high altitude Martian dust using a future orbiter platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Patel, Darshil; Chokhawala, Vimmi; Bogavelly, Anvesh

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils mostly occur during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer on Mars and play a key role in the background dust opacity. Due to continuous bombardment of micrometeorites, secondary ejecta come out from the Moons of the Mars and can easily escape. This phenomenon can contribute dust around the Moons and therefore, also around the Mars. Similar to the Moons of the Earth, the surfaces of the Martian Moons get charged and cause the dust levitation to occur, adding to the possible dust source. Also, interplanetary dust particles may be able to reach the Mars and contribute further. It is hypothesized that the high altitude Martian dust could be in the form of a ring or tori around the Mars. However, no such rings have been detected to the present day. Typically, width and height of the dust torus is ~5 Mars radii wide (~16950 km) in both the planes as reported in the literature. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, a langmuir probe cannot explain the source of such dust particles. It is a puzzling question to the space scientist how dust has reached to such high altitudes. A dedicated dust instrument on future Mars orbiter may be helpful to address such issues. To study origin, abundance, distribution and seasonal variation of Martian dust, a Mars Orbit Dust Experiment (MODEX) is proposed. In order to measure the Martian dust from a future orbiter, design of a prototype of an impact ionization dust detector has been initiated at PRL. This paper presents developmental aspects of the prototype dust detector and initial results. The further work is underway.

  4. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  5. On the electric charge of interplanetary grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, J. P. J.

    The importance of surface effects on grain charging in the interplanetary plasma is considered. It is shown by numerical calculations that the photoemission and the thermoemission of electrons can govern the charge and reverse it at radial distances of a few solar radii. Properties relative to the calculations, such as solar wind in high speed streams, are illustrated, and the electric potential reached by the grains versus radial distance is plotted. It is found that electrical potential reaches saturation-like values at large distances from the sun, that electric photoemission weakens the negative potential at small radial distances and renders the potential positive at large distances, and that thermoemission prevents grain disruption. Further laboratory measurements and theoretical models of surface effects are necessary to continue studies.

  6. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  7. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm-1, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  8. Trailblazing Medicine Sustaining Explorers During Interplanetary Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2011-01-01

    To prepare for the day when astronauts leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploration missions, space medicine experts must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways of mitigating them. To gain a complete understanding of the effects of space on the human body and to create tools and technologies required for successful exploration, space medicince will become an increasingly collaborative discipline incorporating the skills of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. Trailblazing Medicine examines the future of space medicine in relation to human space exploration; describes what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, including the use of surgical robots, surface-based telemedicine, and remote emergency care; discusses bioethical problems such as euthanasia, sex, and precautionary surgery; investigates the medical challenges faced by interplanetary astronauts; details the process of human hibernation.

  9. A new method to generate dust with astrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J F; van Breugel, W; Bringa, E M; Graham, G A; Remington, B A; Taylor, E A; Tielens, A G

    2010-04-21

    In interstellar and interplanetary space, the size distribution and composition of dust grains play an important role. For example, dust grains determine optical and ultraviolet extinction levels in astronomical observations, dominate the cooling rate of our Galaxy, and sets the thermal balance and radiative cooling rates in molecular clouds, which are the birth place of stars. Dust grains are also a source of damage and failure to space hardware and thus present a hazard to space flight. To model the size distribution and composition of dust grains, and their effect in the above scenarios, it is vital to understand the mechanism of dust-shock interaction. We demonstrate a new experiment which employs a laser to subject dust grains to pressure spikes similar to those of colliding astrophysical dust, and which accelerates the grains to astrophysical velocities. The new method generates much larger data sets than earlier methods; we show how large quantities (thousands) of grains are accelerated at once, rather than accelerating individual grains, as is the case of earlier methods using electric fields.

  10. Anhydrous proton conducting composite membranes containing Nafion and triazole modified POSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of membrane electrolytes having reasonable proton conductivity and mechanical strength under anhydrous conditions is of great importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells operated at elevated temperature. With the introduction of triazole modified polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (Tz-POSS) into Nafion membrane, the formed composite electrolytes exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to pristine Nafion membrane due to the well distribution of Tz-POSS inside the membrane. The anhydrous proton conductivity of the formed composite membranes increases initially with the increase in temperature, reaching about 0.02 Scm−1 at 140 °C. With further increase in temperature to about 150 °C, the composite membrane reaches its glass transition point above which the proton conductivity decreases dramatically. The performance of assembled single cell from composite membrane is slightly dependent on humidification conditions at 95 °C, reaching 0.45 V at 600 mAcm−2 using hydrogen and oxygen as reaction gases

  11. Using microkinetic analysis to search for novel anhydrous formaldehyde production catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Han-Jung; Lausche, Adam C.; Peterson, Andrew A.;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Direct dehydrogenation of methanol to produce anhydrous formaldehyde is investigated using periodic density functional theory (DFT) and combining the microkinetic model to estimate rates and selectivities on stepped (211) surfaces under a desired reaction condition. Binding energies of...... production due to higher rate for CH2O dehydrogenation than CH2O desorption. The selectivities toward CH2O production on Zn, Cu, and Ag surfaces are located on the boundary between the high and low selectivity regions. To find suitable catalysts for anhydrous CH2O production, a large number of A3B......-type transition metal alloys are screened based on their predicted rates and selectivities, as well as their estimated stabilities and prices. We finally propose several promising candidates for the dehydrogenation of CH3OH....

  12. Synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 via a mild hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Justin B.; Yeon, Jeongho; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 has been previously attempted by transforming precursor compounds, such as the peroxide (K2Ti(O2)F4), hydrate (K2TiOF4·H2O) and fluoride (K2TiF6). Due to the large structural differences between these precursors and the anhydrous oxyfluorides, however, these preparations have been unsuccessful. Therefore, a direct method of synthesis has been employed to grow single crystals of K2TiOF4 that were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. K2TiOF4 was found to be isostructural with the previously known K2VOF4.

  13. Anhydrous proton-conducting glass membranes doped with ionic liquid for intermediate-temperature fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Homogeneous [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass electrolyte membranes are prepared. ► The conductivity of the hybrid glass membrane exceeds 10−2 S cm−1 in the temperature range of 120–220 °C. ► After annealing at 120 °C for 180 h, no decrease in conductivity can be observed. - Abstract: Proton-conducting glass membranes based on SiO2 monoliths and a protic ionic liquid (diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, [dema][TfO]) as the anhydrous proton conductor were studied. The [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass membranes were prepared via a sol–gel process. The stability and ionic conductivity of the glass membrane were investigated. The [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass monoliths exhibit very high anhydrous ionic conductivities that exceed 10−2 S cm−1 at 120–220 °C.

  14. Studies on anhydrous proton conducting membranes based on imidazole derivatives and sulfonated polyimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anhydrous proton conducting membranes based on sulfonated polyimide (sPI) and imidazole derivatives were prepared. The acid-base composite membranes show a good chemical oxidation stability and high thermal stability. The addition of imidazole derivatives in sPIs can improve the chemical oxidation stability of the composite membranes enormously, and even much better than that of pure sPI. The proton conductivity of a typical sPI/xUI(2-undecylimidazole) composite membrane can reach 10-3 S cm-1 at 180 deg. C under the anhydrous condition. The proton conductivity of the acid-base composite membranes increases significantly with increasing content of UI. Moreover, UI in sPI/xUI composite membrane is difficult to be brought out by the vapor due to the existence of long hydrophobic moiety, which will improve the stability and lifetime of the membranes in the fuel cells

  15. Preparation and characteristic research of anhydrous magnesium chloride with dehydrated ammonium carnallite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ning-bo; CHEN Bai-zhen; HE Xin-kuai; LI Yi-bing

    2006-01-01

    Taking the saline lake bischofite and NH4Cl that was removed with the ammonia method and continuwas synthesized. And then the ammonium carnallite was dehydrated to some extent at 160℃ for 4 h. Ammonium carnallite reacted with ammonia at 240℃ for 150 min and the ammonation ammonium carnallite was produced. Finally, the ammonation ammonium carnallite was calcined at 750℃ into anhydrous magnesium chloride containing only 0.1% (mass fraction) of MgO. On the other hand, dehydrated ammonium carnallite was mixed with the solid ammonium chloride at mass ratio 1:4 at high temperature and with the differential pressure of HN3 above 30.5 kPa. The dehydrated ammonium carnallite of mixture was dehydrated at 410℃, and then calcined at 700℃ into anhydrous magnesium chloride with only 0. 087% (mass fraction) of MgO. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy analysis results prove that anhydrous magnesium chloride obtained by both methods hasn't mixed phases, the particle is large and even has good dispersion, which is suitable for preparation of metal magnesium in the electrolysis.

  16. Preparation of anhydrous magnesium chloride in a gas-solid reaction with ammonium carnallite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ningbo; Chen Baizhen; He Xinkuai; Li Yibing

    2006-01-01

    Dehydrated ammonium carnallite was synthesized with bischofite from salt lake and ammonium chloride solution in a 1:1 molar ratio of MgCl2:NH4Cl,dehydrated at 160℃ for about 4 h.The yield was above 85%.The product was then mixed with solid-state ammonium chloride with a 1:4 mass ratio for the further dehydration at 410℃.The decomposition of NH4Cl made a pressure of NH3 at 30.5 kPa to prevent the hydrolysis of ammonium carnallite.The anhydration of magnesium chloride was achieved at 700℃.The results showed that anhydrous magnesium chloride contains magnesium oxide in an amount that was less than 0.1% by weight.XRD pattern and SEM micrograph showed a good dispersion of ammonium carnallite and anhydrous magnesium chloride crystals with well-distributed big grains,just enough to meet the need for the production of magnesium metal in the electrolysis process.

  17. Use of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in extending the shelf-life of anhydrous cow milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Ruby; Tokas, Jayanti; Seth, Raman

    2016-05-15

    Oxidative rancidity in anhydrous cow milk fat leads to reduction in its shelf life. Use of synthetic antioxidants is prevalent in dairy industry to prevent the development of rancidity. Keeping in view the increasing demand for natural additives, the present study was carried out to explore the potential of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in anhydrous cow milk fat. Lycopene at five different levels (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150ppm) and butylated hydroxyl anisole (200ppm), were incorporated in anhydrous cow milk fat. Potential of lycopene extract to enhance the shelf life of anhydrous cow milk fat was evaluated by measuring Free Fatty Acids, peroxide value, Thiobarbituric Acid value and color value during 12months of storage at ambient conditions (30°C). Lycopene significantly (p<0.05) prevented the development of oxidative rancidity. Lycopene containing samples scored significantly higher in terms of sensory attributes as compared to control. PMID:26776006

  18. LiAISON: Linked, Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new navigation technique known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) may be used to propel the benefits of GPS to new orbits,...

  19. Radar Characterization of the Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new modeling effort that will make substantial refinements and improvements to our existing models of the interplanetary meteoroid environment near...

  20. Multi-Purpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altius Space Machines and MSNW LLC propose the development of a cubesat-scale Multipurpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS), to provide cubesats...

  1. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  2. Lipase-catalyzed process in an anhydrous medium with enzyme reutilization to produce biodiesel with low acid value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azócar, Laura; Ciudad, Gustavo; Heipieper, Hermann J; Muñoz, Robinson; Navia, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    One major problem in the lipase-catalyzed production of biodiesel or fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) is the high acidity of the product, mainly caused by water presence, which produces parallel hydrolysis and esterification reactions instead of transesterification to FAME. Therefore, the use of reaction medium in absence of water (anhydrous medium) was investigated in a lipase-catalyzed process to improve FAME yield and final product quality. FAME production catalyzed by Novozym 435 was carried out using waste frying oil (WFO) as raw material, methanol as acyl acceptor, and 3Å molecular sieves to extract the water. The anhydrous conditions allowed the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) from feedstock at the initial reaction time. However, after the initial esterification process, water absence avoided the consecutives reactions of hydrolysis and esterification, producing FAME mainly by transesterification. Using this anhydrous medium, a decreasing in both the acid value and the diglycerides content in the product were observed, simultaneously improving FAME yield. Enzyme reuse in the anhydrous medium was also studied. The use of the moderate polar solvent tert-butanol as a co-solvent led to a stable catalysis using Novozym 435 even after 17 successive cycles of FAME production under anhydrous conditions. These results indicate that a lipase-catalyzed process in an anhydrous medium coupled with enzyme reuse would be suitable for biodiesel production, promoting the use of oils of different origin as raw materials. PMID:21889401

  3. Space dust and debris; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission B (Meetings B2, B3, and B5) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J. (Editor); Zarnecki, J. C. (Editor); Matson, D. L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on space dust and debris encompasses orbital debris, in situ measurements and laboratory analysis of space-dust particles, comparative studies of comets, asteroids, and dust, the protection and maneuvering of spacecraft in space-debris environments, and the out-of-elliptic distribution of interplanetary dust derived from near-earth flux. Specific issues addressed include asteroid taxonomy, the optical properties of dust from cometary and interplanetary grains, light scattering by rough surfaces on asteroidal/lunar regoliths, and the first results of particulate impacts and foil perforations on the Long Duration Exposure Facility. Also addressed are collision probability and spacecraft disposition in the geostationary orbit, a flash on the moon caused by orbital debris, the limits of population growth in low earth orbit due to collisional cascading, and the simulation of cosmic man-made dust effects on space-vehicle elements in rocket and laboratory experiments.

  4. On fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubčan, V.; Tóth, J.; Yano, H.

    2002-10-01

    A possible fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space inferred from grouping of particles in meteor streams is discussed. There is a conviction maintained by many observers that meteors within the streams are observed to be clustered in pairs or larger groups more frequently than one could expect from random distribution. The rate of dispersive effects indicates that the lifetime of any such a group of meteoroids is very limited. Therefore, if real, the pairs or groups must be due to recent fragmentation of larger meteoroids. Analyses based on visual observations of meteor streams lead to contradictory results. More conclusive are analyses based on radio measurements, which present a negative result concerning the permanent meteor showers with the stream structures at their middle and late evolutionary stages, and an indication of a positive result for younger dense stream structures of recent origin. Analysis of the 1969 Leonid display obtained by the Springhill high-power radar shows that about 10% of the population around the shower maximum is associated in close groups, within a distance up to of about 10 km and confined to an effective stream width comparable to the diameter of the Earth. The recent Leonid returns with the storm in 1999 provided a possibility to verify a non-random grouping of particles within this young filament of the stream. The analysis and results based on TV observations of the storm are presented and discussed.

  5. Radioisotopic heater units warm an interplanetary spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe, which were successfully launched on October 15, 1997, constitute NASA's last grand-scale interplanetary mission of this century. The mission, which consists of a four-year, close-up study of Saturn and its moons, begins in July 2004 with Cassini's 60 orbits of Saturn and about 33 fly-bys of the large moon Titan. The Huygens probe will descend and land on Titan. Investigations will include Saturn's atmosphere, its rings and its magnetosphere. The atmosphere and surface of Titan and other icy moons also will be characterized. Because of the great distance of Saturn from the sun, some of the instruments and equipment on both the orbiter and the probe require external heaters to maintain their temperature within normal operating ranges. These requirements are met by Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) designed, fabricated and safety tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. An improved gas tungsten arc welding procedure lowered costs and decreased processing time for heat units for the Cassini spacecraft

  6. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fa st forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, here after IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30$^o$ in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger...

  7. Toxicity of lunar dust

    OpenAIRE

    Linnarsson, Dag; Carpenter, James; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L.; Loftus, David J.; Prisk, G. Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M.; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowle...

  8. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2012-04-01

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  9. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  10. Counter Data of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer aboard the Cassini spacecraft and possible "dust clouds" at Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Khalisi, Emil; Grün, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    We present the impact rates of dust particles recorded by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The "dust counters" evaluate the quality of an impact and give rise to the apparent density of dust particles in space. The raw data is pre-selected and refined to a new structure that serves to a better investigation of densities, flows, and properties of interplanetary dust grains. Our data is corrected for the dead time of the instrument and corresponds to an assumed Kepler orbit (pointing of the sensitive area). The processed data are published on the website for the Magnetosphere and Plasma Science (MAPSview), where it can be correlated with other Cassini instruments. A sample is presented for the Titan flyby on DOY 250/2006. We find that the dust density peaks at two times, at least, in a void region between Titan and Rhea. Such features may point to extended clouds of small particles drifting slowly in space. These density clouds seem to be stable for as long as several months or few ...

  11. Solar and interplanetary ions near earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplanetary medium is host to a variety of plasma phenomena. Decades of ground-based measurements, and a quarter century of satellite observations, have aided in identifying the signatures of distinct plasma acceleration mechanisms. For example, particle-producing solar flares show up most dramatically as a large increase in the flux of 1-50 MeV protons, with similar enhancements for other ionic species and for electrons. This region of the plasma spectrum is examined in great detail for both individual and group characteristics of flare-accelerated ion populations. Data for this study come from the Charged Particle Measurement Experiment (CPME) aboard the Earth-orbiting IMP 7 and IMP 8 satellites. Solid state detectors measure protons, alpha particles, and Z > 2 nuclei over a series of kinetic energy passbands. Detailed analysis of the raw data allows us to construct approximate differential energy spectra for protons (0.5-200 MeV), alphas (1.0-32. MeV/nuc), and medium (CNO) nuclei (1.0-4.0 MeV/nuc). Using an array of satellite and ground-based monitoring data in conjunction with CPME data, particle-producing flares occurring between September 1972 and June 1978 have been identified. Event-averaged spectra and abundance ratios are studied for statistical trends. Among the results: (1) The average proton spectrum tends to be harder for flares with larger total proton output. Alphas and medium nuclei do not show this trend. (2) Crossplots of event proton flux vs. alpha flux at equal energy per nucleon demonstrate that, while the main trend shows a slight increase of P/α with event size, there is a distinct group of flares which have unusually large P/α ratios

  12. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  13. Quasi-stationary States of Dust Flows Under Poynting-Robertson Drag New Analytical and Numerical Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkavyi, N N; Mather, J C; Taidakova, T

    1997-01-01

    The effect of solar or stellar radiation on dust particles' trajectories (the Poynting-Robertson drag) has been studied by a number of authors and applied to interplanetary dust dynamics in numerical computations. Meanwhile some important features of dust flows can be studied analytically by implementing our novel hydrodynamical approach to use the continuity equation written in the particle's orbital elements as coordinates (Gor'kavyi, Ozernoy, & Mather 1997). By employing this approach and integrating the continuity equation, we are able to find two integrals of motion when the Poynting-Robertson drag dominates the dissipative forces in the dust flow. These integrals of motion enable us to explore basic characteristics of dust flows from any sources in the Solar system (such as asteroids, comets, Kuiper belt, etc.) or in another planetary system. In particular, we have reproduced the classical solution $n(r)\\propto r^{-1}$ that approximately represents the overall distribution of dust in the Solar syste...

  14. Optimizing the efficiency of anhydrous ethanol purification via regenerable molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A renewable molecular sieves equipped system can mass-produce anhydrous ethanol. • Response surface methodology used to optimize recovery molecular sieve parameters. • The power consuming of the system can be equivalent to the extractive distillation. • The purified process can simplify manipulation and reduce environmental pollution. - Abstract: In response to the global energy development trend and greenhouse effects, bio-energy applications are gradually being taken seriously. Gasohol is an alternative fuel that consists of anhydrous ethanol (purity 99.3 wt% or higher) blended with gasoline, which produces less air pollution than standard car fuels. A system was constructed for bio-ethanol production from molasses feedstock. The molasses was fermented and then distilled using a distillation tower, producing up to 90 wt% ethanol concentration. This sample was further concentrated using 3A-type molecular sieves to adsorb water from the ethanol samples until saturated. The sieves were then regenerated for reuse via continuous heating by high-temperature nitrogen. The response surface methodology was applied to determine an optimized operational model for regeneration of molecular sieves. The results indicate that the cost of molecular sieve regeneration (unit energy yield was 0.283 L/kW h) which can stand comparison with other purify methods. The optimal parameters were at a temperature of 193 °C and a heating time of 7 h. 40 min. The results also demonstrated that a yield of 60 L anhydrous ethanol required energy consumption of 212.1 kW h

  15. Detection of anhydrous hydrochloric acid, HCl, in IRC+10216 with the Herschel SPIRE and PACS spectrometers

    OpenAIRE

    Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Barlow, M.J.; Agundez, M.; Royer, P.; Wesson, R.; Polehampton, E.T.; Beck, E; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Daniel, F; De Meester, W.; Exter, K. M.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Gear, W. K.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the detection of anhydrous hydrochloric acid (hydrogen chlorine, HCl) in the carbon-rich star IRC+10216 using the spectroscopic facilities onboard the Herschel satellite. Lines from J=1-0 up to J=7-6 have been detected. From the observed intensities, we conclude that HCl is produced in the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelope with an abundance relative to H2 of 5x10^-8 and extends until the molecules reach its photodissociation zone. Upper limits to the column densities...

  16. On the intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; 10.1063/1.2711429

    2009-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behaviour has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field.

  17. Interplanetary magnetic field effects on high latitude ionospheric convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the electric field and the electric current in the ionosphere can be established on the basis of a system of mathematical and physical equations provided by the equations of current continuity and Ohm's law. For this reason, much of the synthesis of electric field and plasma velocity data in the F-region is made with the aid of similar data sets derived from field-aligned current and horizontal current measurements. During the past decade, the development of a self-consistent picture of the distribution and behavior of these measurements has proceeded almost in parallel. The present paper is concerned with the picture as it applies to the electric field and plasma drift velocity and its dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. Attention is given to the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the northward interplanetary magnetic field.

  18. Conceptual Design For Interplanetary Spaceship Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    With the recently revived national interest in Lunar and Mars missions, this design study was undertaken by the author in an attempt to satisfy the long-term space exploration vision of human travel ``to the Moon, Mars, and beyond'' with a single design or family of vehicles. This paper describes a conceptual design for an interplanetary spaceship of the not-to-distant future. It is a design that is outwardly similar to the spaceship Discovery depicted in the novel ``2001 - A Space Odyssey'' and film of the same name. Like its namesake, this spaceship could one day transport a human expedition to explore the moons of Jupiter. This spaceship Discovery is a real engineering design that is capable of being implemented using technologies that are currently at or near the state-of-the-art. The ship's main propulsion and electrical power are provided by bi-modal nuclear thermal rocket engines. Configurations are presented to satisfy four basic Design Reference Missions: (1) a high-energy mission to Jupiter's moon Callisto, (2) a high-energy mission to Mars, (3) a low-energy mission to Mars, and (4) a high-energy mission to the Moon. The spaceship design includes dual, strap-on boosters to enable the high-energy Mars and Jupiter missions. Three conceptual lander designs are presented: (1) Two types of Mars landers that utilize atmospheric and propulsive braking, and (2) a lander for Callisto or Earth's Moon that utilizes only propulsive braking. Spaceship Discovery offers many advantages for human exploration of the Solar System: (1) Nuclear propulsion enables propulsive capture and escape maneuvers at Earth and target planets, eliminating risky aero-capture maneuvers. (2) Strap-on boosters provide robust propulsive energy, enabling flexibility in mission planning, shorter transit times, expanded launch windows, and free-return abort trajectories from Mars. (3) A backup abort propulsion system enables crew aborts at multiple points in the mission. (4) Clustered NTR

  19. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  20. Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Dust Grain Charging in Space Environments: Measurements on Apollo 11 and 17 Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10- 400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approximately 0.2 to 13 microns diameters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  1. OUTWARD MOTION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES BY STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazaki, Ryo [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nomura, Hideko, E-mail: rtazaki@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in the surface layer migrate outward owing to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study we calculate the mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates, in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains, for which radiation pressure efficiency becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 μm is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are hardly transported to the outer region by stellar radiation pressure, whereas porous dust aggregates like chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles are efficiently transported to the comet formation region. Crystalline silicates are possibly transported in porous dust aggregates by stellar radiation pressure from the inner hot region to the outer cold cometary region in the protosolar nebula.

