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Sample records for anhydrous interplanetary dust

  1. Unequilibrated, equilibrated, and reduced aggregates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Track-rich anhydrous IDP's are probably the most primitive IDP's because they have escaped significant post-accretional alteration; they exhibit evidence of (nebular) gas phase reactions; their mineralogy is similar to comet Halley's dust; and some of them exhibit comet-like IR spectral characteristics. However, basic questions about the mineralogy and petrography of anhydrous IDP's remain unanswered, because they contain aggregated components that can be heterogeneous on a scale of nanometers. In some IDP's, aggregates account for greater than 75 percent of the volume of the particle. The aggregates have been systematically examined using an analytical electron microscope (AEM), which provides probe-forming optics and (x-ray and electron) spectrometers necessary to analyze individual nanometer-sized grains. The AEM results reveal at least three mineralogically distinct classes of aggregates in an hydrous IDP's, with mineralogies reflecting significantly different formation/aggregation environments.

  2. High Precision Oxygen Three Isotope Analysis of Wild-2 Particles and Anhydrous Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, D.; Ushikubo, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Weisberg, M. K.; Joswiak, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Matrajt, G.; Kita, N. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries from comet Wild-2 samples was observation of crystalline silicate particles that resemble chondrules and CAIs in carbonaceous chondrites. Previous oxygen isotope analyses of crystalline silicate terminal particles showed heterogeneous oxygen isotope ratios with delta(sup 18)O to approx. delta(sup 17)O down to -50% in the CAI-like particle Inti, a relict olivine grain in Gozen-sama, and an olivine particle. However, many Wild-2 particles as well as ferromagnesian silicates in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) showed Delta(sup 17)O values that cluster around -2%. In carbonaceous chondrites, chondrules seem to show two major isotope reservoirs with Delta(sup 17)O values at -5% and -2%. It was suggested that the Delta(sup 17)O = -2% is the common oxygen isotope reservoir for carbonaceous chondrite chondrules and cometary dust, from the outer asteroid belt to the Kuiper belt region. However, a larger dataset with high precision isotope analyses (+/-1-2%) is still needed to resolve the similarities or distinctions among Wild-2 particles, IDPs and chondrules in meteorites. We have made signifi-cant efforts to establish routine analyses of small particles (isotope analyses of Wild-2 particles and anhydrous chondritic IDPs, and discuss the relationship between the cometary dust and carbonaceous chondrite chondrules.

  3. Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    micrometeorites) containing layer silicates indicative of parent-body aqueous alteration and the more distant anhydrous P and D asteroids exhibiting no evidence of (aqueous) alteration (Gradie and Tedesco, 1982). This gradation in spectral properties presumably extends several hundred AU out to the Kuiper belt, the source region of most short-period comets, where the distinction between comets and outer asteroids may simply be one of the orbital parameters ( Luu, 1993; Brownlee, 1994; Jessberger et al., 2001). The mineralogy and petrography of meteorites provides direct confirmation of aqueous alteration, melting, fractionation, and thermal metamorphism among the inner asteroids ( Zolensky and McSween, 1988; Farinella et al., 1993; Brearley and Jones, 1998). Because the most common grains in the ISM (silicates and carbonaceous matter) are not as refractory as those found in meteorites, it is unlikely that they have survived in significant quantities in meteorites. Despite a prolonged search, not a single presolar silicate grain has yet been identified in any meteorite.Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are the smallest and most fine-grained meteoritic objects available for laboratory investigation (Figure 1). In contrast to meteorites, IDPs are derived from a broad range of dust-producing bodies extending from the inner main belt of the asteroids to the Kuiper belt (Flynn, 1996, 1990; Dermott et al., 1994; Liou et al., 1996). After release from their asteroidal or cometary parent bodies the orbits of IDPs evolve by Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag (the combined influence of light pressure and radiation drag) ( Dermott et al., 2001). Irrespective of the location of their parent bodies nearly all IDPs under the influence of PR drag can eventually reach Earth-crossing orbits. IDPs are collected in the stratosphere at 20-25 km altitude using NASA ER2 aircraft ( Sandford, 1987; Warren and Zolensky, 1994). Laboratory measurements of implanted rare gases, solar flare tracks ( Figure 2

  4. Dust in the interplanetary medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ingrid; Lamy, Herve [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Czechowski, Andrzej [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud, E-mail: ingrid.mann@aeronomie.b [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    2010-12-15

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nanodust particles of sizes {approx_equal}1-10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nanodust are detected near 1 AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Although such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  5. Water and organics in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and larger micrometeorites (MMs) impinge on the upper atmosphere where they decelerate at 90 km altitude and settle to the Earths surface. Comets and asteroids are the major sources and the flux, 30,000-40,000 tons/yr, is comparable to the mass of larger meteorites impacting the Earths surface. The sedimentary record suggests that the flux was much higher on the early Earth. The chondritic porous (CP) subset of IDPs together with their larger counterparts, ultracarbonaceous micrometeorites (UCMMs), appear to be unique among known meteoritic materials in that they are composed almost exclusively of anhydrous minerals, some of them contain >> 50% organic carbon by volume as well as the highest abundances of presolar silicate grains including GEMS. D/H and 15N abundances implicate the Oort Cloud or presolar molecular cloud as likely sources of the organic carbon. Prior to atmospheric entry, IDPs and MMs spend 104-105 year lifetimes in solar orbit where their surfaces develop amorphous space weathered rims from exposure to the solar wind (SW). Similar rims are observed on lunar soil grains and on asteroid Itokawa regolith grains. Using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) we have detected radiolytic water in the rims on IDPs formed by the interaction of solar wind protons with oxygen in silicate minerals. Therefore, IDPs and MMs continuously deliver both water and organics to the earth and other terrestrial planets. The interaction of protons with oxygen-rich minerals to form water is a universal process.

  6. Migration of Interplanetary Dust and Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    Our studies of migration of interplanetary dust and comets were based on the results of integration of the orbital evolution of 15,000 dust particles and 30,000 Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) [1-3]. For asteroidal and cometary particles, the values of the ratio β between the radiation pressure force and the gravitational force varied from 1000 and 1 microns. The probability of a collision of a dust particle started from an asteroid or JFC with the Earth during a lifetime of the particle was maximum at diameter d ˜100 microns. For particles started from asteroids and comet 10P, this maximum probability was ˜0.01. Different studies of migration of dust particles and small bodies testify that the fraction of cometary dust particles of the overall dust population inside Saturn's orbit is considerable and can be dominant: (1) Cometary dust particles produced both inside and outside Jupiter's orbit are needed to explain the observed constant number density of dust particles at 3-18 AU. The number density of migrating trans-Neptunian particles near Jupiter's orbit is smaller by a factor of several than that beyond Saturn's orbit. Only a small fraction of asteroidal particles can get outside Jupiter's orbit. (2) Some (less than 0.1%) JFCs can reach typical near-Earth object orbits and remain there for millions of years. Dynamical lifetimes of most of the former JFCs that have typical near-Earth object orbits are about 106 -109 yr, so during most of these times they were extinct comets. Such former comets could disintegrate and produce a lot of mini-comets and dust. (3) Comparison of the velocities of zodiacal dust particles (velocities of MgI line) based on the distributions of particles over their orbital elements obtained in our runs [3-4] with the velocities obtained at the WHAM observations shows that only asteroidal dust particles cannot explain these observations, and particles produced by comets, including high-eccentricity comets, are needed for such explanation

  7. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (less than um) assemblages of anhydrous amorphous and crystalline silicates, oxides and sulfides bound together by abundant carbonaceous material. Ancient silicate, oxide, and SiC stardust grains exhibiting highly anomalous isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission.

  8. Coordinates Analyses of Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles: Samples of Primitive Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere fall into two major groups: an anhydrous group termed the "chondritic-porous (CP) IDPs and a hydrated group, the "chondritic-smooth (CS) IDPs, although rare IDPs with mineralogies intermediate between these two groups are known [1]. The CP-IDPs are widely believed to be derived from cometary sources [e.g. 2]. The hydrated CS-IDPs show mineralogical similarities to heavily aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrites (e.g. CI chondrites), but only a few have been directly linked to carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies [e.g. 3, 4]. Most CS-IDPs show distinct chemical [5] and oxygen isotopic composition differences [6-8] from primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Here, we report on our coordinated analyses of a suite of carbon-rich CS-IDPs focusing on their bulk compositions, mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and isotopic compositions.

  9. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a O-16-rich reservoir and a O-17,O-18-rich reservoir produced via mass-independent fractionation. The composition of the O-16-rich reservoir is reasonably well constrained, but material representing the O-17,O-18-rich end-member is rare. Self-shielding models predict that cometary water, presumed to represent this reservoir, should be enriched in O-17 and O-18 18O by > 200%. Hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) rich in carbonaceous matter may be derived from comets; such particles likely contain the products of reaction between O-16-poor water and anhydrous silicates that formed in the inner solar system. Here we present mineralogy and oxygen isotope compositions of two C-rich hydrated IDPs, L2083E47 and L2071E35.

  10. Capture of interplanetary and interstellar dust by the jovian magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J E; Horányi, M; Grün, E

    1998-04-03

    Interplanetary and interstellar dust grains entering Jupiter's magnetosphere form a detectable diffuse faint ring of exogenic material. This ring is composed of particles in the size range of 0. 5 to 1.5 micrometers on retrograde and prograde orbits in a 4:1 ratio, with semimajor axes 3 jovian radii, eccentricities 0. 1 < e < 0.3, and inclinations i less, similar 20 degrees or i greater, similar 160 degrees. The size range and the orbital characteristics are consistent with in situ detections of micrometer-sized grains by the Galileo dust detector, and the measured rates match the number densities predicted from numerical trajectory integrations.

  11. Comparison of comet 81P/Wild 2 dust with interplanetary dust from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hope A; Bradley, John P; Dai, Zu Rong; Chi, Miaofang; Kearsley, Anton T; Burchell, Mark J; Browning, Nigel D; Molster, Frank

    2008-01-25

    The Stardust mission returned the first sample of a known outer solar system body, comet 81P/Wild 2, to Earth. The sample was expected to resemble chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles because many, and possibly all, such particles are derived from comets. Here, we report that the most abundant and most recognizable silicate materials in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles appear to be absent from the returned sample, indicating that indigenous outer nebula material is probably rare in 81P/Wild 2. Instead, the sample resembles chondritic meteorites from the asteroid belt, composed mostly of inner solar nebula materials. This surprising finding emphasizes the petrogenetic continuum between comets and asteroids and elevates the astrophysical importance of stratospheric chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles as a precious source of the most cosmically primitive astromaterials.

  12. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  13. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  14. Interplanetary dust fluxes, solar and galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'skij, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The role of dust fluxes in cosmic ray (CR) propagation in the interplanetary space is investigated. Global effects arising in the interaction of CR with magnetic and electric fields of a sporadic meteor cloud or of all meteor fluxes as a whole are discussed. The local effects arising in the interaction of CR with magnetic and electric fields of separate meteor fluxes are also considered. It is shown that an increase in the CR intensity during the maximum activity of meteor fluxes confirms the supposition on the CR acceleration in electric fields of meteor fluxes

  15. Assemblage of Presolar Materials and Early Solar System Condensates in Chondritic Porous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous inter-planetary dust particles (CP IDPs) contain an assortment of highly primitive solar system components, molecular cloud matter, and presolar grains. These IDPs have largely escaped parent body processing that has affected meteorites, advocating cometary origins. Though the stardust abundance in CP IDPs is generally greater than in primitive meteorites, it can vary widely among individual CP IDPs. The average abundance of silicate stardust among isotopically primitive IDPs is approx. 375 ppm while some have extreme abundances up to approx. 1.5%. H and N isotopic anomalies are common in CP IDPs and the carrier of these anomalies has been traced to organic matter that has experienced chemical reactions in cold molecular clouds or the outer protosolar disk. Significant variations in these anomalies may reflect different degrees of nebular processing. Refractory inclusions are commonly observed in carbonaceous chondrites. These inclusions are among the first solar system condensates and display 16O-rich isotopic compositions. Refractory grains have also been observed in the comet 81P/Wild-2 samples re-turned from the Stardust Mission and in CP IDPs, but they occur with much less frequency. Here we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of CP IDPs that were characterized for their bulk chemistry by to study the distribution of primitive components and the degree of nebular alteration incurred.

  16. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  17. Analytical electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, D.F.; Bunch, T.E.; Mardinly, A.J.; Echer, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    A hydrated interplanetary dust particle (IDP), IDP number-sign Ames-Dec86-11, was selected for study from a number of IDPs collected by U-2 aircraft from Ames Research Center. The particle consists primarily of a relatively nonporous aggregate of fine-grained layer silicates, some of which are in situ hydrous alteration products of pre-existing grains. The particle shows no apparent alteration due to its deceleration upon atmospheric entry. The layer silicates have a bimodal size distribution, in which matrix phyllosilicates have an apparent grain size of 10-50 nm, and phyllosilicates that pseudomorphically replace pre-existing grains have a grain size of 1-10 nm. Despite this order of magnitude difference in crystallite size, both phases are smectites, according to quantitative analytical and electron diffraction data. Euhedral to subhedral pyrrhotites, which have grain size of 0.1-1.0 μm, have high nickel contents. Pre-existing grains that have been pseudomorphed by clays are commonly surrounded or decorated with fine-grained (10-20 nm) low-nickel pentlandite. Very fine grained (1-10 nm) magnetite occurs in clusters throughout the matrix. Several fragments of a Mg-Fe silicate phase, apparently a glass, are present

  18. Link between interplanetary & cometary dust: Polarimetric observations and space studies with Rosetta & Eye-Sat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Gaboriaud, Alain; Buil, Christian; Ressouche, Antoine; Lasue, J.; Palun, Adrien; Apper, Fabien; Elmaleh, Marc

    Intensity and linear polarization observations of the solar light scattered by interplanetary dust, the so-called zodiacal light, provide information on properties of the dust particles, such as their spatial density, local changes, morphology and albedo. Earth-based polarimetric observations, with a resolution of 5° or more, have been used to derive the polarization phase curve of interplanetary dust particles and to establish that the polarization at 90° phase angle increases with increasing solar distance, at least up to 1.5 au in the ecliptic, while the albedo decreases [1, 2]. Analysis of such studies will be revisited. Numerical simulations of the polarimetric behavior of interplanetary dust particles strongly suggest that, in the inner solar system, interplanetary dust particles consist of absorbing (e.g., organic compounds) and less absorbing (e.g., silicates) materials, that radial changes originate in a decrease of organics with decreasing solar distance (probably due to alteration processes), and that a significant fraction of the interplanetary dust is of cometary origin, in agreement with dynamical studies [3, 4]. The polarimetric behaviors of interplanetary dust and cometary dust particles seem to present striking similarities. The properties of cometary dust particles, as derived from remote polarimetric observations of comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the Rosetta rendezvous mission, at various wavelengths, will be summarized [5, 6]. The ground truth expected from Rosetta dust experiments, i.e., MIDAS, COSIMA, GIADA, about dust particles’ morphology, composition, and evolution (with distance to the nucleus before Philae release and with distance to the Sun before and after perihelion passage) over the year and a half of nominal mission, will be discussed. Finally, the Eye-Sat nanosatellite will be presented. This triple cubesat, developed by students from engineering schools working as interns at CNES, is to be launched

  19. Development of the isotopic analysis of individual macroparticles: a study of desert dust and interplanetary dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleon, Jerome

    2001-01-01

    During this thesis a new analytical technique has been developed to allow the determination of isotopic ratios in microparticles. This technique is based on the imaging properties of the IMS 1270 ion microprobe in CRPG in Nancy. The development of quantitative isotopic imaging allows the determination of the 18 O/ 16 O ratio of individual macroparticles having a size < 2 μm with a 3 to 4 % precision and to map, with ∼ 1 μm lateral resolution, the isotopic variation of hydrogen in particles having a size of 10 μm. This new technique was used to study the problem of the origin of Saharan dust particles, indeed the distribution of 18 O/ 16 O ratios in individual quartz grains is shown to be a characteristic fingerprint of the geology of the source area. The determination of oxygen isotopic ratio in individual grains of a given dust storm above the Atlantic Ocean indicates that the likely source area of this storm is the Air-Tenere region. This result has strong implications for the cycle of Saharan dust in the atmosphere and the processes of dust suspension into the atmosphere. Mapping the D/H variations in 4 interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere by the NASA shows that these particles contain several distinct types of organic matter having an interstellar origin. These organic matters can be related to polymers measured in cornets and carbonaceous chondrites. The presence of these different polymers inside one single particle suggests that the most primitive materials of the solar system may be related to each other. (author) [fr

  20. Polarimetry of Dust in Optically Thin Clouds: Observations and Experimental Simulations of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Lasue, J.

    2013-12-01

    Remote polarimetric observations are used to tentatively infer the physical properties of the dust particles in cometary and interplanetary environments. To interpret the results, numerical and experimental simulations are necessary. Light scattering measurements on levitating particles with the PROGRA2 experiment -in dedicated microgravity flights or in the laboratory for low-density particles- provide relevant simulations of the scattering properties of real particles, which can present large size distributions and a large variety of structures and materials (Renard et al., 2002; Hadamcik et al., 2009). Previous systematic experiments, together with numerical models and laboratory analysis of cosmic particles (e.g. Stardust samples) allow to optimize dust particles' properties -such as their structures, sizes, size distributions, and silicate to organics ratios- (Hadamcik et al. 2007a; Zubko et al., 2009; Lasue et al., 2010). We present intensity and polarization images of cometary comae providing evidence for changes in the polarization properties in the internal regions of the coma, linked to the variation of particles properties with nucleus distance and/or rotation phase (Hadamcik et al., 2007a; Hadamcik et al., 2013a; 2013b) and preliminary results of 2013 observations. Associated experimental simulations help us to interpret how particles evolve within different coma regions and at different solar distances (Hadamcik et al. 2007b; 2009; 2011). We expect in situ confirmation of our results during the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014-2015 (Hadamcik et al., 2010). Analyses of observations of the zodiacal light scattered by the interplanetary dust cloud particles have shown local polarisation changes with the solar distance (Levasseur-Regourd et al., 2001). Such changes are interpreted through numerical models to be related to variations in the composition and physical properties of the particles through various processes including

  1. Mid-Infrared Spectrum of the Zodiacal Emission: Detection of Crystalline Silicates in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ootsubo, T.; Onaka, T.; Yamamura, I.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabe, T.; Roellig, T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Within a few astronomical units of the Sun the solar system is filled with interplanetary dust, which is believed to be dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. Spectroscopic observations of the zodiacal emission with moderate resolution provide key information on the composition and size distribution of the dust in the interplanetary space. They can be compared directly to laboratory measurements of candidate materials, meteorites, and dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Recently mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of the zodiacal emission have been made by two instruments on board the Infrared Space Observatory; the camera (ISOCAM) and the spectrophotometer (ISOPHOT-S). A broad excess emission feature in the 9-11 micron range is reported in the ISOCAM spectrum, whereas the ISOPHOT-S spectra in 6-12 microns can be well fitted by a blackbody radiation without spectral features.

  2. The Distribution of Interplanetary Dust Near 1-AU: An MMS Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; St Cyr, O. C.; Wilson, L. B., III; Schiff, C.; Sacks, L. W.; Chai, D. J.; Queen, S. Z.; Sedlak, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane in the vicinity of 1-AU has been inferred from impacts on the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission spacecraft as detected by the Acceleration Measurement System (AMS) during periods when no other spacecraft activities are in progress. Consisting of four identically instrumented spacecraft, with an inter-spacecraft separation ranging from 10-km to 400-km, the MMS constellation forms a dust "detector" with approximately four-times the collection area of any previous dust monitoring framework. Here we introduce the MMS-AMS and the inferred dust impact observations, provide a preliminary comparison of the MMS distribution of dust impacts to previously reported interplanetary dust distributions — namely those of the STEREO mission — and report on our initial comparison of the MMS distribution of dust impacts with known meteor showers.

  3. A Database of Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Detected by the Wind Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2016-01-01

    It was recently discovered that the WAVES instrument on the Wind spacecraft has been detecting, in situ, interplanetary and interstellar dust of approximately 1 micron radius for the past 22 years. These data have the potential to enable advances in the study of cosmic dust and dust-plasma coupling within the heliosphere due to several unique properties: the Wind dust database spans two full solar cycles; it contains over 107,000 dust detections; it contains information about dust grain direction of motion; it contains data exclusively from the space environment within 350 Earth radii of Earth; and it overlaps by 12 years with the Ulysses dust database. Further, changes to the WAVES antenna response and the plasma environment traversed by Wind over the lifetime of the Wind mission create an opportunity for these data to inform investigations of the physics governing the coupling of dust impacts on spacecraft surfaces to electric field antennas. A Wind dust database has been created to make the Wind dust data easily accessible to the heliophysics community and other researchers. This work describes the motivation, methodology, contents, and accessibility of the Wind dust database.

  4. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.

    1986-01-01

    An understanding of carbonaceous matter in primitive extraterrestrial materials is an essential component of studies on dust evolution in the interstellar medium and the early history of the Solar System. Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) on carbonaceous material in two Chondritic Porous (CP) aggregrates is presented. The study suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may also be preserved in these materials

  5. Observations of interplanetary dust by the Juno magnetometer investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Mathias; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz

    2017-01-01

    by micrometeoroid impacts on the solar arrays. The majority of detections occurred just prior to and shortly after Juno's transit of the asteroid belt. This rather novel detection technique utilizes the Juno spacecraft's prodigious 60 m2 of solar array as a dust detector and provides valuable information...

  6. Metastable carbon in two chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope study is presented on carbonaceous material in two chondritic porous aggregates, W7029* A and W7010* A2, from the Johnson Space Center Cosmic Dust Collection. The finding of well-ordered carbon-2H (lonsdaleite) in the two aggregates suggests that a record of hydrocarbon carbonization may be preserved in these materials. This carbon is a metastable phase resulting from hydrous pyrolysis below 300-350 0 C and may be a precursor to poorly graphitized carbons in primitive extra terrestrial materials. (UK)

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE GEGENSCHEIN AND THE GEOMETRIC ALBEDO OF INTERPLANETARY DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Yang, Hongu [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Usui, Fumihiko [Department of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Ueno, Munetaka [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kwon, Suk Minn [Department of Science Education, Kangwon National University, 192-1 Hyoja-dong, Kangwon-do, Chunchon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mukai, Tadashi, E-mail: ishiguro@astro.snu.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-04-10

    We performed optical observations of the Gegenschein using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled wide-field camera, the Wide-field Imager of Zodiacal light with ARray Detector (WIZARD), between 2003 March and 2006 November. We found a narrow brightness enhancement superimposed on the smooth gradient of the Gegenschein at the exact position of the antisolar point. Whereas the Gegenschein morphology changed according to the orbital motion of the Earth, the maximum brightness coincided with the antisolar direction throughout the year. We compared the observed morphology of the Gegenschein with those of models in which the spatial density of the interplanetary dust cloud was considered and found that the volume scattering phase function had a narrow backscattering enhancement. The morphology was reproducible with a spatial distribution model for infrared zodiacal emission. It is likely that the zero-phase peak (the so-called opposition effect) was caused by coherent backscattering and/or shadow-hiding effects on the rough surfaces of individual dust particles. These results suggest that big particles are responsible for both zodiacal light and zodiacal emission. Finally, we derived the geometric albedo of the smooth component of interplanetary dust, assuming big particles, and obtained a geometric albedo of 0.06 {+-} 0.01. The derived albedo is in accordance with collected dark micrometeorites and observed cometary dust particles. We concluded that chondritic particles are dominant near Earth space, supporting the recent theoretical study by dynamical simulation.

  8. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  9. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Rietmeijer, F.J.M.; Mckay, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides

  10. Interplanetary dust profile observed on Juno's cruise from Earth to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joergensen, J. L.; Benn, M.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Denver, T.; Jørgensen, F. E.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Andersen, A. C.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S.

    2017-12-01

    Juno was launched August 5th, 2011, and entered the highly-elliptical polar orbit about Jupiter on July 4th, 2016, some 5 years later. Juno's science objectives include the mapping of Jupiter's gravity and magnetic fields and observation of the planet's deep atmosphere, aurora and polar regions. The Juno spacecraft is a large spin-stabilized platform powered by three long solar panel structures, 11 m in length, extending radially outward from the body of the spacecraft with panel normal parallel to the spacecraft spin axis. During almost 5 years in cruise, Juno traversed the inner part of the solar system, from Earth, to a deep space maneuver at 2.2AU, back to 0.8AU for a subsequent rendezvous with Earth for gravity assist, and then out to Jupiter (at 5.4AU at the time of arrival). The solar panels were nearly sun-pointing during the entire cruise phase, with the 60 m2 of solar panel area facing the ram direction (panel normal parallel to the spacecraft velocity vector). Interplanetary Dust Particles (IPDs) impacting Juno's solar panels with typical relative velocities of 20 km/s excavate target mass, some of which will leave the spacecraft at moderate speeds (few m/s) in the form of a few large spallation products. Many of these impact ejecta have been recorded and tracked by one of the autonomous star trackers flown as part of the Juno magnetometer investigation (MAG). Juno MAG instrumentation is accommodated on a boom at the end of one of the solar arrays, and consists of two magnetometer sensor suites each instrumented with two star trackers for accurate attitude determination at the MAG sensors. One of the four star trackers was configured to report such fast moving objects, effectively turning Juno's large solar array area into the largest-aperture IPD detector ever flown - by far. This "detector", by virtue of its prodigious collecting area, is sensitive to the relatively infrequent impacts of particles much larger (at 10's of microns) than those collected

  11. Sub-micrometer scale minor element mapping in interplanetary dust particles: a test for stratospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, G.J.; Keller, L.P.; Sutton, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped the spatial distribution of minor elements including K, Mn, and Zn in 3 IDPs and found no evidence for the surface coatings (rims) of these elements that would be expected if the enrichments previously reported were due to contamination. Combined X-ray microprobe (XRM), energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), and electron microprobe measurements have determined that the average bulk chemical composition of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere is enriched relative to the CI meteorite composition by a factor of 2 to 4 for carbon and for the moderately volatile elements Na, K, P, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and Se, and enriched to ∼30 times CI for Br. However, Jessberger et al., who have reported similar bulk enrichments using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), attribute the enrichments to contamination by meteor-derived atmospheric aerosols during the several weeks these IDPs reside in the Earth's atmosphere prior to collection. Using scanning Auger spectroscopy, a very sensitive surface analysis technique, Mackinnon and Mogk have observed S contamination on the surface of IDPs, presumably due to the accretion of sulfate aerosols during stratospheric residence. But the S-rich layer they detected was so thin (∼100 angstroms thick) that the total amount of S on the surface was too small to significantly perturb the bulk S-content of a chondritic IDP. Stephan et al. provide support for the contamination hypothesis by reporting the enrichment of Br on the edges of the IDPs using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass-Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), but TOF-SIMS is notorious for producing false edge-effects, particularly on irregularly-shaped samples like IDPs. Sutton et al. mapped the spatial distribution of Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, and Sr, at the ∼2 (micro)m scale, in four IDPs using element-specific x-ray fluorescence (XRF) computed microtomography. They found the moderately volatile

  12. Structure of Cometary and Interplanetary Dust, a Clue to the Formation and Early Evolution of Dust Particles in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Lasue, J.; Hadamcik, E.; Botet, R.

