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Sample records for anhydrous interplanetary dust

  1. Correlated Nitrogen And Carbon Anomalies In An Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J; Dai, Z; Graham, G

    2003-10-31

    Given the ubiquitous presence of H and N isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their probable association with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar isotopic anomalies in C has been a major conundrum. We report here the first observation of correlated N and C isotopic anomalies in organic matter from an anhydrous non-cluster IDP. The {sup 15}N composition of the anomalous region is the highest seen to date in an IDP and is accompanied by a moderate depletion in {sup 13}C. Theoretical models suggest that low temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds does produce C and N fractionations, but it remains to be seen if these models can reproduce the specific effects we observe here.

  2. Combined Carbon, Nitrogen, and Oxygen XANES Spectroscopy on Hydrated and Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, M.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth s stratosphere generally contain percent-level concentrations of organic matter. This organic matter in IDPs is important for several reasons: 1) some IDPs contain interstellar organic matter, identified by high D/H or N-15, providing the opportunity to characterize this interstellar material, 2) comparison of the organic matter in anhydrous IDPs to that in hydrated IDPs can help establish the effects of parent body aqueous alteration, and, 3) IDPs are believed to have delivered to the surface of the early Earth pre-biotic organic matter important for the origin of life. X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy provides information on the functional groups present in a sample, and XANES can be performed on the nano-scale, comparable to the size of some of the sub-units of the IDPs. The energies of the XANES transitions are diagnostic of the type of bonding of the C, N, and O, allowing identification of the functional groups present in the sample. As part of our ongoing effort to characterize the organic matter in the IDPs, we have performed carbon- and oxygen- and the first nitrogen-XANES spectroscopy on two IDPs and acid-insoluble residue from the CM2 meteorite Murchison.

  3. Correlated Nitrogen and Carbon Anomalies in an Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particle - Implications for Extraterrestrial Organic Matter Accreted by the Prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z; Bajt, S; Graham, G

    2003-12-17

    Given the ubiquitous presence of H and N isotopic anomalies in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and their probable association with carbonaceous material, the lack of similar isotopic anomalies in C has been a major conundrum. We report here the first observation of correlated N and C isotopic anomalies in organic matter within an anhydrous IDP. The {sup 15}N composition of the anomalous region is the highest seen to date in an IDP and is accompanied by a moderate depletion in {sup 13}C. Our observations establish the presence of hetero-atomic organic compounds of presolar origin among the constant flux of carbonaceous material accreting to the terrestrial planets within IDPs. Theoretical models suggest that low temperature formation of organic compounds in cold interstellar molecular clouds does produce C and N fractionations, but it remains to be seen if these models can reproduce the specific effects we observe here.

  4. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John P.

    2015-08-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at ~90 km altitude and settle to the Earth’s surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earth’s surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend ~104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.Affiliations:a University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.b National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.c Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.d Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California

  5. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (less than um) assemblages of anhydrous amorphous and crystalline silicates, oxides and sulfides bound together by abundant carbonaceous material. Ancient silicate, oxide, and SiC stardust grains exhibiting highly anomalous isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission.

  6. GEO debris and interplanetary dust: fluxes and charging behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Graps, A L; McBride, N; McDonnell, J A M; Bunte, K; Svedhem, H; Drolshagen, G; Graps, Amara L.; Green, Simon F.; Bride, Neil Mc; Bunte, Kalle; Svedhem, Hakan; Drolshagen, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into the geostationary (GEO) region as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris to interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. While the physical characteristics of the GORID impacts alone are insufficient for a reliable distinction between debris and interplanetary dust, the temporal behavior of the impacts are strong enough indicators to separate the populations based on clustering. Non-cluster events are predominantly interplanetary, while cluster events are debris. The GORID mean flux distributions (at mass thresholds which are impact speed dependent) for IDPs, corrected for dead time, are 1.35x10^{-4} m^{-2} s^{-1} using a...

  7. Inferring the interplanetary dust properties from remote observations and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lasue, Jeremie; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Since in situ studies and interplanetary dust collections only provide a spatially limited amount of information about the interplanetary dust properties, it is of major importance to complete these studies with properties inferred from remote observations of light scattered and emitted, with interpretation through simulations. Physical properties of the interplanetary dust in the near-ecliptic symmetry surface, such as the local polarization, temperature and composition, together with their heliocentric variations, may be derived from scattered and emitted light observations, giving clues to the respective contribution of the particles sources. A model of light scattering by a cloud of solid particles constituted by spheroidal grains and aggregates thereof is used to interpret the local light scattering data. Equilibrium temperature of the same particles allows us to interpret the temperature heliocentric variations. A good fit of the local polarization phase curve, $P_{\\alpha}$, near 1.5~AU from the Sun is ...

  8. Origin of Interplanetary Dust through Optical Properties of Zodiacal Light

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hongu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the origin of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) through the optical properties, albedo and spectral gradient, of zodiacal light. The optical properties were compared with those of potential parent bodies in the solar system, which include D-type (as analogue of cometary nuclei), C-type, S-type, X-type, and B-type asteroids. We applied Bayesian inference on the mixture model made from the distribution of these sources, and found that >90% of the interplanetary dust particles originate from comets (or its spectral analogues, D-type asteroids). Although some classes of asteroids (C-type and X-type) may make a moderate contribution, ordinary chondrite-like particles from S-type asteroids occupy a negligible fraction of the interplanetary dust cloud complex. The overall optical properties of the zodiacal light were similar to those of chondritic porous IDPs, supporting the dominance of cometary particles in zodiacal cloud.

  9. In-situ Measurements of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, E.

    2008-09-01

    Dust is finely dispersed solid material in interplanetary space. It derives from a number of sources: larger meteoroids, comets, asteroids, the planets, and satellites, and there is interstellar dust sweeping through the solar system. These dust particles range in size from assemblages of a few molecules to tenth millimetre-sized grains. Dust particles absorb and scatter solar radiation and emit thermal radiation giving rise to Zodiacal light at visible and thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. Astronomical observations of both emissions provide information on the average properties of very large number of particles and their spatial distribution. Information on the physical and chemical properties and the orbital motion is obtained by direct methods. Direct methods include: (1) collection of dust particles (Fig. 1) on collectors on spacecraft returned to Earth and on airplanes in the stratosphere, (2) investigations of dust impacts craters on lunar samples and manmade impact plates returned from space, and (3) insitu measurements of individual particles by instruments on board satellites and space probes. Dust particles collected in the upper atmosphere provide the morphology and chemical and mineralogical composition of extraterrestrial particles of 5 to 50 microns in diameter but no information on the source of these particles is obtained. The NASA Stardust mission was the first space mission that returned dust from a comet. The study of impact craters on man-made and lunar surface samples exposed to space is used to characterize the flux of interplanetary micrometeoroids and their size distribution. Microcraters have been found ranging from 0.02 μm to millimetres in diameter. In-situ detectors on board of satellites and spaceprobes for the measurement of interplanetary dust have been used in the ecliptic plane from inside Mercury's orbit to the Kuiper belt and in space above and below the solar poles. Penetration detectors have a detection threshold of

  10. Coordinates Analyses of Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles: Samples of Primitive Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere fall into two major groups: an anhydrous group termed the "chondritic-porous (CP) IDPs and a hydrated group, the "chondritic-smooth (CS) IDPs, although rare IDPs with mineralogies intermediate between these two groups are known [1]. The CP-IDPs are widely believed to be derived from cometary sources [e.g. 2]. The hydrated CS-IDPs show mineralogical similarities to heavily aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites (e.g. CI chondrites), but only a few have been directly linked to carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies [e.g. 3, 4]. Most CS-IDPs show distinct chemical [5] and oxygen isotopic composition differences [6-8] from primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Here, we report on our coordinated analyses of a suite of carbon-rich CS-IDPs focusing on their bulk compositions, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and isotopic compositions.

  11. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Simonia; Sh. Nabiyev

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  12. Capture of interplanetary and interstellar dust by the jovian magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J E; Horányi, M; Grün, E

    1998-04-01

    Interplanetary and interstellar dust grains entering Jupiter's magnetosphere form a detectable diffuse faint ring of exogenic material. This ring is composed of particles in the size range of 0. 5 to 1.5 micrometers on retrograde and prograde orbits in a 4:1 ratio, with semimajor axes 3 jovian radii, eccentricities 0. 1 < e < 0.3, and inclinations i less, similar 20 degrees or i greater, similar 160 degrees. The size range and the orbital characteristics are consistent with in situ detections of micrometer-sized grains by the Galileo dust detector, and the measured rates match the number densities predicted from numerical trajectory integrations. PMID:9525863

  13. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  14. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  15. Fractal signatures in analogs of interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Nisha; Banerjee, Varsha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earths stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. (2007) [1] to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension dm≃1.75. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from diffusion limited aggregation (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically transported silicate particles.

  16. Fractal Signatures in Analogs of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Puri, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are an important constituent of the earth's stratosphere, interstellar and interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, etc. Their physical and optical characteristics are significantly influenced by the morphology of silicate aggregates which form the core in IDPs. In this paper we reinterpret scattering data from laboratory analogs of cosmic silicate aggregates created by Volten et al. \\cite{volten2007}, to extract their morphological features. By evaluating the structure factor, we find that the aggregates are mass fractals with a mass fractal dimension $d_{m} \\simeq 1.75$. The same fractal dimension also characterizes clusters obtained from {\\it diffusion limited aggregation} (DLA). This suggests that the analogs are formed by an irreversible aggregation of stochastically-transported silicate particles

  17. Discovery of Brownleeite: a New Manganese Silicide Mineral in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Clemett, Simon J.; Messenger, Scott; Jones, John H.; Palma, Russell L.; Pepin, Robert O.; Klock, Wolfgang; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The Earth accretes approximately 40,000 tons of cosmic dust annually, originating mainly from the disintegration of comets and collisions among asteroids. This cosmic dust, also known as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), is a subject of intense interest since it is made of the original building blocks of our Solar System. Although the specific parent bodies of IDPs are unknown, the anhydrous chondritic-porous IDPs (CP-IDPs) subset has been potentially linked to a cometary source. The CP-IDPs are extremely primitive materials based on their unequilibrated mineralogy, C-rich chemistry, and anomalous isotopic signatures. In particular, some CP-IDPs escaped the thermal, aqueous and impact shock processing that has modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of meteorites. Thus, the CP-IDPs represent some of the most primitive solar system materials available for laboratory study. Most CP-IDPs are comprised of minerals that are common on Earth. However, in the course of an examination of one of the CP-IDPs, we encountered three sub-micrometer sized grains of manganese silicide (MnSi), a phase that has heretofore not been found in nature. In the seminar, we would like to focus on IDP studies and this manganese silicide phase that has been approved as the first new mineral identified from a comet by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA) in 2008. The mineral is named in honour of Donald E. Brownlee, an American astronomer and a founder of the field of cosmic dust research who is the principal investigator of the NASA Stardust Mission that collected dust samples from Comet 81P/Wild-2 and returned them to Earth. Much of our current view and understanding of the early solar system would not exist without the pioneering work of professor Don Brownlee in the study of IDPs.

  18. Observations of the spectrum of the interplanetary dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Moreno, G.

    Published data from satellite (IRAS), rocket-borne (ZIP), and balloon-borne (ARGO) spectroscopic observations of interplanetary dust emission in the FIR are compiled and analyzed, extending the spatial-distribution results of Salama et al. (1986) to evaluate the possible role of silicate and graphite grains in determining the FIR spectrum. The zodiacal dust spectra in the ecliptic plane at solar elongations epsilon = 45 and 90 deg are calculated on the basis of theoretical models and compared with the observations. A model based on a flat distribution of 10-micron-diameter silicate grains is shown to reproduce the observed spectrum at epsilon = 45 deg but not at epsilon = 90 deg, where a model with a mixture of silicate and graphite grains gives a better, but still unsatisfactory fit to the observations.

  19. Stochastic diffusion of dust grains by the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the sectored Interplanetary Magnetic Field on charged dust grains orbiting around the sun under radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag forces are examined for initially circular and non-inclined orbits. The distribution function of the charged grains satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation in which the sectored field is taken as a source of stochastic impulses. By adopting the integrals of the impulse-free motion as variable parameters, the Fokker-Planck equation can be properly treated as a diffusion equation. Analytic solutions of the resulting diffusion equation show that dust grains injected near the ecliptic plane are scattered strongly to high helio-latitudes. The scattering is more pronounced for small grains injected at large distances from the Sun. (author)

  20. Physical properties of interplanetary dust: laboratory and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadamcik, Edith; Lasue, Jeremie; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Cottin, Hervé; Fray, Nicolas; Guan, Yuan Yong; Szopa, Cyril

    interplanetary dust organics approaching the Sun. Albedo and polarization variations will be discussed. The polarization evolution will be compared to those obtained through observations [11]. Studies of the properties of our interplanetary dust cloud should provide information to better interpret observations of dust around exoplanets. Some of these planets are very close to their star. The thermal evolution of organics driven by chemical reactions will represent a fundamental knowledge to interpret the relevant polarimetric observations. We acknowledge CNES for funding the PROGRA2 experiment, CNES and ESA for the micro-gravity flights. [1] Renard J.-B. et al., Appl. Opt. 41, 609 (2002) [2] Hadamcik E. et al., In: Light scattering rev. 4, 31 (Kokhanovszky ed.), Springer -Praxis, Berlin (2009) [3] Mann I. et al., Space Sci. Rev. 110, 269 (2004) [4] Hoertz F. et al., Science 314, 716 (2006) [5] Lasue J. et al., Astron. Astrophys. 473, 641 (2007) [6] Levasseur-Regourd A.C et al., Planet Space Sci. 55, 1010 (2007) [7] Hadamcik E. et al., Icarus 190, 660 (2007) [8] Cottin H. et al., Adv. Space Res. 42, 2019 (2008) [9] Fray N. et al., Planet. Space Sci. 53, 1243 (2005) [10] Sciamma-O'Brien E. et al., Icarus, accepted [11] Levasseur-Regourd A.C., et al., In: Interplanetary dust, Gruen, Gustafson B., Dermott S., Fechtig H. (Eds), Springer, Berlin, 57 (2001)

  1. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Keller, L. P.

    1991-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period of the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites (near solar composition) of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. The former are subdivided (according to bulk composition and petrology) into CI, CM, CV, CO, CR, and ungrouped classes. IDPs are extraterrestrial particulates, collected in stratosphere, which have chemical compositions indicative of a primitive origin; they are typically distinct from the primitive meteorites. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is a high priority because of the important physico-chemical information they hold. The most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentine-group minerals, smectites, and micas. We discuss these phyllosilicates and describe the interpretation of their occurrence in meteorites and IDPs and what this indicates about history of their parent bodies, which are probably the hydrous asteroids.

  2. An interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1992-01-01

    W7013F5 is a chondritic, hydrated interplanetary dust particle whose composition and mineralogy is nearly identical to that found in the CI chondrites. Transmission electron microscope observations show that the phyllosilicates in W7013F5 consist largely of a coherent undergrowth of Mg-Fe serpentine and Fe-bearing saponite on the unitcell scale. This distinctive intergrowth of phyllosilicates has only been observed previously in the CI chondrites. Other secondary minerals in W7013F5 include Mg-Fe carbonates, magnetite, and pentlandite. The mineral assemblage in W7013F5 is generally not as oxidized as that in the CI chondrites. The presence of kamacite in W7013F5 indicates that the particle is extraterrestrial, and a thin amorphous rim surrounding the particle provides evidence that it is not a piece of a meteorite that fragmented during transit through the atmosphere. The apparent lack of hydrated IDPs with CI mineralogy and chemistry may indicate that CI-type dust-producing asteroids are uncommon in the asteroid belt.

  3. An improved model for interplanetary dust fluxes in the outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer Solar System constrained by in situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer Solar System for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. Finally, we compare the model predictions of interplanetary dust oxygen influx to the giant planet atmospheres with various observational and photochemical constraints and generally find good agreement, with the exception of Jupiter, which suggests the possibility of additional chemical pathways for exogenous oxygen in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  4. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  5. Mineralogy of interplanetary dust particles from the 'olivine' infrared class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy observations establish that olivine is abundant and the predominant silicate phase in three interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from the 'olivine' infrared spectra category. Two of the particles have microstructures resembling those of most nonhydrous chondritic IDPs, consisting of micron to submicron grains together with a matrix composed of amorphous carbonaceous material and sub-500 A grains. In addition to olivine these particles respectively contain enstatite and magnetite, and pentlandite plus Ca-rich clinopyroxene. The third IDP consists mostly of olivine and pyrrhotite with little or no matrix material. Olivine grains in this particle contain prominent solar-flare ion tracks with densities corresponding to a space-exposure age between 1000 to 100,000 years. Although the three particles have olivine-rich mineralogies in common, other aspects of their mineralogies and microstructures suggest that they experienced different formation histories. The differences between the particles indicate that the olivine infrared spectral category is a diverse collection of IDPs that probably incorporates several genetic groups.

  6. Fullerenes and interplanetary dust at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreda, Robert J; Becker, Luann

    2003-01-01

    We recently presented new evidence that an impact occurred approximately 250 million years ago at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB), triggering the most severe mass extinction in the history of life on Earth. We used a new extraterrestrial tracer, fullerene, a third carbon carrier of noble gases besides diamond and graphite. By exploiting the unique properties of this molecule to trap noble gases inside of its caged structure (helium, neon, argon), the origin of the fullerenes can be determined. Here, we present new evidence for fullerenes with extraterrestrial noble gases in the PTB at Graphite Peak, Antarctica, similar to PTB fullerenes from Meishan, China and Sasayama, Japan. In addition, we isolated a (3)He-rich magnetic carrier phase in three fractions from the Graphite Peak section. The noble gases in this magnetic fraction were similar to zero-age deep-sea interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and some magnetic grains isolated from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The helium and neon isotopic compositions for both the bulk Graphite Peak sediments and an isolated magnetic fraction from the bulk material are consistent with solar-type gases measured in zero-age deep-sea sediments and point to a common source, namely, the flux of IDPs to the Earth's surface. In this instance, the IDP noble gas signature for the bulk sediment can be uniquely decoupled from fullerene, demonstrating that two separate tracers are present (direct flux of IDPs for (3)He vs. giant impact for fullerene).

  7. Physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the micrometeoroid experiment on board of Helios allowed the measurement of physical and chemical characteristics of interplanetary dust particles between 0.3AU and 1AU solar distance. During the first 10 orbits of Helios 1,235 impacts of micrometeoroids have been detected. 83 particles have been registered by the ecliptic sensor and 152 by the south sensor. Most of the particles detected by the ecliptic sensor had masses 10-13g -10g and impacted the sensor from the apex direction. The particles observed by the south sensor had masses 10-15g -9g and impacted the sensor from all directions with a slightly enhanced flux from solar direction. The average impact speed of particles with masses 10-13g -10g was 15km/s. From 1AU to.3AU, the observed paritcle flux increased by a factor 5-10. The orbits of the registered particles are highly eccentric, e approx. >= 0.6, and some are hyperbolic. The mass spectra measured upon impact allow the classification of chondritic and iron-rich particles. Approx. 20% of the particles had low densities rho 3. On 4 particles, a positive electric charge has been observed. (orig.)

  8. Cometary dust: A thermal criterion to identify cometary samples among the collected interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George J.

    The relative proportions of the cometary and the asteroidal contributions to the interplanetary dust have not yet been definitively established. These proportions may vary with time as a result of major catastrophic disruptions in the main belt or the appearance of fresh, active comets. Dermott et al. and Reach suggest the debris from catastrophic collisions in the main belt can account for most of the zodiacal cloud particles. Earth collection of these asteroidal particles is strongly favored by near-Earth gravitational enhancement. However, comets are observed to produce interplanetary dust particles (IDP's), and the identification of cometary IDP's would allow inferences of the compositions, mineralogies, and physical properties of the comets. The peak temperatures reached by IDP's on atmospheric entry indicate the distribution of IDP velocities. Each IDP contains many internal thermometers: minerals that transform above certain temperatures, volatile elements that are lost sequentially with increasing temperatures, solar flare tracks that anneal at different temperatures in different minerals, and solar-implanted noble gases that outgas progressively with temperature. Thus, limits on the peak temperature reached by each IDP on Earth atmospheric entry can be set. Other aspects of this investigation are covered.

  9. An improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes to the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer solar system constrained by in-situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer solar system for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in-situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. We present modeled mass fluxes to various moons, atmospheres, and ring systems of the outer planets.

  10. Link between interplanetary & cometary dust: Polarimetric observations and space studies with Rosetta & Eye-Sat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Gaboriaud, Alain; Buil, Christian; Ressouche, Antoine; Lasue, J.; Palun, Adrien; Apper, Fabien; Elmaleh, Marc

    Intensity and linear polarization observations of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust, the so-called zodiacal light, provide information on properties of the dust particles, such as their spatial density, local changes, morphology and albedo. Earth-based polarimetric observations, with a resolution of 5° or more, have been used to derive the polarization phase curve of interplanetary dust particles and to establish that the polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance, at least up to 1.5 au in the ecliptic, while the albedo decreases [1, 2]. Analysis of such studies will be revisited. Numerical simulations of the polarimetric behavior of interplanetary dust particles strongly suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of absorbing (e.g., organic compounds) and less absorbing (e.g., silicates) materials, that radial changes originate in a decrease of organics with decreasing solar distance (probably due to alteration processes), and that a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is of cometary origin, in agreement with dynamical studies [3, 4]. The polarimetric behaviors of interplanetary dust and cometary dust particles seem to present striking similarities. The properties of cometary dust particles, as derived from remote polarimetric observations of comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the Rosetta rendezvous mission, at various wavelengths, will be summarized [5, 6]. The ground truth expected from Rosetta dust experiments, i.e., MIDAS, COSIMA, GIADA, about dust particles’ morphology, composition, and evolution (with distance to the nucleus before Philae release and with distance to the Sun before and after perihelion passage) over the year and a half of nominal mission, will be discussed. Finally, the Eye-Sat nanosatellite will be presented. This triple cubesat, developed by students from engineering schools working as interns at CNES, is to be launched

  11. The Origin of Organic Matter in the Solar System: Evidence from Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the organic matter in interplanetary materials has not been established. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed, with two extreme cases being a Fisher-Tropsch type process operating in the gas phase of the solar nebula or a Miller-Urey type process, which requires interaction with an aqueous fluid, presumably occurring on an asteroid. In the Fisher-Tropsch case, we might expect similar organic matter in hydrated and anhydrous interplanetary materials. However, aqueous alteration is required in the case of the Miller-Urey process, and we would expect to see organic matter preferentially in interplanetary materials that exhibit evidence of aqueous activity, such as the presence of hydrated silicates. The types and abundance of organic matter in meteorites have been used as an indicator of the origin of organic matter in the Solar System. Indigenous complex organic matter, including amino acids, has been found in hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Murchison. Much lower amounts of complex organic matter, possibly only terrestrial contamination, have been found in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Allende, that contain most of their carbon in elemental form. These results seem to favor production of the bulk of the organic matter in the Solar System by aqueous processing on parent bodies such as asteroids, a Miller-Urey process. However, the hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have approximately solar abundances of the moderately volatile elements, while all anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have significantly lower contents of these moderately volatile elements. Two mechanisms, incomplete condensation or evaporation, both of which involve processing at approx. 1200 C, have been suggested to explain the lower content of the moderately volatile elements in all anhydrous meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Microbeam analysis of four chondritic interplanetary dust particles for major elements, carbon and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compositions determined using electron excited X-rays are reported for four interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. These analyses include measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances which are important elements in these primitive materials. Spot analyses show very heterogeneous compositions on a micrometer scale although average composition approaches that of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. While the spot analyses show intermediate compositions between cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrites, the heterogeneity more closely resembles that of comet Halley dust particles.

  13. Polarimetry of Dust in Optically Thin Clouds: Observations and Experimental Simulations of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Lasue, J.

    2013-12-01

    Remote polarimetric observations are used to tentatively infer the physical properties of the dust particles in cometary and interplanetary environments. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental simulations are necessary. Light scattering measurements on levitating particles with the PROGRA2 experiment -in dedicated microgravity flights or in the laboratory for low-density particles- provide relevant simulations of the scattering properties of real particles, which can present large size distributions and a large variety of structures and materials (Renard et al., 2002; Hadamcik et al., 2009). Previous systematic experiments, together with numerical models and laboratory analysis of cosmic particles (e.g. Stardust samples) allow to optimize dust particles' properties -such as their structures, sizes, size distributions, and silicate to organics ratios- (Hadamcik et al. 2007a; Zubko et al., 2009; Lasue et al., 2010). We present intensity and polarization images of cometary comae providing evidence for changes in the polarization properties in the internal regions of the coma, linked to the variation of particles properties with nucleus distance and/or rotation phase (Hadamcik et al., 2007a; Hadamcik et al., 2013a; 2013b) and preliminary results of 2013 observations. Associated experimental simulations help us to interpret how particles evolve within different coma regions and at different solar distances (Hadamcik et al. 2007b; 2009; 2011). We expect in situ confirmation of our results during the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014-2015 (Hadamcik et al., 2010). Analyses of observations of the zodiacal light scattered by the interplanetary dust cloud particles have shown local polarisation changes with the solar distance (Levasseur-Regourd et al., 2001). Such changes are interpreted through numerical models to be related to variations in the composition and physical properties of the particles through various processes including

  14. Synchrotron FTIR Examination of Interplanetary Dust Particles: An Effort to Determine the Compounds and Minerals in Interstellar and Circumstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2002-01-01

    Some interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, are the most primitive extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis. Many exhibit isotopic anomalies in H, N, and O, suggesting they contain preserved interstellar matter. We report the preliminary results of a comparison of the infrared absorption spectra of subunits of the IDPs with astronomical spectra of interstellar grains.

  15. Organic matter on the early surface of Mars: An assessment of the contribution by interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations by Anders and Chyba et al. have recently revived interest in the suggestion that organic compounds important to the development of life were delivered to the primitive surface of the Earth by comets, asteroids or the interplanetary dust derived from these two sources. Anders has shown that the major post-accretion contribution of extraterrestrial organic matter to the surface of the Earth is from interplanetary dust. Since Mars is a much more favorable site for the gentle deceleration of interplanetary dust particles than is Earth, model calculations show that biologically important organic compounds are likely to have been delivered to the early surface of Mars by the interplanetary dust in an order-of-magnitude higher surface density than onto the early Earth. Using the method described by Flynn and McKay, the size frequency distribution, and the atmospheric entry velocity distribution of IDP's at Mars were calculated. The entry velocity distribution, coupled with the atmospheric entry heating model developed by Whipple and extended by Fraundorf was used to calculate the fraction of the particles in each mass decade which survives atmospheric entry without melting (i.e., those not heated above 1600K). The incident mass and surviving mass in each mass decade are shown for both Earth and Mars.

  16. Interplanetary dust physical properties deduced from scattered and emitted light simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Fray, N.; Cottin, H.

    2007-08-01

    In situ studies as well as interplanetary dust particles collections in the earth stratosphere provide important but spatially limited information about the interplanetary dust properties. It is therefore of major importance to complement these studies through remote observations of scattered and emitted light, interpreted through numerical simulations. Physical properties of the interplanetary dust in the near-ecliptic symmetry surface, such as the local polarization, the temperature and its composition, together with their heliocentric variations, may be derived from such observations [1], giving clues to the respective contribution of the particles sources. The size distribution, as well as the shape and the composition of the particles constituting the interplanetary dust cloud are tentatively derived from scattered and emitted light observations through a model of light scattering by a cloud of solid particles constituted by spheroidal grains and aggregates thereof [2]. Considering the same particles cloud, this model allows us to simultaneously interpret the heliocentric variation of the temperature, which is different from the black body one. A good fit of the local polarization phase curve, P(?), near 1.5 AU from the Sun is obtained for a mixture of both silicates and more absorbing organics material (˜40% in mass) and for a realistic particles size distribution, typical of the interplanetary dust (power law a-3 for particles with an equivalent diameter in the 0.2 μm to 20 μm size range and a-4.4 for larger particles). The contribution of un-fragmented dust particles aggregates of cometary origin is at least 20% in mass around 1.5 AU. This size distribution can also explain the variation of temperature with the solar distance. The decrease of P(?=90°) with the solar distance between 1.5 and 0.5 AU is interpreted as a progressive disappearance of solid organics (such as HCN polymers [3] or amorphous carbon) towards the Sun, probably linked with the

  17. Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbon in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Wopenka, B.

    1987-01-01

    Raman spectra of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteorites containing material similar to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) show features that are similar in position and relative strength to interstellar IR emission features attributable to vibrational transitions in free molecular-sized PAHs. In addition, these spectra sometimes show red photoluminescence that has elsewhere been attributed to PAHs, and a part of the carbonaceous phase in IDPs and meteorites contain a degree of deuterium enrichment anticipated in small, free PAHs that are exposed to ISM UV radiation. These observations suggest that some of the IDPs' carbonaceous material may have been produced in circumstellar dust shells, and only slightly modified in interstellar space.

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE GEGENSCHEIN AND THE GEOMETRIC ALBEDO OF INTERPLANETARY DUST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed optical observations of the Gegenschein using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled wide-field camera, the Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector (WIZARD), between 2003 March and 2006 November. We found a narrow brightness enhancement superimposed on the smooth gradient of the Gegenschein at the exact position of the antisolar point. Whereas the Gegenschein morphology changed according to the orbital motion of the Earth, the maximum brightness coincided with the antisolar direction throughout the year. We compared the observed morphology of the Gegenschein with those of models in which the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was considered and found that the volume scattering phase function had a narrow backscattering enhancement. The morphology was reproducible with a spatial distribution model for infrared zodiacal emission. It is likely that the zero-phase peak (the so-called opposition effect) was caused by coherent backscattering and/or shadow-hiding effects on the rough surfaces of individual dust particles. These results suggest that big particles are responsible for both zodiacal light and zodiacal emission. Finally, we derived the geometric albedo of the smooth component of interplanetary dust, assuming big particles, and obtained a geometric albedo of 0.06 ± 0.01. The derived albedo is in accordance with collected dark micrometeorites and observed cometary dust particles. We concluded that chondritic particles are dominant near Earth space, supporting the recent theoretical study by dynamical simulation.

  19. Analysis of organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for the origin of Solar System organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George

    Analysis of organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for the origin of Solar System organic matter Chondritic, porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), the most primitive samples of extraterrestrial material available for laboratory analysis [1], are unequilibrated aggregates of mostly submicron, anhydrous grains of a diverse mineralogy. They contain organic matter not produced by parent body aqueous processing [2], some carrying H and N isotopic anomalies consistent with molecular cloud or outer Solar System material [3]. Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscope (STXM) imaging at the C K-edge shows the individual grains in 10 micron aggregate CP IDPs are coated by a layer of carbonaceous material 100 nm thick. This structure implies a three-step formation sequence. First, individual grains condensed from the cooling nebular gas. Then complex, refractory organic molecules covered the surfaces of the grains either by deposition, formation in-situ, or a combination of both processes. Finally, the grains collided and stuck together forming the first dust-size material in the Solar System. Ultramicrotome sections, 70 to 100 nm thick were cut from several CP IDPs, embedded in elemental S to avoid exposure to C-based embedding media. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectra were derived from image stacks obtained using a STXM. "Cluster analysis" was used to compare the C-XANES spectra from each of the pixels in an image stack and identify pixels exhibiting similar spectra. When applied to a CP IDP, cluster analysis identifies most carbonaceous grain coatings in a particle as having similar C-XANES spectra. Two processes are commonly suggested in the literature for production of organic grain coatings. The similarity in thickness and C-XANES spectra of the coatings on different minerals in the same IDP indicates the first, mineral specific catalysis, was not the process that produced these organic rims. Our results

  20. Pristine stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust on an oil-free polyurethane foam substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay P.; Clemett, Simon J.

    2015-08-01

    We performed chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic studies of the first interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere without the use of silicone oil. The collection substrate, polyurethane foam, effectively traps impacting particles, but the lack of an embedding medium results in significant particle fragmentation. Two dust particles found on the collector exhibit the typical compositional and mineralogical properties of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic imaging revealed isotopic anomalies of typical magnitude and spatial variability observed in previous CP-IDP studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows that individual mineral grains and glass with embedded metal and sulfide (GEMS) grains are dominated by solar system materials. No systematic differences are observed in element abundance patterns of GEMS grains from the dry collection versus silicone oil-collected IDPs. This initial study establishes the validity of a new IDP collection substrate that avoids the use of silicone oil as a collection medium, removing the need for this problematic contaminant and the organic solvents necessary to remove it. Additional silicone oil-free collections of this type are needed to determine more accurate bulk element abundances of IDPs and to examine the indigenous soluble organic components of IDPs.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  2. A 100,000-year periodicity in the accretion rate of interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp; Dermott

    1998-05-01

    Numerical modeling of the orbital evolution of interplanetary dust particles revealed that, over the past 1.2 million years, the rate of accretion of dust by Earth has varied by a factor of 2 to 3. These variations display a 100,000-year periodicity and are anticorrelated with Earth's changing orbital eccentricity. Extraterrestrial helium-3 concentrations in a deep-sea sediment core display a similar periodicity but are 50,000 years out of phase with the predicted variations. Also, because collisions between large bodies in the asteroid belt are inevitable, it is expected that large-amplitude stochastic variations on 10(7)- to 10(8)-year time scales would be superimposed on the 10(5)-year periodic variations. PMID:9572725

  3. Discovery of Presolar Corundum (and SiC?) in an Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadermann, F. J.; Floss, C.

    2004-01-01

    This work is part of an ongoing investigation [1-3] of isotopically anomalous phases in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) on a scale of 100 nm. Previously, such NanoSIMS studies have found sub-micrometer sized, isotopically distinct presolar grains in IDPs at higher abundances than in primitive meteorites [1-5], which demonstrates the unique and primitive nature of IDPs. Although not all presolar grains found so far in IDPs have been chemically or petrographically characterized, the majority appear to be silicate stardust. Conspicuously absent from the presolar grain inventory in IDPs have been other grain types, which are commonly found in primitive meteorites, such as SiC and corundum (Al2O3).

  4. IRSI-DARWIN How to see through the interplanetary dust cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, M; Flury, W; Fridlund, M; Karlsson, A M; Léger, A

    2001-01-01

    ESA has identified interferometry as one of the major goals of the Horizon 2000+ programme. Infrared interferometers are a highly sensitive astronomical instruments that enable us to observe terrestrial planets around nearby stars. In this context the Infrared Space Interferometry Mission (IRSI)/ DARWIN is studied. The current design calls for a constellation of 6 free flying telescopes using 1.5m mirrors, plus one hub and one master spacecraft. As the baseline trajectory an orbit about the second collinear libration point of the Earth-Sun system has been selected. The thermal radiation from the interplanetary dust cloud that surrounds the Sun, the so-called zodiacal infrared foreground, is a major concern for any high-sensitivity infrared mission. The most reliable information about this radiation comes from the measurements by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission. There are various ways to detect faint terrestrial planets despite the bright foreground. We find that, using integration times in th...

  5. Inferring Sources in the Interplanetary Dust Cloud, from Observations and Simulations of Zodiacal Light and Thermal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles physical properties may be approached through observations of the solar light they scatter, specially its polarization, and of their thermal emission. Results, at least near the ecliptic plane, on polarization phase curves and on the heliocentric dependence of the local spatial density, albedo, polarization and temperature are summarized. As far as interpretations through simulations are concerned, a very good fit of the polarization phase curve near 1.5 AU is obtained for a mixture of silicates and more absorbing organics material, with a significant amount of fluffy aggregates. In the 1.5-0.5 AU solar distance range, the temperature variation suggests the presence of a large amount of absorbing organic compounds, while the decrease of the polarization with decreasing solar distance is indeed compatible with a decrease of the organics towards the Sun. Such results are in favor of the predominance of dust of cometary origin in the interplanetary dust cloud, at least below 1.5 AU. The implication of these results on the delivery of complex organic molecules on Earth during the LHB epoch, when the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was orders of magnitude greater than today, is discussed.

  6. Arecibo radar micrometeor studies: Interplanetary dust in the solar system and the atmospheric fate of this dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, J.; Briczinski, S.; Meisel, D.; Zhou, Q.; Janches, D.

    Radar (head-echo) observations of micrometeors at Arecibo uniquely yield velocity, deceleration, radiant, and scattering mechanism information of large numbers of interplanetary dust particles. The resulting high accuracy meteoroid orbit determinations indicate that most of these particles are in heliocentric orbits with about 5% in hyperbolic, usually extrasolar orbits, and with a comparable fraction appearing to enter the atmosphere from highly eccentric geocentric orbits. Heliocentric orbits range from low/high inclination, prograde/retrograde, and interstellar particles are readily discerned even in the large flux of ecliptic and near-ecliptic particles. Observed particle masses range from a few micrograms to a small fraction of a nanogram, a size range that requires taking into account radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, as well as dusty plasma effects in the solar wind---particle charging and motion in the solar wind magnetic field. The atmospheric fate of these meteoroids is also of interest with 10-20% of all particles disappearing in ``terminal'' events and with perhaps 5% of the slow (15-25 km/sec) particles displaying evidence of trail-scattering with implications for the atmospheric interaction process. Terminal events are presumed to deposit the meteoroid mass as ``smoke'' particles rather than in atomic form that results from ablation. We give the micrometeoroid altitude, speed, deceleration, mass, and orbital distributions from February 2001, the first data set for which a completely automated analysis approach was employed.

  7. Charged dust grain dynamics subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the interplanetary magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Lhotka, Christoph; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the un-averaged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semi-major axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces unde...

  8. Stable motions of charged dust grains subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the mean interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semi-major axis.

  9. Physics of interplanetary dust capture via impact into organic polymer foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William W.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of hypervelocity impacts into foams is of interest because of the possible application to interplanetary dust particle (IDP) capture by spacecraft. We present a model for the phenomena occurring in such impacts into low-density organic polymer foams. Particles smaller than foam cells behave as if the foam is a series of solid slabs and are fragmented and, at higher velocities, thermally altered. Particles much larger than the foam cells behave as if the foam were a continuum, allowing the use of a continuum mechanics model to describe the effects of drag and ablation. Fragmentation is expected to be a major process, especially for aggregates of small grains. Calculations based on these arguments accurately predict experimental data and, for hypothetical IDPs, indicate that recovery of organic materials will be low for encounter velocities greater than 5 km/s. For an organic particle 100 micrometers in diameter, approx. 35% of the original mass would be collected in an impact at 5 km/s, dropping to approx. 10% at 10 km/s and approx. 0% at 15 km/s. For the same velocities the recovery ratios for troilite (FeS) are approx. 95%, 65%, and 50%, and for olivine (Mg2SiO4) they are approx. 98%, 80%, and 65%, demonstrating that inorganic materials are much more easily collected. The density of the collector material has only a second-order effect, changing the recovered mass by less than 10% of the original mass.