  2. OUTWARD MOTION OF POROUS DUST AGGREGATES BY STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in the surface layer migrate outward owing to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study we calculate the mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates, in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains, for which radiation pressure efficiency becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 μm is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions are hardly transported to the outer region by stellar radiation pressure, whereas porous dust aggregates like chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles are efficiently transported to the comet formation region. Crystalline silicates are possibly transported in porous dust aggregates by stellar radiation pressure from the inner hot region to the outer cold cometary region in the protosolar nebula

  3. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  4. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  5. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-06-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyze zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring components based on the AKARI far-IR maps. In the maps, ± 1.4°, ± 2.1°, and ± 10° asteroidal dust-band structures are detected in the 65 μm and 90 μm bands. A possible ± 17° band may also have been detected. No evident dust-band structures are identified in either the 140 μm or the 160 μm bands. By subtracting the dust-band templates constructed in this paper, we can achieve a similar level of flux calibration of the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps in the |β| 40°.

  6. Time of flight mass spectra of ions in plasmas produced by hypervelocity impacts of organic and mineralogical microparticles on a cosmic dust analyser

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsworthy, B. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M J; Armes, S. P.; M. A. Khan; Lascelles, S. F.; Green, S.F.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Srama, R.; Bigger, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    The ionic plasma produced by a hypervelocity particle impact can be analysed to determine compositional information for the original particle by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such methods have been adopted on interplanetary dust detectors to perform in-situ analyses of encountered grains, for example, the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA). In order to more fully understand the data returned by such instruments, it is necessary to study their response to impacts in the laboratory....

  7. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  8. X-ray crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Philip-Kunio; Ogawa, Yu; Sawada, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Tadahisa; Wada, Masahisa

    2016-07-01

    We determined the crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution, using X-ray fiber diffraction data extending to 1.17 Å resolution. The unit cell [a = 8.129(7) Å, b = 8.347(6) Å, c = 10.311(7) Å, space group P21 21 21 ] of anhydrous chitosan contains two chains having one glucosamine residue in the asymmetric unit with the primary hydroxyl group in the gt conformation, that could be directly located in the Fourier omit map. The molecular arrangement of chitosan is very similar to the corner chains of cellulose II implying similar intermolecular hydrogen bonding between O6 and the amine nitrogen atom, and an intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond from O3 to O5 and O6. In addition to the classical hydrogen bonds, all the aliphatic hydrogens were involved in one or two weak hydrogen bonds, mostly helping to stabilize cohesion between antiparallel chains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 361-368, 2016. PMID:26930586

  9. Activity and dynamics of an enzyme, pig liver esterase, in near-anhydrous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Murielle [ORNL; Kurkal-Siebert, V [University of Heidelberg; Dunn, Rachel V. [University of Manchester, UK; Tehei, M [University of Waikato, New Zealand; Finney, J.L. [University College, London; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Daniel, R. M. [University of Waikato, New Zealand

    2010-10-01

    Water is widely assumed to be essential for life, although the exact molecular basis of this requirement is unclear. Water facilitates protein motions, and although enzyme activity has been demonstrated at low hydrations in organic solvents, such nonaqueous solvents may allow the necessary motions for catalysis. To examine enzyme function in the absence of solvation and bypass diffusional constraints we have tested the ability of an enzyme, pig liver esterase, to catalyze alcoholysis as an anhydrous powder, in a reaction system of defined water content and where the substrates and products are gaseous. At hydrations of 3 ( 2) molecules of water per molecule of enzyme, activity is several orders-of-magnitude greater than nonenzymatic catalysis. Neutron spectroscopy indicates that the fast ( nanosecond) global anharmonic dynamics of the anhydrous functional enzyme are suppressed. This indicates that neither hydration water nor fast anharmonic dynamics are required for catalysis by this enzyme, implying that one of the biological requirements of water may lie with its role as a diffusion medium rather than any of its more specific properties.

  10. Quasi-anhydrous proton conducting di-ureasil hybrid electrolytes incorporating a protic ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Quasi-anhydrous proton conducting sol-gel derived hybrid electrolytes were developed. • The electrolytes synthesized contain N-ethylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate. • The proton conductivity of the materials suggests applications in fuel cells. - Abstract: A wide range of concentrations of the [EIm][TfO] proton ionic liquid (PIL) were for the first time incorporated into a poly(oxyethyelene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid host matrix (d-U(2000)) belonging to the di-ureasil family. The synthesis procedure adopted, involving the lowest amount of water possible, resulted in the formation of essentially anhydrous electrolytes at certain PIL levels. The optimized sample d-U(2000)/[EIm][TfO]50 (where 50 represents the ratio in % of the mass of [EIm][TfO] per mass of POE precursor) is amorphous, thermally stable up to 200 °C, displays good mechanical properties and exhibits an ionic conductivity of 3.2×10-4 and 4.3×10-3 S cm-1 at 20 and 186 °C, respectively. These features have persisted for more than three years. These new electrolytes appear quite attractive for applications in fuel cells operating under non-humidified conditions

  11. Structural and Theoretical Investigation of Anhydrous 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S Carvalho

    Full Text Available A comprehensive investigation of anhydrous form of 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic acid (TABA is reported. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, Thermal analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and DFT calculations were applied for TABA characterization. This anhydrous phase crystallizes in the triclinic [Formula: see text] space group (Z' = 1 and its packing shows a supramolecular motif in a classical [Formula: see text] ring formed by acid-acid groups association. The phase stability is accounted in terms of supramolecular architecture and its thermal behaviour. Conformation search at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p level of theory shows the existence of three stable conformers and the most stable conformation was found experimentally. The reactivity of TABA was investigated using the molecular orbital theory and molecular electrostatic potential. The calculation results were used to simulate the infrared spectrum. There is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, which allowed the assignment of the normal vibrational modes.

  12. Dusts and Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ABOUT DUSTS AND MOLDS? Tiny dust particles and mold spores can be inhaled into the lungs. Dusts that come from a living source (“organic dusts”) such as hair, bedding, hay, grain, silage, and dried urine and feces are most dangerous. ...

  13. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Vilmer, N.; Pick, M.; Schwenn, R.; Ballatore, P.; Villain, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta) and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for ass...

  14. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-01-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyse zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 $\\mu$m. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circu...

  15. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Formation and Evolution of the Trans-Neptunian Belt and Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, S I; Ipatov, Sergei I.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.

    2001-01-01

    Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) with diameter greater than 100 km currently moving in not too eccentric orbits could be formed directly by the contraction of large rarefied condensations. Along with the gravitational influence of planets, gravitational interactions of TNOs played a certain role in their orbital evolution as well. More than 20% of Earth-crossing objects could have come from the trans-Neptunian belt. TNOs and Centaurs (invisible comets mainly beyond Jupiter) could produce an important contribution to the dust content of the interplanetary dust cloud.

  17. Preparation of anhydrous TFA solution for deposition of YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realisation of superconducting thin films by MOD is possible using different precursors; among them, the most promising approach is the use of trifluoroacetates (TFAMOD). However, one of the major drawbacks of this approach is the generation of water when trifluoroacetic acid (TFAH) is used. In this case, a lengthy purification process of the solution is necessary. As an alternative, trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) has been used affording anhydrous TFA solutions without any additional purification. Anhydrous TFA solutions have allowed YBa2Cu3O7-x films to be obtained with high critical currents (Jc > 3-4 MA/cm2 at 77K, thickness 300nm)

  18. Final Reports of the Stardust ISPE: Seven Probable Interstellar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Gruen, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, (Bruce); Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.

    2014-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft carried the first spaceborne collector specifically designed to capture and return a sample of contemporary interstellar dust to terrestrial laboratories for analysis [1]. The collector was exposed to the interstellar dust stream in two periods in 2000 and 2002 with a total exposure of approximately 1.8 10(exp 6) square meters sec. Approximately 85% of the collector consisted of aerogel, and the remainder consisted of Al foils. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) was a consortiumbased effort to characterize the collection in sufficient detail to enable future investigators to make informed sample requests. Among the questions to be answered were these: How many impacts are consistent in their characteristics with interstellar dust, with interplanetary dust, and with secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft? Are the materials amorphous or crystalline? Are organics detectable? An additional goal of the ISPE was to develop or refine the techniques for preparation, analysis, and curation of these tiny samples, expected to be approximately 1 picogram or smaller, roughly three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than the samples in other small particle collections in NASA's collections - the cometary samples returned by Stardust, and the collection of Interplanetary Dust Particles collected in the stratosphere.

  19. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination II: Curating the Interstellar Dust Collector, Picokeystones, and Sources of Impact Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David R.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Gainsforth, Zack; Butterworth, Anna L.; Bastien, Ronald K.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Bechtel, Hans A.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the inherent difficulties that arise during "ground truth" characterization of the Stardust interstellar dust collector. The challenge of identifying contemporary interstellar dust impact tracks in aerogel is described within the context of background spacecraft secondaries and possible interplanetary dust particles and beta-meteoroids. In addition, the extraction of microscopic dust embedded in aerogel is technically challenging. Specifically, we provide a detailed description of the sample preparation techniques developed to address the unique goals and restrictions of the Interstellar Preliminary Exam. These sample preparation requirements and the scarcity of candidate interstellar impact tracks exacerbate the difficulties. We also illustrate the role of initial optical imaging with critically important examples, and summarize the overall processing of the collection to date.

  20. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  1. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    Blue Sun Enterprises, Inc. is creating a common deep space bus capable of a wide variety of Mars, asteroid, and comet science missions, observational missions in and near GEO, and interplanetary delivery missions. The spacecraft are modular and highly autonomous, featuring a common core and optional expansion for variable-sized science or commercial payloads. Initial spacecraft designs are targeted for Mars atmospheric science, a Phobos sample return mission, geosynchronous reconnaissance, and en-masse delivery of payloads using packetized propulsion modules. By combining design, build, and operations processes for these missions, the cost and effort for creating the bus is shared across a variety of initial missions, reducing overall costs. A CLIpSAT can be delivered to different orbits and still be able to reach interplanetary targets like Mars due to up to 14.5 km/sec of delta-V provided by its high-ISP Xenon ion thruster(s). A 6U version of the spacecraft form fits PPOD-standard deployment systems, with up to 9 km/s of delta-V. A larger 12-U (with the addition of an expansion module) enables higher overall delta-V, and has the ability to jettison the expansion module and return to the Earth-Moon system from Mars orbit with the main spacecraft. CLIpSAT utilizes radiation-hardened electronics and RF equipment, 140+ We of power at earth (60 We at Mars), a compact navigation camera that doubles as a science imager, and communications of 2000 bps from Mars to the DSN via X-band. This bus could form the cornerstone of a large number asteroid survey projects, comet intercept missions, and planetary observation missions. The TugBot architecture uses groups of CLIpSATs attached to payloads lacking innate high-delta-V propulsion. The TugBots use coordinated trajectory following by each individual spacecraft to move the payload to the desired orbit - for example, a defense asset might be moved from GEO to lunar transfer orbit in order to protect and hide it, then returned

  2. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  3. Faraday cup on board Japan's first interplanetary probe 'SAKIGAKE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday cup on board Japan's 1st interplanetary test probe 'SAKIGAKE' is described. The contents include the description of the principle of the measurement, structure of the sensor, accuracy of the measurement of bulk velocity, ion density and temperature of the solar wind plasma, data processing, and the thorough system of the experiment including telemetry allocation, status words and command system. (author)

  4. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  5. Enhanced interplanetary magnetic fields as the cause of forbush decreases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a strong correlation between neutron monitor variations and variations in the interplanetary magnetic field intensity. It is suggested that the cosmic ray intensity depressions are the result of perpendicular gradient drifts. Drift speeds were computed for a 3-dimensional magnetic field configuration associated with a representative stream and are found to be high enough to explain the observations. (orig.)

  6. An improved method of inferring interplanetary sector structure, 1905-present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Zieger, B.; Friis-Christensen, Eigil

    back to 1926, with an accuracy which is sufficient to follow the development of large-scale unipolar structures in the interplanetary medium. Furthermore, we present results indicating that it may be possible to derive sector polarity even further back in time to 1905, but with less accuracy. This is...

  7. Optical Design of Astrograph for 'Interplanetary Solar Stereoscopic Observatory'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the project of the 'Interplanetary Solar Stereoscopic Observatory' (ISSO) the astrograph with the high resolution is one of the basic tools. Optical requirements to the tool are discussed. Creation the astrograph as the three-mirror system is offered. Design variants of the scheme with all third-order aberrations correction are presented. Obscuration is considered in the obtained variants

  8. Automated interplanetary shock detection and its application to Wind observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupařová, Oksana; Maksimovic, M.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Santolík, Ondřej; Krupař, Vratislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 8 (2013), 4793–4803. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Interplanetary shocks * instruments and techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50468/abstract

  9. Effects of standard and modified gravity on interplanetary ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the impact on the two-body range by several Newtonian and non-Newtonian dynamical effects for some Earth-planet (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) pairs in view of the expected cm-level accuracy in some future planned or proposed interplanetary ranging operations (abridged).

  10. Controlled synthesis of porous anhydrous cobalt oxalate nanorods with high reversible capacity and excellent cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: One-dimensional porous anhydrous cobalt oxalate nanorods are prepared via a facile water-controlled coprecipitate method followed by thermal annealing treatment under N2 at 300 °C. The nanorods are characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. When evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the nanorods exhibit high reversible specific capacity and excellent cycling stability (924 mA h g−1 at 50 mA g−1 after 100 cycles and 709 mA h g−1 at 200 mA g−1 after 220 cycles). This remarkable electrochemical performance is attributed to the one-dimensional porous nanostructure that can provide large electrode/electrolyte contact area and short lithium-ion diffusion pathway, meanwhile reduce the volume expansion during the repeated discharge/charge process

  11. Mechanical properties of lunar materials under anhydrous, hard vacuum conditions: applications of lunar glass structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunar materials and derivatives such as glass may possess very high tensile strengths compared to equivalent materials on earth because of the absence of hydrolytic weakening processes on the moon and in the hard vacuum of free space. Hydrolyzation of Si-O bonds at crack tips or dislocations reduces the strength of silicates by about an order of magnitude in earth environments. However, lunar materials are extremely anhydrous and hydrolytic weakening will be suppressed in free space. Thus, the geomechanical properties of the moon and engineering properties of lunar silicate materials in space environments will be very different than equivalent materials under earth conditions where the action of water cannot be conveniently avoided. Possible substitution of lunar glass for structural metals in a variety of space engineering applications enhances the economic utilization of the moon. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  12. Detection of anhydrous hydrochloric acid, HCl, in IRC+10216 with the Herschel SPIRE and PACS spectrometers

    CERN Document Server

    Cernicharo, J; Barlow, M J; Agundez, M; Royer, P; Vandenbussche, B; Wesson, R; Polehampton, E T; De Beck, E; Blommaert, J A D L; Daniel, F; De Meester, W; Exter, K M; Feuchtgruber, H; Gear, W K; Goicoechea, J R; Gomez, H L; Groenewegen, M A T; Hargrave, P C; Huygen, R; Imhof, P; Ivison, R J; Jean, C; Kerschbaum, F; Leeks, S J; Lim, T L; Matsuura, M; Olofsson, G; Posch, T; Regibo, S; Savini, G; Sibthorpe, B; Swinyard, B M; Vandenbussche, B; Waelkens, C

    2010-01-01

    We report on the detection of anhydrous hydrochloric acid (hydrogen chlorine, HCl) in the carbon-rich star IRC+10216 using the spectroscopic facilities onboard the Herschel satellite. Lines from J=1-0 up to J=7-6 have been detected. From the observed intensities, we conclude that HCl is produced in the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelope with an abundance relative to H2 of 5x10^-8 and extends until the molecules reach its photodissociation zone. Upper limits to the column densities of AlH, MgH, CaH, CuH, KH, NaH, FeH, and other diatomic hydrides have also been obtained.

  13. Modelling anhydrous weight loss of wood chips during torrefaction in a pilot kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repellin, Vincent; Govin, Alexandre; Guyonnet, Rene [Department of Physico-Chemistry of Multi-Components Materials (PMMC), SPIN Research Center, Ecole des Mines de Saint Etienne (EMSE), 158, Cours Fauriel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Rolland, Matthieu [Process Developments and Engineering Division, Chemical Engineering Department, Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP-Lyon), F-69390 Vernaison (France)

    2010-05-15

    Beech and spruce chips were torrefied in a batch rotating pilot kiln. For each torrefaction the temperature curve of the moving chips bed was recorded. The anhydrous weight loss (AWL) of each torrefaction was measured. Effect of torrefaction temperature and duration on the AWL was studied. In order to optimise short time torrefaction, models that can estimate the AWL from the chips temperature curve are required. Three phenomenological models were successfully applied. They all gave good correlations between experimental and calculated AWL. These three models can be employed to optimise industrial torrefaction. However, the more complex they are, the more difficult it is to understand their physical meaning. It is thus preferable to use simple model for the industrial control of torrefaction. (author)

  14. Thermal decomposition of ammonium uranous fluoride to anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride in freon - 12 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study on the thermal decomposition of the double salt has been carried out. A range of temperature, duration, thickness of layers during heating and flow rate of gas were investigated and the physico-chemical properties of the resulting uranium tetrafluoride determined. The chemical analysis included the determination of U4, UO2 formed, UF4 assay and UO2F2 formed. The X-ray analysis confirmed the formation of anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride after heating of 0.3-cm thick ammonium uranous fluoride layer at 3500C while passing 0.05 litre min-1 Freon-12 for four hours. Emission spectrographic analysis confirmed nuclear purity of the final product

  15. Structural study and crystallography of the major compound of anhydrous cement: tri-calcium silicate; Etude structurale et cristallographie du compose majoritaire du ciment anhydre: le silicate tricalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirfontaine, M.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Anhydrous (Portland) cement is mainly composed of a synthetic material, the clinker, whose major compound is tri-calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), often referred as C{sub 3}S with the compact oxides notations, C = CaO et S = SiO{sub 2}. The polymorphism of C{sub 3}S, still not well known, is the main subject of the thesis. Various crystal structures (rhombohedral R, monoclinic M1, M2, M3 and triclinic T1, T2, T3) can be found, depending on temperature and impurities. The only known structures are T1, M1 and M3, involving large unit cells with an orientational disorder of silicate tetrahedra. The single crystal studies exhibit no clear relation between the various polymorphs. Starting from known results from literature single crystal experiments, we establish the metric and structural relations between the different structures. Averaged structures for the T1, M1 and M3 polymorphs are proposed, together with all the matrices of transformation between the unit cells. We also introduce new 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D structural units, which make easier the understanding of the structures of C{sub 3}S, with the result of a better description of the orientational disorder. The effects of impurities on the structure are discussed. In industrial clinkers, impurities stabilize mainly M1 and M3 monoclinic forms. We propose a space group (Pc) and two structural models (a superstructure and an approximate averaged structure) for the M1 form. All the models are validated on synthetic compounds (M3, M2, M1 et T1) and industrial clinkers analysed by X-Ray powder diffraction with Rietveld analysis. (author)

  16. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise. PMID:26394649

  17. Dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media: Long-term stability and reusability of immobilized Alcalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Nuijens, T.; Quaedflieg, P.J.L.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term stability and re-use of Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Cov) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were investigated. Cov can be used to synthesize dipeptides under near-anhydrous conditions in THF. Cov was incubated with and without molecular sieves (beads or powder

  18. Crystal structure of aspartame anhydrate from powder diffraction data. Structural aspects of the dehydration process of aspartame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guguta, C.; Meekes, H.L.M.; Gelder, R. de

    2006-01-01

    Aspartame has three pseudo-polymorphic forms, two hydrates and a hemi-hydrate, for which crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffraction data. This paper presents the crystal structure of the anhydrate, which was obtained by dehydrating the hemi-hydrate. The crystal structure of a

  19. Anhydrous ZnCl2: A Highly Efficient Reagent for Facile and Regioselective Conversion of Epoxides to β-Chlorohydrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Eisavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facile conversion of structurally different epoxides to the corresponding β-chlorohydrins was carried out successfully with anhydrous ZnCl2 in CH3CN. The reactions were carried out within 10-50 min to give β-chlorohydrins with perfect regioselectivity and high yields (80-97%.

  20. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission

  1. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  2. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  3. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  4. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  5. Simulation of interplanetary scintillation with SSSF and SSDF mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The sun has the biggest effect on the Earth in many ways. Observing the solar wind is an important method to study the solar-earth environment. Ground-based interplanetary scintillation observations are an effective method of monitoring solar wind speed, studying the random fluctuations of the interplanetary plasma and the structures of radio sources. Two modes of single-station observations, namely, single station-single frequency (SSSF) and single station dual-frequency (SSDF), are briefly introduced and numerically simulated in this paper. The SSSF mode are easier to carry out and has been widely used. Although the observing system and data processing system of the SSDF mode are more complicated, it can measure the solar wind speed more accurately. A new SSDF system is under construction in Miyun, NAOC (the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences), with a 50 m telescope, which will serve the Meridian Project, and this paper is devoted to preparing for this new system.

  6. The control of the magnetopause by the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the interplanetary magnetic field turns from northward to southward, the magnetopause moves in toward the Earth, the polar cusp moves equatorward, and the polar cap increases in size, as does the diameter of the magnetotail. Since particle observations show that the polar cap magnetic field is directly connected to the interplanetary magnetic field, this observation of magnetopause erosion is an unambiguous demonstration that the process of reconnection is occurring. The study of the physical processes at the magnetopause and their control by the IMF is actively being investigated on the ISEE mission. Initial results indicate that when the magnetosheath magnetic field is southward the connection takes place in a series of flux transfer events capable of transporting 1016 Mx or more per hour. (Auth.)

  7. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  8. The thickness of the interplanetary collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thicknesses of magnetic structures of the interplanetary shock waves related to the upstream solar wind plasma parameters are studied. From this study the following results have been obtained: the measured shock thickness increases for decreasing upstream proton number density and decreases for increasing proton flux energy. The shock thickness strongly depends on the ion plasma β, i.e. for higher values of the β the thickness decreases. (author)

  9. Use of Reference Frames for Interplanetary Navigation at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Michael; Jacobs, Chris; Sovers, Ojars; Moore, Angelyn; Owen, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Navigation of interplanetary spacecraft is typically based on range, Doppler, and differential interferometric measurements made by ground-based telescopes. Acquisition and interpretation of these observations requires accurate knowledge of the terrestrial reference frame and its orientation with respect to the celestial frame. Work is underway at JPL to reprocess historical VLBI and GPS data to improve realizations of the terrestrial and celestial frames. Improvements include minimal constraint alignment, improved tropospheric modeling, better orbit determination, and corrections for antenna phase center patterns.

  10. An unusual interplanetary event: encounter with a comet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of three years of both ISEE3 and Pioneer Venus interplanetary magnetic field data reveals that Venus passed through the wake of an active comet; other possible explanations seem less likely. However, no known comet was near Venus at the time of this observation. The signature in plasma and field, described here, indicates that its orbit would be prograde and inclined to the orbit of Venus. The putative comet seems to have approached Venus from above the ecliptic plane. (author)

  11. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  12. Interplanetary Alfven waves and auroral (substorm) activity: IMP 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost year of IMP 8 interplanetary magnetic field and plasma data (Days 1-312, 1979) have been examined to determine the interplanetary causes of geomagnetic AE activity. The nature of the interplanetary medium (Alfvenic or non-Alfvenic) and the B2 correlation with AE were examined over 12-hour increments throughout the study. It is found that Alfvenic wave intervals (defined as Vx-Bx cross-correlation coefficients of >0.6) are present over 60% of the time and the southward component of the Alfven waves is well correlated with AE (average peak correlation coefficient 0.62), with a median lag of 43 min. The most probable delay of AE from Bs is considerably shorter, about 20-25 min. Southward magnetic fields during non-Alfvenic intervals (Vx-Bx cross-correlation coefficients of s were variable from event to event (and at different times within the Alfven wave train), ranging from 45 min to as little as 0 min. The cause of this variable delay is somewhat surprising and is not presently well understood

  13. Structure of the solar wind inferred from interplanetary scintillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-station solar wind velocity measurements made at the University of California, San Diego by the method of interplanetary scintillations are presented. The data, taken at 73.8 MHz during the period 1972 to 1975 are used to infer the large scale structure of the solar wind and to relate it to the structure of the solar corona. The use of scintillation observations to detect flare associated disturbances out of the ecliptic is also discussed and some examples given. The crude resolution, both spatially and temporally, prevents any very strong conclusion's being made, but this shows that the available observations are consistent with theoretical models for shock geometries in the interplanetary medium. Finally, observations of the scintillation index for the radio sources 3C48, 3C144, 3C147, 3C161, 3C237, 3C273, 3C298 and 3C459 are reported. Agreement is shown between the present observations on 3C144 and previous ones made at this observatory by a different method and as far as possible, all the data are interpreted using theoretical predictions from a power law model for the interplanetary medium. Whereas there is some disagreement with previously published measurements, inferred source diameters are generally consistent with VLBI and other scintillation results

  14. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lario, D; Roelof, E C; Vinas, A -F

    2015-01-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic ($\\geq$83 keV) protons ($P_{EP}$) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field ($P_{B}$). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when $P_{EP}$ exceeds $P_{B}$ by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of the energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, $P_{EP}$ also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population ($P_{TH}$). Prolonged periods ($>$12 h) with both $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{B}$ and $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{TH}$ may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well-upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential incre...