    2007-10-01

    Cometary dust particles have been suspected to be fragile since the Giotto and Vega missions to comet Halley. More recently, numerous observations of the solar light scattered by dust particles in comet Hale-Bopp coma, together with versatile numerical simulations, have allowed us to suggest that these particles are likely to be built of both very fluffy aggregates and of more compact grains, with (to the first order) equivalent proportions in mass of absorbing material and transparent silicates [1,2]. The same approach, used to fit zodiacal light observations, indicates that a significant proportion of fluffy absorbing particles is found in the interplanetary dust cloud [3]. Laboratory simulations also lead to similar results, with e.g. polarimetric phase curves obtained for agglomerates of magnesio-ferrosilica comparable to those observed for cometary dust [4]. These estimations are now confirmed by the analysis of Stardust samples, with, e.g. evidence for both dense grains and aggregates with low bulk density within the coma of comet Wild 2 [5]. The relevance of such a structure for the formation and early evolution of dust particles in the solar system will be discussed. [1] Lasue & Levasseur-Regourd, JQSRT 100, 220-236, 2006. [2] Levasseur-Regourd, Mukai, Lasue, Okada, PSS, 55, 1010-1020, 2007. [3] Lasue, Levasseur-Regourd, Fray, Cottin, A&A, in press, 2007 [4] Hadamcik, Renard, Rietmeijer, Levasseur-Regourd et al., Icarus, in press, 2007 [5] Hoerz, Bastien, Borg, Bradley et al., Science 314, 1716 - 1719, 2006

  13. Precision Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Two C-Rich Hydrated Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; Keller, L. P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Messenger, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chondritic-smooth IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles) are low porosity objects whose mineralogy is dominated by aqueous alteration products such as Mg-rich phyllosilicates (smectite and serpentine group) and Mg-Fe carbonate minerals. Their hydrated mineralogy combined with low atmospheric entry velocities have been used to infer an origin largely from asteroidal sources. Spectroscopic studies show that the types and abundance of organic matter in CS IDPs is similar to that in CP IDPs. Although CS IDPs show broad similarities to primitive carbonaceous chondrites, only a few particles have been directly linked to specific meteorite groups such as CM and CI chondrites based on the presence of diagnostic minerals. Many CS IDPs however, have carbon contents that greatly exceed that of known meteorite groups suggesting that they either may derive from comets or represent samples of more primitive parent bodies than do meteorites. It is now recognized that many large, dark primitive asteroids in the outer main belt, as well as some trans-Neptunian objects, show spectroscopic evidence for aqueous alteration products on their surfaces. Some CS IDPs exhibit large bulk D enrichments similar to those observed in the cometary CP IDPs. While hydrated minerals in comets have not been unambiguously identified to date, the presence of the smectite group mineral nontronite has been inferred from infrared spectra obtained from the ejecta from comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact mission. Recent observations of low temperature sulfide minerals in Stardust mission samples suggest that limited aqueous activity occurred on comet Wild-2. All of these observations, taken together, suggest that the high-carbon hydrated IDPs are abundant and important samples of primitive solar system objects not represented in meteorite collections. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites reflect mixing between a 16O-rich reservoir and a 17O,18O-rich reservoir produced via mass

  14. On the Reliability of PIXE and SXRF Microanalyses of Interplanetary Dust Paticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, P.; Flynn, G. J.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: The trace element contents of stratospheric interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) eventually provide clues as to their origin(s). Since the masses of IDPs are on the order of nanograms, their trace element contents typically amount to only ab out 10^8 atoms. Therefore all analytical techniques are operating near their limits of detection (LODs) and the question is: how reliable are the trace element data of IDPs? At present three different analytical techniques are applied to measure trace elements in IDPs: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (SXRF), and Time Of Flight- or double-focusing Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (T OF-SIMS/SIMS). In 1989 we performed a crosscheck between minor and trace element data obtained by SXRF in Hamburg and by PIXE in Heidelberg and found non-conflicting results [1]. Here we report on a new chrosscheck between results acquired with the new He idelberg PIXE facility [2] and the actual SXRF facility in Brookhaven [3]. Measurements: Three IDPs, L2005AB2 (~12 micrometers), L2011K1 (~15 x 25 micrometers), and L2011R13 (~17 x 34 micrometers), were first analyzed with SXRF in 1994 and re-analyzed with PIXE in March 1995. The PIXE data were aquired in two runs with different absorbers in front of the detector. One spectrum was obtained with a 45 micrometers Be-absorber and a 5 pA beam of 2x2 micrometers^2 during 20-50 min for each particle. For a second analysis we used a 155 micrometers Al-absorber and a 5x5 micrometers^2 beam of ~300 pA for 60-120 min. The SXRF data were aquired in one ru n (<30 min) with a thick Al-absorber and a beam size of roughly 20x20 micrometers^2. Results: The resulting element weight-ratios normalized to iron (set to be =19.04%=CI [4]) are presented in Tab.1. Abundances normalized to Fe and to the respective CI(=solar) ratios from Anders and Grevesse are shown in Fig.1. With only a few exceptions, there is a very good agreement between the PIXE and the SXRF

  15. Coordinated Analyses of Mineral-organic Matter Associations in Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Herzog, G. F.; Smith, T.; Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.; Khodja, H.; Taylor, S.; Wirick, S.; Messenger, S.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the timing and processes involved in the incorporation of organic matter with inorganic materials in early Solar System bodies. Recently, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) studies showed carbon-rich rims surrounding individual mineral grains in anhydrous IDPs [1,2]. These carbonaceous rims are believed to have formed prior to parent body formation and likely served to bond mineral grains during accretion into larger aggregates. We are exploring the nature of these carbonaceous rims through coordinated analyses of their chemistry, mineralogy, spectroscopy and isotopic characteristics. Here we report our preliminary mineralogical observations.

  16. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  17. The effects of interplanetary dust impacts on the accumulation of volatiles in the lunar permanently shadowed regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Szalay, Jamey

    2017-10-01

    The lunar regolith has been formed, and remains continually reworked, by the intermitten impacts of comets, asteroids, meteoroids, and the continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles (IDP). Thick atmospheres protect Venus, Earth, and Mars, ablating the incoming IDPs into “shooting stars” that rarely reach the surface. However, the surfaces of airless bodies near 1 AU are directly exposed to the high-speed (>> 1 km/s) IDP impacts. The Moon is expected to be bombarded by 5x103 kg/day of IDPs arriving with a characteristic speed of ~ 20 km/s. The IDP sources impacting the Moon at high latitudes remain largely uncharacterized due to the lack of optical and radar observations in the polar regions on Earth. These high latitude sources have very large impact speeds in the range of 30 < v < 50 km/ hence they are expected to have a significant effect on the lunar surface, including the removal and burial of volatile deposits in the lunar polar regions.Water is thought to be continually delivered to the Moon through geological timescales by water-bearing comets and asteroids, and produced continuously in situ by the impacts of solar wind protons of oxygen rich minerals exposed on the surface. IDPs are an unlikely source of water due to their long UV exposure in the inner solar system, but their high-speed impacts can mobilize secondary ejecta dust particles, atoms and molecules, some with high-enough speed to escape the Moon. Other surface processes that can lead to mobilization, transport and loss of water molecules and other volatiles include solar heating, photochemical processes, and solar wind sputtering. Since none of these are at work in permanently shadowed regions (PSR), dust impacts remain the dominant process to dictate the evolution of volatiles in PSRs. The competing effects of dust impacts are: a) ejecta production leading to loss out of a PSR; b) gardening and overturning the regolith; and c) the possible accumulation of impact ejecta, leading

  18. Comparison of Carbon XANES Spectra from an Iron Sulfide from Comet Wild 2 with an Iron Sulfide Interplanetary Dust Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Sanford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Messenger, Nakamura K.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Among one of the first particles removed from the aerogel collector from the Stardust sample return mission was an approx. 5 micron sized iron sulfide. The majority of the spectra from 5 different sections of this particle suggests the presence of aliphatic compounds. Due to the heat of capture in the aerogel we initially assumed these aliphatic compounds were not cometary but after comparing these results to a heated iron sulfide interplanetary dust particle (IDP) we believe our initial interpretation of these spectra was not correct. It has been suggested that ice coating on iron sulfides leads to aqueous alteration in IDP clusters which can then lead to the formation of complex organic compounds from unprocessed organics in the IDPs similar to unprocessed organics found in comets [1]. Iron sulfides have been demonstrated to not only transform halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons but also enhance the bonding of rubber to steel [2,3]. Bromfield and Coville (1997) demonstrated using Xray photoelectron spectroscopy that "the surface enhancement of segregated sulfur to the surface of sulfided precipitated iron catalysts facilitates the formation of a low-dimensional structure of extraordinary properties" [4]. It may be that the iron sulfide acts in some way to protect aliphatic compounds from alteration due to heat.

  19. Creation of fully vectorized FORTRAN code for integrating the movement of dust grains in interplanetary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquitt, W.

    1989-07-01

    The main objective is to improve the performance of a specific FORTRAN computer code from the Planetary Sciences Division of NASA/Johnson Space Center when used on a modern vectorizing supercomputer. The code is used to calculate orbits of dust grains that separate from comets and asteroids. This code accounts for influences of the sun and 8 planets (neglecting Pluto), solar wind, and solar light pressure including Poynting-Robertson drag. Calculations allow one to study the motion of these particles as they are influenced by the Earth or one of the other planets. Some of these particles become trapped just beyond the Earth for long periods of time. These integer period resonances vary from 3 orbits of the Earth and 2 orbits of the particles to as high as 14 to 13

  20. Microparticle impact calibration of the Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) onboard the solar power sail demonstrator IKAROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Takayuki; Cole, Michael J.; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwai, Takeo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Srama, Ralf; Yano, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    The Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) is an array of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based dust detectors aboard the solar power sail demonstrator named IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun). The total sensor area of ALADDIN (0.54 m2) is the world's largest among the past PVDF-based dust detectors. IKAROS was launched in May 2010 and then ALADDIN measured cosmic dust impacts for 16 months while orbiting around between 0.7 and 1.1 AU. The main scientific objective of ALADDIN is to reveal number density of ≥10-μm-sized dust in the zodiacal cloud with much higher time-space resolution than that achieved by any past in-situ measurements. The distribution of ≥10-μm-sized dust can be also observed mainly with the light scattering by optical instruments. This paper gives the scientific objectives, the instrumental description, and the results of microparticle impact calibration of ALADDIN conducted in ground laboratories. For the calibration tests we used Van de Graaf accelerators (VdG), two-stage light gas guns (LGG), and a nano-second pulsed Nd:YAG laser (nsPL). Through these experiments, we obtained depolarization charge signal caused by hypervelocity impacts or laser irradiation using the flight spare of 20-μm-thick PVDF sensor and the electronics box of ALADDIN. In the VdG experiment we accelerated iron, carbon, and silver microparticles at 1-30 km/s, while in the LGG experiment we performed to shoot 100's-μm-sized particles of soda-lime glass and stainless steel at 3-7 km/s as single projectile. For interpolation to ≥10-μm size, we irradiated infrared laser at the energy of 15-20 mJ directly onto the PVDF sensor. From the signal analysis, we developed a calibration law for estimation of masses of impacted dust particles. The dynamic range of ALADDIN corresponds from 9×10-14 kg to 2×10-10 kg (4-56 μm in diameter at density of 2.0 g/cm3) at the expected impact velocity of 10 km/s at 1 AU

  1. Solar and interplanetary disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Alurkar, S K

    1997-01-01

    Over the last three decades, a spate of solar wind observations have been made with sophisticated ground-based and space-borne instruments. Two highly successful space missions of the Skylab and the twin spacecraft Helios 1 and 2 have amassed an invaluable wealth of information on the large scale structure of the inner heliosphere, the solar and interplanetary magnetic field, coronal holes, interplanetary dust, solar windflows, etc.Solar and interplanetary propagating phenomena have been extensively studied during the last two decades. Very recently, a new simple model based on results from a

  2. Whither Cometary Dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey M.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper I will discuss recent findings that have important implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of primitive solar system dust, including: - Nesvorny et al. (2010), following up on their dynamical analyses of the zodiacal dust bands as sourced by the breakup of the Karin (5Mya) and Veritas (8Mya) asteroid families, argue that over 90% of the interplanetary dust cloud at 1 AU comes from JFC comets with near-circularized, low inclination orbits. This implies that the noted IPD collections of anhydrous and hydrous dust particles are likely to be from Oort cloud and JFC comets, respectively, not from asteroids and comets as thought in the past. Hydrous dust particles from comets like 85P/Wild2 and 9P/Tempel 1 would be consistent with results from the STARDUST and Deep Impact experiments. - Estimates of the dust particle size distributions (PSDs) in the comae of 85P/Wild2 (Green et al. 2004, 2007) and 73P/SW-3 (Sitko et al. 2010, Vaubaillon & Reach 2010) and in the trails of comets (Reach et al. 2007) have broken power law structure, with a plateau enhancement of particles of 1 mm - 1 cm in size. This size is also the size of most chondritic inclusions, and the predicted size range of the "aggregational barrier", where collisions between dust particles become destructive. - Studies of the albedo and polarization properties of cometary dust (Kolokolova et al. 2007) suggest there are 2 major groupings, one with low scattering capability and one with high. While these families could possibly have been explained by systematics in the PSDs of the emitted dust, independent work by Lisse et al. (2008) on the mineralogy of a number of highly dusty comets has shown evidence for one family of comets with highly crystalline dust and another with highly amorphous dust.

  3. The Evolution of the Surface of Symmetry of the Interplanetary Dust from 24° to 5° Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenborg, Guillermo; Howard, Russell A.

    2017-10-01

    The white-light STEREO/SECCHI images include light scattered by dust in orbit about the Sun (the F-corona). We analyzed the evolution of the symmetry axis of the F-corona between 2007 and 2012 in the elongation range covered by the STEREO-A/HI-1 instrument (4°-24° elongation) to characterize the plane of symmetry of the zodiacal dust cloud. The symmetry axes both above and below the ecliptic plane were derived separately without assuming any particular functional form. No noticeable time dependence was observed. However, we did find an evolution with elongation of both the inclination I and the ascending node {{{Ω }}}A of the inferred plane of symmetry. Both parameters appeared fairly constant in the outer half of the elongation range studied (I=˜ 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7,{{{Ω }}}A=˜ 83^\\circ ; values close to those of Venus’s orbit). Then, they start to evolve, becoming I=˜ 6^\\circ (I.e., a trend toward the solar equatorial plane) and {{{Ω }}}A=˜ 57^\\circ at about 5° elongation. This variation indicates that the zodiacal dust cloud exhibits a warped plane of symmetry, with an estimated center of symmetry at about 0.5 {R}⊙ from the Sun’s center on the side of the heliosphere containing Jupiter. We found a marginal difference between the inclination of the axes below and above the ecliptic. This is suggestive of an increased dust density distribution at certain fixed longitudes, which could be explained by the dust deposition of Kreutz Sun-grazing comets. We conjecture that the circumsolar dust is mainly affected by gravitational forces, other forces becoming dominant only where the more rapid changes occur.

  4. Comparison of the oxidation state of Fe in comet 81P/Wild 2 and chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogliore, Ryan C.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Gainsforth, Zack; Marcus, Matthew A.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2010-07-16

    The fragile structure of chondritic-porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and their minimal parent-body alteration have led researchers to believe these particles originate in comets rather than asteroids where aqueous and thermal alterations have occurred. The solar elemental abundances and atmospheric entry speed of CP-IDPs also suggest a cometary origin. With the return of the Stardust samples from Jupiter-family comet 81P/Wild 2, this hypothesis can be tested. We have measured the Fe oxidation state of 15 CP-IDPs and 194 Stardust fragments using a synchrotron-based x-ray microprobe. We analyzed {approx}300 ng of Wild 2 material - three orders of magnitude more material than other analyses comparing Wild 2 and CP-IDPs. The Fe oxidation state of these two samples of material are > 2{sigma} different: the CP-IDPs are more oxidized than the Wild 2 grains. We conclude that comet Wild 2 contains material that formed at a lower oxygen fugacity than the parent-body, or parent bodies, of CP-IDPs. If all Jupiter-family comets are similar, they do not appear to be consistent with the origin of CP-IDPs. However, comets that formed from a different mix of nebular material and are more oxidized than Wild 2 could be the source of CP-IDPs.

  5. Interplanetary magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Burlaga, Leonard F

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft such as the Pioneer, Vela, and Voyager have explored the interplanetary medium between the orbits of Mercury and Pluto. The insights derived from these missions have been successfully applied to magnetospheric, astro-solar, and cosmic ray physics. This book is an overview of these insights, using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows as the framework for interpreting objects and processes observed in the interplanetary medium. Topics include various types of MHD shocks and interactions among them, tangential and rotational discontinuities, force-free field configurations, the formation of merged interaction regions associated with various types of flows, the destruction of flows, the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and formation of a heliospheric vortex street, the development of multifractal fluctuations on various scales, and the evolution of multifractal intermittent turbulence. Students and researchers in astrophysics will value the data from these missions, which provide confirmation of m...

  6. ULYSSES DUST DETECTION SYSTEM V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dataset Overview ================ This data set contains information on dust the dust environment in interplanetary space within the inner solar system, between...

  7. Dust analysis on board the Destiny+ mission to 3200 Phaethon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Arai, T.; Srama, R.; Sarli, B. V.; Kimura, H.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Soja, R.; Altobelli, N.; Grün, E.

    2017-09-01

    The Japanese Destiny+ spacecraft will be launched to the active asteroid 3200 Phaethon in 2022. Among the proposed core payload is an in-situ dust instrument based on the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer. We use the ESA Interplanetary Meteoroid Engineering Model (IMEM), to study detection conditions and fluences of interplanetary and interstellar dust with a dust analyzer on board Destiny+.

  8. The Distribution of Interplanetary Dust between 0.96 and 1.04 au as Inferred from Impacts on the STEREO Spacecraft Observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. J.; Davis, J. A.; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S.; Lintott, C.; Smith, A.; Bamford, S.; Baeten, E. M. L.; SaintCyr, O. C.; Campbell-Brown, M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 au has been inferred from impacts on the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the heliospheric imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed webbased citizen science project Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The different position of the HI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft leads to each sampling different populations of dust particles. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera, these dust particles are estimated to have masses in excess of 10 (exp-17) kg with radii exceeding 0.1 µm. For off-points observed in the HI-A images, which can only have been caused by particles travelling from the anti-apex direction, the distribution is consistent with that of secondary 'storm' trails observed by HI-B, providing evidence that these trails also result from impacts with primary particles from an anti-apex source. Investigating the mass distribution for the off-points of both HI-A and HI-B, it is apparent that the differential mass index of particles from the apex direction (causing off-points in HI-B) is consistently above 2. This indicates that the majority of the mass is within the smaller particles of this population. In contrast, the differential mass

  9. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  10. Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Agarwal, Jessica; Cottin, Hervé; Engrand, Cécile; Flynn, George; Fulle, Marco; Gombosi, Tamas; Langevin, Yves; Lasue, Jérémie; Mannel, Thurid; Merouane, Sihane; Poch, Olivier; Thomas, Nicolas; Westphal, Andrew

    2018-04-01

    This review presents our understanding of cometary dust at the end of 2017. For decades, insight about the dust ejected by nuclei of comets had stemmed from remote observations from Earth or Earth's orbit, and from flybys, including the samples of dust returned to Earth for laboratory studies by the Stardust return capsule. The long-duration Rosetta mission has recently provided a huge and unique amount of data, obtained using numerous instruments, including innovative dust instruments, over a wide range of distances from the Sun and from the nucleus. The diverse approaches available to study dust in comets, together with the related theoretical and experimental studies, provide evidence of the composition and physical properties of dust particles, e.g., the presence of a large fraction of carbon in macromolecules, and of aggregates on a wide range of scales. The results have opened vivid discussions on the variety of dust-release processes and on the diversity of dust properties in comets, as well as on the formation of cometary dust, and on its presence in the near-Earth interplanetary medium. These discussions stress the significance of future explorations as a way to decipher the formation and evolution of our Solar System.

  11. Lunar and interplanetary trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Biesbroek, Robin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a clear description of the types of lunar and interplanetary trajectories, and how they influence satellite-system design. The description follows an engineering rather than a mathematical approach and includes many examples of lunar trajectories, based on real missions. It helps readers gain an understanding of the driving subsystems of interplanetary and lunar satellites. The tables and graphs showing features of trajectories make the book easy to understand. .

  12. Anhydrous Ammonia Frost on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a probable source for sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Ammonia is believed to be important to maintaining nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere. Ammonia is seen in clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, but has yet to be detected on any of the satellites. This may be because all forms of NH3 are unstable in the ambient conditions of the satellites surfaces or that its spectral features are altered by other components of the surface, and have not been identified. It has recently been demonstrated[1] that brightening occurs in Titan’s atmosphere that is transient on the time-scale of months. The spectral shape of the brightening is more consistent with that of the transient apparition of a pure ammonia frost than of an ammonia monohydrate or ammonia dihydrate frost. However, the phase behavior of the ammonia water system has peritectics at compositions of 1:1 and 1:2. These hydrate forms would be expected to dominate if the frost, or the reservoir from which the frost was derived had any water present. Physical mechanisms for producing measurable quanitities of anhydrous ammonia can include chemical dehydration or dehydration of the vapor phase - but it is challenging to store significant quantities of the anhydrous material because of the phase behavior in the solid state. [1] Nelson, R.M., et al. Saturn’s Titan: Surface Change, Ammonia, and Implications for Atmospheric and Tectonic Activity., Icarus, 199, pp. 429-441, 2009 This work was performed at JPL under contract to NASA

  13. Transport of anhydrous ammoniac - risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, S.; Degrange, J.P.; Hubert, P.; Pages, P.; Lamblin, J.

    1989-12-01

    This risk analysis of anhydrous ammonia transport in France was done within a study initiated by the Department of dangerous goods of the Ministry of transport. The study deals with the road and rail transportation of bulk anhydrous ammonia. After analysis of transport system and traffic, the transport accident risks are estimated, as well as their distribution on the French territory. Finally after a synthesis of results, a number of safety measures to be undertaken were identified. This is a joint study of SMC-CEPN, with a specific role of SEMA-METRA-CONSEIL concerning the traffic frequency, and the center for risk evaluation concerning nuclear safety

  14. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  15. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ammonia, anhydrous. 151.50-32 Section 151.50-32 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-32 Ammonia, anhydrous. (a) The anhydrous ammonia tanks may be installed in the bulk liquid cargo tanks provided the liquid surrounding the...

  16. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains.

  17. High-Nickel Iron-Sulfides in Anhydrous, Gems-Rich CP IDPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Wirick, S.; Hu, W.; Li, L.; Yan, H.; Huang, X.; Nazaretski, E.; Lauer, K.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) that were not severly heated during atmospheric deceleration are the best preserved samples of the solids that condensed from the Solar protoplanetary disk, as well as pre-Solar grains thatr survived incorporation into the disk, currently available for laboratory analysis [1]. These CP IDPs never experienced the aqueous and/or thermal processing, gravitational compaction, and shock effects that overprinted the record of Solar nebula processes in meteorites.

  18. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  19. Demethylation of Quinine Using Anhydrous Aluminium Trichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyi Asnawi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinine is a natural alkaloid having a methoxy group bound to quinoline ring and an allyl group bound to quinuclidine ring. Demethylation of quinine applying strong acid such as HBr or HI at high temperature was unsuccessful. The aim of this research was to obtain demethylated quinine by means of mild and selective demethylation procedure to prevent the addition reaction of allyl group. Selective demethylation of quinine has been carried out using anhydrous aluminium trichloride as reagent. The demethylation product was achieved in 68.12% yield by mole ratio of quinine to anhydrous aluminium trichloride of 1 to 4 in dried methylene chloride under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction was firstly carried out at 0°C for 4 h and after the reaction mixture reached room temperature, the reaction was continued up to 24 h.

  20. Electrochemistry of acid-base reactions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, J.P.; Devynck, J.; Tremillon, B.

    1975-01-01

    Electrochemical studies were made in following media: water-HF mixtures, anhydrous HF and KF solutions in HF, solutions of the SbF5 type in HF. The acidity level of these solutions was evaluated using the R(H) functions based on the strehlow hypotheses. From the pH measurement in anhydrous HF, it was possible to get acid-base titration curves and pH buffers. The behavior of quinones in anhydrous HF is presented [fr

  1. GALILEO DUST DETECTION SYSTEM V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains information on the dust environment in interplanetary space within the inner solar system and in the Jupiter system, within and without the...

  2. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Schwehm, G.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Gruen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>∼2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  3. 46 CFR 98.25-5 - How anhydrous ammonia may be carried.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. 98.25-5 Section 98... Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk § 98.25-5 How anhydrous ammonia may be carried. (a) Anhydrous ammonia shall be..., except as otherwise provided in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) When anhydrous ammonia is to be...

  4. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  5. Potentiometric titrations in anhydrous acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Port, L.

    1966-03-01

    The method used for studying anhydrous acetic acid is potentiometry with a glass electrode. We have in this way studied the titration of common inorganic acids (HClO 4 - HBr - H 2 SO 4 - HCl - HNO 3 - H 3 PO 4 ) and of some metallic salts. Furthermore we have shown that complex acids are formed between HCl and some metallic chlorides. An analysis of the titration curves for the inorganic acids against pyridinium chloride has made it possible to calculate a certain number of values for the dissociation pK of these acids and of the corresponding pyridinium salts. The titration of metallic perchlorates constitutes a method of studying the stability of acetates; we have thus been able to draw up a classification for some of these acetates. The metallic chlorides studied fall into two groups according to their behaviour in weak or strong acids. The differences have been explained on the basis of the role played by solvolysis. In the third part we have studied the acidic properties of mixtures of HCl with certain metallic chlorides. This work has demonstrated the existence, in certain cases, of acid complexes of the type (HCl) m MCl n . (author) [fr

  6. Lipase nanogel catalyzed transesterification in anhydrous dimethyl sulfoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jun; Lu, Diannan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Zheng

    2009-06-08

    The present work showed that Candida rugosa lipase, which is inactive in anhydrous dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), has been granted its original catalytic activity and greatly enhanced stability when encapsulated into a polyacrylamide nanogel. The molecular simulation and structural analysis suggested that the polyacrylamide nanogel shielded the extraction of essential water and maintained the native configuration of encapsulated lipase in anhydrous DMSO at an elevated temperature. The electron and fluorescence microscopy showed that the lipase nanogel would be well dispersed in anhydrous DMSO where its native counterpart aggregated. The encapsulated lipase behaved as a stable catalyst for transesterification between dextran and vinyl decanoate in anhydrous DMSO at 60 degrees C for 240 h and yielded a dextran-based polymeric surfactant with regioselectivity toward the C-2 hydroxyl group in the glucopyranosyl unit of dextran. All these indicated a high potential of enzyme nanogel for nonaqueous biocatalysis.