  10. Investigating the Role of Earth's Quasi-Satellite Resonance in the Accretion of Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, S.

    2012-12-01

    We studied the orbital evolution of low inclination asteroidal interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) decaying towards 1 AU under the influence of radiation pressure, PR drag, and solar wind drag. We used a series of β values (the ratio of radiation pressure to central gravity) ranging from 0.0025 up to 0.02. Assuming a composition consistent with astronomical silicate and a particle density of 2.5 g cm-3 these β values correspond to diameters ranging from 200 down to 25 microns, respectively. Simulations with the larger IDPs (>50 microns) typically showed that 100% of the dust particles became temporarily trapped in mean-motion resonances outside Earth's orbit. When trapped in these outer resonances a dust particle's orbital eccentricity significantly increases (sometimes to e > 0.2) while its decay in semi-major axis is halted. Most dust particles eventually slip out of these outer resonances and their orbits continue decaying inwards toward 1 AU. We found that a significant fraction of the initial populations subsequently became trapped in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. In addition to traditional horseshoe type co-orbitals, IDPs also became trapped as so-called quasi-satellites. About 1% of the smallest IDPs (25 microns) and 10% of the largest (200 microns) became trapped in the quasi-satellite resonance for some length of time. Quasi-satellite IDPs always remain relatively near to Earth, within about 0.2-0.3 AU, and undergo two close-encounters with Earth each year. While resonant perturbations from Earth halt the decay in semi-major axis of quasi-satellite IDPs their eccentricities continue to decrease, forcing the IDPs onto more Earth-like orbits and causing them to spiral closer and closer to Earth. This has dramatic consequences for the relative velocity and distance of closest approach between Earth and the IDPs. After about 104 years in the quasi-satellite resonance IDPs are typically less than 0.1 AU from Earth and consistently coming within about

  11. Interplanetary matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the total number of 57 presented papers 56 have been submitted to INIS. One paper was out of INIS scope. List of sessions (in brackets is the number of papers presented in the respective session and incorporated in the INIS): Preface (2), Comets (17), Asteroids (7), Meteors (19), Interplanetary dust (9), Other bodies (2). (Z.S.). 155 figs., 68 tabs., 1140 refs

  12. Precision Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; Keller, L. P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chondritic-smooth IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles) are low porosity objects whose mineralogy is dominated by aqueous alteration products such as Mg-rich phyllosilicates (smectite and serpentine group) and Mg-Fe carbonate minerals. Their hydrated mineralogy combined with low atmospheric entry velocities have been used to infer an origin largely from asteroidal sources. Spectroscopic studies show that the types and abundance of organic matter in CS IDPs is similar to that in CP IDPs. Although CS IDPs show broad similarities to primitive carbonaceous chondrites, only a few particles have been directly linked to specific meteorite groups such as CM and CI chondrites based on the presence of diagnostic minerals. Many CS IDPs however, have carbon contents that greatly exceed that of known meteorite groups suggesting that they either may derive from comets or represent samples of more primitive parent bodies than do meteorites. It is now recognized that many large, dark primitive asteroids in the outer main belt, as well as some trans-Neptunian objects, show spectroscopic evidence for aqueous alteration products on their surfaces. Some CS IDPs exhibit large bulk D enrichments similar to those observed in the cometary CP IDPs. While hydrated minerals in comets have not been unambiguously identified to date, the presence of the smectite group mineral nontronite has been inferred from infrared spectra obtained from the ejecta from comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact mission. Recent observations of low temperature sulfide minerals in Stardust mission samples suggest that limited aqueous activity occurred on comet Wild-2. All of these observations, taken together, suggest that the high-carbon hydrated IDPs are abundant and important samples of primitive solar system objects not represented in meteorite collections. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a 16O-rich reservoir and a 17O,18O-rich reservoir produced via mass

  13. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  14. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  15. Identification and Characterization of Early Solar system Organic Matter Preserved in Chondritic Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), collected by NASA from the Earth's stratosphere, have experienced minimal aqueous or thermal alteration since their formation. These CP IDPs are the best preserved samples of the minerals and organic matter that was present in the primitive Solar Nebula that are currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. The ~10 μm CP IDPs are aggregates of tens-of-thousands of mostly sub-micron grains of diverse compositions and mineralogies. Many of the individual mineral grains are coated by a 50 to 200 nm thick rims of carbonaceous material, and other carbonaceous material occurs as larger, discrete subunits within the particles [2]. We characterize this carbonaceous material using two high-resolution, synchrotron-based instruments: a Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) to locate and map the carbon and to identify its major functional groups by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and a micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (μ-FTIR) spectrometer to further characterize the functional groups by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Carbon-XANES spectroscopy identifies the rims coating the individual grains in CP IDPs as organic matter, dominated by the C=C, likely C-rings, and the C=O functional groups [3]. This structure, with the organic rims being the contact surfaces between the grains, implies a 3-step formation sequence: grain condensation, organic rim emplacement, and, finally, aggregation of the grains to form the dust particles. This suggests these organic rims formed very early in the evolution of the Solar Nebula, after grain condensation but before grain aggregation [3]. These organic rims coat grains of diverse compositions, including silicates, sulfides, and carbonates, which is inconsistent with formation by Fischer-Tropsch-like, mineral-specific catalysis, one of the mechanisms suggested for the formation of primitive organic matter. Our observations are consistent with an

  16. A Fluorescent Aerogel for Capture and Identification of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, G; Phillips, M L F; Jones, S M; Dominguez, Gerardo; Westphal, Andrew J.; Phillips, Mark L.F.; Jones, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    Contemporary interstellar dust has never been analyzed in the laboratory, despite its obvious astronomical importance and its potential as a probe of stellar nucleosynthesis and galactic chemical evolution. Here we report the discovery of a novel fluorescent aerogel which is capable of capturing hypervelocity dust grains and passively recording their kinetic energies. An array of these "calorimetric" aerogel collectors in low earth orbit would lead to the capture and identification of large numbers of interstellar dust grains.

  17. Coordinated Analyses of Mineral-organic Matter Associations in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Smith, T.; Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.; Khodja, H.; Taylor, S.; Wirick, S.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the timing and processes involved in the incorporation of organic matter with inorganic materials in early Solar System bodies. Recently, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) studies showed carbon-rich rims surrounding individual mineral grains in anhydrous IDPs [1,2]. These carbonaceous rims are believed to have formed prior to parent body formation and likely served to bond mineral grains during accretion into larger aggregates. We are exploring the nature of these carbonaceous rims through coordinated analyses of their chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy and isotopic characteristics. Here we report our preliminary mineralogical observations.

  18. Analysis of the Organic Matter in Interplanetary Dust Particles: Clues to the Organic Matter in Comets, Asteroids, and Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection spectroscopy suggests the C- , P-, and D-types of asteroids contain abundant carbon, but these Vis-nearIR spectra are featureless, providing no information on the type(s) of carbonaceous matter. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrates that organic carbon is a significant component in comets and as grains or grain coatings in the interstellar medium. Most of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) recovered from the Earth s stratosphere are believed to be fragments from asteroids or comets, thus characterization of the carbon in IDPs provides the opportunity to determine the type(s) and abundance of organic matter in asteroids and comets. Some IDPs exhibit isotopic excesses of D and N-15, indicating the presence of interstellar material. The characterization of the carbon in these IDPs, and particularly any carbon spatially associated with the isotopic anomalies, provides the opportunity to characterize interstellar organic matter.

  19. CM-like Interplanetary Dust Particles in Lower Stratosphere During 1989 October and 1991 June/July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stratospheric interplanetary dust particles L2005T12 and L2011O3 are linked to CM chondrite matrix. Particle L2005T12 is dominated by tabular grains of partially dehydrated greenalite-rich serpentine. Its amorphous matrix contains abundant smectite nanocrystals and annular Fe,Ni,S units. A uniquely stratified (partial) maghemite rim occurs only on S-rich parts of the matrix. Formation of this rim and Mg depletions in the matrix occurred during atmospheric entry heating of this particle. Particle L2011O3 has large iron sulfide and magnesiowustite grains in an amorphous low-Al, ferromagnesiosilica matrix. Hydrous crystallisation of this matrix produced ultrafine-grained smectites and disseminated iron sulfides. Atmospheric entry heating of both particles is indicated by the partial iron oxide rim, vesicular sulfides, and the scatter of matrix compositions due to loss of Mg. While many uncertainties remain, the high incidence of chondritic rough particles, which include an unknown amount of CM-like particles, in the lower stratosphere during 1984, 1989, and 1991 suggests annual variations in their abundances. The timing of lower stratospheric dust samplings is critical to collect these particles.

  20. Dust properties determined from backscattering in the interplanetary and interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and composition of comet dust were investigated through the dependence of polarization and angular albedo as a function of phase angle. The investigations concentrated on small phase angles (comet near opposition). Polarization measurements over wide ranges of phase angle were made for three comets. The polarization data showed no color dependence from 0.5 μm to 0.8 μm. Data from two comets confirmed that the position angle of the polarization lies parallel to the scattering plane at small phase angles. All polarization data of comets at small phase angles were merged to show that the angular dependence of polarization repeats from comet to comet. Mie models were unable to explain the polarization observations, even though the parameters were varied over wide ranges. Infrared observations of the reflected solar spectrum and the dust thermal spectrum allowed a determination of the angular albedo of comet dust. The angular albedo at all phase angles describes the dust phase functions. A large phase coefficient is characteristic of class C asteroids, asteroids of low albedo. The comet infrared data supports the conclusions of the polarization study. An attempt to observe a polarization signature of comet dust in the Orion Nebula could not be completed because of instrumental problems. Instrumental improvements are suggested

  1. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 2. Smectites and micas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    The classification is briefly summarized of stony meteorites and cosmic dust, and the mineralogy and chemistry is described of serpentine group minerals. The occurrence of smectites and micas in extraterrestrial materials is examined. The characterization of fine grained minerals in meteorites and IDPs relies heavily on electron beam instruments, especially the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Typically, phyllosilicates are identified by a combination of high resolution imaging of basal spacings, electron diffraction, and chemical analysis. Smectites can be difficult to differentiate from micas because the smectites lose their interlayer water and the interlayer partly collapse in the high vacuum of the TEM.

  2. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel w...

  3. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm(3) developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  4. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  5. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  6. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  7. Comparison of the Oxidation State of Fe in Comet 81P/Wild 2 and Chondritic-Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ogliore, R C; Fakra, S C; Gainsforth, Z; Marcus, M A; Westphal, A J

    2010-01-01

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP- IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alteration have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed ~300 nanograms of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are >2{\\sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all J...

  8. Interplanetary Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) has been used as a diagnostic of solar wind speed and interplanetary plasma turbulence, allowing inference of speed and electron density power spectrum close to the Sun and out of the ecliptic. In that context, IPS is 'signal' and provides scientifically interesting data. IPS is also of interest because amplitude and phase perturbations imposed on radio waves are 'noise' for telemetry and precision Doppler tracking of deep space probes and for some radio astronomical observations. This paper briefly reviews the connection between scattering observables and the electron density power spectrum. Interplanetary phase scintillation on time scales of 100 to 10 000 seconds is an important noise in mass determinations of small solar system bodies during space-probe fly-bys and in searches for low-frequency gravitational radiation.

  9. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anhydrous ammonia. 573.180 Section 573.180 Food... Additive Listing § 573.180 Anhydrous ammonia. (a) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly...: (1)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied as a component of an aqueous premix...

  10. Dusty Plasma Effects in the Interplanetary Medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Issautier, Karine; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Le Chat, Gaétan; Czechowski, Andrzej; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Zouganelis, Yannis; Belheouane, Soraya

    Cosmic dust particles exist in a variety of compositions and sizes in the interplanetary medium. There is little direct information on the composition, but those interplanetary dust particles that are collected in the upper Earth’s atmosphere and can be studied in the laboratory typically have an irregular, sometimes porous structure on scales carbide, iron-nickel and iron-sulfur compounds, calcium- and aluminum oxides, and chemical compounds that contain a large mass fraction of carbon (e.g. carbonaceous species). A fraction of the dust originates from comets, but because of their bulk material temperature of about 280 K near 1 AU, most icy compounds have disappeared. The dust particles are embedded in the solar wind, a hot plasma with at 1 AU kinetic temperatures around 100 000 K and flow direction nearly radial outward from the Sun at supersonic bulk velocities around 400 km/s. Since the dust particles carry an electric surface charge they are subject to electromagnetic forces and the nanodust particles are efficiently accelerated to velocities of order of solar wind speed. The acceleration of the nanodust is similar, but not identical to the formation of pick-up ions. The S/WAVES radio wave instrument on STEREO measured a flux of nanodust at 1 AU [1]. The nanodust probably forms in the region inward of 1 AU and is accelerated by the solar wind as discussed. We also discuss the different paths of dust - plasma interactions in the interplanetary medium and their observations with space experiments. Comparing these interactions we show that the interplanetary medium near 1 AU can in many cases be described as “dust in plasma" rather than "dusty plasma”. [1] S. Belheouane, N. Meyer-Vernet, K. Issautier, G. Le Chat, A. Zaslavsky, Y. Zouganelis, I. Mann, A. Czechowski: Dynamics of nanoparticles detected at 1 AU by S/WAVES onboard STEREO spacecraft, in this session.

  11. The distribution of interplanetary dust between 0.96 and 1.04 AU as inferred from impacts on the STEREO spacecraft observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, C J; Cyr, O C St; Campbell-Brown, M; Skelt, A; Kaiser, M; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S; Lintott, C; Smith, A; Bamford, S; Baeten, E M L

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 AU has been inferred from impacts on the two STEREO spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the Heliospheric Imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed web-based project, Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A, indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera these d...

  12. Anhydrous Taphole Mix for Blast Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the term,definition,brand,label,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of anhydrous taphole mix for blast furnace.

  13. Transport of anhydrous ammoniac - risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This risk analysis of anhydrous ammonia transport in France was done within a study initiated by the Department of dangerous goods of the Ministry of transport. The study deals with the road and rail transportation of bulk anhydrous ammonia. After analysis of transport system and traffic, the transport accident risks are estimated, as well as their distribution on the French territory. Finally after a synthesis of results, a number of safety measures to be undertaken were identified. This is a joint study of SMC-CEPN, with a specific role of SEMA-METRA-CONSEIL concerning the traffic frequency, and the center for risk evaluation concerning nuclear safety

  14. Manufacture of high purity low arsenic anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for manufacturing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity from arsenic contaminated anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is described which comprises: (a) contacting the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with an effective amount of hydrogen peroxide to oxidize the arsenic impurity in the presence of a catalyst which comprises a catalytic amount of (i) molybdenum or an inorganic molybdenum compound and (ii) a phosphate compound, at a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to oxidize volatile trivalent arsenic impurities in the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride to non-volatile pentavalent arsenic compounds, and (b) distilling the resulting mixture and recovering anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with reduced levels of arsenic impurity

  15. Interplanetary Field Enhancements: The Interaction between Solar Wind and Interplanetary Dusty Plasma Released by Interplanetary Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hairong

    Interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs) are unique large-scale structures in the solar wind. During IFEs, the magnetic-field strength is significantly enhanced with little perturbation in the solar-wind plasma. Early studies showed that IFEs move at nearly the solar-wind speed and some IFEs detected at 0.72AU by Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) are associated with material co-orbiting with asteroid Oljato. To explain the observed IFE features, we develop and test an IFE formation hypothesis: IFEs result from interactions between the solar wind and clouds of nanoscale charged dust particles released in interplanetary collisions. This hypothesis predicts that the magnetic field drapes and the solar wind slows down in the upstream. Meanwhile the observed IFE occurrence rate should be comparable with the detectable interplanetary collision rate. Based on this hypothesis, we can use the IFE occurrence to determine the spatial distribution and temporal variation of interplanetary objects which produce IFEs. To test the hypothesis, we perform a systematic survey of IFEs in the magnetic-field data from many spacecraft. Our datasets cover from 1970s to present and from inner than 0.3AU to outer than 5 AU. In total, more than 470 IFEs are identified and their occurrences show clustering features in both space and time. We use multi-spacecraft simultaneous observations to reconstruct the magnetic-field geometry and find that the magnetic field drapes in the upstream region. The results of a superposed epoch study show that the solar wind slows down in the upstream and there is a plasma depletion region near the IFE centers. In addition, the solar-wind slowdown and plasma depletion feature are more significant in larger IFEs. The mass contained in IFEs can be estimated by balancing the solar-wind pressure force exerted on the IFEs against the solar gravity. The solar-wind slowdown resultant from the estimated mass is consistent with the result in superposed epoch study. The

  16. NQR frequencies of anhydrous carbamazepine polymorphic phases

    CERN Document Server

    Bonin, C J; Pusiol, D J

    2010-01-01

    In this work we propose the Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) technique as an analytical method suitable for polymorphism detection in active parts (or active principles) of pharmaceuticals with high pharmacological risk. Samples of powder carbamazepine (5H-dibenz(b,f)-azepine-5-carboxamide) are studied. In its anhydrous state, this compound presents at least three different polymorphic forms: form III, the commercial one, form II, and form I. Of these, only form III possesses desirable therapeutic effects. By using the NQR technique, it was possible to characterize two of the three polymorphic phases (I and III) for anhydrous carbamazepine in few minutes at room temperature, detecting the characteristic frequencies of 14N nuclei (I=1) present in their chemical composition and in the frequency range 2.820-3.935 MHz. For form II, characteristic lines were not detected within this range of frequencies. The lines detected for form III are centered at the frequencies \

  17. The use of anhydrous ammonia for bioventing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zytner, R.G.; Hallman, M.; Gimenez, B.F.; Jennings, R.; Leek, K. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Graduate Studies

    2002-07-01

    Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons can be effectively treated using bioventing remediation technology, an ideal method for removing residual contamination left by soil vapour extraction (SVE). Bioventing uses low or intermitted air flow rates to produce oxygen-rich conditions in the vadose zone, thereby promoting the formation of micro-organisms that can mineralize the hydrocarbons if enough nutrients are present. There is concern regarding the use of nutrients (the addition of nitrogen) to the subsurface because current applications methods cannot uniformly disperse nitrogen throughout the entire subsurface. Two research studies are being conducted using gasoline contaminated soil to address this concern. The first phase of the study focuses on how to best deliver nitrogen to the subsurface. Injecting anhydrous ammonia into the contaminated surface was one suggestion for stimulating the growth of hydrocarbon degraders. SVE extraction well models indicated this was an effective and safe way to disperse nitrogen. The second phase of the study involved the use of respirometers to compare total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation with nitrogen additions in the form of NH{sub 4}Cl or anhydrous ammonia. The respirometers were run for about 1 month after which time it was determined that the use of anhydrous ammonia is an effective method to promote bioventing.

  18. High-Nickel Iron-Sulfides in Anhydrous, Gems-Rich CP IDPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Wirick, S.; Hu, W.; Li, L.; Yan, H.; Huang, X.; Nazaretski, E.; Lauer, K.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) that were not severly heated during atmospheric deceleration are the best preserved samples of the solids that condensed from the Solar protoplanetary disk, as well as pre-Solar grains thatr survived incorporation into the disk, currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. These CP IDPs never experienced the aqueous and/or thermal processing, gravitational compaction, and shock effects that overprinted the record of Solar nebula processes in meteorites.

  19. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  20. An element with a liquid, anhydrous electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nankay, S.; Indzima, T.; Toyeguti, Y.

    1982-09-01

    A liquid anhydrous element and a heat treated Mn0/sub 2/ cathode, to which sodium silicate in the form of Na/sub 2/0 with 5/2Si0/sub 2/ liquid glass is added in a volume of 3 grams per 100 grams of Mn0/sub 2/ is used in the element with a light metal, lithium type anode. Moreover 4.5 grams of acetylene soot is added to the active cathode mass. A fluorine bearing resin is used as the binder. The cathode stores well.

  1. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  2. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to...

  3. Gyrosynchrotron Radiation of Interplanetary CMEs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Weiying; WU Ji; WANG Chuanbing; WANG Shui

    2012-01-01

    CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections) are an important means of energy release in the solar corona. Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope (SPORT) is a mission being proposed for observing the propagation of interplanetary CMEs from solar polar orbit. The main payload onboard SPORT is a synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer, which receives radio emission of interplanetary CMEs. It is identified that there are mainly three radio emission mechanisms of CMEs, i.e., bremsstrahlung, gyrosynchrotron emission and plasma emission. Among these emission types, bremsstrahlung emission is the main emission mechanism of the high-density plasma clouds of interplanetary CMEs. Gyrosynchrotron emission is the continuous emission generated by high-energy electrons from CMEs, while plasma emission is the main mechanism of transient radio bursts from CMEs. In this paper, the gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs is focused on. Firstly, the mechanism of gyrosynchrotron emission is reviewed. Secondly, a review of the physical parameter models of background solar wind and interplanetary CMEs is presented. After these, the brightness temperature and polarization of gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs are calculated and analyzed. Finally, the detectability of gyrosynchrotron emission of interplanetary CMEs by radio meters is discussed briefly.

  4. 2002 Kuiper prize lecture: Dust Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Krüger, Harald; Kempf, Sascha; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg

    2005-03-01

    Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and their bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is called "Dust Astronomy" which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a Dust Observatory in space. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids. Dust from interstellar and interplanetary sources is distinguished by accurately sensing their trajectories. Trajectory sensors may use the electric charge signals that are induced when charged grains fly through the detector. Modern in-situ dust impact detectors are capable of providing mass, speed, physical and chemical information of dust grains in space. A Dust Observatory mission is feasible with state-of-the-art technology. It will (1) provide the distinction between interstellar dust and interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, (2) determine the elemental composition of impacting dust particles, and (3) monitor the fluxes of various dust components as a function of direction and particle masses.

  5. Crystallization kinetics of citric acid anhydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemdili, L.; Koutchoukali, O.; Bouhelassa, M.; Seidel, J.; Mameri, F.; Ulrich, J.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility curve, metastable zone width (MSZW) and Crystallization kinetics (nucleation and growth) were measured and estimated during batch crystallization of citric acid anhydrate (CAA). The solubility of citric acid in pure water was measured over the temperature range from 15 to 60 °C using a refractometer. The experimental data were correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. The MSZW was determined under four cooling rates for different citric acid concentrations by means of an ultrasonic technique. The primary nucleation kinetics of CAA was calculated based on these data and the polythermal method of Nyvlt. It was found that the MSZW obtained is in good agreement with literature. Crystal growth rates were calculated by two methods. The first one used seeded isothermal growth experiments (desupersaturation curve) and the derivatives method of Garside. The second method used the measurement of the dimension change of a single crystal in a microscopic cell at different supersaturation levels.

  6. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  7. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere. PMID:26542578

  8. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Weber, T. D.; Malaspina, D.; Crary, F.; Ergun, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Fowler, C. M.; Morooka, M. W.; McEnulty, T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Andrews, D. J.; Horanyi, M.; Collette, A.; Yelle, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars’s atmosphere.

  9. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>∼2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  10. Magnetopause displacements: the possible role of dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large compressions of the magnetopause are proposed to occasionally result from temporary encounters of the magnetosphere with dust streams in interplanetary space. Such streams may have their origin in cometary dust tails or asteroids which cross the inner heliosphere or in meteoroids in Earth's vicinity. Dust ejected from such objects when embedding the magnetosphere for their limited transition time should cause substantial global deformations of the magnetopause/magnetosphere due to the very large dust grain mass and momentum which compensates for the low dust density when contributing to the upstream pressure variation.

  11. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) before a colonoscopy (examination of the inside of the colon to ...

  12. Preparation of anhydrous lanthanum bromide for scintillation crystal growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong; LI Hongwei; ZHAO Chunlei; YU Jinqiu; HU Yunsheng; CUI Lei; HE Huaqiang

    2012-01-01

    This paper reported an efficient and economical method for preparation of anhydrous LaBr3 for scintillation crystal growth.High purity anhydrous LaBr3 powders in large quantities were successfully obtained by stepped dehydration of LaBr3·7H2O using NH4Br as additive.Experiments revealed that adding proper amount of NH4Br could effectively restrain the hydrolysis of LaBr3 during dehydration and thus decreased the yield of deleterious impurity of LaOBr.Optimum preparation conditions,including the amount of NH4Br in use,the dehydration temperature and atmosphere,were investigated by DTA/TG and water/oxygen analysis.The Raman characterization of the as-prepared anhydrous LaBr3 was also presented.

  13. Dynamics of Solar System Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing aim of the research is to investigate the dynamical and physical evolution of interplanetary dust particles in order to produce a detailed global model of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components that is capable of predicting thermal fluxes in mid-infrared wave bands to an accuracy of 1% or better; with the additional aim of exploiting this research as a basis for predicting structure in exozodiacal clouds that may be signatures of unseen planets.

  14. Probing exoplanetary materials using sublimating dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Lieshout

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems consist of more than just planets orbiting a central star. They also include a wide range of smaller bodies, such as asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust grains. All these materials can be investigated to increase our understanding of planetary systems. In the study of extras

  15. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m<3>, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of

  16. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for... Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1178 Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content...

  18. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  19. Investigation of the dynamics of nanometer-size dust particles in the inner heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'brien, L.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and size distribution of submicron-sized interplanetary dust particles at 1 AU is highly variable due to the nature of its production and transport through the solar system. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles [Meyer-Vernet et al., 2009]. Simulations of nano-dust dynamics are performed to gain an understanding of their transport in the inner heliosphere and distribution near 1 AU where they can potentially be detected. Simulations show that the temporal variation in nano-dust detection, as suggested by the STEREO observations, can be described by the dust's interaction with the complex structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) [Juhasz and Horanyi, 2013]. The dust trajectories and their distribution near Earth's orbit is a function of the initial conditions of both nano-dust particles and the IMF. Le Chat et al. (2015) reported on the correlation between high nano-dust fluxes observed by STEREO and the observed Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). We present the results from simulating nano-dust interaction with ICMEs that are modeled as magnetic clouds, and report that the dust trajectories and, thus, their distribution and velocities at 1 AU are significantly altered.

  20. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  1. Lipid-sugar interaction: Relevance to anhydrous biology

    OpenAIRE

    Caffrey, Martin

    1988-01-01

    PUBLISHED The ability of seeds and other anhydrous plant forms to survive the withdrawal of water must involve a mechanism for protecting the integrity of cellular membranes. Evidence from animal systems implicates sugars as protective components, and we have tested the changes in mesomorphic phase state of phospholipid model membranes upon hydration and dehydration in the presence of sucrose and/or sucrose plus raffinose. X-ray diffraction studies of dry dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DM...

  2. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  3. Interplanetary Physics Laboratory (IPL): A concept for an interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Feldman, W.

    1977-01-01

    A concept for a near-earth interplanetary mission in the mid-eighties is described. The proposed objectives would be to determine the composition of the interplanetary constituents and its dependence on source-conditions and to investigate energy and momentum transfer processes in the interplanetary medium. Such a mission would accomplish three secondary objectives: (1) provide a baseline for deep space missions, (2) investigate variations of the solar wind with solar activity, and (3) provide input functions for magnetospheric studies.

  4. Rheological Study of Mutarotation of Fructose in Anhydrous State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yangyang [ORNL; Wlodarczyk, Patryk [Institute ofNon-Ferrous Metals, Sowinskiego Gliwice, POLAND; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Paluch, Marian W [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Rheological measurement was employed to study the mutarotation of D-fructose in anhydrous state. By monitoring the evolution of shear viscosity with time, rate constants for mutarotation were estimated, and two different stages of this reaction were identified. One of the mutarotation stages is rapid and has a low activation energy, whereas the other is much slower and has a much higher activation energy. Possible conversions corresponding to these two phases are discussed. This work demonstrates that, in addition to the routine techniques such polarimetry and gas liquid chromatography, rheological measurement can be used as an alternative method to continuously monitor the mutarotation of sugars.

  5. Anhydrous crystals of DNA bases are wide gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, F. F.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Azevedo, D. L.; Sales, F. A. M.; Albuquerque, E. L.

    2011-05-01

    We present the structural, electronic, and optical properties of anhydrous crystals of DNA nucleobases (guanine, adenine, cytosine, and thymine) found after DFT (Density Functional Theory) calculations within the local density approximation, as well as experimental measurements of optical absorption for powders of these crystals. Guanine and cytosine (adenine and thymine) anhydrous crystals are predicted from the DFT simulations to be direct (indirect) band gap semiconductors, with values 2.68 eV and 3.30 eV (2.83 eV and 3.22 eV), respectively, while the experimentally estimated band gaps we have measured are 3.83 eV and 3.84 eV (3.89 eV and 4.07 eV), in the same order. The electronic effective masses we have obtained at band extremes show that, at low temperatures, these crystals behave like wide gap semiconductors for electrons moving along the nucleobases stacking direction, while the hole transport are somewhat limited. Lastly, the calculated electronic dielectric functions of DNA nucleobases crystals in the parallel and perpendicular directions to the stacking planes exhibit a high degree of anisotropy (except cytosine), in agreement with published experimental results.

  6. A New Thickener for CO2 Anhydrous Fracturing Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 dry fracturing technology is well-known for its advantages. Little water is used in this technology, which is able to ease the pressure of consumption on water resources. Many abroad theoretical researches, laboratory experiments and field tests have been taken to explore the yield mechanism, the adaptability and the technology of pure liquid CO2 fracturing. These achievements have been applied to a variety of reservoirs transformation and improven the effectiveness of stimulation treatment in a degree. The researches and studies in the domestic didn’t get popular until recent years. Thus, this article firstly introduces the main development and application about pure CO2 anhydrous fracturing technology, and sums up the effect and evaluation of its fluid through application examples both in the domestic and abroad. However, although this technology has many excellent qualities, but systematic studies indicate that its proppant-carrying capacity is less competitive because of the low viscosity of pure CO2 liquid and other reasons. In a consequence, it is necessary to develop an appropriate thickener for CO2 anhydrous fracturing fluid to improve its carrying capacity. Then this article describes some studies of previous scholars about CO2 thickener. Then we put forward our own research ideas and transform it into actual experiments. Thanks to the valid performances of these tests, we successfully develop a thickener X and cosolvent B.

  7. Techniques for Galactic Dust Measurements in the Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Horányi, M; Kissel, J; Krüger, H; Srama, R A; Svedhem, H; Withnell, P; Grün, Eberhard; Landgraf, Markus; Horány, Mihaly; Kissel, Jochen; Krüger, Harald; Srama, Ralf; Withnell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Galactic interstellar dust (ISD) is the major ingredient in planetary formation. However, information on this important material has been extremely limited. Recently the Ulysses dust detector has identified and measured interstellar dust outside 1.8~AU from the Sun at ecliptic latitudes above $50^{\\circ}$. Inside this distance it could not reliably distinguish interstellar from interplanetary dust. Modeling the Ulysses data suggests that up to 30 % of dust flux with masses above $10^{-16}\\rm kg$ at 1~AU is of interstellar origin. From the Hiten satellite in high eccentric orbit about the Earth there are indications that ISD indeed reaches the Earth's orbit. Two new missions carrying dust detectors, Cassini and Stardust, will greatly increase our observational knowledge. In this paper we briefly review instruments used on these missions and compare their capabilities. The Stardust mission [{\\em Brownlee et al.}, 1996] will analyze the local interstellar dust population by an in-situ chemical analyzer and colle...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.111 - Storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 are suitable for emergency action involving most anhydrous ammonia... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) under 42 CFR part 84 for use with anhydrous...—Regulations of the Department of Transportation published in 49 CFR Chapter I. (b) Basic rules. This...

  9. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  10. The Microwave Thermal Emission from the Zodiacal Dust Cloud Predicted with Contemporary Meteoroid Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dikarev, Valery V

    2015-01-01

    Predictions of the microwave thermal emission from the interplanetary dust cloud are made using several contemporary meteoroid models to construct the distributions of cross-section area of dust in space, and applying the Mie light-scattering theory to estimate the temperatures and emissivities of dust particles in broad size and heliocentric distance ranges. In particular, the model of the interplanetary dust cloud by Kelsall et al. (1998, ApJ 508: 44-73), the five populations of interplanetary meteoroids of Divine (1993, JGR 98(E9): 17,029-17,048) and the Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM) by Dikarev et al. (2004, EMP 95: 109-122) are used in combination with the optical properties of olivine, carbonaceous and iron spherical particles. The Kelsall model has been widely accepted by the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) community. We show, however, that it predicts the microwave emission from interplanetary dust remarkably different from the results of application of the meteoroid engineering m...

  11. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark S.; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-09-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release.

  12. Aggregate dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mark S; Schmied, Roland; Mannel, Thurid; Torkar, Klaus; Jeszenszky, Harald; Romstedt, Jens; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Weber, Iris; Jessberger, Elmar K; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Koeberl, Christian; Havnes, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Comets are thought to preserve almost pristine dust particles, thus providing a unique sample of the properties of the early solar nebula. The microscopic properties of this dust played a key part in particle aggregation during the formation of the Solar System. Cometary dust was previously considered to comprise irregular, fluffy agglomerates on the basis of interpretations of remote observations in the visible and infrared and the study of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles that were thought, but not proved, to originate in comets. Although the dust returned by an earlier mission has provided detailed mineralogy of particles from comet 81P/Wild, the fine-grained aggregate component was strongly modified during collection. Here we report in situ measurements of dust particles at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The particles are aggregates of smaller, elongated grains, with structures at distinct sizes indicating hierarchical aggregation. Topographic images of selected dust particles with sizes of one micrometre to a few tens of micrometres show a variety of morphologies, including compact single grains and large porous aggregate particles, similar to chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles. The measured grain elongations are similar to the value inferred for interstellar dust and support the idea that such grains could represent a fraction of the building blocks of comets. In the subsequent growth phase, hierarchical agglomeration could be a dominant process and would produce aggregates that stick more easily at higher masses and velocities than homogeneous dust particles. The presence of hierarchical dust aggregates in the near-surface of the nucleus of comet 67P also provides a mechanism for lowering the tensile strength of the dust layer and aiding dust release. PMID:27582221

  13. Interplanetary monitoring platform engineering history and achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the fall of 1979, last of ten Interplanetary Monitoring Platform Satellite (IMP) missions ended a ten year series of flights dedicated to obtaining new knowledge of the radiation effects in outer space and of solar phenomena during a period of maximum solar flare activity. The technological achievements and scientific accomplishments from the IMP program are described.

  14. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  15. Formation of β-cyclodextrin complexes in an anhydrous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaoui, Hocine; Modarressi, Ali; Magri, Pierre; Stachowicz-Kuśnierz, Anna; Korchowiec, Jacek; Rogalski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The formation of inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin was studied at the melting temperature of guest compounds by differential scanning calorimetry. The complexes of long-chain n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids were investigated by calorimetry and IR spectroscopy. The complexation ratio of β-cyclodextrin was compared with results obtained in an aqueous environment. The stability and structure of inclusion complexes with various stoichiometries were estimated by quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results confirmed the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds. This finding gives new insight into the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes and shows that hydrophobic interactions play a secondary role in this case. Graphical abstract The formation of complexes of β-cyclodextrin with selected n-alkanes, polyaromatics, and organic acids in an anhydrous environment is studied by differential scanning calorimetry, IR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling. The results obtained confirm the possible formation of multiple inclusion complexes with guest molecules capable of forming hydrogen bonds and give a new perspective on the mechanism of formation of host-guest complexes. PMID:27518085

  16. Activation of Anhydrate Phosphogypsmn by K2SO4 and Hemihydrate Gypsum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; QIAN Jueshi

    2011-01-01

    Lime pretreated phosphogypsum(PG) was calcined at 500 ℃ to produce anhydrate gypsum cement.Due to the slow hydration of anhydrate gypsum,additives,K2SO4 and hemihydrate gypsum were selected to accelerate the hydration of anhydrate.The hydration characteristics,the resistance to hydrodynamic water,and the mineralogical studies were investigated.The experimental results suggest that activated by K2SO4 and hemihydrate,anhydrate PG hydrates much more rapidly than that in the presence of only K2SO4 or in the absence of additives.The binder has proper setting time,good strength development,and relatively better resistance to water.The hardened binder has hydrated products of rod or stick like shaped dihydrate gypsum crystals.

  17. Molecular structure and vibration spectra of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magnesium acetate by density functional theory and AB initio hartree-fock calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of anhydrous zinc acetate and anhydrous magesium acetate in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree-Fock and density functional method with 6-31G basic set. The optimized geometric band tengths and bond angles obtained by using HF and DFT show the best agreement with the experimental data. Comparison of the observed fundamental vibrational frequencies of melamine diborate with calculated results by density functional B3LYP and Hatree-Fock methods indicate that B3LYP is superior to the scaled Hatree-Fock approach for molecular vibrational problems

  18. Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2005-01-01

    Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-conv...

  19. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals and some rare earths in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth and some rare earth metals in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid is studied. For each type of fluoride solubility depends on the ionic radius of the cation. Solubility of fluorides of alkaline earth metals grows from magnesium to barium. All the fluorides in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid form solvates. Solvates of strontium and scandium fluorides are shown to decompose at 110 and 150 deg C respectively

  20. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu-Wen Chen; Shu-Mei Lee; Yi-Shyan Chen; Pey-Shiuan Wu; Nai-Fang Chang; Chao-Hsun Yang; Chih-Chien Lin

    2011-01-01

    The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w) or water-in-oil (w/o) systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive ...

  1. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  2. Modelling interplanetary CMEs using magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available The dynamics of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs are discussed from the viewpoint of numerical modelling. Hydrodynamic models are shown to give a good zero-order picture of the plasma properties of ICMEs, but they cannot model the important magnetic field effects. Results from MHD simulations are shown for a number of cases of interest. It is demonstrated that the strong interaction of the ICME with the solar wind leads to the ICME and solar wind velocities being close to each other at 1 AU, despite their having very different speeds near the Sun. It is also pointed out that this interaction leads to a distortion of the ICME geometry, making cylindrical symmetry a dubious assumption for the CME field at 1 AU. In the presence of a significant solar wind magnetic field, the magnetic fields of the ICME and solar wind can reconnect with each other, leading to an ICME that has solar wind-like field lines. This effect is especially important when an ICME with the right sense of rotation propagates down the heliospheric current sheet. It is also noted that a lack of knowledge of the coronal magnetic field makes such simulations of little use in space weather forecasts that require knowledge of the ICME magnetic field strength.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (interplanetary magnetic fields Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (flares and mass ejections Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  3. Status of the Stardust ISPE and the Origin of Four Interstellar Dust Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Ansari, A.; Bajt, S.; Bastien, R. S.; Bassim, N.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F. E.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Changela, H.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Gruen, E.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Some bulk properties of interstellar dust are known through infrared and X-ray observations of the interstellar medium. However, the properties of individual interstellar dust particles are largely unconstrained, so it is not known whether individual interstellar dust particles can be definitively distinguished from interplanetary dust particles in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) based only on chemical, mineralogical or isotopic analyses. It was therefore understood from the beginning of the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) that identification of interstellar dust candidates would rest on three criteria - broad consistency with known extraterrestrial materials, inconsistency with an origin as secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft, and consistency, in a statistical sense, of observed dynamical properties - that is, trajectory and capture speed - with an origin in the interstellar dust stream. Here we quantitatively test four interstellar dust candidates, reported previously [1], against these criteria.