  15. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  16. The physical and compositional properties of dust: what do we really know?

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ant

    2014-01-01

    Many things in current interstellar dust studies are taken as well understood givens by much of the community. For example, it is widely held that interstellar dust is made up of only three components, i.e., astronomical silicates, graphite and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and that our understanding of these is now complete and sufficient enough to interpret astronomical observations of dust in galaxies. To zeroth order this is a reasonable approximation. However, while these three pillars of dust modelling have been useful in advancing our understanding over the last few decades, it is now apparent that they are insufficient to explain the observed evolution of the dust properties from one region to another. Thus, it is time to abandon the three pillars approach and to seek more physically-realistic interstellar dust analogues. The analy- sis of the pre-solar grains extracted from meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and from the Stardust mission, and the interpretation of x-ray scattering and abso...

  17. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  18. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation

  19. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Anhydrous Magnesium Chloride in Organic Solvent%有机溶剂法无水氯化镁的制备与表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周宁波; 陈白珍; 何新快; 李义兵

    2005-01-01

    Ammonium carnallite was synthesized by hydrated magnesium chloride in salt lake and ammonium chloride solution. Dehydrated ammonium carnallite was dissolved in methanol under low temperature by feeding ammonia, to prepare anhydrous magnesium chloride. The results show that anhydrous magnesium chloride contains magnesium oxide in an amount less than 0.1% by weight, the yield of magnesium chloride was above 99.5%. Ammonium carnallite, ammoniation magnesium chloride and anhydrous magnesium chloride were characterized by thermoanalysis, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Interplanetary Alfven waves inducing ionospheric disturbances observed by GPS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Interplanetary Alfven waves appear in satellite data as high-amplitude, fast oscillations in the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind velocity components. The waves are more often present in high speed solar wind streams emanating from coronal holes. For a long time, these Alfven waves were not believed as able to produce geomagnetic responses due to the absence of a strong and sustained southward Bz (Bs) interplanetary magnetic field. But in 1987, Tsurutani and Gonzalez showed that these structures were responsible by intense and long-lasting auroral activity (observable through the AE index). However, these phenomena were not strong enough to produce significant ring current intensification (measured by the middle/low latitude Dst index). In this work we analyze three intervals of strong auroral activity related to interplanetary Alfven waves outside main phases of geomagnetic storms. These events occurred in the years 2002, 2003, and 2005. The ionospheric effects were observed through the vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) data from GPS receivers. Data from three GPS stations were employed in this study: Porto Alegre (POAL, Brazil, Lat. 30.1deg S, Long. 51.1deg W, Dip Lat. 20.7deg S, LT=UT-3 h), Bahia Blanca (VBCA, Argentina, Lat 38.7deg S, Long. 62.3deg W, Dip Lat. 22.4deg S, LT=UT-4 h), and Rio Grande (RIOG, Argentina, Lat. 53.6deg S, Long. 67.8deg W, Dip Lat. 43.6deg S, LT=UT-4 h). For each event three quiet days around the date were used to calculate the VTEC average and standard deviation. These values were assumed as reference for disturbed intervals comparisons. For the three selected intervals we observed VTEC increases in all the analyzed stations. The VTEC values may reach over 50% increases compared to quiet day values. Another remarkable observation is that the POAL station (the most equatorward station) always presents higher increases than the other stations. This effect is reduced as the latitude

  2. Improved Synthesis of 1,3-Diaryl-2-propen-1-one Oxime in the Presence of Anhydrous Sodium Sulfate%Improved Synthesis of 1,3-Diaryl-2-propen-1-one Oxime in the Presence of Anhydrous Sodium Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓亚; 李记太; 杜超; 宋亚丽

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one oxime via the condensation of 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in the presence of anhydrous sodium sulfate was carried out in refluxing EtOH for 2-4 h in 83%-93% yields. The significant features of the present procedure include higher yield, shorter reaction time, reduced molar ratio of hydroxylamine hydrochloride to substrate, compared to the reported literature method.

  3. Clementine Observations of the Zodiacal Light and the Dust Content of the Inner Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joseph M.; Zook, Herbert A.; Cooper, Bonnie; Sunkara, Bhaskar

    2002-01-01

    Using the Moon to occult the Sun, the Clementine spacecraft used its navigation cameras to map the inner zodiacal light at optical wavelengths over elongations of 3 approx. less than epsilon approx. less than 30 deg from the Sun. This surface brightness map is then used to infer the spatial distribution of interplanetary dust over heliocentric distances of about 10 solar radii to the orbit of Venus. The averaged ecliptic surface brightness of the zodiacal light falls off as Z(epsilon) is a member of epsilon(sup -2.45 +/- 0.05), which suggests that the dust cross-sectional density nominally falls off as sigma(r) is a member of r(sup - 1.45 +/- 0.05). The interplanetary dust also has an albedo of alpha approx. = 0.1 that is uncertain by a factor of approx. 2. Asymmetries of approx. 10% are seen in directions east-west and north-south of the Sun, and these may be due the giant planets' secular gravitational perturbations. We apply a simple model that attributes the zodiacal light as due to three dust populations having distinct inclination distributions, namely, dust from asteroids and Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) having characteristic inclinations of i approx. 7 deg, dust from Halley-type comets having i approx. 33 deg, and an isotropic cloud of dust from Oort Cloud comets. The best-fitting scenario indicates that asteroids + JFCs are the source of about 45% of the optical dust cross section seen in the ecliptic at 1 AU but that at least 89% of the dust cross section enclosed by a 1-AU-radius sphere is of a cometary origin. Each population's radial density variations can also deviate somewhat from the nominal sigma(r) is a member of r(sup -1.45). When these results are extrapolated out to the asteroid belt, we find an upper limit on the mass of the light-reflecting asteroidal dust that is equivalent to a 12-km asteroid, and a similar extrapolation of the isotropic dust cloud out to Oort Cloud distances yields a mass equivalent to a 30-km comet, although the latter

  4. Signatures of interplanetary transients behind shocks and their associated near-surface solar activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    1998-01-01

    Interplanetary transients with particular signatures different from the normal solar wind have been observed behind interplanetary shocks and also without shocks. In this paper we have selected four well-known transient interplanetary signatures, namely: magnetic clouds, helium enhancements and bidirectional electron and ion fluxes, found in the solar wind behind shocks, and undertaken a correlative study between them and the corresponding solar observations. We found that a...

  5. Signatures of interplanetary transients behind shocks and their associated near-surface solar activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    1998-01-01

    Interplanetary transients with particular signatures different from the normal solar wind have been observed behind interplanetary shocks and also without shocks. In this paper we have selected four well-known transient interplanetary signatures, namely: magnetic clouds, helium enhancements and bidirectional electron and ion fluxes, found in the solar wind behind shocks, and undertaken a correlative study between them and the corresponding solar observations. We found that although commonly d...

  6. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español Why are dust storms a concern? A dust storm is a moving ... on Human Health (US Geological Survey) Chemicals in Dust Storms Are these chemicals in MY community? Particulate Matter ...

  7. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olimpia Maria Martins; Freitas, Jennifer Tavares Jacon; Cazedey, Edith Cristina Laignier; de Araújo, Magali Benjamim; Doriguetto, Antonio Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Orbifloxacin (ORBI) is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures. PMID:27005603

  8. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Maria Martins Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbifloxacin (ORBI is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures.

  9. Towards biomimetic scaffolds: anhydrous scaffold fabrication from biodegradable amine-reactive diblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Michael; Tessmar, Jörg; Neubauer, Markus; Blaimer, Andrea; Blunk, Torsten; Göpferich, Achim; Schulz, Michaela B

    2003-11-01

    The development of biomimetic materials and their processing into three-dimensional cell carrying scaffolds is one promising tissue engineering strategy to improve cell adhesion, growth and differentiation on polymeric constructs developing mature and viable tissue. This study was concerned with the fabrication of scaffolds made from amine-reactive diblock copolymers, N-succinimidyl tartrate monoamine poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D,L-lactic acid), which are able to suppress unspecific protein adsorption and to covalently bind proteins or peptides. An appropriate technique for their processing had to be both anhydrous, to avoid hydrolysis of the active ester, and suitable for the generation of interconnected porous structures. Attempts to fabricate scaffolds utilizing hard paraffin microparticles as hexane-extractable porogens failed. Consequently, a technique was developed involving lipid microparticles, which served as biocompatible porogens on which the scaffold forming polymer was precipitated in the porogen extraction media (n-hexane). Porogen melting during the extraction and polymer precipitation step led to an interconnected network of pores. Suitable lipid mixtures and their melting points, extraction conditions (temperature and time) and a low-toxic polymer solvent system were determined for their use in processing diblock copolymers of different molecular weights (22 and 42 kDa) into highly porous off-the-shelf cell carriers ready for easy surface modification towards biomimetic scaffolds. Insulin was employed to demonstrate the principal of instant protein coupling to a prefabricated scaffold. PMID:12922156

  10. Preparation and characterization of 1,6 anhydrous Β-D-Glucopyranose from starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prepare 2-deoxi-2-fluoride-D-glucosa (2FDG) in an inert form there are several synthesis methods, but the more interesting one for our study is based in a reaction from the 1,6 anhydrous, Β-D-glucopyranose (1,6AGP), in an attempt to compare the labelling efficiency rate of 2FDG with F-18, which is highly used in nuclear medicine. In the present paper the attainment of starch from white potatoe, infrared analysis of this starch and fusion point are included. Also results are compared with an analytical reactive standard. The process of preparation of 1,6AGP by pyrolysis of starch under reduced pressure, its separation and purification by crystallization and infrared characterization of 1,6AGP, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are also included. 10 kg. of potatoes were used, and 93059 g. ±5.8 of starch with an efficiency rate of 9.32 ±0.631; fusion point was 272 oC and there was a 9.83 ± 1.48 % of humidity. After the pyrolysis, crystallization an purification processes, 1.71 ±0.54 % of 1,6AGP were obtained. Later results of compound characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry were compared with a commercial product and it was proved that it corresponds to such pure compound. (Author)

  11. Preliminary evaluation of anhydrous ethanol as a solvent in the oilseed extraction of Jatropha curcas L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary evaluation was performed on anhydrous ethanol as a solvent for the extraction of oil from whole Jatropha curcas L. seeds (32.24 % lipids, 16.05 % proteins), supplied from Mato Grosso, Brazil. The methodology of factorial 2k designs was followed, which included a comparison between pressing and n-hexane extraction methods. The regression model corresponding to the comparison between ethanol and n-hexane, varying extraction time, did not have lack of fit and presented an R2 of 99%. The experimental design for the pressing method, varying press rotation speed and temperature, yielded a poorly fitted linear model. The oil composition extracted with ethanol was similar to those obtained by n-hexane and by pressing. The highest yield (36.7%) was obtained using ethanol for 4 hours. The excess of extracted material was attributed to additional solubilization of impurities that could be diminished by limiting the extraction time to 1 hour. The oil extracted with ethanol and by pressing have the same color. It is presumed that the purification steps for both oils should be similar. Further studies using mixtures of ethanol with small proportions of n-hexane are suggested. (Author) 20 refs.

  12. Taste Masking of Griseofulvin and Caffeine Anhydrous Using Kleptose Linecaps DE17 by Hot Melt Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluri, Abhishek; Popescu, Carmen; Zhou, Leon; Murthy, Reena N; Gowda, Vanaja K; Chetan Kumar, P; Pimparade, Manjeet B; Repka, Michael A; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 (KLD) in masking the unpleasant/bitter taste of therapeutic agents by hot melt extrusion (HME). Griseofulvin (GRI) and caffeine anhydrous (CA) were used as a bitter active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) model drugs. Thermogravimetric studies confirmed the stability of GRI, CA, and KLD at the employed extrusion temperatures. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed a characteristic melting endotherm of GRI at 218-220°C and CA at 230-232°C in the physical mixtures as well as in all extrudates over the period of study, indicating the crystalline nature of drug. HME of KLD was achieved only in the presence of plasticizer. Among the several plasticizers investigated, xylitol showed improved processability of KLD at 15% w/w concentration. Dissolution studies of HME extrudates using simulated salivary medium exhibited ∼threefold less release compared to physical mixture at the end of 5 min (the lesser drug release, better the taste masking efficiency). Furthermore, the results from the sensory evaluation of products in human panel demonstrated strong bitter taste in the case of physical mixture compared to the HME formulation, suggesting the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 as taste masking polymer in melt extruded form. PMID:26288942

  13. Laboratory-Scale Membrane Reactor for the Generation of Anhydrous Diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Doris; Pinho, Vagner D; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2016-07-15

    A configurationally simple and robust semibatch apparatus for the in situ on-demand generation of anhydrous solutions of diazomethane (CH2N2) avoiding distillation methods is presented. Diazomethane is produced by base-mediated decomposition of commercially available Diazald within a semipermeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing and subsequently selectively separated from the tubing into a solvent- and substrate-filled flask (tube-in-flask reactor). Reactions with CH2N2 can therefore be performed directly in the flask without dangerous and labor-intensive purification operations or exposure of the operator to CH2N2. The reactor has been employed for the methylation of carboxylic acids, the synthesis of α-chloro ketones and pyrazoles, and palladium-catalyzed cyclopropanation reactions on laboratory scale. The implementation of in-line FTIR technology allowed monitoring of the CH2N2 generation and its consumption. In addition, larger scales (1.8 g diazomethane per hour) could be obtained via parallelization (numbering up) by simply wrapping several membrane tubings into the flask. PMID:27359257

  14. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements

  15. Radioactive dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report is the second of a five part series on the technical evaluation of a number of dust monitoring instruments and the characterization of Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The data reported here pertain to an experimental study conducted under laboratory controlled conditions in a Long-Lived Radioactive Dust Test Facility (LLRDTF) designed for this purpose. This study was carried out with a twofold purpose in mind, namely, for the characterization of dust and LLRD, and for the evaluation of a variety of monitoring instruments, including cascade impactors, optical particle counters, nylon cyclones, open face filter samplers, and α-particle personal dosimeters, the latter normally used for α-particle radiation exposure purposes. Several non-radioactive and radioactive dusts were characterized. The non-radioactive dusts were SiC, Al2O3, talcum powder, corn starch and flour, while uranium tailings were used as a radioactive dust. Clear differences in instrument performance were observed for the various measurements made

  16. East - West asymmetry of interplanetary plasma disturbances propagating from the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delay of interplanetary scintillation index variations from west regions with respect to east regions of interplanetary plasma is studied. It is shown that there exists East-West asymmetry of the front configuration of interplanetary disturbances propagating from the Sun. Such asymmetry in average is about 30 deg in the Earth orbit. The most probable causes of asymmetry can be both spiral twisting of the disturbance structure directly associated with solar rotation and interaction of this disturbance with the spiral interplanetary magnetic field and, probably, with the corotating large-scale structure in the solar wind

  17. Dust torus around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Antal; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of small dust particles generated via the continuous micrometeoroid bombardment of the Martian moons. In addition to Mar's oblateness, we also consider the radiation pressure perturbation that is complicated by the planet's eccentric orbit and tilted rotational axis. Considering the production rates and the lifetimes of dust grains, we show that particles from Deimos with radii of about 15 micrometers are expected to dominate the population of a permanently present and tilted dust torus. This torus has an estimated peak number density of approximately equals 5 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm and an optical depth of approximately equals 4 x 10(exp -8).

  18. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan P.; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke;

    2016-01-01

    in water was shorter than for DOPC/SDS but still faster than the conversion seen in fed and fasted state micellar media. The conversion of CBZ anhydrate to hydrate was the slowest in the solution containing bile salt alone. In contrast, the solution-mediated phase transformations of NF did only show...... with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with...... component analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate...

  19. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  20. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  1. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  2. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  3. Geometrical Relationship Between Interplanetary Flux Ropes and Their Solar Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, K.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the physical connection between interplanetary flux ropes (IFRs) near Earth and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by comparing the magnetic field structures of IFRs and CME source regions. The analysis is based on the list of 54 pairs of ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections) and CMEs that are taken to be the most probable solar source events. We first attempted to identify the flux rope structure in each of the 54 ICMEs by fitting models with a cylinder and torus magnetic field geometry, both with a force-free field structure. This analysis determined the possible geometries of the identified flux ropes. Then we compared the flux rope geometries with the magnetic field structure of the solar source regions. We obtained the following results: (1) Flux rope structures are seen in 51 ICMEs out of the 54. The result implies that all ICMEs have an intrinsic flux rope structure, if the three exceptional cases are attributed to unfavorable observation conditions. (2) It is possible to find flux rope geometries with the main axis orientation close to the orientation of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) in the solar source regions, the differences being less than 25°. (3) The helicity sign of an IFR is strongly controlled by the location of the solar source: flux ropes with positive (negative) helicity are associated with sources in the southern (northern) hemisphere (six exceptions were found). (4) Over two-thirds of the sources in the northern hemisphere are concentrated along PILs with orientations of 45° ± 30° (measured clockwise from the east), and over two-thirds in the southern hemisphere along PILs with orientations of 135° ± 30°, both corresponding to the Hale boundaries. These results strongly support the idea that a flux rope with the main axis parallel to the PIL erupts in a CME and that the erupted flux rope propagates through the interplanetary space with its orientation maintained and is observed as an IFR.

  4. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic (≥83 keV) protons (PEP) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field (PB). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when PEP exceeds PB by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, PEP also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population (PTH). Prolonged periods (>12 hr) with both PEP > PB and PEP > PTH may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential increases of the sum PSUM = PB + PTH + PEP are observed in the immediate upstream region of the shocks regardless of individual changes in PEP, PB, and PTH, indicating a coupling between PEP and the pressure of the background medium characterized by PB and PTH. The quasi-exponential increase of PSUM implies a radial gradient ∂PSUM/∂r > 0 that is quasi-stationary in the shock frame and results in an outward force applied to the plasma upstream of the shock. This force can be maintained by the mobile energetic particles streaming upstream of the shocks that, in the most intense events, drive electric currents able to generate diamagnetic cavities and depressed solar wind density regions.

  5. Interplanetary crew exposure estimates for galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center galactic cosmic-ray transport computer code and the Computerized Anatomical Man model, initial estimates of interplanetary exposure of astronauts to galactic cosmic rays, during periods of solar minimum activity, are made for a realistic human geometry shielded by various thicknesses of spacecraft aluminum shielding. Conventional dose assessment in terms of total absorbed dose and dose equivalent is made for the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow. Included in the analyses are separate evaluations of the contributions from the incident primary ions, from subsequent-generation fragmentation products, and from target fragments. In all cases considered, the equivalent sphere approximation yielded conservative overestimates for the actual organ exposures.

  6. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves

  7. GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 μm in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

  8. IR-based Water Quantification in Nominally Anhydrous High-Pressure Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Müller, Monika; Rhede, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine traces of OH and H2O in minerals and glasses. The application is based on the Beer Lambert law A = ɛ*c*t, where A is the absorbance, ɛ the absorption coefficient, e.g. in L mol H2O-1 cm-2, c the concentration in mol/L and t the thickness in cm. It has been shown in numerous experimental and theoretical studies, i.e. Paterson (1982) and Libowitzky and Rossman (1997) that ɛ generally increases with decreasing wavenumbers. However, this general trend seems to be valid only for hydrous minerals and glasses and should not be applied to water quantification in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) which incorporate traces of water in their structures (e.g. Rossman 2006, Thomas et al. 2009). For example, Bell et al. (2003) showed that if the general IR calibration of Paterson (1982) is adopted, the water concentration of olivine is underestimated by about 25 %. A similar result has been obtained by Deon et al. (2010) for Mg-wadsleyite. Thomas et al. (2009) evidenced using a large variety of analytical methods that not using mineral-specific IR-calibrations for the OH quantification in NAMs (e.g. SiO2 polymorphs and olivine) leads to either underestimation as for olivine or overestimation of the water content as for stishovite and coesite. Thus, to quantify the water content of NAMs mineral specific absorption coefficients are needed but unfortunately only for a few minerals available. In this study we propose that within a polymorphic mineral series of the same composition ɛ positively correlates with the density and negatively with the molar volume of the respective mineral phase. To prove this hypothesis we determined ɛ-values for synthetic hydrous ringwoodite samples ranging in composition from xMg = 0.0 to 0.6 by combining results of FTIR-spectroscopy with those of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The ɛ-values plot well below the general calibration curves of Paterson (1982) and Libowitzky and Rossman (1997

  9. Rapid Preliminary Design of Interplanetary Trajectories Using the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    This set of tutorial slides is an introduction to the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's autonomous tool for preliminary design of interplanetary missions. This slide set covers the basics of creating and post-processing simple interplanetary missions in EMTG using both high-thrust chemical and low-thrust electric propulsion along with a variety of operational constraints.

  10. Influence of interplanetary trajectory selection on Mars atmospheric entry velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and Earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles could limit the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis of aerobraking Mars missions, many opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO). These opportunities result from varying the initial launch date and the encounter dates and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper demonstrates this technique by using three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival (6.0-8.5, 6.4-8.1, and 7.2-7.3 km/s), unconstrained Mars entry velocities, and an Earth return entry velocity below 14 km/s. The results indicate that, by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum IMLEO mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 yr studied.

  11. Magnetic field-line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Qiang; Krucker, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field-line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. (2011) based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux-rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the differen...

  12. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  13. Potential Cislunar and Interplanetary Proving Ground Excursion Trajectory Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Strange, Nathan J.; Burke, Laura M.; MacDonald, Mark A.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Landau, Damon F.; Lantoine, Gregory; Hack, Kurt J.; Lopez, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been investigating potential translunar excursion concepts to take place in the 2020s that would be used to test and demonstrate long duration life support and other systems needed for eventual Mars missions in the 2030s. These potential trajectory concepts could be conducted in the proving ground, a region of cislunar and near-Earth interplanetary space where international space agencies could cooperate to develop the technologies needed for interplanetary spaceflight. Enabled by high power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) technologies, the excursion trajectory concepts studied are grouped into three classes of increasing distance from the Earth and increasing technical difficulty: the first class of excursion trajectory concepts would represent a 90-120 day round trip trajectory with abort to Earth options throughout the entire length, the second class would be a 180-210 day round trip trajectory with periods in which aborts would not be available, and the third would be a 300-400 day round trip trajectory without aborts for most of the length of the trip. This paper provides a top-level summary of the trajectory and mission design of representative example missions of these three classes of excursion trajectory concepts.

  14. Effect of Interplanetary Transients on Cosmic Ray Anisotropic Variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the present work the cosmic ray intensity data recorded with ground-based neutron monitor at Deep River has investigated taking into account the associated interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma data during 1981-1994. A large number of days having abnormally high/low amplitudes for successive number of five or more days as compared to annual average amplitude of diurnal anisotropy have been taken as high/low amplitude anisotropic wave train events (HAE/LAE). The amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy of these events is found to increase on the days of magnetic cloud as compared to the days prior to the event and it found to decrease during the later period of the event as the cloud passes the Earth. The High-Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS) do not play any significant role in causing these types of events. The interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) are also effective in producing cosmic ray decreases. Hα solar flares have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for HAEs,whereas PMSs have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for LAEs.The source responsible for these unusual anisotropic wave trains in CR has been proposed.

  15. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  16. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin; Li, Gang; Wang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Hot channel (HC) is a high temperature ($\\sim$10 MK) structure in the inner corona revealed first by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory}. Eruption of HC is often associated with flare and coronal mass ejection. Previous studies suggest that HC is a good proxy of magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona, in addition to another well-known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure that is with a normal coronal temperature ($\\sim$1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, $\\sim$1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary coronal mass ejection induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R$_\\odot$, and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar win...