  7. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large ... clear view of the walls of the colon. Sodium picosulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  9. Preparation and physicochemical properties of niclosamide anhydrate and two monohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, Elsa C; Maleka, Tshoane S P; Liebenberg, Wilna; Song, Mingna; Wurster, Dale Eric; de Villiers, Melgardt M

    2004-01-28

    The intent of the study was to prepare and characterize three crystal forms of niclosamide namely the anhydrate and the two monohydrates and to investigate the moisture adsorption and desorption behavior of these crystal forms. The crystal forms were prepared by recrystallization and were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, isoperibol solution calorimetry, Karl Fischer titration, and X-ray powder diffractometry. Moisture adsorption by the anhydrate at increased relative humidities and two temperatures, 30 and 40 degrees C, was measured while the desorption from the monohydrates was determined at 45, 55, and 65 degrees C for monohydrate H(A) and 75, 90, and 100 degrees C for monohydrate H(B). Thermal analysis and solution calorimetry showed that monohydrate H(B) is more stable than monohydrate H(A) and solubility measurements showed the solubility of the crystal forms decreased in the order: anhydrate>monohydrate H(A)>monohydrate H(B). With an increase in temperature and relative humidity niclosamide anhydrate adsorbed moisture to form monohydrate H(A) by a random nucleation process. Dehydration of monohydrate H(A) at increased temperatures followed zero order kinetics and resulted in a change to the anhydrate. Monohydrate H(B) was transformed to the anhydrate at higher temperatures by a three-dimensional diffusion mechanism.

  10. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... ... cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index–orbital inclinations ...

  11. Ion Microprobe Measurements of Comet Dust and Implications for Models of Oxygen Isotope Heterogeneity in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen isotopic compositions of anhydrous minerals in carbonaceous chondrites reflect mixing between a O-16-rich and O-17, O18-rich reservoir. The UV photodissociation of CO (i.e. selfshielding) has been proposed as a mass-independent mechanism for producing these isotopically distinct reservoirs. Self-shielding models predict the composition for the CO gas reservoir to be O-16-rich, and that the accreting primordial dust was in isotopic equilibrium with the gaseous reservoir [1, 2]. Self-shielding also predicts that cometary water, presumed to represent the O-17, O-18-rich reservoir, should be enriched in O-17 and O-18, with compositions of 200 -1000per mille, and that the interaction with this O-17, O-18-rich H2O reservoir altered the compositions of the primordial dust toward planetary values. The bulk composition of the solar nebula, which may be an approximation to the 16O-rich gaseous reservoir, has been constrained by the Genesis results [3]. However, material representing the O-17, O-18-rich end-member is rare [4], and dust representing the original accreting primordial dust has been challenging to conclusively identify in current collections. Anhydrous dust from comets, which accreted in the distal cold regions of the nebula at temperatures below approximately 30K, may provide the best opportunity to measure the oxygen isotope composition of primordial dust. Chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) have been suggested as having cometary origins [5]; however, until direct comparisons with dust from a known comet parent body were made, link between CP-IDPs and comets remained circumstantial. Oxygen isotope analyses of particles from comet 81P/Wild 2 collected by NASA's Stardust mission have revealed surprising similarities to minerals in carbonaceous chondrites which have been interpreted as evidence for large scale radial migration of dust components from the inner solar nebula to the accretion regions of Jupiter- family comets [6

  12. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of ...

  13. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary distur- bances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of enhanced ...

  14. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geo- magnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms. (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron monitor, solar geophysical and interplanetary data during the period 1978–99. Further, the duration of recovery phase has been ...

  15. Transceiver optics for interplanetary communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. T.; Farr, W. H.; Rider, B.; Sampath, D.

    2017-11-01

    In-situ interplanetary science missions constantly push the spacecraft communications systems to support successively higher downlink rates. However, the highly restrictive mass and power constraints placed on interplanetary spacecraft significantly limit the desired bandwidth increases in going forward with current radio frequency (RF) technology. To overcome these limitations, we have evaluated the ability of free-space optical communications systems to make substantial gains in downlink bandwidth, while holding to the mass and power limits allocated to current state-of-the-art Ka-band communications systems. A primary component of such an optical communications system is the optical assembly, comprised of the optical support structure, optical elements, baffles and outer enclosure. We wish to estimate the total mass that such an optical assembly might require, and assess what form it might take. Finally, to ground this generalized study, we should produce a conceptual design, and use that to verify its ability to achieve the required downlink gain, estimate it's specific optical and opto-mechanical requirements, and evaluate the feasibility of producing the assembly.

  16. Extracting lunar dust parameters from image charge signals produced by the Lunar Dust Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.; Szalay, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is an impact ionization dust detector used to characterize the lunar dust exosphere generated by the impacts of large interplanetary particles and meteor streams (Horanyi et al., 2015). In addition to the mass and speed of these lofted particles, LDEX is sensitive to their charge. The resulting signatures of impact events therefore provide valuable information about not only the ambient plasma environment, but also the speed vectors of these dust grains. Here, impact events produced from LDEX's calibration at the Dust Accelerator Laboratory are analyzed using an image charge model derived from the electrostatic simulation program, Coulomb. We show that parameters such as dust grain speed, size, charge, and position of entry into LDEX can be recovered and applied to data collected during LADEE's seven-month mission.

  17. Anhydrous ammonia burns case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amshel, C E; Fealk, M H; Phillips, B J; Caruso, D M

    2000-08-01

    Chemical burns are associated with significant morbidity, especially anhydrous ammonia burns. Anhydrous ammonia is a colorless, pungent gas that is stored and transported under pressure in liquid form. A 28 year-old patient suffered 45% total body surface area of second and third degree burns as well as inhalational injury from an anhydrous ammonia explosion. Along with fluid resuscitation, the patient's body was scrubbed every 6 h with sterile water for the first 48 h to decrease the skin pH from 10 to 6-8. He subsequently underwent a total of seven wound debridements; initially with allograft and then autograft. On post burn day 45, he was discharged. The injuries associated with anhydrous ammonia burns are specific to the effects of ammonium hydroxide. Severity of symptoms and tissue damage produced is directly related to the concentration of hydroxyl ions. Liquefactive necrosis results in superficial to full-thickness tissue loss. The affinity of anhydrous ammonia and its byproducts for mucous membranes can result in hemoptysis, pharyngitis, pulmonary edema, and bronchiectasis. Ocular sequelae include iritis, glaucoma, cataracts, and retinal atrophy. The desirability of treating anhydrous ammonia burns immediately cannot be overemphasized. Clothing must be removed quickly, and irrigation with water initiated at the scene and continued for the first 24 h. Resuscitative measures should be started as well as early debridement of nonviable skin. Patients with significant facial or pharyngeal burns should be intubated, and the eyes irrigated until a conjunctivae sac pH below 8.5 is achieved. Although health care professionals need to be prepared to treat chemical burns, educating the public, especially those workers in the agricultural and industrial setting, should be the first line of prevention.

  18. CFDP for Interplanetary Overlay Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol for Interplanetary Overlay Network (CFDP-ION) is an implementation of CFDP that uses IO' s DTN (delay tolerant networking) implementation as its UT (unit-data transfer) layer. Because the DTN protocols effect automatic, reliable transmission via multiple relays, CFDP-ION need only satisfy the requirements for Class 1 ("unacknowledged") CFDP. This keeps the implementation small, but without loss of capability. This innovation minimizes processing resources by using zero-copy objects for file data transmission. It runs without modification in VxWorks, Linux, Solaris, and OS/X. As such, this innovation can be used without modification in both flight and ground systems. Integration with DTN enables the CFDP implementation itself to be very simple; therefore, very small. Use of ION infrastructure minimizes consumption of storage and processing resources while maximizing safety.

  19. Synthesis of cerous ammonium nitrate using ceric ammonium nitrate and anhydrous ammonia as a reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourleaux, G.; Colombet, P.; Rouxel, J.; Gradeff, P.S.; Mauermann, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction of ceric ammonium nitrate by anhydrous ammonia has been studied. The reaction yields cerous ammonium nitrate complex. This is an easy method to prepare an anhydrous Ce (III) salt, suitable for synthesis of organo cerium (III) derivatives [fr

  20. Interplanetary magnetic field and geomagnetic Dst variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V. L.; Desai, U. D.

    1973-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field has been shown to influence the ring current field represented by Dst. Explorer 28 hourly magnetic field observations have been used with the hourly Dst values. The moderate geomagnetic storms of 60 gammas and quiet-time fluctuations of 10 to 30 gammas are correlated with the north to south change of the interplanetary field component perpendicular to the ecliptic. This change in the interplanetary field occurs one to three hours earlier than the corresponding change in the Dst field.

  1. Interaction of Ketotifen Fumarate with Anhydrous Theophylline in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate interaction between ketotifen fumarate and anhydrous theophylline in aqueous media of various pH. Methods: By using Job's continuous-variation analysis and Ardon's spectrophotomeric methods, the values of stability constants of theophylline with ketotifen ...

  2. Effect of anhydrous magnesium sulphate fertilizer and cutting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of anhydrous magnesium sulphate fertilizer on Panicum maximum yield and chemical composition of the resultant herbage harvested at 3, 4 and 5 weeks of age was investigated. The treatments were labeled T1 to T6. T1 was fertilized and harvested at 3 weeks cutting interval, T2 was fertilized and harvested at 4 ...

  3. Anhydrous Ammonia Training Module. Trainer's Package. Participant's Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Bart; And Others

    This document contains a trainer's and a participant's package for teaching employees on site safe handling procedures for working with anhydrous ammonia, especially on farms. The trainer's package includes the following: a description of the module; a competency; objectives; suggested instructional aids; a training outline (or lesson plan) for…

  4. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Process for the production of sodium carbonate anhydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, H.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.; Witkamp, G.J.; De Graauw, J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of sodium carbonate-anhydrate having a bulk density of at least 800 kg/m<3>, said process comprising: providing a suspension of solid sodium carbonate and/or solid sodium bicarbonate and/or solid double salts at least comprising one of sodium

  6. 7 CFR 58.347 - Butteroil or anhydrous milkfat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.347 Butteroil or anhydrous milkfat. The flavor shall be bland and free from rancid, oxidized, or other objectionable flavors. (a) In addition, the finished... use by the Food and Drug Administration Those permitted by standards of the Codex Alimentarius...

  7. Quantitative assessment of the effect of anhydrous zinc chloride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... MgSO4, H3COOH, Mg(ClO4)2 to activate the carbonyl group of benzaldehyde, catalyse the nucleophilic attack by amines, and dehydrate the system, and eliminate water as the final steps. Anhydrous zinc chloride has been extensively used in literature for its affordability and reliability, however there is limited information ...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for... Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1178 Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in...

  9. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed in...

  10. Dynamic Model Development for Interplanetary Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Eun-Seo Park; Young-Joo Song; Sung-Moon Yoo; Sang-Young Park; Kyu-Hong Choi; Jae-Cheol Yoon; Jo Ryeong Yim; Joon-Min Choi; Byung-Kyo Kim

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic model development for interplanetary navigation has been discussed. The Cowell method for special perturbation theories was employed to develop an interplanetary trajectory propagator including the perturbations due to geopotential, the Earth's dynamic polar motion, the gravity of the Sun, the Moon and the other planets in the solar system, the relativistic effect of the Sun, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag. The equations of motion in dynamic model we...

  11. Interplanetary Small Satellite Conference 2017 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle, Derek Jordan

    2017-01-01

    The Interplanetary Small Satellite Conference will be held at San Jose State University on May 1 and 2, 2017. The program attached here contains logistical information for attendees, the agenda, and abstracts of the conference presentations. All abstracts were reviewed by their authors' home institute and approved for public release prior to inclusion in the program booklet. The ISSC explores mission concepts, emerging technologies, and fosters outside the box thinking critical to future interplanetary small satellite missions.

  12. Electron heating at interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 41 forward interplanetary shocks measured between August 1978 and December 1979 show that the ratio of downstream to upstream electron temperatures, T/sub e/(d/u) is variable in the range between 1.0 (isothermal) and 3.0. On average, (T/sub e/(d/u) = 1.5 with a standard deviation, sigma e = 0.5. This ratio is less than the average ratio of proton temperatures across the same shocks, (T/sub p/(d/u)) = 3.3 with sigma p = 2.5 as well as the average ratio of electron temperatures across the earth's bow shock. Individual samples of T/sub e/(d/u) and T/sub p/(d/u) appear to be weakly correlated with the number density ratio. However the amounts of electron and proton heating are well correlated with each other as well as with the bulk velocity difference across each shock. The stronger shocks appear to heat the protons relatively more efficiently than they heat the electrons

  13. Harvesting Water from Air: Using Anhydrous Salt with Sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyuan; Shi, Yusuf; Shi, Le; Alsaedi, Mossab; Wang, Peng

    2018-04-02

    Atmospheric water is abundant alternative water resource, equivalent to 6 times of water in all rivers on Earth. This work screens 14 common anhydrous and hydrated salt couples in terms of their physical and chemical stability, water vapor harvesting and release capacity under relevant application scenarios. Among the salts screened, copper chloride (CuCl2), copper sulfate (CuSO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) distinguish themselves and are further made into bi-layer water collection devices, with the top layer being photothermal layer while the bottom layer being salt-loaded fibrous membrane. The water collection devices are capable of capturing water vapor out of the air with low relative humidity (down to 15 %) and releasing water under regular and even weakened sunlight (i.e. 0.7 kW/m2). The work shines light on the potential use of anhydrous salt towards producing drinking water in water scarce regions.

  14. Harvesting Water from Air: Using Anhydrous Salt with Sunlight

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Renyuan

    2018-04-02

    Atmospheric water is abundant alternative water resource, equivalent to 6 times of water in all rivers on Earth. This work screens 14 common anhydrous and hydrated salt couples in terms of their physical and chemical stability, water vapor harvesting and release capacity under relevant application scenarios. Among the salts screened, copper chloride (CuCl2), copper sulfate (CuSO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) distinguish themselves and are further made into bi-layer water collection devices, with the top layer being photothermal layer while the bottom layer being salt-loaded fibrous membrane. The water collection devices are capable of capturing water vapor out of the air with low relative humidity (down to 15 %) and releasing water under regular and even weakened sunlight (i.e. 0.7 kW/m2). The work shines light on the potential use of anhydrous salt towards producing drinking water in water scarce regions.

  15. Glass transition of anhydrous starch by fast scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Xavier; Maigret, Jean-Eudes; Lourdin, Denis; Saiter, Allisson

    2017-10-01

    By means of fast scanning calorimetry, the glass transition of anhydrous amorphous starch has been measured. With a scanning rate of 2000Ks -1 , thermal degradation of starch prior to the glass transition has been inhibited. To certify the glass transition measurement, structural relaxation of the glassy state has been investigated through physical aging as well as the concept of limiting fictive temperature. In both cases, characteristic enthalpy recovery peaks related to the structural relaxation of the glass have been observed. Thermal lag corrections based on the comparison of glass transition temperatures measured by means of differential and fast scanning calorimetry have been proposed. The complementary investigations give an anhydrous amorphous starch glass transition temperature of 312±7°C. This estimation correlates with previous extrapolation performed on hydrated starches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Electromagnetically Interacting Dust Streams During Ulysses' Second Jupiter Encounter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, H.; Forsyth, R.J.; Graps, A.L.; Gruen, E.

    2005-01-01

    The Jupiter system is a source of collimated burst-like streams of electrically charged 10-nm dust particles. In 2004 the Ulysses spacecraft had its second flyby at Jupiter and from late 2002 to early 2005 it measured a total of 24 dust streams between 0.8 and 3.4 AU from the planet. The grains show strong coupling to the interplanetary magnetic field: their impact directions correlate with the orientation and strength of the interplanetary magnetic field vector (namely its tangential and radial components) and they occur at 26 day intervals, closely matching the solar rotation period. Ulysses measured the dust streams over a large range in jovian latitude (+75 deg. to -35 deg.). Enhanced dust emission was measured along the jovian equator

  17. Analysing Interplanetary Probe Guidance Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Sukhova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a guidance accuracy analysis and estimates delta-v budget required to provide the trajectory correction maneuvers for direct interplanetary flights (without midcourse gravity assists. The analysis takes into consideration the orbital hyperbolic injection errors (depend on a selected launch vehicle and ascent trajectory and the uncertainties of midcourse correction maneuvers.The calculation algorithm is based on Monte Carlo simulation and Danby’s matrix methods (the matrizant of keplerian motion. Danby’s method establishes a link between the errors of the spacecraft state vectors at different flight times using the reference keplerian orbit matrizant. Utilizing the nominal trajectory parameters and the covariance matrix of launch vehicle injection errors the random perturbed orbits are generated and required velocity corrections are calculated. The next step is to simulate midcourse maneuver performance uncertainty using the midcourse maneuver covariance matrix. The obtained trajectory correction impulses and spacecraft position errors are statistically processed to compute required delta-v budget and dispersions ellipse parameters for different prediction intervals.As an example, a guidance accuracy analysis has been conducted for a 2022 mission to Mars and a Venus mission in 2026. The paper considers one and two midcourse correction options, as well as utilization of two different launch vehicles.The presented algorithm based on Monte Carlo simulation and Danby’s methods provides preliminary evaluation for midcourse corrections delta-v budget and spacecraft position error. The only data required for this guidance accuracy analysis are a reference keplerian trajectory and a covariance matrix of the injection errors. Danby’s matrix method allows us to take into account also the other factors affecting the trajectory thereby increasing the accuracy of analysis.

  18. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  19. Dry fumes purifying system using anhydrous baking soda; Procede chimique d`epuration des fumees au bicarbonate de soude anhydre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-04-01

    UNISYSTEMS has developed the industrial implementation of the chemical process using anhydrous backing soda, patented by SOLVAY, for purifying fumes containing inorganic salts and sulphur oxides as polluting agents. The system can be applied to industrial processes releasing this type of polluting agents in the fumes at a temperature over 160 deg C, as it is specially indicated in purifying fumes coming from ceramic firing kilns. (authors)

  20. Wood Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about wood dust, which can raise the risk of cancers of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. High amounts of wood dust are produced in sawmills, and in the furniture-making, cabinet-making, and carpentry industries.

  1. Multifrequency techniques for studying interplanetary scintillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, R.

    1975-01-01

    Rytov's approximation or the method of smooth perturbations is utilized to derive the temporal frequency spectra of the amplitude and phase fluctuations of multifrequency plane and spherical waves propagating in the interplanetary medium and solar corona. It is shown that multifrequency observations of interplanetary scintillations using either compact radio stars or spacecraft radio signals are desirable because the correlation of the multifrequency waves yields additional independent measurements of the solar wind and turbulence. Measurements of phase fluctuations are also desirable because, unlike amplitude fluctuations, they provide information on the full range of scale sizes for the electron density fluctuations. It is shown that a coherent dual-frequency radio system is particularly useful in making such measurements. In addition to providing a means for interpreting observations of multifrequency interplanetary scintillations, the analysis is also essential for estimating the effects of solar corona turbulence on the communications and navigation of a spacecraft whose line-of-sight path passes close to the Sun

  2. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field

  3. International Launch Vehicle Selection for Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Kristine; Nguyen, Lori T.

    2010-01-01

    In developing a mission strategy for interplanetary travel, the first step is to consider launch capabilities which provide the basis for fundamental parameters of the mission. This investigation focuses on the numerous launch vehicles of various characteristics available and in development internationally with respect to upmass, launch site, payload shroud size, fuel type, cost, and launch frequency. This presentation will describe launch vehicles available and in development worldwide, then carefully detail a selection process for choosing appropriate vehicles for interplanetary missions focusing on international collaboration, risk management, and minimization of cost. The vehicles that fit the established criteria will be discussed in detail with emphasis on the specifications and limitations related to interplanetary travel. The final menu of options will include recommendations for overall mission design and strategy.

  4. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  5. Interplanetary Space Weather and Its Planetary Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Norma; Bothmer, Volker; Facius, Rainer; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Moussas, Xenophon; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Romanova, Natalia; Withers, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Interplanetary travel is not just a science fiction scenario anymore, but a goal as realistic as when our ancestors started to cross the oceans. With curiosity driving humans to visit other planets in our solar system, the understanding of interplanetary space weather is a vital subject today, particularly because the physical conditions faced during a space vehicle's transit to its targeted solar system object are crucial to a mission's success and vital to the health and safety of spacecraft crew, especially when scheduling planned extravehicular activities.

  6. Evolution of coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided the detailed information necessary for a substantive synthesis of the empirical relation between the magnetic field of the sun and the structure of the interplanetary field. The author points out the latest techniques and studies of the global solar magnetic field and its relation to the interplanetary field. The potential to overcome most of the limitations of present methods of analysis exists in techniques of modelling the coronal magnetic field using observed solar data. Such empirical models are, in principle, capable of establishing the connection between a given heliospheric point and its magnetically-connected photospheric point, as well as the physical basis for the connection. (Auth.)

  7. The microphysics of the Saharan dust and its implications on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalu, A.E.

    1987-12-01

    A strong influence of Saharan dust plumes on the microphysics of cumulus clouds, especially along their long-distance transport trajectories into cloudy regions of the world, has been discussed and illustrated. This climate-related influence is primarily based on the observed anhydrous non-hygroscopic property of the Saharan dust, otherwise known as the Harmattan dust haze in Nigeria. An observational feature of the dust-cloud interaction which is strongly climate-related is the rapid clearance of cumulus clouds on arrival of a dust plume. This is because aeolian dust particles and water droplets cannot coexist comfortably. A useful practical application of this influence of the dust on clouds by means of atmospheric teleconnection principles for fine-weather prediction in cloudy remote regions seasonally affected by dust plumes from the Sahara, has therefore been suggested. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs, 3 plates

  8. Raising Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    21 December 2003Dust storms are a common occurrence on the extremely arid planet, Mars. However, very rarely do we get to see the actual process of dust being lifted off the martian surface to feed these dust storms. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image captures some of the dust-raising process in action. The picture shows a shallow trough with large, ripple-like dunes on its floor. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. Puffy, billowy clouds of dust obscure some of the surface from view. Closer inspection shows streamers of dust, streaking from left/upper left toward right/lower right, down near the surface of the planet. It is in these streamers that dust is being lifted from the ground. This image is located near 29.6oS, 73.1oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. Relationship between Interplanetary (IP) Parameters and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In the present study, we investigate the possible relationship of IP parameters of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field with ground-based geomagnetic indices. To carry out the study, we take all the IP shock events listed by Proton Monitor onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) during ...

  10. Relationship between Interplanetary (IP) Parameters and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3SITAA-SAC, Indian Space Research Organisation, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 380 015, India. 4Indian Space Research Organisation-Head Quarters, Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Abstract. In the present study, .... Lepping, R. P., Jones, J. A., Burlaga, L. F. 1990, Magnetic field structure of Interplanetary. Magnetic Clouds at 1 A.U; ...

  11. Geomagnetic response to solar and interplanetary disturbances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.; Cid, C.; Dobrica, V.; Hejda, Pavel; Nenovski, P.; Stauning, P.; Bochníček, Josef; Danov, D.; Demetrescu, C.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Maris, G.; Teodosiev, D.; Valach, F.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, July (2013), A26/1-A26/20 ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : solar activity * interplanetary medium * indices * ionosphere (general) * ring current Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013

  12. Relationship between Interplanetary (IP) Parameters and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An active Sun spews out concentrated particle and field energy into interplanetary space (IP), and manifestations of these have been studied by many researchers (to mention a few,. Cargill 2000; Lepping et al. 1990; Gopalswamy et al. 2004; Bothmer & Schwenn. 1998). Propagation of these emissions through IP space and ...

  13. Dynamic Model Development for Interplanetary Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Seo Park

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic model development for interplanetary navigation has been discussed. The Cowell method for special perturbation theories was employed to develop an interplanetary trajectory propagator including the perturbations due to geopotential, the Earth's dynamic polar motion, the gravity of the Sun, the Moon and the other planets in the solar system, the relativistic effect of the Sun, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag. The equations of motion in dynamic model were numerically integrated using Adams-Cowell 11th order predictor-corrector method. To compare the influences of each perturbation, trajectory propagation was performed using initial transfer orbit elements of the Mars Express mission launched in 2003, because it can be the criterion to choose proper perturbation models for navigation upon required accuracy. To investigate the performance of dynamic model developed, it was tested whether the spacecraft can reach the Mars. The interplanetary navigation tool developed in this study demonstrated the spacecraft entering the Mars SOI(Sphere of Influence and its velocity relative to the Mars was less than the escape velocity of the Mars, hence, the spacecraft can arrive at the target planet. The obtained results were also verified by using the AGI Satellite Tool Kit. It is concluded that the developed program is suitable for supporting interplanetary spacecraft mission for a future Korean Mars mission.

  14. Solar and Interplanetary Disturbances causing Moderate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Keywords. Solar flares; active prominences and disappearing filaments; sunspot numbers; geomagnetic storms. Abstract. The effect of solar and interplanetary disturbances on geomagnetospheric conditions leading to 121 moderate geomagnetic storms (MGS) have been investigated using the neutron ...

  15. Crystallo-chemistry of boric anhydride and of anhydrous borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, Jacques

    1968-01-01

    After an overview of various aspects related to the atomic structure of boron and of its three-bind and four-bind compounds, this report briefly presents the different forms of boric anhydride (in solid, liquid, glassy and gaseous state), presents and comments the structure of these different forms, and addresses the molten boric anhydride which is used as oxide solvent. The next part addresses the structure of anhydrous borates. It presents some generalities on their structure, and describes examples of known structures: dimers, trimers, polymers with a degree higher than three like calcium metaborate, caesium tri-borate, lithium tetraborate, or potassium pentaborate

  16. Thermal decomposition of anhydrous zinc and cadmium salicylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.; Tujebakhova, Z.K.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of studying thermograms, thermogravigrams, IR absorption spectra, X-rayograms of anhydrous znc and cadmium salicylate complexes of the M(HSal) 2 composition, (where M=Zn, Cd; HSal is an anion of once deprotonated salicyclic acid H 2 Sal) and products of their thermal transformations, the processes are characterized of stage-by-stage thermal decomposition of these compounds under continuous heating in the air from room temperature to approximately 1000 deg C. It is shown that the Cd(HSal) 2 pyrolysis proceeds with the formation of CdSal at 170-250 deg C and CdO - at 320-460 deg C

  17. A New Thickener for CO2 Anhydrous Fracturing Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 dry fracturing technology is well-known for its advantages. Little water is used in this technology, which is able to ease the pressure of consumption on water resources. Many abroad theoretical researches, laboratory experiments and field tests have been taken to explore the yield mechanism, the adaptability and the technology of pure liquid CO2 fracturing. These achievements have been applied to a variety of reservoirs transformation and improven the effectiveness of stimulation treatment in a degree. The researches and studies in the domestic didn’t get popular until recent years. Thus, this article firstly introduces the main development and application about pure CO2 anhydrous fracturing technology, and sums up the effect and evaluation of its fluid through application examples both in the domestic and abroad. However, although this technology has many excellent qualities, but systematic studies indicate that its proppant-carrying capacity is less competitive because of the low viscosity of pure CO2 liquid and other reasons. In a consequence, it is necessary to develop an appropriate thickener for CO2 anhydrous fracturing fluid to improve its carrying capacity. Then this article describes some studies of previous scholars about CO2 thickener. Then we put forward our own research ideas and transform it into actual experiments. Thanks to the valid performances of these tests, we successfully develop a thickener X and cosolvent B.