  4. Three years of Galileo dust data 2 1993 to 1995

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Hamilton, D P; Baguhl, M; Dermott, S F; Fechtig, H; Gustafson, B A; Hanner, M S; Horányi, M; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I; McDonnell, J A M; Morfill, G E; Polanskey, C; Riemann, R; Schwehm, G; Srama, R A; Zook, H A

    1998-01-01

    Between Jan 1993 and Dec 1995 the Galileo spacecraft traversed interplanetary space between Earth and Jupiter and arrived at Jupiter on 7 Dec 1995. The dust instrument onboard was operating during most of the time. A relatively constant impact rate of interplanetary and interstellar (big) particles of 0.4 impacts per day was detected over the whole three-year time span. In the outer solar system (outside about 2.6 AU) they are mostly of interstellar origin, whereas in the inner solar system they are mostly interplanetary particles. Within about 1.7 AU from Jupiter intense streams of small dust particles were detected with impact rates of up to 20,000 per day whose impact directions are compatible with a Jovian origin. Two different populations of dust particles were detected in the Jovian magnetosphere: small stream particles during Galileo's approach to the planet and big particles concentrated closer to Jupiter between the Galilean satellites. There is strong evidence that the dust stream particles are orde...

  5. Summary of the results from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment (LADEE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly

    2016-07-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission (9/2013 - 4/2014) discovered a permanently present dust cloud engulfing the Moon. The size, velocity, and density distributions of the dust particles are consistent with ejecta clouds generated from the continual bombardment of the lunar surface by sporadic interplanetary dust particles. Intermittent density enhancements were observed during several of the annual meteoroid streams, especially during the Geminids. LDEX found no evidence of the expected density enhancements over the terminators where electrostatic processes were predicted to efficiently loft small grains. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector, it captures coincident signals and full waveforms to reliably identify dust impacts. LDEX recorded average impact rates of approximately 1 and 0.1 hits/minute of particles with impact charges of q > 0.5 and q > 5 fC, corresponding to particles with radii of a > 0.3 and a> 0.7~μm, respectively. Several of the yearly meteor showers generated sustained elevated levels of impact rates, especially if their radiant direction intersected the lunar surface near the equatorial plane, greatly enhancing the probability of crossing their ejecta plumes. The characteristic velocities of dust particles in the cloud are on the order of ~100 m/s which we neglect compared to the typical spacecraft speeds of 1.6 km/s. Hence, with the knowledge of the spacecraft orbit and attitude, impact rates can be directly turned into particle densities as functions of time and position. LDEX observations are the first to identify the ejecta clouds around the Moon sustained by the continual bombardment of interplanetary dust particles. Most of the dust particles generated in impacts have insufficient energy to escape and follow ballistic orbits, returning to the surface, 'gardening' the regolith. Similar ejecta clouds are expected to engulf all airless planetary objects, including

  6. Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R. L.; Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many varied space and astrophysical plasmas, and as such plays an important role in the dynamics of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). It is widely regarded that reconnection is instrumental in the formation and ejection of the initial CME flux rope, but reconnection also continues to affect the dynamics as it propagates through the interplanetary medium. For example, reconnection on the leading edge of the ICME, by which it interacts with the interplanetary medium, leads to flux erosion. However, recent in situ observations by Gosling et al. found signatures of reconnection exhausts in the interior. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of systems with this flux rope geometry with regard to their minimum energy Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field relaxing back towards the minimum energy state, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity remain invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by reconnection in the interior of the system, as has been shown theoretically and experimentally. By treating the ICME flux rope in a similar fashion, we show analytically that the the elongation of the flux tube cross section in the latitudinal direction will result in a departure from the Taylor state. The resulting relaxation of the magnetic field causes reconnection to commence in the interior of the ICME, in agreement with the observations of Gosling et al. We present MHD simulations in which reconnection initiates at a number of rational surfaces, and ultimately produces a stochastic magnetic field. If the time scales for this process are shorter than the propagation time to 1 AU, this result explains why many ICME flux ropes no longer exhibit the smooth, helical flux structure characteristic of a magnetic cloud.

  7. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost to the user of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed.

  8. Interplanetary exploration-A challenge for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future U.S. interplanetary missions will be less complex and costly than past missions such as Voyager and the soon to be launched, Galileo. This is required to achieve a balanced exploration program that can be sustained within the context of a limited budget. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) have served as the power source for missions beyond the orbit of Mars. It is indicated that the cost of these power sources will significantly increase. Solar arrays can provide a low cost alternative for a number of missions. Potential missions are identified along with concerns for implementation, and some array configurations under present investigation are reviewed

  9. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  10. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion Systemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Wen Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w or water-in-oil (w/o systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future.

  11. Interplanetary Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    Although more than ten thousand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced during each solar cycle at the Sun, only a small fraction hits the Earth. Only a small fraction of the Earth-directed CMEs ultimately arrive at Earth depending on their interaction with the solar wind and other large-scale structures such as coronal holes and CMEs. The interplanetary propagation is essentially controlled by the drag force because the propelling force and the solar gravity are significant only near the Sun. Combined remote-sensing and in situ observations have helped us estimate the influence of the solar wind on the propagation of CMEs. However, these measurements have severe limitations because the remote-sensed and in-situ observations correspond to different portions of the CME. Attempts to overcome this problem are made in two ways: the first is to model the CME and get the space speed of the CME, which can be compared with the in situ speed. The second method is to use stereoscopic observation so that the remote-sensed and in-situ observations make measurements on the Earth-arriving part of CMEs. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission observed several such CMEs, which helped understand the interplanetary evolution of these CMEs and to test earlier model results. This paper discusses some of these issues and updates the CME/shock travel time estimates for a number of CMEs.

  12. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  13. Tracking heliospheric disturbances by interplanetary scintillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tokumaru

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal mass ejections are known as a solar cause of significant geospace disturbances, and a fuller elucidation of their physical properties and propagation dynamics is needed for space weather predictions. The scintillation of cosmic radio sources caused by turbulence in the solar wind (interplanetary scintillation; IPS serves as an effective ground-based method for monitoring disturbances in the heliosphere. We studied global properties of transient solar wind streams driven by CMEs using 327-MHz IPS observations of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL of Nagoya University. In this study, we reconstructed three-dimensional features of the interplanetary (IP counterpart of the CME from the IPS data by applying the model fitting technique. As a result, loop-shaped density enhancements were deduced for some CME events, whereas shell-shaped high-density regions were observed for the other events. In addition, CME speeds were found to evolve significantly during the propagation between the corona and 1 AU.

  14. Impact ionization experiments with porous cosmic dust particle analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibration of cosmic dust instruments using a linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Such an accelerator can accelerate conductive dust particles of sizes between ca. a few tens of microns, and a micron in size to speeds up to 80 km/s depending on particle size. Many different materials have been used for instrument calibration, from iron in the earlier days to carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, no comparative analysis has been made yet of compact particles versus porous or fluffy particles of the same material. Porous or fluffy particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system, e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko or aggregate grains from the plumes of Enceladus and recently also indications were found for low-density interstellar dust (ISD) from ISD data and trajectory simulations. These recalibrations are thus relevant for estimations of the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this talk we report about the calibrations being performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge after impact. We use the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser as an impact target. We then explain the experiment set-up, the preparation of the materials and the materials used. We elaborate on the technical challenges, and finally about the current status of the research at this stage. We conclude the talk with the relevance of the study, being the potential influence of such calibrations on the estimates of the mass distributions of interstellar and interplanetary dust.

  15. The three-dimensional structure of the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general structure of the interplanetary medium, especially in three-dimensions, is reviewed with special emphasis being given to the solar wind, the interplanetary magnetic field, the modulation of galactic cosmic rays and the propagation of energetic solar particles. (Auth.)

  16. Interplanetary Physics Research in China During 2004 - 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chi; WANG Shui

    2006-01-01

    This brief report summarized the latest advances of the interplanetary physics research in China during the period of 2004-2005, made independently by Chinese space physicists and through international collaboration. The report covers all aspects of the interplanetary physics, including theoretical studies, numerical simulation and data analysis.

  17. Interplanetary Physics Research in China: 2006-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chi; FENG Xueshang

    2008-01-01

    This brief report summarized the latest advances of the interplanetary physics research in China during the period of 2006-2007,made independently by Chinese space physicists and through international collaboration.The report covers all aspects of the interplanetary physics,including theoretical studies,numerical simulation and data analysis.

  18. The importance of monopole antennas for dust observations: why Wind/WAVES does not detect nanodust

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer-Vernet, N; Issautier, K; Lecacheux, A

    2014-01-01

    The charge released by impact ionization of fast dust grains impinging on spacecraft is at the basis of a well-known technique for dust detection by wave instruments. Since most of the impact charges are recollected by the spacecraft, monopole antennas generally detect a much greater signal than dipoles. This is illustrated by comparing dust signals in monopole and dipole mode on different spacecraft and environments. It explains the weak sensitivity of Wind/WAVES dipole antennas for dust detection, so that it is not surprising that this instrument did not detect the interplanetary nanodust discovered by STEREO/WAVES. We propose an interpretation of the Wind dust data, elsewhere discussed by Malaspina et al. (2014), which explains the observed pulse amplitude and polarity for interstellar dust impacts, as well as the non-detection of nanodust. This proposed mechanism might be the dominant dust detection mechanism by some wave instruments using dipole antennas.

  19. Impact ionization mass spectra of anorthite cosmic dust analogue particles

    OpenAIRE

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Sestak, S.; R. Srama; Kempf, S.; Trieloff, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Green, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Anorthite, the Ca-rich end-member of plagioclase feldspar, is a dominant mineral component of the Lunar highlands. Plagioclase feldspar is also found in comets, meteorites and stony asteroids. It is therefore expected to contribute to the population of interplanetary (and circumplanetary) dust grains within the solar system. After coating micron- and submicron-sized grains of Anorthite with a conductive layer of Platinum, the mineral was successfully accelerated to hypervelocity speeds in the...

  20. Carbonaceous Components in the Comet Halley Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter (CHON) were discovered by in situ measurements of comet Halley dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO flyby missions. In this paper, we report the classification of these cometary, grains by means of cluster analysis, discuss the resulting compositional groups, and compare them with substances observed or hypothesized in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and the interstellar medium. Grains dominated by carbon and/or organic matter (CHON grains) represent approx. 22% of the total population of measured cometary dust particles. They, usually contain a minor abundance of rock-forming elements as well. Grains having organic material are relatively more abundant in the vicinity of the nucleus than in the outer regions of the coma, which suggests decomposition of the organics in the coma environment. The majority of comet Halley organic particles are multicomponent mixtures of carbon phases and organic compounds. Possibly, the cometary CHON grains may be related to kerogen material of an interstellar origin in carbonaceous meteorites. Pure carbon grains, hydrocarbons and polymers of cyanopolyynes, and multi-carbon monoxides are present in cometary dust as compositionally simple and distinctive components among a variety of others. There is no clear evidence of significant presence of pure formaldehyde or HCN polymers in Halley dust particles. The diversity of types of cometary organic compounds is consistent with the inter-stellar dust model of comets and probably reflects differences in composition of precursor dust. Preservation of this heterogeneity among submicron particles suggest the gentle formation of cometary, nucleus by aggregation of interstellar dust in the protosolar nebula without complete mixing or chemical homogenization at the submicron level.

  1. An unrealistic drift in assay on anhydrous basis towards content limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivram K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The assay on anhydrous basis is a mathematically derived value from an experimental results of assay and water content tests. The results of assay and water content tests are determined, separately, on as-is basis. The industry-accepted formula for assay on anhydrous basis = (assay on as-is basis×100/(100-%water. Statistically, the two variables involved in accepted formula are assay on as-is basis and water to obtain assay on anhydrous basis. The experimental errors associated with these two variables propagate in assay on anhydrous basis. The error propagates either in constructive or destructive mode. The constructive mode of error propagation is combination of positive error of assay on as-is basis and positive error of water or negative error of assay on as-is basis and negative error of water. The constructive mode of error propagation has more impact on assay on anhydrous basis values and its confidence interval. The destructive mode of error propagation is combination of a positive error of assay on as-is basis and a negative error of water or vice versa. The destructive mode of error propagation has lesser impact on assay on anhydrous basis values and its confidence interval in comparison to the constructive mode of error propagation. In accepted formula said above, the constructive or destructive error propagation causes unrealistic drift of assay on anhydrous basis towards either lower or higher side of content limit of substance. The risk of rejection of pharmaceutical use substance is higher based on assay test results that results are calculated from industry-accepted formula. The purpose of the study is to propose an alternative formula to overcome limitations of accepted formula and justify the propagation of errors in realistic way. We have given three examples of pharmaceutical use substances to emphasise the above proposition. The proposed formula for assay on anhydrous basis= (assay on as-is basis×F/(F-%water in which F is

  2. Magnetospheric Response to Interplanetary Field Enhancements: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Peter; Russell, Christopher; Lai, Hairong

    2014-05-01

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth's magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth's field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth's magnetopause. These ground stations spread across many

  3. A cosmic dust influx model. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedinets, V. N.; Begkhanov, M.

    A model of cosmic dust influx is developed using results of radar and photographic studies of meteors and bolides, micrometeor impact data obtained during space missions, and the available experimental data on dust particles as small as 10 to the -17th g. It is shown, in particular, that particles of all sizes occurring above 30 km are mainly of meteor origin. Above 140 km, the earth atmosphere contains only primary cosmic particles of all sizes whose concentrations are equal to those observed in the interplanetary space but whose flux densities are twice as high. Above 30 km and below 100 km, the atmosphere contains primary micrometeor particles with masses less than 10 to the -8th g and particles of the same mass formed as a result of the fragmentation of large meteoric bodies.

  4. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  5. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm-1, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  6. Trailblazing Medicine Sustaining Explorers During Interplanetary Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2011-01-01

    To prepare for the day when astronauts leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploration missions, space medicine experts must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways of mitigating them. To gain a complete understanding of the effects of space on the human body and to create tools and technologies required for successful exploration, space medicince will become an increasingly collaborative discipline incorporating the skills of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. Trailblazing Medicine examines the future of space medicine in relation to human space exploration; describes what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, including the use of surgical robots, surface-based telemedicine, and remote emergency care; discusses bioethical problems such as euthanasia, sex, and precautionary surgery; investigates the medical challenges faced by interplanetary astronauts; details the process of human hibernation.

  7. Solar Sources of ``Driverless'' Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2010-03-01

    We identify the solar sources of a large number of interplanetary (IP) shocks that do not have a discernible driver as observed by spacecraft along the Sun-Earth line. At the Sun, these ``driverless'' shocks are associated with fast and wide CMEs. Most of the CMEs were also driving shocks near the Sun, as evidenced by the association of IP type II radio bursts. Thus, all these shocks are driven by CMEs and they are not blast waves. Normally limb CMEs produce driverless shocks at 1 AU. But some disk-center CMEs also result in driverless shocks because of deflection by nearby coronal holes. We estimate the angular deflection to be in the range 20°-60°. We also compared the influence of nearby coronal holes on a set of CMEs that resulted in magnetic clouds. The influence is nearly three times larger in the case of driverless shocks, confirming the large deflection required.

  8. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  9. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  10. Process design for enzymatic peptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a case study on a process design for enzymatic peptide synthesis, which is based on and inspired by previously established data about the Alcalase-catalyzed coupling of an amino acid amide and a chemically synthesized activated N-protected amino acid carbamoylmethyl ester in near-anhydr

  11. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems. PMID:26976718

  12. Effect of enzyme dehydration on alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of enzyme dehydration by molecular sieves on the coupling of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran was investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Co

  13. Kinetics of Alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling kinetics of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran were investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads; these immobilized enzymes were hydrated prior to

  14. Influence of amorphous content on compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziffels, S; Steckel, H

    2010-03-15

    Modified lactoses are widely used as filler-binders in direct compression of tablets. Until today, little about the compaction behaviour of anhydrous alpha-lactose is known. In this study, a new method to prepare anhydrous alpha-lactose from alpha-lactose monohydrate by desiccation with heated ethanol was evaluated and the influence of amorphous content in the lactose powder prior to modification on powder properties, compaction behaviour and storage stability was determined. The modification process led to anhydrous alpha-lactose with decreased bulk and tapped density, increased flow rate and significantly higher specific surface area. Due to the higher specific surface area, the compaction behaviour of the anhydrous alpha-lactose was found to be significantly better than the compaction behaviour of powder blends consisting of alpha-lactose monohydrate and amorphous lactose. An influence of the amorphous content prior to modification could be observed only at higher compaction forces. In general, tablets of modified powders needed longer time to disintegrate directly after compression. However, the storage stability of modified tablets was found to be better compared to the amorphous-crystalline tablets which were influenced by storage conditions, initial crushing strength as well as amorphous content due to the re-crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage. PMID:20005927

  15. Ammonium-iodide route to anhydrous EuI2:mechanism and preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁成鹏; 余金秋; 李红卫; 彭鹏; 吴浩; 何华强; 颜世宏; 胡运生

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrous EuI2 is an essential raw material for novel Eu2+-doped halide scintillators such as SrI2:Eu, CsBa2I5:Eu and BaBrI:Eu. An efficient and economic method to produce high purity anhydrous EuI2 is critical for future development and applications of these scintillators. In this paper, the ammonium-iodide route to anhydrous EuI2 was investigated, and anhydrous EuI2 with purity of 99.95 wt.%was successfully prepared. The dehydration mechanisms of europium iodide hydrate and its mixture with NH4I were comparatively investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The thermal decomposition process of individual europium iodide hydrate was revealed as follows:EuI3·9H2O→EuI3·8H2O→EuI3·7H2O→EuI2·H2O→EuI2, and the hydrolysis mechanism of europium hydrate was comprehensively studied. When europium iodide hydrate was dehydrated with NH4I, NH4Eu2I5 formed as an intermediate product, and the hydrolysis of EuI2 was effectively restrained. The role of NH4I as an io-dination agent was also discussed.

  16. 75 FR 40765 - Hours of Service; Limited Exemption for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... Management System published in the Federal Register on January 17, 2008 (73 FR 3316), or you may visit http... of the retail or wholesale distribution point (54 FR 13441). The waiver extended the agricultural... Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural Operations AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier...

  17. Solar wind and motion of dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J; Pastor, P; Komar, L

    2009-01-01

    Action of solar wind on arbitrarily shaped interplanetary dust particle is investigated. The final relativistically covariant equation of motion of the particle contains both orbital evolution and change of particle's mass. Non-radial solar wind velocity vector is also included. The covariant equation of motion reduces to the Poynting-Robertson effect in the limiting case when spherical particle is treated, the speed of the incident solar wind corpuscles tends to the speed of light and the corpuscles spread radially from the Sun. The results of quantum mechanics have to be incorporated into the physical considerations, in order to obtain the limiting case. The condition for the solar wind effect on motion of spherical interplanetary dust particle is $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ $=$ (1 $-$ $\\sigma'_{pr} / \\sigma'_{tot}$) $\\vec{p}'_{in}$, where $\\vec{p}'_{in}$ and $\\vec{p}'_{out}$ are incoming and outgoing radiation momenta (per unit time) measured in the proper frame of reference of the particle; $\\sigma'_{pr}$ and $\\sigm...

  18. Prototype detector development for measurement of high altitude Martian dust using a future orbiter platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Patel, Darshil; Chokhawala, Vimmi; Bogavelly, Anvesh

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils mostly occur during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer on Mars and play a key role in the background dust opacity. Due to continuous bombardment of micrometeorites, secondary ejecta come out from the Moons of the Mars and can easily escape. This phenomenon can contribute dust around the Moons and therefore, also around the Mars. Similar to the Moons of the Earth, the surfaces of the Martian Moons get charged and cause the dust levitation to occur, adding to the possible dust source. Also, interplanetary dust particles may be able to reach the Mars and contribute further. It is hypothesized that the high altitude Martian dust could be in the form of a ring or tori around the Mars. However, no such rings have been detected to the present day. Typically, width and height of the dust torus is ~5 Mars radii wide (~16950 km) in both the planes as reported in the literature. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, a langmuir probe cannot explain the source of such dust particles. It is a puzzling question to the space scientist how dust has reached to such high altitudes. A dedicated dust instrument on future Mars orbiter may be helpful to address such issues. To study origin, abundance, distribution and seasonal variation of Martian dust, a Mars Orbit Dust Experiment (MODEX) is proposed. In order to measure the Martian dust from a future orbiter, design of a prototype of an impact ionization dust detector has been initiated at PRL. This paper presents developmental aspects of the prototype dust detector and initial results. The further work is underway.

  19. Multi-Purpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altius Space Machines and MSNW LLC propose the development of a cubesat-scale Multipurpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS), to provide cubesats...

  20. Radar Characterization of the Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new modeling effort that will make substantial refinements and improvements to our existing models of the interplanetary meteoroid environment near...

  1. LiAISON: Linked, Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new navigation technique known as LiAISON (Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation) may be used to propel the benefits of GPS to new orbits,...

  2. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fa st forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, here after IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30$^o$ in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger...

  3. On fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubčan, V.; Tóth, J.; Yano, H.

    2002-10-01

    A possible fragmentation of meteoroids in interplanetary space inferred from grouping of particles in meteor streams is discussed. There is a conviction maintained by many observers that meteors within the streams are observed to be clustered in pairs or larger groups more frequently than one could expect from random distribution. The rate of dispersive effects indicates that the lifetime of any such a group of meteoroids is very limited. Therefore, if real, the pairs or groups must be due to recent fragmentation of larger meteoroids. Analyses based on visual observations of meteor streams lead to contradictory results. More conclusive are analyses based on radio measurements, which present a negative result concerning the permanent meteor showers with the stream structures at their middle and late evolutionary stages, and an indication of a positive result for younger dense stream structures of recent origin. Analysis of the 1969 Leonid display obtained by the Springhill high-power radar shows that about 10% of the population around the shower maximum is associated in close groups, within a distance up to of about 10 km and confined to an effective stream width comparable to the diameter of the Earth. The recent Leonid returns with the storm in 1999 provided a possibility to verify a non-random grouping of particles within this young filament of the stream. The analysis and results based on TV observations of the storm are presented and discussed.

  4. A new method to generate dust with astrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J F; van Breugel, W; Bringa, E M; Graham, G A; Remington, B A; Taylor, E A; Tielens, A G

    2010-04-21

    In interstellar and interplanetary space, the size distribution and composition of dust grains play an important role. For example, dust grains determine optical and ultraviolet extinction levels in astronomical observations, dominate the cooling rate of our Galaxy, and sets the thermal balance and radiative cooling rates in molecular clouds, which are the birth place of stars. Dust grains are also a source of damage and failure to space hardware and thus present a hazard to space flight. To model the size distribution and composition of dust grains, and their effect in the above scenarios, it is vital to understand the mechanism of dust-shock interaction. We demonstrate a new experiment which employs a laser to subject dust grains to pressure spikes similar to those of colliding astrophysical dust, and which accelerates the grains to astrophysical velocities. The new method generates much larger data sets than earlier methods; we show how large quantities (thousands) of grains are accelerated at once, rather than accelerating individual grains, as is the case of earlier methods using electric fields.

  5. Anhydrous proton conducting composite membranes containing Nafion and triazole modified POSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of membrane electrolytes having reasonable proton conductivity and mechanical strength under anhydrous conditions is of great importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells operated at elevated temperature. With the introduction of triazole modified polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (Tz-POSS) into Nafion membrane, the formed composite electrolytes exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to pristine Nafion membrane due to the well distribution of Tz-POSS inside the membrane. The anhydrous proton conductivity of the formed composite membranes increases initially with the increase in temperature, reaching about 0.02 Scm−1 at 140 °C. With further increase in temperature to about 150 °C, the composite membrane reaches its glass transition point above which the proton conductivity decreases dramatically. The performance of assembled single cell from composite membrane is slightly dependent on humidification conditions at 95 °C, reaching 0.45 V at 600 mAcm−2 using hydrogen and oxygen as reaction gases

  6. Synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 via a mild hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Justin B.; Yeon, Jeongho; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 has been previously attempted by transforming precursor compounds, such as the peroxide (K2Ti(O2)F4), hydrate (K2TiOF4·H2O) and fluoride (K2TiF6). Due to the large structural differences between these precursors and the anhydrous oxyfluorides, however, these preparations have been unsuccessful. Therefore, a direct method of synthesis has been employed to grow single crystals of K2TiOF4 that were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. K2TiOF4 was found to be isostructural with the previously known K2VOF4.

  7. Anhydrous proton-conducting glass membranes doped with ionic liquid for intermediate-temperature fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Homogeneous [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass electrolyte membranes are prepared. ► The conductivity of the hybrid glass membrane exceeds 10−2 S cm−1 in the temperature range of 120–220 °C. ► After annealing at 120 °C for 180 h, no decrease in conductivity can be observed. - Abstract: Proton-conducting glass membranes based on SiO2 monoliths and a protic ionic liquid (diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, [dema][TfO]) as the anhydrous proton conductor were studied. The [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass membranes were prepared via a sol–gel process. The stability and ionic conductivity of the glass membrane were investigated. The [dema][TfO]/SiO2 hybrid glass monoliths exhibit very high anhydrous ionic conductivities that exceed 10−2 S cm−1 at 120–220 °C.

  8. Ab initio and DFT studies of the structure and vibrational spectra of anhydrous caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.; Singh, Vipin B.

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational spectra and molecular structure of anhydrous caffeine have been systematically investigated by second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vibrational assignments have been made and many previous ambiguous assignments in IR and Raman spectra are amended. The calculated DFT frequencies and intensities at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, were found to be in better agreement with the experimental values. It was found that DFT with B3LYP functional predicts harmonic vibrational wave numbers more close to experimentally observed value when it was performed on MP2 optimized geometry rather than DFT geometry. The calculated TD-DFT vertical excitation electronic energies of the valence excited states of anhydrous caffeine are found to be in consonance to the experimental absorption peaks.

  9. Mössbauer study on the gamma radiolysis of anhydrous cesium tris (oxalato) ferrate(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladriere, J.; Senterre, V.; Apers, D.

    1992-04-01

    The final product of the gamma radiolysis of anhydrous cesium tris(oxalato) ferrate(III) has been identified by Mössbauer spectroscopy as Cs2Fe(ox)2. The radiolytic decomposition proceeds as a first-order process due to the original compound depletion and to the radiolytic stability of the ferrous compound. Lamb-Mössbauer factors measurements indicate that the recoilless fractions of the iron species are practically unaffected by the radiolysis.

  10. Using microkinetic analysis to search for novel anhydrous formaldehyde production catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Han-Jung; Lausche, Adam C.; Peterson, Andrew A.;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Direct dehydrogenation of methanol to produce anhydrous formaldehyde is investigated using periodic density functional theory (DFT) and combining the microkinetic model to estimate rates and selectivities on stepped (211) surfaces under a desired reaction condition. Binding energies......-type transition metal alloys are screened based on their predicted rates and selectivities, as well as their estimated stabilities and prices. We finally propose several promising candidates for the dehydrogenation of CH3OH....

  11. THE PRODUCTION OF PURE ABSOLUTE ALCOHOL WITH CALCIUM CARBIDE AND ANHYDROUS COPPER SULPHATE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, R E; Smith, L T

    1925-09-01

    (1) The above is recommended as an economical, convenient and quick method for producing absolute alcohol on a laboratory scale. If the distillation is executed with free flame, excessive or careless heating must be avoided near the end of the operation because of the copper acetylide in the residue. (2) Calcium carbide is recommended over potassium permanganate or anhydrous copper sulphate as a qualitative reagent in detecting traces of water in alcohol.

  12. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual stresses near unannealed welds in anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A T; Chumbley, L S; Goettee, D; Russell, A M

    2014-01-01

    Neutron diffraction analysis was employed to measure residual stresses near welds in used anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks. Tensile residual stresses contribute to stress corrosion cracking of nurse tanks, which can cause tanks to release toxic ammonia vapor. The analysis showed that tensile residual stresses were present in the tanks measured, and the magnitudes of these stresses approached the yield strength of the steel. Implications for agricultural safety and health are discussed.

  13. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to the upstream case. It is possible that downstream fluctuations are generated by ion relaxation as suggested in previous hybrid simulation shocks.

  14. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  15. Generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available It is well known that most MHD shocks observed within 1 AU are MHD fast shocks. Only a very limited number of MHD slow shocks are observed within 1 AU. In order to understand why there are only a few MHD slow shocks observed within 1 AU, we use a one-dimensional, time-dependent MHD code with an adaptive grid to study the generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS in the solar wind. Results show that a negative, nearly square-wave perturbation will generate a pair of slow shocks (a forward and a reverse slow shock. In addition, the forward and the reverse slow shocks can pass through each other without destroying their characteristics, but the propagating speeds for both shocks are decreased. A positive, square-wave perturbation will generate both slow and fast shocks. When a forward slow shock (FSS propagates behind a forward fast shock (FFS, the former experiences a decreasing Mach number. In addition, the FSS always disappears within a distance of 150R (where R is one solar radius from the Sun when there is a forward fast shock (with Mach number ≥1.7 propagating in front of the FSS. In all tests that we have performed, we have not discovered that the FSS (or reverse slow shock evolves into a FFS (or reverse fast shock. Thus, we do not confirm the FSS-FFS evolution as suggested by Whang (1987.

  16. Preparation of anhydrous magnesium chloride in a gas-solid reaction with ammonium carnallite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ningbo; Chen Baizhen; He Xinkuai; Li Yibing

    2006-01-01

    Dehydrated ammonium carnallite was synthesized with bischofite from salt lake and ammonium chloride solution in a 1:1 molar ratio of MgCl2:NH4Cl,dehydrated at 160℃ for about 4 h.The yield was above 85%.The product was then mixed with solid-state ammonium chloride with a 1:4 mass ratio for the further dehydration at 410℃.The decomposition of NH4Cl made a pressure of NH3 at 30.5 kPa to prevent the hydrolysis of ammonium carnallite.The anhydration of magnesium chloride was achieved at 700℃.The results showed that anhydrous magnesium chloride contains magnesium oxide in an amount that was less than 0.1% by weight.XRD pattern and SEM micrograph showed a good dispersion of ammonium carnallite and anhydrous magnesium chloride crystals with well-distributed big grains,just enough to meet the need for the production of magnesium metal in the electrolysis process.

  17. Preparation and characteristic research of anhydrous magnesium chloride with dehydrated ammonium carnallite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ning-bo; CHEN Bai-zhen; HE Xin-kuai; LI Yi-bing

    2006-01-01

    Taking the saline lake bischofite and NH4Cl that was removed with the ammonia method and continuwas synthesized. And then the ammonium carnallite was dehydrated to some extent at 160℃ for 4 h. Ammonium carnallite reacted with ammonia at 240℃ for 150 min and the ammonation ammonium carnallite was produced. Finally, the ammonation ammonium carnallite was calcined at 750℃ into anhydrous magnesium chloride containing only 0.1% (mass fraction) of MgO. On the other hand, dehydrated ammonium carnallite was mixed with the solid ammonium chloride at mass ratio 1:4 at high temperature and with the differential pressure of HN3 above 30.5 kPa. The dehydrated ammonium carnallite of mixture was dehydrated at 410℃, and then calcined at 700℃ into anhydrous magnesium chloride with only 0. 087% (mass fraction) of MgO. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy analysis results prove that anhydrous magnesium chloride obtained by both methods hasn't mixed phases, the particle is large and even has good dispersion, which is suitable for preparation of metal magnesium in the electrolysis.

  18. Use of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in extending the shelf-life of anhydrous cow milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Ruby; Tokas, Jayanti; Seth, Raman

    2016-05-15

    Oxidative rancidity in anhydrous cow milk fat leads to reduction in its shelf life. Use of synthetic antioxidants is prevalent in dairy industry to prevent the development of rancidity. Keeping in view the increasing demand for natural additives, the present study was carried out to explore the potential of lycopene as a natural antioxidant in anhydrous cow milk fat. Lycopene at five different levels (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 ppm) and butylated hydroxyl anisole (200 ppm), were incorporated in anhydrous cow milk fat. Potential of lycopene extract to enhance the shelf life of anhydrous cow milk fat was evaluated by measuring Free Fatty Acids, peroxide value, Thiobarbituric Acid value and color value during 12 months of storage at ambient conditions (30°C). Lycopene significantly (p<0.05) prevented the development of oxidative rancidity. Lycopene containing samples scored significantly higher in terms of sensory attributes as compared to control. PMID:26776006

  19. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  20. Start-Time of Magnetic Reconnection in Interplanetary Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范全林; 魏奉思; 冯学尚

    2003-01-01

    Start-time of magnetic reconnection under typical interplanetary parameters has been numerically simulated by using the two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with a third-order compact upwind scheme. Magnetic reconnection would occur near the interplanetary current sheet impacted by a plasmoid.Its initiation is associated with the interplanetary plasma parameter β and the momentum of the plasmoid.The higher the β value is, the faster the reconnection takes place. Meanwhile the reconnection occurs earlier with increasing the plasmoid momentum, and increasing driving velocity is more effective in initializing the reconnection than that of the plasma density when the other factors are kept to be the same. The evolution of the reconnection with the heliocentric distance is also investigated.

  1. On the intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; 10.1063/1.2711429

    2009-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behaviour has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field.

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field effects on high latitude ionospheric convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between the electric field and the electric current in the ionosphere can be established on the basis of a system of mathematical and physical equations provided by the equations of current continuity and Ohm's law. For this reason, much of the synthesis of electric field and plasma velocity data in the F-region is made with the aid of similar data sets derived from field-aligned current and horizontal current measurements. During the past decade, the development of a self-consistent picture of the distribution and behavior of these measurements has proceeded almost in parallel. The present paper is concerned with the picture as it applies to the electric field and plasma drift velocity and its dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. Attention is given to the southward interplanetary magnetic field and the northward interplanetary magnetic field.

  3. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  4. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  5. Counter Data of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer aboard the Cassini spacecraft and possible "dust clouds" at Saturn

    CERN Document Server

    Khalisi, Emil; Grün, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    We present the impact rates of dust particles recorded by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The "dust counters" evaluate the quality of an impact and give rise to the apparent density of dust particles in space. The raw data is pre-selected and refined to a new structure that serves to a better investigation of densities, flows, and properties of interplanetary dust grains. Our data is corrected for the dead time of the instrument and corresponds to an assumed Kepler orbit (pointing of the sensitive area). The processed data are published on the website for the Magnetosphere and Plasma Science (MAPSview), where it can be correlated with other Cassini instruments. A sample is presented for the Titan flyby on DOY 250/2006. We find that the dust density peaks at two times, at least, in a void region between Titan and Rhea. Such features may point to extended clouds of small particles drifting slowly in space. These density clouds seem to be stable for as long as several months or few ...

  6. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Vilmer, N.; Pick, M.; Schwenn, R.; Ballatore, P.; Villain, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta) and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for ass...

  7. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    Blue Sun Enterprises, Inc. is creating a common deep space bus capable of a wide variety of Mars, asteroid, and comet science missions, observational missions in and near GEO, and interplanetary delivery missions. The spacecraft are modular and highly autonomous, featuring a common core and optional expansion for variable-sized science or commercial payloads. Initial spacecraft designs are targeted for Mars atmospheric science, a Phobos sample return mission, geosynchronous reconnaissance, and en-masse delivery of payloads using packetized propulsion modules. By combining design, build, and operations processes for these missions, the cost and effort for creating the bus is shared across a variety of initial missions, reducing overall costs. A CLIpSAT can be delivered to different orbits and still be able to reach interplanetary targets like Mars due to up to 14.5 km/sec of delta-V provided by its high-ISP Xenon ion thruster(s). A 6U version of the spacecraft form fits PPOD-standard deployment systems, with up to 9 km/s of delta-V. A larger 12-U (with the addition of an expansion module) enables higher overall delta-V, and has the ability to jettison the expansion module and return to the Earth-Moon system from Mars orbit with the main spacecraft. CLIpSAT utilizes radiation-hardened electronics and RF equipment, 140+ We of power at earth (60 We at Mars), a compact navigation camera that doubles as a science imager, and communications of 2000 bps from Mars to the DSN via X-band. This bus could form the cornerstone of a large number asteroid survey projects, comet intercept missions, and planetary observation missions. The TugBot architecture uses groups of CLIpSATs attached to payloads lacking innate high-delta-V propulsion. The TugBots use coordinated trajectory following by each individual spacecraft to move the payload to the desired orbit - for example, a defense asset might be moved from GEO to lunar transfer orbit in order to protect and hide it, then returned

  8. Trace Element Abundance Measurements on Cosmic Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George

    1996-01-01

    The X-Ray Microprobe on beamline X-26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to determine the abundances of elements from Cr through Sr in individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere and the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) on beamline X-1A at the NSLS was used to determine the carbon abundances and spatial distributions in IDPs. In addition, modeling was performed in an attempt to associate particular types of IDPs with specific types of parent bodies, and thus to infer the chemistry, mineralogy, and structural properties of those parent bodies.