  17. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (∼10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (∼1–2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ∼1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ȯ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  18. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh Kumar; M. P. Yadav; Amita Raizada

    2008-03-01

    The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron monitor, solar geophysical and interplanetary data during the period 1978–99. Further, the duration of recovery phase has been observed to be greater than the duration of main phase in most of the cases of MGS. It has further been noted that Ap-index increases on sudden storm commencement (SSC) day than its previous day value and acquires maximum value on the day of maximum solar activity. Generally, the decrease in cosmic ray (CR) intensity and Dst begins few hours earlier than the occurrence of MGS at Earth. Furthermore, negative Bz pointing southward plays a key causal role in the occurrence of MGS and the magnitude and the duration of Bz and Bav also play a significant role in the development of MGS. The solar features H, X-ray solar flares and active prominences and disappearing filaments (APDFs) which have occurred within lower helio-latitudinal/helio-longitudinal zones produce larger number of MGS. Solar flares seem to be the major cause for producing MGS.

  19. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  20. Astrobiology studies of microorganisms in simulated interplanetary and planetary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    For laboratory studies on the responses of resistant life forms to simulated interplanetary space conditions, testbeds are available that simulate the parameters of space, such as vacuum, solar electromagnetic and cosmic ionizing radiation, temperature extremes and reduced gravity that can be applied separately, or in selected combinations. Appropriate biological test systems are extremophiles, i.e. microorganisms that are adapted to grow, or survive in extreme conditions of our biosphere. Examples are airborne microbes, epilithic, endolithic or endoevaporitic microbial communities, or bacterial endospores. Such studies contribute to answer several questions pertinent to astrobiology, such as (i) the role of solar UV radiation in genetic stability, (ii) the role of gravity in basic biological functions, (iii) the probability and limits for interplanetary transfer of life, (iv) strategies of adaptation to environmental extremes, and (v) the needs for planetary protection. In addition, studies on the responses of extremophile microbial communities to simulated planetary surface and subsurface conditions are an essential prerequisite in preparation of space missions to Mars, icy moons or asteroids, searching for signature of life.

  1. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallows, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Forte, B.; Ulich, Th.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Mann, G.; Vocks, C.

    2016-09-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan et al. presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of nightside IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2 s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To check this assumption, this Letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of nightside IPS using LOFAR, with solar wind speeds consistent with a slow solar wind stream in one observation and a coronal mass ejection expected to be observed in another.

  2. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Fallows, R A; Forte, B; Ulich, Th; Konovalenko, A A; Mann, G; Vocks, C

    2016-01-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan {\\it et al} (2015) presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of night-side IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2\\,s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To verify or otherwise this assumption, this letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of night-side IPS using LOFAR, w...

  3. Density Fluctuations Upstream and Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitňa, A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Goncharov, O.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks as typical large-scale disturbances arising from processes such as stream-stream interactions or Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) launching play a significant role in the energy redistribution, dissipation, particle heating, acceleration, etc. They can change the properties of the turbulent cascade on shorter scales. We focus on changes of the level and spectral properties of ion flux fluctuations upstream and downstream of fast forward oblique shocks. Although the fluctuation level increases by an order of magnitude across the shock, the spectral slope in the magnetohydrodynamic range is conserved. The frequency spectra upstream of IP shocks are the same as those in the solar wind (if not spoiled by foreshock waves). The spectral slopes downstream are roughly proportional to the corresponding slopes upstream, suggesting that the properties of the turbulent cascade are conserved across the shock thus, the shock does not destroy the shape of the spectrum as turbulence passes through it. Frequency spectra downstream of IP shocks often exhibit “an exponential decay” in the ion kinetic range that was earlier reported at electron scales in the solar wind or at ion scales in the interstellar medium. We suggest that the exponential shape of ion flux spectra in this range is caused by stronger damping of the fluctuations in the downstream region.

  4. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  5. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  6. Positive and negative sudden impulses caused by fast forward and reverse interplanetary shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrioli, Vania Fatima; Savian, Jairo Francisco, E-mail: vaniafatima@gmail.com, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br [Space Science Laboratory of Santa Maria - LACESM/CT - UFSM, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Centro Tecnologico, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Echer, Ezequiel, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br [National Institute for Space Research - INPE - MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br [Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRSPE/INPE - MCT, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Fast forward interplanetary shocks (FFS) are characterized by positive jump in all interplanetary plasma parameters (solar wind speed, temperature and density) and interplanetary magnetic field. However the fast reverse interplanetary shocks (FRS) are characterized by negative jump in all mentioned parameters except solar wind speed. Observations show that FFS cause positive sudden impulses (SI) while FRS cause negative SI in the H-component of the geomagnetic field. In this work we investigate the SI caused by interplanetary shocks. We use the observed plasma parameters, upstream and downstream, to calculate the variation of dynamic pressure. We observe that the SI amplitude is larger for positive SI than for negative ones, as a consequence of the fact that FFS have larger dynamic pressure variations as compared to FRS. (author)

  7. Nano dust impacts on spacecraft and boom antenna charging

    CERN Document Server

    Pantellini, Filippo; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    High rate sampling detectors measuring the potential difference between the main body and boom antennas of interplanetary spacecraft have been shown to be efficient means to measure the voltage pulses induced by nano dust impacts on the spacecraft body itself (see Meyer-Vernet et al, Solar Phys. 256, 463 (2009)). However, rough estimates of the free charge liberated in post impact expanding plasma cloud indicate that the cloud's own internal electrostatic field is too weak to account for measured pulses as the ones from the TDS instrument on the STEREO spacecraft frequently exceeding 0.1 V/m$. In this paper we argue that the detected pulses are not a direct measure of the potential structure of the plasma cloud, but are rather the consequence of a transitional interruption of the photoelectron return current towards the portion of the antenna located within the expanding cloud.

  8. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered. PMID:184524

  9. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  10. Analysis of the contact graph routing algorithm: Bounding interplanetary paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrane, Edward; Burleigh, Scott; Kasch, Niels

    2012-06-01

    Interplanetary communication networks comprise orbiters, deep-space relays, and stations on planetary surfaces. These networks must overcome node mobility, constrained resources, and significant propagation delays. Opportunities for wireless contact rely on calculating transmit and receive opportunities, but the Euclidean-distance diameter of these networks (measured in light-seconds and light-minutes) precludes node discovery and contact negotiation. Propagation delay may be larger than the line-of-sight contact between nodes. For example, Mars and Earth orbiters may be separated by up to 20.8 min of signal propagation time. Such spacecraft may never share line-of-sight, but may uni-directionally communicate if one orbiter knows the other's future position. The Contact Graph Routing (CGR) approach is a family of algorithms presented to solve the messaging problem of interplanetary communications. These algorithms exploit networks where nodes exhibit deterministic mobility. For CGR, mobility and bandwidth information is pre-configured throughout the network allowing nodes to construct transmit opportunities. Once constructed, routing algorithms operate on this contact graph to build an efficient path through the network. The interpretation of the contact graph, and the construction of a bounded approximate path, is critically important for adoption in operational systems. Brute force approaches, while effective in small networks, are computationally expensive and will not scale. Methods of inferring cycles or other librations within the graph are difficult to detect and will guide the practical implementation of any routing algorithm. This paper presents a mathematical analysis of a multi-destination contact graph algorithm (MD-CGR), demonstrates that it is NP-complete, and proposes realistic constraints that make the problem solvable in polynomial time, as is the case with the originally proposed CGR algorithm. An analysis of path construction to complement hop

  11. Dust-Dust Collisional Charging and Lightning in Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Muranushi, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    We study the role of dust-dust collisional charging in protoplanetary discs. We show that dust-dust collisional charging becomes an important process in determining the charge state of dust and gas, if there is dust enhancement and/or dust is fluffy, so that dust surface area per disc volume is locally increased. We solve the charge equilibrium equations for various disc environments and dust condensation $\\eta$ (dust number density of the considered region divided by the fiducial value), using general purpose graphic processors (GPGPU) and {\\sc cuda} programming language. We found that as dust condensation $\\eta$ increases, the charge distribution experience four phases. In one of these phases the electrostatic field $E$ caused by dust migration increases as $E \\propto \\eta^4$. As a result, macroscopic electric discharge takes place typically at $\\eta = 30 \\sim 300$. We present a model that describes the charge exchange processes in the discs as an electric circuit. We estimate the total energy, intensity an...

  12. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  13. Thermal Decomposition of Anhydrous Alkali Metal Dodecaborates M2B12H12 (M = Li, Na, K)

    OpenAIRE

    Liqing He; Hai-Wen Li; Etsuo Akiba

    2015-01-01

    Metal dodecaborates M2/nB12H12 are regarded as the dehydrogenation intermediates of metal borohydrides M(BH4)n that are expected to be high density hydrogen storage materials. In this work, thermal decomposition processes of anhydrous alkali metal dodecaborates M2B12H12 (M = Li, Na, K) synthesized by sintering of MBH4 (M = Li, Na, K) and B10H14 have been systematically investigated in order to understand its role in the dehydrogenation of M(BH4)n. Thermal decomposition of M2B12H12 indicates m...

  14. Summary on Ferric Chloride Anhydrous Production%无水三氯化铁生产运行总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢峰

    2014-01-01

    In ferric chloride anhydrous production operation condition, improve the process, reduce consumption, improve operational control level, stable safety production and protecting the environment and social benefit is remarkable.%介绍了无水三氯化铁生产运行状况。通过实践改进工艺,降低消耗,提高操作控制水平,达到安全生产,环境、社会效益显著。

  15. Crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and DFT comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate, [K3(C6H5O7)] n , has been solved and refined using laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional techniques. The three unique potassium cations are 6-, 8-, and 6-coordinate (all irregular). The [KO n ] coordination polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework, with channels running parallel to the c axis. The only hydrogen bond is an intra-molecular one involving the hy-droxy group and the central carboxyl-ate group, with graph-set motif S(5). PMID:27536403

  16. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  17. A new instrument to measure charged and neutral cometary dust particles at low and high impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economon, T.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of dust particle detector, the PVDF dust detector, was designed for space missions such as the Halley Comet missions where the particle impact velocity is very high. It is demonstrated that this same PVDF detector (operating in a different mode) also has the capability of detecting dust particles having low velocity (approx. 100 m/s). This low velocity detection capability is extremely important in terms of planned missions requiring measurement of low velocity dust particles such as comet rendezvous missions. An additional detecting element (charge induction cylinder) was also developed which, when combined with a PVDF detector, yields a system which will measure the charge (magnitude and sign) carried by a cometary particle as well as the particle velocity and mass for impact velocities in the range 100 to 500 m/s. Since the cylinder-PVDF detector system has a relatively small geometry factors, an array of PVDF detectors was included having a total sensing area of 0.1 sq m for measurements in regions of space where the dust flux is expected to be low. The characteristics of the detectors in this array have been chosen to provide optimum mass sensitivity for both low-velocity cometary dust as well as high-velocity asteroid associated and interplanetary dust.

  18. Designing Complex Interplanetary Trajectories for the Global Trajectory Optimization Competitions

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Dario; Simões, Luís F; Märtens, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The design of interplanetary trajectories often involves a preliminary search for options that are later refined into one final selected trajectory. It is this broad search that, often being intractable, inspires the international event called Global Trajectory Optimization Competition. In the first part of this chapter, we introduce some fundamental problems of space flight mechanics, building blocks of any attempt to participate successfully in these competitions and we describe the use of the open source software PyKEP to assemble them into a final global solution strategy. In the second part, we formulate an instance of a multiple asteroid rendezvous problem, related to the 7th edition of the competition, and we show step by step how to build a possible solution strategy. We introduce two new techniques useful in the design of this particular mission type: the use of an asteroid phasing value and its surrogates and the efficient computation of asteroid clusters. We show how basic building blocks, sided to...

  19. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  20. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  1. Radiation shielding of spacecraft in manned interplanetary flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the interplanetary flights the crewmembers will be exposed to cosmic ray radiation with great risk for their health. The absorbed dose due to CR depends on the galactic (GCR) or solar (SCR) origin. GCRs are isotropic and relatively high in energy and deliver a dose nearly constant with time that can be reduced only by means of 'heavy' passive protection. The outer walls of the spacecraft usually shield the SCRs up to a few tens of MeV, but during some exceptional solar bursts, a great number of particles, mainly protons, are ejected at higher energies. In this case the dose delivered in a few hours by a solar burst can easily exceed 1 year cumulated dose by GCRs. The high-energy component of SCRs is quasi-directional so that a shielding system based on a superconductive magnetic lens can reduce the daily dose of SCRs to the level delivered by GCRs

  2. Modification and relaxation of turbulence behind interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Goncharov, Oleksandr; Chen, Christopher H. K.

    2016-04-01

    The solar wind is a weakly collisional super-Alfvenic expanding flow of the ejected solar plasma. This flow is highly turbulent and it plays an essential role in solar wind heating. Interplanetary shocks (IP) are an inseparable part of the solar wind and they increase the solar wind temperature via dissipation of a portion of the kinetic energy at the shock ramp. In downstream of IP shocks, turbulence is enhanced with respect to a level of upstream plasma fluctuations. We used the high cadence (31 ms) plasma measurements from the BMSW instrument on board the Spektr-R spacecraft. A unique time resolution allows us to study the transition from an inertial range of turbulence up to the scales where the kinetic effects become dominant. In this paper, we focus mainly on a relaxation of the increased level of the turbulent fluctuations showing that it takes hours for the solar wind to reach its un-shocked upstream state.

  3. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C.; Dresing, N.

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  4. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts

  5. The use of the Earth's gravitational potential for interplanetary flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, G. G.

    2007-04-01

    An efficient scheme of the use of the Earth’s gravity in interplanetary flights is suggested, which opens up new opportunities for exploration of the solar system. The scheme of the gravitational maneuver allows one to considerably reduce the spacecraft mass consumption for a flight and the time of flight. An algorithm of the gravitational maneuver is suggested that takes into account the restriction on the altitude of a planet flyby. Estimates are made of transport capabilities for delivery of a spacecraft to the orbits of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The spacecraft is based on a middle-class carrier launcher of the Soyuz type and includes chemical and electric plasma jet engines of the SPD-140 type, which use solar energy.

  6. Interplanetary sources of magnetic storms: A statistical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic storms are mainly caused by the occurrence of intense southward magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium. These fields can be formed directly either by ejection of magnetic structures from the Sun or by stream interaction processes during solar wind propagation. In the present study we...... examine 30 years of satellite measurement of the solar wind during magnetic storms, with the aim of estimating the relative importance of these two processes. We use the solar wind proton temperature relative to the temperature expected from the empirical relation to the solar wind speed T...... so. Only around 20-25% of major and large storm hours and 10-15% of medium and small storm hours are directly associated with a solar wind meeting the criteria T-p/T-exp storm hours...

  7. Interplanetary sources to magnetic storms - A statistical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic storms are mainly caused by the occurrence of intense southward magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium. These fields can be formed directly either by ejection of magnetic structures from the Sun or by stream interaction processes during solar wind propagation. In the present study we...... examine 30 years of satellite measurement of the solar wind during magnetic storms, with the aim of estimating the relative importance of these two processes. We use the solar wind proton temperature relative to the temperature expected from the empirical relation to the solar wind speed Tp/Texp, together...... around 20-25% of major and large storm hours and 10-15% of medium and small storm hours are directly associated with a solar wind meeting the criteria Tp/Texp...

  8. Time delay of interplanetary magnetic field penetration into Earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Z. J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Wan, W. X.; Yang, Y. Y.; Shen, C.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Many previous studies have demonstrated that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can control the magnetospheric dynamics. Immediate magnetospheric responses to the external IMF have been assumed for a long time. The specific processes by which IMF penetrates into magnetosphere, however, are actually unclear. Solving this issue will help to accurately interpret the time sequence of magnetospheric activities (e.g., substorm and tail plasmoids) exerted by IMF. With two carefully selected cases, we found that the penetration of IMF into magnetotail is actually delayed by 1-1.5 h, which significantly lags behind the magnetotail response to the solar wind dynamic pressure. The delayed time appears to vary with different auroral convection intensity, which may suggest that IMF penetration in the magnetotail is controlled considerably by the dayside reconnection. Several unfavorable cases demonstrate that the penetration lag time is more clearly identified when storm/substorm activities are not involved.

  9. Solar and Interplanetary Data availability for space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmer, Volker

    2012-07-01

    Multi-point space missions, such as STEREO, SDO, SOHO, ACE and Proba2, with dedicated instrumentations operating in the Sun-Earth system currently provide a huge amount of unprecedented solar and interplanetary observations. The data from these missions as well as unique other long-term datasets already established provide to date unique input resources for quantification of space weather processes and the development of reliable space weather models. In this presentation I will give an overview on the availability of these datasets to the scientific community, the tools required for access of these datasets, namely the VOs and website resources, and brief comments on their individual importance for the various fields of space weather research.

  10. Recurrent structures of the interplanetary magnetic field observed by Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdos, G.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    Since its launch in October 1990, Ulysses has provided good quality magnetic field data, practically covering the whole time interval until now. We have studied the very long time scale evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field, in particlular, we have search for recurrent disturbances in the magnetic field. The magnetic field vectors have been mapped back to the Sun along Parker spirals, in order to determine the Heliographic longitude of the source regions in the corona. It was found that the position of many high field sources drifts systematically relative to the corona assumed to rotate with the equatorial rotation period of the Sun. The results are compared to similar observations on the eastward drift of magnetic sectors observed after about June 1992. Changes associated with both the declining phase of the solar cycle and the latitudinal excursion of Ulysses are also discussed.

  11. The evolution of the interplanetary sector structure in 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.; Forsyth, R. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The unique vantage point of the Ulysses spacecraft throughout 1992 and the beginning of 1993, at a close to constant heliocentric distance of about 5 AU and a slowly varying heliographic latitude from 5 deg to 30 deg south is used to describe and discuss the evolution of the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field during the declining phase of the solar cycle. From the end of 1990 to the beginning of 1992 the sector structure changed from a four sector to a two sector structure, but remained constant in solar longitude. From about June-July 1992, the structure, matching the evolution in the computed coronal magnetic fields, drifted eastwards, with a recurrence period of about 28 days. This result may indicate a slower rotation rate for the dipolar component of the solar magnetic field which becomes dominant about this time in the solar cycle.

  12. Solar sail time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectory design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Ping Gong; Yun-Feng Gao; Jun-Feng Li

    2011-01-01

    The fuel consumption associated with some interplanetary transfer trajectories using chemical propulsion is not affordable.A solar sail is a method of propulsion that does not consume fuel.Transfer time is one of the most pressing problems of solar sail transfer trajectory design.This paper investigates the time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectories to a circular orbit of given inclination and radius.The optimal control law is derived from the principle of maximization.An indirect method is used to solve the optimal control problem by selecting values for the initial adjoint variables,which are normalized within a unit sphere.The conditions for the existence of the time-optimal transfer are dependent on the lightness number of the sail and the inclination and radius of the target orbit.A numerical method is used to obtain the boundary values for the time-optimal transfer trajectories.For the cases where no time-optimal transfer trajectories exist,first-order necessary conditions of the optimal control are proposed to obtain feasible solutions.The results show that the transfer time decreases as the minimum distance from the Sun decreases during the transfer duration.For a solar sail with a small lightness number,the transfer time may be evaluated analytically for a three-phase transfer trajectory.The analytical results are compared with previous results and the associated numerical results.The transfer time of the numerical result here is smaller than the transfer time from previous results and is larger than the analytical result.

  13. Search for interplanetary He II, 304-A emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A region of the sky around the antisolar direction in the earth's shadow was systematically surveyed for the first time at high sensitivity and angular resolution by the extreme ultraviolet telescope on the Apollo-Soyuz mission. The signal from the 170-620 A channel of the instrument, which is sensitive primarily to the He II, 304-A and He I, 584-A resonance lines, shows a sharp decrease in intensity as the line of sight sweeps into the shadow region. Once the line of sight is completely contained within the shadow, a small residual signal above instrumental background and independent of view direction and spacecraft position is observed. Its intensity is consistent with the expected signal from the interplanetary He I, 584-A emission measured by the 500-780 A channel of the extreme ultraviolet telescope. An upper limit at the 2sigma confidence level to a possible He II, 304-A component that can escape detection by our instrument corresponds to 0.02 R (rayleigh) (1.6 x 103 photons cm-2 sr-1) or to a column density of 109 ions cm-2 scattering at line center. This flux conceivably could be generated by a number of emission sources whose characteristics we investigate in detail. We find that the two mechanisms most likely to approach the observed limit are multiple scattering of solar radiation of He+ in the plasmasphere and resonance scattering of sunlight by interplanetary He+ produced by photoionization if interstellar neutral He. For the latter source, our upper limit can be used to set an upper limit of 109 s to the e-folding time for the decrease of the suprathermal He+ velocity toward the bulk solar wind speed, if line radiation dominates the solar continuum beyond a full line width. If the opposite is true, the upper limit becomes 107 s. These high values conflict with commonly believed theories of the underlying relaxation process

  14. Autonomous aerobraking for low-cost interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrelli, David; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Strikwerda, Thomas; Kaidy, James; Prince, Jill; Powell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aerobraking has previously been used to reduce the propellant required to deliver an orbiter to its desired final orbit. In principle, aerobraking should be possible around any target planet or moon having sufficient atmosphere to permit atmospheric drag to provide a portion of the mission ΔV, in lieu of supplying all of the required ΔV propulsively. The spacecraft is flown through the upper atmosphere of the target using multiple passes, ensuring that the dynamic pressure and thermal loads remain within the spacecraft's design parameters. NASA has successfully conducted aerobraking operations four times, once at Venus and three times at Mars. While aerobraking reduces the fuel required, it does so at the expense of time (typically 3-6 months), continuous Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage, and a large ground staff. These factors can result in aerobraking being a very expensive operational phase of the mission. However, aerobraking has matured to the point that much of the daily operation could potentially be performed autonomously onboard the spacecraft, thereby reducing the required ground support and attendant aerobraking related costs. To facilitate a lower-risk transition from ground processing to an autonomous capability, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has assembled a team of experts in aerobraking and interplanetary guidance and control to develop a high-fidelity, flight-like simulation. This simulation will be used to demonstrate the overall feasibility while exploring the potential for staff and DSN coverage reductions that autonomous aerobraking might provide. This paper reviews the various elements of autonomous aerobraking and presents an overview of the various models and algorithms that must be transformed from the current ground processing methodology to a flight-like environment. Additionally the high-fidelity flight software test bed, being developed from models used in a recent interplanetary mission, will be summarized.

  15. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our theoretical research on dust-plasma interactions has concentrated on three main areas: (a)studies of grain charging and applications; (b) waves and instabilities in weakly correlated dusty plasma with applications to space and laboratory plasmas; (c) waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  16. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  17. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  18. Dust Devil Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, C. E.; Escarguel, A.; Horton, W.; Arnas, C.; Couedel, L.; Benkadda, S.

    2013-12-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The horizontal toroidal flow and vertical velocity field are driven by the vertical temperature gradient instability of gravity waves. The critical temperature gradient is derived and the associated eigenmodes for simple models are given. The nonlinear dynamics in the vertical/horizontal flows drive the toroidal flow through a parametric decay process. Methods developed for triboelectric charging of dust are used to compute the electric polarization vector from the charging of the sand particles. Elementary comparisons are made with the data from dust devil observations and research and simulations by Farrell et al. 2004, 2006. The parameters for a proposed Dust Devil laboratory experiment at Aix-Marseille University are presented. Following R. L. Miller et al. JGR 2006 estimates are made of the overall contribution to the mid-latitude aerosol layer in the atmosphere that acts to moderate global climate temperature increases through a negative feedback loop. The problem has an analog in terms of the heating of the boron or beryllium coated steel vacuum vessel walls in tokamaks where the core plasma plays the role of the sun and has a temperature (~ 10keV ) that exceeds that of the core of the sun.

  19. Heliocentric trajectory analysis of Sun-pointing smart dust with electrochromic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.

    2016-02-01

    A smart dust is a micro spacecraft, with a characteristic side length on the order of a few millimeters, whose surface is coated with electrochromic material. Its orbital dynamics is controlled by exploiting the differential force due to the solar radiation pressure, which is obtained by modulating the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material within a range of admissible values. A significant thrust level can be reached due to the high values of area-to-mass ratio of such a spacecraft configuration. Assuming that the smart dust is designed to achieve a passive Sun-pointing attitude, the propulsive acceleration due to the solar radiation pressure lies along the Sun-spacecraft direction. The aim of this paper is to study the smart dust heliocentric dynamics in order to find a closed form, analytical solution of its trajectory when the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material can assume two values only. The problem is addressed by introducing a suitable transformation that regularizes the spacecraft motion and translates the smart-dust dynamics into that of a linear harmonic oscillator with unitary frequency, whose forcing input is a boxcar function. The solution is found using the Laplace transform method, and afterwards the problem is generalized by accounting for the degradation of the electrochromic material due to its exposition to the solar radiation. Three spacecraft configurations, corresponding to low, medium and high performance smart dusts, are finally used to quantify the potentialities of these advanced devices in an interplanetary mission scenario.