  18. Estimation of micrometeorites and satellite dust flux surrounding Mars in the light of MAVEN results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, J. P.; Bhalodi, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, MAVEN observed dust around Mars from ∼150 km to ∼1000 km and it is a puzzling question to the space scientists about the presence of dust at orbital altitudes and about its source. A continuous supply of dust from various sources could cause existence of dust around Mars and it is expected that the dust could mainly be from either the interplanetary source or the Phobos/Deimos. We have studied incident projectiles or micrometeorites at Mars using the existing model, in this article. Comparison of results with the MAVEN results gives a new value of the population index S, which is reported here. The index S has been referred in a power law model used to describe the number of impacting particles on Mars. In addition, the secondary ejecta from natural satellites of Mars can cause a dust ring or torus around Mars and remain present for its lifetime. The dust particles whose paths are altered by the solar wind over its lifetime, could present a second plausible source of dust around Mars. We have investigated escaping particles from natural satellites of Mars and compared with the interplanetary dust flux estimation. It has been found that flux rate at Mars is dominated (∼2 orders of magnitude higher) by interplanetary particles in comparison with the satellite originated dust. It is inferred that the dust at high altitudes of Mars could be interplanetary in nature and our expectation is in agreement with the MAVEN observation. As a corollary, the mass loss from Martian natural satellites is computed based on the surface erosion by incident projectiles.

  19. 75 FR 61626 - Hours of Service; Limited Exemption for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... No. FMCSA-2010-0230] Hours of Service; Limited Exemption for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in... ammonia from any distribution point to a local farm retailer or to the ultimate consumer, and from a local... anhydrous ammonia during the planting and harvesting seasons, as defined by the States in which the carriers...

  20. 75 FR 40765 - Hours of Service; Limited Exemption for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... No. FMCSA-2010-0230] Hours of Service; Limited Exemption for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in... ammonia from any distribution point to a local farm retailer or to the ultimate consumer, and from a local... anhydrous ammonia during the planting and harvesting seasons, as defined by the States in which the carriers...

  1. Reference Design for a Simple, Durable and Refuelable Interplanetary Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, B. S.; Tolley, A. M.

    This article describes a reference design for interplanetary vessels, composed mostly of water, that utilize simplified RF engines for low thrust, long duration propulsion, and hydrogen peroxide for short duration, high thrust burns. The electrothermal engines are designed to heat a wide range of liquid materials, possibly also milled solids or surface dusts. The system emphasizes simple components and processes based on older technologies, many well known since the 1960s, that are understandable, can process a variety of materials, and are easily serviced in flight. The goal is to radically simplify systems and their inter-dependencies, to a point where a reasonably skilled person can learn to operate these vessels, not unlike a sailboat, and to eliminate many design and testing bottlenecks in their construction. The use of water, or hydrogen peroxide generated in situ from that water, is multiply advantageous because it can be used for structure, consumption, irrigation, radiation and debris shielding, and thermal regulation, and thus greatly reduce dead weight by creating an almost fully consumable ship. This also enables the ship to utilize a wide range of in situ materials, and eventually obtain reaction mass from lower gravity sites. The ability to switch between low thrust, constant power and high thrust, short duration maneuvers will enable these ships to travel freely and reach many interesting destinations throughout the solar system. One can think of them as “spacecoaches”, not unlike the prairie schooners of the Old West, which were rugged, serviceable by tradesmen, and easily maintained.

  2. Software Risk Identification for Interplanetary Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Robert J.; Papadopoulos, Periklis E.

    2005-01-01

    The need for a systematic and effective software risk identification methodology is critical for interplanetary probes that are using increasingly complex and critical software. Several probe failures are examined that suggest more attention and resources need to be dedicated to identifying software risks. The direct causes of these failures can often be traced to systemic problems in all phases of the software engineering process. These failures have lead to the development of a practical methodology to identify risks for interplanetary probes. The proposed methodology is based upon the tailoring of the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) method of taxonomy-based risk identification. The use of this methodology will ensure a more consistent and complete identification of software risks in these probes.

  3. Interplanetary Alfvenic fluctuations: A stochastic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, A.

    1981-01-01

    The strong alignment of the average directions of minimum magnetic variance and mean magnetic field in interplanetary Alfvenic fluctuations is inconsistent with the usual wave-propagation models. We investigate the concept of minimum variance for nonplanar Alfvenic fluctuations in which the field direction varies stochastically. It is found that the tendency of the minimum variance and mean field directions to be aligned may be purely a consequence of the randomness of the field direction. In particular, a well-defined direction of minimum variance does not imply that the fluctuations are necessarily planar. The fluctuation power spectrum is a power law for frequencies much higher than the inverse of the correlation time. The probability distribution of directions a randomly fluctuating field of constant magnitude is calculated. A new approach for observational studies of interplanetary fluctuations is suggested

  4. Multifrequency techniques for studying interplanetary scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, R.

    1975-01-01

    Rytov's approximation, or the method of smooth perturbations, is utilized to derive the temporal frequency spectra of the amplitude and phase fluctuations of multifrequency plane and spherical waves propagating in the interplanetary medium and solar corona. It is shown that multifrequency observations of interplanetary scintillations using either compact radio stars of spacecraft radio signals are desirable because the correlation of the multifrequency waves yields additional independent measurements of the solar wind and turbulence. Measurements of phase fluctuations are also desirable because, unlike amplitude fluctuations, they provide information on the full range of scale sizes for the electron-density fluctuations. It is also shown that a coherent dual-frequency radio system is particularly useful in making such measurements. In addition to providing a means for interpreting observations of multifrequency interplanetary scintillations, the present analysis is essential for estimating the effects of solar corona turbulence on the communications and navigation of a spacecraft whose line-of-sight path passes close to the sun.

  5. Modelling interplanetary CMEs using magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    Full Text Available The dynamics of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs are discussed from the viewpoint of numerical modelling. Hydrodynamic models are shown to give a good zero-order picture of the plasma properties of ICMEs, but they cannot model the important magnetic field effects. Results from MHD simulations are shown for a number of cases of interest. It is demonstrated that the strong interaction of the ICME with the solar wind leads to the ICME and solar wind velocities being close to each other at 1 AU, despite their having very different speeds near the Sun. It is also pointed out that this interaction leads to a distortion of the ICME geometry, making cylindrical symmetry a dubious assumption for the CME field at 1 AU. In the presence of a significant solar wind magnetic field, the magnetic fields of the ICME and solar wind can reconnect with each other, leading to an ICME that has solar wind-like field lines. This effect is especially important when an ICME with the right sense of rotation propagates down the heliospheric current sheet. It is also noted that a lack of knowledge of the coronal magnetic field makes such simulations of little use in space weather forecasts that require knowledge of the ICME magnetic field strength.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (interplanetary magnetic fields Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (flares and mass ejections Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  6. Investigations of Wind/WAVES Dust Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Wilson, L. B., III; Rockcliffe, K.; Mills, A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Adrian, M. L.; Malaspina, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Wind spacecraft launched in November 1994 with a primary goal to observe and understand the interaction between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. The waveform capture detector, TDS, of the radio and plasma wave investigation, WAVES [Bougeret et al., 1995], onboard Wind incidentally detected micron-sized dust as electric field pulses from the recollection of the impact plasma clouds (an unintended objective). TDS has detected over 100,000 dust impacts spanning almost two solar cycles; a dataset of these impacts has been created and was described in Malaspina & Wilson [2016]. The spacecraft continues to collect data about plasma, energetic particles, and interplanetary dust impacts. Here we report on two investigations recently conducted on the Wind/WAVES TDS database of dust impacts. One possible source of dust particles is the annually-recurring meteor showers. Using the nine major showers defined by the American Meteor Society, we compared dust count rates before, during, and after the peak of the showers using averaging windows of varying duration. However, we found no statistically significant change in the dust count rates due to major meteor showers. This appears to be an expected result since smaller grains, like the micron particles that Wind is sensitive to, are affected by electromagnetic interactions and Poynting-Robertson drag, and so are scattered away from their initial orbits. Larger grains tend to be more gravitationally dominated and stay on the initial trajectory of the parent body so that only the largest dust grains (those that create streaks as they burn up in the atmosphere) are left in the orbit of the parent body. Ragot and Kahler [2003] predicted that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Sun could effectively scatter dust grains of comparable size to those observed by Wind. Thus, we examined the dust count rates immediately before, during, and after the passage of the 350 interplanetary CMEs observed by Wind over its 20+ year

  7. Anhydrous proton conductor based on composites of PEO and ATMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baoying [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Qiu Xinping, E-mail: qiuxp@tsinghua.edu.c [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhu Wentao [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-04-15

    A new type anhydrous PEM material based on Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO)/Amino Trimethylene Phosphonic Acid (ATMP) composite was prepared. In this study, PEO assumed to 'grab' protons via hydrogen bond between PEO and ATMP. Based on this point, the PEO/ATMP composites were prepared firstly as the preliminary study to verify this proton conducting system. Then, PVDF was added to enhance the membrane's stability. The PVDF/PEO/ATMP composite membranes were thermally stable up to 200 {sup o}C in the studied composition ranges. The membrane had relatively compact structure by SEM images. Proton conductivity of 59% PVDF/29% PEO/12% ATMP was up to 6.71 x 10 {sup -3} S cm{sup -1} at 86 {sup o}C after doping with 7.9 wt% phosphoric acid without extra humidification.

  8. Anhydrous proton conductor based on composites of PEO and ATMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Baoying; Qiu Xinping; Zhu Wentao

    2011-01-01

    A new type anhydrous PEM material based on Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO)/Amino Trimethylene Phosphonic Acid (ATMP) composite was prepared. In this study, PEO assumed to 'grab' protons via hydrogen bond between PEO and ATMP. Based on this point, the PEO/ATMP composites were prepared firstly as the preliminary study to verify this proton conducting system. Then, PVDF was added to enhance the membrane's stability. The PVDF/PEO/ATMP composite membranes were thermally stable up to 200 o C in the studied composition ranges. The membrane had relatively compact structure by SEM images. Proton conductivity of 59% PVDF/29% PEO/12% ATMP was up to 6.71 x 10 -3 S cm -1 at 86 o C after doping with 7.9 wt% phosphoric acid without extra humidification.

  9. 75 FR 13441 - Hours of Service; Limited 90-Day Waiver for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Service; Limited 90-Day Waiver for the Distribution of Anhydrous Ammonia in Agricultural Operations AGENCY... anhydrous ammonia from any distribution point to a local farm retailer or to the ultimate consumer, and from... anhydrous ammonia during the 2010 spring planting season. The Agency has determined that the waiver would...

  10. Status of the Stardust ISPE and the Origin of Four Interstellar Dust Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Ansari, A.; Bajt, S.; Bastien, R. S.; Bassim, N.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F. E.; Bridges, J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Some bulk properties of interstellar dust are known through infrared and X-ray observations of the interstellar medium. However, the properties of individual interstellar dust particles are largely unconstrained, so it is not known whether individual interstellar dust particles can be definitively distinguished from interplanetary dust particles in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) based only on chemical, mineralogical or isotopic analyses. It was therefore understood from the beginning of the Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) that identification of interstellar dust candidates would rest on three criteria - broad consistency with known extraterrestrial materials, inconsistency with an origin as secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft, and consistency, in a statistical sense, of observed dynamical properties - that is, trajectory and capture speed - with an origin in the interstellar dust stream. Here we quantitatively test four interstellar dust candidates, reported previously [1], against these criteria.

  11. Dust trajectory sensor: accuracy and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J; Sternovsky, Z; Grün, E; Auer, S; Duncan, N; Drake, K; Le, H; Horanyi, M; Srama, R

    2011-10-01

    The Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS) instrument is developed for the measurement of the velocity vector of cosmic dust particles. The trajectory information is imperative in determining the particles' origin and distinguishing dust particles from different sources. The velocity vector also reveals information on the history of interaction between the charged dust particle and the magnetospheric or interplanetary space environment. The DTS operational principle is based on measuring the induced charge from the dust on an array of wire electrodes. In recent work, the DTS geometry has been optimized [S. Auer, E. Grün, S. Kempf, R. Srama, A. Srowig, Z. Sternovsky, and V Tschernjawski, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501 (2008)] and a method of triggering was developed [S. Auer, G. Lawrence, E. Grün, H. Henkel, S. Kempf, R. Srama, and Z. Sternovsky, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 622, 74 (2010)]. This article presents the method of analyzing the DTS data and results from a parametric study on the accuracy of the measurements. A laboratory version of the DTS has been constructed and tested with particles in the velocity range of 2-5 km/s using the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility. Both the numerical study and the analyzed experimental data show that the accuracy of the DTS instrument is better than about 1% in velocity and 1° in direction.

  12. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and Stardust@home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Bastien, R.; Butterworth, A.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Kelley, N.; Lettieri, R.; Mendez, B.; Prasad, R.; Tsitrin, S.; von Korff, J.; Warren, J.; Wertheimer, D.; Zhang, A.; Zolensky, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Stardust sample return mission is effectively two missions in one. Stardust brought back to earth for analytical study the first solid samples from a known solar system body beyond the moon, comet Wild2. The first results of the analyses of these samples are reported elsewhere in this session. In a separate aerogel collector, Stardust also captured and has returned the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Landgraf et al. [1] has estimated that ~ 50 interstellar dust particles in the micron size range have been captured in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Their state after capture is unknown. Before analysis of these particles can begin, they must be located in the collector. Here we describe the current status of Stardust@home, the massively distributed public search for these tiny interstellar dust particles. So far more than 13,000 volunteers have collectively performed more than 10,000,000 searches in stacks of digital images of ~10% of the collector. We report new estimates of the flux of interplanetary dust at ~2 AU based on the results of this search, and will compare with extant models[2]. References: [1] Landgraf et al., (1999) Planet. Spac. Sci. 47, 1029. [2] Staubach et al. (2001) in Interplanetary Dust, E. Grün, ed., Astron. &Astro. Library, Springer, 2001.

  13. The near-Earth and interplanetary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'pert, Y.L.

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is an extensive revision and expansion of the original paper which first appeared in 1976 in the encyclopedia, Handbuch der Physik. It presents a detailed and comprehensive treatment of wave processes and of the motion of bodies through plasma around moving bodies such as artificial satellites, and with natural plasma waves and oscillations. Contents, abridged: General properties of the near-Earth and interplanetary plasma. Refractive indexes of cold magnetoplasma. Growth rates for the different oscillation branches. Nonlinear effects in a plasma. Group velocity, trajectories, and trapping of electromagnetic waves in a magnetoplasma. Indexes

  14. Radio emission from coronal and interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cane, H.V.

    1987-01-01

    Observational data on coronal and interplanetary (IP) type II burst events associated with shock-wave propagation are reviewed, with a focus on the past and potential future contributions of space-based observatories. The evidence presented by Cane (1983 and 1984) in support of the hypothesis that the coronal (metric) and IP (kilometric) bursts are due to different shocks is summarized, and the fast-drift kilometric events seen at the same time as metric type II bursts (and designated shock-accelerated or shock-associated events) are characterized. The need for further observations at 0.5-20 MHz is indicated. 20 references

  15. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  16. Anhydrous proton conductivity of acid doped vinyltriazole-based polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, Hongting; Ye, Sheng; Wan, Decheng

    2007-01-01

    Poly(1,2,4-vinyltriazole) (PVTr) and poly(1,2,4-vinyltriazole-co-5-vinyltetrazole-co-acrylonitrile) (P(VTr-VT-AN)) were prepared by normal free radical polymerization and click chemistry, respectively. The structure of the polymers was characterized by FTIR spectra, H NMR spectrum and elemental analysis. Compared with polybenzimidazole (PBI) which is one of the most widely studied anhydrous proton conducting polymers, the solubility of vinyltriazole-based polymers is improved significantly. They are soluble in a lot of polar solvents. The glass-transition temperatures of such kind of polymers are between 70 and 85 o C, thus indirectly indicating the improvement of fabricating properties. In phosphoric acid doped membranes, the higher the basicity of the vinyltriazole-based polymers is, the higher the proton conductivity is. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of the acid doped membranes can always be fitted by a simple Arrhenius equation. Transmittance of phosphoric acid doped vinyltriazole-based polymers is above 80% in the range of visual spectra and changes a little with the different structure and basicity of the copolymers

  17. Interaction of alcohols with the anhydrous silico-12-molybdic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, I.N.; Chuvaev, V.F.; Ovchinnikova, N.S.; Zhuravlev, L.T.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made on interaction of methanol, ethanol and isopropanol with silico-12-molybdic acid (H 4 SiMo 12 O 40 (SMA). It was revealed that anhydrous SMA at room temperature adds a sufficient amount of alcohol from gaseous phase with formation of solvates of the following compositions: H 4 SiMo 12 O 40 x3CH 3 OH, H 4 SiMo 12 O 40 x5C 2 H 5 OH and H 4 SiMo 12 O 40 x3C 3 H 7 OH. Thermal decomposition of SMA solvates was studied and the mechanism of solid-phase heteropolyacid interaction with alcohols was suggested. Temperature ranges of separate catalytic and redox processes were established. Specificity of activity and peculiarities of heteropolyacid transformation in the course of reaction were investigated. It was shown that formation of deprotonated phases of SiMosub(12)Osub(38-y/2) or Csub(n)SiMosub(12)Osub(38-x) type during SMA interaction with alcohol can't be probably reduced to the simple succession of reduction and dehydration reactions

  18. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous intake during creatine loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T.; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Roelofs, Erica J.; Hirsch, Katie R.; Persky, Adam M.; Mock, Meredith G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 5 d of creatine (CRE) loading alone or in combination with caffeine anhydrous (CAF) or coffee (COF) on upper and lower body strength and sprint performance. Physically active males (n=54; Mean ± SD; Age = 20.1 ± 2.1 yrs; Weight = 78.8 ± 8.8 kg) completed baseline testing, consisting of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) with 80% 1RM for bench press (BP) and leg press (LP), followed by a repeated sprint test of five, 10 s sprints separated by 60 s rest on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power (PP) and total power (TP). At least 72 hr later, subjects were randomly assigned to supplement with CRE (5 g creatine monohydrate, 4 times*d−1; n=14), CRE+CAF (CRE + 300 mg*d−1 of CAF; n=13), CRE+COF (CRE + 8.9 g COF, yielding 303 mg caffeine; n=13), or placebo (PLA; n=14) for 5 d. Serum creatinine (CRN) was measured prior to and following supplementation and on day six, participants repeated pre-testing procedures. Strength measures were improved in all groups (pperformance compared to PLA. PMID:26439785

  19. Tomography of the Solar Wind using Interplanetary Scintillation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Tomography—solar wind—interplanetary scintillation. Extended abstract. Interplanetary ... properties of solar wind (SW) along the line of sight (los) to a distant compact radio source. Mapping a los back to ... power spectra of intensity fluctuations, the primary IPS observable, constructed using the distribution of properties of ...

  20. Evolution and interaction of large interplanetary streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, Y.C.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1985-02-01

    A computer simulation for the evolution and interaction of large interplanetary streams based on multi-spacecraft observations and an unsteady, one-dimensional MHD model is presented. Two events, each observed by two or more spacecraft separated by a distance of the order of 10 AU, were studied. The first simulation is based on the plasma and magnetic field observations made by two radially-aligned spacecraft. The second simulation is based on an event observed first by Helios-1 in May 1980 near 0.6 AU and later by Voyager-1 in June 1980 at 8.1 AU. These examples show that the dynamical evolution of large-scale solar wind structures is dominated by the shock process, including the formation, collision, and merging of shocks. The interaction of shocks with stream structures also causes a drastic decrease in the amplitude of the solar wind speed variation with increasing heliocentric distance, and as a result of interactions there is a large variation of shock-strengths and shock-speeds. The simulation results shed light on the interpretation for the interaction and evolution of large interplanetary streams. Observations were made along a few limited trajectories, but simulation results can supplement these by providing the detailed evolution process for large-scale solar wind structures in the vast region not directly observed. The use of a quantitative nonlinear simulation model including shock merging process is crucial in the interpretation of data obtained in the outer heliosphere

  1. Dehydration Behaviour of Borax Pentahydrate to Anhydrous Borax by Multi-Stage Heating in a Fluidized

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, Ömer

    2002-01-01

    In order to optimize the anhydrous borax process in a fluidized bed calcinator, it is absolutely necessary to study the dehydration behaviour of borax pentahydrate. It was found that the basic feature of the dehydration of borax pentahydrate to anhydrous borax is concerned with the conditions employed. The bulk density and sodium borate content of the end product were determined to be a function of number of stages of temperature of the dehydration period in the fluidized bed. It...

  2. Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature by o-aminophenol-based photocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Wakizaka, Masanori; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Chang, Ho-Chol

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol is of great importance, given its ubiquity as an intermediate for the production of a large number of industrial chemicals. Since dehydrogenation of methanol is an endothermic reaction, heterogeneous or homogeneous precious-metal-based catalysts and high temperatures are usually required for this reaction to proceed. Here we report the photochemical dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature catalysed by o-aminophenol (apH2), o-aminophenola...

  3. Study of alkaline-earth element complexes in anhydrous acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, N.

    1968-10-01

    We have studied the complexes of alkaline-earth elements in anhydrous acetic acid. Using glass-electrode potentiometry we have studied the titration of alkaline earth acetates with perchloric acid which is the strongest acid in anhydrous acetic acid. These titrations have shown that the basic strength of these acetates increases as follows: Mg 4 ); the mixed acetate-acid sulfate complex of barium: Ba (OAc)(HSO 4 ); the mixed acetate-chloride of barium: Ba (OAc)(Cl). (author) [fr

  4. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nickelous-iron in conditions of the rarefied interplanetary environment, as a result of ... the subject of different interactions, micro- and macro-phenomena. .... macrophenomenon. We assume that the sunlight passing through the nano-dust com- plex is scattered. Thus, a conditional observer, if staying on the surface of one of ...

  5. Trailblazing Medicine Sustaining Explorers During Interplanetary Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2011-01-01

    To prepare for the day when astronauts leave low-Earth orbit for long-duration exploration missions, space medicine experts must develop a thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on the human body, as well as ways of mitigating them. To gain a complete understanding of the effects of space on the human body and to create tools and technologies required for successful exploration, space medicince will become an increasingly collaborative discipline incorporating the skills of physicians, biomedical scientists, engineers, and mission planners. Trailblazing Medicine examines the future of space medicine in relation to human space exploration; describes what is necessary to keep a crew alive in space, including the use of surgical robots, surface-based telemedicine, and remote emergency care; discusses bioethical problems such as euthanasia, sex, and precautionary surgery; investigates the medical challenges faced by interplanetary astronauts; details the process of human hibernation.

  6. Magnetospheric and interplanetary physics 1979-1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Major trends in the study of magnetospheric and interplanetary physics during the 1979-1982 period are surveyed. Topics discussed include the exploration of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres by Voyagers 1 and 2, the behavior of different ions in the earth magnetosphere, auroral kilometric radiation, computer modeling of global magnetospheric MHD flow, the magnetic substorm, the quiet state, the earth's bow shock, the heliospheric current sheet, and new techniques such as electron beam experiments, 'active' injection experiments, auroral radars, and observations of the earth's distant magnetic tail. The future of this area of research is seen in the combination of data from different spacecraft and ground observations in a single correlated data set, and in the consolidation of past gains by analysis of the large data backlog, while a small number of new missions goes forward.

  7. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm -1 , which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  8. Physical Characteristics of Coronal Region Driving Out the Interplanetary Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon Oh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the solar wind data of 2000 observed by ACE, We classified the interplanetary shock on basis of shock driver. We examined the physical properties of shock drivers such as the ratio of charge states(O7/O6 and thermal index(I_{th}. Most of 51 interplanetary shocks are driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections(ICME; magnetic cloud and ejecta and high speed streams. According to the test of temperature(O7/O6 and I_{th}, we found that ICMEs originated from region with hot source in corona.

  9. Transient Density Enhancements of the Martian Orbiting Dust Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, A.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The moons Phobos and Deimos have been suggested to be responsible for sustaining a permanently present dust cloud around Mars. The equilibrium size and spatial distribution of this dust torus has been the subject of numerous theoretical studies. However, no observational evidence has been found as of yet. Because of the renewed interest in Phobos and Deimos as potential targets for human precursor mission to Mars, there is a new opportunity for the detection of the putative Martian dust clouds using in situ measurements. Both Phobos and Deimos, as all airless bodies in the solar system, are continually bombarded by interplanetary dust grains, generating secondary ejecta particles. The surface gravity escape of these objects are low, hence most secondary particles escapethem, but remain in orbit about Mars. Subsequent perturbations by solar radiation pressure, electromagnetic forces acting on charged grains, and collisions with the moons or Mars itself limit the lifetime of the produced particles. The size dependent production rates and lifetimes set the most abundant particle size range of 10 - 30 micron in radius. Large, but short-lived, dust density enhancements can be predicted during periods of meteor showers. Also, comet Siding Spring will flyby Mars in October, 2014. Its dust tail can 'sand-blast' both Phobos and Deimos, dramatically increasing their dust production for a few hours. We present the results of our numerical studies on the temporal and spatial evolution of the dust clouds raised during highly enhanced production rates that last only hours-to-days.

  10. Hypervelocity Dust Impacts in Space and the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) Team

    2013-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles continually bombard all objects in the solar system, leading to the excavation of material from the target surfaces, the production of secondary ejecta particles, plasma, neutral gas, and electromagnetic radiation. These processes are of interest to basic plasma science, planetary and space physics, and engineering to protect humans and instruments against impact damages. The Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) has recently completed a 3 MV dust accelerator, and this talk will summarize our initial science results. The 3 MV Pelletron contains a dust source, feeding positively charged micron and sub-micron sized particles into the accelerator. We will present the technical details of the facility and its capabilities, as well as the results of our initial experiments for damage assessment of optical devices, and penetration studies of thin films. We will also report on the completion of our dust impact detector, the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), is expected to be flying onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission by the time of this presentation. LDEX was tested, and calibrated at our dust accelerator. We will close by offering the opportunity to use this facility by the planetary, space and plasma physics communities.