  9. The Cl Isotope Composition of the Moon as evidence for an Anhydrous Mantle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Shearer, C., Jr.; McKeegan, K. D.; Barnes, J.; Wang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of primitive terrestrial basalts and carbonaceous chondrites cover a narrow range centered around 0‰ with a total variation of ± 0.5‰. In contrast, the chlorine isotope composition of bulk samples and in situ ion microprobe analyses of lunar basalts and glasses cover a range of 25‰. Three possibilities were considered to explain the large spread: 1) initial isotopic heterogeneities, 2) devolatilization from solar wind/micrometeorite bombardment, 3) degassing under anhydrous conditions. The first of these possibilities is rejected because the Moon went through an magma ocean stage which would have homogenized any isotopic heterogeneities. To examine surface effects, we chose samples that have extremely different degrees of surface exposure. We find no correlation between the Cl isotope composition and surface exposure. We also conducted a laboratory experiment in which a thin film of NaCl was bombarded with a proton source for 24 hours with no change in Cl isotope composition. The third possibility is that the fractionation is explained by the anhydrous character of the Moon. On Earth, the volatiling Cl species is HCl. HCl is known to preferentially incorporate 37Cl relative to 35Cl due to the high bond strength of the molecule. This is offset by the higher translational velocity of H35Cl, so that overall, there is very little Cl isotope fractionation during degassing. We propose that lunar basalts were anhydrous and the volatile Cl species were metal chlorides, such as ZnCl2, NaCl, FeCl2, etc. The bond strength of metal chlorides and Cl dissolved in a basalt are similar, so that fractionation is caused mainly by volatilization, with the light isotopologue preferentially lost to the vapor phase. This idea is supported by the consistent lower Cl isotope ratios of water soluble salt fraction (~10 ‰ lower) and the lowest lunar Cl isotope values close to those of bulk Earth. The H content of lunar magmas must have been lower

  10. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  11. Faraday cup on board Japan's first interplanetary probe 'SAKIGAKE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraday cup on board Japan's 1st interplanetary test probe 'SAKIGAKE' is described. The contents include the description of the principle of the measurement, structure of the sensor, accuracy of the measurement of bulk velocity, ion density and temperature of the solar wind plasma, data processing, and the thorough system of the experiment including telemetry allocation, status words and command system. (author)

  12. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream Disturbances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Shelke

    2006-06-01

    Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced density turbulence in the interplanetary medium driven by the high-speed flows of low-density plasma trailing behind for several days. Here, an attempt has been made to investigate the solar cause of erupting stream disturbances, mapped by Hewish & Bravo (1986) from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements made between August 1978 and August 1979 at 81.5 MHz. The position of the sources of 68 erupting stream disturbances on the solar disk has been compared with the locations of newborn coronal holes and/or the areas that have been coronal holes previously. It is found that the occurrence of erupting stream disturbances is linked to the emergence of newcoronal holes at the eruption site on the solar disk. A coronal hole is indicative of a radial magnetic field of a predominant magnetic polarity. The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal hole, which can support high-speed flow trailing behind the compression zone of the erupting stream for several days.

  13. Effects of standard and modified gravity on interplanetary ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the impact on the two-body range by several Newtonian and non-Newtonian dynamical effects for some Earth-planet (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) pairs in view of the expected cm-level accuracy in some future planned or proposed interplanetary ranging operations (abridged).

  14. The interplanetary magnetic structure that guides solar relativistic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Démoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K.-L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Relating in-situ measurements of relativistic solar particles to their parent activity in the corona requires understanding the magnetic structures that guide them from their acceleration site to the Earth. Relativistic particle events are observed at times of high solar activity, when transient magnetic structures such as interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) often shape the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). They may introduce interplanetary paths that are longer than nominal, and magnetic connections rooted far from the nominal Parker spiral. Aims: We present a detailed study of the IMF configurations during ten relativistic solar particle events of the 23rd activity cycle to elucidate the actual IMF configuration that guides the particles to the Earth, where they are measured by neutron monitors. Methods: We used magnetic field (MAG) and plasma parameter measurements (SWEPAM) from the ACE spacecraft and determined the interplanetary path lengths of energetic particles through a modified version of the velocity dispersion analysis based on energetic particle measurements with SoHO/ERNE. Results: We find that the majority (7/10) of the events is detected in the vicinity of an ICME. Their interplanetary path lengths are found to be longer (1.5-2.6 AU) than those of the two events propagating in the slow solar wind (1.3 AU). The longest apparent path length is found in an event within the fast solar wind, probably caused by enhanced pitch angle scattering. The derived path lengths imply that the first energetic and relativistic protons are released at the Sun at the same time as electron beam emitting type III radio bursts. Conclusions: The timing of the first high-energy particle arrival on Earth is mainly determined by the type of IMF in which the particles propagate. Initial arrival times are as expected from Parker's model in the slow solar wind, and significantly longer in or near transient structures such as ICMEs.

  15. Time of flight mass spectra of ions in plasmas produced by hypervelocity impacts of organic and mineralogical microparticles on a cosmic dust analyser

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsworthy, B. J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M J; Armes, S. P.; M. A. Khan; Lascelles, S. F.; Green, S.F.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Srama, R.; Bigger, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    The ionic plasma produced by a hypervelocity particle impact can be analysed to determine compositional information for the original particle by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such methods have been adopted on interplanetary dust detectors to perform in-situ analyses of encountered grains, for example, the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA). In order to more fully understand the data returned by such instruments, it is necessary to study their response to impacts in the laboratory....

  16. Development of a high resolution interstellar dust engineering model - overview of the project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, V. J.; Strub, P.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Krüger, H.; Grün, E.

    2013-09-01

    Beyond 3 AU heliocentric distance, the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system is a dominant component of the total dust population. The modulation of this flux with the solar cycle and the position in the solar system has been predicted by theoretical studies since the seventies. The modulation was proven to exist by matching dust trajectory simulations with real spacecraft data from Ulysses in 1998. The modulations were further analyzed and studies in detail in 2012. The current ESA interplanetary meteoroid model IMEM includes an interstellar dust component, but this component was modelled only with straight line trajectories through the solar system. For the new ESA IMEX model, a high-resolution interstellar dust component is implemented separately from a dust streams module. The dust streams module focuses on dust in streams that was released from comets (cf. Abstract R. Soja). Parallel processing techniques are used to improve computation time (cf. Abstract P. Strub). The goal is to make predictions for the interstellar dust flux as close to the Sun as 1 AU or closer, for future space mission design.

  17. On Dust Charging Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsintsadze, Nodar L.; Tsintsadze, Levan N.

    2008-01-01

    A general derivation of the charging equation of a dust grain is presented, and indicated where and when it can be used. A problem of linear fluctuations of charges on the surface of the dust grain is discussed.

  18. Structural and Theoretical Investigation of Anhydrous 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Paulo S; Almeida, Leonardo R; Araújo Neto, João H; Medina, Ana Carolina Q D; Menezes, Antonio C S; Sousa, José E F; Oliveira, Solemar S; Camargo, Ademir J; Napolitano, Hamilton B

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of anhydrous form of 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic acid (TABA) is reported. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, Thermal analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and DFT calculations were applied for TABA characterization. This anhydrous phase crystallizes in the triclinic [Formula: see text] space group (Z' = 1) and its packing shows a supramolecular motif in a classical [Formula: see text] ring formed by acid-acid groups association. The phase stability is accounted in terms of supramolecular architecture and its thermal behaviour. Conformation search at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) level of theory shows the existence of three stable conformers and the most stable conformation was found experimentally. The reactivity of TABA was investigated using the molecular orbital theory and molecular electrostatic potential. The calculation results were used to simulate the infrared spectrum. There is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, which allowed the assignment of the normal vibrational modes. PMID:27355378

  19. Activity and dynamics of an enzyme, pig liver esterase, in near-anhydrous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Murielle [ORNL; Kurkal-Siebert, V [University of Heidelberg; Dunn, Rachel V. [University of Manchester, UK; Tehei, M [University of Waikato, New Zealand; Finney, J.L. [University College, London; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Daniel, R. M. [University of Waikato, New Zealand

    2010-10-01

    Water is widely assumed to be essential for life, although the exact molecular basis of this requirement is unclear. Water facilitates protein motions, and although enzyme activity has been demonstrated at low hydrations in organic solvents, such nonaqueous solvents may allow the necessary motions for catalysis. To examine enzyme function in the absence of solvation and bypass diffusional constraints we have tested the ability of an enzyme, pig liver esterase, to catalyze alcoholysis as an anhydrous powder, in a reaction system of defined water content and where the substrates and products are gaseous. At hydrations of 3 ( 2) molecules of water per molecule of enzyme, activity is several orders-of-magnitude greater than nonenzymatic catalysis. Neutron spectroscopy indicates that the fast ( nanosecond) global anharmonic dynamics of the anhydrous functional enzyme are suppressed. This indicates that neither hydration water nor fast anharmonic dynamics are required for catalysis by this enzyme, implying that one of the biological requirements of water may lie with its role as a diffusion medium rather than any of its more specific properties.

  20. Anhydrous ethanol production in sugar mills; Produccion de etanol anhidro en ingenios azucareros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez Poy, Manuel. E-mail:poymanuel@prodigy.net.mx

    2007-04-15

    The anhydrous ethanol production is recent and limited, because the disadvantage of the renewable energies is the economic impossibility of the projects. Nevertheless, there are aspects to consider to achieve the anhydrous ethanol production, among which are: the cost of the raw material, the self-sufficiency of energy from the sugar cane bagasse without the need of oil burning, the larger size of the distilleries, incorporation of the Cogeneration with delivery of electricity to the public network in the sugar mill facilities, the introduction of the biotechnology to improve the processes of fermentation and subsidies to agriculture. [Spanish] La produccion de etanol anhidro es reciente y limitada, debido a que la desventaja de las energias renovables es la inviabilidad economica de los proyectos. Sin embargo hay aspectos a considerar para lograr la produccion de etanol anhidro, entre los cuales estan: el costo de la materia prima, la autosuficiencia energetica a partir del bagazo de la cana sin necesidad de petroleo, mayor tamano de las destilerias, incorporacion de la Cogeneracion con entrega de electricidad a la red publica en el ingenio, la introduccion de la biotecnologia para mejorar los procesos de fermentacion y subsidios a la agricultura.

  1. Quasi-anhydrous proton conducting di-ureasil hybrid electrolytes incorporating a protic ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Quasi-anhydrous proton conducting sol-gel derived hybrid electrolytes were developed. • The electrolytes synthesized contain N-ethylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate. • The proton conductivity of the materials suggests applications in fuel cells. - Abstract: A wide range of concentrations of the [EIm][TfO] proton ionic liquid (PIL) were for the first time incorporated into a poly(oxyethyelene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid host matrix (d-U(2000)) belonging to the di-ureasil family. The synthesis procedure adopted, involving the lowest amount of water possible, resulted in the formation of essentially anhydrous electrolytes at certain PIL levels. The optimized sample d-U(2000)/[EIm][TfO]50 (where 50 represents the ratio in % of the mass of [EIm][TfO] per mass of POE precursor) is amorphous, thermally stable up to 200 °C, displays good mechanical properties and exhibits an ionic conductivity of 3.2×10-4 and 4.3×10-3 S cm-1 at 20 and 186 °C, respectively. These features have persisted for more than three years. These new electrolytes appear quite attractive for applications in fuel cells operating under non-humidified conditions

  2. X-ray crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Philip-Kunio; Ogawa, Yu; Sawada, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwata, Tadahisa; Wada, Masahisa

    2016-07-01

    We determined the crystal structure of anhydrous chitosan at atomic resolution, using X-ray fiber diffraction data extending to 1.17 Å resolution. The unit cell [a = 8.129(7) Å, b = 8.347(6) Å, c = 10.311(7) Å, space group P21 21 21 ] of anhydrous chitosan contains two chains having one glucosamine residue in the asymmetric unit with the primary hydroxyl group in the gt conformation, that could be directly located in the Fourier omit map. The molecular arrangement of chitosan is very similar to the corner chains of cellulose II implying similar intermolecular hydrogen bonding between O6 and the amine nitrogen atom, and an intramolecular bifurcated hydrogen bond from O3 to O5 and O6. In addition to the classical hydrogen bonds, all the aliphatic hydrogens were involved in one or two weak hydrogen bonds, mostly helping to stabilize cohesion between antiparallel chains. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 361-368, 2016. PMID:26930586

  3. Polyelectrolyte microcapsules as ionic liquid reservoirs within ionomer membrane to confer high anhydrous proton conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqin; Wu, Wenjia; Li, Yifan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Jindun

    2015-04-01

    Herein, novel composite membranes are prepared by embedding methacrylic acid polyelectrolyte microcapsules (PMCs) into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) matrix, followed by impregnating imidazole-type ionic liquids (ILs). Within the composite membrane, the lumens of PMCs act as IL reservoirs, which provide large space for IL storage and thus significantly elevate the IL uptake. The IL leaching measurement suggests that the cross-linked shells of PMCs manipulate the IL release, endowing the composite membrane with high IL retention. Moreover, the high IL retention renders the composite membrane more anhydrous hopping sites (e.g., the imidazole groups on IL and the acid-base pairs between imidazole and sulfonic acid groups), imparting a facilitated proton conduction via Grotthuss mechanism. In particular, the composite membrane containing 12% PMCs achieves a high anhydrous proton conductivity of 33.7 mS cm-1 at 150 °C. The same membrane also exhibits a surprising steady-state IL retention of 36.9% after leaching in liquid water.

  4. Structural and Theoretical Investigation of Anhydrous 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S Carvalho

    Full Text Available A comprehensive investigation of anhydrous form of 3,4,5-Triacetoxybenzoic acid (TABA is reported. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, Thermal analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and DFT calculations were applied for TABA characterization. This anhydrous phase crystallizes in the triclinic [Formula: see text] space group (Z' = 1 and its packing shows a supramolecular motif in a classical [Formula: see text] ring formed by acid-acid groups association. The phase stability is accounted in terms of supramolecular architecture and its thermal behaviour. Conformation search at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p level of theory shows the existence of three stable conformers and the most stable conformation was found experimentally. The reactivity of TABA was investigated using the molecular orbital theory and molecular electrostatic potential. The calculation results were used to simulate the infrared spectrum. There is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, which allowed the assignment of the normal vibrational modes.

  5. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  6. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  7. Three years of Ulysses dust data: 2005 to 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald; Anweiler, B; Dermott, S F; Graps, A L; Grün, E; Gustafson, B A; Hamilton, D P; Hanner, M S; Horányi, M; Kissel, J; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I; McDonnell, J A M; Morfill, G E; Polanskey, C; Schwehm, G; Srama, R

    2009-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been orbiting the Sun on a highly inclined ellipse since it encountered Jupiter in February 1992. Since then it made almost three revolutions about the Sun. Here we report on the final three years of data taken by the on-board dust detector. During this time, the dust detector recorded 609 dust impacts of particles with masses 10^-16 g <= m <= 10^-7 g, bringing the mission total to 6719 dust data sets. The impact rate varied from a low value of 0.3 per day at high ecliptic latitudes to 1.5 per day in the inner solar system. The impact direction of the majority of impacts between 2005 and 2007 is compatible with particles of interstellar origin, the rest are most likely interplanetary particles. We compare the interstellar dust measurements from 2005/2006 with the data obtained during earlier periods (1993/1994) and (1999/2000) when Ulysses was traversing the same spatial region at southern ecliptic latitudes but the solar cycle was at a different phase. During these three inte...

  8. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Meteorites and cosmic dust: Interstellar heritage and nebular processes in the early solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engrand C.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small solar system bodies like asteroids and comets have escaped planetary accretion. They are the oldest and best preserved witnesses of the formation of the solar system. Samples of these celestial bodies fall on Earth as meteorites and interplanetary dust. The STARDUST mission also recently returned to Earth cometary dust from comet 81P/Wild 2, a Jupiter Family Comet (JFC. These samples provide unique insights on the physico-chemical conditions and early processes of the solar system. They also contain some minute amount of materials inherited from the local interstellar medium that have survived the accretion processes in the solar system.

  10. Formation and Evolution of the Trans-Neptunian Belt and Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, S I; Ipatov, Sergei I.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.

    2001-01-01

    Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) with diameter greater than 100 km currently moving in not too eccentric orbits could be formed directly by the contraction of large rarefied condensations. Along with the gravitational influence of planets, gravitational interactions of TNOs played a certain role in their orbital evolution as well. More than 20% of Earth-crossing objects could have come from the trans-Neptunian belt. TNOs and Centaurs (invisible comets mainly beyond Jupiter) could produce an important contribution to the dust content of the interplanetary dust cloud.

  11. Final Reports of the Stardust ISPE: Seven Probable Interstellar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Sterken, Veerle J.; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Gruen, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, (Bruce); Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.

    2014-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft carried the first spaceborne collector specifically designed to capture and return a sample of contemporary interstellar dust to terrestrial laboratories for analysis [1]. The collector was exposed to the interstellar dust stream in two periods in 2000 and 2002 with a total exposure of approximately 1.8 10(exp 6) square meters sec. Approximately 85% of the collector consisted of aerogel, and the remainder consisted of Al foils. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) was a consortiumbased effort to characterize the collection in sufficient detail to enable future investigators to make informed sample requests. Among the questions to be answered were these: How many impacts are consistent in their characteristics with interstellar dust, with interplanetary dust, and with secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft? Are the materials amorphous or crystalline? Are organics detectable? An additional goal of the ISPE was to develop or refine the techniques for preparation, analysis, and curation of these tiny samples, expected to be approximately 1 picogram or smaller, roughly three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than the samples in other small particle collections in NASA's collections - the cometary samples returned by Stardust, and the collection of Interplanetary Dust Particles collected in the stratosphere.

  12. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination II: Curating the Interstellar Dust Collector, Picokeystones, and Sources of Impact Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David R.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Gainsforth, Zack; Butterworth, Anna L.; Bastien, Ronald K.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Bechtel, Hans A.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the inherent difficulties that arise during "ground truth" characterization of the Stardust interstellar dust collector. The challenge of identifying contemporary interstellar dust impact tracks in aerogel is described within the context of background spacecraft secondaries and possible interplanetary dust particles and beta-meteoroids. In addition, the extraction of microscopic dust embedded in aerogel is technically challenging. Specifically, we provide a detailed description of the sample preparation techniques developed to address the unique goals and restrictions of the Interstellar Preliminary Exam. These sample preparation requirements and the scarcity of candidate interstellar impact tracks exacerbate the difficulties. We also illustrate the role of initial optical imaging with critically important examples, and summarize the overall processing of the collection to date.

  13. Preparation of anhydrous TFA solution for deposition of YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realisation of superconducting thin films by MOD is possible using different precursors; among them, the most promising approach is the use of trifluoroacetates (TFAMOD). However, one of the major drawbacks of this approach is the generation of water when trifluoroacetic acid (TFAH) is used. In this case, a lengthy purification process of the solution is necessary. As an alternative, trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA) has been used affording anhydrous TFA solutions without any additional purification. Anhydrous TFA solutions have allowed YBa2Cu3O7-x films to be obtained with high critical currents (Jc > 3-4 MA/cm2 at 77K, thickness 300nm)

  14. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  15. Spectral analysis of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations near interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A. F.; Goldstein, M. L.; Acuna, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation of magnetic fluctuations seen upstream of two interplanetary shocks are presented. The spectral analysis includes calculation of the normalized reduced magnetic helicity spectrum, the normalized reduced cross-helicity spectrum, and the Alfven ratio as discussed by Matthaeus and Goldstein (1982). Minimum variance methods are used to compute wave polarization as a function of frequency. The Taylor 'frozen in flow' hypothesis is assumed to convert frequencies to wave vectors. Some of the basic properties of the waves, including the probable mode of propagation in association with both quasi-parallel forward and reverse shocks, are described. A comparison with previous results on the generation of waves at interplanetary and planetary shocks is presented.

  16. Simulation of interplanetary scintillation with SSSF and SSDF mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The sun has the biggest effect on the Earth in many ways. Observing the solar wind is an important method to study the solar-earth environment. Ground-based interplanetary scintillation observations are an effective method of monitoring solar wind speed, studying the random fluctuations of the interplanetary plasma and the structures of radio sources. Two modes of single-station observations, namely, single station-single frequency (SSSF) and single station dual-frequency (SSDF), are briefly introduced and numerically simulated in this paper. The SSSF mode are easier to carry out and has been widely used. Although the observing system and data processing system of the SSDF mode are more complicated, it can measure the solar wind speed more accurately. A new SSDF system is under construction in Miyun, NAOC (the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences), with a 50 m telescope, which will serve the Meridian Project, and this paper is devoted to preparing for this new system.

  17. Identification of configuration and boundaries of interplanetary magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2006-07-01

    To study interplanetary magnetic clouds (IMCs), it is important to find their configurations and boundaries from the observed magnetic field data. This paper presents a novel method of identifying the configuration and boundaries of IMCs, wherein the interplanetary magnetic field data, which are measured in the Geocentric Solar Ecliptic (GSE) coordinate system, are converted into an IMC natural coordinate system that can more clearly display the configuration and boundaries of the IMC as a flux tube. The establishment of the natural coordinate system is based on the idea that the IMC is a flux rope with approximately constant α force-free field configuration. We also apply this method to analyze four IMCs observed by the Wind spacecraft. Two of them are identified as having the flux rope configuration lying in the ecliptic plane, and the other two are flux ropes vertical to the ecliptic plane. The results demonstrate that our method can work well for real IMCs.

  18. Pioneer 10 studies of interplanetary shocks at large heliocentric distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, J. D.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Pioneer 10 Ames plasma analyzer data collected in the 6.1 to 12.6 AU range of heliocentric distances (November 1974 to April 1977) have been examined for interplanetary shock waves. Eighteen shock signatures have been identified, with four of these being of the reverse type and the remainder the forward type. Sonic Mach numbers in the range from 3 to 10 are estimated for these events.

  19. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  20. Active shielding for long duration interplanetary manned missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillantini, Piero

    2010-04-01

    For long duration interplanetary manned missions the protection of astronauts from cosmic radiation is an unavoidable problem that has been considered by many space agencies. In Europe, during 2002-2004, the European Space Agency supported two research programs on this thematic: one was the constitution of a dedicated study group (on the thematic 'Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions: active and passive methods') in the framework of the 'life and physical sciences' report, and the other an industrial study concerning the 'radiation exposure and mission strategies for interplanetary manned missions to Moon and Mars'. Both programs concluded that, outside the protection of the magnetosphere and in the presence of the most intense and energetic solar events, the protection cannot rely solely on the mechanical structures of the spacecraft, but a temporary shelter must be provided. Because of the limited mass budget, the shelter should be based on the use of superconducting magnetic systems. For long duration missions the astronauts must be protected from the much more energetic galactic cosmic rays during the whole mission period. This requires the protection of a large habitat where they could live and work, and not the temporary protection of a small volume shelter. With passive absorbers unable to play any significant role, the use of active shielding is mandatory. The possibilities offered by superconducting magnets are discussed, and recommendations are made about the needed R&D. The technical developments that have occurred in the meanwhile and the evolving panorama of possible near future interplanetary missions, require revising the pioneering studies of the last decades and the adoption of a strategy that considers long lasting human permanence in 'deep' space, moreover not only for a relatively small number of dedicated astronauts but also for citizens conducting there 'normal' activities.

  1. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lario, D; Roelof, E C; Vinas, A -F

    2015-01-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic ($\\geq$83 keV) protons ($P_{EP}$) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field ($P_{B}$). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when $P_{EP}$ exceeds $P_{B}$ by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of the energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, $P_{EP}$ also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population ($P_{TH}$). Prolonged periods ($>$12 h) with both $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{B}$ and $P_{EP}$$>$$P_{TH}$ may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well-upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential incre...

  2. Interplanetary Lyman $\\alpha$ line profiles: variations with solar activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Quemerais, E; Bertaux, J L; Koutroumpa, D; Clarke, J; Kyrola, E; Schmidt, W; Qu\\'emerais, Eric; Lallement, Rosine; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Clarke, John; Kyrola, Erkki; Schmidt, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Interplanetary Lyman alpha line profiles are derived from the SWAN H cell data measurements. The measurements cover a 6-year period from solar minimum (1996) to after the solar maximum of 2001. This allows us to study the variations of the line profiles with solar activity. These line profiles were used to derive line shifts and line widths in the interplanetary medium for various angles of the LOS with the interstellar flow direction. The SWAN data results were then compared to an interplanetary background upwind spectrum obtained by STIS/HST in March 2001. We find that the LOS upwind velocity associated with the mean line shift of the IP \\lya line varies from 25.7 km/s to 21.4 km/s from solar minimum to solar maximum. Most of this change is linked with variations in the radiation pressure. LOS kinetic temperatures derived from IP line widths do not vary monotonically with the upwind angle of the LOS. This is not compatible with calculations of IP line profiles based on hot model distributions of interplanet...

  3. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  4. Sensing CMEs Propagating in the Interplanetary Medium. MEXART IPS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Romero Hernandez, E.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Rodriguez-Martinez, M. R.; Mejia-Ambriz, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexican Array Radiotelescope (MEXART) is a ground instrument fully dedicated to perform Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) observations to track large-scale solar wind disturbances within the Sun and the Earth. The MEXART is located at Michoacan (19 degrees 48' North, 101 degrees 41' West) and has an operation frequency of 140 MHz. The IPS technique is based on the scintillations that interplanetary disturbances (e.g., ICMEs) causes on the signal of small diameter cosmic radio sources detected by a radiotelescope. We report the tracking of the first solar disturbances detected by the instrument during the maximum of solar cycle 24. We estimated solar wind velocities and scintillation indexes (m). We present the first curves of the variation of the scintillating index with respect to the heliocentric distance for some strong radio sources using IPS observations at 140 MHZ. We identified events associated with strong scintilltaion in our data. We combine the IPS data with white light chronograph observations to identify the first CMEs in the interplanetary medium detected by the instrument.

  5. Crystallization behavior of anhydrous milk fat-sunflower oil wax blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rebekah M; Tombokan, Xenia; Ghosh, Supriyo; Martini, Silvana

    2011-03-23

    This research evaluates the effect of sunflower oil wax (SFOw) addition on the crystallization behavior and functional properties of anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Induction times of nucleation, melting behavior, microstructure of crystals, and hardness were evaluated for samples of pure AMF and AMF with 0.1 and 0.25% SFOw. Results from this research show that the addition of waxes induced the onset of crystallization of AMF by inducing its nucleation, as evidenced by decreased induction times of nucleation and the formation of smaller crystals. Crystal growth after tempering was also promoted by waxes, and significantly harder lipid networks were obtained. Results presented in this paper suggest that SFOw can be used as an additive to alter the physiochemical properties of low trans-fatty acid lipids.

  6. Modelling anhydrous weight loss of wood chips during torrefaction in a pilot kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repellin, Vincent; Govin, Alexandre; Guyonnet, Rene [Department of Physico-Chemistry of Multi-Components Materials (PMMC), SPIN Research Center, Ecole des Mines de Saint Etienne (EMSE), 158, Cours Fauriel, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Rolland, Matthieu [Process Developments and Engineering Division, Chemical Engineering Department, Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP-Lyon), F-69390 Vernaison (France)

    2010-05-15

    Beech and spruce chips were torrefied in a batch rotating pilot kiln. For each torrefaction the temperature curve of the moving chips bed was recorded. The anhydrous weight loss (AWL) of each torrefaction was measured. Effect of torrefaction temperature and duration on the AWL was studied. In order to optimise short time torrefaction, models that can estimate the AWL from the chips temperature curve are required. Three phenomenological models were successfully applied. They all gave good correlations between experimental and calculated AWL. These three models can be employed to optimise industrial torrefaction. However, the more complex they are, the more difficult it is to understand their physical meaning. It is thus preferable to use simple model for the industrial control of torrefaction. (author)

  7. Mechanical properties of lunar materials under anhydrous, hard vacuum conditions: applications of lunar glass structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunar materials and derivatives such as glass may possess very high tensile strengths compared to equivalent materials on earth because of the absence of hydrolytic weakening processes on the moon and in the hard vacuum of free space. Hydrolyzation of Si-O bonds at crack tips or dislocations reduces the strength of silicates by about an order of magnitude in earth environments. However, lunar materials are extremely anhydrous and hydrolytic weakening will be suppressed in free space. Thus, the geomechanical properties of the moon and engineering properties of lunar silicate materials in space environments will be very different than equivalent materials under earth conditions where the action of water cannot be conveniently avoided. Possible substitution of lunar glass for structural metals in a variety of space engineering applications enhances the economic utilization of the moon. 26 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  8. Solidus and liquidus temperatures and mineralogies for anhydrous garnet-lherzolite to 15 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Strong convergence is noted, in experimental data for systems pertaining to anhydrous fertile garnet-lherzolite in the 6.5-15 GPa range, either to a common temperature or to temperatures differing by only about 100 C. The major element composition of magmas generated by even minor degrees of partial melting may be similar to the composition of the primordial, bulk silicate earth in an upper mantle stratigraphic column more than 160 km deep. Whether or not the solidus and liquidus intersect, the liquidus mineralogy for undepleted garnet-lherzolite compositions is found to change from olivine, at low pressures, to pyroxene, garnet, or a solid solution of both, at pressures greater than 10-15 GPa.

  9. Structural study and crystallography of the major compound of anhydrous cement: tri-calcium silicate; Etude structurale et cristallographie du compose majoritaire du ciment anhydre: le silicate tricalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirfontaine, M.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Anhydrous (Portland) cement is mainly composed of a synthetic material, the clinker, whose major compound is tri-calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), often referred as C{sub 3}S with the compact oxides notations, C = CaO et S = SiO{sub 2}. The polymorphism of C{sub 3}S, still not well known, is the main subject of the thesis. Various crystal structures (rhombohedral R, monoclinic M1, M2, M3 and triclinic T1, T2, T3) can be found, depending on temperature and impurities. The only known structures are T1, M1 and M3, involving large unit cells with an orientational disorder of silicate tetrahedra. The single crystal studies exhibit no clear relation between the various polymorphs. Starting from known results from literature single crystal experiments, we establish the metric and structural relations between the different structures. Averaged structures for the T1, M1 and M3 polymorphs are proposed, together with all the matrices of transformation between the unit cells. We also introduce new 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D structural units, which make easier the understanding of the structures of C{sub 3}S, with the result of a better description of the orientational disorder. The effects of impurities on the structure are discussed. In industrial clinkers, impurities stabilize mainly M1 and M3 monoclinic forms. We propose a space group (Pc) and two structural models (a superstructure and an approximate averaged structure) for the M1 form. All the models are validated on synthetic compounds (M3, M2, M1 et T1) and industrial clinkers analysed by X-Ray powder diffraction with Rietveld analysis. (author)

  10. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  11. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise.

  12. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise. PMID:26394649

  13. Dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media: Long-term stability and reusability of immobilized Alcalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Nuijens, T.; Quaedflieg, P.J.L.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term stability and re-use of Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Cov) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were investigated. Cov can be used to synthesize dipeptides under near-anhydrous conditions in THF. Cov was incubated with and without molecular sieves (beads or powder

  14. Crystal structure of aspartame anhydrate from powder diffraction data. Structural aspects of the dehydration process of aspartame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guguta, C.; Meekes, H.L.M.; Gelder, R. de

    2006-01-01

    Aspartame has three pseudo-polymorphic forms, two hydrates and a hemi-hydrate, for which crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffraction data. This paper presents the crystal structure of the anhydrate, which was obtained by dehydrating the hemi-hydrate. The crystal structure of a

  15. Prediction of the In-Situ Dust Measurements of the Stardust Mission to Comet 81P/Wild 2

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, M; Grün, E; Landgraf, Markus; Müller, Michael; Grün, Eberhard

    1999-01-01

    We predict the amount of cometary, interplanetary, and interstellar cosmic dust that is to be measured by the Cometary and Interstellar Dust Analyzer (CIDA) and the aerogel collector on-board the Stardust spacecraft during its fly-by of comet P/Wild 2 and during the interplanetary cruise phase. We give the dust flux on the spacecraft during the encounter with the comet using both, a radially symmetric and an axially symmetric coma model. At closest approach, we predict a total dust flux of $10^{6.0} m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for the radially symmetric case and $10^{6.5} m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for the axially symmetric case. This prediction is based on an observation of the comet at a heliocentric distance of $1.7 {\\rm AU}$. We reproduce the measurements of the Giotto and VEGA missions to comet P/Halley using the same model as for the Stardust predictions. The planned measurements of {\\em interstellar} dust by Stardust have been triggered by the discovery of interstellar dust impacts in the data collected by the Ulysses and Gali...

  16. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  17. Four years of Ulysses dust data 1996 to 1999

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Landgraf, M; Dermott, S; Fechtig, H; Gustafson, B A; Hamilton, D P; Hanner, M S; Horányi, M; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I; McDonnell, J A M; Morfill, G E; Polanskey, C; Schwehm, G; Srama, R A; Zook, H A

    2001-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft is orbiting the Sun on a highly inclined ellipse ($ i = 79^{\\circ}$, perihelion distance 1.3 AU, aphelion distance 5.4 AU). Between January 1996 and December 1999 the spacecraft was beyond 3 AU from the Sun and crossed the ecliptic plane at aphelion in May 1998. In this four-year period 218 dust impacts were recorded with the dust detector on board. We publish and analyse the complete data set of both raw and reduced data for particles with masses $\\rm 10^{-16} g$ to $\\rm 10^{-8}$ g. Together with 1477 dust impacts recorded between launch of Ulysses and the end of 1995 published earlier \\cite{gruen1995c,krueger1999b}, a data set of 1695 dust impacts detected with the Ulysses sensor between October 1990 and December 1999 is now available. The impact rate measured between 1996 and 1999 was relatively constant with about 0.2 impacts per day. The impact direction of the majority of the impacts is compatible with particles of interstellar origin, the rest are most likely interplanetary parti...

  18. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  19. Temperature of cometary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Th.; Weidlich, U.

    1988-05-01

    The variation of dust temperature with heliocentric distance for a comet is calculated using the optical constants of an astronomically important silicate. The silicate, described by Drane (1985), is assumed to be similar to cometary dust. The temperatures of cometary dust grains are determined by the energy balance between the absorbed sunlight and emitted thermal radiation, and equilibrium temperatures of dust grains for different radii and heliocentric distances are compared. Deviations between computed and observed temperatures are attributed to variations in the chemical composition of the ablated grains.

  20. IDIS Small Bodies and Dust Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, M. C.; Capria, M. T.; Carraro, F.; Fonte, S.; Giacomini, L.; Turrini, D.

    2009-04-01

    Node aims at becoming a focus point in the fields of Solar System's minor bodies and interplanetary dust by providing the community with a central, user friendly resource and service inventory and contact point. The main aim of the Small Bodies and Dust Node will be to: • support collaborative work in the field of Small Bodies and Dust • provide information about databases and scientific tools in this field • establish a scientific information management system • define and develop Science Cases regarding IDIS

  1. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  2. The physical and compositional properties of dust: what do we really know?

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ant

    2014-01-01

    Many things in current interstellar dust studies are taken as well understood givens by much of the community. For example, it is widely held that interstellar dust is made up of only three components, i.e., astronomical silicates, graphite and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and that our understanding of these is now complete and sufficient enough to interpret astronomical observations of dust in galaxies. To zeroth order this is a reasonable approximation. However, while these three pillars of dust modelling have been useful in advancing our understanding over the last few decades, it is now apparent that they are insufficient to explain the observed evolution of the dust properties from one region to another. Thus, it is time to abandon the three pillars approach and to seek more physically-realistic interstellar dust analogues. The analy- sis of the pre-solar grains extracted from meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and from the Stardust mission, and the interpretation of x-ray scattering and abso...

  3. Earth's Magnetosphere Impinged by Interplanetary Shocks of Different Orientations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Cheng; HU You-Qiu; WANG Chi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Using a recently developed PPMLR-MHD code, we carry out a global numerical simulation of the interaction between interplanetary shocks and Earth's magnetosphere. The initial magnetosphere is in a quasi-steady state,embedded in a uniform solar wind and a spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). An interplanetary (IP)shock interacts in turn with the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause, and the magnetosphere, and changes the magnetosphere in shape and structure, and the distribution of the electric current and potential in the ionosphere as well. A preliminary comparison is made between two IP shocks of the same solar wind dynamic pressure and a vanishing IMF Bz on the downstream side, but with different propagation directions, one parallel and the other oblique to the Sun-Earth line. The numerical results show that both shocks cause a compression of the magnetosphere, an enhancement of magnetic field strength and field-aligned current in the magnetosphere, and an increase of the dawn-dusk electric potential drops across the polar ionosphere. Moreover, the magnetosphereionosphere system approaches a similar quasi-steady state after the interaction, for the downstream states are very close for the two shocks. However, the evolution processes of the system are remarkably different during the interaction with the two shocks of different orientations. The shock with the normal oblique to the Sun-Earth line results in a much longer evolution time for the system. This demonstrates that the shock orientation plays an important role in determining the associated geophysical effects and interpreting multisatellite observations of IP shock-magnetosphere interaction events.

  4. Energetic Particle Pressure at Interplanetary Shocks: STEREO-A Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We study periods of elevated energetic particle intensities observed by STEREO-A when the partial pressure exerted by energetic (≥83 keV) protons (PEP) is larger than the pressure exerted by the interplanetary magnetic field (PB). In the majority of cases, these periods are associated with the passage of interplanetary shocks. Periods when PEP exceeds PB by more than one order of magnitude are observed in the upstream region of fast interplanetary shocks where depressed magnetic field regions coincide with increases of energetic particle intensities. When solar wind parameters are available, PEP also exceeds the pressure exerted by the solar wind thermal population (PTH). Prolonged periods (>12 hr) with both PEP > PB and PEP > PTH may also occur when energetic particles accelerated by an approaching shock encounter a region well upstream of the shock characterized by low magnetic field magnitude and tenuous solar wind density. Quasi-exponential increases of the sum PSUM = PB + PTH + PEP are observed in the immediate upstream region of the shocks regardless of individual changes in PEP, PB, and PTH, indicating a coupling between PEP and the pressure of the background medium characterized by PB and PTH. The quasi-exponential increase of PSUM implies a radial gradient ∂PSUM/∂r > 0 that is quasi-stationary in the shock frame and results in an outward force applied to the plasma upstream of the shock. This force can be maintained by the mobile energetic particles streaming upstream of the shocks that, in the most intense events, drive electric currents able to generate diamagnetic cavities and depressed solar wind density regions.

  5. Interplanetary crew exposure estimates for galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Langley Research Center galactic cosmic-ray transport computer code and the Computerized Anatomical Man model, initial estimates of interplanetary exposure of astronauts to galactic cosmic rays, during periods of solar minimum activity, are made for a realistic human geometry shielded by various thicknesses of spacecraft aluminum shielding. Conventional dose assessment in terms of total absorbed dose and dose equivalent is made for the skin, ocular lens, and bone marrow. Included in the analyses are separate evaluations of the contributions from the incident primary ions, from subsequent-generation fragmentation products, and from target fragments. In all cases considered, the equivalent sphere approximation yielded conservative overestimates for the actual organ exposures.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Anhydrous Magnesium Chloride in Organic Solvent%有机溶剂法无水氯化镁的制备与表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周宁波; 陈白珍; 何新快; 李义兵

    2005-01-01

    Ammonium carnallite was synthesized by hydrated magnesium chloride in salt lake and ammonium chloride solution. Dehydrated ammonium carnallite was dissolved in methanol under low temperature by feeding ammonia, to prepare anhydrous magnesium chloride. The results show that anhydrous magnesium chloride contains magnesium oxide in an amount less than 0.1% by weight, the yield of magnesium chloride was above 99.5%. Ammonium carnallite, ammoniation magnesium chloride and anhydrous magnesium chloride were characterized by thermoanalysis, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  8. Improved Synthesis of 1,3-Diaryl-2-propen-1-one Oxime in the Presence of Anhydrous Sodium Sulfate%Improved Synthesis of 1,3-Diaryl-2-propen-1-one Oxime in the Presence of Anhydrous Sodium Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓亚; 李记太; 杜超; 宋亚丽

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one oxime via the condensation of 1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-one with hydroxylamine hydrochloride in the presence of anhydrous sodium sulfate was carried out in refluxing EtOH for 2-4 h in 83%-93% yields. The significant features of the present procedure include higher yield, shorter reaction time, reduced molar ratio of hydroxylamine hydrochloride to substrate, compared to the reported literature method.