  20. Instrument study of the Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX) for a lunar lander mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Srama, Ralf; Henkel, Hartmut; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Kempf, Sascha; Wu, Yiyong; Grün, Eberhard

    2014-11-01

    One of the highest-priority issues for a future human or robotic lunar exploration is the lunar dust. This problem should be studied in depth in order to develop an environment model for a future lunar exploration. A future ESA lunar lander mission requires the measurement of dust transport phenomena above the lunar surface. Here, we describe an instrument design concept to measure slow and fast moving charged lunar dust which is based on the principle of charge induction. LDX has a low mass and measures the speed and trajectory of individual dust particles with sizes below one micrometer. Furthermore, LDX has an impact ionization target to monitor the interplanetary dust background. The sensor consists of three planes of segmented grid electrodes and each electrode is connected to an individual charge sensitive amplifier. Numerical signals were computed using the Coulomb software package. The LDX sensitive area is approximately 400 cm2. Our simulations reveal trajectory uncertainties of better than 2° with an absolute position accuracy of better than 2 mm.

  1. Performance Analysis of the Nano Dust Analyzer Under Solar UV Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, L. E.; Gruen, E.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Nano Dust Analyzer (NDA) is a linear time-of-flight mass analyzer developed to measure the distribution and elemental composition of nanometer-sized dust particles originating in the inner Heliosphere. The temporal variability of the flux and angular distribution is governed by the complex interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field within 1 AU and provides the means also to learn about solar wind conditions. As part of a heliospheric mission, measurements made by the NDA will determine the size-dependent flux of nano-dust and its variations, it will characterize the composition of nano-dust, and may determine their source processes. The nano-dust particles arrive at 1 AU approximately from the direction of the Sun, thus, the NDA is designed specifically to operate while being exposed directly to solar UV radiation. Here, we report on the performance analysis of the NDA under UV illumination. Solar UV radiation is most likely the largest source of noise for the instrument. A fraction of incident photons will scatter into the ion detector and generate background noise, reducing the instrument's sensitivity. The detailed modeling is conducted using a commercial ray-tracing program. The instrument's performance while exposed to UV radiation is optimized in terms of instrument geometry and surface materials/optical properties, and the requirements on all optical surfaces that are necessary to reduce the effect of UV to the required level are defined and presented here.

  2. Observations of interplanetary scintillation and their application to the space weather forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) method using natural radio sources can observe the solar wind near the sun and at high latitudes that have never been accessible to any spacecraft. Therefore, the IPS has been the most powerful method to observe the solar wind in three-dimensional space. Although the IPS method cannot predict when a flare will occur or when a filament will disappear, it can be used to forecast the propagation of interplanetary disturbances and to warn when they will attack the earth. Thus, the IPS method can be used to forecast recurrent interplanetary phenomena as well as transient phenomena. (author)

  3. Global dayside ionospheric uplift and enhancements due to interplanetary shock electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurutani, B. R.; Mannucci, A.; Ijima, B.; Saito, A; Yumoto, K.; M. A. Abdu; Sobral, J. H. A.; W. D. Gonzalez; F. L. Guarnieri; Tsuda, T.; Fejer, Bela G.; T. J. Fuller-Rowell; Kozyra, J. U.O.; Foster, J. C.; De Coster, A

    2004-01-01

    [1] The interplanetary shock/electric field event of 5–6 November 2001 is analyzed using ACE interplanetary data. The consequential ionospheric effects are studied using GPS receiver data from the CHAMP and SAC-C satellites and altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. Data from ∼100 ground-based GPS receivers as well as Brazilian Digisonde and Pacific sector magnetometer data are also used. The dawn-to-dusk interplanetary electric field was initially ∼33 mV/m just after the forward s...

  4. Enhancement of proton conductivity of chitosan membrane enabled by sulfonated graphene oxide under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Haoqin; Ma, Chuanming; Liu, Jindun; Cao, Shaokui; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, sulfonated graphene oxide (SGO) nanosheets with controllable sulfonic acid group loading are synthesized via the facile distillation-precipitation polymerization, and then incorporated into chitosan (CS) matrix to prepare nanohybrid membranes. The microstructure and physicochemical properties of the resulting membranes are extensively investigated. Compared with CS control and GO-filled membranes, SGO-filled membranes attain enhanced thermal and mechanical stabilities due to the strong electrostatic attractions between -SO3H of SGO and -NH2 of CS, which inhibit the mobility of CS chains. Additionally, the inhibited mobility reduces the area swellings of SGO-filled membranes, reinforcing their structural stabilities. The incorporation of SGO generates acid-base pairs along CS-SGO interface, which work as facile proton-hoping sites and thus construct continuous and wide proton transfer pathways, yielding enhanced proton conductivities under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions. Meanwhile, the conductivity can be elevated by increasing the sulfonic acid group loading and content of SGO. Particularly, incorporating 2.0% S4GO can afford the nanohybrid membrane a 122.5% increase in hydrated conductivity and a 90.7% increase in anhydrous conductivity when compared with CS control membrane. The superior conduction properties then offered a significant enhancement in H2/O2 cell performances to the nanohybrid membranes, guaranteeing them to be promising proton exchange membranes.

  5. Effects of polymorphic transformation on pharmaceutical properties of direct compressed tablets containing theophylline anhydrate bulk powder under high humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuta; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-02-01

    The effect of high humidity on the pharmaceutical properties of direct compression tablets containing theophylline anhydrate (TA) was investigated to prepare high quality pharmaceuticals. A mixed powder (230 mg) containing the TA, β-lactose anhydrate, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and magnesium stearate was compressed in a die by 8-mm diameter punches with flat surfaces at 4.8 kN. The TA tablets were stored in desiccators at 96% relative humidity and 20°C. Physicochemical properties of the tablets were measured using, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray computed tomography (XCT), the tablet hardness test and the dissolution test. The water absorption process could be divided into two stages: 1.0% absorption at for 0-6h due to absorption of MCC, and 4% absorption at 6-24h due to hydration of TA. The XRD and XCT results were supported be tablet weight changes in the initial and later stages, respectively. The relationship between tablet hardness and water absorption indicated that the first stage of absorption was more significant. In contrast, the relationship between the dissolved amount at 20 min (D20) and water absorption indicated that the first stage was less effective. The first stage of absorption was due to MCC, but the second was due to hydration of the TA bulk powder. PMID:23178204

  6. Ionic-liquid-based proton conducting membranes for anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel-cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sa; Zhou, Li; Wang, Pengjie; Zhang, Fangfang; Yu, Shuchun; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-03-12

    An ionic-liquid-doped poly(benzimidazole) (PBI) proton-conducting membrane for an anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel cell has been proposed. Compared with other ionic liquids, such as imidazole-type ionic liquids, diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([dema][TfO]) showed better electrode reaction kinetics (H2 oxidation and Cl2 reduction reaction at platinum) and was more suitable for a H2/Cl2 fuel cell. PBI polymer and [dema][TfO] were compatible with each other, and the hybrid membranes exhibited high stability and good ionic conductivity, reaching 20.73 mS cm(-1) at 160 °C. We also analyzed the proton-transfer mechanism in this ionic-liquid-based membrane and considered that both proton-hopping and diffusion mechanisms existed. In addition, this composite electrolyte worked well in a H2/Cl2 fuel cell under non-water conditions. This work would give a good path to study the novel membranes for anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel-cell application. PMID:24490850

  7. PREPARATION OF ANHYDROUS F-18 FLUORIDE, T. Tewson. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals S165; 52, Supplement 1 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewson, T.

    2009-07-01

    The original specific aims of the grant where cut back considerably as the study section reduced both the time and the budget for the project. The objective of the grant was to show that fluorine-18 fluoride could be prepared completely anhydrous and thus substantially more reactive than conventionally dried fluoride using the method of Sun and DiMagno. This method involved using conventionally dried fluoride to prepare an aromatic fluoride in which the aromatic ring is substituted with electron withdrawing groups. The aryl fluoride is then dried and purified and the fluoride is displaced with an anhydrous nucleophile. Using fluorine-19 and macroscopic scale reactions the reactions work well and give anhydrous fluoride salts that are both more reactive and more selective in their reactions than conventionally dried fluoride. The original substrate chosen for the reaction was bromopentacyanobenzene (1). This compound proved to be easy to make but very hard to purify. As an alternative hexabromobenzene, which is commercially available in high purity, was tried. This reacted cleanly with conventionally dried F-18 fluoride in acetonitrile to give [{sup 18}F]-fluoropentabromobenzene (2), which could be dried by passage of the solution over alumina, which also removed any unreacted fluoride. The fluorine-18 fluoride could be liberated from (2) by displacement with an anhydrous nucleophilic tetra-alkylammonium salt but the anion had to be chosen with considerable care. The reaction is potentially reversible especially as, on the no carrier added scale, there is inevitably an excess of hexabromobenzene and so the displacing nucleophile is chosen to deactivate the aromatic compound to further nucleophilic displacement reactions. To this end tetrabutylammonium azide and tetrabutylammonium phenolate have been tried. Both work but the phenolate is probably the better choice. The F-18 fluoride produced by this process is substantially more reactive than conventionally dried

  8. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  9. Plutos interaction with its space environment: Solar Wind, Energetic Particles & Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Bagenal, F; McComas, D J; McNutt,, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) observations suggested ions are accelerated and-or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes about one tenth the flux in the interplanetary medium, increasing with distance downstream. The Student Dust Counter, which measures radius greater than 1.4 um grains, detected 1 candidate impact from 5days before to 5 days after closest approach, indicating an upper limit for the dust density in the Pluto system of 4.6 per cubic km.

  10. Phase Transitions in a Capacitively Coupled Dusty Plasma with Conducting Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2011-10-01

    Complex plasma is present in a variety of environments including planetary rings, cometary tails, interplanetary clouds and semiconductor manufacturing and fusion environments. Understanding the physics behind such complex plasmas, particularly those comprised of conducting dust, is not well understood. In this work, a GEC reference cell is employed to examine the translational and orientational order of conducting dust contained within crystal lattice structures formed in a complex plasma. The Pair Correlation function, bond orientation function and Voronoi and polygon construction diagrams are used to measure dislocations and disclinations, yielding a quantitative measure of the overall phase of the structure. The role this phase transition process plays in the melting of conducting and non-conducting 2D structures will be discussed.

  11. Dust arising during steelmaking processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Popielska-Ostrowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper describes the dust arising during steelmaking processes.Design/methodology/approach: Steelmaking dusts may be a viable alternative for obtaining valuable and widely used metal which is zinc. On the other hand, heavy metals, it was as dangerous to the environment, and this in turn means that development of steelmaking dusts in the best possible way.Findings: The analysis of the formation of steelmaking dust.Research limitations/implications: Understanding the mechanism of steelmaking dusts will help to increase the participation of zinc recycling from wastes.Practical implications: Contained zinc in the dust can be recovered from the positive economic effect, and neutralization of hazardous waste to the desired environmental effect.Originality/value: Description of the mechanism of steelmaking dust, with particular emphasis on the distribution of zinc. The information is very important in the development of metal recovery technology from waste.

  12. Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications allowing moving up from UHF, S or X to get higher gain for a given diameter.

  13. Research Progress of Solar Corona and Interplanetary Physics in China: 2010-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xinhua; XIANG Changqing

    2012-01-01

    The scientific objective of solar corona and interplanetary research is the understanding of the various phenomena related to solar activities and their effects on the space environments of the Earth. Great progress has been made in the study of solar corona and interplanetary physics by the Chinese space physics community during the past years. This paper will give a brief report about the latest progress of the corona and interplanetary research in China during the years of 2010--2012. The paper can be divided into the following parts: solar corona and solar wind, CME- ICME, magnetic reconnection, energetic particles, space plasma, space weather numerical modeling by 3D SIP-CESE MHD model, space weather prediction methods, and proposed missions. They constitute the abundant content of study for the complicated phenomena that originate from the solar corona, propagate in interplanetary space, and produce geomagnetic disturbances. All these progresses are acquired by the Chinese space physicists, either independently or through international collaborations.

  14. High-Efficiency Data-Rate-Scalable Laser Transmitter for Interplanetary Optical Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interplanetary missions are at the core of NASA's current space exploration program and are expected to lead the way to new resource discovery in the next decade...

  15. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vilmer

    Full Text Available The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO is then performed, starting from an estimation of the transit time of the inter-planetary perturbation from the Sun to the Earth, assumed to be achieved at a constant speed (i.e. the speed measured at 1 AU. EIT/SOHO and Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH observations are also used as proxies in this identification for the cases when LASCO observations do not allow one to firmly establish the association. The last part of the analysis concerns the identification of the solar source of the CMEs, performed using a large set of solar observations from X-ray to radio wavelengths. In the present study, this association is based on a careful examination of many data sets (EIT, NRH and H images and not on the use of catalogs and of Solar Geophysical Data reports. An association between inter-planetary disturbances and LASCO/CMEs or proxies on the disk is found for 36 interplanetary events. For 32 events, the solar source of activity can also be identified. A large proportion of cases is found to be associated with a flare signature in an active region, not excluding of course the involvement of a filament. Conclusions are finally drawn on the propagation of the disturbances in the interplanetary medium, the preferential association of disturbances detected close to the Earth’s orbit with halos or wide CMEs and the location on the solar disk of solar sources of the interplanetary disturbances during that period

  16. Differential Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Gradient with Respect to Interplanetary Current Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Christon, S. P.; Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous magnetic field and charged particle measurements from the Voyager spacecraft at heliographic latitude separations from 10° to 21 a are used to determine the latitude gradient of the galactic cosmic ray flux with respect to the interplanetary current sheet. By comparing the ratio of cosmic ray flux at Voyager 1 to that at Voyager 2 during periods when both spacecraft are first north and then south of the interplanetary current sheet, we find an estimate of the la...

  17. Dust in External Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Calzetti, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Existing (Spitzer Space Telescope) and upcoming (Herschel Space Telescope) facilities are deepening our understanding of the role of dust in tracing the energy budget and chemical evolution of galaxies. The tools we are developing while exploring the local Universe will in turn become pivotal in the interpretation of the high redshift Universe when near--future facilities (the Atacama Large Millimeter Array [ALMA], the Sub--Millimeter Array [SMA], the Large Millimeter Telescope [LMT], the Jam...

  18. PFASs in house dust

    OpenAIRE

    Nizzetto, Pernilla Bohlin; Hanssen, Linda; Herzke, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    NILU has, on behalf of the Norwegian Environment Agency, performed sampling and analysis of house dust from Norwegian households. The goal was to study concentration ranges, and variability between- and within-houses of anionic and volatile per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs), including the regulated PFOA, as well as for total extractable organic fluorine (TEOF). The sampling was done in six separate rooms in six different households. The analysis covered a suite of 20 targeted ...

  19. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  20. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  1. Interplanetary medium and geomagnetic activity after compact flare triplets 1966-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplanetary medium state and geomagnetic activity when the Earth is getting into this or that interplanetary disturbance zone after flare triplets, i.e. trains of three solar flares out of an active zone, are considered. There are the following conditionally differentiated zones in the interplanetary disturbance configuration: a forbidden (F), a perturbed (P) and a normal (N) zones of interplanetary disturbance. The interplanetary medium disturbances and geomagnetic activity after trains of three flares of class 2 and higher out of one of active zones depend on the following factors: the magnetic axis orientation of a bipolar group of active zone spots appeared after flares, time interval between the first and second flares in the train, flare intensity. The conditions of maximum disturbance occurrence pointed out. The interplanetary and geomagnetic disturbance intensity in the N zone is higher than that of the F and P zones (i.e. in the proximity of the great circle planes passing through the flares parallel with tha active zone magnetic axes), and it is higher after quasicompact rather than after compact triplets (i.e. it considerably grows when passing over the critical value of the time interval betwenn the first and second triplet flares, τ12=16 h)

  2. Achievements and Future Plan of Interplanetary CubeSats and Micro-Sats in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Ryu

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces Japanese achievements and future plans of CubeSats and Micro-Sats for deep space exploration. As the first step toward deep space mission by such tiny spacecraft, University of Tokyo and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) developed the world's first deep space micro-spacecraft PROCYON (Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation). Its mission objective is to demonstrate a micro-spacecraft bus technology for deep space exploration and proximity flyby to asteroids performing optical measurements. PROCYON was launched into the Earth departure trajectory on December 3, 2014 together with Japanese asteroid sample return mission Hayabusa-2. PROCYON successfully completed the bus system demonstration mission in its interplanetary flight. Currently, Japan is not only pursuing the improvement and utilization of the demonstrated micro-sat deep space bus system with a weight of tens of kg or more for more practical scientific deep space missions, but also trying to develop smaller spacecraft with a weight of less than tens of kg, namely CubeSats, for deep space exploration. We are proposing a self-contained 6U CubeSat mission for the rideshare opportunity on the USA's SLS EM-1 mission, which will fly to a libration orbit around Earth-Moon L2 point and perform scientific observations of the Earth and the Moon. We are also seeking the possibility of CubeSats which is carried by a larger spacecraft to the destination and supports the mission by taking advantage of its low-cost and risk-tolerable feature. As an example of such style of CubeSat missions, we are studying a CubeSat for close observations of an asteroid, which will be carried to the target asteroid by a larger mother spacecraft. This CubeSat is released from the mother spacecraft to make a close flyby for scientific observations, which is difficult to be performed by the mother spacecraft if we consider the risk of the collision to the target asteroid or dust particles ejected

  3. Applying new solar particle event models to interplanetary satellite programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in the models and methods used for single event upset (SEU) calculations in microelectronic memory devices can lead to a range of possible upset rates. In order to compare the Adams 1986 interplanetary solar flare model to a new model proposed by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL92) the authors have calculated an array of upset rates using heavy ion and proton data for selected DRAM and SRAM memories and for Actel Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). To make more general comparisons of the models the authors have produced a set of engineering curves of predicted upset rates versus hypothetical device cross-section parameters. The results show that use of this more realistic, although still conservative, JPL model can have significant benefits for satellite programs, especially those which must operate continuously during solar particle events. The benefits include more flexibility in model choice, a higher level of confidence in the environment, and potential cost savings by the calculation of less pessimistic SEU rates which allows designers to integrate commercial products into their spacecraft design with the use of Error Detection and Correction (EDAC) schemes

  4. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X-line. The electric field parallel to the X-line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X-line at a large number of points along the X-line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resisti...

  5. How are Forbush decreases related with interplanetary magnetic field enhancements ?

    CERN Document Server

    Arunbabu, K P; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Mohanty, P K; Oshima, A; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods. We use muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We select those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude > 0.25%. We use IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We look for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one hour averaged IMF. We ask if the diffusion of high energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results. The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably simil...

  6. Collaborative Wideband Compressed Signal Detection in Interplanetary Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin; Bian, Dongming; Gou, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    As the development of autonomous radio in deep space network, it is possible to actualize communication between explorers, aircrafts, rovers and satellites, e.g. from different countries, adopting different signal modes. The first mission to enforce the autonomous radio is to detect signals of the explorer autonomously without disturbing the original communication. This paper develops a collaborative wideband compressed signal detection approach for InterPlaNetary (IPN) Internet where there exist sparse active signals in the deep space environment. Compressed sensing (CS) can be utilized by exploiting the sparsity of IPN Internet communication signal, whose useful frequency support occupies only a small portion of an entirely wide spectrum. An estimate of the signal spectrum can be obtained by using reconstruction algorithms. Against deep space shadowing and channel fading, multiple satellites collaboratively sense and make a final decision according to certain fusion rule to gain spatial diversity. A couple of novel discrete cosine transform (DCT) and walsh-hadamard transform (WHT) based compressed spectrum detection methods are proposed which significantly improve the performance of spectrum recovery and signal detection. Finally, extensive simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of our proposed collaborative scheme for signal detection in IPN Internet. Compared with the conventional discrete fourier transform (DFT) based method, our DCT and WHT based methods reduce computational complexity, decrease processing time, save energy and enhance probability of detection.

  7. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  8. Extermophylic microorganisms: issue of interplanetary transfer on external spacecraft surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N.; Deshevaya, E.; Polykarpov, N.; Svistunova, Y.; Grigoriev, A.

    Interplanetary transfer of terrestrial microbes capable of surviving in extreme environments and planetary protection from accidental biocontamination by them are the issues of major practical rather than hypothetical value The natural resistance of microbes to extreme environments and a possibility of their transfer beyond geographical barriers of Earth on external spacecraft surfaces have brought forward a need in profound research into the likelihood of their survival in outer space Hardware and a program have been developed at the State Scientific Research Center of the Russian Federation -- Institute for Biomedical Problems with the goal of carrying out a space experiment Biorisk The experiment was aimed at assessing the possibility of long-term comparable with the duration of the Martian flight survival of microorganisms in outer space on materials used in space industry Samples of materials were contaminated with test cultures of bacteria Bacillus and fungi Aspergillus Penicillium Cladosporium known to be common residents of various environments on Earth and resistant to multiple alternation of high and low temperatures Materials used in the construction of external spacecraft surfaces such as steel aluminium alloy heat-insulating coating were chosen as test samples for the experiment Containers with materials and test microorganisms were placed on the external side of the Russian segment of the ISS Unique data have been accumulated after a 204 day exposure on the external side of the ISS which have proved that

  9. Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control for Interplanetary Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary design of low-thrust interplanetary missions is a highly complex process. The mission designer must choose discrete parameters such as the number of flybys, the bodies at which those flybys are performed, and in some cases the final destination. Because low-thrust trajectory design is tightly coupled with systems design, power and propulsion characteristics must be chosen as well. In addition, a time-history of control variables must be chosen which defines the trajectory. There are often many thousands, if not millions, of possible trajectories to be evaluated. The customer who commissions a trajectory design is not usually interested in a point solution, but rather the exploration of the trade space of trajectories between several different objective functions. This can be very expensive process in terms of the number of human analyst hours required. An automated approach is therefore very desirable. This work presents such an approach by posing the mission design problem as a multi-objective hybrid optimal control problem. The methods is demonstrated on hypothetical mission to the main asteroid belt and to Deimos.

  10. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness: A statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Raeder, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using Wind and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere are investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.78) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and for varied IP shock impact angle. We attribute this result, predicted previously with simulations, to the fact that frontal shocks compress the magnetosphere symmetrically from all sides, which is a favorable condition for the release of magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail, which in turn can produce moderate to strong auroral substorms, which are then observed by ground-based magnetometers.

  11. Radiation shielding of spacecraft's in manned interplanetary flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high energy protons of the Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) are by far the most dangerous for the health of the astronauts in manned flights outside the protection of the Earth magnetic field. However, since the astronauts are in any case protected by the walls of the spaceship, only protons with kinetic energy exceeding 20 MeV must be taken into consideration. They have a small dispersion around the direction of the solar wind, what makes easier the protection against their action because absorber's of adequate thickness can be located in the side of their arrival direction. The mass of the required absorber rapidly increases with the energy of the proton, and is already 1,400 kg/m2 for stopping protons of 500 MeV. It is therefore necessary to have recourse to the use of magnetic superconducting lenses for defocusing the beam of the arriving protons and protect the astronauts behind them. It is presented and discussed a scheme of toroidal lens protecting a volume of 10 m2 cross section at all energies of interest and weighing a few hundred kg. It is presented the program for developing a prototype of such a lens to be validated on board of the International Space Station and for sending an interplanetary probe for mapping the characteristics of the high energy SCR from Earth to Mars and correlating them with the solar activity phenomena

  12. The structure of plasma density irregularities in the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the scintillation of sources 3C273 and 3C279 at 2292 MHz are described. The interpretation of the scintillation in terms of the structure of the plasma-density irregularities in the interplanetary medium is discussed. Scintillation index measurements obtained during these observations are combined with similar measurements at other frequencies reported in the literature. The resulting variation of the scintillation-index and observing-frequency product with source elongation is interpreted in terms of irregularities with a spatial spectrum of electron density which is of power law form. This result is reinforced by an analysis of the spectra of the observed scintillations. Several tests are applied to both the Fourier and Bessel spectra which illustrate conclusively that the irregularity spatial spectrum is of power law form, rather than the Gaussian form suggested by some workers. The spectra also show that the irregularities are isotopic within 0.2 AU of the sun, while there is some evidence that a degree of elongation normal to the direction of the motion of the irregularities may develop at slightly greater solar distances. The irregularity velocities determined are consistent with solar wind velocities. (author)

  13. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness: A Statistical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using WIND and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere is investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.70) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and varying the IP shock impact angle. We ...