  11. Synthesis of fertilizers nitrogen and 15N-enriched. Pt. I. Production of enriched 15N-anhydrous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendassolli, J.A.; Mortatti, J.; Trivelin, P.C.O.; Victoria, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The results of 15 N-anhydrous ammonia production through reaction between 15 N-enriched ammonium sulphate and sodium hidroxide are reported. Influence of the reaction temperature, carrier gas flow, reaction time and mass of ammonium sulphate on the production of anhydrous ammonia were studied. Analyses for the cost of production of 5% atoms in 15 N-enriched anhydrous ammonia were made. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion Systemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Wen Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w or water-in-oil (w/o systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future.

  13. Study on the Stability of DeoxyArbutin in an Anhydrous Emulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chien; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Chang, Nai-Fang; Wu, Pey-Shiuan; Chen, Yi-Shyan; Lee, Shu-Mei; Chen, Chiu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The skin-whitening agent, deoxyArbutin, is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor that is safer than hydroquinone and arbutin. However, it is thermolabile in aqueous solutions, where it decomposes to hydroquinone. Pharmaceutical and cosmetic emulsions are normally oil-in-water (o/w) or water-in-oil (w/o) systems; however, emulsions can be formulated with no aqueous phase to produce an anhydrous emulsion system. An anhydrous emulsion system could offer a stable vehicle for compounds that are sensitive to hydrolysis or oxidation. Therefore, to enhance the stability of deoxyArbutin in formulations, we chose the polyol-in-silicone, anhydrous emulsion system as the basic formulation for investigation. The quantity of deoxyArbutin and the accumulation of hydroquinone in both hydrous and anhydrous emulsions at various temperatures were analyzed through an established high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. The results indicated that water increased the decomposition of deoxyArbutin in the formulations and that the polyol-in-silicone, oil-based, anhydrous emulsion system provided a relatively stable surrounding for the deoxyArbutin that delayed its degradation at 25 °C and 45 °C. Moreover, the composition of the inner hydrophilic phase, containing different amounts of glycerin and propylene glycol, affected the stability of deoxyArbutin. Thus, these results will be beneficial when using deoxyArbutin in cosmetics and medicines in the future. PMID:22016637

  14. Multi-Purpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altius Space Machines and MSNW LLC propose the development of a cubesat-scale Multipurpose Interplanetary Deployable Aerocapture System (MIDAS), to provide cubesats...

  15. Fast, Autonomous Chemical Interplanetary Mission Design via Hybrid Optimal Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interplanetary mission design is historically a complex and expensive process requiring many human-hours of work. This proposal outlines a novel technique for...

  16. Radar Characterization of the Interplanetary Meteoroid Environment, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new modeling effort that will make substantial refinements and improvements to our existing models of the interplanetary meteoroid environment near...

  17. Optimizing Materials for Energy Harvesting on Interplanetary Return Missions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Manned interplanetary missions will only be desirable once the ability to return is established. Even using improved fuel technologies we have not resourced the fuel...

  18. Machine learning and evolutionary techniques in interplanetary trajectory design

    OpenAIRE

    Izzo, Dario; Sprague, Christopher; Tailor, Dharmesh

    2018-01-01

    After providing a brief historical overview on the synergies between artificial intelligence research, in the areas of evolutionary computations and machine learning, and the optimal design of interplanetary trajectories, we propose and study the use of deep artificial neural networks to represent, on-board, the optimal guidance profile of an interplanetary mission. The results, limited to the chosen test case of an Earth-Mars orbital transfer, extend the findings made previously for landing ...

  19. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs

  20. Interplanetary shock induced ring current auroras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongliang; Paxton, Larry J.; Zheng, Yihua

    2008-01-01

    On 21 January 2005, a fast interplanetary (IP) shock compressed the magnetosphere and caused detached auroras (DA) on the dayside, duskside and nightside ionosphere. The DA were detected by three independent FUV instruments: IMAGE/SI-12, TIMED/GUVI and DMSP/SSUSI. The SI-12 observations show that the dayside detached aurora (DDA) was located between 60° and 68° Mlat and between 06:00 and 15:00 MLT. It lasted for only ˜2 min. Coincident in situ Polar measurements show that sudden bursts of proton EMIC waves (˜2 min) were associated with the DDA. This provides direct evidence of the link between the EMIC waves and the DDA. The DA in the duskside and nightside appeared once the DDA disappeared. GUVI and SSUSI also observed the DA in the duskside and dayside with more details. Ring current simulations show that ˜10 keV protons with sausage-shaped spatial distribution of high anisotropy in flux and temperature were the particle source for the duskside and nightside DA. Compression of the magnetosphere appears to be the driver for both of the DDA and dusk/night DA. The nightside DA was observed for the first time during a sudden commencement. To unify the different terminologies, the detached auroras due to precipitating energetic protons from the ring current are called the ring current auroras.

  1. Optimizing interplanetary trajectories with deep space maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navagh, John

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of interplanetary trajectories is a crucial area for both manned and unmanned missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. A deep space maneuver (DSM) can improve a trajectory in much the same way as a planetary swingby. However, instead of using a gravitational field to alter the trajectory, the on-board propulsion system of the spacecraft is used when the vehicle is not near a planet. The purpose is to develop an algorithm to determine where and when to use deep space maneuvers to reduce the cost of a trajectory. The approach taken to solve this problem uses primer vector theory in combination with a non-linear optimizing program to minimize Delta(V). A set of necessary conditions on the primer vector is shown to indicate whether a deep space maneuver will be beneficial. Deep space maneuvers are applied to a round trip mission to Mars to determine their effect on the launch opportunities. Other studies which were performed include cycler trajectories and Mars mission abort scenarios. It was found that the software developed was able to locate quickly DSM's which lower the total Delta(V) on these trajectories.

  2. Interplanetary CubeSat Navigational Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Gustafson, Eric D.; Young, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats are miniaturized spacecraft of small mass that comply with a form specification so they can be launched using standardized deployers. Since the launch of the first CubeSat into Earth orbit in June of 2003, hundreds have been placed into orbit. There are currently a number of proposals to launch and operate CubeSats in deep space, including MarCO, a technology demonstration that will launch two CubeSats towards Mars using the same launch vehicle as NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) Mars lander mission. The MarCO CubeSats are designed to relay the information transmitted by the InSight UHF radio during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) in real time to the antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) on Earth. Other CubeSatts proposals intend to demonstrate the operation of small probes in deep space, investigate the lunar South Pole, and visit a near Earth object, among others. Placing a CubeSat into an interplanetary trajectory makes it even more challenging to pack the necessary power, communications, and navigation capabilities into such a small spacecraft. This paper presents some of the challenges and approaches for successfully navigating CubeSats and other small spacecraft in deep space.

  3. Interplanetary Overlay Network Bundle Protocol Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) system's BP package, an implementation of the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Bundle Protocol (BP) and supporting services, has been specifically designed to be suitable for use on deep-space robotic vehicles. Although the ION BP implementation is unique in its use of zero-copy objects for high performance, and in its use of resource-sensitive rate control, it is fully interoperable with other implementations of the BP specification (Internet RFC 5050). The ION BP implementation is built using the same software infrastructure that underlies the implementation of the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) built into the flight software of Deep Impact. It is designed to minimize resource consumption, while maximizing operational robustness. For example, no dynamic allocation of system memory is required. Like all the other ION packages, ION's BP implementation is designed to port readily between Linux and Solaris (for easy development and for ground system operations) and VxWorks (for flight systems operations). The exact same source code is exercised in both environments. Initially included in the ION BP implementations are the following: libraries of functions used in constructing bundle forwarders and convergence-layer (CL) input and output adapters; a simple prototype bundle forwarder and associated CL adapters designed to run over an IPbased local area network; administrative tools for managing a simple DTN infrastructure built from these components; a background daemon process that silently destroys bundles whose time-to-live intervals have expired; a library of functions exposed to applications, enabling them to issue and receive data encapsulated in DTN bundles; and some simple applications that can be used for system checkout and benchmarking.

  4. Impacts of Cosmic Dust on Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.; Flynn, George J.; Määttänen, Anni; Moores, John E.; Poppe, Andrew R.; Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan Diego; Listowski, Constantino

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in interplanetary dust modelling provide much improved estimates of the fluxes of cosmic dust particles into planetary (and lunar) atmospheres throughout the solar system. Combining the dust particle size and velocity distributions with new chemical ablation models enables the injection rates of individual elements to be predicted as a function of location and time. This information is essential for understanding a variety of atmospheric impacts, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; meteoric smoke particles and ice cloud nucleation; perturbations to atmospheric gas-phase chemistry; and the effects of the surface deposition of micrometeorites and cosmic spherules. There is discussion of impacts on all the planets, as well as on Pluto, Triton and Titan.

  5. 7 CFR 58.715 - Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.715 Cream, plastic cream and anhydrous milkfat. These food products shall be pasteurized, sweet, have a pleasing and desirable flavor and be free from objectionable flavors, and shall be obtained from milk which complies with the quality requirements as specified...

  6. Kinetics of Alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling kinetics of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran were investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads; these immobilized enzymes were hydrated prior to

  7. Effect of enzyme dehydration on alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of enzyme dehydration by molecular sieves on the coupling of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran was investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads

  8. Lean hydrous and anhydrous bioethanol combustion in spark ignition engine at idle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuepeng, Sathaporn; Srisuwan, Sudecha; Tongroon, Manida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Anhydrous ethanol burns fastest in uncalibrated engine at equal equivalence ratio. • The leaner hydrous ethanol combustion tends to elevate the COV in imep. • Hydrous ethanol consumption was 10% greater than anhydrous ethanol at ϕ = 0.67 limit. • Optimizing alternative fuel engine at idle for stability and emission is suggested. - Abstract: The applications of anhydrous bioethanol to substitute or replace gasoline fuel have shown to attain benefits in terms of engine thermal efficiency, power output and exhaust emissions from spark ignition engines. A hydrous bioethanol has also been gained more attention due to its energy and cost effectiveness. The main aim of this work is to minimize fuel quantity injected to the intake ports of a four-cylinder engine under idle condition. The engine running with hydrous ethanol undergoes within lean-burn condition as its combustion stability is analyzed using an engine indicating system. Coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure is an indicator for combustion stability with hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emission monitoring as a supplement. Anhydrous ethanol burns faster than hydrous ethanol and gasoline in the uncalibrated engine at the same fuel-to-air equivalence ratio under idle condition. The leaner hydrous ethanol combustion tends to elevate the coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure. The experimental results have found that the engine consumes greater hydrous ethanol by 10% on mass basis compared with those of anhydrous ethanol at the lean limit of fuel-to-air equivalence ratio of 0.67. The results of exhaust gas analysis were compared with those predicted by chemical equilibrium analysis of the fuel-air combustion; the resemble trends were found. Calibrating the alternative fueled engine for fuel injection quantity should be accomplished at idle with combustion stability and emissions optimization.

  9. Conceptual Design For Interplanetary Spaceship Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    With the recently revived national interest in Lunar and Mars missions, this design study was undertaken by the author in an attempt to satisfy the long-term space exploration vision of human travel ``to the Moon, Mars, and beyond'' with a single design or family of vehicles. This paper describes a conceptual design for an interplanetary spaceship of the not-to-distant future. It is a design that is outwardly similar to the spaceship Discovery depicted in the novel ``2001 - A Space Odyssey'' and film of the same name. Like its namesake, this spaceship could one day transport a human expedition to explore the moons of Jupiter. This spaceship Discovery is a real engineering design that is capable of being implemented using technologies that are currently at or near the state-of-the-art. The ship's main propulsion and electrical power are provided by bi-modal nuclear thermal rocket engines. Configurations are presented to satisfy four basic Design Reference Missions: (1) a high-energy mission to Jupiter's moon Callisto, (2) a high-energy mission to Mars, (3) a low-energy mission to Mars, and (4) a high-energy mission to the Moon. The spaceship design includes dual, strap-on boosters to enable the high-energy Mars and Jupiter missions. Three conceptual lander designs are presented: (1) Two types of Mars landers that utilize atmospheric and propulsive braking, and (2) a lander for Callisto or Earth's Moon that utilizes only propulsive braking. Spaceship Discovery offers many advantages for human exploration of the Solar System: (1) Nuclear propulsion enables propulsive capture and escape maneuvers at Earth and target planets, eliminating risky aero-capture maneuvers. (2) Strap-on boosters provide robust propulsive energy, enabling flexibility in mission planning, shorter transit times, expanded launch windows, and free-return abort trajectories from Mars. (3) A backup abort propulsion system enables crew aborts at multiple points in the mission. (4) Clustered NTR

  10. Cosmic dust in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2012-04-01

    This review discusses the magnitude of the cosmic dust input into the earth's atmosphere, and the resulting impacts from around 100 km to the earth's surface. Zodiacal cloud observations and measurements made with a spaceborne dust detector indicate a daily mass input of interplanetary dust particles ranging from 100 to 300 tonnes, which is in agreement with the accumulation rates of cosmic-enriched elements (Ir, Pt, Os and super-paramagnetic Fe) in polar ice cores and deep-sea sediments. In contrast, measurements in the middle atmosphere - by radar, lidar, high-flying aircraft and satellite remote sensing - indicate that the input is between 5 and 50 tonnes per day. There are two reasons why this huge discrepancy matters. First, if the upper range of estimates is correct, then vertical transport in the middle atmosphere must be considerably faster than generally believed; whereas if the lower range is correct, then our understanding of dust evolution in the solar system, and transport from the middle atmosphere to the surface, will need substantial revision. Second, cosmic dust particles enter the atmosphere at high speeds and undergo significant ablation. The resulting metals injected into the atmosphere are involved in a diverse range of phenomena, including: the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions; the nucleation of noctilucent clouds, which are a sensitive marker of climate change; impacts on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, which need to be considered against the background of a cooling stratosphere and geo-engineering plans to increase sulphate aerosol; and fertilization of the ocean with bio-available Fe, which has potential climate feedbacks.

  11. Particle acceleration by coronal and interplanetary shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesses, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing many years of observation from deep space and near-earth spacecraft a theoretical understanding has evolved on how ions and electrons are accelerated in interplanetary shock waves. This understanding is now being applied to solar flare-induced shock waves propagating through the solar atmosphere. Such solar flare phenomena as gamma-ray line and neutron emissions, interplanetary energetic electron and ion events, and Type II and moving Type IV radio bursts appear understandable in terms of particle acceleration in shock waves

  12. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Taku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: t.ueda@geo.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting–Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI . The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μ m band and 3.0% in the 18 μ m band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading–trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading–trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (∼10–100 μ m) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading–trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s {sub max} = 3000 μ m. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ∼10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  13. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting-Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI. The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μm band and 3.0% in the 18 μm band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading-trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading-trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (˜10-100 μm) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading-trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s max = 3000 μm. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ˜10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  14. CLIpSAT for Interplanetary Missions: Common Low-cost Interplanetary Spacecraft with Autonomy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, C.

    2015-10-01

    Blue Sun Enterprises, Inc. is creating a common deep space bus capable of a wide variety of Mars, asteroid, and comet science missions, observational missions in and near GEO, and interplanetary delivery missions. The spacecraft are modular and highly autonomous, featuring a common core and optional expansion for variable-sized science or commercial payloads. Initial spacecraft designs are targeted for Mars atmospheric science, a Phobos sample return mission, geosynchronous reconnaissance, and en-masse delivery of payloads using packetized propulsion modules. By combining design, build, and operations processes for these missions, the cost and effort for creating the bus is shared across a variety of initial missions, reducing overall costs. A CLIpSAT can be delivered to different orbits and still be able to reach interplanetary targets like Mars due to up to 14.5 km/sec of delta-V provided by its high-ISP Xenon ion thruster(s). A 6U version of the spacecraft form fits PPOD-standard deployment systems, with up to 9 km/s of delta-V. A larger 12-U (with the addition of an expansion module) enables higher overall delta-V, and has the ability to jettison the expansion module and return to the Earth-Moon system from Mars orbit with the main spacecraft. CLIpSAT utilizes radiation-hardened electronics and RF equipment, 140+ We of power at earth (60 We at Mars), a compact navigation camera that doubles as a science imager, and communications of 2000 bps from Mars to the DSN via X-band. This bus could form the cornerstone of a large number asteroid survey projects, comet intercept missions, and planetary observation missions. The TugBot architecture uses groups of CLIpSATs attached to payloads lacking innate high-delta-V propulsion. The TugBots use coordinated trajectory following by each individual spacecraft to move the payload to the desired orbit - for example, a defense asset might be moved from GEO to lunar transfer orbit in order to protect and hide it, then returned

  15. Capture of interplanetary bodies in geocentric orbits and early lunar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the accretion of planets such as Earth,which are formed by collisional accretion of plan-etesimals,the probability of capture of interplanetary bodies in planetocentric orbits is calculated following the approach of Hills (1973)and the -body simulation,using simplectic integration method.The simulation,taking an input ...

  16. A Statistical Study of Interplanetary Type II Bursts: STEREO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, V.; Eastwood, J. P.; Magdalenic, J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kruparova, O.; Szabo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary cause of the most severe and disruptive space weather events such as solar energetic particle (SEP) events and geomagnetic storms at Earth. Interplanetary type II bursts are generated via the plasma emission mechanism by energetic electrons accelerated at CME-driven shock waves and hence identify CMEs that potentially cause space weather impact. As CMEs propagate outward from the Sun, radio emissions are generated at progressively at lower frequencies corresponding to a decreasing ambient solar wind plasma density. We have performed a statistical study of 153 interplanetary type II bursts observed by the two STEREO spacecraft between March 2008 and August 2014. These events have been correlated with manually-identified CMEs contained in the Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service (HELCATS) catalogue. Our results confirm that faster CMEs are more likely to produce interplanetary type II radio bursts. We have compared observed frequency drifts with white-light observations to estimate angular deviations of type II burst propagation directions from radial. We have found that interplanetary type II bursts preferably arise from CME flanks. Finally, we discuss a visibility of radio emissions in relation to the CME propagation direction.

  17. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meena Pokharia

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... Abstract. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) and slow speed solar wind streams (SSSWS) for solar cycle −23 and 24. We have found very interesting and ...

  18. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) and slow speed solar wind streams (SSSWS) for solar cycle −23 and 24. We have found very interesting and adequate results where CRI ...

  19. Effect of solar features and interplanetary parameters on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The dependence of geomagnetic activity on solar features and interplanetary. (IP) parameters is investigated. Sixty-seven intense (−200 nT ≤ Dst < −100 nT) and seventeen superintense (Dst < −200 nT) geomagnetic storms (GMSs) have been studied from January 1996 to April 2006. The number of intense and ...

  20. Automated interplanetary shock detection and its application to Wind observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupařová, Oksana; Maksimovic, M.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Santolík, Ondřej; Krupař, Vratislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 8 (2013), 4793–4803 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Interplanetary shocks * instruments and techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50468/abstract

  1. Solar Cycle Variation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-25

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Spörer's sunspot law at low latitudes (thus, no 'butterfly diagram'); how- ever, at high latitudes, there may be a poleward motion and an equator- ward motion from the rise to the maximum to the declining phases. Key words. Sun: activity, coronal mass ejections (CMEs). 1. Introduction. Interplanetary coronal ...

  2. Anhydrous proton conducting composite membranes containing Nafion and triazole modified POSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, M.; Wang, Y.G.; Zhang, F.F.; Huang, C.; Xu, X.; Zhang, R.; Fan, D.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Development of membrane electrolytes having reasonable proton conductivity and mechanical strength under anhydrous conditions is of great importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells operated at elevated temperature. With the introduction of triazole modified polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (Tz-POSS) into Nafion membrane, the formed composite electrolytes exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to pristine Nafion membrane due to the well distribution of Tz-POSS inside the membrane. The anhydrous proton conductivity of the formed composite membranes increases initially with the increase in temperature, reaching about 0.02 Scm −1 at 140 °C. With further increase in temperature to about 150 °C, the composite membrane reaches its glass transition point above which the proton conductivity decreases dramatically. The performance of assembled single cell from composite membrane is slightly dependent on humidification conditions at 95 °C, reaching 0.45 V at 600 mAcm −2 using hydrogen and oxygen as reaction gases

  3. Ab initio and DFT studies of the structure and vibrational spectra of anhydrous caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.; Singh, Vipin B.

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational spectra and molecular structure of anhydrous caffeine have been systematically investigated by second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vibrational assignments have been made and many previous ambiguous assignments in IR and Raman spectra are amended. The calculated DFT frequencies and intensities at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, were found to be in better agreement with the experimental values. It was found that DFT with B3LYP functional predicts harmonic vibrational wave numbers more close to experimentally observed value when it was performed on MP2 optimized geometry rather than DFT geometry. The calculated TD-DFT vertical excitation electronic energies of the valence excited states of anhydrous caffeine are found to be in consonance to the experimental absorption peaks.

  4. Method for application of nitrogen-15-labeled anhydrous ammonia to small plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, C.A.; Blackmer, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described that permits precise application of anhydrous ammonia in bands to plots of the size often used in 15 N-tracer studies. This method involves placing a stainless-steel capillary tube in the soil where the ammonia is to be banded, attaching this tube to a cylinder of ammonia, and then pulling the tube through the soil with deposition of ammonia as an even band. The procedure has marked advantages over previously described methods because it can be used with mixtures of anhydrous ammonia and nitrification inhibitors and because the soil environment at the point of application is representative of the soil environment found when a conventional applicator is used

  5. Synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 via a mild hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Justin B.; Yeon, Jeongho; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of anhydrous K2TiOF4 has been previously attempted by transforming precursor compounds, such as the peroxide (K2Ti(O2)F4), hydrate (K2TiOF4·H2O) and fluoride (K2TiF6). Due to the large structural differences between these precursors and the anhydrous oxyfluorides, however, these preparations have been unsuccessful. Therefore, a direct method of synthesis has been employed to grow single crystals of K2TiOF4 that were characterized by single crystal x-ray diffraction. K2TiOF4 was found to be isostructural with the previously known K2VOF4.

  6. Ab initio and DFT studies of the structure and vibrational spectra of anhydrous caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Santosh K; Singh, Vipin B

    2013-11-01

    Vibrational spectra and molecular structure of anhydrous caffeine have been systematically investigated by second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vibrational assignments have been made and many previous ambiguous assignments in IR and Raman spectra are amended. The calculated DFT frequencies and intensities at B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level, were found to be in better agreement with the experimental values. It was found that DFT with B3LYP functional predicts harmonic vibrational wave numbers more close to experimentally observed value when it was performed on MP2 optimized geometry rather than DFT geometry. The calculated TD-DFT vertical excitation electronic energies of the valence excited states of anhydrous caffeine are found to be in consonance to the experimental absorption peaks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual stresses near unannealed welds in anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A T; Chumbley, L S; Goettee, D; Russell, A M

    2014-01-01

    Neutron diffraction analysis was employed to measure residual stresses near welds in used anhydrous ammonia nurse tanks. Tensile residual stresses contribute to stress corrosion cracking of nurse tanks, which can cause tanks to release toxic ammonia vapor. The analysis showed that tensile residual stresses were present in the tanks measured, and the magnitudes of these stresses approached the yield strength of the steel. Implications for agricultural safety and health are discussed.

  8. Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature by o-aminophenol-based photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakizaka, Masanori; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Chang, Ho-Chol

    2016-07-26

    Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol is of great importance, given its ubiquity as an intermediate for the production of a large number of industrial chemicals. Since dehydrogenation of methanol is an endothermic reaction, heterogeneous or homogeneous precious-metal-based catalysts and high temperatures are usually required for this reaction to proceed. Here we report the photochemical dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature catalysed by o-aminophenol (apH2), o-aminophenolate (apH(-)) and the non-precious metal complex trans-[Fe(II)(apH)2(MeOH)2]. Under excitation at 289±10 nm and in the absence of additional photosensitizers, these photocatalysts generate hydrogen and formaldehyde from anhydrous methanol with external quantum yields of 2.9±0.15%, 3.7±0.19% and 4.8±0.24%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far to the best of our knowledge. Mechanistic investigations reveal that the photo-induced formation of hydrogen radicals triggers the reaction.

  9. Development of a high resolution interstellar dust engineering model - overview of the project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, V. J.; Strub, P.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Krüger, H.; Grün, E.

    2013-09-01

    Beyond 3 AU heliocentric distance, the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system is a dominant component of the total dust population. The modulation of this flux with the solar cycle and the position in the solar system has been predicted by theoretical studies since the seventies. The modulation was proven to exist by matching dust trajectory simulations with real spacecraft data from Ulysses in 1998. The modulations were further analyzed and studies in detail in 2012. The current ESA interplanetary meteoroid model IMEM includes an interstellar dust component, but this component was modelled only with straight line trajectories through the solar system. For the new ESA IMEX model, a high-resolution interstellar dust component is implemented separately from a dust streams module. The dust streams module focuses on dust in streams that was released from comets (cf. Abstract R. Soja). Parallel processing techniques are used to improve computation time (cf. Abstract P. Strub). The goal is to make predictions for the interstellar dust flux as close to the Sun as 1 AU or closer, for future space mission design.

  10. Lunar Dust: Properties and Investigation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Zakharov, A. V.; Dolnikov, G. G.; Lyash, A. N.; Afonin, V. V.; Popel, S. I.; Shashkova, I. A.; Borisov, N. D.

    2017-12-01

    Physical conditions in the near-surface layer of the Moon are overviewed. This medium is formed in the course of the permanent micrometeoroid bombardment of the lunar regolith and due to the exposure of the regolith to solar radiation and high-energy charged particles of solar and galactic origin. During a considerable part of a lunar day (more than 20%), the Moon is passing through the Earth's magnetosphere, where the conditions strongly differ from those in the interplanetary space. The external effects on the lunar regolith form the plasma-dusty medium above the lunar surface, the so-called lunar exosphere, whose characteristic altitude may reach several tens of kilometers. Observations of the near-surface dusty exosphere were carried out with the TV cameras onboard the landers Surveyor 5, 6, and 7 (1967-1968) and with the astrophotometer of Lunokhod-2 (1973). Their results showed that the near-surface layer glows above the sunlit surface of the Moon. This was interpreted as the scattering of solar light by dust particles. Direct detection of particles on the lunar surface was made by the Lunar Ejects and Meteorite (LEAM) instrument deployed by the Apollo 17 astronauts. Recently, the investigations of dust particles were performed by the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) instrument at an altitude of several tens of kilometers. These observations urged forward the development of theoretical models for the lunar exosphere formation, and these models are being continuously improved. However, to date, many issues related to the dynamics of dust and the near-surface electric fields remain unresolved. Further investigations of the lunar exosphere are planned to be performed onboard the Russian landers Luna-Glob and Luna-Resurs.