  9. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate Geomagnetic Storms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santosh Kumar; M. P. Yadav; Amita Raizada

    2008-03-01

    The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron monitor, solar geophysical and interplanetary data during the period 1978–99. Further, the duration of recovery phase has been observed to be greater than the duration of main phase in most of the cases of MGS. It has further been noted that Ap-index increases on sudden storm commencement (SSC) day than its previous day value and acquires maximum value on the day of maximum solar activity. Generally, the decrease in cosmic ray (CR) intensity and Dst begins few hours earlier than the occurrence of MGS at Earth. Furthermore, negative Bz pointing southward plays a key causal role in the occurrence of MGS and the magnitude and the duration of Bz and Bav also play a significant role in the development of MGS. The solar features H, X-ray solar flares and active prominences and disappearing filaments (APDFs) which have occurred within lower helio-latitudinal/helio-longitudinal zones produce larger number of MGS. Solar flares seem to be the major cause for producing MGS.

  10. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  11. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  12. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  13. Astrobiology studies of microorganisms in simulated interplanetary and planetary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    For laboratory studies on the responses of resistant life forms to simulated interplanetary space conditions, testbeds are available that simulate the parameters of space, such as vacuum, solar electromagnetic and cosmic ionizing radiation, temperature extremes and reduced gravity that can be applied separately, or in selected combinations. Appropriate biological test systems are extremophiles, i.e. microorganisms that are adapted to grow, or survive in extreme conditions of our biosphere. Examples are airborne microbes, epilithic, endolithic or endoevaporitic microbial communities, or bacterial endospores. Such studies contribute to answer several questions pertinent to astrobiology, such as (i) the role of solar UV radiation in genetic stability, (ii) the role of gravity in basic biological functions, (iii) the probability and limits for interplanetary transfer of life, (iv) strategies of adaptation to environmental extremes, and (v) the needs for planetary protection. In addition, studies on the responses of extremophile microbial communities to simulated planetary surface and subsurface conditions are an essential prerequisite in preparation of space missions to Mars, icy moons or asteroids, searching for signature of life.

  14. Influence of interplanetary trajectory selection on Mars atmospheric entry velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1993-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and Earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles could limit the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis of aerobraking Mars missions, many opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO). These opportunities result from varying the initial launch date and the encounter dates and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper demonstrates this technique by using three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival (6.0-8.5, 6.4-8.1, and 7.2-7.3 km/s), unconstrained Mars entry velocities, and an Earth return entry velocity below 14 km/s. The results indicate that, by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum IMLEO mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 yr studied.

  15. Effect of Interplanetary Transients on Cosmic Ray Anisotropic Variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the present work the cosmic ray intensity data recorded with ground-based neutron monitor at Deep River has investigated taking into account the associated interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma data during 1981-1994. A large number of days having abnormally high/low amplitudes for successive number of five or more days as compared to annual average amplitude of diurnal anisotropy have been taken as high/low amplitude anisotropic wave train events (HAE/LAE). The amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy of these events is found to increase on the days of magnetic cloud as compared to the days prior to the event and it found to decrease during the later period of the event as the cloud passes the Earth. The High-Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS) do not play any significant role in causing these types of events. The interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) are also effective in producing cosmic ray decreases. Hα solar flares have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for HAEs,whereas PMSs have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for LAEs.The source responsible for these unusual anisotropic wave trains in CR has been proposed.

  16. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin; Li, Gang; Wang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Hot channel (HC) is a high temperature ($\\sim$10 MK) structure in the inner corona revealed first by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory}. Eruption of HC is often associated with flare and coronal mass ejection. Previous studies suggest that HC is a good proxy of magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona, in addition to another well-known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure that is with a normal coronal temperature ($\\sim$1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, $\\sim$1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary coronal mass ejection induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R$_\\odot$, and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar win...

  17. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (∼10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (∼1–2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ∼1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ȯ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  18. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallows, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Forte, B.; Ulich, Th.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Mann, G.; Vocks, C.

    2016-09-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan et al. presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of nightside IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2 s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To check this assumption, this Letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of nightside IPS using LOFAR, with solar wind speeds consistent with a slow solar wind stream in one observation and a coronal mass ejection expected to be observed in another.

  19. Separating Nightside Interplanetary and Ionospheric Scintillation with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Fallows, R A; Forte, B; Ulich, Th; Konovalenko, A A; Mann, G; Vocks, C

    2016-01-01

    Observation of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) beyond Earth-orbit can be challenging due to the necessity to use low radio frequencies at which scintillation due to the ionosphere could confuse the interplanetary contribution. A recent paper by Kaplan {\\it et al} (2015) presenting observations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) reports evidence of night-side IPS on two radio sources within their field of view. However, the low time cadence of 2\\,s used might be expected to average out the IPS signal, resulting in the reasonable assumption that the scintillation is more likely to be ionospheric in origin. To verify or otherwise this assumption, this letter uses observations of IPS taken at a high time cadence using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). Averaging these to the same as the MWA observations, we demonstrate that the MWA result is consistent with IPS, although some contribution from the ionosphere cannot be ruled out. These LOFAR observations represent the first of night-side IPS using LOFAR, w...

  20. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Olimpia Maria Martins; Freitas, Jennifer Tavares Jacon; Cazedey, Edith Cristina Laignier; de Araújo, Magali Benjamim; Doriguetto, Antonio Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Orbifloxacin (ORBI) is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures. PMID:27005603

  1. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Maria Martins Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbifloxacin (ORBI is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures.

  2. Laboratory-Scale Membrane Reactor for the Generation of Anhydrous Diazomethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Doris; Pinho, Vagner D; Gutmann, Bernhard; Kappe, C Oliver

    2016-07-15

    A configurationally simple and robust semibatch apparatus for the in situ on-demand generation of anhydrous solutions of diazomethane (CH2N2) avoiding distillation methods is presented. Diazomethane is produced by base-mediated decomposition of commercially available Diazald within a semipermeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing and subsequently selectively separated from the tubing into a solvent- and substrate-filled flask (tube-in-flask reactor). Reactions with CH2N2 can therefore be performed directly in the flask without dangerous and labor-intensive purification operations or exposure of the operator to CH2N2. The reactor has been employed for the methylation of carboxylic acids, the synthesis of α-chloro ketones and pyrazoles, and palladium-catalyzed cyclopropanation reactions on laboratory scale. The implementation of in-line FTIR technology allowed monitoring of the CH2N2 generation and its consumption. In addition, larger scales (1.8 g diazomethane per hour) could be obtained via parallelization (numbering up) by simply wrapping several membrane tubings into the flask. PMID:27359257

  3. Towards biomimetic scaffolds: anhydrous scaffold fabrication from biodegradable amine-reactive diblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Michael; Tessmar, Jörg; Neubauer, Markus; Blaimer, Andrea; Blunk, Torsten; Göpferich, Achim; Schulz, Michaela B

    2003-11-01

    The development of biomimetic materials and their processing into three-dimensional cell carrying scaffolds is one promising tissue engineering strategy to improve cell adhesion, growth and differentiation on polymeric constructs developing mature and viable tissue. This study was concerned with the fabrication of scaffolds made from amine-reactive diblock copolymers, N-succinimidyl tartrate monoamine poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D,L-lactic acid), which are able to suppress unspecific protein adsorption and to covalently bind proteins or peptides. An appropriate technique for their processing had to be both anhydrous, to avoid hydrolysis of the active ester, and suitable for the generation of interconnected porous structures. Attempts to fabricate scaffolds utilizing hard paraffin microparticles as hexane-extractable porogens failed. Consequently, a technique was developed involving lipid microparticles, which served as biocompatible porogens on which the scaffold forming polymer was precipitated in the porogen extraction media (n-hexane). Porogen melting during the extraction and polymer precipitation step led to an interconnected network of pores. Suitable lipid mixtures and their melting points, extraction conditions (temperature and time) and a low-toxic polymer solvent system were determined for their use in processing diblock copolymers of different molecular weights (22 and 42 kDa) into highly porous off-the-shelf cell carriers ready for easy surface modification towards biomimetic scaffolds. Insulin was employed to demonstrate the principal of instant protein coupling to a prefabricated scaffold. PMID:12922156

  4. Preparation and characterization of 1,6 anhydrous Β-D-Glucopyranose from starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prepare 2-deoxi-2-fluoride-D-glucosa (2FDG) in an inert form there are several synthesis methods, but the more interesting one for our study is based in a reaction from the 1,6 anhydrous, Β-D-glucopyranose (1,6AGP), in an attempt to compare the labelling efficiency rate of 2FDG with F-18, which is highly used in nuclear medicine. In the present paper the attainment of starch from white potatoe, infrared analysis of this starch and fusion point are included. Also results are compared with an analytical reactive standard. The process of preparation of 1,6AGP by pyrolysis of starch under reduced pressure, its separation and purification by crystallization and infrared characterization of 1,6AGP, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are also included. 10 kg. of potatoes were used, and 93059 g. ±5.8 of starch with an efficiency rate of 9.32 ±0.631; fusion point was 272 oC and there was a 9.83 ± 1.48 % of humidity. After the pyrolysis, crystallization an purification processes, 1.71 ±0.54 % of 1,6AGP were obtained. Later results of compound characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry were compared with a commercial product and it was proved that it corresponds to such pure compound. (Author)

  5. Taste Masking of Griseofulvin and Caffeine Anhydrous Using Kleptose Linecaps DE17 by Hot Melt Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluri, Abhishek; Popescu, Carmen; Zhou, Leon; Murthy, Reena N; Gowda, Vanaja K; Chetan Kumar, P; Pimparade, Manjeet B; Repka, Michael A; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 (KLD) in masking the unpleasant/bitter taste of therapeutic agents by hot melt extrusion (HME). Griseofulvin (GRI) and caffeine anhydrous (CA) were used as a bitter active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) model drugs. Thermogravimetric studies confirmed the stability of GRI, CA, and KLD at the employed extrusion temperatures. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed a characteristic melting endotherm of GRI at 218-220°C and CA at 230-232°C in the physical mixtures as well as in all extrudates over the period of study, indicating the crystalline nature of drug. HME of KLD was achieved only in the presence of plasticizer. Among the several plasticizers investigated, xylitol showed improved processability of KLD at 15% w/w concentration. Dissolution studies of HME extrudates using simulated salivary medium exhibited ∼threefold less release compared to physical mixture at the end of 5 min (the lesser drug release, better the taste masking efficiency). Furthermore, the results from the sensory evaluation of products in human panel demonstrated strong bitter taste in the case of physical mixture compared to the HME formulation, suggesting the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 as taste masking polymer in melt extruded form. PMID:26288942

  6. 锰硅炉无水炮泥试用实践%SILICON-MANGANESE FURNACE ANHYDROUS STEMMING TRIAL PRACTICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康峰

    2015-01-01

    In order to prevent the leakage of molten alloy and furnace-wearing accident and extend life-span of tap hole, it analyzes that silicon-manganese furnace tries out anhydrous stemming, summarizes its production and test process. Practice has proved that long-term use of anhydrous stemming can effectively lower cost and improve economic benefit.%为防止锰硅炉跑眼和穿炉事故以及延长出铁口使用寿命,通过对锰硅炉试用无水炮泥实践的分析,总结了无水炮泥的制作、试用过程.实践证明:长期使用无水炮泥能有效降低成本,提高经济效益.

  7. Rapid Preliminary Design of Interplanetary Trajectories Using the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    This set of tutorial slides is an introduction to the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's autonomous tool for preliminary design of interplanetary missions. This slide set covers the basics of creating and post-processing simple interplanetary missions in EMTG using both high-thrust chemical and low-thrust electric propulsion along with a variety of operational constraints.

  8. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español Why are dust storms a concern? A dust storm is a moving ... on Human Health (US Geological Survey) Chemicals in Dust Storms Are these chemicals in MY community? Particulate Matter ...

  9. Radioactive dust sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report is the second of a five part series on the technical evaluation of a number of dust monitoring instruments and the characterization of Long-Lived Radioactive Dust (LLRD). The data reported here pertain to an experimental study conducted under laboratory controlled conditions in a Long-Lived Radioactive Dust Test Facility (LLRDTF) designed for this purpose. This study was carried out with a twofold purpose in mind, namely, for the characterization of dust and LLRD, and for the evaluation of a variety of monitoring instruments, including cascade impactors, optical particle counters, nylon cyclones, open face filter samplers, and α-particle personal dosimeters, the latter normally used for α-particle radiation exposure purposes. Several non-radioactive and radioactive dusts were characterized. The non-radioactive dusts were SiC, Al2O3, talcum powder, corn starch and flour, while uranium tailings were used as a radioactive dust. Clear differences in instrument performance were observed for the various measurements made

  10. Positive and negative sudden impulses caused by fast forward and reverse interplanetary shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrioli, Vania Fatima; Savian, Jairo Francisco, E-mail: vaniafatima@gmail.com, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br [Space Science Laboratory of Santa Maria - LACESM/CT - UFSM, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Centro Tecnologico, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Echer, Ezequiel, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br [National Institute for Space Research - INPE - MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br [Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRSPE/INPE - MCT, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Fast forward interplanetary shocks (FFS) are characterized by positive jump in all interplanetary plasma parameters (solar wind speed, temperature and density) and interplanetary magnetic field. However the fast reverse interplanetary shocks (FRS) are characterized by negative jump in all mentioned parameters except solar wind speed. Observations show that FFS cause positive sudden impulses (SI) while FRS cause negative SI in the H-component of the geomagnetic field. In this work we investigate the SI caused by interplanetary shocks. We use the observed plasma parameters, upstream and downstream, to calculate the variation of dynamic pressure. We observe that the SI amplitude is larger for positive SI than for negative ones, as a consequence of the fact that FFS have larger dynamic pressure variations as compared to FRS. (author)

  11. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  12. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  13. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  14. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  15. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  16. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves

  17. The contribution of cometary dust to the zodiacal cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J. C.; Dermott, S. F.; Xu, Y. L.

    1995-06-01

    on the structure of the IRAS dust bands and the Earth's resonant ring (Dermott et al., Nature369, 719-723, 1994; Asteroids, Comets and Meteors, 1993, pp. 127-142. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1994). It is also consistent with the conclusions of other workers that the cloud must be heterogeneous (Levasseur-Regourd et al., Icarus86, 264-272, 1990; Origin and Evolution of Interplanetary Dust, pp. 131-138. Kluwer, Japan, 1991).

  18. IR-based Water Quantification in Nominally Anhydrous High-Pressure Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Müller, Monika; Rhede, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool to determine traces of OH and H2O in minerals and glasses. The application is based on the Beer Lambert law A = ɛ*c*t, where A is the absorbance, ɛ the absorption coefficient, e.g. in L mol H2O-1 cm-2, c the concentration in mol/L and t the thickness in cm. It has been shown in numerous experimental and theoretical studies, i.e. Paterson (1982) and Libowitzky and Rossman (1997) that ɛ generally increases with decreasing wavenumbers. However, this general trend seems to be valid only for hydrous minerals and glasses and should not be applied to water quantification in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) which incorporate traces of water in their structures (e.g. Rossman 2006, Thomas et al. 2009). For example, Bell et al. (2003) showed that if the general IR calibration of Paterson (1982) is adopted, the water concentration of olivine is underestimated by about 25 %. A similar result has been obtained by Deon et al. (2010) for Mg-wadsleyite. Thomas et al. (2009) evidenced using a large variety of analytical methods that not using mineral-specific IR-calibrations for the OH quantification in NAMs (e.g. SiO2 polymorphs and olivine) leads to either underestimation as for olivine or overestimation of the water content as for stishovite and coesite. Thus, to quantify the water content of NAMs mineral specific absorption coefficients are needed but unfortunately only for a few minerals available. In this study we propose that within a polymorphic mineral series of the same composition ɛ positively correlates with the density and negatively with the molar volume of the respective mineral phase. To prove this hypothesis we determined ɛ-values for synthetic hydrous ringwoodite samples ranging in composition from xMg = 0.0 to 0.6 by combining results of FTIR-spectroscopy with those of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The ɛ-values plot well below the general calibration curves of Paterson (1982) and Libowitzky and Rossman (1997

  19. Designing Complex Interplanetary Trajectories for the Global Trajectory Optimization Competitions

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Dario; Simões, Luís F; Märtens, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The design of interplanetary trajectories often involves a preliminary search for options that are later refined into one final selected trajectory. It is this broad search that, often being intractable, inspires the international event called Global Trajectory Optimization Competition. In the first part of this chapter, we introduce some fundamental problems of space flight mechanics, building blocks of any attempt to participate successfully in these competitions and we describe the use of the open source software PyKEP to assemble them into a final global solution strategy. In the second part, we formulate an instance of a multiple asteroid rendezvous problem, related to the 7th edition of the competition, and we show step by step how to build a possible solution strategy. We introduce two new techniques useful in the design of this particular mission type: the use of an asteroid phasing value and its surrogates and the efficient computation of asteroid clusters. We show how basic building blocks, sided to...

  20. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  1. Radiation shielding of spacecraft in manned interplanetary flights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillantini, P. E-mail: spillantini@fi.infn.it; Taccetti, F.; Papini, P.; Rossi, L

    2000-04-01

    During the interplanetary flights the crewmembers will be exposed to cosmic ray radiation with great risk for their health. The absorbed dose due to CR depends on the galactic (GCR) or solar (SCR) origin. GCRs are isotropic and relatively high in energy and deliver a dose nearly constant with time that can be reduced only by means of 'heavy' passive protection. The outer walls of the spacecraft usually shield the SCRs up to a few tens of MeV, but during some exceptional solar bursts, a great number of particles, mainly protons, are ejected at higher energies. In this case the dose delivered in a few hours by a solar burst can easily exceed 1 year cumulated dose by GCRs. The high-energy component of SCRs is quasi-directional so that a shielding system based on a superconductive magnetic lens can reduce the daily dose of SCRs to the level delivered by GCRs.

  2. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous spacecraft measurements bearing on the heliocentric distance dependencies of both large- and small-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are assembled and compared. These data tend to indicate that the average of the radial field component varies as the inverse square of distance. However, the azimuthal component is rather strongly a function of time, being influenced by both the time-dependent solar wind speed and the evolution of the source field at the sun. Thus, unless the solar wind speed dependence is taken into account, individual sets of measurements by a single spacecraft give an azimuthal component gradient which is steeper than the inverse distance dependence predicted from the Parker spiral model. A least squares fit to the composite (five spacecraft) solar rotation average data set gives a result close to the inverse distance dependence. Preliminary Helios results suggest general consistency with the spiral model.

  3. The use of the Earth's gravitational potential for interplanetary flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, G. G.

    2007-04-01

    An efficient scheme of the use of the Earth’s gravity in interplanetary flights is suggested, which opens up new opportunities for exploration of the solar system. The scheme of the gravitational maneuver allows one to considerably reduce the spacecraft mass consumption for a flight and the time of flight. An algorithm of the gravitational maneuver is suggested that takes into account the restriction on the altitude of a planet flyby. Estimates are made of transport capabilities for delivery of a spacecraft to the orbits of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The spacecraft is based on a middle-class carrier launcher of the Soyuz type and includes chemical and electric plasma jet engines of the SPD-140 type, which use solar energy.

  4. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Solar Wind Driven Magnetospheric Reconfiguration

    CERN Document Server

    Savov, E

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic disturbances are associated with electric currents as it is well checked at laboratory room scales and described by the Maxwell's equations of electromagnetic field. The analysis of spacecraft observations for more than a quarter of a century failed to provide a self-consistent three-dimensional picture of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo generated magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems. The proposed solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) driven reconfiguration of the earth's magnetosphere directly accounts for the observed magnetic disturbances. So role of the magnetospheric currents in creation of the magnetic disturbances is reconsidered in accordance with some poorly understood observations. A quantitative agreement with observations is demonstrated and a laboratory experiment to test the suggested model of the solar wind/IMF-magnetosphere interaction is described.

  5. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  6. Study of Interplanetary Magnetic Field with Atomic Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Shangguan, Jinyi

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new way of studying interplanetary magnetic field -- atomic alignment. Instead of sending thousands of space probes, atomic alignment allows magnetic mapping with any ground telescope facilities equipped with spectro-polarimeter. The polarization of spectral lines that are pumped by the anisotropic radiation from the sun is influenced by the magnetic alignment, which happens for weak magnetic field (<1G). As a result, the line polarization becomes an excellent tracer of the embedded magnetic field. The method is illustrated by the specific cases of Io and comet Halley that we consider. Magnetometer data from the Galileo mission Io flyby (2002) were used in order to construct the topology of the magnetic field around Jupiter. So as to the data from the vega mission comet Halley flyby(1986). A uniform density distribution of Na was considered and polarization at each point was then constructed. Both spatial and temporal variations of turbulent magnetic field can be traced with this technique...

  7. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  8. Interplanetary sources of magnetic storms: A statistical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic storms are mainly caused by the occurrence of intense southward magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium. These fields can be formed directly either by ejection of magnetic structures from the Sun or by stream interaction processes during solar wind propagation. In the present study we...... examine 30 years of satellite measurement of the solar wind during magnetic storms, with the aim of estimating the relative importance of these two processes. We use the solar wind proton temperature relative to the temperature expected from the empirical relation to the solar wind speed T...... so. Only around 20-25% of major and large storm hours and 10-15% of medium and small storm hours are directly associated with a solar wind meeting the criteria T-p/T-exp storm hours...

  9. Interplanetary sources to magnetic storms - A statistical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic storms are mainly caused by the occurrence of intense southward magnetic fields in the interplanetary medium. These fields can be formed directly either by ejection of magnetic structures from the Sun or by stream interaction processes during solar wind propagation. In the present study we...... examine 30 years of satellite measurement of the solar wind during magnetic storms, with the aim of estimating the relative importance of these two processes. We use the solar wind proton temperature relative to the temperature expected from the empirical relation to the solar wind speed Tp/Texp, together...... around 20-25% of major and large storm hours and 10-15% of medium and small storm hours are directly associated with a solar wind meeting the criteria Tp/Texp...

  10. Modification and relaxation of turbulence behind interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitna, Alexander; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Goncharov, Oleksandr; Chen, Christopher H. K.

    2016-04-01

    The solar wind is a weakly collisional super-Alfvenic expanding flow of the ejected solar plasma. This flow is highly turbulent and it plays an essential role in solar wind heating. Interplanetary shocks (IP) are an inseparable part of the solar wind and they increase the solar wind temperature via dissipation of a portion of the kinetic energy at the shock ramp. In downstream of IP shocks, turbulence is enhanced with respect to a level of upstream plasma fluctuations. We used the high cadence (31 ms) plasma measurements from the BMSW instrument on board the Spektr-R spacecraft. A unique time resolution allows us to study the transition from an inertial range of turbulence up to the scales where the kinetic effects become dominant. In this paper, we focus mainly on a relaxation of the increased level of the turbulent fluctuations showing that it takes hours for the solar wind to reach its un-shocked upstream state.

  11. IPS limits on very low frequency VLBI. [Interplanetary Scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Williamson, Robert S., III

    1990-01-01

    The ability of a space-based radio interferometer array to make high resolution images at frequencies of only a few MHz will be limited by interplanetary scintillation. Numerical simulations have been used to study the severity of interferometer phase fluctuations caused by the density fluctuations in the solar wind over a range of frequencies and solar elongation angles. The impact of these fluctuations on the quality of radio images produced has also been investigated. The results show that, for baselines up to 100 km, accurate imaging should be possible when nu sin (epsilon/2) is equal to or greater than 2.5, where nu is the observing frequency in MHz and epsilon is the solar elongation angle.

  12. Planetary and interplanetary environmental models for radiation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    In this introductory talk the essence of environmental modeling is presented as suited for radiation analysis purposes. The variables of fundamental importance for radiation environmental assessment are discussed. The characterization is performed by dividing modeling into three areas, namely the interplanetary medium, the circumplanetary environment, and the planetary or satellite surface. In the first area, the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their modulation by the heliospheric magnetic field as well as solar particle events (SPE) are considered, in the second area the magnetospheres are taken into account, and in the third area the effect of the planetary environment is also considered. Planetary surfaces and atmospheres are modeled based on results from the most recent targeted spacecraft. The results are coupled with suited visualization techniques and radiation transport models in support of trade studies of spacecraft and crew health risks for future exploration missions.

  13. Solar sail time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectory design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Ping Gong; Yun-Feng Gao; Jun-Feng Li

    2011-01-01

    The fuel consumption associated with some interplanetary transfer trajectories using chemical propulsion is not affordable.A solar sail is a method of propulsion that does not consume fuel.Transfer time is one of the most pressing problems of solar sail transfer trajectory design.This paper investigates the time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectories to a circular orbit of given inclination and radius.The optimal control law is derived from the principle of maximization.An indirect method is used to solve the optimal control problem by selecting values for the initial adjoint variables,which are normalized within a unit sphere.The conditions for the existence of the time-optimal transfer are dependent on the lightness number of the sail and the inclination and radius of the target orbit.A numerical method is used to obtain the boundary values for the time-optimal transfer trajectories.For the cases where no time-optimal transfer trajectories exist,first-order necessary conditions of the optimal control are proposed to obtain feasible solutions.The results show that the transfer time decreases as the minimum distance from the Sun decreases during the transfer duration.For a solar sail with a small lightness number,the transfer time may be evaluated analytically for a three-phase transfer trajectory.The analytical results are compared with previous results and the associated numerical results.The transfer time of the numerical result here is smaller than the transfer time from previous results and is larger than the analytical result.

  14. Predicting cosmic ray fluxes for the interplanetary space missions needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymmik, Rikho

    One of the main claims for the planning forthcoming interplanetary missions is the prediction of radiation threatening that effects on both astronauts and onboard instrumentation. It is caused by the SEP and GCR particle fluxes which always present in space and depend on solar activity level. The GCR and SEP fluxes' quantitative models developed at moment in Moscow University are based on the analysis of experimental data set for the four previous solar cycles, and establish a connection between particle fluxes and solar activity (Wolf numbers) for noted radiation fields. The GCR fluxes model (see for example, International Standard ISO 15390, Space environment (natural and artificial) - Galactic cosmic ray model) establishes an accordance between GCR fluxes and smoothed (over 13 months) month-averaged Wolf numbers. For the SEP fluxes which subordinates to quite defined statistical laws, the model developed enables to calculate a total fluxes that to be occurred probably with some given probability during a long time period under any solar activity level. This report presents examples of GCR and SEP fluxes occurred under different solar activity levels as well as energy spectra calculated for various probabilities of SEP flux occurrences. The data presented shows that SEP fluxes observed and their spectra are never exceed the bounds of probabilities, set by the model input. Thus, the MSU's models of GCR and SEP fluxes allows one to take account of solar activity effect on the probable value of fluxes that formed by radiation environment particles for an interplanetary mission of any period. The accuracy of such a prediction depends above all on the solar activity's (e.g., Wolf numbers)prediction reliability.

  15. Autonomous aerobraking for low-cost interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrelli, David; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Strikwerda, Thomas; Kaidy, James; Prince, Jill; Powell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aerobraking has previously been used to reduce the propellant required to deliver an orbiter to its desired final orbit. In principle, aerobraking should be possible around any target planet or moon having sufficient atmosphere to permit atmospheric drag to provide a portion of the mission ΔV, in lieu of supplying all of the required ΔV propulsively. The spacecraft is flown through the upper atmosphere of the target using multiple passes, ensuring that the dynamic pressure and thermal loads remain within the spacecraft's design parameters. NASA has successfully conducted aerobraking operations four times, once at Venus and three times at Mars. While aerobraking reduces the fuel required, it does so at the expense of time (typically 3-6 months), continuous Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage, and a large ground staff. These factors can result in aerobraking being a very expensive operational phase of the mission. However, aerobraking has matured to the point that much of the daily operation could potentially be performed autonomously onboard the spacecraft, thereby reducing the required ground support and attendant aerobraking related costs. To facilitate a lower-risk transition from ground processing to an autonomous capability, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has assembled a team of experts in aerobraking and interplanetary guidance and control to develop a high-fidelity, flight-like simulation. This simulation will be used to demonstrate the overall feasibility while exploring the potential for staff and DSN coverage reductions that autonomous aerobraking might provide. This paper reviews the various elements of autonomous aerobraking and presents an overview of the various models and algorithms that must be transformed from the current ground processing methodology to a flight-like environment. Additionally the high-fidelity flight software test bed, being developed from models used in a recent interplanetary mission, will be summarized.

  16. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Peng, R. D. [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Y. H. [Institute of Complexity Science, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Z. Y. [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ye, M. F.; Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  17. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  18. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered. PMID:184524

  19. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  20. Improved quantification of alite and belite in anhydrous Portland cements by 29Si MAS NMR: Effects of paramagnetic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Kocaba, Vanessa; Le Saoût, Gwenn;

    2009-01-01

    The applicability, reliability, and repeatability of 29Si MAS NMR for determination of the quantities of alite (Ca3SiO5) and belite (Ca2SiO4) in anhydrous Portland cement was investigated in detail for 11 commercial Portland cements and the results compared with phase quantifications based...... on powder X-ray diffraction combined with Rietveld analysis and with Taylor-Bogue calculations. The effects from paramagnetic ions (Fe3+) on the spinning sideband intensities, originating from dipolar couplings between 29Si and the spins of the paramagnetic electrons, were considered and analyzed in spectra...

  1. Special topical approach to the treatment of acne. Suppression of sweating with aluminum chloride in an anhydrous formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, H J; Shelley, W B

    1978-12-01

    A new topical approach to acne treatment--the use of aluminum chloride hexahydrate in anhydrous ethanol (ACAE)--was studied in 141 patients. Using sequential treatment schedules, paired comparison techniques, and various concentrations of ACAE, we established maximal efficacy with minimal local irritation for the 6.25% strength solution. Clinical efficacy and lack of toxicity of this formulation were confirmed by the additional clinical study of 65 patients. The antiperspirant and antibacterial actions of 6.25% ACAE solution were then verified on acne skin areas. It is postulated that the clinical improvement in acne that follows the topical use of ACAE results from one or both of these actions.

  2. Summary on Ferric Chloride Anhydrous Production%无水三氯化铁生产运行总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢峰

    2014-01-01

    In ferric chloride anhydrous production operation condition, improve the process, reduce consumption, improve operational control level, stable safety production and protecting the environment and social benefit is remarkable.%介绍了无水三氯化铁生产运行状况。通过实践改进工艺,降低消耗,提高操作控制水平,达到安全生产,环境、社会效益显著。

  3. Crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and DFT comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate, [K3(C6H5O7)] n , has been solved and refined using laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional techniques. The three unique potassium cations are 6-, 8-, and 6-coordinate (all irregular). The [KO n ] coordination polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework, with channels running parallel to the c axis. The only hydrogen bond is an intra-molecular one involving the hy-droxy group and the central carboxyl-ate group, with graph-set motif S(5). PMID:27536403

  4. A new instrument to measure charged and neutral cometary dust particles at low and high impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economon, T.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of dust particle detector, the PVDF dust detector, was designed for space missions such as the Halley Comet missions where the particle impact velocity is very high. It is demonstrated that this same PVDF detector (operating in a different mode) also has the capability of detecting dust particles having low velocity (approx. 100 m/s). This low velocity detection capability is extremely important in terms of planned missions requiring measurement of low velocity dust particles such as comet rendezvous missions. An additional detecting element (charge induction cylinder) was also developed which, when combined with a PVDF detector, yields a system which will measure the charge (magnitude and sign) carried by a cometary particle as well as the particle velocity and mass for impact velocities in the range 100 to 500 m/s. Since the cylinder-PVDF detector system has a relatively small geometry factors, an array of PVDF detectors was included having a total sensing area of 0.1 sq m for measurements in regions of space where the dust flux is expected to be low. The characteristics of the detectors in this array have been chosen to provide optimum mass sensitivity for both low-velocity cometary dust as well as high-velocity asteroid associated and interplanetary dust.

  5. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  6. High-Efficiency Data-Rate-Scalable Laser Transmitter for Interplanetary Optical Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interplanetary missions are at the core of NASA's current space exploration program and are expected to lead the way to new resource discovery in the next decade...

  7. Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications allowing moving up from UHF, S or X to get higher gain for a given diameter.

  8. Research Progress of Solar Corona and Interplanetary Physics in China: 2010-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xinhua; XIANG Changqing

    2012-01-01

    The scientific objective of solar corona and interplanetary research is the understanding of the various phenomena related to solar activities and their effects on the space environments of the Earth. Great progress has been made in the study of solar corona and interplanetary physics by the Chinese space physics community during the past years. This paper will give a brief report about the latest progress of the corona and interplanetary research in China during the years of 2010--2012. The paper can be divided into the following parts: solar corona and solar wind, CME- ICME, magnetic reconnection, energetic particles, space plasma, space weather numerical modeling by 3D SIP-CESE MHD model, space weather prediction methods, and proposed missions. They constitute the abundant content of study for the complicated phenomena that originate from the solar corona, propagate in interplanetary space, and produce geomagnetic disturbances. All these progresses are acquired by the Chinese space physicists, either independently or through international collaborations.

  9. The impact of interplanetary transport on the charge spectra of heavy ions accelerated in SEP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartavykh, J.; Kovaltsov, G.; Ostryakov, V.; Droege, W.

    We investigate the effects of interplanetary propagation on charge spectra of heavy ions observed at 1 AU. A Monte-Carlo approach is applied to solve the transport equation which takes into account spatial diffusion as well as convection and adiabatic deceleration. It is shown that interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration. This fact should be taken into account when experimental data are interpreted. A broadening of charge distributions caused by interplanetary propagation might explain rather wide charge distributions observed in a number of SEP events. We explain the available charge spectra of iron for several impulsive SEP events making use of our model of interplanetary propagation assuming different values of the mean free path.

  10. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vilmer

    Full Text Available The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO is then performed, starting from an estimation of the transit time of the inter-planetary perturbation from the Sun to the Earth, assumed to be achieved at a constant speed (i.e. the speed measured at 1 AU. EIT/SOHO and Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH observations are also used as proxies in this identification for the cases when LASCO observations do not allow one to firmly establish the association. The last part of the analysis concerns the identification of the solar source of the CMEs, performed using a large set of solar observations from X-ray to radio wavelengths. In the present study, this association is based on a careful examination of many data sets (EIT, NRH and H images and not on the use of catalogs and of Solar Geophysical Data reports. An association between inter-planetary disturbances and LASCO/CMEs or proxies on the disk is found for 36 interplanetary events. For 32 events, the solar source of activity can also be identified. A large proportion of cases is found to be associated with a flare signature in an active region, not excluding of course the involvement of a filament. Conclusions are finally drawn on the propagation of the disturbances in the interplanetary medium, the preferential association of disturbances detected close to the Earth’s orbit with halos or wide CMEs and the location on the solar disk of solar sources of the interplanetary disturbances during that period

  11. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  12. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  13. One year of Galileo dust data from the Jovian system 1996

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Graps, A; Bindschadler, D; Dermott, S; Fechtig, H; Gustason, B A; Hamilton, D P; Hanner, M S; Horányi, M; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I; McDonnell, J A M; Morfill, G E; Planskey, C; Schwehm, G; Srama, R A; Zook, H A

    2001-01-01

    The dust detector system onboard Galileo records dust impacts in circumjovian space since the spacecraft has been injected into a bound orbit about Jupiter in December 1995. This is the sixth in a series of papers dedicated to presenting Galileo and Ulysses dust data. We present data from the Galileo dust instrument for the period January to December 1996 when the spacecraft completed four orbits about Jupiter (G1, G2, C3 and E4). Data were obtained as high resolution realtime science data or recorded data during a time period of 100 days, or via memory read-outs during the remaining times. Because the data transmission rate of the spacecraft is very low, the complete data set (i. e. all parameters measured by the instrument during impact of a dust particle) for only 2% (5353) of all particles detected could be transmitted to Earth; the other particles were only counted. Together with the data for 2883 particles detected during Galileo's interplanetary cruise and published earlier, complete data of 8236 parti...

  14. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  15. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  16. Sources of zodiacal dust

    CERN Document Server

    Ipatov, S I

    2007-01-01

    Fractions of asteroidal particles, particles originating beyond Jupiter's orbit (including trans-Neptunian particles), and cometary particles originating inside Jupiter's orbit among zodiacal dust are estimated to be about 1/3 each, with a possible deviation from 1/3 up to 0.1-0.2. These estimates were based on the comparison of our models of the zodiacal cloud that use results of numerical integration of the orbital evolution of dust particles produced by asteroids, comets, and trans-Neptunian objects with different observations (e.g., WHAM [Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper spectrometer] observations of spectra of zodiacal light, the number density at different distances from the Sun). The fraction of particles produced by Encke-type comets (with e~0.8-0.9) does not exceed 0.15 of the overall population. The estimated fraction of particles produced by long-period and Halley-type comets among zodiacal dust also does not exceed 0.1-0.15. Though trans-Neptunian particles fit different observations of dust inside Jupite...

  17. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  18. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our theoretical research on dust-plasma interactions has concentrated on three main areas: (a)studies of grain charging and applications; (b) waves and instabilities in weakly correlated dusty plasma with applications to space and laboratory plasmas; (c) waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

  19. Operational Experience with Autonomous Star Trackers on ESA Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Mathias; Jauregui, Libe; Kielbassa, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Mars Express (MEX), Rosetta and Venus Express (VEX) are ESA interplanetary spacecrafts (S/C) launched in June 2003, March 2004 and November 2005, respectively. Mars Express was injected into Mars orbit end of 2003 with routine operations starting in spring 2004. Rosetta is since launch on its way to rendezvous comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. It has completed several test and commissioning activities and is performing several planetary swingbys (Earth in spring 2005, Mars in spring 2007, Earth in autumn 2007 and again two years later). Venus Express has also started routine operations since the completion of the Venus orbit insertion maneuver sequence beginning of May 2006. All three S/C are three axes stabilized with a similar attitude and orbit control system (AOCS). The attitude is estimated on board using star and rate sensors and controlled using four reaction wheels. A bipropellant reaction control system with 10N thrusters serves for wheel off loadings and attitude control in safe mode. Mars Express and Venus Express have an additional 400N engine for the planetary orbit insertion. Nominal Earth communication is accomplished through a high gain antenna. All three S/C are equipped with a redundant set of autonomous star trackers (STR) which are based on almost the same hardware. The STR software is especially adapted for the respective mission. This paper addresses several topics related to the experience gained with the STR operations on board the three S/C so far.

  20. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  1. Effects of Interplanetary Shock Inclinations on Nightside Auroral Power Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectiveness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and Wind spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earth's magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some potential mechanisms will be discussed.