  14. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  15. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    CERN Document Server

    Alissandrakis, C E; Patsourakos, S; Kontogeorgos, A; Tsitsipis, P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which small scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. We analyze observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nan\\c cay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type IIIs. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated EUV emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. We found that the EUV events that produced IP type IIIs were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55" with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the l...

  16. An analysis of whistler waves at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Farrell, W. M.; Stone, R. G.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of whistler wave magnetic and electric field amplitude ratios from which we compute wave propagation angles and energies of electrons in resonance with the waves. To do this analysis, we compute the theoretical dependence of ratios of wave components on the whistler wave propagation angle Theta for various combinations of orthogonal wave components. Ratios of wave components that would be observed by a spinning spacecraft are determined, and the effects of arbitrary inclinations of the spacecraft to the ambient magnetic field and to the whistler wave vector are studied. This analysis clearly demonstrates that B/E, the ratio of magnetic to electric field amplitudes, cannot be assumed to be the wave index of refraction, contrary to assumptions of some earlier studies. Therefore previous interpretations of whistler wave observations based on this assumption must be reinvestigated. B/E ratios derived using three orthogonal wave components can be used to unambiguously determine Theta. Using spin plane observations alone, a significant uncertainty occurs in the determination of Theta. Nevertheless, for whistler waves observed downstream of several interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses plasma wave experiment we find that Theta is highly oblique. We suggest that the analysis of wave amplitude ratios used in conjunction with traditional stability analyses provide a promising tool for determining which particle distributions and resonances are likely to be dominant contributors to wave growth.

  17. Interplanetary cosmic ray radial gradients with steady state modulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potgieter, M.S.; Le Roux, J.A.; Burger, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have used steady state modulation models of increasing complexity, with emphasis on drift models, to establish to what extent these models can simulate the observed cosmic ray integral radial gradient (energygreater than or equal to60--70 MeV/nucleon) in the heliosphere from 1977 to 1986. Special attention has been given to the apparent asymmetric behavior of the radial gradient with respect to the recent interplanetary magnetic field polarity reversal, and the remarkable constant radial gradient for the years 1977--1982. Instead of using differential intensities at specific energies, we presented integral radial gradients calculated from the computed integral intensities which made comparison with observations more realistic. We found that nondrift models had difficulties producing constant radial gradients over several years of increasing solar activity, because these models depend primarily on changes of the radial diffusion coefficient K/sub r//sub r/ to simulate an 11-year cycle and therefore produce, in general, radial gradients symmetric with respect to solar maximum activity. Making these models independent of changes in K/sub r//sub r/ needs, in our opinion, unrealistic changes in the conventional modulation parameters.

  18. Operational Experience with Autonomous Star Trackers on ESA Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Mathias; Jauregui, Libe; Kielbassa, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Mars Express (MEX), Rosetta and Venus Express (VEX) are ESA interplanetary spacecrafts (S/C) launched in June 2003, March 2004 and November 2005, respectively. Mars Express was injected into Mars orbit end of 2003 with routine operations starting in spring 2004. Rosetta is since launch on its way to rendezvous comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. It has completed several test and commissioning activities and is performing several planetary swingbys (Earth in spring 2005, Mars in spring 2007, Earth in autumn 2007 and again two years later). Venus Express has also started routine operations since the completion of the Venus orbit insertion maneuver sequence beginning of May 2006. All three S/C are three axes stabilized with a similar attitude and orbit control system (AOCS). The attitude is estimated on board using star and rate sensors and controlled using four reaction wheels. A bipropellant reaction control system with 10N thrusters serves for wheel off loadings and attitude control in safe mode. Mars Express and Venus Express have an additional 400N engine for the planetary orbit insertion. Nominal Earth communication is accomplished through a high gain antenna. All three S/C are equipped with a redundant set of autonomous star trackers (STR) which are based on almost the same hardware. The STR software is especially adapted for the respective mission. This paper addresses several topics related to the experience gained with the STR operations on board the three S/C so far.

  19. Plasma Depletion and Mirror Waves Ahead of Interplanetary Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y; Belcher, J W; Kasper, J C; Skoug, R M

    2006-01-01

    We find that the sheath regions between fast interplanetary mass ejections (ICMEs) and their preceding shocks are often characterized by plasma depletion and mirror wave structures, analogous to planetary magnetosheaths. A case study of these signatures in the sheath of a magnetic cloud (MC) shows that a plasma depletion layer (PDL) coincides with magnetic field draping around the MC. In the same event, we observe an enhanced thermal anisotropy and plasma beta as well as anti-correlated density and magnetic fluctuations which are signatures of mirror mode waves. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of ACE and Wind plasma and magnetic field data from different classes of ICMEs to illuminate the general properties of these regions. For MCs preceded by shocks, the sheaths have a PDL with an average duration of 6 hours (corresponding to a spatial span of about 0.07 AU), a proton temperature anisotropy ${T_{\\perp p}\\over T_{\\parallel p}} \\simeq$ 1.2 - 1.3 and are marginally unstable to the mirror instability. Pl...

  20. Development of a phase-change thermal storage system using modified anhydrous sodium hydroxide for solar electric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. M.; Rice, R. E.; Rowny, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    A thermal storage system for use in solar power electricity generation was investigated analytically and experimentally. The thermal storage medium is principally anhydrous NaOH with 8% NaNO3 and 0.2% MnO2. Heat is charged into storage at 584 K and discharged from storage at 582 K by Therminol-66. Physical and thermophysical properties of the storage medium were measured. A mathematical simulation and computer program describing the operation of the system were developed. A 1/10 scale model of a system capable of storing and delivering 3.1 x 10 to the 6th power kJ of heat was designed, built, and tested. Tests included steady state charging, discharging, idling, and charge-discharge conditions simulating a solar daily cycle. Experimental data and computer-predicted results are correlated. A reference design including cost estimates of the full-size system was developed.

  1. Automatic synthesis of [11C]NKY-722 with high specific activity, using anhydrous [11C] methanol as a precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-(4-allyl-1-piperazinyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl- 4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridine dicarboxylate (NKY-722) was labeled with carbon-11 using anhydrous [11C] methanol. Using a computer controlled equipment, a few GBq of [11C] NKY-722 with the specific activity of 120 - 180 GBq/μmol could by synthesized at the radiochemical purity of > 99% in 10 ml of physiological saline containing Polysolvate-80 (1.5 vol%) and ethyl alcohol (0.75 vol%). Preliminary PET experiments using rats and a rhesus monkey have bee done, and very low accumulation of the compound into the brain, however comparatively higher accumulation in the heart were observed. (author)

  2. Encapsulating Mobile Proton Carriers into Structural Defects in Coordination Polymer Crystals: High Anhydrous Proton Conduction and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Horike, Satoshi; Itakura, Tomoya; Shinozaki, Ryota; Ogiwara, Naoki; Umeyama, Daiki; Nagarkar, Sanjog; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Hayashi, Akari; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-13

    We describe the encapsulation of mobile proton carriers into defect sites in nonporous coordination polymers (CPs). The proton carriers were encapsulated with high mobility and provided high proton conductivity at 150 °C under anhydrous conditions. The high proton conductivity and nonporous nature of the CP allowed its application as an electrolyte in a fuel cell. The defects and mobile proton carriers were investigated using solid-state NMR, XAFS, XRD, and ICP-AES/EA. On the basis of these analyses, we concluded that the defect sites provide space for mobile uncoordinated H3PO4, H2PO4(-), and H2O. These mobile carriers play a key role in expanding the proton-hopping path and promoting the mobility of protons in the coordination framework, leading to high proton conductivity and fuel cell power generation. PMID:27324658

  3. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 v has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  4. Mars atmospheric dust properties: A synthesis of Mariner 9, Viking, and PHOBOS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    We have modified a doubling-and-adding code to reanalyze the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra of Mars atmospheric dust as well as Viking IRTM EPF sequences in the 7, 9, and 20 micron channels. The code is capable of accurate emission/ absorption/scattering radiative transfer calculations over the 5-30 micron wavelength region for variable dust composition and particle size inputs, and incorporates both the Viking IRTM channel weightings and the Mariner 9 IRIS wavelength resolution for direct comparisons to these datasets. We adopt atmospheric temperature profiles according to the algorithm of Martin (1986) in the case of the Viking IRTM comparisons, and obtained Mariner 9 IRIS temperature retrievals from the 15 micron CO2 band for the case of the IRIS comparisons. We consider palagonite as the primary alternative to the montmorillonite composition of Mars atmospheric dust, based on several considerations. Palagonite absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible wavelength region due to its Fe content. Palagonite is also, in principal, consistent with the observed lack of clays on the Mars surface. Furthermore, palagonite does not display strong, structured absorption near 20 microns as does montmorillonite (in conflict with the IRIS observations). We propose that a palagonite composition with particle sizes roughly one-half that of the Toon et al. (1977) determination provide a much improved model to Mars atmospheric dust. Since palagonite is a common weathering product of terrrestrial basalts, it would not be unreasonable for palagonite to be a major surface component for Mars. The lack of even a minor component of Al-rich clays on the surface of Mars could be consistent with a palagonite composition for Mars dust if the conditions for basalt weathering on Mars were sufficiently anhydrous. Variations in palagonite composition could also lead to the inability of the modeled palagonite to fit the details of the 9 micron absorbtion indicated by the IRIS observations.

  5. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hayes, Ryan L.; Freed, Michael S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form...

  6. The physical nature of interplanetary dust as inferred by particles collected at 35 km. [morphology of micrometeorites and ablation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Bucher, W.

    1973-01-01

    Particles were collected at an altitude of 35 km by two flights of a volume sampling micrometeorite collector. The collection scheme is very sensitive and is capable of collecting a significant number of particles. Many of the particles collected have chemical compositions similar to solar or to iron meteorites. Morphology of collected particles indicates that both true micrometeorites and ablation products were collected.

  7. Use of terpene-based products, with and without anhydrous alcohol, as clearing agents in trichrome staining technique for intestinal protozoa.

    OpenAIRE

    Gubash, S M; Milburn, L

    1990-01-01

    BDH xylene substitute, a terpene-based product, and its mixture with anhydrous alcohol were found to be excellent replacements for xylene and carbol-xylene, respectively, in the trichrome staining technique applied to sodium acetate-acetic acid-Formalin-fixed fecal smears for detection of intestinal protozoa.

  8. Broadcast urea reduces N2O emissions but increases NO emissions compared with conventional and shallow-applied anhydrous ammonia in a coarse-textured soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO) fluxes from corn (Zea Mays L.) production fields under contrasting fertilizer regimes is essential for identifying ways of mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Despite the importance of anhydrous ammonia (AA) and urea as N fert...

  9. Dust Heating in Nearby Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Lingjie

    2013-01-01

    Dust is an important part of the interstellar medium (ISM). Dust absorbs ultravioletand optical star light and re-emits in the mid- and far-infrared light. More than onethird of the total star light in the universe is absorbed and re-emitted by dust.Observations show that dust emission is strongly correlated with star formationrates. Recent research with Herschel Space Observatory data has shown that dustemission at ≥ 250 µm appears to be heated by the total stellar population ratherthan just...

  10. Atmospheric entry survival and the possibility of stratospheric collection of modern interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George J.

    1997-03-01

    Taylor et al. (1996) detected the ion trails of dust particles, estimated to range from 15 to 45 microns in diameter, entering the Earth's atmosphere with velocities of about 100 km/s. Since this velocity significantly exceeds the solar system escape velocity, these particles were identified as interstellar. Taylor et al. observed a seasonal peak in the detected flux, and interpreted this peak to indicate the time of year when the Earth, in its heliocentric orbit, is moving directly towards a stream of incoming interstellar dust, increasing the geocentric velocity of the particles so that particles as small as 15 to 45 microns in diameter produce micrometeors detectable by Taylor et al.'s radar system. Six months later, when the Earth's heliocentric motion is directly opposite the direction of the interstellar flux, the atmospheric entry velocity of these interstellar grains will be reduced by twice the Earth's orbital velocity, and, instead of producing ion trails, some of these interstellar grains may enter the Earth's atmosphere without melting or vaporizing. Those interstellar grains which enter the atmosphere without melting will settle into the Earth's stratosphere in the same manner as the interplanetary dust particles, which are routinely collected by NASA stratospheric sampling aircraft. Thus, interstellar dust particles in the 5-20 micron size range may be present on the NASA stratospheric collection surfaces flown during the favorable collection season.

  11. Signatures of interplanetary transients behind shocks and their associated near-surface solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bravo

    Full Text Available Interplanetary transients with particular signatures different from the normal solar wind have been observed behind interplanetary shocks and also without shocks. In this paper we have selected four well-known transient interplanetary signatures, namely: magnetic clouds, helium enhancements and bidirectional electron and ion fluxes, found in the solar wind behind shocks, and undertaken a correlative study between them and the corresponding solar observations. We found that although commonly different signatures appear in a single interplanetary transient event, they are not necessarily simultaneous, that is, they may belong to different plasma regions within the ejecta, which suggests that they may be generated by complex processes involving the ejection of plasma from different solar regions. We also found that more than 90% of these signatures correspond to cases when an Hα flare and/or the eruption of a filament occurred near solar central meridian between 1 and 4 days before the observation of the disturbance at 1 AU, the highest association being with flares taking place between 2 and 3 days before. The majority of the Hα flares were also accompanied by soft X-ray events. We also studied the longitudinal distribution of the associated solar events and found that between 80% and 90% of the interplanetary ejecta were associated with solar events within a longitudinal band of ±30° from the solar central meridian. An east-west asymmetry in the associated solar events seems to exist for some of the signatures. We also look for coronal holes adjacent to the site of the explosive event and find that they were present almost in every case.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics · Interplanetary shocks · Solar wind plasma · Solar physics · Flares and mass ejections

  12. Characteristics of the dust trail of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: an application of the IMEX model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, R. H.; Sommer, M.; Herzog, J.; Agarwal, J.; Rodmann, J.; Srama, R.; Vaubaillon, J.; Strub, P.; Hornig, A.; Bausch, L.; Grün, E.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Here we describe a new model of the dust streams of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that has been developed using the Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment for Exploration (IMEX). This is a new universal model for recently created cometary meteoroid streams in the inner solar system. Aims: The model can be used to investigate characteristics of cometary trails: here we describe the model and apply it to the trail of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to develop our understanding of the trail and assess the reliability of the model. Methods: Our IMEX model provides trajectories for a large number of dust particles released from ~400 short-period comets. We use this to generate optical depth profiles of the dust trail of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and compare these to Spitzer observations of the trail of this comet from 2004 and 2006. Results: We find that our model can match the observed trails if we use very low ejection velocities, a differential size distribution index of α ≈ -3.7, and a dust production rate of 300-500 kg s-1 at perihelion. The trail is dominated by mm-sized particles and can contain a large proportion of dust produced before the most recent apparition. We demonstrate the strength of IMEX in providing time-resolved histories of meteoroid streams. We find that the passage of Mars through the stream in 2062 creates visible gaps. This indicates the utility of this model in providing insight into the dynamical evolution of streams and trails, as well as impact hazard assessment for spacecraft on interplanetary missions. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Impact of Mars sand on dust on the design of space suits and life support equipment: A technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    Space suits and life support equipment will come in intimate contact with Martian soil as aerosols, wind blown particles and material thrown up by men and equipment on the Martian surface. For purposes of this discussion the soil is assumed to consist of a mixture of cominuted feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz, titanomagnetite and other anhydrous and hydrous iron bearing oxides, clay minerals, scapolite and water soluble chlorides and sulfates. The soil may have photoactivated surfaces that acts as a strong oxidizer with behavior similar to hydrogen peroxide. The existing data about the Mars soil suggests that the dust and sand will require designs analogous to those uses on equipment exposed to salty air and blowing sand and dust. The major design challenges are in developing high performance radiators which can be cleaned after each EVA without degradation, designing seals that are readily cleaned and possibly in selecting materials which will not be degraded by any strong oxidants in the soil. The magnitude of the dust filtration challenge needs careful evaluation in terms of the trade off between fine-particle dust filters with low pressure drop that are either physically large and heavy, like filter baghouses require frequent replacement of filter elements, of low volume high pressure thus power consumption approaches, or washable filters. In the latter, filter elements are cleaned with water, as could the outsides of the space suits in the airlock.

  14. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ariel F.

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic “fluffy” surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons. PMID:27258088

  15. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  16. Interplanetary Laser Ranging. Analysis for Implementation in Planetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the motion of natural (and artificial) bodies in the solar system provide key input on their interior structre and properties. Currently, the most accurate measurements of solar system dynamics are performed using radiometric tracking systems on planetary missions, providing range measurement with an accuracy in the order of 1 m. Laser ranging to Earth-orbiting satellites equipped with laser retroreflectors provides range data with (sub-)cm accuracy. Extending this technology to planetary missions, however, requires the use of an active space segment equipped with a laser detector and transmitter (for a two-way system). The feasibility of such measurements have been demonstrated at planetary distances, and used operationally (with a one-way system) for the Lunar Reconaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. The topic of this dissertation is the analysis of the application of interplanetary laser ranging (ILR) to improve the science return from next-generation space missions, with a focus on planetary science objectives. We have simulated laser ranging data for a variety of mission and system architectures, analyzing the influence of both model and measurement uncertainties. Our simulations show that the single-shot measurement precision is relatively inconsequential compared to the systematic range errors, providing a strong rationale for the consistent use of single-photon signal-intensity operation. We find that great advances in planetary geodesy (tidal, rotational characteristics, etc.) could be achieved by ILR. However, the laser data should be accompanied by commensurate improvements in other measurements and data analysis models to maximize the system's science return. The science return from laser ranging data will be especially strong for planetary landers, with a radio system remaining the preferred choice for many orbiter missions. Furthermore, we conclude that the science case for a one-way laser ranging is relatively weak compared to next

  17. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulations of broadband fluctuations near interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of a theoretical study of evolution of a spectrum of finite amplitude right-hand elliptically polarized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The analysis includes use of one-and-a-half-dimensional solutions of the equations that describe compressible MHD together with one-and-a-half-dimensional hybrid simulation of the phenomenon. The motivation of the study is to understand the origin and properties of finite amplitude waves often observed in the vicinity of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. The solutions of the MHD equations are compared with both the results of the hybrid simulations and observations previously reported by Vinas et al. in the vicinity of a quasi-parallel interplanetary shock. The initial conditions of the MHD solutions were constructed to model the observed spectrum of magnetic and velocity fluctuations; plasma parameters were also chosen to replicate the observed parameters. For the typical parameters of β = 0.5, σB/B0 = 0.25 and a spectrum of parallel propagating, circularly polarized dispersive waves, initially the density and magnetic energy density correlations grow due to the (nonlinear) ponderomotive effect. The spectral features below the ion cyclotron frequency are established quickly on the Alfvenic timescale but then persist and match closely the observed fluctuations. The parametric decay instabilities that subsequently appear further enhance the density fluctuations and produce a high-frequency magnetic power spectrum consistent with the spacecraft observation. The MHD and hybrid simulations extend the previous picture of wave generation by a beam-driven ion cyclotron instability to the fully nonlinear stage. 64 refs., 24 figs

  19. Eastward deflection of fast coronal mass ejecta in interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has shown that a bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux is one of the more prominent signatures of a coronal mass ejection event in the solar wind at 1 AU. Using ISEE 3 solar wind electron measurements obtained during 1978 and 1979, we have used this signature to identify the fast coronal mass ejecta driving 19 interplanetary shocks. In 17 of the 19 shock events an eastward deflection of the ejection plasma (apparent arrival from west of the sun) was observed. The average eastward deflection for all of the events was ∼30, corresponding to a typical transverse velocity of ∼25 km/s. Usually an oppositely directed (i.e., westward) flow deflection of comparable magnitude was observed within the compressed ambient plasma ahead of the ejecta. The sense of these deflections: first westward within the compressed ambient plasma and then eastward within the ejecta: is the same as is observed near the leading edges of quasi-stationary, corotating high speed streams. However, in contrast to the case of corotating streams, the west-east flow reversal does not coincide with a local maximum in static pressure. No consistent flow deflection pattern perpendicular to the ecliptic has been observed for these events, and no similar deflections have been observed for ejecta (bidirectional electron heat flux events) traveling at the same speed as or slower than the ambient plasma ahead. We suggest that the preferred eastward deflection of these fast coronal mass ejecta is a consequence of solar rotation and the spiral geometry of the ambient solar wind. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  20. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  1. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  2. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  3. Radionuclides in house dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  4. 75 FR 32142 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... combustible dust in the workplace. (74 FR 54334, Oct. 21, 2009). OSHA plans to use the information received in... Secretary's Order 5-2007 (72 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, on June 1, 2010. David Michaels, Assistant... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 RIN 1218-AC41 Combustible Dust...

  5. 75 FR 10739 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... for combustible dust. (74 FR 54334, Oct. 21, 2009) II. Stakeholder Meetings OSHA conducted two... (72 FR 31160). Signed at Washington, DC, on March 2, 2010. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1910 RIN 1218-AC41 Combustible Dust...

  6. Dust particle charging in sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charging and the screening of spherical dust particles in sheaths near the wall were studied using computer simulation. The three-dimensional PIC/MCC method and molecular dynamics method were applied to describe plasma particles motion and interaction with macroscopic dust grain. Calculations were carried out at different neutral gas pressures and wall potentials. Values of the charge of the dust particles and spatial distributions of plasma parameters are obtained by modelling. The results have shown that the charge of the dust particles in the sheath, as well as the spatial distribution of the ions and electrons near the dust particles, depend strongly on the wall potential. It is shown that for large negative values of the wall potential the negative charge of a dust particle decreases due to the decline of the electron density in its vicinity. In addition, the flow of energy of the ions on the surface of dust particles is increased due to better focusing effect of the dust particle field on ions.

  7. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  8. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  9. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan; Skov, Peder; Valbjørn, Ole; Nielsen, Peter A.; Schneider, Thomas; Jørgensen, Ole; Wolkoff, Peder; Wilkins, C. K.; Gravesen, Suzanne; Norn, Svend

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  10. Interplanetary magnetic field structure at Saturn inferred from nanodust measurements during the 2013 aurora campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H.-W.; Kempf, S.; Badman, S. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the solar wind and planetary magnetospheres provide important diagnostic information about the magnetospheric dynamics. The lack of monitoring of upstream solar wind conditions at the outer planets, however, restrains the overall scientific output. Here we apply a new method, using Cassini nanodust stream measurements, to derive the interplanetary magnetic field structure during the 2013 Saturn aurora campaign. Due to the complex dynamical interactions with the interplanetary magnetic field, a fraction of fast nanodust particles emerging from the Saturnian system is sent back into the magnetosphere and can be detected by a spacecraft located within. The time-dependent directionality caused by the variable interplanetary magnetic field enable these particles to probe the solar wind structure remotely. Information about the arrival time of solar wind compression regions (coupled with the heliospheric current sheet crossings) as well as the field direction associated with the solar wind sector structure can be inferred. Here we present a tentative identification of the interplanetary magnetic field sector structure based on Cassini nanodust and radio emission measurements during the 2013 Saturn aurora campaign. Our results show that, the interplanetary magnetic field near Saturn during 2013-080 to 176 was consistent with a two-sector structure. The intensifications of aurora and the radio emission on 2013-095, 112 and 140 coincide with the IMF sector boundaries, indicating that the encounter of the compressed solar wind is the main cause of the observed activities.