  11. Dusts and Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limit your exposure by taking these general measures. Think about how they apply in your setting. • Prevent dusts and molds from forming, e.g. drying feeds and cleaning animal areas regularly. • Prevent dusts and molds from becoming ...

  12. LADEE LUNAR DUST EXPERIMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive bundle includes data taken by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) instrument aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft....

  13. Construction dust amelioration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Dust produced on seasonal road construction sites in Alaska is both a traffic safety and environmental concern. Dust emanating from : unpaved road surfaces during construction severely reduces visibility and impacts stopping sight distance, and contr...

  14. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. High-velocity streams of dust originating from Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Horányi, Mihaly; Burton, Marcia; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Roy, Mou; Grün, Eberhard

    2005-01-20

    High-velocity submicrometre-sized dust particles expelled from the jovian system have been identified by dust detectors on board several spacecraft. On the basis of periodicities in the dust impact rate, Jupiter's moon Io was found to be the dominant source of the streams. The grains become positively charged within the plasma environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and gain energy from its co-rotational electric field. Outside the magnetosphere, the dynamics of the grains are governed by the interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field that eventually forms the streams. A similar process was suggested for Saturn. Here we report the discovery by the Cassini spacecraft of bursts of high-velocity dust particles (> or = 100 km s(-1)) within approximately 70 million kilometres of Saturn. Most of the particles detected at large distances appear to originate from the outskirts of Saturn's outermost main ring. All bursts of dust impacts detected within 150 Saturn radii are characterized by impact directions markedly different from those measured between the bursts, and they clearly coincide with the spacecraft's traversals through streams of compressed solar wind.

  16. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  17. Final Reports of the Stardust ISPE: Seven Probable Interstellar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Westphal, Andrew J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Brenker, Frank E.; Butterworth, Anna L.; Flynn, George J.; Frank, David R.; Gainsforth, Zack; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft carried the first spaceborne collector specifically designed to capture and return a sample of contemporary interstellar dust to terrestrial laboratories for analysis [1]. The collector was exposed to the interstellar dust stream in two periods in 2000 and 2002 with a total exposure of approximately 1.8 10(exp 6) square meters sec. Approximately 85% of the collector consisted of aerogel, and the remainder consisted of Al foils. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) was a consortiumbased effort to characterize the collection in sufficient detail to enable future investigators to make informed sample requests. Among the questions to be answered were these: How many impacts are consistent in their characteristics with interstellar dust, with interplanetary dust, and with secondary ejecta from impacts on the spacecraft? Are the materials amorphous or crystalline? Are organics detectable? An additional goal of the ISPE was to develop or refine the techniques for preparation, analysis, and curation of these tiny samples, expected to be approximately 1 picogram or smaller, roughly three orders of magnitude smaller in mass than the samples in other small particle collections in NASA's collections - the cometary samples returned by Stardust, and the collection of Interplanetary Dust Particles collected in the stratosphere.

  18. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination II: Curating the Interstellar Dust Collector, Picokeystones, and Sources of Impact Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David R.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Gainsforth, Zack; Butterworth, Anna L.; Bastien, Ronald K.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Bechtel, Hans A.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the inherent difficulties that arise during "ground truth" characterization of the Stardust interstellar dust collector. The challenge of identifying contemporary interstellar dust impact tracks in aerogel is described within the context of background spacecraft secondaries and possible interplanetary dust particles and beta-meteoroids. In addition, the extraction of microscopic dust embedded in aerogel is technically challenging. Specifically, we provide a detailed description of the sample preparation techniques developed to address the unique goals and restrictions of the Interstellar Preliminary Exam. These sample preparation requirements and the scarcity of candidate interstellar impact tracks exacerbate the difficulties. We also illustrate the role of initial optical imaging with critically important examples, and summarize the overall processing of the collection to date.

  19. Cultural ethology as a new approach of interplanetary crew's behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforin, Carole; Giner Abati, Francisco

    2017-10-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, during short-term and medium-term orbital flights, human beings developed new spatial and motor behaviors to compensate for the lack of terrestrial gravity. Past space ethological studies have shown adaptive strategies to the tri-dimensional environment, with the goal of optimizing relationships between the astronaut and unusual sensorial-motor conditions. During a long-term interplanetary journey, crewmembers will have to develop new individual and social behaviors to adapt, far from earth, to isolation and confinement and as a result to extreme conditions of living and working together. Recent space psychological studies pointed out that heterogeneity is a feature of interplanetary crews, based on personality, gender mixing, internationality and diversity of backgrounds. Intercultural issues could arise between space voyagers. As a new approach we propose to emphasize the behavioral strategies of human groups' adaptation to this new multicultural dimension of the environment.

  20. The thickness of the interplanetary collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, S.

    1980-05-01

    The thicknesses of magnetic structures of the interplanetary shock waves related to the upstream solar wind plasma parameters are studied. From this study the following results have been obtained: the measured shock thickness increases for decreasing upstream proton number density and decreases for increasing proton flux energy. The shock thickness strongly depends on the ion plasma β, i.e. for higher values of the β the thickness decreases. (author)

  1. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  2. Asynchronous Laser Transponders for Precise Interplanetary Ranging and Time Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of a two-way asynchronous (i.e. independently firing) interplanetary laser transponder pair, capable of decimeter ranging and subnanosecond time transfer from Earth to a spacecraft anywhere within the inner Solar System, is discussed. In the Introduction, we briefly discuss the current state-of-the-art in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) which use single-ended range measurements to a passive optical reflector, and the limitations of this approach in ranging beyond the Moon to the planets. In Section 2 of this paper, we describe two types of transponders (echo and asynchronous), introduce the transponder link equation and the concept of "balanced" transponders, describe how range and time can be transferred between terminals, and preview the potential advantages of photon counting asynchronous transponders for interplanetary applications. In Section 3, we discuss and provide mathematical models for the various sources of noise in an interplanetary transponder link including planetary albedo, solar or lunar illumination of the local atmosphere, and laser backscatter off the local atmosphere. In Section 4, we introduce the key engineering elements of an interplanetary laser transponder and develop an operational scenario for the acquisition and tracking of the opposite terminal. In Section 5, we use the theoretical models of th previous sections to perform an Earth-Mars link analysis over a full synodic period of 780 days under the simplifying assumption of coaxial, coplanar, circular orbits. We demonstrate that, using slightly modified versions of existing space and ground based laser systems, an Earth-Mars transponder link is not only feasible but quite robust. We also demonstrate through analysis the advantages and feasibility of compact, low output power (laser ranging system as the Earth terminal. Section 6 provides a summary of the results and some concluding remarks regarding future applications.

  3. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  4. Relativistic electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Boyd, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Spence, H. E.

    2017-12-01

    Interplanetary shocks that impact Earth's magnetosphere can produce immediate and dramatic responses in the trapped relativistic electron population. One well-studied response is a prompt injection capable of transporting relativistic electrons deep into the magnetosphere and accelerating them to multi-MeV energies. The converse effect, electron dropout echoes, are observations of a sudden dropout of electron fluxes observed after the interplanetary shock arrival. Like the injection echo signatures, dropout echoes can also show clear energy dispersion signals. They are of particular interest because they have only recently been observed and their causal mechanism is not well understood. In the analysis presented here, we show observations of electron drift echo signatures from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) and Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensors (MagEIS) onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, which show simultaneous prompt enhancements and dropouts within minutes of the associated with shock impact. We show that the observations associated with both enhancements and dropouts are explained by the inward motion caused by the electric field impulse induced by the interplanetary shock, and either energization to cause the enhancement, or lack of a seed population to cause the dropout.

  5. Sheath-accumulating Propagation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahasi@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607–8471 (Japan)

    2017-03-10

    Fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the drivers of strong space weather storms such as solar energetic particle events and geomagnetic storms. The connection between the space-weather-impacting solar wind disturbances associated with fast ICMEs at Earth and the characteristics of causative energetic CMEs observed near the Sun is a key question in the study of space weather storms, as well as in the development of practical space weather prediction. Such shock-driving fast ICMEs usually expand at supersonic speeds during the propagation, resulting in the continuous accumulation of shocked sheath plasma ahead. In this paper, we propose a “sheath-accumulating propagation” (SAP) model that describes the coevolution of the interplanetary sheath and decelerating ICME ejecta by taking into account the process of upstream solar wind plasma accumulation within the sheath region. Based on the SAP model, we discuss (1) ICME deceleration characteristics; (2) the fundamental condition for fast ICMEs at Earth; (3) the thickness of interplanetary sheaths; (4) arrival time prediction; and (5) the super-intense geomagnetic storms associated with huge solar flares. We quantitatively show that not only the speed but also the mass of the CME are crucial for discussing the above five points. The similarities and differences between the SAP model, the drag-based model, and the“snow-plow” model proposed by Tappin are also discussed.

  6. A sheet-current approach to coronal-interplanetary modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, T.; Pneuman, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    The most pertinent effect of the currents in the coronal-interplanetary space is their alteration of the magnetic topology to form configurations of open field lines. The important currents seem to be those in the neighborhoods of the interfaces between closed and open field lines or between oppositely directed open field lines in the coronal helmet-streamer structures. Thus, the coronal-interplanetary space may be regarded as being partitioned by current-sheets into several piecewise current-free regions. These current sheets overlie the photospheric neutral lines, where the vertical component of the magnetic field reverses its polarity on the solar surface. But, their locations and strengths are determined by force balance between the magnetic field and the gas pressure in the coronal-interplanetary space. Since the pressure depends on the flow velocity of the solar wind and the solar wind channels along magnetic flux tubes, there is a strong magnetohydrodynamic coupling between the magnetic field and the solar wind. The sheet-current approach presented in this paper seems to be a reasonable way to account for this complicated interaction. (Auth.)

  7. The dynamics of solar plasma events and their interplanetary consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra; Sharma, Giriraj

    2015-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind streams originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers 220 geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decrease of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data acquired by space satellites and those provided by World Data Center (WDC) - A and geomagnetic stations data from WDC- C, Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with sunspot cycle, however we have not found any significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle. It is also inferred from the results that solar cycle-23 was remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its descending phase.

  8. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  9. Development of the nano-dust analyzer (NDA) for detection and compositional analysis of nanometer-size dust particles originating in the inner heliosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, L; Auer, S; Gemer, A; Grün, E; Horanyi, M; Juhasz, A; Kempf, S; Malaspina, D; Mocker, A; Moebius, E; Srama, R; Sternovsky, Z

    2014-03-01

    A linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer is developed for the detection and chemical analysis of nanometer-sized particles originating near the Sun. Nano-dust particles are thought to be produced by mutual collisions between interplanetary dust particles slowly spiraling toward the Sun and are accelerated outward to high velocities by interaction with the solar wind plasma. The WAVES instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft reported the detection, strong temporal variation, and potentially high flux of these particles. Here we report on the optimization and the results from the detailed characterization of the instrument's performance using submicrometer sized dust particles accelerated to 8-60 km/s. The Nano Dust Analyzer (NDA) concept is derived from previously developed detectors. It has a 200 cm(2) effective target area and a mass resolution of approximately m/Δm = 50. The NDA instrument is designed to reliably detect and analyze nanometer-sized dust particles while being pointed close to the Sun's direction, from where they are expected to arrive. Measurements by such an instrument will determine the size-dependent flux of the nano-dust particles and its variations, it will characterize the composition of the nano-dust and, ultimately, it may determine their source. The flight version of the NDA instrument is estimated to be <5 kg and requires <10 W for operation.

  10. Charge storage mechanism of nanostructured anhydrous and hydrous ruthenium-based oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Wataru; Yokoshima, Katsunori; Murakami, Yasushi; Takasu, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    The charge storage mechanism of nanostructured anhydrous and hydrous ruthenium-based oxides was evaluated by various electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammety, hydrodynamic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy). The effects of various factors, such as particle size, hydrous state, and structure, on the pseudocapacitive property were characterized. The electric double layer capacitance (C dl ), adsorption related charge (C ad ), and the irreversible redox related charge (C irr ) per unit mass and surface area of electrode material has been estimated and the role of structural water within the material either in micropores or interlayer are discussed

  11. Effect of Melting Point on the Physical Properties of Anhydrous Milk Fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunna; Li, Yang; Han, Jie; Li, Yan; Zhang, Liebing

    2017-12-01

    The effect of melting point on the physical properties of anhydrous milk fat were investigated. The results showed that high melting fractions (HMF) (S30,S35) were enriched in long-chain fatty acids, whereas low melting fractions (LMF)(S5,S10,S15) were enriched in short-chain and unsaturated fatty acids. From S5 to S35, enthalpy value was gradually increased on both crystallization and melting condition, so as SFC on different temperature. The mixture and chemical interesterification allowed obtaining fats with various degrees of plasticity, increasing the possibilities for the commercial use of different fraction of AMF.

  12. Using microkinetic analysis to search for novel anhydrous formaldehyde production catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Han-Jung; Lausche, Adam C.; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Direct dehydrogenation of methanol to produce anhydrous formaldehyde is investigated using periodic density functional theory (DFT) and combining the microkinetic model to estimate rates and selectivities on stepped (211) surfaces under a desired reaction condition. Binding energies...... that explicitly includes the effects of adsorbate coverage on the rates and selectivities as well as the volcano plots are obtained. Our results show that most of the stepped (211) pure-metallic surfaces such as Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ni, Fe, and Co are located in a region of low activity and selectivity toward CH2O...

  13. Relationship between Al content and substitution mechanism of Al-bearing anhydrous bridgmanites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, M.; Inoue, T.; Kakizawa, S.

    2017-12-01

    It is considered that two substitution mechanisms, Tschermak substitution and oxygen vacancy substitution, exist in MgSiO3 bridgmanite for the incorporation of Al in anhydrous condition. Kubo and Akaogi (2000) has conducted the phase equilibrium experiment in the system MgSiO3-Al2O3, and established the phase diagram up to 28 GPa. However the careful observation in the bridgmanite shows that the chemical compositions are slightly deviated from Tschermak substitution join. The same tendency can be also observed in the run products by Irifune et al. (1996). This result indicates that pure Tschermak substitution bridgmanite cannot be stable even in the MgSiO3-Al2O3 join experiment. However, the previous studies used powder samples as the starting materials, so the absorbed water may affect the results. Therefore, we tried to conduct the experiment in the join MgSiO3-Al2O3 in extremely anhydrous condition to clarify whether the pure Tschermak substitution bridgmanite can be stable or not. In addition, we also examined the stability of oxygen vacancy bridgmanite in the extremely anhydrous condition for the comparison. The high pressure synthesis experiments were conducted at 28 GPa and 1600-1700° for 1hour using a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. Four different Al content samples were prepared as the starting materials along the ideal substitution line of Tschermak (Al=0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 mol) and oxygen-vacancy (Al=0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1 mol) substitutions, respectively (when total cation of 2). The glass rods were used as the starting materials to eliminate the absorbed water on the sample surface. The chemical compositions of the synthesized bridgmanite could not be measured by EPMA because of small grain size less than submicron. Therefore the chemical compositions were estimated from the result of the XRD pattern by subtracting the amount of the other phases. The estimated chemical compositions of Tschermak substitution bridgmanites were consistent with the

  14. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  15. Adsorption of organic compounds pertinent to urban environments onto mineral dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovich, Alla H.; Schkolnik, Gal; Ganor, Eliezer; Rudich, Yinon

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of mineral dust particles from the Sahara with semivolatile organic compounds over an urban region in Israel's coastal plain was studied. Dust samples were collected during numerous dust storm events in 2000 and 2001, under varying meteorological conditions. Organic compounds adsorbed on collected mineral dust particles were analyzed using an integrated, multitechnique study that employed a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersion system (SEM-EDS) and bulk aerosol analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and ion chromatography (IC). The SEM-EDS analysis exemplifies the coexistence of inorganic and organic species on individual mineral dust particles. Using the GC/MS and IC analysis, specific tracers for urban air pollution and photodegradation products of agriculture emissions have been identified, and their size distributions have been obtained. Redistribution of semivolatile organics such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and pesticides from submicron to larger particle size fractions, governed by the mineral dust transport trajectory and size distributions, was observed. Nonvolatile species, such as anhydrous sugars and large PAH, do not redistribute between the phases because of their low vapor pressure. The concentrations of short chain carboxylic acids increased with higher ambient relative humidity, suggesting water-assisted uptake onto the mineral particles.

  16. Dust in Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Mašková, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    Indoor air pollution in libraries and archives can be harmful for materials stored there. Adverse effects of most of gaseous pollutants are well described, but less is known about dust. Dust particles cover a wide range of sizes and have a variable composition. These characteristics determine their transport to the surfaces and also possible harmful effects. Dust particles not only cause soiling, but coarse particles can damage surfaces by abrasion. Fine particles of acidic or alkaline charac...

  17. Anhydrous ethanol production in sugar mills; Produccion de etanol anhidro en ingenios azucareros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez Poy, Manuel. E-mail:poymanuel@prodigy.net.mx

    2007-04-15

    The anhydrous ethanol production is recent and limited, because the disadvantage of the renewable energies is the economic impossibility of the projects. Nevertheless, there are aspects to consider to achieve the anhydrous ethanol production, among which are: the cost of the raw material, the self-sufficiency of energy from the sugar cane bagasse without the need of oil burning, the larger size of the distilleries, incorporation of the Cogeneration with delivery of electricity to the public network in the sugar mill facilities, the introduction of the biotechnology to improve the processes of fermentation and subsidies to agriculture. [Spanish] La produccion de etanol anhidro es reciente y limitada, debido a que la desventaja de las energias renovables es la inviabilidad economica de los proyectos. Sin embargo hay aspectos a considerar para lograr la produccion de etanol anhidro, entre los cuales estan: el costo de la materia prima, la autosuficiencia energetica a partir del bagazo de la cana sin necesidad de petroleo, mayor tamano de las destilerias, incorporacion de la Cogeneracion con entrega de electricidad a la red publica en el ingenio, la introduccion de la biotecnologia para mejorar los procesos de fermentacion y subsidios a la agricultura.

  18. An Efficient, Solvent-Free Process for Synthesizing Anhydrous MgCl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Vemuri, Venkata Rama S.; Barpaga, Dushyant; Schaef, Herbert T.; Loring, John S.; Martin, Paul F.; Lao, David; Nune, Satish K.; McGrail, Bernard P.

    2018-01-02

    A new efficient and solvent-free method for the synthesis of anhydrous MgCl2 from its hexahydrate is proposed. Fluidized dehydration of MgCl2·6H2O feedstock at 200 °C in a porous bed reactor yields MgCl2·nH2O (0 < n < 1), which has a similar diffraction pattern as activated MgCl2. The MgCl2·nH2O is then ammoniated directly using liquefied NH3 in the absence of solvent to form MgCl2·6NH3. Calcination of the hexammoniate complex at 300 °C then yields anhydrous MgCl2. Both dehydration and deammoniation were thoroughly studied using in situ as well as ex situ characterization techniques. Specifically, a detailed understanding of the dehydration process was monitored by in situ PXRD and in situ FTIR techniques where formation of salt with nH2O (n = 4, 2, 1, <1) was characterized. Given the reduction in thermal energy required to produce dehydrated feedstock with this method compared with current strategies, significant cost benefits are expected. Overall, the combined effect of activation, macroporosity, and coordinated water depletion allows the formation of hexammoniate without using solvent, thus minimizing waste formation.

  19. Using microkinetic analysis to search for novel anhydrous formaldehyde production catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Jung; Lausche, Adam C.; Peterson, Andrew A.; Hansen, Heine A.; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Direct dehydrogenation of methanol to produce anhydrous formaldehyde is investigated using periodic density functional theory (DFT) and combining the microkinetic model to estimate rates and selectivities on stepped (211) surfaces under a desired reaction condition. Binding energies of reaction intermediates and transition state energies for each elementary reaction can be accurately scaled with CHO and OH binding energies as the only descriptors. Based on these two descriptors, a steady-state microkinetic model is constructed with a piecewise adsorbate-adsorbate interaction model that explicitly includes the effects of adsorbate coverage on the rates and selectivities as well as the volcano plots are obtained. Our results show that most of the stepped (211) pure-metallic surfaces such as Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ni, Fe, and Co are located in a region of low activity and selectivity toward CH2O production due to higher rate for CH2O dehydrogenation than CH2O desorption. The selectivities toward CH2O production on Zn, Cu, and Ag surfaces are located on the boundary between the high and low selectivity regions. To find suitable catalysts for anhydrous CH2O production, a large number of A3B-type transition metal alloys are screened based on their predicted rates and selectivities, as well as their estimated stabilities and prices. We finally propose several promising candidates for the dehydrogenation of CH3OH.

  20. The impact of prior coffee consumption on the subsequent ergogenic effect of anhydrous caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Tom M; Bell, Doug G

    2004-12-01

    This study examined whether the prior consumption of coffee (COF) decreased the ergogenic effect of the subsequent ingestion of anhydrous caffeine (CAF). Thirteen subjects performed 6 rides to exhaustion at 80 % VO2max 1.5 h after ingesting combinations of COF, decaffeinated coffee (DECOF), CAF, or placebo. The conditions were DECOF + placebo (A), DECOF + CAF (5 mg/kg) (B), COF (1.1 mg/kg caffeine) + CAF (5 mg/kg) (C), COF + CAF (3 mg/kg) (D), COF + CAF (7 mg/kg) (E), and colored water + CAF (5 mg/kg) (F). Times to exhaustion were significantly greater for all trials with CAF versus placebo (trial A). Exercise times (in minutes) were: 21.7 +/- 8.1, 29.0 +/- 7.4, 27.8 +/- 10.8, 25.1 +/-7.9, 26.4 +/- 8.0 and 26.8 +/- 8.1 for trials A through F, respectively. In conclusion, the prior consumption of COF did not decrease the ergogenic effect of the subsequent ingestion of anhydrous CAF.

  1. A new anhydrous proton conductor based on polybenzimidazole and tridecyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fengjing; Pu Hongting; Meyer, Wolfgang H.; Guan Yisi; Wan Decheng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the anhydrous proton conducting membranes are based on inorganic or partially inorganic materials, like SrCeO 3 membranes or polybenzimidazole (PBI)/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes. In present work, a new kind of anhydrous proton conducting membrane based on fully organic components of PBI and tridecyl phosphate (TP) was prepared. The interaction between PBI and TP is discussed. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of the composite membranes can be modeled by an Arrhenius relation. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) illustrates that these composite membranes are chemically stable up to 145 deg. C. The weight loss appearing at 145 deg. C is attributed to the selfcondensation of phosphate, which results in the proton conductivity drop of the membranes occurring at the same temperature. The DC conductivity of the composite membranes can reach ∼10 -4 S/cm for PBI/1.8TP at 140 deg. C and increases with increasing TP content. The proton conductivity of PBI/TP and PBI/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes is compared. The former have higher proton conductivity, however, the proton conductivity of the PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes increases with temperature more significantly. Compared with PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes, the migration stability of TP in PBI/TP membranes is improved significantly

  2. Anhydrous proton exchange membrane of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) enabled by polydopamine-modified silica nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jingtao; Bai, Huijuan; Zhang, Haoqin; Zhao, Liping; Chen, Huiling; Li, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The concept of acid/base pairs was employed to design anhydrous PEMs. • Polydopamine-modified silica particles were uniformly dispersed in SPEEK membrane. • The membranes displayed enhancement in both stability and anhydrous proton conductivity. - Abstract: Novel anhydrous proton exchange membrane is (PEM) facilely prepared by embedding dopamine-modified silica nanoparticles (DSiOis 2 ) into sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) polymer matrix. DSiO 2 bearing -NH 2 /-NH- groups are synthesized inspired by the bioadhesion principle, which are uniformly dispersed within SPEEK membrane due to the good interfacial compatibility. The interfacial electrostatic attractions render unique rearrangement of the nanophase-separated structure and the chain packing of the resultant hybrid membranes. As a result, the thermal and mechanical stabilities as well as structural stability of the hybrid membranes are enhanced when compared to SPEEK control membrane. On the other hand, induced by the attractions, acid–base pairs are formed at the SPEEK/DSiOarewere 2 interface, where fast proton transfer via Grotthuss mechanism is expected. These features confer much higher proton conductivities on the DSiO 2 -filled membranes under both hydrated and anhydrous conditions, compared to those of the SPEEK control membrane and SiO 2 -filled membranes. Particularly, the hybrid membrane with 15 wt% DSiO 2 achieve the highest conductivities of 4.52achieveachieved × 10 −3 S cm −1 at 120 °C under anhydrous condition, which is much higher than the SPEEK control membrane and the commercial Nafion membrane (0.1iswas × 10 −3 S cm −1 ). The membrane with 9 wt% DSiO 2 show an open cell potential of 0.98showshowed V and an optimum power density of 111.7 mW cm −2 , indicative of its potential application in fuel cell under anhydrous condition

  3. Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselyn, Jo Ann

    The Workshop on Solar Events and Their Influence on the Interplanetary Medium very successfully met its goal “to foster interactions among colleagues, leading to an improved understanding of the unified relationship between solar events and interplanetary disturbances.” Organized by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Environment Laboratory and funded by the national Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Solar Maximum Mission Principal Investigators and the Space Environment Laboratory, this meeting was held held September 8—11, 1986, in Estes Park, Colo. A total of 94 scientists, including representatives from Argentina, Germany, Japan, France, Scotland, England, Australia, Poland, Israel, Greece, China and the United States attended. A novel meeting schedule was adopted, with no formal presentations other than a keynote address by Rainer Schwenn of the Max Planck Institut fur Aeronomie (Federal republic of Germany), entitled “Transients on the Sun and Their Effects on the Interplanetary Medium: An Interdisciplinary Challenge” a Gordon A. Newkirk Memorial talk on “Early History of the Coronagraph” by John Eddy of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Interdisciplinary Earth Studies (Boulder, Colo.); and introductory and summary statements by working group leaders. Instead, there were three working groups, which met either independently or with one of the other groups according to a prearranged plan. Suggested roundtable discussion topics were distributed in advance to the members of each group, but primarily, each group was expected to think of questions for the other groups and respond to requests for information from them. As may be expected, for some topics there was group consensus. Other topics were contentious.

  4. Geometrical Relationship Between Interplanetary Flux Ropes and Their Solar Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, K.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cho, K.-S.; Park, Y.-D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the physical connection between interplanetary flux ropes (IFRs) near Earth and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) by comparing the magnetic field structures of IFRs and CME source regions. The analysis is based on the list of 54 pairs of ICMEs (interplanetary coronal mass ejections) and CMEs that are taken to be the most probable solar source events. We first attempted to identify the flux rope structure in each of the 54 ICMEs by fitting models with a cylinder and torus magnetic field geometry, both with a force-free field structure. This analysis determined the possible geometries of the identified flux ropes. Then we compared the flux rope geometries with the magnetic field structure of the solar source regions. We obtained the following results: (1) Flux rope structures are seen in 51 ICMEs out of the 54. The result implies that all ICMEs have an intrinsic flux rope structure, if the three exceptional cases are attributed to unfavorable observation conditions. (2) It is possible to find flux rope geometries with the main axis orientation close to the orientation of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) in the solar source regions, the differences being less than 25°. (3) The helicity sign of an IFR is strongly controlled by the location of the solar source: flux ropes with positive (negative) helicity are associated with sources in the southern (northern) hemisphere (six exceptions were found). (4) Over two-thirds of the sources in the northern hemisphere are concentrated along PILs with orientations of 45° ± 30° (measured clockwise from the east), and over two-thirds in the southern hemisphere along PILs with orientations of 135° ± 30°, both corresponding to the Hale boundaries. These results strongly support the idea that a flux rope with the main axis parallel to the PIL erupts in a CME and that the erupted flux rope propagates through the interplanetary space with its orientation maintained and is observed as an IFR.