  2. An analysis of whistler waves at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Farrell, W. M.; Stone, R. G.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of whistler wave magnetic and electric field amplitude ratios from which we compute wave propagation angles and energies of electrons in resonance with the waves. To do this analysis, we compute the theoretical dependence of ratios of wave components on the whistler wave propagation angle Theta for various combinations of orthogonal wave components. Ratios of wave components that would be observed by a spinning spacecraft are determined, and the effects of arbitrary inclinations of the spacecraft to the ambient magnetic field and to the whistler wave vector are studied. This analysis clearly demonstrates that B/E, the ratio of magnetic to electric field amplitudes, cannot be assumed to be the wave index of refraction, contrary to assumptions of some earlier studies. Therefore previous interpretations of whistler wave observations based on this assumption must be reinvestigated. B/E ratios derived using three orthogonal wave components can be used to unambiguously determine Theta. Using spin plane observations alone, a significant uncertainty occurs in the determination of Theta. Nevertheless, for whistler waves observed downstream of several interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses plasma wave experiment we find that Theta is highly oblique. We suggest that the analysis of wave amplitude ratios used in conjunction with traditional stability analyses provide a promising tool for determining which particle distributions and resonances are likely to be dominant contributors to wave growth.

  3. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  4. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    CERN Document Server

    Alissandrakis, C E; Patsourakos, S; Kontogeorgos, A; Tsitsipis, P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which small scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. We analyze observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nan\\c cay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type IIIs. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated EUV emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. We found that the EUV events that produced IP type IIIs were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55" with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the l...

  5. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  6. Extermophylic microorganisms: issue of interplanetary transfer on external spacecraft surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, N.; Deshevaya, E.; Polykarpov, N.; Svistunova, Y.; Grigoriev, A.

    Interplanetary transfer of terrestrial microbes capable of surviving in extreme environments and planetary protection from accidental biocontamination by them are the issues of major practical rather than hypothetical value The natural resistance of microbes to extreme environments and a possibility of their transfer beyond geographical barriers of Earth on external spacecraft surfaces have brought forward a need in profound research into the likelihood of their survival in outer space Hardware and a program have been developed at the State Scientific Research Center of the Russian Federation -- Institute for Biomedical Problems with the goal of carrying out a space experiment Biorisk The experiment was aimed at assessing the possibility of long-term comparable with the duration of the Martian flight survival of microorganisms in outer space on materials used in space industry Samples of materials were contaminated with test cultures of bacteria Bacillus and fungi Aspergillus Penicillium Cladosporium known to be common residents of various environments on Earth and resistant to multiple alternation of high and low temperatures Materials used in the construction of external spacecraft surfaces such as steel aluminium alloy heat-insulating coating were chosen as test samples for the experiment Containers with materials and test microorganisms were placed on the external side of the Russian segment of the ISS Unique data have been accumulated after a 204 day exposure on the external side of the ISS which have proved that

  7. How are Forbush decreases related with interplanetary magnetic field enhancements ?

    CERN Document Server

    Arunbabu, K P; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Mohanty, P K; Oshima, A; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods. We use muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We select those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude > 0.25%. We use IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We look for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one hour averaged IMF. We ask if the diffusion of high energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results. The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably simil...

  8. Collaborative Wideband Compressed Signal Detection in Interplanetary Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulin; Zhang, Gengxin; Bian, Dongming; Gou, Liang; Zhang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    As the development of autonomous radio in deep space network, it is possible to actualize communication between explorers, aircrafts, rovers and satellites, e.g. from different countries, adopting different signal modes. The first mission to enforce the autonomous radio is to detect signals of the explorer autonomously without disturbing the original communication. This paper develops a collaborative wideband compressed signal detection approach for InterPlaNetary (IPN) Internet where there exist sparse active signals in the deep space environment. Compressed sensing (CS) can be utilized by exploiting the sparsity of IPN Internet communication signal, whose useful frequency support occupies only a small portion of an entirely wide spectrum. An estimate of the signal spectrum can be obtained by using reconstruction algorithms. Against deep space shadowing and channel fading, multiple satellites collaboratively sense and make a final decision according to certain fusion rule to gain spatial diversity. A couple of novel discrete cosine transform (DCT) and walsh-hadamard transform (WHT) based compressed spectrum detection methods are proposed which significantly improve the performance of spectrum recovery and signal detection. Finally, extensive simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of our proposed collaborative scheme for signal detection in IPN Internet. Compared with the conventional discrete fourier transform (DFT) based method, our DCT and WHT based methods reduce computational complexity, decrease processing time, save energy and enhance probability of detection.

  9. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness: A Statistical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using WIND and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere is investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.70) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and varying the IP shock impact angle. We ...

  10. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X-line. The electric field parallel to the X-line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X-line at a large number of points along the X-line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resisti...

  11. Design of Control System to Anhydrous Alcohol Production%无水酒精控制系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖斌

    2014-01-01

    在熟悉无水酒精生产工艺流程的基础上,确立无水酒精控制方案和IO点数。通过运用SIMATIC STEP7软件,结合无水酒精生产工艺,利用PLC编程组态软件STEP7建立过程控制程序,并与上位机监控软件WinCC链接,达到模拟工艺的效果。%By using SIMATIC STEP7 original combination of anhydrous alcohol production process,PLC programming software config-uration STEP7 building process control procedures,and Computer Software WinCC link,configuration,simulation technology to achieve re-sults.In a familiar anhydrous alcohol production process and the master of the software operating circumstances ,familiar with the single-loop and master control program,familiar with and master the process control system development steps.

  12. Ionic-liquid-based proton conducting membranes for anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel-cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sa; Zhou, Li; Wang, Pengjie; Zhang, Fangfang; Yu, Shuchun; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-03-12

    An ionic-liquid-doped poly(benzimidazole) (PBI) proton-conducting membrane for an anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel cell has been proposed. Compared with other ionic liquids, such as imidazole-type ionic liquids, diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([dema][TfO]) showed better electrode reaction kinetics (H2 oxidation and Cl2 reduction reaction at platinum) and was more suitable for a H2/Cl2 fuel cell. PBI polymer and [dema][TfO] were compatible with each other, and the hybrid membranes exhibited high stability and good ionic conductivity, reaching 20.73 mS cm(-1) at 160 °C. We also analyzed the proton-transfer mechanism in this ionic-liquid-based membrane and considered that both proton-hopping and diffusion mechanisms existed. In addition, this composite electrolyte worked well in a H2/Cl2 fuel cell under non-water conditions. This work would give a good path to study the novel membranes for anhydrous H2/Cl2 fuel-cell application. PMID:24490850

  13. Enhancement of proton conductivity of chitosan membrane enabled by sulfonated graphene oxide under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahua; Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Haoqin; Ma, Chuanming; Liu, Jindun; Cao, Shaokui; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, sulfonated graphene oxide (SGO) nanosheets with controllable sulfonic acid group loading are synthesized via the facile distillation-precipitation polymerization, and then incorporated into chitosan (CS) matrix to prepare nanohybrid membranes. The microstructure and physicochemical properties of the resulting membranes are extensively investigated. Compared with CS control and GO-filled membranes, SGO-filled membranes attain enhanced thermal and mechanical stabilities due to the strong electrostatic attractions between -SO3H of SGO and -NH2 of CS, which inhibit the mobility of CS chains. Additionally, the inhibited mobility reduces the area swellings of SGO-filled membranes, reinforcing their structural stabilities. The incorporation of SGO generates acid-base pairs along CS-SGO interface, which work as facile proton-hoping sites and thus construct continuous and wide proton transfer pathways, yielding enhanced proton conductivities under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions. Meanwhile, the conductivity can be elevated by increasing the sulfonic acid group loading and content of SGO. Particularly, incorporating 2.0% S4GO can afford the nanohybrid membrane a 122.5% increase in hydrated conductivity and a 90.7% increase in anhydrous conductivity when compared with CS control membrane. The superior conduction properties then offered a significant enhancement in H2/O2 cell performances to the nanohybrid membranes, guaranteeing them to be promising proton exchange membranes.

  14. Hot Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in Dust Plasma with Variable Dust Charge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段文山; 吕克朴; 赵金保

    2001-01-01

    Considering the variation of dust charges, we have analytically studied the governing equation for the system with the same model as that for cold dust acoustic waves in a demagnetized plasma but with the contribution of hot dust. The result indicates that the governing equation is also a Kortweg-de Vries equation, although its amplitude and width will be smaller compared with the cold dust case.

  15. Achievements and Future Plan of Interplanetary CubeSats and Micro-Sats in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Ryu

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces Japanese achievements and future plans of CubeSats and Micro-Sats for deep space exploration. As the first step toward deep space mission by such tiny spacecraft, University of Tokyo and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) developed the world's first deep space micro-spacecraft PROCYON (Proximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation). Its mission objective is to demonstrate a micro-spacecraft bus technology for deep space exploration and proximity flyby to asteroids performing optical measurements. PROCYON was launched into the Earth departure trajectory on December 3, 2014 together with Japanese asteroid sample return mission Hayabusa-2. PROCYON successfully completed the bus system demonstration mission in its interplanetary flight. Currently, Japan is not only pursuing the improvement and utilization of the demonstrated micro-sat deep space bus system with a weight of tens of kg or more for more practical scientific deep space missions, but also trying to develop smaller spacecraft with a weight of less than tens of kg, namely CubeSats, for deep space exploration. We are proposing a self-contained 6U CubeSat mission for the rideshare opportunity on the USA's SLS EM-1 mission, which will fly to a libration orbit around Earth-Moon L2 point and perform scientific observations of the Earth and the Moon. We are also seeking the possibility of CubeSats which is carried by a larger spacecraft to the destination and supports the mission by taking advantage of its low-cost and risk-tolerable feature. As an example of such style of CubeSat missions, we are studying a CubeSat for close observations of an asteroid, which will be carried to the target asteroid by a larger mother spacecraft. This CubeSat is released from the mother spacecraft to make a close flyby for scientific observations, which is difficult to be performed by the mother spacecraft if we consider the risk of the collision to the target asteroid or dust particles ejected

  16. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan P.; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke;

    2016-01-01

    dependence on the dispersion media used, indicating the complexity of the nucleation process. Furthermore, when the CBZ and NF material was compacted into tablets the transformation times were remarkably slower. Results suggest that variations in the composition of the contents of the stomach/gut may affect...... with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different...... analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate in water...

  17. Phase Transitions in a Capacitively Coupled Dusty Plasma with Conducting Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2011-10-01

    Complex plasma is present in a variety of environments including planetary rings, cometary tails, interplanetary clouds and semiconductor manufacturing and fusion environments. Understanding the physics behind such complex plasmas, particularly those comprised of conducting dust, is not well understood. In this work, a GEC reference cell is employed to examine the translational and orientational order of conducting dust contained within crystal lattice structures formed in a complex plasma. The Pair Correlation function, bond orientation function and Voronoi and polygon construction diagrams are used to measure dislocations and disclinations, yielding a quantitative measure of the overall phase of the structure. The role this phase transition process plays in the melting of conducting and non-conducting 2D structures will be discussed.

  18. Plutos interaction with its space environment: Solar Wind, Energetic Particles & Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Bagenal, F; McComas, D J; McNutt,, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) observations suggested ions are accelerated and-or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes about one tenth the flux in the interplanetary medium, increasing with distance downstream. The Student Dust Counter, which measures radius greater than 1.4 um grains, detected 1 candidate impact from 5days before to 5 days after closest approach, indicating an upper limit for the dust density in the Pluto system of 4.6 per cubic km.

  19. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  20. Dust arising during steelmaking processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Popielska-Ostrowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper describes the dust arising during steelmaking processes.Design/methodology/approach: Steelmaking dusts may be a viable alternative for obtaining valuable and widely used metal which is zinc. On the other hand, heavy metals, it was as dangerous to the environment, and this in turn means that development of steelmaking dusts in the best possible way.Findings: The analysis of the formation of steelmaking dust.Research limitations/implications: Understanding the mechanism of steelmaking dusts will help to increase the participation of zinc recycling from wastes.Practical implications: Contained zinc in the dust can be recovered from the positive economic effect, and neutralization of hazardous waste to the desired environmental effect.Originality/value: Description of the mechanism of steelmaking dust, with particular emphasis on the distribution of zinc. The information is very important in the development of metal recovery technology from waste.

  1. The physical nature of interplanetary dust as inferred by particles collected at 35 km. [morphology of micrometeorites and ablation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Hodge, P. W.; Bucher, W.

    1973-01-01

    Particles were collected at an altitude of 35 km by two flights of a volume sampling micrometeorite collector. The collection scheme is very sensitive and is capable of collecting a significant number of particles. Many of the particles collected have chemical compositions similar to solar or to iron meteorites. Morphology of collected particles indicates that both true micrometeorites and ablation products were collected.

  2. Dynamical evolution of interplanetary dust particles trapped in Earth's horseshoe and quasi-satellite co-orbital resonance regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    We use numerical integrations to model the orbital evolution of IDPs decaying from the asteroid belt into the inner solar system under the influence of radiation pressure, Poynting-Roberston light drag, and solar wind drag. In our models the ratio of radiation pressure to solar gravity ranges from 0.0025 up to 0.02, corresponding to IDP diameters ranging from about 200 microns down to about 25 microns, respectively. In this size range nearly 100% of IDPs become temporarily trapped in mean-motion resonances just outside Earth's orbit. While trapped in these outer resonances the orbital eccentricities of IDPs significantly increases. This causes most IDPs to eventually escape the resonances, allowing their orbits to continue decaying inwards past 1 AU. We've shown previously (Kortenkamp, Icarus 226, 1550-1558, 2013) that significant fractions of IDPs in this size range can subsequently become trapped in Earth's co-orbital horseshoe and quasi-satellite resonance regions, with semi-major axes just inside of 1 AU. Here, we present new results on the long-term effects of Earth's varying orbital eccentricity and inclination on the trapping and evolution of these co-orbital IDPs.

  3. Signatures of interplanetary transients behind shocks and their associated near-surface solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bravo

    Full Text Available Interplanetary transients with particular signatures different from the normal solar wind have been observed behind interplanetary shocks and also without shocks. In this paper we have selected four well-known transient interplanetary signatures, namely: magnetic clouds, helium enhancements and bidirectional electron and ion fluxes, found in the solar wind behind shocks, and undertaken a correlative study between them and the corresponding solar observations. We found that although commonly different signatures appear in a single interplanetary transient event, they are not necessarily simultaneous, that is, they may belong to different plasma regions within the ejecta, which suggests that they may be generated by complex processes involving the ejection of plasma from different solar regions. We also found that more than 90% of these signatures correspond to cases when an Hα flare and/or the eruption of a filament occurred near solar central meridian between 1 and 4 days before the observation of the disturbance at 1 AU, the highest association being with flares taking place between 2 and 3 days before. The majority of the Hα flares were also accompanied by soft X-ray events. We also studied the longitudinal distribution of the associated solar events and found that between 80% and 90% of the interplanetary ejecta were associated with solar events within a longitudinal band of ±30° from the solar central meridian. An east-west asymmetry in the associated solar events seems to exist for some of the signatures. We also look for coronal holes adjacent to the site of the explosive event and find that they were present almost in every case.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics · Interplanetary shocks · Solar wind plasma · Solar physics · Flares and mass ejections

  4. The use of various interplanetary scintillation indices within geomagnetic forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available Interplanetary scintillation (IPS, the twinkling of small angular diameter radio sources, is caused by the interaction of the signal with small-scale plasma irregularities in the solar wind. The technique may be used to sense remotely the near-Earth heliosphere and observations of a sufficiently large number of sources may be used to track large-scale disturbances as they propagate from close to the Sun to the Earth. Therefore, such observations have potential for use within geomagnetic forecasts. We use daily data from the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, made available through the World Data Centre, to test the success of geomagnetic forecasts based on IPS observations. The approach discussed here was based on the reduction of the information in a map to a single number or series of numbers. The advantages of an index of this nature are that it may be produced routinely and that it could ideally forecast both the occurrence and intensity of geomagnetic activity. We start from an index that has already been described in the literature, INDEX35. On the basis of visual examination of the data in a full skymap format modifications were made to the way in which the index was calculated. It was hoped that these would lead to an improvement in its forecasting ability. Here we assess the forecasting potential of the index using the value of the correlation coefficient between daily Ap and the IPS index, with IPS leading by 1 day. We also compare the forecast based on the IPS index with forecasts of Ap currently released by the Space Environment Services Center (SESC. Although we find that the maximum improvement achieved is small, and does not represent a significant advance in forecasting ability, the IPS forecasts at this phase of the solar cycle are of a similar quality to those made by SESC.

  5. Interplanetary Laser Ranging. Analysis for Implementation in Planetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the motion of natural (and artificial) bodies in the solar system provide key input on their interior structre and properties. Currently, the most accurate measurements of solar system dynamics are performed using radiometric tracking systems on planetary missions, providing range measurement with an accuracy in the order of 1 m. Laser ranging to Earth-orbiting satellites equipped with laser retroreflectors provides range data with (sub-)cm accuracy. Extending this technology to planetary missions, however, requires the use of an active space segment equipped with a laser detector and transmitter (for a two-way system). The feasibility of such measurements have been demonstrated at planetary distances, and used operationally (with a one-way system) for the Lunar Reconaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission. The topic of this dissertation is the analysis of the application of interplanetary laser ranging (ILR) to improve the science return from next-generation space missions, with a focus on planetary science objectives. We have simulated laser ranging data for a variety of mission and system architectures, analyzing the influence of both model and measurement uncertainties. Our simulations show that the single-shot measurement precision is relatively inconsequential compared to the systematic range errors, providing a strong rationale for the consistent use of single-photon signal-intensity operation. We find that great advances in planetary geodesy (tidal, rotational characteristics, etc.) could be achieved by ILR. However, the laser data should be accompanied by commensurate improvements in other measurements and data analysis models to maximize the system's science return. The science return from laser ranging data will be especially strong for planetary landers, with a radio system remaining the preferred choice for many orbiter missions. Furthermore, we conclude that the science case for a one-way laser ranging is relatively weak compared to next

  6. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  7. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  8. Transport of Dust Particles in Tokamak Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R D; Krasheninnikov, S I; Rognlien, T D; Rozenberg, M

    2006-06-06

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  9. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  10. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  11. Encapsulating Mobile Proton Carriers into Structural Defects in Coordination Polymer Crystals: High Anhydrous Proton Conduction and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Horike, Satoshi; Itakura, Tomoya; Shinozaki, Ryota; Ogiwara, Naoki; Umeyama, Daiki; Nagarkar, Sanjog; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Hayashi, Akari; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-13

    We describe the encapsulation of mobile proton carriers into defect sites in nonporous coordination polymers (CPs). The proton carriers were encapsulated with high mobility and provided high proton conductivity at 150 °C under anhydrous conditions. The high proton conductivity and nonporous nature of the CP allowed its application as an electrolyte in a fuel cell. The defects and mobile proton carriers were investigated using solid-state NMR, XAFS, XRD, and ICP-AES/EA. On the basis of these analyses, we concluded that the defect sites provide space for mobile uncoordinated H3PO4, H2PO4(-), and H2O. These mobile carriers play a key role in expanding the proton-hopping path and promoting the mobility of protons in the coordination framework, leading to high proton conductivity and fuel cell power generation. PMID:27324658

  12. Quantitative determination of amorphous nicardipine hydrochloride in long acting formula (NIC-LA) using light anhydrous silicic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohinata, Takeru; Fujii, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Souichiro; Hamada, Noritaka; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2004-12-01

    We investigated a method to quantitatively determine amorphous nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC) in the NIC-long acting formula (LA) model formulas prepared using NIC, light anhydrous silicic acid (LASA) and carboxymethylethylcellulose (CMEC). Consequently, since the quantity of total NIC in the formula can be determined by means of HPLC and crystal NIC can be determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) method because the heat of fusion (85.08 J/g) of NIC is constant and unaffected by excipients, we developed the HPLC-DSC method by which the quantity of amorphous NIC is calculated as the difference between the quantity of total NIC determined by HPLC and the quantity of crystal NIC determined by DSC. This practical HPLC-DSC method was confirmed to have good accuracy and reproducibility.

  13. Encapsulating Mobile Proton Carriers into Structural Defects in Coordination Polymer Crystals: High Anhydrous Proton Conduction and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inukai, Munehiro; Horike, Satoshi; Itakura, Tomoya; Shinozaki, Ryota; Ogiwara, Naoki; Umeyama, Daiki; Nagarkar, Sanjog; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Malon, Michal; Hayashi, Akari; Ohhara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-07-13

    We describe the encapsulation of mobile proton carriers into defect sites in nonporous coordination polymers (CPs). The proton carriers were encapsulated with high mobility and provided high proton conductivity at 150 °C under anhydrous conditions. The high proton conductivity and nonporous nature of the CP allowed its application as an electrolyte in a fuel cell. The defects and mobile proton carriers were investigated using solid-state NMR, XAFS, XRD, and ICP-AES/EA. On the basis of these analyses, we concluded that the defect sites provide space for mobile uncoordinated H3PO4, H2PO4(-), and H2O. These mobile carriers play a key role in expanding the proton-hopping path and promoting the mobility of protons in the coordination framework, leading to high proton conductivity and fuel cell power generation.

  14. FTIR, HATR and FT-Raman studies on the anhydrous and monohydrate species of maltose in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iramain, Maximiliano Alberto; Davies, Lilian; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2016-06-16

    The structures of α- and β-maltose anhydrous and their corresponding monohydrated species were studied combining the FT-IR, FT-Raman and HATR spectra with DFT calculations. The four structures were optimized in gas and aqueous solution by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. The self-consistent force field (SCRF) calculations together with the polarized continuum (PCM) model were used to study the systems in solution while the solvation energies were computed using the solvation model (SM). The calculated structural and vibrational properties could explain the anomerization of maltose in solution, as was reported in the literature while the natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses for those species support clearly the mutarotation equilibria between both forms in solution, evidencing the anhydrous forms the equilibrium: α (45%) ⇔ β (55%), similar to that experimentally reported at 20 °C. Bands of all the species observed in the vibrational spectra support the presence of the anomeric species of maltose in solution while the presence of dimeric species justify the intense IR bands observed in the higher wavenumbers region. The similar gap values for maltose and lactose probably justify that these sugars are reducing sugars while the high values in sucrose could explain that it is a non-reducing sugar. On the other hand, the sweeteners cyclamate and saccharine are most reactive in solution than the sugars maltose, lactose and sucrose, as expected due to their ionic characteristics. The predicted vibrational spectra for the four species of maltose show reasonable concordances with the corresponding experimental ones. The f(δC-O-C) force constants of the glycosidic bonds follow the tendency: maltose > lactose > sucrose. PMID:27131126

  15. Crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose: A calorimetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Susana S. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: susanapinto@ist.utl.pt; Diogo, Herminio P. [Centro de Quimica Estrutural, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: hdiogo@ist.utl.pt; Moura-Ramos, Joaquim J. [Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Complexo Interdisciplinar, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mouraramos@ist.utl.pt

    2006-09-15

    The mean values of the standard massic energy of combustion of crystalline anhydrous {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11}, polymorph {beta}) and crystalline dihydrate {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13}) measured by static-bomb combustion calorimetry in oxygen, at the temperature T=298.15K, are {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(16434.05+/-4.50)J.g{sup -1} and {delta}{sub c}u{sup o}=-(14816.05+/-3.52)J.g{sup -1}, respectively. The standard (p{sup o}=0.1MPa) molar enthalpy of formation of these compounds were derived from the corresponding standard molar enthalpies of combustion, respectively, {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 22}O{sub 11},cr)=-(2240.9+/-3.9)kJ.mol{sup -1}, and {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o} (C{sub 12}H{sub 26}O{sub 13},cr)=-(2832.6+/-3.6)kJ.mol{sup -1}. The values of the standard enthalpies of formation obtained in this work, together with data on enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution ({delta}{sub sol}H{sup {approx}}) for crystalline dihydrate and amorphous anhydrous trehalose, allow a better insight on the thermodynamic description of the trehalose system which can provide, together with the future research on the subject, a contribution for understanding the metabolism in several organisms, as well as the phase transition between the different polymorphs.

  16. Pretreatment of corn stover by low moisture anhydrous ammonia (LMMA) in a pilot-scale reactor and bioconversion to fuel ethanol and industrial chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn stover (CS) adjusted to 50%, 66% and 70% moisture was pretreated by the low moisture anhydrous ammonia (LMAA) process in a pilot-scale ammoniation reactor. After ammoniation, the 70% moisture CS was treated at 90 degree C and 100 degree C whereas the others were treated at 90 degree C only. The...

  17. Use of terpene-based products, with and without anhydrous alcohol, as clearing agents in trichrome staining technique for intestinal protozoa.

    OpenAIRE

    Gubash, S M; Milburn, L

    1990-01-01

    BDH xylene substitute, a terpene-based product, and its mixture with anhydrous alcohol were found to be excellent replacements for xylene and carbol-xylene, respectively, in the trichrome staining technique applied to sodium acetate-acetic acid-Formalin-fixed fecal smears for detection of intestinal protozoa.

  18. Control of powdery mildew on glasshouse-grown roses and tomatoes in the Netherlands using anhydrous milk fat and soybean oil emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurms, K.V.; Hofland-Zijlstra, Jantineke

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very serious disease affecting glasshouse-grown roses and tomatoes in the Netherlands. Control is limited because of resistance to existing fungicides. Anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and soybean oil (SBO) emulsions were evaluated for control of PM in roses and tomatoes. Both AM

  19. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hayes, Ryan L.; Freed, Michael S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form...

  20. Constraining the Origin of Impact Craters on Al Foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Rhonda M.; Achilles, Cheri; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bassim, Nabil; Bastien, Ron S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Fougeray, Patrick; Frank, David; Sandford, Scott A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary examination (PE) of the aerogel tiles and Al foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector has revealed multiple impact features. Some are most likely due to primary impacts of interstellar dust (ISD) grains, and others are associated with secondary impacts of spacecraft debris, and possibly primary impacts of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) [1, 2]. The current focus of the PE effort is on constraining the origin of the individual impact features so that definitive results from the first direct laboratory analysis of contemporary ISD can be reported. Because crater morphology depends on impacting particle shape and composition, in addition to the angle and direction of impact, unique particle trajectories are not easily determined. However, elemental analysis of the crater residues can distinguish real cosmic dust from the spacecraft debris, due to the low cosmic abundance of many of the elements in the spacecraft materials. We present here results from the elemental analysis of 24 craters and discuss the possible origins of 4 that are identified as candidate ISD impacts

  1. Atmospheric entry survival and the possibility of stratospheric collection of modern interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, George J.

    1997-03-01

    Taylor et al. (1996) detected the ion trails of dust particles, estimated to range from 15 to 45 microns in diameter, entering the Earth's atmosphere with velocities of about 100 km/s. Since this velocity significantly exceeds the solar system escape velocity, these particles were identified as interstellar. Taylor et al. observed a seasonal peak in the detected flux, and interpreted this peak to indicate the time of year when the Earth, in its heliocentric orbit, is moving directly towards a stream of incoming interstellar dust, increasing the geocentric velocity of the particles so that particles as small as 15 to 45 microns in diameter produce micrometeors detectable by Taylor et al.'s radar system. Six months later, when the Earth's heliocentric motion is directly opposite the direction of the interstellar flux, the atmospheric entry velocity of these interstellar grains will be reduced by twice the Earth's orbital velocity, and, instead of producing ion trails, some of these interstellar grains may enter the Earth's atmosphere without melting or vaporizing. Those interstellar grains which enter the atmosphere without melting will settle into the Earth's stratosphere in the same manner as the interplanetary dust particles, which are routinely collected by NASA stratospheric sampling aircraft. Thus, interstellar dust particles in the 5-20 micron size range may be present on the NASA stratospheric collection surfaces flown during the favorable collection season.

  2. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary-Magnetic-Field Polar Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Boschini, M J; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Tacconi, M

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2-D (radius and colatitude) Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0), was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1\\,AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton...

  3. Characteristics of the dust trail of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: an application of the IMEX model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, R. H.; Sommer, M.; Herzog, J.; Agarwal, J.; Rodmann, J.; Srama, R.; Vaubaillon, J.; Strub, P.; Hornig, A.; Bausch, L.; Grün, E.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Here we describe a new model of the dust streams of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko that has been developed using the Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment for Exploration (IMEX). This is a new universal model for recently created cometary meteoroid streams in the inner solar system. Aims: The model can be used to investigate characteristics of cometary trails: here we describe the model and apply it to the trail of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko to develop our understanding of the trail and assess the reliability of the model. Methods: Our IMEX model provides trajectories for a large number of dust particles released from ~400 short-period comets. We use this to generate optical depth profiles of the dust trail of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and compare these to Spitzer observations of the trail of this comet from 2004 and 2006. Results: We find that our model can match the observed trails if we use very low ejection velocities, a differential size distribution index of α ≈ -3.7, and a dust production rate of 300-500 kg s-1 at perihelion. The trail is dominated by mm-sized particles and can contain a large proportion of dust produced before the most recent apparition. We demonstrate the strength of IMEX in providing time-resolved histories of meteoroid streams. We find that the passage of Mars through the stream in 2062 creates visible gaps. This indicates the utility of this model in providing insight into the dynamical evolution of streams and trails, as well as impact hazard assessment for spacecraft on interplanetary missions. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetker, Johan P; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke; Doreth, Maria; Raijada, Dhara; Loebmann, Korbinian; Madsen, Cecilie; Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Hawley, Adrian; Thomas, Diana; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-03-01

    Transformation of the solid-state form of a drug compound in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract may alter the drug bioavailability and in extreme cases result in patient fatalities. The solution-mediated anhydrate-to-hydrate phase transformation was examined using an in vitro model with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different overall transformation time into hydrate form were used as model compounds. The transformations were monitored using direct structural information from time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The kinetics of these transformations were estimated using multivariate data analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate in water was shorter than for DOPC/SDS but still faster than the conversion seen in fed and fasted state micellar media. The conversion of CBZ anhydrate to hydrate was the slowest in the solution containing bile salt alone. In contrast, the solution-mediated phase transformations of NF did only show limited kinetic dependence on the dispersion media used, indicating the complexity of the nucleation process. Furthermore, when the CBZ and NF material was compacted into tablets the transformation times were remarkably slower. Results suggest that variations in the composition of the contents of the stomach/gut may affect the recrystallization kinetics, especially when investigating compounds with relatively fast overall transformation time, such as CBZ.

  5. Study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work submitted in this paper is to contribute to the study of interplanetary hydrogen from Lyman alpha emission and absorption measurements, carried out on board the D2A, OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. This study, which was undertaken from the D2A satellite, moved us to study the interplanetary environment as from observations made from the following experiments placed on board the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites. The experiment set up on board the OSO-8 satellite made it possible to obtain the profile of the solar alpha Lyman emission. An absorption profile was observed for the first time on these profiles and this made it possible to attribute them to interplanetary hydrogen and enabled us to make a direct and local determination of the solar ionization rate. - The spectrometer set up on board Copernicus made it possible to obtain the emission spectrum of the interplanetary environment at the same time as the geocorona. The overall velocity of the interplanetary environment was deduced from the Doppler shift between the two spectra. In the first part, the principle of the REA and POLAR experiments is recalled but only the REA experiment is described in detail, particularly the problems arising from the construction and calibration of the cell. In the second part, a study of the interplanetary environment made from the D2A determinations is presented in synthesized form. On the other hand, the study to which theses initial results led us is presented in detail. Finally, in the third part, the results obtained by means of the OSO-8 and Copernicus satellites are given

  6. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Cordoba, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique H Bucher

    Full Text Available Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina, the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite, and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr, and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  7. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Enrique H; Stein, Ariel F

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons. PMID:27258088

  8. Impact of Mars sand on dust on the design of space suits and life support equipment: A technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    Space suits and life support equipment will come in intimate contact with Martian soil as aerosols, wind blown particles and material thrown up by men and equipment on the Martian surface. For purposes of this discussion the soil is assumed to consist of a mixture of cominuted feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz, titanomagnetite and other anhydrous and hydrous iron bearing oxides, clay minerals, scapolite and water soluble chlorides and sulfates. The soil may have photoactivated surfaces that acts as a strong oxidizer with behavior similar to hydrogen peroxide. The existing data about the Mars soil suggests that the dust and sand will require designs analogous to those uses on equipment exposed to salty air and blowing sand and dust. The major design challenges are in developing high performance radiators which can be cleaned after each EVA without degradation, designing seals that are readily cleaned and possibly in selecting materials which will not be degraded by any strong oxidants in the soil. The magnitude of the dust filtration challenge needs careful evaluation in terms of the trade off between fine-particle dust filters with low pressure drop that are either physically large and heavy, like filter baghouses require frequent replacement of filter elements, of low volume high pressure thus power consumption approaches, or washable filters. In the latter, filter elements are cleaned with water, as could the outsides of the space suits in the airlock.

  9. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ariel F.

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic “fluffy” surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons. PMID:27258088

  10. Long-Term Temporal Behavior of Interplanetary and Trapped Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R.A; Selesnick, R. S.; Cummings, A. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    New measurements of the long-term temporal history of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) at 1 AU are presented, based on data from SAMPEX and ACE. Over the period from 1992 to 1997 the interplanetary intensity of 8 to 27 MeV/nuc ACR oxygen increased by a factor of -5 as solar minimum approached. The intensity of ACR oxygen trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere showed a corresponding time history. Early in 1998 both the interplanetary and trapped intensities suddenly decreased with the...

  11. A quasi-linear kinetic equation for cosmic rays in the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic equation for interplanetary cosmic rays is set up with the aid of weak-plasma-turbulence theory for an idealized radially symmetric model of the interplanetary magnetic field. As a starting point, this treatment invokes the Vlasov equation instead of the traditional Fokker-Planck equation. Quasi-linear theory is applied to obtain a momentum diffusion equation for the heliocentric frame of reference which describes the interaction of cosmic rays with convecting magnetic irregularities in the solar-wind plasma. Under restricted conditions, the well-known equation of solar modulation can be obtained from this kinetic equation.

  12. Transverse flow deflections associated with fast coronal mass ejecta in interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a bidirectional electron heat flux signature to identify coronal mass ejections, CMEs, in the solar wind at 1 AU, we find that the fast CMEs which drive interplanetary shocks are preferentially deflected eastward in transit outward from the sun. A corresponding westward deflection usually occurs in the compressed ambient solar wind plasma ahead of these CMEs. We suggest that this preferential pattern of deflections is caused primarily by the asymmetrical draping of the ambient interplanetary magnetic field about fast CMEs. 10 refs., 7 figs

  13. Pallene dust torus observations by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiß, M.; Srama, R.; Sun, K.-L.; Seiler, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Spahn, F.

    2014-04-01

    The ISS cameras on-board the Cassini spacecraft have detected a faint dust torus along the orbit of Pallene [1]. It is believed that the source of the torus is the moon Pallene itself, where dust particles are ejected from its surface by micrometeoroid bombardment. Here, we present in-situ dust measurements of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on-board of the spacecraft Cassini which confirm the existence of a dust torus of micrometer-sized particles along the orbit of Pallene. The cross-section of the torus has been modeled by a double-Gaussian distribution, resulting in a radial and vertical full width at half maximum of 2300 km and 270 km, respectively, and a maximum particle density of n = 2.7 · 10-3m-3.

  14. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  15. Role of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field during two-step Forbush decreases caused by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Arunbabu, K. P.; Raghav, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The relationship of Forbush decreases (FDs) observed in Moscow neutron monitor with the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and solar wind speed (Vsw) is investigated in detail for the FDs associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) during 2001-2004. The classical two-step FD events are selected, and characteristics of the first step (mainly associated with shock), as well as of complete decrease (main phase) and recovery phase, are studied here. It is observed that the onset of FD occurs generally after zero to a few hours of shock arrival, indicating in the post-shock region that mainly sheath and ICME act as important drivers of FD. A good correlation is observed between the amplitude of B and associated FD magnitude observed in the neutron count rate of the main phase. The duration of the main phase observed in the neutron count rate also shows good correlation with B. This might indicate that stronger interplanetary disturbances have a large dimension of magnetic field structure which causes longer fall time of FD main phase when they transit across the Earth. It is observed that Vsw and neutron count rate time profiles show considerable similarity with each other during complete FD, especially during the recovery phase of FD. Linear relationship is observed between time duration/e-folding time of FD recovery phase and Vsw. These observations indicate that the FDs are influenced by the inhibited diffusion of cosmic rays due to the enhanced convection associated with the interplanetary disturbances. We infer that the inhibited cross-field diffusion of the cosmic rays due to enhanced B is mainly responsible for the main phase of FD whereas the expansion of ICME contributes in the early recovery phase and the gradual variation of Vsw beyond ICME boundaries contributes to the long duration of FD recovery through reduced convection-diffusion.

  16. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  17. 16 Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System: I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust (ISD) penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in-situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the ISD stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses ISD data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of 'big' ISD grains [up to 10^-13kg]. The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of ISD in the very local interstellar medium. We analyse the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses ISD measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of ISD. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses ISD data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modelling of the ISD flow applied to Ulysses. We...

  18. Radiation Protection for Manned Interplanetary Missions - Radiation Sources, Risks, Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.

    Health risks in interplanetary explorative missions differ in two major features significantly from those during the manned missions experienced so far. For one, presently available technologies lead to durations of such missions significantly longer than so far encountered - with the added complication that emergency returns are ruled out. Thus radiation exposures and hence risks for late radiation sequelae like cancer increase proportional to mission duration - similar like most other health and many technical risks too. Secondly, loss of the geomagnetic shielding available in low earth orbits (LEO) does increase the radiation dose rates from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since significant fractions of the GCR flux below about 10 GeV/n now can reach the space vehicle. In addition, radiation from solar particle events (SPE) which at most in polar orbit segments can contribute to the radiation exposure during LEO missions now can reach the spaceship unattenuated. Radiation doses from extreme SPEs can reach levels where even early acute radiation sickness might ensue - with the added risks from potentially associated crew performance decrements. In contrast to the by and large predictable GCR contribution, the doses and hence risks from large SPEs can only stochastically be assessed. Mission designers face the task to contain the overall health risk within acceptable limits. Towards this end they have to transport the particle fluxes of the radiation fields in free space through the walls of the spaceship and through the tissue of the astronaut to the radiation sensitive organs. To obtain a quantity which is useful for risk assessment, the radiobiological effectiveness as well as the specific sensitivity of a given organ has to be accounted for in such transport calculations which of course require a detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution and the atomic composition of the surrounding shielding material. In doing so the mission designer encounters two major

  19. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  20. Filtering of interstellar dust in the heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, V. J.