  11. Bi-dust acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Valdeblanquez, E. [Universidad del Zulia, facultad de Ingenieria, Apartado 4011-A 526, Maracaibo, Edo. Zulia (Venezuela)

    2006-07-01

    Low frequencies waves in plasmas with two kind of dusty grains have been studied. Each species of dust particle is characterized by the grain radius, which determines its equilibrium charge. Relative velocities between the two kinds of dust grain for the unperturbed plasma is also considered in order to study instabilities and compare with astrophysical and industrial applications. In this analysis, each dust species is handled with a simplified model of kinetic-fluid equations, and the electrons and ions are determined by Boltzmann factors. The low frequency dispersion relation for bi-dust plasma waves with non relative motion between each kind of grain leads to damped waves with two characteristic frequencies. Instabilities are produced by the relative motion between the species. The onset of these instabilities is studied as a function of the plasma dust frequencies and relative velocities among each species. (Author)

  12. Filtering of interstellar dust in the heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, V. J.

    2012-08-01

    The space between the stars is filled with gas and interstellar dust (ISD). The dust grains cause extinction of the starlight that we observe and they play an important role in the evolution of galaxies and in the formation of stellar and planetary systems. The ISD has been long observed by astronomical methods, the grains were measured by in-situ measurements of spacecraft in the solar system and even samples of interstellar material have been brought back to Earth by the Stardust mission in 2006. Many questions on the composition, morphology and size distribution of ISD still exist today which require more and improved measurements. Modeling and understanding the ISD flow through the solar system is needed to interpret these observations and to fully extract the information on ISD grains carried by these measurements. Also, the modelling is necessary for designing and optimizing future ISD missions. The modeling in this thesis follows this flow of ISD through the solar system taking into account three main forces: solar gravity, solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz forces resulting from the motion of the charged grains through the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Simulations of dust trajectories over a large range of grain parameters β and Q/m were performed. β is the ratio of solar radiation pressure force to gravity and depends on the grain size, morphology and material. Q/m is the charge to mass ratio. The influence of solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz forces on the trajectories, densities and fluxes were systematically studied. Radiation pressure reduces gravitational attraction and can become even dominant (β > 1) for particles of about 0.2 μm radius, leading to a void region downstream from the Sun: the β -cone. The ISD flow under the influence of solar radiation pressure and gravity only is axi-symmetric, stationary and can even be calculated analytically. Lorentz force becomes stronger for smaller grains having higher Q=m and

  13. 16 Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System: I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust (ISD) penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in-situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the ISD stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses ISD data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of 'big' ISD grains [up to 10^-13kg]. The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of ISD in the very local interstellar medium. We analyse the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses ISD measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of ISD. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses ISD data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modelling of the ISD flow applied to Ulysses. We...

  14. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  15. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  16. The Martian Dust Cycle: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for Mars' current climate system. Suspended atmospheric dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, and thus greatly influences the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Evidence for the presence of dust in the Martian atmosphere can be traced back to yellow clouds telescopically observed as early as the early 19th century. The Mariner 9 orbiter arrived at Mars in November of 1971 to find a planet completely enshrouded in airborne dust. Since that time, the exchange of dust between the planet's surface and atmosphere and the role of airborne dust on Mars' weather and climate has been studied using observations and numerical models. The goal of this talk is to give an overview of the observations and to discuss the successes and challenges associated with modeling the dust cycle. Dust raising events on Mars range in size from meters to hundreds of kilometers. During some years, regional storms merge to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by tens of kelvin. The interannual variability of planet encircling dust storms is poorly understood. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. A low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading are generally observed: one peak occurs before northern winter solstice and one peak occurs after northern winter solstice. Numerical modeling studies attempting to interactively simulate the Martian dust cycle with general circulation models (GCMs) include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Two dust lifting processes are commonly represented in

  17. Dust jets produced by a dust-discharge instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report observations of an instability that occurs in a dc glow discharge (anodic plasma) dusty plasma when a floating plate with a 5 mm aperture is placed in front of the anode. The instability is characterized by periodic quenching and reignition of the discharge. When the discharge is quenched, the dust is ejected from the aperture at speeds on the order of the dust-acoustic speed. The ejected dust remains partially charged and retracts back to the aperture when the discharge spontaneously redevelops.

  18. Regular spherical dust spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, N; Matravers, D R; Humphreys, Neil; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David

    1998-01-01

    Physical (and weak) regularity conditions are used to determine and classify all the possible types of spherically symmetric dust spacetimes in general relativity. This work unifies and completes various earlier results. The junction conditions are described for general non-comoving (and non-null) surfaces, and the limits of kinematical quantities are given on all comoving surfaces where there is Darmois matching. We show that an inhomogeneous generalisation of the Kantowski-Sachs metric may be joined to the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. All the possible spacetimes are explicitly divided into four groups according to topology, including a group in which the spatial sections have the topology of a 3-torus. The recollapse conjecture (for these spacetimes) follows naturally in this approach.

  19. μ-Erda developments in order to improve the water content determination in hydrous and nominally anhydrous mantle phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bureau, H.; Khodja, H.; Aubaud, C.; Carraro, A.

    2008-04-01

    The precise knowledge of the water content in geological samples such as mantle minerals, volcanic glasses and glassy inclusions proves to be crucial information for the Earth Sciences because water has a considerable influence on physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle and crust. Among the nuclear microbeam techniques, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) has been used at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory (LPS) with a very good reliability for a long time to determine the water content of various materials. Previous ERDA measurements gave the total H content at a micrometric scale in the bulk of hydrous geologic samples. However, it was more difficult to characterize nominally anhydrous phases. Recent efforts allowed us to significantly improve the different steps of the ERDA analysis, from the sample preparation to the determination of the uncertainties of the resulting H concentration. A large series of very different geological samples has been measured: volcanic glasses and glassy inclusions, synthetic and natural nominally anhydrous minerals. Our new sample preparation protocol limited the thickness of the surface layer of H-pollution, leading to an easier differentiation of the bulk contribution. Simultaneous PIXE and RBS measurements allow the precise location of the interesting areas and also give information on the chemical characterization of the investigated samples, with respect to the major and minor elements. The processing of the list-mode acquisition files is made using the RISMIN software, allowing among other interesting features to check the absence of water loss under the beam. We will present the results of the H-content measurements and show the good agreement between our present results and those obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for the same set of samples. The detection limit was measured on a dehydrated natural San Carlos olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) equal to 130 wt ppm H2O (15 wt ppm H

  20. Solar cycle study of interplanetary Lyman-alpha variations - Pioneer Venus Orbiter sky background results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PVO observations of the interplanetary Ly-alpha (IPL) background, obtained over an entire solar cycle (SC) from 1979 to 1985, are compiled and analyzed statistically, along with data from other instruments and earlier solar cycles. The results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include SC variation of 1.8 for the longitudinally averaged IPL intensity (in agreement with the variation of the 27-d disk-averaged integrated solar Ly-alpha flux), yearly averaged ecliptic H-atom lifetime at 1 AU equal to 1.0 Ms at solar minimum and 1.5 Ms at solar maximum, interplanetary H density equal to 0.07 + or - 0.01/cu cm, and interplanetary H/He within the heliopause but far from the sun of 7 + or - 3. 74 references

  1. Interplanetary shocks and the resulting geomagnetically induced currents at the equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Pradipta, R.; Halford, A. J.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2015-08-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by interplanetary shocks represent a serious space weather threat to modern technological infrastructure. The arrival of interplanetary shocks drives magnetosphere and ionosphere current systems, which then induce electric currents at ground level. The impact of these currents at high latitudes has been extensively researched, but the magnetic equator has been largely overlooked. In this paper, we investigate the potential effects of interplanetary shocks on the equatorial region and demonstrate that their magnetic signature is amplified by the equatorial electrojet. This local amplification substantially increases the region's susceptibility to GICs. Importantly, this result applies to both geomagnetic storms and quiet periods and thus represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of adverse space weather impacts on technological infrastructure.

  2. Study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work submitted in this paper is to contribute to the study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption measurements, carried out on board the D2A, OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. This study, which was undertaken from the D2A satellite, moved us to study the interplanetary environment as from observations made from the following experiments placed on board the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. The experiment set up on board the OSO-8 satellite made it possible to obtain the profile of the solar alpha Lyman emission. An absorption profile was observed for the first time on these profiles and this made it possible to attribute them to interplanetary hydrogen and enabled us to make a direct and local determination of the solar ionization rate. - The spectrometer set up on board Copernicus made it possible to obtain the emission spectrum of the interplanetary environment at the same time as the geocorona. The overall velocity of the interplanetary environment was deduced from the Doppler shift between the two spectra. In the first part, the principle of the REA and POLAR experiments is recalled but only the REA experiment is described in detail, particularly the problems arising from the construction and calibration of the cell. In the second part, a study of the interplanetary environment made from the D2A determinations is presented in synthesized form. On the other hand, the study to which theses initial results led us is presented in detail. Finally, in the third part, the results obtained by means of the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites are given

  3. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Spectroscopy of the 10 Myr Old EF Cha Debris Disk: Evidence for Phyllosilicate-rich Dust in the Terrestrial Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Lisse, Carey M.; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.

    2011-06-01

    We describe Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopic observations of the ~10 Myr old star, EF Cha. Compositional modeling of the spectra from 5 μm to 35 μm confirms that it is surrounded by a luminous debris disk with LD /L sstarf ~ 10-3, containing dust with temperatures between 225 K and 430 K, characteristic of the terrestrial zone. The EF Cha spectrum shows evidence for many solid-state features, unlike most cold, low-luminosity debris disks but like some other 10-20 Myr old luminous, warm debris disks (e.g., HD 113766A). The EF Cha debris disk is unusually rich in a species or combination of species whose emissivities resemble that of finely powdered, laboratory-measured phyllosilicate species (talc, saponite, and smectite), which are likely produced by aqueous alteration of primordial anhydrous rocky materials. The dust and, by inference, the parent bodies of the debris also contain abundant amorphous silicates and metal sulfides, and possibly water ice. The dust's total olivine to the pyroxene ratio of ~2 also provides evidence of aqueous alteration. The large mass volume of grains with sizes comparable to or below the radiation blow-out limit implies that planetesimals may be colliding at a rate high enough to yield the emitting dust but not so high as to devolatize the planetesimals via impact processing. Because phyllosilicates are produced by the interactions between anhydrous rock and warm, reactive water, EF Cha's disk is a likely signpost for water delivery to the terrestrial zone of a young planetary system.

  4. A quasi-linear kinetic equation for cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic equation for interplanetary cosmic rays is set up with the aid of weak-plasma-turbulence theory for an idealized radially symmetric model of the interplanetary magnetic field. As a starting point, this treatment invokes the Vlasov equation instead of the traditional Fokker-Planck equation. Quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain a momentum diffusion equation for the heliocentric frame of reference which describes the interaction of cosmic rays with convecting magnetic irregularities in the solar-wind plasma. Under restricted conditions, the well-known equation of solar modulation can be obtained from this kinetic equation.

  5. Long-Term Temporal Behavior of Interplanetary and Trapped Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R.A; Selesnick, R. S.; Cummings, A. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    New measurements of the long-term temporal history of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) at 1 AU are presented, based on data from SAMPEX and ACE. Over the period from 1992 to 1997 the interplanetary intensity of 8 to 27 MeV/nuc ACR oxygen increased by a factor of -5 as solar minimum approached. The intensity of ACR oxygen trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere showed a corresponding time history. Early in 1998 both the interplanetary and trapped intensities suddenly decreased with the...

  6. The solar wind angular momentum and energy carried by the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.; de La Torre, A.

    1995-03-01

    Solutions already found by one of the authors with a two-region model of the solar coronal expansion are used to analyze the transport of angular momentum and energy by the interplanetary magnetic field. In agreement with observations, it is predicted that the interplanetary magnetic field plays an insignificant role for the flux of energy, but carries a large amount of angular momentum. The appropriate description might be related to the replacement of classical transport coefficients by a collisionless heat flux equation in the outer region of the model. The Sun's loss of angular momentum may affect the strength of the solar rotation in the long term.

  7. Transverse flow deflections associated with fast coronal mass ejecta in interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a bidirectional electron heat flux signature to identify coronal mass ejections, CMEs, in the solar wind at 1 AU, we find that the fast CMEs which drive interplanetary shocks are preferentially deflected eastward in transit outward from the sun. A corresponding westward deflection usually occurs in the compressed ambient solar wind plasma ahead of these CMEs. We suggest that this preferential pattern of deflections is caused primarily by the asymmetrical draping of the ambient interplanetary magnetic field about fast CMEs. 10 refs., 7 figs

  8. A quasi-linear kinetic equation for cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic equation for interplanetary cosmic rays is set up with the aid of weak plasma turbulence theory for an idealized radially symmetric model of the interplanetary magnetic field. As a starting point this treatment invokes the Vlasov equation instead of the traditional Fokker-Planck equation. Quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain a momentum diffusion equation for the heliocentric frame of reference which describes the interaction of cosmic rays with convecting magnetic irregularities in the solar wind plasma. Under restricted conditions the well-known equation of solar modulation can be obtained from this kinetic equation

  9. Nonlinear theory of dust lattice mode coupling in dust crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kourakis, I; Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-crystals formed by charged mesoscopic dust grains (dust lattices), observed since hardly a decade ago, are an exciting paradigm of a nonlinear chain. In laboratory discharge experiments, these quasi-lattices are formed spontaneously in the sheath region near a negative electrode, usually at a levitated horizontal equilibrium configuration where gravity is balanced by an electric field. It is long known (and experimentally confirmed) that dust-lattices support linear oscillations, in the longitudinal (acoustic mode) as well as in the transverse, in plane (acoustic-) or off-plane (optic-like mode) directions. Either due to the (typically Yukawa type) electrostatic inter-grain interaction forces or to the (intrinsically nonlinear) sheath environment, nonlinearity is expected to play an important role in the dynamics of these lattices. Furthermore, the coupling between the different modes may induce coupled nonlinear modes. Despite this evidence, the elucidation of the nonlinear mechanisms governing dust cr...

  10. Dust Storm Events in Iceland: Physical Properties of Icelandic Dust

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Arnalds, O.; Olafsson, H.; Škrabalová, L.; Sigurdardottir, G. M.; Braniš, M.; Hladil, Jindřich; Skála, Roman; Navrátil, Tomáš; Chadimová, Leona; von Lowis of Menar, S.; Thorsteinsson, T.

    s. l : s. n, 2013. [International Workshop on Sand /Duststorms and Associated Dustfall /7./. 02.12.2013-04.12.2013, Rome] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : dust * geology * geochemistry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  11. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  12. Methods for the preparation of ultra-pure anhydrous zirconium tetrafluoride from zirconium tetraborohydride, researches in connection with halide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of ultrapure zirconium tetrafluoride, the main component of fluorozirconate based optical fibers, was successfully attempted from zirconium tetraborohydride. Of the fluorinating agents used, nitrogen trifluoride doesn't react with zirconium tetraborohydride while xenon difluoride reacts too violently and leads to phases which contain boron. The fluorination in a compatible solvent enabled us to minimize the degradation. The best results were obtained with the fluorination of Zr(BH4)4 dissolved in CFCl3 at -40 deg C by anhydrous HF. Using several analytical methods such as graphite furnace atomic absorption and proton activation, we analyzed the purity. The degree of transition element impurities is less than the ppm level for ZrF4. The dehydration of ZrF4,H2O and ZrF4,3H2O at room temperature by CIF3 in gaseous and liquid state was also investigated. At exceptionally low temperature, this process allows oxide and oxyfluoride components to be reduced

  13. Physicochemical properties of new amide-based protic ionic liquids and their use as materials for anhydrous proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Jin [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Renjie, E-mail: chenrj@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Wu Feng, E-mail: wufeng863@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Li Li; Chen Shi [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Zou Qinqin [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-09-01

    We prepared 3 protic ionic liquids based on trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and an amide, namely isobutyramide (ITSA), n-butyramide(NTSA), and benzamide(BTSA). All of the protic ionic liquids exhibit excellent thermal stability (above 200 deg. C). ITSA has the highest ionic conductivity, which is 32.6 mS/cm at 150 deg. C. ITSA was used to prepare anhydrous, conducting composite membranes based on polymers of polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) to serve as intermediate temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This type of composite membrane possesses good thermal stability, high ionic conductivity and good mechanical properties. Increasing the polymer content leads to the improvement of mechanical properties, but is accompanied by a reduction in ionic conductivity. We made efforts to eliminate the trade-off between strength and conductivity of the ITSA/PVDF composite membrane by adding polyamide imide, which resulted in a simultaneous increase in strength and conductivity. A conductivity of 7.5 mS/cm is achieved in a membrane containing 60 wt.% ITSA and 5 wt.% PAI in PVDF at 150 deg. C.

  14. THE COORDINATION ADSORPTION OF AMINES ON CARBOXYL RESIN IN Cu2+ FORM FROM NON-AQUEOUS MEDIUM AND DESORPTION WITH ANHYDROUS ELUANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-zheng Li; Zuo-qing Shi; Yun-ge Fan

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of aniline, N-methylaniline and N,N-dimethylaniline onto carboxyl resin in Cu2+ form from water,ethanol and n-hexane have been studied. The results show that the adsorption affinities from n-hexane are higher than that from water, and nearly zero from ethanol. The separation factors for the adsorption of these three amines from mixed solution were also examined. The results of continuous column operations show that the breakthrough capacity of aniline from nhexane reaches 90 mg/g dry resin in Cu2+ form, and the amines adsorbed can be stripped with anhydrous ethanol effectively.Adsorption onto carboxyl resin in Cu2+ form from non-aqueous medium and desorption with anhydrous eluant can overcome the run-off of Cu2+ from the resin, and would show potential advantages in the separation of some water-insoluble natural products.

  15. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr – Part 2: A new reconstruction of the interplanetary magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, M.; L. Barnard; Nevanlinna, H; Owens, M. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davis, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new reconstruction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, B) for 1846–2012 with a full analysis of errors, based on the homogeneously constructed IDV(1d) composite of geomagnetic activity presented in Part 1 (Lockwood et al., 2013a). Analysis of the dependence of the commonly used geomagnetic indices on solar wind parameters is presented which helps explain why annual means of interdiurnal range data, such as the new composite, depend only on the IMF with on...

  16. The Sky in Dust -- Methods and Prospects of Dust Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, M; Srama, R; Helfert, S; Kempf, S; Morgas-Klostermeyer, G; Rachev, M; Srowig, A; Auer, S; Hor`anyi, M; Sternovsky, Z; Harris, D

    2006-01-01

    Information about the make-up of the galaxy arrives in the Solar system in many forms: photons of different energies, classically collected by ground- and space-based telescopes, neutral and charged atomic particles, and solid macroscopic particles: cosmic dust particles. Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. This information can be analysed in order to understand the processes and mechanisms that are involved in the formation and evolution of solid matter in the galaxy. This approach is called ``Dust Astronomy'' which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a dust observatory in space. The analysis of cosmic grains collected in the high atmosphere of the Earth has shown that each dust grain is a small world with various sub-grains featuring different galactic origin and evolution, which is identified on the basis of elementary and isotopic analysis. Independent information about the origin and evolution of the grains coming from the kinematic properties o...

  17. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  18. A study of new anhydrous, conducting membranes based on composites of aprotic ionic liquid and cross-linked SPEEK for fuel cell application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New composite membranes based on SPEEK/EG/IL were fabricated. • Composite membranes exhibit good thermal stability than neat SPEEK and XSPEEK membrane. • Proton conductivity of all composite membranes increased with temperature and amount of ionic liquid. • Proton conductivity was measured under anhydrous condition in the temperature ranging from 30–140 °C. - Abstract: The present study describe the preparation and characterisation of anhydrous proton conducting composite membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) [SPEEK–degree of sulfonation 70–72%]/ethylene glycol [EG]/ionic liquid by solution casting method using water: ethanol (50:50) as solvent. For this purpose several composite membranes were prepared by mixing solution of SPEEK/ethylene glycol (67:33 wt %) in water:ethanol with varying amounts of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluromethanesulfonate [bmim][OTf] ionic liquid. The cross-linking of SPEEK was carried out by thermal treatment i.e. by heating in vacuum oven at 80 °C (2 h), 100 °C (2 h), 120 °C (2 h) and 135 °C for 16 h. Ethylene glycol was used as a cross-linker for SPEEK to reduce the leaching out of ionic liquid and enhance the mechanical strength of SPEEK membranes. The membranes were characterized for thermal [thermogravimetry analysis], structural [FTIR–ATR], proton conductivity, morphology (XRD, SEM) and leaching out of ionic liquid with water. FTIR studies clearly showed the interactions between SPEEK, EG and ionic liquid. The proton conductivity and dynamic mechanical properties of the composite membranes were investigated at elevated temperature and under anhydrous conditions. Proton conductivity of all the membranes measured in the temperature range of 30–140 °C under anhydrous conditions was in the range of 10−3 Scm−1 which showed an increase with increase in temperature and amount of ionic liquid

  19. Two expedient ‘one-pot’ methods for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones over anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chayan Guha; Rina Mondal; Rammohan Pal; Asok K Mallik

    2013-11-01

    Two expedient one-pot methods have been developed for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones using acetophenones, benzaldehydes and thiols as starting materials. The methods involve microwave irradiation (5min) of 1:1 mixtures of acetophenones and benzaldehydes over neutral alumina supported anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 in the first step, and that is followed by addition of thiol to the resulting material and keeping at room temperature for 1.5 h.

  20. The luminescence properties Zn2-xMnxP2O7(x=0-2) pyrophosphate. Part 1: The anhydrous phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence properties of two valence metals anhydrous double phosphates Zn2-xMnxP2O7(x=0-2) have been investigated. It was shown that Mn2+ ions form three types of the emission centers where Mn2+ ion can be located, first in the regular octahedral oxygen environment, second, in defect octahedra that has oxygen vacancy, and third, -in the tetrahedral oxygen environment

  1. The use of anhydrous CeCl{sub 3} as a recyclable and selective catalyst for the acetalization of aldehydes and ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Claudio C.; Mendes, Samuel R.; Ziembowicz, Francieli I. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lenardao, Eder J.; Perin, Gelson [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica e Geociencias

    2010-07-01

    An efficient, clean, chemoselective and solvent-free method for the synthesis of ketone and aldehyde dimethyl acetals was developed using trimethyl orthoformate and commercially available anhydrous CeCl{sub 3} as a recyclable catalyst. The method is general and affords the protected carbonyl compounds in good yields and under mild conditions, including aryl and alkyl ketones and activated aldehydes. The catalyst could be utilised directly for 3 cycles, without significant loss of activity. (author)

  2. Twisted Dust Acoustic Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K

    2012-01-01

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  3. Metals and dust in high redshift AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Marconi, A; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Pedani, M; Pipino, A; Matteucci, F; Cox, P; Caselli, P

    2006-01-01

    We summarize some recent results on the metallicity and dust properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at high redshift (110). The properties of dust in high-z QSOs are discussed within the context of the dust production mechanisms in the early universe. The dust extinction curve is observed to evolve beyond z>4, and by z~6 it is well described by the properties expected for dust produced by SNe, suggesting that the latter is the main mechanism of dust production in the early universe. We also show that the huge dust masses observed in distant QSOs can be accounted for by SN dust within the observational constraints currently available. Finally, we show that QSO winds, which have been proposed as an alternative mechanism of dust production, may also contribute significantly to the total dust budget at high redshift.

  4. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  5. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  6. Infrared astronony and galactic dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of infrared sources of cosmic radiation - interstellar dust clouds, cocoon stars, novae, and gas supergiants - is presented. The possibilities of exact estimation of the star and galaxy brightness are considered. The difficulties of experiments and the reasons for choosing the infrared range for observations (teh maximum radiation of cold dust particles and the high transparency of the dust clouds) are noted. A Galaxy centre strongly radiating in the infrared range and situated in the Sagittarius constellation is considered as an example, and its schematic picture is given. A rough estimate of the absorption by stellar structures, dust and gas clouds is given. The diagram of the Main sequence of infrared sources and the dependence of their luminosity on the effective temperature are presented. The energy distribution in the spectrum of a complex object at different temperatures and wave lengths is considered. The frequency dependence of the radiation flux for the objects of the Orion constellation is given

  7. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    OpenAIRE

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity ...

  8. Saharan Dust Pollution: Implications for the Sahel?

    OpenAIRE

    De Longueville, Florence; Henry, Sabine; Ozer, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The main source of atmospheric mineral dust is the Sahara desert, which produces about half of the yearly global mineral dust.1 About 12% of the Saharan dust moves northwards to Europe, 28% westwards to the Americas, and 60% southwards to the Gulf of Guinea. Saharan dust storms can lead to particulate matter (PM) levels that exceed internationally recommended levels. Recently, special attention has been paid to the mineral PM air pollution of dust storms, which may be a serious health threat....