  5. Comet Dust: The Diversity of "Primitive" Particles and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Comet dust is primitive and shows significant diversity. Our knowledge of the properties of primitive particles has expanded significantly through microscale investigations of cosmic dust samples ( IDP's(Interplanetary Dust Particles) and AMM's (Antarctic Micrometeorites)) and of comet dust samples (Stardust and Rosetta's COSIMA), as well as through remote sensing (spectroscopy and imaging) via Spitzer and via spacecraft encounters with 103P/Hartley 2 and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Microscale investigations show that comet dust and cosmic dust are particles of unequilibrated materials, including aggregates of materials unequilibrated at submicron scales. We call unequilibrated materials "primitive" and we deduce they were incorporated into ice-rich (H2O-, CO2-, and CO-ice) parent bodies that remained cold, i.e., into comets, because of the lack of aqueous or thermal alteration since particle aggregation; yet some Stardust olivines suggest mild thermal metamorphism. Primitive particles exhibit a diverse range of: structure and typology; size and size distribution of constituents; concentration and form of carbonaceous and organic matter; D-, N-, and O- isotopic enhancements over solar; Mg-, Fe-contents of the silicate minerals; the compositions and concentrations of sulfides, and of less abundant mineral species such as chondrules, CAIs and carbonates. The uniformity within a group of samples points to: aerodynamic sorting of particles and/or particle constituents; the inclusion of a limited range of oxygen fugacities; the inclusion or exclusion of chondrules; a selection of organics. The properties of primitive particles imply there were disk processes that resulted in different comets having particular selections of primitive materials. The diversity of primitive particles has implications for the diversity of materials in the protoplanetary disk present at the time and in the region where the comets formed.

  6. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  7. Velocity of interplanetary shock waves according to radioastronomical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    Velocities of 34 interplanetary shock waves are estimated by the method of radioastronomical cartography of scintillation indices of cosmic radiosources. The velocity of shock waves within the limits of approximately 0.2-1.2 a.e. is shown to decrease as far as they are far from the Sun at a distance equalling 1/r α , where 0.25 < or approx. α ≤ 1. In this case the degree of shock wave slowing-down dependences on their initial velocity; the velocity radial gradient is approximately proportional to the square of the shock wave initial velocity

  8. The Interplanetary Network I: From the Past to the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Hurley, K.; Laros, J.; Mazets, E.; Golenetskii, S.; Trombka, J.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.

    2000-10-01

    Interplanetary spacecraft have been used with orbiting satellites to precisely localize gamma ray transients for nearly 25 years, making possible both early GRB and SGR discoveries and recent afterglow observations. This technique, always subject to the vagaries of circumstance, was maintained by creative experiment modifications from seeming space piracy to the NEAR in-flight software change that made possible the present fully long-baseline network. We review the anecdotal history of the IPN, and outline future IPN possibilities when HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Mars 2001, AGILE, Swift, GLAST and the ISS may be involved.

  9. Radiation protection for human interplanetary spaceflight and planetary surface operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, B.C. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[DLR Inst. of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne (Germany)]|[NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiation protection issues are reviewed for five categories of radiation exposure during human missions to the moon and Mars: trapped radiation belts, galactic cosmic rays, solar flare particle events, planetary surface emissions, and on-board radiation sources. Relative hazards are dependent upon spacecraft and vehicle configurations, flight trajectories, human susceptibility, shielding effectiveness, monitoring and warning systems, and other factors. Crew cabins, interplanetary mission modules, surface habitats, planetary rovers, and extravehicular mobility units (spacesuits) provide various degrees of protection. Countermeasures that may be taken are reviewed relative to added complexity and risks that they could entail, with suggestions for future research and analysis.

  10. Communication plan for windblown dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Windblown dust events occur in Arizona, and blowing dust has been considered a contributing factor to serious crashes on the : segment of Interstate 10 (I10) between Phoenix and Tucson, as well as on other Arizona roadways. Arizonas dust events...

  11. Dust in Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "They cannot look out far·IThey cannot look in deep. I. But when was that ever a bar ITo any watch they keep?" - Robert Frost, (Neither Out Far Nor In Deep'. Dust grains in space, which absorb and redden starlight, were once considered to be a nuisance for astronomers, but the study of dust has be- come important in ...

  12. Dust in Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure B. The concept of photon nlust travel such that the probability of its interacting is interaction length is ex- almost unity. Putting the above probability equal to unity, and plained. writing ~x = 1, the interaction length, 1, is given by 1 = (/n'. How much Dust is there? One can estimate the amount of dust in interstellar space ...

  13. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    The author's review concentrates on theoretical aspects of dust in planetary nebulae (PN). He considers the questions: how much dust is there is PN; what is its composition; what effects does it have on the ionization structure, on the dynamics of the nebula. (Auth.)

  14. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  15. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently

  16. Helioseismology with Seismometers: II Coherence with the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David J.; Vernon, Frank L.

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of seismic "hum'' in 1998 unexpected lines have been observed in terrestrial seismology.In this talk we give further evidence that these lines originate as normal modes of the Sun. Frequencies observed in terrestrial seismic and geomagnetic data are often split by multiples of a cycle/day and, unexpectedly, by multiples of one-half cycle per sidereal day.There is coherence between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at ACE (located at L_1) and terrestrial geomagnetic and seismic data. There are slight frequency offsets between colocated geomagnetic and seismic data similar to those observed in normal modes excited by earthquakes. These have been attributed to dispersion from large-scale structure in the Earth.Both the splitting and coherence with the IMF give further confirmation that solar modes propagatethrough interplanetary space and are sufficiently strong to literally shake the Earth. This gives another method to detect and possibly identify solar gravity and low--frequency P-modes.

  17. First Taste of Hot Channel in Interplanetary Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. Q.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, X.; Li, G.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-04-01

    A hot channel (HC) is a high temperature (˜10 MK) structure in the inner corona first revealed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eruptions of HCs are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results of previous studies have suggested that an HC is a good proxy for a magnetic flux rope (MFR) in the inner corona as well as another well known MFR candidate, the prominence-cavity structure, which has a normal coronal temperature (˜1-2 MK). In this paper, we report a high temperature structure (HTS, ˜1.5 MK) contained in an interplanetary CME induced by an HC eruption. According to the observations of bidirectional electrons, high temperature and density, strong magnetic field, and its association with the shock, sheath, and plasma pile-up region, we suggest that the HTS is the interplanetary counterpart of the HC. The scale of the measured HTS is around 14 R ⊙ , and it maintained a much higher temperature than the background solar wind even at 1 AU. It is significantly different from the typical magnetic clouds, which usually have a much lower temperature. Our study suggests that the existence of a corotating interaction region ahead of the HC formed a magnetic container to inhibit expansion of the HC and cool it down to a low temperature.

  18. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  19. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  20. North-South asymmetry of interplanetary plasma and solar parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Borie, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Data of interplanetary plasma (field magnitude, solar wind speed, ion plasma density and temperature) and solar parameters (sunspot number, solar radio flux, and geomagnetic index) over the period 1965-1991, have been used to examine the asymmetry between the solar field north and south of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The dependence of N-S asymmetry of field magnitude (B) upon the interplanetary solar polarities is statistically insignificant. There is no clear indication for the presence of N-S asymmetry in the grand-average field magnitude over the solar cycles. During the period 1981-89 (qA<0; negative solar polarity state), the solar plasma was more dense and cooler south of the HCS than north of it. The solar flux component of toward field vector is larger in magnitude than those of away field vector during the qA<0 epoch, and no asymmetry observed in the qA<0 epoch. Furthermore, the sign of the N-S asymmetry in the solar activity depends positively upon the solar polarity state. In addition, it was studied the N-S asymmetry of solar parameters near the HCS, throughout the periods of northern and southern hemispheres were more active than the other. Some asymmetries (with respect to the HCS) in plasma parameters existed during the periods of southern hemisphere predominance

  1. Positive and negative sudden impulses caused by fast forward and reverse interplanetary shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrioli, Vania Fatima; Savian, Jairo Francisco, E-mail: vaniafatima@gmail.com, E-mail: savian@lacesm.ufsm.br [Space Science Laboratory of Santa Maria - LACESM/CT - UFSM, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Centro Tecnologico, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Echer, Ezequiel, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br [National Institute for Space Research - INPE - MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br [Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRSPE/INPE - MCT, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria - UFSM, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Fast forward interplanetary shocks (FFS) are characterized by positive jump in all interplanetary plasma parameters (solar wind speed, temperature and density) and interplanetary magnetic field. However the fast reverse interplanetary shocks (FRS) are characterized by negative jump in all mentioned parameters except solar wind speed. Observations show that FFS cause positive sudden impulses (SI) while FRS cause negative SI in the H-component of the geomagnetic field. In this work we investigate the SI caused by interplanetary shocks. We use the observed plasma parameters, upstream and downstream, to calculate the variation of dynamic pressure. We observe that the SI amplitude is larger for positive SI than for negative ones, as a consequence of the fact that FFS have larger dynamic pressure variations as compared to FRS. (author)

  2. The chlorine isotope composition of the moon and implications for an anhydrous mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Z D; Shearer, C K; McKeegan, K D; Barnes, J D; Wang, Y Q

    2010-08-27

    Arguably, the most striking geochemical distinction between Earth and the Moon has been the virtual lack of water (hydrogen) in the latter. This conclusion was recently challenged on the basis of geochemical data from lunar materials that suggest that the Moon's water content might be far higher than previously believed. We measured the chlorine isotope composition of Apollo basalts and glasses and found that the range of isotopic values [from -1 to +24 per mil (per thousand) versus standard mean ocean chloride] is 25 times the range for Earth. The huge isotopic spread is explained by volatilization of metal halides during basalt eruption--a process that could only occur if the Moon had hydrogen concentrations lower than those of Earth by a factor of approximately 10(4) to 10(5), implying that the lunar interior is essentially anhydrous.

  3. Thermal decomposition of ammonium uranous fluoride to anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride in freon - 12 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, M.Y.; El-Fekey, S.A.; Rofail, N.H.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic study on the thermal decomposition of the double salt has been carried out. A range of temperature, duration, thickness of layers during heating and flow rate of gas were investigated and the physico-chemical properties of the resulting uranium tetrafluoride determined. The chemical analysis included the determination of U 4 , UO 2 formed, UF 4 assay and UO 2 F 2 formed. The X-ray analysis confirmed the formation of anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride after heating of 0.3-cm thick ammonium uranous fluoride layer at 350 0 C while passing 0.05 litre min -1 Freon-12 for four hours. Emission spectrographic analysis confirmed nuclear purity of the final product

  4. Controlled synthesis of porous anhydrous cobalt oxalate nanorods with high reversible capacity and excellent cycling stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Junmin; He, Lei; Liu, Hui; Han, Tao; Wang, Yongjian; Zhang, Changjin; Zhang, Yuheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Abstract: One-dimensional porous anhydrous cobalt oxalate nanorods are prepared via a facile water-controlled coprecipitate method followed by thermal annealing treatment under N 2 at 300 °C. The nanorods are characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. When evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, the nanorods exhibit high reversible specific capacity and excellent cycling stability (924 mA h g −1 at 50 mA g −1 after 100 cycles and 709 mA h g −1 at 200 mA g −1 after 220 cycles). This remarkable electrochemical performance is attributed to the one-dimensional porous nanostructure that can provide large electrode/electrolyte contact area and short lithium-ion diffusion pathway, meanwhile reduce the volume expansion during the repeated discharge/charge process

  5. SIMULATION OF THE DISTILLATION BY PRESSURE REDUCTION TO OBTAIN ANHYDROUS ETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Lauzurique Guerra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the distillation by pressure reduction was evaluated through the HYSYS v3.2 process simulator. Due to the lack of data in the consulted bibliography to perform the simulation, the STATGRAPHICS Centurion XVI software was used to obtain a response surface that would define optimal operating conditions. The property package selected to work was based on the Margules model. An anhydrous ethanol molar composition of 0.9917 was obtained. Temperature profiles were analyzed as well as liquid and vapor molar flows and dehydration column composition profiles. The influence of operating parameters on the efficiency of simulated technology was determined by analyzing one case study. According to economic evaluation, the implementation of this technology is not economically profitable; taking into account current prices and costs mostly due to high energy consumption and construction costs of the tower. This result contributes to the pursuit of other profitable technologies from the economic point of view.

  6. Dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media: Long-term stability and reusability of immobilized Alcalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Nuijens, T.; Quaedflieg, P.J.L.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term stability and re-use of Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Cov) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were investigated. Cov can be used to synthesize dipeptides under near-anhydrous conditions in THF. Cov was incubated with and without molecular sieves (beads or

  7. Improved quantification of alite and belite in anhydrous Portland cements by 29Si MAS NMR: Effects of paramagnetic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Kocaba, Vanessa; Le Saoût, Gwenn

    2009-01-01

    The applicability, reliability, and repeatability of 29Si MAS NMR for determination of the quantities of alite (Ca3SiO5) and belite (Ca2SiO4) in anhydrous Portland cement was investigated in detail for 11 commercial Portland cements and the results compared with phase quantifications based...

  8. Crystal structure of aspartame anhydrate from powder diffraction data. Structural aspects of the dehydration process of aspartame

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guguta, C.; Meekes, H.L.M.; Gelder, R. de

    2006-01-01

    Aspartame has three pseudo-polymorphic forms, two hydrates and a hemi-hydrate, for which crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffraction data. This paper presents the crystal structure of the anhydrate, which was obtained by dehydrating the hemi-hydrate. The crystal structure of

  9. Structural study and crystallography of the major compound of anhydrous cement: tri-calcium silicate; Etude structurale et cristallographie du compose majoritaire du ciment anhydre: le silicate tricalcique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirfontaine, M.N. de

    2000-01-01

    Anhydrous (Portland) cement is mainly composed of a synthetic material, the clinker, whose major compound is tri-calcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), often referred as C{sub 3}S with the compact oxides notations, C = CaO et S = SiO{sub 2}. The polymorphism of C{sub 3}S, still not well known, is the main subject of the thesis. Various crystal structures (rhombohedral R, monoclinic M1, M2, M3 and triclinic T1, T2, T3) can be found, depending on temperature and impurities. The only known structures are T1, M1 and M3, involving large unit cells with an orientational disorder of silicate tetrahedra. The single crystal studies exhibit no clear relation between the various polymorphs. Starting from known results from literature single crystal experiments, we establish the metric and structural relations between the different structures. Averaged structures for the T1, M1 and M3 polymorphs are proposed, together with all the matrices of transformation between the unit cells. We also introduce new 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D structural units, which make easier the understanding of the structures of C{sub 3}S, with the result of a better description of the orientational disorder. The effects of impurities on the structure are discussed. In industrial clinkers, impurities stabilize mainly M1 and M3 monoclinic forms. We propose a space group (Pc) and two structural models (a superstructure and an approximate averaged structure) for the M1 form. All the models are validated on synthetic compounds (M3, M2, M1 et T1) and industrial clinkers analysed by X-Ray powder diffraction with Rietveld analysis. (author)

  10. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise.

  11. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Andrew D; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Flemming H; Qu, Haiyan; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-09-01

    Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II) of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S)-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state (13)C and (23)Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships to the monohydrate (MH) and anhydrate (AH) structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system. All structures contain Na(+)/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH-I is essentially identical to MH in the naproxen region, containing face-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings, whereas the structure of DH-II is comparable to AH in the naproxen region, containing edge-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings. This structural similarity permits topotactic transformation between AH and DH-II, and between MH and DH-I, but requires re-organization of the naproxen molecules for transformation between any other pair of structures. The topotactic pathways dominate at room temperature or below, while the non-topotactic pathways become active at higher temperatures. Thermochemical data for the dehydration processes are rationalized in the light of this new structural information.

  12. Quantifying Anthropogenic Dust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Pierre, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic land use and land cover change, including local environmental disturbances, moderate rates of wind-driven soil erosion and dust emission. These human-dust cycle interactions impact ecosystems and agricultural production, air quality, human health, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. While the impacts of land use activities and land management on aeolian processes can be profound, the interactions are often complex and assessments of anthropogenic dust loads at all scales remain highly uncertain. Here, we critically review the drivers of anthropogenic dust emission and current evaluation approaches. We then identify and describe opportunities to: (1) develop new conceptual frameworks and interdisciplinary approaches that draw on ecological state-and-transition models to improve the accuracy and relevance of assessments of anthropogenic dust emissions; (2) improve model fidelity and capacity for change detection to quantify anthropogenic impacts on aeolian processes; and (3) enhance field research and monitoring networks to support dust model applications to evaluate the impacts of disturbance processes on local to global-scale wind erosion and dust emissions.

  13. The stability of anhydrous phase B, Mg14Si5O24, at mantle transition zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang; Ohtani, Eiji; Shibazaki, Yuki; Ozawa, Shin; Jin, Zhenmin; Suzuki, Akio; Frost, Daniel J.

    2017-12-01

    The stability of anhydrous phase B, Mg14Si5O24, has been determined in the pressure range of 14-21 GPa and the temperature range of 1100-1700 °C with both normal and reversal experiments using multi-anvil apparatus. Our results demonstrate that anhydrous phase B is stable at pressure-temperature conditions corresponding to the shallow depth region of the mantle's transition zone and it decomposes into periclase and wadsleyite at greater depths. The decomposition boundary of anhydrous phase B into wadsleyite and periclase has a positive phase transition slope and can be expressed by the following equation: P(GPa) = 7.5 + 6.6 × 10-3 T (°C). This result is consistent with a recent result on the decomposition boundary of anhydrous phase B (Kojitani et al., Am Miner 102:2032-2044, 2017). However, our phase boundary deviates significantly from this previous study at temperatures 250 km, which could contribute ferropericlase (Mg, Fe)O or magnesiowustite (Fe, Mg)O into the deep mantle. Incongruent melting of hydrous peridotite may also produce MgO-rich compounds. Anh-B could form in these conditions due to reactions between Mg-rich oxides and silicates. Anh-B might provide a new interpretation for the origin of diamonds containing ferropericlase-olivine inclusions and chromitites which have been found to have ultrahigh-pressure characteristics. We propose that directly touching ferropericlase-olivine inclusions found in natural diamonds might be the retrogressive products of anhydrous phase B decomposing via the reaction (Mg,Fe)14Si5O24 (Anh-B) = (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 (olivine) + (Mg,Fe)O (periclase). This decomposition may occur during the transportation of the host diamonds from their formation depths of < 500 km in the upper part of the mantle transition zone to the surface.

  14. Economics of wood dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J.A.

    1980-11-01

    This article reviews the economic effects of wood dust. The most important use of wood today is a fuel, and wood chips and shavings are sources of feedstock for boilers. Other uses include wood chips in the manufacture of particleboard, wood dust as bedding in riding stables and race tracks, as mulch for florists, and as an absorbent in the meat packing industry. The installation of dust collection systems is strongly urged as the consequences of inadequate collection include rapid machine wear, poor environmental conditions for workers, general interference with work, and its combustibility makes it a constant fire hazard.

  15. The aeolian dust accumulation curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, D.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a simple physical concept of aeolian dust accumulation, based on the behaviour of the subprocesses of dust deposition and dust erosion. The concept is tested in an aeolian dust wind tunnel. The agreement between the accumulation curve predicted by the model and the accumulation

  16. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  17. Stardust@home: An Interactive Internet-based Search for Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, B. J.; Westphal, A. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Craig, N.

    2006-12-01

    On January 15, 2006, NASA's Stardust mission returned to Earth after nearly seven years in interplanetary space. During its journey, Stardust encountered comet Wild 2, collecting dust particles from it in a special material called aerogel. At two other times in the mission, aerogel collectors were also opened to collect interstellar dust. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector is being scanned by an automated microscope at the Johnson Space Center. There are approximately 700,000 fields of view needed to cover the entire collector, but we expect only a few dozen total grains of interstellar dust were captured within it. Finding these particles is a daunting task. We have recruited many thousands of volunteers from the public to aid in the search for these precious pieces of space dust trapped in the collectors. We call the project Stardust@home. Through Stardust@home, volunteers from the public search fields of view from the Stardust aerogel collector using a web-based Virtual Microscope. Volunteers who discover interstellar dust particles have the privilege of naming them. The interest and response to this project has been extraordinary. Many people from all walks of life are very excited about space science and eager to volunteer their time to contribute to a real research project such as this. We will discuss the progress of the project and the education and outreach activities being carried out for it.

  18. Scattering Properties of Large Irregular Cosmic Dust Particles at Visible Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar-Cerezo, J.; Palmer, C.; Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F. [Instituto de Astrofìsica de Andalucìa, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomìa s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Penttilä, A.; Muinonen, K. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-03-20

    The effect of internal inhomogeneities and surface roughness on the scattering behavior of large cosmic dust particles is studied by comparing model simulations with laboratory measurements. The present work shows the results of an attempt to model a dust sample measured in the laboratory with simulations performed by a ray-optics model code. We consider this dust sample as a good analogue for interplanetary and interstellar dust as it shares its refractive index with known materials in these media. Several sensitivity tests have been performed for both structural cases (internal inclusions and surface roughness). Three different samples have been selected to mimic inclusion/coating inhomogeneities: two measured scattering matrices of hematite and white clay, and a simulated matrix for water ice. These three matrices are selected to cover a wide range of imaginary refractive indices. The selection of these materials also seeks to study astrophysical environments of interest such as Mars, where hematite and clays have been detected, and comets. Based on the results of the sensitivity tests shown in this work, we perform calculations for a size distribution of a silicate-type host particle model with inclusions and surface roughness to reproduce the experimental measurements of a dust sample. The model fits the measurements quite well, proving that surface roughness and internal structure play a role in the scattering pattern of irregular cosmic dust particles.

  19. Dust filter testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupoux, J.

    1975-01-01

    The composition of dust filters used in cleanup systems for radioactive gaseous effluents is described as well as the technical controls, especially efficiency measured by a soda fluorescein aerosol [fr

  20. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  1. Cosmic Dust Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially...

  2. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  3. The Interplanetary Network Response to LIGO GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, K.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R.L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Boynton, W.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We have performed a blind search for a gamma-ray transient of arbitrary duration and energy spectrum around the time of the LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914 with the six-spacecraft interplanetary network (IPN). Four gamma-ray bursts were detected between 30 hr prior to the event and 6.1 hr after it, but none could convincingly be associated with GW150914. No other transients were detected down to limiting 15-150 keV fluences of roughly 5 x 10(exp -8) -5 x 10(exp -7) erg cm(exp -2). We discuss the search strategies and temporal coverage of the IPN on the day of the event and compare the spatial coverage to the region where GW150914 originated. We also report the negative result of a targeted search for the Fermi-GBM event reported in conjunction with GW150914.

  4. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK RESPONSE TO LIGO GW150914

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Zhang, X. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, Garching, D-85748 Germany (Germany); Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cline, T.; Gehrels, N., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We have performed a blind search for a gamma-ray transient of arbitrary duration and energy spectrum around the time of the LIGO gravitational-wave event GW150914 with the six-spacecraft interplanetary network (IPN). Four gamma-ray bursts were detected between 30 hr prior to the event and 6.1 hr after it, but none could convincingly be associated with GW150914. No other transients were detected down to limiting 15–150 keV fluences of roughly 5 ×10{sup −8}–5 × 10{sup −7} erg cm{sup −2}. We discuss the search strategies and temporal coverage of the IPN on the day of the event and compare the spatial coverage to the region where GW150914 originated. We also report the negative result of a targeted search for the Fermi -GBM event reported in conjunction with GW150914.

  5. Geoeffectiveness of interplanetary shocks controlled by impact angles: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Samsonov, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The high variability of the Sun's magnetic field is responsible for the generation of perturbations that propagate throughout the heliosphere. Such disturbances often drive interplanetary shocks in front of their leading regions. Strong shocks transfer momentum and energy into the solar wind ahead of them which in turn enhance the solar wind interaction with magnetic fields in its way. Shocks then eventually strike the Earth's magnetosphere and trigger a myriad of geomagnetic effects observed not only by spacecraft in space, but also by magnetometers on the ground. Recently, it has been revealed that shocks can show different geoeffectiveness depending closely on the angle of impact. Generally, frontal shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks, even if the former are comparatively weaker than the latter. This review is focused on results obtained from modeling and experimental efforts in the last 15 years. Some theoretical and observational background are also provided.

  6. The interplanetary magnetic field observed by Juno enroute to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-06-01

    The Juno spacecraft was launched on 5 August 2011 and spent nearly 5 years traveling through the inner heliosphere on its way to Jupiter. The Magnetic Field Investigation was powered on shortly after launch and obtained vector measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at sample rates from 1 to 64 samples/second. The evolution of the magnetic field with radial distance from the Sun is compared to similar observations obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 and the Ulysses spacecraft, allowing a comparison of the radial evolution between prior solar cycles and the current depressed one. During the current solar cycle, the strength of the IMF has decreased throughout the inner heliosphere. A comparison of the variance of the normal component of the magnetic field shows that near Earth the variability of the IMF is similar during all three solar cycles but may be less at greater radial distances.

  7. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field Observed by Juno Enroute to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-01-01

    The Juno spacecraft was launched on 5 August 2011 and spent nearly 5 years traveling through the inner heliosphere on its way to Jupiter. The Magnetic Field Investigation was powered on shortly after launch and obtained vector measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at sample rates from 1 to 64 samples/second. The evolution of the magnetic field with radial distance from the Sun is compared to similar observations obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 and the Ulysses spacecraft, allowing a comparison of the radial evolution between prior solar cycles and the current depressed one. During the current solar cycle, the strength of the IMF has decreased throughout the inner heliosphere. A comparison of the variance of the normal component of the magnetic field shows that near Earth the variability of the IMF is similar during all three solar cycles but may be less at greater radial distances.

  8. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  9. The acceleration of particles at propagating interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, P. L.; Strauss, R. D. T.

    2017-12-01

    Enhancements of charged energetic particles are often observed at Earth following the eruption of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the Sun. These enhancements are thought to arise from the acceleration of those particles at interplanetary shocks forming ahead of CMEs, propagating into the heliosphere. In this study, we model the acceleration of these energetic particles by solving a set of stochastic differential equations formulated to describe their transport and including the effects of diffusive shock acceleration. The study focuses on how acceleration at halo-CME-driven shocks alter the energy spectra of non-thermal particles, while illustrating how this acceleration process depends on various shock and transport parameters. We finally attempt to establish the relative contributions of different seed populations of energetic particles in the inner heliosphere to observed intensities during selected acceleration events.