    2012-08-01

    The space between the stars is filled with gas and interstellar dust (ISD). The dust grains cause extinction of the starlight that we observe and they play an important role in the evolution of galaxies and in the formation of stellar and planetary systems. The ISD has been long observed by astronomical methods, the grains were measured by in-situ measurements of spacecraft in the solar system and even samples of interstellar material have been brought back to Earth by the Stardust mission in 2006. Many questions on the composition, morphology and size distribution of ISD still exist today which require more and improved measurements. Modeling and understanding the ISD flow through the solar system is needed to interpret these observations and to fully extract the information on ISD grains carried by these measurements. Also, the modelling is necessary for designing and optimizing future ISD missions. The modeling in this thesis follows this flow of ISD through the solar system taking into account three main forces: solar gravity, solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz forces resulting from the motion of the charged grains through the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Simulations of dust trajectories over a large range of grain parameters β and Q/m were performed. β is the ratio of solar radiation pressure force to gravity and depends on the grain size, morphology and material. Q/m is the charge to mass ratio. The influence of solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz forces on the trajectories, densities and fluxes were systematically studied. Radiation pressure reduces gravitational attraction and can become even dominant (β > 1) for particles of about 0.2 μm radius, leading to a void region downstream from the Sun: the β -cone. The ISD flow under the influence of solar radiation pressure and gravity only is axi-symmetric, stationary and can even be calculated analytically. Lorentz force becomes stronger for smaller grains having higher Q=m and

  1. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan;

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  2. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  3. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  4. The Martian Dust Cycle: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for Mars' current climate system. Suspended atmospheric dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, and thus greatly influences the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Evidence for the presence of dust in the Martian atmosphere can be traced back to yellow clouds telescopically observed as early as the early 19th century. The Mariner 9 orbiter arrived at Mars in November of 1971 to find a planet completely enshrouded in airborne dust. Since that time, the exchange of dust between the planet's surface and atmosphere and the role of airborne dust on Mars' weather and climate has been studied using observations and numerical models. The goal of this talk is to give an overview of the observations and to discuss the successes and challenges associated with modeling the dust cycle. Dust raising events on Mars range in size from meters to hundreds of kilometers. During some years, regional storms merge to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by tens of kelvin. The interannual variability of planet encircling dust storms is poorly understood. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. A low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading are generally observed: one peak occurs before northern winter solstice and one peak occurs after northern winter solstice. Numerical modeling studies attempting to interactively simulate the Martian dust cycle with general circulation models (GCMs) include the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Two dust lifting processes are commonly represented in

  5. Interplanetary space weather effects on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter avalanche photodiode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, E. B.; Carlton, A. K.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Sun, X.; Cahoy, K.

    2016-05-01

    Space weather is a major concern for radiation-sensitive space systems, particularly for interplanetary missions, which operate outside of the protection of Earth's magnetic field. We examine and quantify the effects of space weather on silicon avalanche photodiodes (SiAPDs), which are used for interplanetary laser altimeters and communications systems and can be sensitive to even low levels of radiation (less than 50 cGy). While ground-based radiation testing has been performed on avalanche photodiode (APDs) for space missions, in-space measurements of SiAPD response to interplanetary space weather have not been previously reported. We compare noise data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) SiAPDs with radiation measurements from the onboard Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument. We did not find any evidence to support radiation as the cause of changes in detector threshold voltage during radiation storms, both for transient detector noise and long-term average detector noise, suggesting that the approximately 1.3 cm thick shielding (a combination of titanium and beryllium) of the LOLA detectors is sufficient for SiAPDs on interplanetary missions with radiation environments similar to what the LRO experienced (559 cGy of radiation over 4 years).

  6. Radio and optical follow-up observations and improved interplanetary network position of GRB 970111

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, TJ; Groot, PJ; Strom, RG; vanParadijs, J; Hurley, K; Kouveliotou, C; Fishman, GJ; Meegan, CA; Heise, J; intZand, JJM; deBruyn, AG; Hanlon, LO; Bennett, K; Telting, JH; Rutten, RGM

    1997-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 840 MHz and 1.4 and 5 GHz radio observations of the improved Interplanetary Network Wide Field Camera (IPN WFC) error box of the gamma-ray burst GRB 970111, between 26.4 hr and 120 days after the event onset. In the similar to 13 arcmin(2) area defined by the IPN (BATSE and U

  7. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup;

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind paramete...

  8. Non-radial solar wind flows induced by the motion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the non-radial flows (NRFs during nearly five years of interplanetary observations revealed the average non-radial speed of the solar wind flows to be ~30km/s, with approximately one-half of the large (>100km/s NRFs associated with ICMEs. Conversely, the average non-radial flow speed upstream of all ICMEs is ~100km/s, with just over one-third preceded by large NRFs. These upstream flow deflections are analysed in the context of the large-scale structure of the driving ICME. We chose 5 magnetic clouds with relatively uncomplicated upstream flow deflections. Using variance analysis it was possible to infer the local axis orientation, and to qualitatively estimate the point of interception of the spacecraft with the ICME. For all 5 events the observed upstream flows were in agreement with the point of interception predicted by variance analysis. Thus we conclude that the upstream flow deflections in these events are in accord with the current concept of the large-scale structure of an ICME: a curved axial loop connected to the Sun, bounded by a curved (though not necessarily circular cross section.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (flare and stream dynamics; interplanetary magnetic fields; interplanetary shocks

  9. The influence of the interplanetary medium on SuperDARN radar scattering occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ballatore

    Full Text Available The effects of the characteristics of the interplanetary medium on the radar scattering occurrence, related to the whole array of SuperDARN radars installed in the Northern Hemisphere, have been studied over a two-year period. Statistically significant correlations of the variation of the scattering occurrence are found with the merging electric field and with the negative Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field, independent of the seasonal period considered. This result demonstrates that the merging rate (and in particular the reconnection process between the interplanetary magnetic field and the magnetosphere is a relevant factor affecting the occurrence of scattering. For comparison, we note that no statistically significant correlations are obtained when the interplanetary ion density or the solar wind speed are considered, although also these variables affect to a small degree the scattering occurrence variation. The study of the latitudinal and magnetic local time dependence of the observations shows an association between the considered correlation and the location of the auroral oval and the cusp/cleft region.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (solar wind-magnetosphere interactions · Radio science (ionospheric physics

  10. Management of flight control for "ExoMars-2018" robotic interplanetary space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshakov, A. E.; Artyukhov, M. I.; Kazakevich, Yu. V.; Kalashnikov, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The article covers the current status of activities on development of "ExoMars-2018" robotic interplanetary space station in terms of SC Composite flight program, results of onboard systems interaction functional design study. Organizational structure of p]Russian part of ground control and management of its interaction with European part of ground control are proposed.

  11. μ-Erda developments in order to improve the water content determination in hydrous and nominally anhydrous mantle phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bureau, H.; Khodja, H.; Aubaud, C.; Carraro, A.

    2008-04-01

    The precise knowledge of the water content in geological samples such as mantle minerals, volcanic glasses and glassy inclusions proves to be crucial information for the Earth Sciences because water has a considerable influence on physical and chemical properties of Earth's mantle and crust. Among the nuclear microbeam techniques, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) has been used at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory (LPS) with a very good reliability for a long time to determine the water content of various materials. Previous ERDA measurements gave the total H content at a micrometric scale in the bulk of hydrous geologic samples. However, it was more difficult to characterize nominally anhydrous phases. Recent efforts allowed us to significantly improve the different steps of the ERDA analysis, from the sample preparation to the determination of the uncertainties of the resulting H concentration. A large series of very different geological samples has been measured: volcanic glasses and glassy inclusions, synthetic and natural nominally anhydrous minerals. Our new sample preparation protocol limited the thickness of the surface layer of H-pollution, leading to an easier differentiation of the bulk contribution. Simultaneous PIXE and RBS measurements allow the precise location of the interesting areas and also give information on the chemical characterization of the investigated samples, with respect to the major and minor elements. The processing of the list-mode acquisition files is made using the RISMIN software, allowing among other interesting features to check the absence of water loss under the beam. We will present the results of the H-content measurements and show the good agreement between our present results and those obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for the same set of samples. The detection limit was measured on a dehydrated natural San Carlos olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) equal to 130 wt ppm H2O (15 wt ppm H

  12. The maximum water storage capacities in nominally anhydrous minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Yurimoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    Water is the most important volatile component in the Earth, and affects the physicochemical properties of mantle minerals, e.g. density, elastic property, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, rheological property, melting temperature, melt composition, element partitioning, etc. So many high pressure experiments have been conducted so far to determine the effect of water on mantle minerals. To clarify the maximum water storage capacity in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals in the mantle transition zone and lower mantle is an important issue to discuss the possibility of the existence of water reservoir in the Earth mantle. So we have been clarifying the maximum water storage capacity in mantle minerals using MA-8 type (KAWAI-type) high pressure apparatus and SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy). Upper mantle mineral, olivine can contain ~0.9 wt% H2O in the condition just above 410 km discontinuity in maximum (e.g. Chen et al., 2002; Smyth et al., 2006). On the other hand, mantle transition zone mineral, wadsleyite and ringwoodite can contain significant amount (about 2-3 wt.%) of H2O (e.g. Inoue et al., 1995, 1998, 2010; Kawamoto et al., 1996; Ohtani et al., 2000). But the lower mantle mineral, perovskite can not contain significant amount of H2O, less than ~0.1 wt% (e.g. Murakami et al., 2002; Inoue et al., 2010). In addition, garnet and stishovite also can not contain significant amount of H2O (e.g. Katayama et al., 2003; Mookherjee and Karato, 2010; Litasov et al., 2007). On the other hand, the water storage capacities of mantle minerals are supposed to be significantly coupled with Al by a substitution with Mg2+, Si4+ or Mg2+ + Si4+, because Al3+ is the trivalent cation, and H+ is the monovalent cation. To clarify the degree of the substitution, the water contents and the chemical compositions of Al-bearing minerals in the mantle transition zone and the lower mantle were also determined in the Al-bearing systems with H2O. We will introduce the

  13. Regular spherical dust spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, N; Matravers, D R; Humphreys, Neil; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David

    1998-01-01

    Physical (and weak) regularity conditions are used to determine and classify all the possible types of spherically symmetric dust spacetimes in general relativity. This work unifies and completes various earlier results. The junction conditions are described for general non-comoving (and non-null) surfaces, and the limits of kinematical quantities are given on all comoving surfaces where there is Darmois matching. We show that an inhomogeneous generalisation of the Kantowski-Sachs metric may be joined to the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. All the possible spacetimes are explicitly divided into four groups according to topology, including a group in which the spatial sections have the topology of a 3-torus. The recollapse conjecture (for these spacetimes) follows naturally in this approach.

  14. Nonlinear theory of dust lattice mode coupling in dust crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kourakis, I; Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-crystals formed by charged mesoscopic dust grains (dust lattices), observed since hardly a decade ago, are an exciting paradigm of a nonlinear chain. In laboratory discharge experiments, these quasi-lattices are formed spontaneously in the sheath region near a negative electrode, usually at a levitated horizontal equilibrium configuration where gravity is balanced by an electric field. It is long known (and experimentally confirmed) that dust-lattices support linear oscillations, in the longitudinal (acoustic mode) as well as in the transverse, in plane (acoustic-) or off-plane (optic-like mode) directions. Either due to the (typically Yukawa type) electrostatic inter-grain interaction forces or to the (intrinsically nonlinear) sheath environment, nonlinearity is expected to play an important role in the dynamics of these lattices. Furthermore, the coupling between the different modes may induce coupled nonlinear modes. Despite this evidence, the elucidation of the nonlinear mechanisms governing dust cr...

  15. Microscopic evaluation of polymeric film properties of anhydrous sunscreen compositions and their relation to absorption and water resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettypaul, Donald; Fares, Hani

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which a VA/butyl maleate/isobornyl acrylate copolymer increases the SPF and water resistance of sunscreen formulations. Anhydrous sunscreen formulations with and without polymer were applied on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plates and absorbance spectra were generated. Before immersion, the areas under the curve for the control and test samples were 98.49 and 117.09, respectively, and were 94.63 and 118.22, after immersion. Static and after-immersion, in vivo SPF values confirmed a boost in SPF and an increase in water resistance for the formulation containing the polymer (VA/butyl maleate/isobornyl acrylate copolymer). Digital imaging of sunscreen films combined with image analysis and contact angle measurements suggest that the polymer conformation changes upon exposure to water. The polymer forms a protective barrier over the sunscreen film upon exposure to water, which explains the enhancement in water resistance. The polymeric film formed has a different refractive index than the sunscreen film. The change in refractive indices causes diffraction of incident light, thus increasing its pathlength, leading to an increase in SPF. PMID:23193694

  16. Pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate matrix tablets for in vitro controlled release of water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Pseidy Luz; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga, María Dolores

    2015-10-15

    Different pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (ADCP) matrix tablets have been developed in order to obtain controlled release of a water-soluble drug (theophylline). Swelling, buoyancy and dissolution studies have been carried out in different aqueous media (demineralized water, progressive pH medium, simulated gastric fluid, simulated intestinal fluid and simulated colonic fluid), to characterize the matrix tablets. When the pectin/ADCP ratio was ≥0.26 (P1, P2, P3 and P4 tablets) a continuous swelling and low theophylline dissolution rate from the matrices were observed. So, pectin gel forming feature predominated over the ADCP properties, yielding pH-independent drug release behavior from these matrices. On the contrary, pectin/ADCP ratios ≤0.11 (P5 and P6 tablets) allowed to achieve drug dissolution pH dependent. Consequently, the suitable selection of the pectin/ADCP ratio will allow to tailor matrix tablets for controlled release of water-soluble drugs in a specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26276258

  17. Crystal structure of barium perchlorate anhydrate, Ba(ClO42, from laboratory X-ray powder data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoo H. Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The previously unknown crystal structure of barium perchlorate anhydrate, determined and refined from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data, represents a new structure type. The title compound was obtained by heating hydrated barium perchlorate [Ba(ClO42·xH2O] at 423 K in vacuo for 6 h. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Fddd. The asymmetric unit contains one Ba (site symmetry 222 on special position 8a, one Cl (site symmetry 2 on special position 16f and two O sites (on general positions 32h. The structure can be described as a three-dimensional polyhedral network resulting from the corner- and edge-sharing of BaO12 polyhedra and ClO4 tetrahedra. Each BaO12 polyhedron shares corners with eight ClO4 tetrahedra, and edges with two ClO4 tetrahedra. Each ClO4 tetrahedron shares corners with four BaO12 polyhedra, and an edge with the other BaO12 polyhedron.

  18. Physicochemical properties of new amide-based protic ionic liquids and their use as materials for anhydrous proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang Jin [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Renjie, E-mail: chenrj@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Wu Feng, E-mail: wufeng863@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Li Li; Chen Shi [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China); National Development Center of High Technology Green Materials, Beijing 100081 (China); Zou Qinqin [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-09-01

    We prepared 3 protic ionic liquids based on trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and an amide, namely isobutyramide (ITSA), n-butyramide(NTSA), and benzamide(BTSA). All of the protic ionic liquids exhibit excellent thermal stability (above 200 deg. C). ITSA has the highest ionic conductivity, which is 32.6 mS/cm at 150 deg. C. ITSA was used to prepare anhydrous, conducting composite membranes based on polymers of polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) to serve as intermediate temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This type of composite membrane possesses good thermal stability, high ionic conductivity and good mechanical properties. Increasing the polymer content leads to the improvement of mechanical properties, but is accompanied by a reduction in ionic conductivity. We made efforts to eliminate the trade-off between strength and conductivity of the ITSA/PVDF composite membrane by adding polyamide imide, which resulted in a simultaneous increase in strength and conductivity. A conductivity of 7.5 mS/cm is achieved in a membrane containing 60 wt.% ITSA and 5 wt.% PAI in PVDF at 150 deg. C.

  19. THE COORDINATION ADSORPTION OF AMINES ON CARBOXYL RESIN IN Cu2+ FORM FROM NON-AQUEOUS MEDIUM AND DESORPTION WITH ANHYDROUS ELUANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-zheng Li; Zuo-qing Shi; Yun-ge Fan

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of aniline, N-methylaniline and N,N-dimethylaniline onto carboxyl resin in Cu2+ form from water,ethanol and n-hexane have been studied. The results show that the adsorption affinities from n-hexane are higher than that from water, and nearly zero from ethanol. The separation factors for the adsorption of these three amines from mixed solution were also examined. The results of continuous column operations show that the breakthrough capacity of aniline from nhexane reaches 90 mg/g dry resin in Cu2+ form, and the amines adsorbed can be stripped with anhydrous ethanol effectively.Adsorption onto carboxyl resin in Cu2+ form from non-aqueous medium and desorption with anhydrous eluant can overcome the run-off of Cu2+ from the resin, and would show potential advantages in the separation of some water-insoluble natural products.

  20. Simulations of Mineral Dust Content With CHIMERE-Dust Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmechtig, C.; Marticorena, B.; Menut, L.; Bergametti, G.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations of the mineral dust cycle have been performed whith CHIMERE-Dust model over a domain that includes North Africa, the Mediterranean basin and the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean (10S-60N and 90W-90E) with a 1°x1° resolution using the ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological fields for two years, 2000 and 2001. As a validation, we compare the simulated dust concentration fields with photometric data from the AERONET network. From the comparisons between the simulated and measured aerosol optical depth for several stations of the Mediterranean basin, the model appears to reproduce correctly the intensity and occurrences of the dust events. Over Western Africa, the results are not as satisfying since some of the most intense dust events observed on the continent and downwind are not captured by the model. In addition, the simulated events are generally underestimated compared to the measured ones. It appears that these differences in the model performances are connected to the origin of the dust plumes. For example, dust plumes coming from Libya are well simulated while dust plumes originating from the Bodélé depression not as frequent as intense as the observations suggest. Soil properties in these two regions are comparable and typical of very erodible surfaces. We thus focused on the comparison between the ECMWF 10m wind speed fields and 10m wind speed measured at the meteorological stations located in both areas. We noticed that over Libya, the measured and ECMWF 10m wind speed are in very good agreement, while the meteorological model does not reproduce the extrema of the measured wind speed in the Bodélé depression. We found that a crude empirical correction of the 10m wind field in the Bodélé Depression significantly improve the simulations in terms of occurrence and of intensity.

  1. The luminescence properties Zn2-xMnxP2O7(x=0-2) pyrophosphate. Part 1: The anhydrous phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence properties of two valence metals anhydrous double phosphates Zn2-xMnxP2O7(x=0-2) have been investigated. It was shown that Mn2+ ions form three types of the emission centers where Mn2+ ion can be located, first in the regular octahedral oxygen environment, second, in defect octahedra that has oxygen vacancy, and third, -in the tetrahedral oxygen environment

  2. Determining the amount of anhydrous alcohol evaporated in vertical cylindrical tanks; Determinacao da quantidade de alcool etilico anidro evaporado em tanques cilindricos verticais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elcio Cruz de [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In order to assess the anhydrous alcohol evaporated amount in vertical cylindrical tanks was developed a calculation methodology based on the rate of mass transfer of the product, the Reynolds number and the mass transfer coefficient. An Excel spreadsheet was prepared with data entry of the tank and physical and chemical properties of the product (temperature and density). For a temperature of 50 deg C, the volume evaporated reaches values of 0.8% by day. (author)

  3. Two expedient ‘one-pot’ methods for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones over anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chayan Guha; Rina Mondal; Rammohan Pal; Asok K Mallik

    2013-11-01

    Two expedient one-pot methods have been developed for synthesis of -aryl--mercaptoketones using acetophenones, benzaldehydes and thiols as starting materials. The methods involve microwave irradiation (5min) of 1:1 mixtures of acetophenones and benzaldehydes over neutral alumina supported anhydrous potassium carbonate or amberlyst-15 in the first step, and that is followed by addition of thiol to the resulting material and keeping at room temperature for 1.5 h.

  4. The use of anhydrous CeCl{sub 3} as a recyclable and selective catalyst for the acetalization of aldehydes and ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Claudio C.; Mendes, Samuel R.; Ziembowicz, Francieli I. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lenardao, Eder J.; Perin, Gelson [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica e Geociencias

    2010-07-01

    An efficient, clean, chemoselective and solvent-free method for the synthesis of ketone and aldehyde dimethyl acetals was developed using trimethyl orthoformate and commercially available anhydrous CeCl{sub 3} as a recyclable catalyst. The method is general and affords the protected carbonyl compounds in good yields and under mild conditions, including aryl and alkyl ketones and activated aldehydes. The catalyst could be utilised directly for 3 cycles, without significant loss of activity. (author)

  5. A numerical study on dust devils with implications to global dust budget estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estimates of the contribution of dust devils (DDs) to the global dust budget have large uncertainties because the dust emission mechanisms in DDs are not yet well understood. In this study, a large-eddy simulation model coupled with a dust scheme is used to investigate DD dust entrainment. DDs a...

  6. The influence of excipients on the stability of the moisture sensitive drugs aspirin and niacinamide: comparison of tablets containing lactose monohydrate with tablets containing anhydrous lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Hoag, S W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that in tablet formulations, moisture-sensitive drugs formulated with lactose monohydrate have the same stability as formulations containing anhydrous lactose, and to characterize the kinetics of niacinamide degradation in the solid state. Aspirin and niacinamide decomposition were used as indicators of stability. Aspirin and niacinamide tablets containing either lactose monohydrate or anhydrous lactose were separately investigated at different temperatures and relative humidities; the stability tests were done at 25 degrees C--60% RH, 40 degrees C--80% RH, 60 degrees C--60% RH, 60 degrees C--80% RH, and 80 degrees C--80% RH. Official U.S. Pharmacopeia methods were used for the aspirin and niacinamide assays. Statistical analysis showed that tablets containing lactose monohydrate have the same stability as tablets containing anhydrous lactose, which means that even though water is present in the crystal structure, the bound water does not influence the reaction rate. In addition, niacinamide degradation in the solid-state can be described by a third order rate equation.

  7. Metals and dust in high redshift AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Maiolino, R; Marconi, A; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Pedani, M; Pipino, A; Matteucci, F; Cox, P; Caselli, P

    2006-01-01

    We summarize some recent results on the metallicity and dust properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at high redshift (110). The properties of dust in high-z QSOs are discussed within the context of the dust production mechanisms in the early universe. The dust extinction curve is observed to evolve beyond z>4, and by z~6 it is well described by the properties expected for dust produced by SNe, suggesting that the latter is the main mechanism of dust production in the early universe. We also show that the huge dust masses observed in distant QSOs can be accounted for by SN dust within the observational constraints currently available. Finally, we show that QSO winds, which have been proposed as an alternative mechanism of dust production, may also contribute significantly to the total dust budget at high redshift.

  8. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  9. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  10. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  11. Dust vortex flows in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K

    2002-12-30

    Coherent nonlinear structures in the form of dust vortex flows have been observed in unmagnetized laboratory dusty plasmas. Our objective here is show that the dynamics of such dust vortices is governed by a modified Navier-Stokes equation (MNSE) and that the stationary solutions of the MNSE can be represented as monopolar as well as a row of identical Stuart and a row of counter-rotating vortices.

  12. Saharan Dust Pollution: Implications for the Sahel?

    OpenAIRE

    De Longueville, Florence; Henry, Sabine; Ozer, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The main source of atmospheric mineral dust is the Sahara desert, which produces about half of the yearly global mineral dust.1 About 12% of the Saharan dust moves northwards to Europe, 28% westwards to the Americas, and 60% southwards to the Gulf of Guinea. Saharan dust storms can lead to particulate matter (PM) levels that exceed internationally recommended levels. Recently, special attention has been paid to the mineral PM air pollution of dust storms, which may be a serious health threat....

  13. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  14. The Student Dust Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Bagenal, F.; Finley, T.; Christensen, F.; Holland, G.; Bryant, C.; Bunch, N.; Neeland, M.; Chanthawanich, T.; Fernandez, A.; Hoxie, V.; Jenkins, A.; Vaudrin, C.; Krauss, E.; Krauss, O.; Crayton, J.; James, D.; Krauss, C.; Mitchell, C.; Colgan, M.; Grogan, B.; Christofferson, J.

    2005-12-01

    This talk will describe the scientific goals, the technical, and the human challenges of the Student Dust Counter (SDC) experiment for the New Horizons Mission to Pluto. CU's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) organized a team of students to design, fabricate, test, calibrate, and fly SDC, one of seven science instruments onboard New Horizons. The student team was responsible for all phases of this development under the supervision of LASP professionals. Both undergraduate and graduate students worked on this project, representing a variety of disciplines, including Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Journalism, and Business. The SDC project is part of the EPO effort of the New Horizons mission. Though it is a student project, the requirements for passing all standard NASA milestones for reviews were identical to other experiments. The students performed at a professional level and SDC was delivered on time and within budget. It is now integrated to the spacecraft awaiting the scheduled launch in January of 2006. To date, SDC provided a group of about 20 students an opportunity to learn first hand how to build instruments, and graduate with years of experience in space exploration.

  15. Propagation and Evolution of CMEs in the Interplanetary Medium: Analysis of Remote Sensing and In situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Vourlidas, Angelos; Gomez-Herrero, Raul; Malandraki, Olga; Szabo, Adam; Dresing, Nina; Davila, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    EUV disk imagers and white light coronagraphs have provided for many years information on the early formation and evolution of corona) mass ejections (CMEs). More recently, the novel heliospheric imaging instruments aboard the STEREO mission are providing crucial remote sensing information on the interplanetary evolution of these events while in situ instruments complete the overall characterization of the interplanetary CMEs. In this work, we present an analysis of CMEs from the Sun to the interplanetary medium using combined data from THE SOHO, STEREO, WIND, and ACE spacecraft. The events were selected to cover the widest possible spectrum of different ambient solar wind, magnetic field configurations, plasma parameters, etc. to allow uncovering those aspects that are important in understanding the propagation and evolution mechanisms of CMEs in the interplanetary medium.

  16. DNA Strand Breaks, Photoproducts, and Repair in Analog Space and Mars Environments: Implications for Microbial Interplanetary Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, W. L.; Möller, R.; Douki, T.; Robles, J.; Bruno, G.; Fajardo-Cavazos, P.; Schuerger, A. C.

    2008-03-01

    Bacterial spores are considered good candidates for interplanetary transport by natural impacts or human spaceflight. In this work we consider the mechanisms of DNA damage and repair in spores subjected to a hypothetical Earth-to-Mars transfer.

  17. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangfeng Shao; Jiandong Mao

    2016-01-01

    Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm) and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust pa...

  18. Ice nucleation by soil dust compared to desert dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, O.; Steinke, I.; Ullrich, R.; Höhler, K.; Schiebel, T.; Hoose, C.; Funk, R.

    2015-12-01

    A minor fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles, so-called ice-nucleating particles (INPs), initiates the formation of the ice phase in tropospheric clouds and thereby markedly influences the Earth's weather and climate systems. Whether an aerosol particle acts as an INP depends on its size, morphology and chemical compositions. The INP fraction of certain aerosol types also strongly depends on the temperature and the relative humidity. Because both desert dust and soil dust aerosols typically comprise a variety of different particles, it is difficult to assess and predict their contribution to the atmospheric INP abundance. This requires both accurate modelling of the sources and atmospheric distribution of atmospheric dust components and detailed investigations of their ice nucleation activities. The latter can be achieved in laboratory experiments and parameterized for use in weather and climate models as a function of temperature and particle surface area, a parameter called ice-nucleation active site (INAS) density. Concerning ice nucleation activity studies, the soil dust is of particular interest because it contains a significant fraction of organics and biological components, both with the potential for contributing to the atmospheric INP abundance at relatively high temperatures compared to mineral components. First laboratory ice nucleation experiments with a few soil dust samples indicated their INP fraction to be comparable or slightly enhanced to that of desert dust. We have used the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud simulation chamber to study the immersion freezing ability of four different arable soil dusts, sampled in Germany, China and Argentina. For temperatures higher than about -20°C, we found the INP fraction of aerosols generated from these samples by a dry dispersion technique to be significantly higher compared to various desert dust aerosols also investigated in AIDA experiments. In this contribution, we

  19. Effect of Thermionic Emission on Dust-Acoustic Solitons in a Dust-Electron Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Li-Wen; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of thermionic emission on dust-acoustic solitons with a very small but finite amplitude in a dustelectron plasma are studied using the reductive perturbation technique. The self-consistent variation of dust charge is taken into account. It is shown that the thermionic emission could significantly increase the dust positive charge. The dependences of the phase velocity, amplitude, and width of such solitons on the dust temperature and the dust work function of dust material are plotted and discussed.

  20. Formation of GEMS from shock-accelerated crystalline dust in superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Westphal, A J

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) contain enigmatic sub-micron components called GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides). The compositions and structures of GEMS indicate that they have been processed by exposure to ion- izing radiation but details of the actual irradiation environment(s) have remained elusive. Here we propose a mechanism and astrophysical site for GEMS formation that explains for the first time the following key properties of GEMS; they are stoichiometrically enriched in oxygen and systematically deple- ted in S, Mg, Ca and Fe (relative to solar abundances), most have normal (solar) oxygen isotopic compositions, they exhibit a strikingly narrow size distribution (0.1-0.5 $\\mu$m diameter), and some of them contain ``relict'' crystals within their glass matrices. We show that these properties are incon- sistent with amorphization by particles accelerated by diffusive shock accel- eration. Instead, we propose that GEMS are formed from crystalline grains that condense in outflows from m...

  1. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections at Mercury: Database and effects on the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka; Anderson, Brian J.; Schwadron, Nathan; Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol

    2016-07-01

    We use observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft since Helios 1 and 2 in the 1980s to make in situ measurements of the interplanetary medium at heliocentric distances Mercury. In addition, using existing data sets of ICMEs at 1 AU, we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. Using our database of nearly 70 ICMEs, we also statistically characterize Mercury's magnetosphere during times of ICMEs, when Mercury's magnetosphere becomes significantly altered. We conduct a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during extreme solar wind conditions, by studying the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, erosion of the dayside magnetosphere, the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the cusp region, and the plasma precipitation to the surface.

  2. Bimodal abundances in the energetic particles of solar and interplanetary origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1988-01-01

    This letter reports the first results from an examination of the daily-averaged abundances of the elements from H through Fe as well as electrons and isotopes of He in energetic particles observed in interplanetary space by the ISEE 3 spacecraft over an 8.5 yr period. The abundances of heavy elements such as Fe/O show, for the first time, clear evidence of the presence of two distinct populations of particles. Earlier observations could be interpreted as extreme variations within a single population. The population with enhanced Fe/O shows correlated enhancements in He-3/He-4, p/e, and He/H. This population is consistent with material that has been processed to high temperatures in the impulsively heated regions of solar flares. The second population, with more normal abundances, is probably accelerated from ambient material by coronal and interplanetary shocks.

  3. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  4. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  5. Interplanetary trajectory optimization of Mars aerobraking missions with constrained atmospheric entry velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striepe, Scott A.; Braun, Robert D.; Powell, Richard W.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    1991-01-01

    Many current manned Mars mission studies are using low lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) vehicles to aerobrake at both Mars and earth. The use of these low L/D vehicles imposes constraints on the allowable velocity at the atmospheric interface. This paper will demonstrate that if these entry velocity constraints are incorporated into the interplanetary analysis, more opportunities can be achieved for a small increase in initial LEO mass. These additional opportunities result from varying the initial launch date, the encounter dates, and possibly using a powered Venus swingby on either the inbound or outbound transfer. This paper presents results for three atmospheric entry velocity ranges at Mars arrival and one velocity limitation upon Earth return. The results indicate that by carefully selecting the interplanetary trajectory, an optimum initial LEO mass mission can be found for even highly restrictive entry velocity missions in practically all of the 15 years studied.

  6. Interplanetary particle transport simulation for warning system for aviation exposure to solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yûki; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are one of the extreme space weather phenomena. A huge SEP event increases the radiation dose received by aircrews, who should be warned of such events as early as possible. We developed a warning system for aviation exposure to SEPs. This article describes one component of the system, which calculates the temporal evolution of the SEP intensity and the spectrum immediately outside the terrestrial magnetosphere. To achieve this, we performed numerical simulations of SEP transport in interplanetary space, in which interplanetary SEP transport is described by the focused transport equation. We developed a new simulation code to solve the equation using a set of stochastic differential equations. In the code, the focused transport equation is expressed in a magnetic field line coordinate system, which is a non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. An inverse Gaussian distribution is employed as the injection profile of SEPs at an inner boundary located near the Sun. We applie...

  7. Adiabatic Deceleration Effects on the Formation of Heavy Ion Charge Spectra in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartavykh, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Ostryakov, V. M.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the effects of interplanetary propagation on the energy dependence of the mean ionic charge of ~0.1 1 MeV/n iron observed during impulsive solar particle events at 1 AU. A Monte-Carlo approach is applied to solve the transport equation which takes into account spatial diffusion as well as convection and adiabatic deceleration. We find that interplanetary propagation results in a shift of charge spectra observed at 1 AU towards lower energies due to adiabatic deceleration. Taking the above effect into account, we compare predictions of our model of charge-consistent stochastic acceleration with recent ACE observations. A detailed analysis of two particle events shows that our model can give a consistent explanation of the observed iron charge and energy spectra, and allows one to put constraints on the temperature, density, and the acceleration and escape time scales in the acceleration region.

  8. Plasma wave phenomena observed at interplanetary shocks by the Ulysses URAP experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of 24 interplanetary shocks observed by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) on the Ulysses spacecraft are presented. These shocks, observed between approximately 1 and 4 AU, display a variety of wave phenomena similar to those detected in earlier studies of shocks near 1 AU. The correspondence of the observed low frequency magnetic and electric field waves with the parallel index of refraction for whistler waves was investigated. Observed B/E ratios are found to be typically about a factor of 0.7 times the computed index of refraction, supporting the whistler interpretation of these waves, but also implying a prevalent electrostatic wave component which may be due to whistlers propagating at an angle to the interplanetary magnetic field. A statistical correlation of the amplitudes of the various types of waves with shock and solar wind properties is presented.

  9. Analysis of the 31 Oct 1972 interplanetary shock wave and associated unusual phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    We analyze in detail the disturbed time period Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 1972 using magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle data as well as magnetic field data. In particular, we discuss an interplanetary forward shock wave accompanied by a traditional shock-spike event in the energetic particles, a large tangential discontinuity correlated with a geomagnetic storm main phase, and a reverse interplanetary shock. This forward and reverse shock pair was caused by a 2N solar flare which occurred some 47 hours earlier. We also discuss an unusual rarefaction in the solar wind following (and probably related to) the shock pair, wherein the Alfven Mach number abruptly decreased from about 4.5 to about 1.5, allowing the earth's bow shock to move outward at least 20 earth radii beyond its nominal position.

  10. Fast damping of ultralow frequency waves excited by interplanetary shocks in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengrui; Rankin, Robert; Zong, Qiugang

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of Cluster spacecraft data shows that intense ultralow frequency (ULF) waves in the inner magnetosphere can be excited by the impact of interplanetary shocks and solar wind dynamic pressure variations. The observations reveal that such waves can be damped away rapidly in a few tens of minutes. Here we examine mechanisms of ULF wave damping for two interplanetary shocks observed by Cluster on 7 November 2004 and 30 August 2001. The mechanisms considered are ionospheric joule heating, Landau damping, and waveguide energy propagation. It is shown that Landau damping provides the dominant ULF wave damping for the shock events of interest. It is further demonstrated that damping is caused by drift-bounce resonance with ions in the energy range of a few keV. Landau damping is shown to be more effective in the plasmasphere boundary layer due to the higher proportion of Landau resonant ions that exist in that region.

  11. Response of magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical studies of the solar-terrestrial interaction often are carried out assuming that steady state conditions are applicable and with the a priori assumption that any specific change in the input conditions will produce magnetospheric and ionospheric responses which are repeatable. In this paper we shall first demonstrate that the variability of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is sufficiently large that, under normal circumstances, the assumption of steady state conditions is questionable. We shall further show that the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems to changes in interplanetary conditions is dependent on the prior state of the system. In this respect it will be shown that the strength of the driven system currents which grow in response to a southward turning of the IMF is dependent on the level of magnetospheric activity prior to that southward turning (as quantified by the AL index of geomagnetic activity). copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  12. New Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in the Tail of Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Ding-Kun; WEI Feng-Si; FENG Xue-Shang; YANG Fang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We analyse the WIND data of an interplanetary magnetic cloud (MC) on 2 November 2001, and find new evidences for magnetic reconnection in the tail of this MC. In the MC tail, the largely dip and the large change of the orientation of the magnetic field occurred simultaneously, △θ≈ 45°, and △φ changed from 90° to 320°. Correspondingly, the number density of ions increased, and the superthermal electrons were heated and accelerated,however its number density decreased. Meanwhile, inverse jets and Hall term were observed. The pitch-angle distributions of the electrons with lower energy and higher energy showed strong turbulence and bi-direction flow, respectively. The plasma wave activity enhanced near the electron plasma frequency, fpe and 2 fpe. These important physical characteristics are new evidences for magnetic reconnection existing in interplanetary space.

  13. Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2010-08-01

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

  14. The Effect of Interplanetary Scintillation on Epoch of Reionisation Power Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Trott, Cathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) induces intensity fluctuations in small angular size astronomical radio sources via the distortive effects of spatially and temporally varying electron density associated with outflows from the Sun. These radio sources are a potential foreground contaminant signal for redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionisation (EoR) because they yield time-dependent flux density variations in bright extragalactic point sources. Contamination from foreground continuum sources complicates efforts to discriminate the cosmological signal from other sources in the sky. In IPS, at large angles from the Sun applicable to EoR observations, weak scattering induces spatially and temporally correlated fluctuations in the measured flux density of sources in the field, potentially affecting the detectability of the EoR signal by inducing non-static variations in the signal strength. In this work, we explore the impact of interplanetary weak scintillation on EoR power spectrum measurements, acc...

  15. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  16. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  17. Particle Lifting Processes in Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neakrase, L. D. V.; Balme, M. R.; Esposito, F.; Kelling, T.; Klose, M.; Kok, J. F.; Marticorena, B.; Merrison, J.; Patel, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-10-01

    Particle lifting in dust devils on both Earth and Mars has been studied from many different perspectives, including how dust devils could influence the dust cycles of both planets. Here we review our current understanding of particle entrainment by dust devils by examining results from field observations on Earth and Mars, laboratory experiments (at terrestrial ambient and Mars-analog conditions), and analytical modeling. By combining insights obtained from these three methodologies, we provide a detailed overview on interactions between particle lifting processes due to mechanical, thermal, electrodynamical and pressure effects, and how these processes apply to dust devils on Earth and Mars. Experiments and observations have shown dust devils to be effective lifters of dust given the proper conditions on Earth and Mars. However, dust devil studies have yet to determine the individual roles of each of the component processes acting at any given time in dust devils.