  9. Radiation Protection for Manned Interplanetary Missions - Radiation Sources, Risks, Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

    Health risks in interplanetary explorative missions differ in two major features significantly from those during the manned missions experienced so far. For one, presently available technologies lead to durations of such missions significantly longer than so far encountered - with the added complication that emergency returns are ruled out. Thus radiation exposures and hence risks for late radiation sequelae like cancer increase proportional to mission duration - similar like most other health and many technical risks too. Secondly, loss of the geomagnetic shielding available in low earth orbits (LEO) does increase the radiation dose rates from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since significant fractions of the GCR flux below about 10 GeV/n now can reach the space vehicle. In addition, radiation from solar particle events (SPE) which at most in polar orbit segments can contribute to the radiation exposure during LEO missions now can reach the spaceship unattenuated. Radiation doses from extreme SPEs can reach levels where even early acute radiation sickness might ensue - with the added risks from potentially associated crew performance decrements. In contrast to the by and large predictable GCR contribution, the doses and hence risks from large SPEs can only stochastically be assessed. Mission designers face the task to contain the overall health risk within acceptable limits. Towards this end they have to transport the particle fluxes of the radiation fields in free space through the walls of the spaceship and through the tissue of the astronaut to the radiation sensitive organs. To obtain a quantity which is useful for risk assessment, the radiobiological effectiveness as well as the specific sensitivity of a given organ has to be accounted for in such transport calculations which of course require a detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution and the atomic composition of the surrounding shielding material. In doing so the mission designer encounters two major

  10. MIDAS The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System for the Rosetta Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedler, W.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Arends, H.; Barth, W.; Biezen, J. V. D.; Butler, B.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Fehringer, M.; Fremuth, G.; Gavira, J.; Havnes, O.; Jessberger, E. K.; Kassing, R.; Klöck, W.; Koeberl, C.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Maurette, M.; Rüdenauer, F.; Schmidt, R.; Stangl, G.; Steller, M.; Weber, I.

    2007-02-01

    The International Rosetta Mission is set for a rendezvous with Comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. On its 10 year journey to the comet, the spacecraft will also perform a fly-by of the two asteroids Stein and Lutetia in 2008 and 2010, respectively. The mission goal is to study the origin of comets, the relationship between cometary and interstellar material and its implications with regard to the origin of the Solar System. Measurements will be performed that shed light into the development of cometary activity and the processes in the surface layer of the nucleus and the inner coma. The Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System (MIDAS) instrument is an essential element of Rosetta’s scientific payload. It will provide 3D images and statistical parameters of pristine cometary particles in the nm-μm range from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. According to cometary dust models and experience gained from the Giotto and Vega missions to 1P/Halley, there appears to be an abundance of particles in this size range, which also covers the building blocks of pristine interplanetary dust particles. The dust collector of MIDAS will point at the comet and collect particles drifting outwards from the nucleus surface. MIDAS is based on an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), a type of scanning microprobe able to image small structures in 3D. AFM images provide morphological and statistical information on the dust population, including texture, shape, size and flux. Although the AFM uses proven laboratory technology, MIDAS is its first such application in space. This paper describes the scientific objectives and background, the technical implementation and the capabilities of MIDAS as they stand after the commissioning of the flight instrument, and the implications for cometary measurements.

  11. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  12. Computer Aided Design of Ka-Band Waveguide Power Combining Architectures for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaden, Karl R.

    2006-01-01

    Communication systems for future NASA interplanetary spacecraft require transmitter power ranging from several hundred watts to kilowatts. Several hybrid junctions are considered as elements within a corporate combining architecture for high power Ka-band space traveling-wave tube amplifiers (TWTAs). This report presents the simulated transmission characteristics of several hybrid junctions designed for a low loss, high power waveguide based power combiner.

  13. Interplanetary space weather effects on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter avalanche photodiode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, E. B.; Carlton, A. K.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Sun, X.; Cahoy, K.

    2016-05-01

    Space weather is a major concern for radiation-sensitive space systems, particularly for interplanetary missions, which operate outside of the protection of Earth's magnetic field. We examine and quantify the effects of space weather on silicon avalanche photodiodes (SiAPDs), which are used for interplanetary laser altimeters and communications systems and can be sensitive to even low levels of radiation (less than 50 cGy). While ground-based radiation testing has been performed on avalanche photodiode (APDs) for space missions, in-space measurements of SiAPD response to interplanetary space weather have not been previously reported. We compare noise data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) SiAPDs with radiation measurements from the onboard Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument. We did not find any evidence to support radiation as the cause of changes in detector threshold voltage during radiation storms, both for transient detector noise and long-term average detector noise, suggesting that the approximately 1.3 cm thick shielding (a combination of titanium and beryllium) of the LOLA detectors is sufficient for SiAPDs on interplanetary missions with radiation environments similar to what the LRO experienced (559 cGy of radiation over 4 years).

  14. Radio and optical follow-up observations and improved interplanetary network position of GRB 970111

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, TJ; Groot, PJ; Strom, RG; vanParadijs, J; Hurley, K; Kouveliotou, C; Fishman, GJ; Meegan, CA; Heise, J; intZand, JJM; deBruyn, AG; Hanlon, LO; Bennett, K; Telting, JH; Rutten, RGM

    1997-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 840 MHz and 1.4 and 5 GHz radio observations of the improved Interplanetary Network Wide Field Camera (IPN WFC) error box of the gamma-ray burst GRB 970111, between 26.4 hr and 120 days after the event onset. In the similar to 13 arcmin(2) area defined by the IPN (BATSE and U

  15. Long-term Regularities in Distribution of Global Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrož, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 637-642. ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : interplanetary magnetic field * solar wind Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  16. Voyager 1 Observations of Termination Shock Particle Events – The Effect of Interplanetary Transients

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, F. B.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The increases in MeV ions and electrons, observed by the Voyager 1 CRS experiment as it moved beyond 85 AU, have persisted over most of the ensuing 3 year period and represents a new particle population in the distant heliosphere - Termination Shock Particle (TSP) events. The properties of these TSP events are strongly influenced by the passage of interplanetary transients.

  17. Non-radial solar wind flows induced by the motion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the non-radial flows (NRFs during nearly five years of interplanetary observations revealed the average non-radial speed of the solar wind flows to be ~30km/s, with approximately one-half of the large (>100km/s NRFs associated with ICMEs. Conversely, the average non-radial flow speed upstream of all ICMEs is ~100km/s, with just over one-third preceded by large NRFs. These upstream flow deflections are analysed in the context of the large-scale structure of the driving ICME. We chose 5 magnetic clouds with relatively uncomplicated upstream flow deflections. Using variance analysis it was possible to infer the local axis orientation, and to qualitatively estimate the point of interception of the spacecraft with the ICME. For all 5 events the observed upstream flows were in agreement with the point of interception predicted by variance analysis. Thus we conclude that the upstream flow deflections in these events are in accord with the current concept of the large-scale structure of an ICME: a curved axial loop connected to the Sun, bounded by a curved (though not necessarily circular cross section.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (flare and stream dynamics; interplanetary magnetic fields; interplanetary shocks

  18. (abstract) An Extensive Search for Interplanetary Slow-mode Shocks: Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, R.; Ho, C. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses has accumulated five years of interplanetary solar wind plasma and IMF measurements. These data cover from 1 to approximately 5 AU and all the heliographic latitudes. Based on these data, we perform an extensive search for the slow-mode shocks. We find a considerable number of discontinuities that have large magnetic field magnitude changes and also large field normal components.

  19. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangfeng Shao; Jiandong Mao

    2016-01-01

    Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm) and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust pa...

  20. Effect of Thermionic Emission on Dust-Acoustic Solitons in a Dust-Electron Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Li-Wen; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons with a very small but finite amplitude in a dustelectron plasma are studied using the reductive perturbation technique. The self-consistent variation of dust charge is taken into account. It is shown that the thermionic emission could significantly increase the dust positive charge. The dependences of the phase velocity, amplitude, and width of such solitons on the dust temperature and the dust work function of dust material are plotted and discussed.

  1. Theoretical aspects of Dust in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that micro-particles (dust) exist in fusion devices. However, an impact of dust on plasma contamination, material migration, and performance of fusion devices is still under debate. In burning plasma experiments like ITER dust can also pose safety problems related to it's chemical activity, toxicity, tritium retention, and radioactive content. In order to address all these issues we need to understand the physics of dust generation, dynamics, and transport. In this paper, the results of recent theoretical studies of dust in fusion plasmas are reviewed. Different aspects of the physics of dust in fusion plasmas, including the processes of dust generation, charging, heating, destruction, spinning, forces acting on dust, dust collision with material walls, etc are discussed. The numerical models of these processes have been incorporated into the dust transport code DUSTT, which is capable of tracking of dust particles in fusion devices in 3D geometry. The results of the simulations of dust particle dynamics, transport, and the impact on edge plasma performance are considered. The latest results on nonlinear interactions of dust grain with tokamak plasma as well as remaining gaps in the understanding of physics of dust in fusion devices are discussed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  3. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  4. Differential dust attenuation in CALIFA galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale Asari, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Amorim, A. L.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Schlickmann, M.; Wild, V.; Kennicutt, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Dust attenuation has long been treated as a simple parameter in SED fitting. Real galaxies are, however, much more complicated: The measured dust attenuation is not a simple function of the dust optical depth, but depends strongly on galaxy inclination and the relative distribution of stars and dust. We study the nebular and stellar dust attenuation in CALIFA galaxies, and propose some empirical recipes to make the dust treatment more realistic in spectral synthesis codes. By adding optical recombination emission lines, we find better constraints for differential attenuation. Those recipes can be applied to unresolved galaxy spectra, and lead to better recovered star formation rates.

  5. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  6. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  7. Bosonic string theory with dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a modified bosonic string theory that has a pressureless ‘dust’ field on the string worldsheet. The dust is a real scalar field with unit gradient which breaks conformal invariance. Hamiltonian analysis reveals a time reparametrization constraint linear in the dust field momentum and a spatial diffeomorphism constraint. This feature provides a natural ‘dust time’ gauge in analogy with the parametrized particle. In this gauge we give a Fock quantization of the theory, which is complete and self-consistent in d < 26. The Hamiltonian of the theory is not a constraint; as a consequence the Hilbert space and mass spectrum are characterized by an additional parameter, and includes the usual string spectrum as a special case. The other sectors provide new particle spectra, some of which do not have tachyons. (paper)

  8. Pulmonary retention of coal dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, P.E.; Gibb, F.R.; Beiter, H.; Amato, F.; Yuile, C.; Kilpper, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of this study were: to determine, quantitatively, coal dust retention times in the dog lung; to test the appropriateness of a pulmonary retention model which incorporates first order rate coefficients obtained from in vitro and in vivo experiments on neutron-activated coal; to acquire a temporal description of the pulmonary disposition of the retained coal dust, and to compare the behavior of two different Pennsylvania coals in the foregoing regards. The principal findings include: retention half-times for both coals of approximately 2 years following single, hour-long exposures; a vivid association of the retained coal dust with the pulmonic lymphatics; and a general validation of the retention model.

  9. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  10. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  11. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  12. Dynamics of Dust Clouds in Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a dynamics of dust clouds embedded in the infinite uniform initially plasma using computer simulation. In the one dimension, the movement of dust particles and ions is governed by cold hydrodynamics equations, electrons are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium. It is assumed that the forces on the dust consist of electrostatic forces and ion drag forces. The spatial distributions of parameters were obtained at various initial densities of dust grains at different times. Results show the expansion of dust clouds at low initial dust grain density, which is evidence of exceeding the electrostatic force over the ion drag force. At the increasing of dust density oscillations of the central part of dust cloud are observed

  13. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  14. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Propagation and Evolution of CMEs in the Interplanetary Medium: Analysis of Remote Sensing and In situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Vourlidas, Angelos; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Malandraki, Olga; Szabo, Adam; Dresing, Nina; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    EUV disk imagers and white light coronagraphs have provided for many years information on the early formation and evolution of corona) mass ejections (CMEs). More recently, the novel heliospheric imaging instruments aboard the STEREO mission are providing crucial remote sensing information on the interplanetary evolution of these events while in situ instruments complete the overall characterization of the interplanetary CMEs. In this work, we present an analysis of CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary medium using combined data from THE SOHO, STEREO, WIND, and ACE spacecraft. The events were selected to cover the widest possible spectrum of different ambient solar wind, magnetic field configurations, plasma parameters, etc. to allow uncovering those aspects that are important in understanding the propagation and evolution mechanisms of CMEs in the interplanetary medium.

  16. DNA Strand Breaks, Photoproducts, and Repair in Analog Space and Mars Environments: Implications for Microbial Interplanetary Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, W. L.; Möller, R.; Douki, T.; Robles, J.; Bruno, G.; Fajardo-Cavazos, P.; Schuerger, A. C.

    2008-03-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for interplanetary transport by natural impacts or human spaceflight. In this work we consider the mechanisms of DNA damage and repair in spores subjected to a hypothetical Earth-to-Mars transfer.

  17. Alkaline leaching of iron and steelmaking dust

    OpenAIRE

    Stafanova, Anna; Aromaa, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Steel production generates significant quantities of dust and sludge in blast furnaces (BF),basic oxygen furnaces (BOF), and electric arc furnaces (EAF). These dusts contain toxicelements, such as heavy metals, and are thus classified as harmful waste making the disposalof them expensive. In addition, direct recycling of dust back to steel production is hindered dueto the presence of zinc. In this literature survey the alkaline leaching of zinc from iron and steelmaking dusts isreviewed. T...

  18. Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I.

    2008-01-01

    Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a ?dust? of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900?C. Literature survey has shown that alloys behave differently in metal dusting conditions based on their composition and the environment. Metal dusting mechanisms for iron and nickel-based alloys have been proposed but, nevertheless, have not been agreed upon and numerous modifications t...

  19. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  20. Adulteration determination of the anhydrous ethanol fuels samples with methanol; Determinacao de adulteracao por metanol em amostras de alcool etilico anidro combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Eduardo; Mota, Claudio J.A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: eduardoc@dh.com.br; cmota@iq.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    A fast test made to evidence an adulteration of anhydrous ethanol with methanol consist in mixing the alcohol with gasoline. A pink coloration indicates the adulteration by methanol. Samples of gasoline A, ethanol and high purity methanol were mixed at different proportions, but no color change was observed. On the other hand, samples of gasoline A, ethanol and formaldehyde 40% showed the characteristic pink coloration, for methanol adulteration. This result indicates that the test is sensible to the presence of formaldehyde, probably presence as impurity or formed by oxidation of the methanol. A lower detection limit of 4.8% of formaldehyde in the alcohol was determined. (author)

  1. In-situ synthesis of the anhydrous La(hfac){sub 3} precursor: a viable route to the MOCVD of LaF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condorelli, G.G.; Gennaro, S.; Fragala, I.L. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Chimiche

    2001-07-01

    Anhydrous Lanthanum tris-(hexafluoroacetylacetonate) is a good precursor for LaF{sub 3} films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. La(hfac){sub 3} was generated in situ by the vapor-solid reaction of the ligand and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the source reservoir of a metal-organic CVD reactor. The nature of the precursor was elucidated by in-situ FTIR. The films were characterized by X-ray and surface analysis methods. The Figure shows an SEM image of a thin film deposited under Ar. (orig.)

  2. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections at Mercury: Database and effects on the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka; Anderson, Brian J.; Schwadron, Nathan; Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol

    2016-07-01

    We use observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft since Helios 1 and 2 in the 1980s to make in situ measurements of the interplanetary medium at heliocentric distances Mercury. In addition, using existing data sets of ICMEs at 1 AU, we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. Using our database of nearly 70 ICMEs, we also statistically characterize Mercury's magnetosphere during times of ICMEs, when Mercury's magnetosphere becomes significantly altered. We conduct a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during extreme solar wind conditions, by studying the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, erosion of the dayside magnetosphere, the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the cusp region, and the plasma precipitation to the surface.

  3. Interplanetary trajectory optimization of Mars aerobraking missions with constrained atmospheric entry velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1991-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles imposes constraints on the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if these entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis, more opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial LEO mass. These additional opportunities result from varying the initial launch date, the encounter dates, and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper presents results for three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival and one velocity limitation upon Earth return. The results indicate that by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum initial LEO mass mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 years studied.

  4. Bimodal abundances in the energetic particles of solar and interplanetary origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1988-01-01

    This letter reports the first results from an examination of the daily-averaged abundances of the elements from H through Fe as well as electrons and isotopes of He in energetic particles observed in interplanetary space by the ISEE 3 spacecraft over an 8.5 yr period. The abundances of heavy elements such as Fe/O show, for the first time, clear evidence of the presence of two distinct populations of particles. Earlier observations could be interpreted as extreme variations within a single population. The population with enhanced Fe/O shows correlated enhancements in He-3/He-4, p/e, and He/H. This population is consistent with material that has been processed to high temperatures in the impulsively heated regions of solar flares. The second population, with more normal abundances, is probably accelerated from ambient material by coronal and interplanetary shocks.

  5. The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusions propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Charles D.; Klein, Gail; Sercel, Joel; Hoffman, Nate; Murray, Kathy; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    1987-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

  6. Plasma wave phenomena observed at interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses URAP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of 24 interplanetary shocks observed by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) on the Ulysses spacecraft are presented. These shocks, observed between approximately 1 and 4 AU, display a variety of wave phenomena similar to those detected in earlier studies of shocks near 1 AU. The correspondence of the observed low frequency magnetic and electric field waves with the parallel index of refraction for whistler waves was investigated. Observed B/E ratios are found to be typically about a factor of 0.7 times the computed index of refraction, supporting the whistler interpretation of these waves, but also implying a prevalent electrostatic wave component which may be due to whistlers propagating at an angle to the interplanetary magnetic field. A statistical correlation of the amplitudes of the various types of waves with shock and solar wind properties is presented.

  7. Analysis of the 31 Oct 1972 interplanetary shock wave and associated unusual phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    We analyze in detail the disturbed time period Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 1972 using magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle data as well as magnetic field data. In particular, we discuss an interplanetary forward shock wave accompanied by a traditional shock-spike event in the energetic particles, a large tangential discontinuity correlated with a geomagnetic storm main phase, and a reverse interplanetary shock. This forward and reverse shock pair was caused by a 2N solar flare which occurred some 47 hours earlier. We also discuss an unusual rarefaction in the solar wind following (and probably related to) the shock pair, wherein the Alfven Mach number abruptly decreased from about 4.5 to about 1.5, allowing the earth's bow shock to move outward at least 20 earth radii beyond its nominal position.

  8. Solar wind heating beyond 1 AU. [interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas effect on protons and electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, T. E.; Leer, E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of an interplanetary atomic hydrogen gas on solar wind proton, electron and alpha-particle temperatures beyond 1 AU is considered. It is shown that the proton temperature (and probably also the alpha-particle temperature) reaches a minimum between 2 AU and 4 AU, depending on values chosen for solar wind and interstellar gas parameters. Heating of the electron gas depends primarily on the thermal coupling of the protons and electrons. For strong coupling, the electron temperature reaches a minimum between 4 AU and 8 AU, but for weak coupling (Coulomb collisions only), the electron temperature continues to decrease throughout the inner solar system. A spacecraft travelling to Jupiter should be able to observe the heating effect of the solar wind-interplanetary hydrogen interaction, and from such observations it may be possible of infer some properties of the interstellar neutral gas.

  9. Response of magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical studies of the solar-terrestrial interaction often are carried out assuming that steady state conditions are applicable and with the a priori assumption that any specific change in the input conditions will produce magnetospheric and ionospheric responses which are repeatable. In this paper we shall first demonstrate that the variability of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is sufficiently large that, under normal circumstances, the assumption of steady state conditions is questionable. We shall further show that the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems to changes in interplanetary conditions is dependent on the prior state of the system. In this respect it will be shown that the strength of the driven system currents which grow in response to a southward turning of the IMF is dependent on the level of magnetospheric activity prior to that southward turning (as quantified by the AL index of geomagnetic activity). copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  10. Interplanetary particle transport simulation for warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yûki; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are one of the extreme space weather phenomena. A huge SEP event increases the radiation dose received by aircrews, who should be warned of such events as early as possible. We developed a warning system for aviation exposure to SEPs. This article describes one component of the system, which calculates the temporal evolution of the SEP intensity and the spectrum immediately outside the terrestrial magnetosphere. To achieve this, we performed numerical simulations of SEP transport in interplanetary space, in which interplanetary SEP transport is described by the focused transport equation. We developed a new simulation code to solve the equation using a set of stochastic differential equations. In the code, the focused transport equation is expressed in a magnetic field line coordinate system, which is a non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. An inverse Gaussian distribution is employed as the injection profile of SEPs at an inner boundary located near the Sun. We applie...

  11. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  12. Correlated variations in the azimuthal and elevation angles of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, N.; Smith, E. J.; Goldstein, B.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of data collected during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission shows that there are periods during which deviations from the Parker spiral direction in the azimuthal and elevation angles of the interplanetary magnetic field are correlated. There are a number of solar wind structures which might be expected to introduce such a correlation into the data, e.g., CMEs, Stream-stream interfaces or helicity carried by the solar wind. These potential sources fall into two categories: Those produced at or close to the solar wind source region and those produced by extended interactions as the solar wind expands. We will distinguish the contributions of these two source categories and assess the impact on the evolution on the interplanetary magnetic field.

  13. Emission of whistler-mode waves and diffusion of electrons around interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of whistler-mode wave generation and wave particle interaction in the vicinity of interplanetary shocks in the ecliptic plane, as observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. Generally the whistler-mode waves (measured in the frequency range 0.22-448 Hz) are observed downstream of the shocks where they persist for some hours. From the electron distribution functions (EDF) in the energy range 1.6 to 862 eV, we compute the temperature anisotropy and the wave growth rate of the electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability for the case of parallel propagation of the waves with respect to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B. In general, in agreement with the wave measurements, the instability grows only downstream of the shock fronts. Following the wave activity, velocity space diffusion of the electrons results in a marginally stable state with sporadic fluctuations

  14. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  15. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  16. The dust debris around HR 4796

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    The IRAS data strongly suggest that there is dust debris around the main-sequence A star HR 4796. The optical depth of the dust cloud around HR 4796 is probably twice that around Beta Pic, the main-sequence star in the Bright Star Catalog which was previously thought to have the most opaque dust debris cloud.

  17. Cluster observations of sudden impulses in the magnetotail caused by interplanetary shocks and pressure increases

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, K. E. J.; Slavin, J; Collier, M.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Szabo, A.(Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia); Tanskanen, E.; Balogh, A.; Lucek, E.; Rème, H.

    2005-01-01

    Sudden impulses (SI) in the tail lobe magnetic field associated with solar wind pressure enhancements are investigated using measurements from Cluster. The magnetic field components during the SIs change in a manner consistent with the assumption that an antisunward moving lateral pressure enhancement compresses the magnetotail axisymmetrically. We found that the maximum variance SI unit vectors were nearly aligned with the associated interplanetary shock normals. For two of the tail lobe SI ...

  18. Cluster observations of sudden impulses in the magnetotail caused by interplanetary shocks and pressure increases

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, K. E. J.; Slavin, J; Collier, M.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Szabo, A.(Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia); Tanskanen, E.; Balogh, A.; Lucek, E.; Rème, H.

    2005-01-01

    Sudden impulses (SI) in the tail lobe magnetic field associated with solar wind pressure enhancements are investigated using measurements from Cluster. The magnetic field components during the SIs change in a manner consistent with the assumption that an antisunward moving lateral pressure enhancement compresses the magnetotail axisymmetrically. We found that the maximum variance SI unit vectors were nearly aligned with the associated interplanetary shock normals. For two of...

  19. Anisotropy of cosmic rays associated with high velocity streams of interplanetary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a detailed comparison of the solar wind parameters with the time variation in the phases and the amplitudes of the cosmic ray anisotropy as observed by a sea level neutron monitor, a characteristic change in the cosmic ray anisotropy was found to associate with the interplanetary streams with fast-rise and slow-decay time profiles in the solar wind velocity. (orig./WBU)

  20. Strong geomagnetic activity forecast by neural networks under dominant southern orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, F.; Bochníček, Josef; Hejda, Pavel; Revallo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2014), s. 589-598. ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300120608; GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geomagnetic activity * interplanetary magnetic field * artificial neural network * ejection of coronal mass * X-ray flares Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014