  18. Elemental tracers for Chinese source dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小曳; 张光宇; 朱光华; 张德二; 安芷生; 陈拓; 黄湘萍

    1996-01-01

    The mass-particle size distributions of 10 dust-carrying elements in aerosol particles were determined tor 12 sites in desert regions of northern China. The desert dust is proved to he of origin of eolian loess deposited on the Loess Plateau. Their transport to the loess was mainly attributable to the non-dust storm processes under the interglacial climate condition. The impact ot" dust storm on the accumulation of the loess increased in the glacial stage. On the basis of the signatures of 4 dust elements (Al. Fe, Mg and Sc). Chinese dust is believed to have 3 major desert sources (northwestern deserts, northern high dust deserts and northern low dust deserts). With a chemical element balance model, an elemental tracer system is established to proportion the export of China-source dust.

  19. High-latitude ionospheric convection during strong interplanetary magnetic field B-y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Sofko, G.J.; Murr, D.;

    1999-01-01

    . The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions corresponding to the occurrence of the ionospheric convection were B-x approximate to 1 nT, B-y approximate to 10 nT, and B-z ...An unusual high-latitude ionospheric pattern was observed on March 23, 1995. ionospheric convection appeared as clockwise merging convection cell focused at 84 degrees magnetic latitude around 1200 MLT. No signature of the viscous convection cell in the afternoon sector was observed...

  20. Reconstruction and prediction of variations in the open solar magnetic flux and interplanetary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mike Lockwood

    2013-01-01

    Historic geomagnetic activity observations have been used to reveal centennial variations in the open solar flux and the near-Earth heliospheric conditions (the interplanetary magnetic field and the solar wind speed). The various methods are in very good agreement for the past 135 years when there were sufficient reliable magnetic observatories in operation to eliminate problems due to site-specific errors and calibration drifts. This review underlines the physical principles that allow these...

  1. The effect of interplanetary magnetic field orientation on the solar wind flux impacting Mercury's surface

    OpenAIRE

    Varela, J.; Pantellini, F.; Moncuquet, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the plasma flows on the Mercury surface for different interplanetary magnetic field orientations on the day side of the planet. We use a single fluid MHD model in spherical coordinates to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere for six solar wind realistic configurations with different magnetic field orientations: Mercury-Sun, Sun-Mercury, aligned with the magnetic axis of Mercury (Northward and Southward) and with the orbita...

  2. Micron-Sized Dust Particles Detected in the Outer Solar System by the Voyager 1 and 2 Plasma Wave Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Ansher, J. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Granroth, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of the outer planets it has been demonstrated that the plasma wave instrument can detect small dust particles striking the spacecraft. In this paper, we examine the Voyager plasma wave data for dust impacts in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 6 to 60 astronomical units (AU). The results show that a small but persistent level of dust impacts exists out to at least 30 to 50 AU. The average number density of these particles is about 2 x 10(exp -8)/cu m, and the average mass of the impacting particles is believed to be a few times 10(exp -11) g, which corresponds to particle diameters in the micron range. Possible sources of these particles are planets, moons, asteroids, comets, and the interstellar medium. Of these, comets appear to be the most likely source. The number densities are only weakly dependent on ecliptic latitude, which indicates that the particles probably do not originate from planets, moons, or asteroids. Comparisons with interstellar dust fluxes measured in the inner regions of the solar system by the Ulysses spacecraft indicate that the particles are not of interstellar origin.

  3. Outer radiation belt dropout dynamics following the arrival of two interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Souza, V. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B. M.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Rockenbach, M.; Lago, A. Dal; Mendes, O.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions are recognized as the two primary mechanisms for losses of electrons from the outer radiation belt. We investigate these mechanisms, using satellite observations both in interplanetary space and within the magnetosphere and particle drift modeling. Two interplanetary shocks/sheaths impinged upon the magnetopause causing a relativistic electron flux dropout. The magnetic cloud (MC) and interplanetary structure sunward of the MC had primarily northward magnetic field, perhaps leading to a concomitant lack of substorm activity and a 10 daylong quiescent period. The arrival of two shocks caused an unusual electron flux dropout. Test-particle simulations have shown ˜ 2 to 5 MeV energy, equatorially mirroring electrons with initial values of L≥5.5 can be lost to the magnetosheath via magnetopause shadowing alone. For electron losses at lower L-shells, coherent chorus wave-driven pitch angle scattering and ULF wave-driven radial transport have been shown to be viable mechanisms.

  4. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections at Mercury: Database and effects on the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka; Anderson, Brian J.; Schwadron, Nathan; Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol

    2016-07-01

    We use observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft since Helios 1 and 2 in the 1980s to make in situ measurements of the interplanetary medium at heliocentric distances < 0.5 AU. Because extensive observations, both remote sensing and in-situ, are available throughout the MESSENGER mission, these data present a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere and the development of the solar wind and interplanetary transients. We catalog ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2015 and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing data sets of ICMEs at 1 AU, we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. Using our database of nearly 70 ICMEs, we also statistically characterize Mercury's magnetosphere during times of ICMEs, when Mercury's magnetosphere becomes significantly altered. We conduct a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during extreme solar wind conditions, by studying the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, erosion of the dayside magnetosphere, the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the cusp region, and the plasma precipitation to the surface.

  5. Interplanetary Consequences of Coronal Mass Ejection Events occurred during 18--25 June 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Manoharan, P K; Johri, A; Induja, M S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the preliminary results on the propagation effects and interplanetary consequences of fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) events, occurred during 18--25 June 2015, in the Sun-Earth distance range. The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) images reveal that the large-scale structures of CME-driven disturbances filled nearly the entire inner heliosphere with a range of speeds, $\\sim$300--1000 {\\kmps}. The comparison of speed data sets, from IPS technique results in the inner heliosphere and {\\it in-situ} measurements at 1 AU, indicates that the drag force imposed by the low-speed wind dominated heliosphere on the propagation of CMEs may not be effective. The arrival of shocks at 1 AU suggests that a shock can be driven in the interplanetary medium by the central part of the moving CME and also by a different part away from its centre. The increased flux of proton at energies $>$10 MeV is consistent with the acceleration of particles by the shock ahead of the CME.

  6. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Polar Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bobik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2D (radius and colatitude Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift, and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0, was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1 AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.

  7. Commercially-driven human interplanetary propulsion systems: Rationale, concept, technology, and performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies of human interplanetary missions are largely characterized by long trip times, limited performance capabilities, and enormous costs. Until these missions become dramatically more open-quote open-quote commercial-friendly close-quote close-quote, their funding source and rationale will be restricted to national governments and their political/scientific interests respectively. A rationale is discussed for human interplanetary space exploration predicated on the private sector. Space propulsion system requirements are identified for interplanetary transfer times of no more than a few weeks/months to and between the major outer planets. Nuclear fusion is identified as the minimum requisite space propulsion technology. A conceptual design is described and evolutionary catalyzed-DD to DHe3 fuel cycles are proposed. Magnetic nozzles for direct thrust generation and quantifying the operational aspects of the energy exchange mechanisms between high energy reaction products and neutral propellants are identified as two of the many key supporting technologies essential to satisfying system performance requirements. Government support of focused, breakthrough technologies is recommended at funding levels appropriate to other ongoing federal research. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Relationship between Interplanetary (IP) Parameters and Geomagnetic Indices during IP Shock Events of 2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jatin Rathod; Girija Rajaram; Radharani Alyana; A. Chandrasekhar Reddy; D. S. Misra; C. G. Patil; M. Y. S. Prasad; A. G. Ananth

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, we investigate the possible relationship of IP parameters of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field with ground-based geomagnetic indices. To carry out the study, we take all the IP shock events listed by Proton Monitor onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) during 2005, and plot the time variations of all the IP parameters and geomagnetic parameters (±5 days), centered at the shock arrival time. Next, we obtain scatter plots of absolute values of solar wind parameters such as Vsw, Nsw and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) components Bx, By, Bz and total B with the values of geomagnetic parameters such as Dst, Kp indices, dayside Magnetopause (MP) distance and Cosmic-Ray Neutron Monitor count (CRNM). The scatter plots show that before the IP shock, the pattern is random with no clear relationship. Following the shock, a clear pattern emerges with a type of relationship being seen – clear for SHARP shocks and less clear for DIFFUSE shocks. A total of 10 shock events for 2005 have been studied. Typical examples of this behaviour are the shock events of January 21, 2005 and May 15, 2005. Our study suggests a definite correlation between changes in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters and ground-based geomagnetic response. We are trying to obtain quantitative relationships between these for shock events of 2005.

  9. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Hamish A S

    2016-01-01

    Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Using coronal radio events above 100 MHz exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited long-standing questions: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts. What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities. What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz. We analysed data from 2002 to 2011 starting with coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used RHESSI X-ray data greater than 6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28 percent of the initial sample of type III events. We examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and any interplanetary radio signature. For...

  10. Acceleration of low-energy protons and alpha particles at interplanetary shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-01-01

    The low-energy protons and alpha particles in the energy range 30 keV/charge to 150 keV/charge associated with three different interplanetary shock waves in the immediate preshock and postshock region are studied using data obtained by the ISEE 3. The spatial distributions in the preshock and postshock medium are presented, and the dependence of the phase space density at different energies on the distance from the shock and on the form of the distribution function of both species immediately at the shock is examined. It is found that in the preshock region the particles are flowing in the solar wind frame of reference away from the shock and in the postshock medium the distribution is more or less isotropic in this frame of reference. The distribution function in the postshock region can be represented by a power law in energy which has the same spectral exponent for both protons and alpha particles. It is concluded that the first-order Fermi acceleration process can consistently explain the data, although the spectra of diffuse bow shock associated particles are different from the spectra of the interplanetary shock-associated particles in the immediate vicinity of the shock. In addition, the mean free path of the low energy ions in the preshock medium is found to be considerably smaller than the mean free path determined by the turbulence of the background interplanetary medium.

  11. Interplanetary Consequences of Coronal Mass Ejection Events Occurred During 18-25 June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Maia, D.; Johri, A.; Induja, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we review the preliminary results on the propagation effects and interplanetary consequences of fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) events, occurred during 18-25 June 2015, in the Sun-Earth distance range. The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) images reveal that the large-scale structures of CME-driven disturbances filled nearly the entire inner heliosphere with a range of speeds, ˜300-1000 km s-1. The comparison of speed data sets, from IPS technique results in the inner heliosphere and in-situ measurements at 1 AU, indicates that the drag force imposed by the low-speed wind dominated heliosphere on the propagation of CMEs may not be effective. The arrival of shocks at 1 AU suggests that a shock can be driven in the interplanetary medium by the central part of the moving CME and also by a different part away from its centre. The increased flux of proton at energies >10 MeV is consistent with the acceleration of particles by the shock ahead of the CME.

  12. Four Interstellar Dust Candidates from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Fougeray, P.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Heck, P. R.; Jillier, J. K.; Hoppe, P.; Howard, L.; Hudson, B.; Huss, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approx. 0.1 sq m in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 sq m/day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a consortium-based project to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques. The goals and restrictions of the ISPE are described . A summary of analytical techniques is described.

  13. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  14. The global atmospheric loading of dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J. F.; Ridley, D. A.; Haustein, K.; Miller, R. L.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust is one of the most ubiquitous aerosols in the atmosphere, with important effects on human health and the climate system. But despite its importance, the global atmospheric loading of dust has remained uncertain, with model results spanning about a factor of five. Here we constrain the particle size-resolved atmospheric dust loading and global emission rate, using a novel theoretical framework that uses experimental constraints on the optical properties and size distribution of dust to eliminate climate model errors due to assumed dust properties. We find that most climate models underestimate the global atmospheric loading and emission rate of dust aerosols.

  15. Evidence for the interplanetary electric potential? WIND observations of electrostatic fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lacombe

    Full Text Available In the solar wind at 1 AU, coherent electrostatic waveforms in the ion acoustic frequency range (~ 1 kHz have been observed by the Time Domain Sampler (TDS instrument on the Wind spacecraft. Small drops of electrostatic potential (Df > 10-3 V have been found across some of these waveforms, which can thus be considered as weak double layers (Mangeney et al., 1999. The rate of occurrence of these potential drops, at 1 AU, is estimated by a comparison of the TDS data with simultaneous data of another Wind instrument, the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR, which measures continuously the thermal and non-thermal electric spectra above 4 kHz. We assume that the potential drops have a constant amplitude and a constant rate of occurrence between the Sun and the Earth. The total potential drop between the Sun and the Earth, which results from a succession of small potential drops during the Sun-Earth travel time, is then found to be about 300 V to 1000 V, of the same order of magnitude as the interplanetary potential implied by a two-fluid or an exospheric model of the solar wind: the interplanetary potential may manifest itself as a succession of weak double layers. We also find that the hourly average of the energy of the non-thermal ion acoustic waves, observed on TNR between 4 and 6 kHz, is correlated to the interplanetary electrostatic field, parallel to the spiral magnetic field, calculated with a two-fluid model: this is another evidence of a relation between the interplanetary electrostatic field and the electrostatic fluctuations in the ion acoustic range. We have yet to discuss the role of the Doppler effect, which is strong for ion acoustic waves in the solar wind, and which can bias the measure of the ion acoustic wave energy in the narrow band 4–6 kHz.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence; solar wind plasma Space plasma physics (electro-static structures

  16. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  17. Bosonic string theory with dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a modified bosonic string theory that has a pressureless ‘dust’ field on the string worldsheet. The dust is a real scalar field with unit gradient which breaks conformal invariance. Hamiltonian analysis reveals a time reparametrization constraint linear in the dust field momentum and a spatial diffeomorphism constraint. This feature provides a natural ‘dust time’ gauge in analogy with the parametrized particle. In this gauge we give a Fock quantization of the theory, which is complete and self-consistent in d < 26. The Hamiltonian of the theory is not a constraint; as a consequence the Hilbert space and mass spectrum are characterized by an additional parameter, and includes the usual string spectrum as a special case. The other sectors provide new particle spectra, some of which do not have tachyons. (paper)

  18. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  19. Dust Devil Populations and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Jackson, Brian K.

    2016-08-01

    The highly-skewed diameter and pressure drop distributions of dust devils on Earth and Mars are noted, and challenges of presenting and comparing different types of observations are discussed. The widely-held view that Martian dust devils are larger than Earth's is critically assessed: the question is confounded somewhat by different observation techniques, but some indication of a {˜} 3x larger population on Mars is determined. The largest and most intense (in a relative pressure sense) devils recorded are on Mars, although the largest reported number density is on Earth. The difficulties of concepts used in the literature of `average' diameter, pressure cross section, and area fraction are noted in the context of estimating population-integral effects such as dust lifting.

  20. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  1. 无水葡萄糖生产中煮糖结晶研究%Research of boiled sugar crystallization in production of anhydrous glucose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉小兵; 刘剑侠; 郭玉波

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo improve the degree of uniformity and liquidity of anhydrous glucose crystal products and to satisfy high-end customer's demand for product feeding and granularity.Methods Take the anhydrous glucose liquidity as an index and selects 100 mesh sieve anhydrous glucose as the seed crystal. The influencing factors of finished product’s liquidity are determined by the single factor experiment, and the four-factor and three-level orthogonal experiment design.Results Add anhydrous glucose and anhydrous ethanol under the volume ratio of 1:1 in stainless steel ball mill, grinding for 4 h and take the suspension liquid as the boiling sugar crystallization seed. Under the condition of glucose content is 98.5%. When the concentration of glucose in the liquid reaches 78%, add 75 mL seed, then continue to boil sugar crystallization for about 14 h, centrifugal separation and fluidized bed drying. The liquidity of the anhydrous glucose product is the best.Conclusion It not only solves the granularity differences between batches and poor liquidity problems, but also improves the separation efficiency of products, thus ensures the drying process smoothly and the homogeneity and stability between batches. At the same time, liquidity detection method for the product is more convenient for staff control and operation, it is good for adjusting and controlling during manufacturing.%目的:为了提高无水葡萄糖产品晶体的均匀程度,改善产品的流动性,以最大限度满足高端食品客户对产品投料及颗粒度的需求。方法以所得无水葡萄糖产品的流动性为指标,选取100目筛上物的无水葡萄糖作为制备晶种母体,通过单因素试验确定了与成品流动性有关的因素,选取四因素三水平进行正交试验设计。结果以无水葡萄糖、无水乙醇的体积比为1:1比例下,连续研磨4 h,并将研磨所得混悬液作为煮糖结晶用晶种,在葡萄糖含量为98.5%条件下,当煮

  2. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  3. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  4. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  5. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  6. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  7. Sorption of pure N2O to biochars and other organic and inorganic materials under anhydrous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Rutherford, David W.; Arp, Hans Peter H.; Dorsch, Peter; Kelly, Charlene N.; Rostad, Colleen E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soil is commonly observed after amendment with biochar. The mechanisms accounting for this suppression are not yet understood. One possible contributing mechanism is N2O sorption to biochar. The sorption of N2O and carbon dioxide (CO2) to four biochars was measured in an anhydrous system with pure N2O. The biochar data were compared to those for two activated carbons and other components potentially present in soils—uncharred pine wood and peat—and five inorganic metal oxides with variable surface areas. Langmuir maximum sorption capacities (Qmax) for N2O on the pine wood biochars (generated between 250 and 500 °C) and activated carbons were 17–73 cm3 g–1 at 20 °C (median 51 cm3 g–1), with Langmuir affinities (b) of 2–5 atm–1 (median 3.4 atm–1). Both Qmaxand b of the charred materials were substantially higher than those for peat, uncharred wood, and metal oxides [Qmax 1–34 cm3 g–1 (median 7 cm3 g–1); b 0.4–1.7 atm–1 (median 0.7 atm–1)]. This indicates that biochar can bind N2O more strongly than both mineral and organic soil materials. Qmax and b for CO2 were comparable to those for N2O. Modeled sorption coefficients obtained with an independent polyparameter—linear free-energy relationship matched measured data within a factor 2 for mineral surfaces but underestimated by a factor of 5–24 for biochar and carbonaceous surfaces. Isosteric enthalpies of sorption of N2O were mostly between −20 and −30 kJ mol–1, slightly more exothermic than enthalpies of condensation (−16.1 kJ mol–1). Qmax of N2O on biochar (50000–130000 μg g–1 biochar at 20 °C) exceeded the N2O emission suppressions observed in the literature (range 0.5–960 μg g–1 biochar; median 16 μg g–1) by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the hypothesis could not be falsified that sorption of N2O to biochar is a mechanism of N2O emission suppression.

  8. Alkaline leaching of iron and steelmaking dust

    OpenAIRE

    Stafanova, Anna; Aromaa, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Steel production generates significant quantities of dust and sludge in blast furnaces (BF),basic oxygen furnaces (BOF), and electric arc furnaces (EAF). These dusts contain toxicelements, such as heavy metals, and are thus classified as harmful waste making the disposalof them expensive. In addition, direct recycling of dust back to steel production is hindered dueto the presence of zinc. In this literature survey the alkaline leaching of zinc from iron and steelmaking dusts isreviewed. T...

  9. Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I.

    2008-01-01

    Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a ?dust? of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900?C. Literature survey has shown that alloys behave differently in metal dusting conditions based on their composition and the environment. Metal dusting mechanisms for iron and nickel-based alloys have been proposed but, nevertheless, have not been agreed upon and numerous modifications t...

  10. History and Applications of Dust Devil Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Balme, Matthew R.; Gu, Zhaolin; Kahanpää, Henrik; Klose, Martina; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Patel, Manish R.; Reiss, Dennis; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Spiga, Aymeric; Takemi, Tetsuya; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Studies of dust devils, and their impact on society, are reviewed. Dust devils have been noted since antiquity, and have been documented in many countries, as well as on the planet Mars. As time-variable vortex entities, they have become a cultural motif. Three major stimuli of dust devil research are identified, nuclear testing, terrestrial climate studies, and perhaps most significantly, Mars research. Dust devils present an occasional safety hazard to light structures and have caused several deaths.

  11. Adulteration determination of the anhydrous ethanol fuels samples with methanol; Determinacao de adulteracao por metanol em amostras de alcool etilico anidro combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Eduardo; Mota, Claudio J.A. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: eduardoc@dh.com.br; cmota@iq.ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    A fast test made to evidence an adulteration of anhydrous ethanol with methanol consist in mixing the alcohol with gasoline. A pink coloration indicates the adulteration by methanol. Samples of gasoline A, ethanol and high purity methanol were mixed at different proportions, but no color change was observed. On the other hand, samples of gasoline A, ethanol and formaldehyde 40% showed the characteristic pink coloration, for methanol adulteration. This result indicates that the test is sensible to the presence of formaldehyde, probably presence as impurity or formed by oxidation of the methanol. A lower detection limit of 4.8% of formaldehyde in the alcohol was determined. (author)

  12. In-situ synthesis of the anhydrous La(hfac){sub 3} precursor: a viable route to the MOCVD of LaF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condorelli, G.G.; Gennaro, S.; Fragala, I.L. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Chimiche

    2001-07-01

    Anhydrous Lanthanum tris-(hexafluoroacetylacetonate) is a good precursor for LaF{sub 3} films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. La(hfac){sub 3} was generated in situ by the vapor-solid reaction of the ligand and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the source reservoir of a metal-organic CVD reactor. The nature of the precursor was elucidated by in-situ FTIR. The films were characterized by X-ray and surface analysis methods. The Figure shows an SEM image of a thin film deposited under Ar. (orig.)

  13. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  14. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the particles

  15. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably endot

  16. The dust debris around HR 4796

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jura, M.

    1991-01-01

    The IRAS data strongly suggest that there is dust debris around the main-sequence A star HR 4796. The optical depth of the dust cloud around HR 4796 is probably twice that around Beta Pic, the main-sequence star in the Bright Star Catalog which was previously thought to have the most opaque dust debris cloud.

  17. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  18. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  19. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  20. Polarized Microwave Radiation from Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2001-01-01

    Observations of cosmic microwave background in the range 10-90 GHz have revealed an anomalous foreground component well correlated with 12 \\mum, 60 \\mum and 100 \\mum emission from interstellar dust. As the recent cross-correlation analysis of WHAM H\\alpha maps with the Tenerife 10 and 15 GHz maps supports an earlier conclusion that the emission does not arise from free-free radiation, the interstellar dust origin of it is left as the only suspect. Two competing models of this emission exist. The more favored at the moment is the spinning dust model, the other is the model that uses grains with strong magnetic response. In the spinning dust model the emission arises from rapid rotation of ultrasmall grains that have dipole moments, while in the other model magnetic grains emit due to thermal vibrations of magnetic dipoles. Both models predict the emission to be partially polarized and this emission can seriously interfere with the CMB polarization measurements. We discuss observational signatures that can be u...

  1. A new look at Apollo 17 LEAM data: Nighttime dust activity in 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály

    2013-12-01

    One of the unresolved enigmas from the Apollo era is the existence and characteristics of highly electrically charged dust floating above the lunar surface. Potential evidence for this hypothesized phenomenon came from the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites (LEAM) experiment on Apollo 17. The LEAM instrument consisted of three sets of multi-coincidence dust sensors facing different directions. Recently, new arguments were raised (O'Brien, 2011) that the signals recorded by LEAM may be caused by interferences from heater current switching, which occurred most frequently near sunrise and sunset. In order to shed light on this controversy a new look into the LEAM data was initiated within the Colorado Center for Lunar and Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) team of NASA's Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). The purpose of this analysis is to verify the earlier analysis by Berg et al. (1975), and to find evidence for impacts of interplanetary meteoroids in the LEAM data available to us. A second goal is to find in the LEAM house keeping data evidence for excessive power switching and correlated signals in the LEAM science data. The original analysis by Berg et al. (1975) covered LEAM data during 22 lunations (~22 months) in 1973 and 1974. This data set is no longer available. For the present study, we had access to LEAM data for only about 5 lunations (140 days) in 1976. We analyzed the housekeeping data and observed excessive heating from about 24 h after sunrise until about 24 h before sunset. We defined sunrise and sunset when the LEAM temperature measurement reached -20 °C above which significant solar heating was apparent. For about 9 days around lunar noon the temperatures were so high that LEAM was switched off. During the times of excessive heating LEAM became very noisy. We limit our current analysis to about 24 h before sunset to about 24 h after sunrise when the LEAM temperatures were moderate set of 74.6 days constitutes about 75% of the periods when LEAM was

  2. The magnetopause as an intermediary between interplanetary structures and the Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. H.; Zheng, Y.; Glocer, A.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Observational studies using data from multipoint spacecraft combined with global modeling of the Earth's magnetosphere are presented to understand the magnetopause as an intermediary between interplanetary structures and the inner magnetosphere in response to a variety of solar-wind structures, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), interplanetary shocks, and pressure pulses. The importance of the magnetopause in the solar wind-inner magnetosphere coupling arises not only from its global motion, which determines the location of the magnetopause relative to the drift paths of outer radiation-belt particles, but also from physical processes occurring at the magnetopause boundary layer. Common physical processes occurring at the magnetopause boundary layer include Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and newly-identified velocity fluctuations, which both provide multiple channels to increase, decrease, or modulate inner-magnetospheric particle density/energy fluxes. We have surveyed the data sets, finding a number of events in which THEMIS observed magnetopause boundary waves while the Van Allen Probes observed flux enhancements in response to various solar-wind structures. Ultra-Low-Frequency (ULF) waves are often excited by, or enhanced, during these boundary fluctuations. Simultaneous intensifications and/or modulations in the energetic radiation belt and ring current populations are common. Amongst these events, we present categorized case studies in which inner-magnetospheric fluxes are regulated by different solar wind-magnetopause couplings. These results provide evidence that the energy from the interplanetary structures is transferred into the inner magnetosphere via magnetopause dynamics. We use measurements from multiple spacecraft including the Van Allen Probes and the THEMIS and global MHD simulations to track down the mechanisms by which this transport is implemented.

  3. Cosmic rays, conditions in interplanetary space and geomagnetic variations during solar cycles 19-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biktash, Lilia

    2016-07-01

    We have studied conditions in interplanetary space, which can have an influence on galactic and solar cosmic rays (CRs). In this connection the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters and CRs variations have been compared with geomagnetic activity represented by the equatorial Dst and Kp indices beginning from 1955 to the end 2015. The indices are in common practice in the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction studies and they are the final product of this interaction. The important drivers in interplanetary medium which have effect on cosmic rays as CMEs (coronal mass ejections) and CIRs (corotating interaction regions) undergo very strong changes during their propagation to the Earth. Correlation of sunspot numbers and long-term variations of cosmic rays do not adequately reflect peculiarities concerned with the solar wind arrival to 1 AU also. Moreover records of in situ space measurements of the IMF and most other indicators of solar activity cover only a few decades and have a lot of gaps for calculations of long-term variations. Because of this, in such investigations, the geomagnetic indices have some inestimable advantage as continuous series other the solar wind measurements. We have compared the yearly average variations of the indices and of the solar wind parameters with cosmic ray data from Moscow, Climax, Halekala and Oulu neutron monitors during the 20-24 solar cycles. During the descending phases of the solar cycles the long-lasting solar wind high speed streams occurred frequently and were the primary contributors to the recurrent Dst variations and had effects on cosmic rays variations. We show that long-term Dst and Kp variations in these solar cycles were correlated with cosmic ray count rates and can be used for prediction of CR variations. Climate change in connection with evolution of CRs variations is discussed.

  4. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  5. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  6. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Greenberg, Richard; Dermott, Stanley F.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations.

  7. Global amount of dust in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fukugita, Masataka

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the total amount of dust in the Universe that is produced in stellar evolution in the entire cosmic time is consistent with the observed amount, if we add to the dust amount inferred for galactic discs the amount recently uncovered in galactic haloes and the surrounding of galaxies in reddening of the quasar light passing through the vicinity of galaxies. The inventory concerning the dust closes. This implies that dust produced from stars should survive effectively for the cosmic time, and that a substantial amount of dust is produced in the burning phase of evolved stars of intermedaite mass.

  8. STEREO observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections and prominence deflection during solar minimum period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. J. Kilpua

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the occurrence rate and solar origin of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs using data from the two Solar TErrestrial RElation Observatory (STEREO and the Wind spacecraft. We perform a statistical survey of ICMEs during the late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Observations by multiple, well-separated spacecraft show that even at the time of extremely weak solar activity a considerable number of ICMEs were present in the interplanetary medium. Soon after the beginning of the STEREO science mission in January 2007 the number of ICMEs declined to less than one ICME per month, but in late 2008 the ICME rate clearly increased at each spacecraft although no apparent increase in the number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs occurred. We suggest that the near-ecliptic ICME rate can increase due to CMEs that have been guided towards the equator from their high-latitude source regions by the magnetic fields in the polar coronal holes.

    We consider two case studies to highlight the effects of the polar magnetic fields and CME deflection taking advantage of STEREO observations when the two spacecraft were in the quadrature configuration (i.e. separated by about 90 degrees. We study in detail the solar and interplanetary consequences of two CMEs that both originated from high-latitude source regions on 2 November 2008. The first CME was slow (radial speed 298 km/s and associated with a huge polar crown prominence eruption. The CME was guided by polar coronal hole fields to the equator and it produced a clear flux rope ICME in the near-ecliptic solar wind. The second CME (radial speed 438 km/s originated from an active region 11007 at latitude 35° N. This CME propagated clearly north of the first CME and no interplanetary consequences were identified. The two case studies suggest that slow and elongated CMEs have difficulties overcoming the straining effect of the overlying field and as a consequence they are guided by

  9. Statistical analysis of interplanetary shock waves observed during a complete solar activity cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisi, E.; Schwenn, R.

    1995-01-01

    During the Helios mission a total of 391 fast forward non-corotating interplanetary shock waves was identified. For most of the 12 years between 1974 and 1986 unique shock detection was possible for more than 80 % of the time. The occurrence rate (in shocks per day) varied from 0.02 at activity minimum in 1976 to 0.17 in 1979 and 0.22 in 1982 with a significant drop to 0.13 in 1980, i.e. right at activity maximum. The average properties of all events as functions of solar distance. phase in the solar cycle, heliographic and -magnetic latitude and others are discussed.

  10. A Study on the Technique of Observing Interplanetary Scintillation with Simultaneous Dual-Frequency Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ground-based observation of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) is an important approach of monitoring solar wind speed. We describe both the principle and method of observing the solar wind speed by using the normalized cross-spectrum of simultaneous dualfrequency IPS measurement. The effects of the solar wind properties and the angular size of the scintillation source on the measurement of solar wind speed are investigated by numerical analysis. We carry out a comparison of this method with the traditional single station-single frequency method. We outline a new IPS observation system using this method now under construction at the National Astronomical Observatories, CAS (NAOC).

  11. Interplanetary conditions during 3-kHz radio-wave detections in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Gold, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma waves detected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft beyond about 12 AU that may be associated with the turbulence expected at the heliopause are interpreted in terms of the characteristics of the interplanetary medium at large heliocentric distances. The low-energy charged-particle environment in the outer heliosphere during the observations of the unusual plasma-wave signals is addressed. The particle data suggest that the outer heliosphere was unusually stable and free of transient shock and particle events for the roughly eight months during the wave observations.

  12. Relationship between the near-Earth interplanetary field and the coronal source flux: dependence on timescale

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has shown that the radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field is approximately independent of latitude. This has allowed quantification of the total open solar flux from near-Earth observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. The open flux can also be estimated from photospheric magnetograms by mapping the fields up to the ‘‘coronal source surface’’ where the field is assumed to be radial and which is usually assumed to be at a heliocentric distance r = 2...

  13. Interplanetary magnetic field changes and condensations in comet Halley's plasma tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Magda; Schwingenschuh, K.

    1992-01-01

    In a time-dependent three dimensional MHD simulation for cometary plasmas, Schmidt-Voigt (1989) could observe the formation of condensations in the plasma tail after a 90 degree change in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sweeping over the comet. We investigated the IMF measurements of the Vega SC in the vicinity of the comet Halley for 90 degree changes in the clock angle and studied the relation between them and optical observations of condensations in the plasma tail. For the time interval 24 Feb. 86 to 14 Mar. 86, we could not find a correlation between such changes and the release of condensations from the cometary head.

  14. Presence of solar filament plasma detected in interplanetary coronal mass ejections by in situ spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To identify the solar filament plasma at 1 AU by using in situ spacecraft data. Methods: We used magnetic, plasma and compositional parameters to identify the presence of filamentary material within and outside magnetic clouds. Results: We report two cases of observed filament plasma embedded in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs related to a flare-associated eruptive filament and a quiescent filament eruption at different phases of solar cycle by using magnetic, plasma, and compositional parameters. Conclusions: Analysis of in situ multi-spacecraft observations of ICME structures and substructures confirms the presence of solar filament material.

  15. The simulation of GCRs at near earth interplanetary locations for radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang

    2010-09-01

    The interplanetary radiation environment is detrimental to space missions, giving rise to cumulative damage to both astronauts and payloads and enhanced background levels in detectors. Therefore, there is a pressing need for a reliable simulation of these harmful effects for risk assessment and shielding optimization in manned space missions. We have modeled the interaction processes of the two most abundant galactic cosmic ray particle fluxes (protons and helium nuclei) using the Geant4 toolkit for a given space vehicle model. The total energy deposited due to protons and helium nuclei is calculated in this work, and the energy deposited due to the secondary particles generated by this radiation is also estimated.

  16. Determination of the crystal structure of anhydrous sodium dodecyl sulphate using a combination of synchrotron radiation powder diffraction and molecular modelling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.; Hammond, R. B.; Roberts, K. J.; Machin, D.; McLeod, G.

    2000-11-01

    The structure of anhydrous sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was determined using a combination of high resolution, synchrotron, powder X-ray diffraction and molecular modelling techniques, including the use of a systematic search method to select suitable inter-molecular packing configurations for subsequent Rietveld refinement. Anhydrous SDS is monoclinic, space group P2 1/c , the unit cell dimensions are a=38.915 Å, b=4.709 Å, c=8.198 Å and β=93.29° and the asymmetric unit is comprised of a single SDS molecule. The packing motif consists of double layers of molecules. Molecules in adjacent layers are related by 2 1 axes, whilst within layers the adjacent molecules are related by c glide planes. The sulphur atom in the head group is displaced from the (100) plane by 2.1 Å and the methyl carbon is displaced by a perpendicular distance of 1.2 Å from the (200) plane. Electrostatic interactions between the headgroups dominate the packing and largely determine the alignment of the hydrocarbon chains with respect to the long axis of the unit cell. The average area per polar head group is 19.4 Å 2. The present structure is compared with previously determined structures for three hydrated phases of SDS in terms of the observed intermolecular packing motifs.

  17. Ringwoodite growth rates from olivine with ~75 ppmw H2O: Metastable olivine must be nearly anhydrous to exist in the mantle transition zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration; Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division; Sharp, Thomas G. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration; Mosenfelder, Jed L. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences; Leinenweber, Kurt [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-04-15

    It has been previously demonstrated that as little as 300 ppmw H2O increases wadsleyite and ringwoodite growth rates to magnitudes that are inconsistent with the metastable olivine hypothesis. To further test this hypothesis, we present new ringwoodite growth rate measurements from olivine with ~75 ppmw H2O at 18 GPa and 700, 900, and 1100 °C. These growth rates are nearly identical to those from olivine with ~300 ppmw H2O, and significantly higher than those from nominally anhydrous olivine. We infer that transformation of olivine with 75-300 ppmw H2O is primarily enhanced by hydrolytic weakening of reaction rims, which reduces the elastic strain-energy barrier to growth. We present a new method for fitting nonlinear nominally anhydrous data, to demonstrate that reduction of growth rates by elastic strain energy is an additional requirement for metastable olivine. In conclusion, based on previous thermokinetic modeling, these enhanced growth rates are inconsistent with the persistence of metastable olivine wedges into the mantle transition zone. Metastable persistence of olivine into the mantle transition-zone would therefore require < 75 ppmw H2O.

  18. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of betaine anhydrous as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by Danisco Animal Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycine betaine (betaine acts as a methyl group donor in transmethylation reactions in organisms. Betaine occurs in numerous vertebrate tissues as an osmolyte, ensuring osmoprotection. Betaine is safe for piglets at the maximum supplementation rate of 2 000 mg/kg complete feed with a margin of safety below 5. This conclusion is extended to all pigs and extrapolated to all animal species and categories. The use of betaine as a feed additive up to a supplementation rate of 2 000 mg/kg complete feed is unlikely to pose concerns for consumer safety. Users’ inhalation exposure to betaine is expected to be minimal. Betaine anhydrous should be considered irritant to skin, eyes and mucous membranes and a skin sensitiser. It is likely to cause skin sensitisation. The supplementation of feed with betaine anhydrous does not pose a risk to the environment. Betaine has the potential to become efficacious in all animal species and categories when administered via feed or water for drinking. The FEEDAP Panel made some recommendations on (i introduction of a maximum content for supplemental betaine in complete feed and water for drinking; (ii avoidance of simultaneous use of betaine in feed and water for drinking; and (iii avoidance of simultaneous inclusion of betaine and choline chloride in premixtures.

  19. Dust Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Landgraf, M; Grün, Eberhard; Krüger, Harald; Landgraf, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Dust measurements in the outer solar system are reviewed. Only the plasma wave instrument on board Voyagers 1 and 2 recorded impacts in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Pioneers 10 and 11 measured a constant dust flux of 10-micron-sized particles out to 20 AU. Dust detectors on board Ulysses and Galileo uniquely identified micron-sized interstellar grains passing through the planetary system. Impacts of interstellar dust grains onto big EKB objects generate at least about a ton per second of micron-sized secondaries that are dispersed by Poynting-Robertson effect and Lorentz force. We conclude that impacts of interstellar particles are also responsible for the loss of dust grains at the inner edge of the EKB. While new dust measurements in the EKB are in an early planning stage, several missions (Cassini and STARDUST) are en route to analyze interstellar dust in much more detail.

  20. Nanoflow Separation of Amino Acids for the Analysis of Cosmic Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of amino acids to the early Earth by interplanetary dust particles, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have been a significant source of the early Earth's prebiotic organic inventory. Amino acids are central to modern terrestrial biochemistry as major components of proteins and enzymes and were probably vital in the origin of life. A variety of amino acids have been detected in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison, many of which are exceptionally rare in the terrestrial biosphere including a-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline. AIB has also been detected in a small percentage of Antarctic micrometeorite grains believed to be related to the CM meteorites We report on progress in optimizing a nanoflow liquid chromatography separation system with dual detection via laser-induced-fluorescence time of flight mass spectrometry (nLC-LIF/ToF-MS) for the analysis of o-phthaldialdehydelN-acetyl-L-cysteine (OPA/NAC) labeled amino acids in cosmic dust grains. The very low flow rates (0.1 ml/min) combined with 4 orders of magnitude lower than traditional GC-MS techniques), and specificity (compounds identities are determined by both retention time and exact mass) makes this a compelling technique. However, the development of an analytical method to achieve separation of compounds as structurally similar as amino acid monomers and produce the sharp peaks required for maximum sensitivity is challenging.