  10. Deep Space Network Measurement Model Development for Interplanetary Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Kim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The DSN(Deep Space Network measurement model for interplanetary navigations which is essential for precise orbit determination has been developed. The DSN measurement model produces fictitious DSN observables such as range, doppler and angular data, containing the potential observational errors in geometric data obtained from orbit propagator. So the important part of this research is to model observational errors in DSN observation and to characterize the errors. The modeled observational errors include the range delay effect caused by troposphere, ionosphere, antenna offset, and angular refraction effect caused by troposphere. Non-modeled errors are justified %%as the solved-for parameters. as the parameters. All of these results from developed models show about 10% errors compared to the JPL's reference results, that are within acceptable error range.

  11. Time delay of interplanetary magnetic field penetration into Earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Z. J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Wan, W. X.; Yang, Y. Y.; Shen, C.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Many previous studies have demonstrated that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can control the magnetospheric dynamics. Immediate magnetospheric responses to the external IMF have been assumed for a long time. The specific processes by which IMF penetrates into magnetosphere, however, are actually unclear. Solving this issue will help to accurately interpret the time sequence of magnetospheric activities (e.g., substorm and tail plasmoids) exerted by IMF. With two carefully selected cases, we found that the penetration of IMF into magnetotail is actually delayed by 1-1.5 h, which significantly lags behind the magnetotail response to the solar wind dynamic pressure. The delayed time appears to vary with different auroral convection intensity, which may suggest that IMF penetration in the magnetotail is controlled considerably by the dayside reconnection. Several unfavorable cases demonstrate that the penetration lag time is more clearly identified when storm/substorm activities are not involved.

  12. The characteristic response of whistler mode waves to interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, C.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Li, J.; An, X.; Zhou, C.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetospheric whistler mode waves play a key role in regulating the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. Recent satellite observations indicate a significant influence of interplanetary (IP) shocks on whistler mode wave power in the inner magnetosphere. In this study, we statistically investigate the response of whistler mode chorus and plasmaspheric hiss to IP shocks based on Van Allen Probes and THEMIS satellite observations. Immediately after the IP shock arrival, chorus wave power is usually intensified, often at dawn, while plasmaspheric hiss wave power predominantly decreases near the dayside but intensifies near the nightside. We conclude that chorus wave intensification outside the plasmasphere is probably associated with the suprathermal electron flux enhancement caused by the IP shock. On the other hand, the solar wind dynamic pressure increase changes the magnetic field configuration to favor ray penetration into the nightside and promote ray refraction away from the dayside, explaining the magnetic local time (MLT) dependent responses of plasmaspheric hiss waves following IP shock arrivals.

  13. The Interplanetary Internet: a communications infrastructure for Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott; Cerf, Vinton; Durst, Robert; Fall, Kevin; Hooke, Adrian; Scott, Keith; Weiss, Howard

    2003-01-01

    A strategy is being developed whereby the current set of internationally standardized space data communications protocols can be incrementally evolved so that a first version of an operational "Interplanetary Internet" is feasible by the end of the decade. This paper describes its architectural concepts, discusses the current set of standard space data communications capabilities that exist to support Mars exploration and reviews proposed new developments. We also speculate that these current capabilities can grow to support future scenarios where human intelligence is widely distributed across the Solar System and day-to-day communications dialog between planets is routine. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Doppler frequency in interplanetary radar and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcvittie, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The change of frequency of an interplanetary radar signal sent from the earth to another planet or to a space probe is worked out according to general relativity. The Schwarzschild spacetime is employed and its null geodesics control the motion of the signals. Exact Doppler frequency formulas are derived for one-way and two-way radar in terms of an arbitrary Schwarzschild radial coordinate. A reduction to the special relativity case is used to interpret the formulas in terms of the relative radial velocity of emitter and target. The general relativity corrections are worked out approximately for each of three possible Schwarzschild radial coordinates, and a numerical example is given. The amount of the correction is different according as one or the other of the Schwarzschild coordinates is identified with the radius vector deduced from classical celestial mechanics. The identification problem is discussed.

  15. The Role of Hydrogen Bonding on Laminar Burning Velocity of Hydrous and Anhydrous Ethanol Fuel with Small Addition of n-Heptane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Suarta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structure of mixed hydrous and anhydrous ethanol with up to 10% v n-heptane had been studied. The burning velocity was examined in a cylindrical explosion combustion chamber. The result showed that the burning velocity of hydrous ethanol is higher than anhydrous ethanol and n-heptane at stoichiometric, rich, and very rich mixtures. The burning velocity of hydrous ethanol with n-heptane drops drastically compared to the burning velocity of anhydrous ethanol with n-heptane. It is caused by two reasons. Firstly, there was a composition change of azeotropic hydrous ethanol molecules within the mixture of fuel. Secondly, at the same volume the number of ethanol molecules in hydrous ethanol was less than in anhydrous ethanol at the same composition of the n-heptane in the mixture. At the mixture of anhydrous ethanol with n-heptane, the burning velocity decreases proportionally to the addition of the n-heptane composition. The burning velocity is between the velocities of anhydrous ethanol and n-heptane. It shows that the burning velocity of anhydrous ethanol mixed with n-heptane is only influenced by the mixture composition.

  16. An Alternative Method for Identifying Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-Gonzalez, A.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V. [Laboratory of Physics and Astronomy, IP and D/Universidade do Vale do Paraíba—UNIVAP, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Mendes, O. [Division of Space Geophysics, National Institute for Space Research, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Calzadilla, A. [Department of Space Geophysics, Institute of Geophysics and Astronomy, Havana (Cuba); Domingues, M. O., E-mail: ojeda.gonzalez.a@gmail.com [Associate Laboratory of Applied Computing and Mathematics, National Institute for Space Research, São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-03-10

    Spatio-temporal entropy (STE) analysis is used as an alternative mathematical tool to identify possible magnetic cloud (MC) candidates. We analyze Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) data using a time interval of only 10 days. We select a convenient data interval of 2500 records moving forward by 200 record steps until the end of the time series. For every data segment, the STE is calculated at each step. During an MC event, the STE reaches values close to zero. This extremely low value of STE is due to MC structure features. However, not all of the magnetic components in MCs have STE values close to zero at the same time. For this reason, we create a standardization index (the so-called Interplanetary Entropy, IE, index). This index is a worthwhile effort to develop new tools to help diagnose ICME structures. The IE was calculated using a time window of one year (1999), and it has a success rate of 70% over other identifiers of MCs. The unsuccessful cases (30%) are caused by small and weak MCs. The results show that the IE methodology identified 9 of 13 MCs, and emitted nine false alarm cases. In 1999, a total of 788 windows of 2500 values existed, meaning that the percentage of false alarms was 1.14%, which can be considered a good result. In addition, four time windows, each of 10 days, are studied, where the IE method was effective in finding MC candidates. As a novel result, two new MCs are identified in these time windows.

  17. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behannon, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    Recent and ongoing planetary missions have provided and are continuing to provide extensive observations of the variations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) both in time and with heliocentric distance from the sun. Large time variations in both the IMF and its fluctuations are observed. These are produced predominantly by dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium associated with stream interactions. Magnetic field variations near the sun are propagated to greater heliocentric distances, a process also contributing to the observed variability of the IMF. Temporal variations on a time scale comparable to or less than the corotation period complicate attempts to deduce radial gradients of the field and its fluctuations from the various observations. However, recent measurements inward to 0.46 AU and outward to 5 AU suggest that the radial component of the field on average decreases approximately as r -2 , as was predicted by Parker, while the azimuthal component decreases more rapidly than the r -1 dependence predicted by simple theory. Three sets of observations are consistent with r/sup -1.3/ dependence for vertical-barB/sub phi/vertical-bar. The temporal variability of solar wind speed is most likely the predominant contributor to this latter observational result. The long-term average azimuthal component radial gradient is probably consistent with the Parker r -1 dependence when solar wind speed variations are taken into account. The observations of the normal component magnitude vertical-barB/sub theta/vertical-bar are roughly consistent with a heliocentric distance dependence of r/sup -1.4/. The observed radial distance dependence of the total magnitude of the IMF is well described by the Parker formulation. There is observational evidence that amplitudes of fluctuations of the vector field with periods less than 1 day vary with heliocentric distance as approximately r/sup -3/2/, in agreement with theoretical models by Whang and Hollweg

  18. Autonomous aerobraking for low-cost interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrelli, David; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Strikwerda, Thomas; Kaidy, James; Prince, Jill; Powell, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Aerobraking has previously been used to reduce the propellant required to deliver an orbiter to its desired final orbit. In principle, aerobraking should be possible around any target planet or moon having sufficient atmosphere to permit atmospheric drag to provide a portion of the mission ΔV, in lieu of supplying all of the required ΔV propulsively. The spacecraft is flown through the upper atmosphere of the target using multiple passes, ensuring that the dynamic pressure and thermal loads remain within the spacecraft's design parameters. NASA has successfully conducted aerobraking operations four times, once at Venus and three times at Mars. While aerobraking reduces the fuel required, it does so at the expense of time (typically 3-6 months), continuous Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage, and a large ground staff. These factors can result in aerobraking being a very expensive operational phase of the mission. However, aerobraking has matured to the point that much of the daily operation could potentially be performed autonomously onboard the spacecraft, thereby reducing the required ground support and attendant aerobraking related costs. To facilitate a lower-risk transition from ground processing to an autonomous capability, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has assembled a team of experts in aerobraking and interplanetary guidance and control to develop a high-fidelity, flight-like simulation. This simulation will be used to demonstrate the overall feasibility while exploring the potential for staff and DSN coverage reductions that autonomous aerobraking might provide. This paper reviews the various elements of autonomous aerobraking and presents an overview of the various models and algorithms that must be transformed from the current ground processing methodology to a flight-like environment. Additionally the high-fidelity flight software test bed, being developed from models used in a recent interplanetary mission, will be summarized.

  19. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-17

    Jun 17, 2016 ... Dusty plasma; dust-acoustic shock wave; dust size distribution; adiabatic dust charge variation; negative ions. PACS Nos 52.27.Lw; 52.35.Tc; 52.35.Mw. 1. Introduction. The low-frequency dust ion-acoustic waves are typi- cal acoustic modes in unmagnetized and collisionless dusty plasma with a weak ...

  20. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation of dust grains on the small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves, in an unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma which contains negative ions, positive ions and electrons, are studied in this paper. A Burgers equation and its stationary ...

  1. Dust particles from comets and asteroids collected at the Earth's orbit: Parent-daughter relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. A.; Zook, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The relative contributions of comets and asteroids to the reservoir of dust in the interplanetary medium is not well known. There are direct observations of dust released from comets and there is evidence to associate the IRAS dust bands with possible collisions of Asteroids in the main belt. It is believed that one may combine lab analysis of the physics and chemistry of captured particles with orbital data in order to identify comet and asteroid parent bodies. It is possible to use the collected orbits of the dust to connect with its source in two ways. One is to consider the long time orbit evolution of the dust under Poynting-Robertson drag. The other is to look at the prompt orbit change of dust from comets onto trajectories that intersect the earth's orbit. In order to characterize the orbits of dust particles evolved over a long period of time, a study of its orbital evolution was undertaken. Various parameters associated with these dust orbits as they cross the Earth's orbit were considered in order to see if one may discriminate between particles evolved from comets and asteroids. The method was to calculate by a numerical procedure the orbits of dust particles after they left their parent bodies. It appears that as the particles pass the Earth's orbit, asteroidal grains and cometary grains can be differentiated on the basis of their measured orbital eccentricities even after much planetary perturbation. Broad parent daughter associations can be made on this basis from measurement of their trajectories intercepted in earth orbit.

  2. A new analysis of Galileo dust data near Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, R. H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-05-01

    The Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS) detected a population of micron-sized grains in and amongst the orbits of Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Previous studies, using roughly 50% of the data now available, concluded that the dominant sources for the impacts were magnetospherically captured interplanetary particles largely on retrograde orbits (Colwell et al., 1998b; Thiessenhusen et al., 2000) and impact-generated ejecta from the Galilean satellites (Krüger et al., 1999b; Krivov et al., 2002a). Here we revisit the problem with the full data set and broaden our consideration to include four additional source populations: debris from the outer satellites, interplanetary and interstellar grains and particles accelerated outwards from Io and the jovian rings. We develop a model of detectable orbits at each Galileo position and we find that about 10% of the impact data require non-circular orbits with eccentricities greater than 0.1. In addition, ~3% of impacts require orbital solutions with eccentricities in excess of 0.7. Using the spatial distribution of particles, we are able to exclude, as dominant sources, all the additional source populations except for outer satellite particles. A study of DDS directional information demonstrates that none of the six standard sources fit the data well and thus a combination of sources is necessary. There are insufficient data to uniquely identify the relative strengths of the various contributions. However, we find an excess of large particles that is consistent with retrograde trajectories.

  3. Observations of interplanetary scintillation and their application to the space weather forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masayoshi; Kakinuma, Takakiyo

    1989-01-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) method using natural radio sources can observe the solar wind near the sun and at high latitudes that have never been accessible to any spacecraft. Therefore, the IPS has been the most powerful method to observe the solar wind in three-dimensional space. Although the IPS method cannot predict when a flare will occur or when a filament will disappear, it can be used to forecast the propagation of interplanetary disturbances and to warn when they will attack the earth. Thus, the IPS method can be used to forecast recurrent interplanetary phenomena as well as transient phenomena. (author)

  4. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  5. Sahara Dust Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Particles Click on the image for Quicktime movie from 7/15-7/24 A continent-sized cloud of hot air and dust originating from the Sahara Desert crossed the Atlantic Ocean and headed towards Florida and the Caribbean. A Saharan Air Layer, or SAL, forms when dry air and dust rise from Africa's west coast and ride the trade winds above the Atlantic Ocean. These dust clouds are not uncommon, especially during the months of July and August. They start when weather patterns called tropical waves pick up dust from the desert in North Africa, carry it a couple of miles into the atmosphere and drift westward. In a sequence of images created by data acquired by the Earth-orbiting Atmospheric Infrared Sounder ranging from July 15 through July 24, we see the distribution of the cloud in the atmosphere as it swirls off of Africa and heads across the ocean to the west. Using the unique silicate spectral signatures of dust in the thermal infrared, AIRS can detect the presence of dust in the atmosphere day or night. This detection works best if there are no clouds present on top of the dust; when clouds are present, they can interfere with the signal, making it much harder to detect dust as in the case of July 24, 2005. In the Quicktime movie, the scale at the bottom of the images shows +1 for dust definitely detected, and ranges down to -1 for no dust detected. The plots are averaged over a number of AIRS observations falling within grid boxes, and so it is possible to obtain fractional numbers. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Total Water Vapor in the Atmosphere Around the Dust Cloud Click on the image for Quicktime movie The dust cloud is contained within a dry adiabatic layer which originates over the Sahara Desert. This Saharan Air Layer (SAL) advances Westward over the Atlantic Ocean, overriding the cool, moist air nearer the surface. This burst of very dry air is visible in the AIRS retrieved total water

  6. Use of X-ray diffraction to quantify amorphous supplementary cementitious materials in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellings, R.; Salze, A.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    The content of individual amorphous supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in anhydrous and hydrated blended cements was quantified by the PONKCS [1] X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The analytical precision and accuracy of the method were assessed through comparison to a series of mixes of known phase composition and of increasing complexity. A 2σ precision smaller than 2–3 wt.% and an accuracy better than 2 wt.% were achieved for SCMs in mixes with quartz, anhydrous Portland cement, and hydrated Portland cement. The extent of reaction of SCMs in hydrating binders measured by XRD was 1) internally consistent as confirmed through the standard addition method and 2) showed a linear correlation to the cumulative heat release as measured independently by isothermal conduction calorimetry. The advantages, limitations and applicability of the method are discussed with reference to existing methods that measure the degree of reaction of SCMs in blended cements

  7. Implementing a Near-Optimal Optical Receiver for Inter-Planetary Communication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposal Objective: Interplanetary communications signals are inherently weak at the receiver. In fact, for a desired data rate the received optical pulses may...

  8. GENESIS OF INTERPLANETARY INTERMITTENT TURBULENCE: A CASE STUDY OF ROPE–ROPE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Loew, Murray H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Feng, Heng Q. [Institute of Space Physics, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang (China); Hu, Qiang [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Miranda, Rodrigo A. [UnB-Gama Campus, and Plasma Physics Laboratory, Institute of Physics, University of Brasília (UnB), Brasília DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Muñoz, Pablo R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of La Serena, Av. Juan Cisternas 1200, La Serena (Chile); Sibeck, David G. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wu, De J., E-mail: abraham.chian@gmail.com [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-12-01

    In a recent paper, the relation between current sheet, magnetic reconnection, and turbulence at the leading edge of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection was studied. We report here the observation of magnetic reconnection at the interface region of two interplanetary magnetic flux ropes. The front and rear boundary layers of three interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are identified, and the structures of magnetic flux ropes are reconstructed by the Grad–Shafranov method. A quantitative analysis of the reconnection condition and the degree of intermittency reveals that rope–rope magnetic reconnection is the most likely site for genesis of interplanetary intermittency turbulence in this event. The dynamic pressure pulse resulting from this reconnection triggers the onset of a geomagnetic storm.

  9. Spacecraft Position Estimation in Interplanetary Trajectories Using Star Trackers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lynntech proposes a novel spacecraft position estimation method that leverages existing star trackers on board of a vehicle in an interplanetary trajectory for...

  10. Possible mechanism of the interplanetary medium effect on the diurnal rotation rate of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krymskij, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanism is proposed for effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field on the Earth rotation. In the mechanism base is Hall current generation in the plasma layer of the magnetosphere tail

  11. Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ka Band Parabolic Deployable Antenna (KaPDA) for Interplanetary CubeSat Communications allowing moving up from UHF, S or X to get higher gain for a given diameter.

  12. Geomagnetic response of interplanetary coronal mass ejections in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badruddin; Mustajab, F.; Derouich, M.

    2018-05-01

    A coronal mass ejections (CME) is the huge mass of plasma with embedded magnetic field ejected abruptly from the Sun. These CMEs propagate into interplanetary space with different speed. Some of them hit the Earth's magnetosphere and create many types of disturbances; one of them is the disturbance in the geomagnetic field. Individual geomagnetic disturbances differ not only in their magnitudes, but the nature of disturbance is also different. It is, therefore, desirable to understand these differences not only to understand the physics of geomagnetic disturbances but also to understand the properties of solar/interplanetary structures producing these disturbances of different magnitude and nature. In this work, we use the spacecraft measurements of CMEs with distinct magnetic properties propagating in the interplanetary space and generating disturbances of different levels and nature. We utilize their distinct plasma and field properties to search for the interplanetary parameter(s) playing important role in influencing the geomagnetic response of different coronal mass ejections.

  13. Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free, anhydrous Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Faul, U. H.

    2013-12-01

    The measured inward motion of Phobos provides a constraint on the tidal dissipation factor, Q, within Mars. We model viscoelastic dissipation inside a convective Mars using a modified Burgers model based on laboratory experiments on anhydrous, melt-free olivine. The model tidal Q is highly sensitive to the mantle potential temperature and grain size assumed but relatively insensitive to the bulk density and rigidity structure. Q thus provides a tight constraint on the Martian interior temperature. By fitting the observed tidal Q and tidal Love number (k2) values and requiring present-day melt generation, we estimate that for a grain size of 1 cm the current mantle potential temperature is 1625±75 K, similar to that of the Earth. This estimate is consistent with recent petrologically derived determinations of mantle potential temperature but lower than estimates in some thermal evolution models. The presence of water in the Martian mantle would reduce our estimated temperature. Our preferred mantle grain size of ≈1 cm is somewhat larger than that of the Earth's upper mantle. The predicted mantle seismic Q is about 130 and is almost independent of depth. The Martian lithosphere represents a high seismic velocity lid, which should be readily detectable with future seismological observations.

  14. Anhydrous Weight Loss Prediction of Meranti Sawdust during Torrefaction using Rousset Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Nur Hazirah Huda Mohd; Samad, Noor Asma Fazli Abdul; Saleh, Suriyati

    2018-03-01

    In torrefaction, the mass loss distribution is evaluated in terms of anhydrous weight loss (AWL). Since temperature gives significant effects on AWL and the behaviour of biomass is highly associated with the AWL, therefore a suitable model for estimating the reaction kinetics is necessary for describing the thermal degradation and predicting the AWL in order to improve its process. In this study, the kinetic parameters of Meranti sawdust are estimated by applying three-parallel reaction models namely the Rousset Model for torrefaction of Meranti sawdust at temperatures of 240°C, 270°C and 300°C. All kinetic parameters are estimated according to the degradation of biomass constituents which are lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose by following the Arrhenius Law. The result shows that AWL estimation using the kinetic parameters predicted from the Rousset model is in good agreement with the experimental result as the R2 value obtained is 0.99. It shows that the Rousset Model successfully described the degradation of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose as well as the formation of char, volatile, tar and intermediate compound. Therefore it can be concluded that the Rousset Model is applicable to represent the torrefaction behaviour.

  15. Contrasting subduction structures within the Philippine Sea plate: Hydrous oceanic crust and anhydrous volcanic arc crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Takaya; Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Susumu; Hirata, Naoshi

    2014-05-01

    show contrasting subduction structures within the Philippine Sea plate inferred from active-source wide-angle reflection data. Previous studies showed that large-amplitude reflections from the slab are observed in southwest Japan and indicated that a thin low-velocity layer with a high fluid content is formed along the top of the subducting oceanic crust. On the contrary, we found that the slab reflections have smaller amplitudes in the Izu collision zone, central Japan, where the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc has been colliding/subducting, suggesting that such a low-velocity layer does not exist beneath the collision zone. This structural difference is also supported by P-wave and S-wave velocity anomalies by passive-source tomography and electrical conductivity, and correlates with the regional distribution of deep tremors and intraslab earthquakes, both of which are induced by dehydration processes within the downgoing slab. Based on these comparisons, we suggest that the original structure of the incoming plate controls the contrasting subducting systems: typical oceanic plate absorbs water by hydrothermal circulation at spreading centers and/or seawater infiltration at outer rises, whereas volcanic arc crust consumes a large amount of hydrous minerals for melt production and metamorphoses to more stable, anhydrous forms before subduction.

  16. Free fatty acids and their esters modulate isothermal crystallization of anhydrous milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, Mathilde; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Cansell, Maud

    2017-03-01

    The effect of free fatty acids with different chain lengths or unsaturation degree on anhydrous milk fat (AMF) crystallization was evaluated. The impact of esterification was also studied using three triglycerides. Melted blends containing the additives at concentrations lower than 12wt.% were quenched at 25°C and isothermal crystallization was monitored by pulsed low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance. In parallel, polarized light microscopy was used to observe the microstructure. Compounds based on long chain saturated fatty acids, i.e. palmitic, stearic, eicosanoic acids, tripalmitin and tristearin accelerated crystallization. Conversely, propanoic, hexanoic and oleic acids slowed down the process, while triacetin had no impact. Interestingly, above a critical concentration, the addition of palmitic, stearic or eicosanoic acids caused a transition from a one-step to two-step process. Gompertz model was used to fit the experimental data and to assess the influence of the molecular properties of the additives on the kinetic parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydration adjacent to a deeply subducting slab: The roles of nominally anhydrous minerals and migrating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Laura B.; Montési, Laurent G. J.

    2013-11-01

    transport of water into the mantle has significant dynamical and geochemical implications. Dehydration of hydrous phases within the slab can introduce water into the transition zone and lower mantle, potentially hydrating nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) and impacting the viscosity and density structure of the mantle over a wide area. We present models of fluid transport and mantle hydration in the vicinity of a deeply subducting slab, focusing on the fate of water released by deep dehydration reaction in the subducted serpentinized mantle. A sharp decrease in water storage capacity across the lower boundary of the transition zone may produce "secondary dehydration" of hydrated NAM, leading to precipitation of a hydrous fluid and heterogeneous hydration of the transition zone. Rapid fluid migration relative to the solid flow field can lead to a broad region of diffuse hydration within the upper mantle wedge and the potential for localized melt regions at the top of the transition zone coincident with fluid pathways. Slower fluid migration instead implies that the fluid phase can be transported deep into the lower mantle. Water stabilized in NAM and as a free fluid can initiate upwelling within and above the transition zone. A less abrupt change in water storage capacity across the base of the transition zone leads to high NAM water contents in a channel adjacent to the slab where viscosity is reduced. However, seismic and electromagnetic observations of hydration in the transition zone are most compatible with a sudden drop of water storage capacity.

  18. Effect of enzyme dehydration on alcalase-catalyzed dipeptide synthesis in near-anhydrous organic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenberg, Petra; Beeftink, Rik; Stuart, Martien Cohen; Tramper, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The effect of enzyme dehydration by molecular sieves on the coupling of phenylalanine amide and the carbamoylmethyl ester of N-protected phenylalanine in near-anhydrous tetrahydrofuran was investigated. This coupling was catalyzed by Alcalase covalently immobilized onto macroporous acrylic beads (Cov); these immobilized enzymes were hydrated prior to use. The dehydration kinetics of Cov by molecular sieve powder were determined by incubating Cov with different amounts of molecular sieve powder for different periods of time (0-80 h). Subsequently, the remaining coupling activity of Cov was measured. Dehydration-induced inactivation of Cov by molecular sieve powder was found to occur in three phases: (1) an initial, rapid, major dehydration-induced inactivation that takes place during the first activity measurement, (2) a phase of first-order inactivation, and (3) a plateau phase in activity. These dehydration kinetics were incorporated into a previously found reaction kinetics model. The resulting model was then used to fit progress curve data of the coupling in the presence of different amounts of molecular sieve powder. Upon establishment of parameter values, the model was used to predict independent data sets and found to work well. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Taste Masking of Griseofulvin and Caffeine Anhydrous Using Kleptose Linecaps DE17 by Hot Melt Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluri, Abhishek; Popescu, Carmen; Zhou, Leon; Murthy, Reena N; Gowda, Vanaja K; Chetan Kumar, P; Pimparade, Manjeet B; Repka, Michael A; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 (KLD) in masking the unpleasant/bitter taste of therapeutic agents by hot melt extrusion (HME). Griseofulvin (GRI) and caffeine anhydrous (CA) were used as a bitter active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) model drugs. Thermogravimetric studies confirmed the stability of GRI, CA, and KLD at the employed extrusion temperatures. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed a characteristic melting endotherm of GRI at 218-220°C and CA at 230-232°C in the physical mixtures as well as in all extrudates over the period of study, indicating the crystalline nature of drug. HME of KLD was achieved only in the presence of plasticizer. Among the several plasticizers investigated, xylitol showed improved processability of KLD at 15% w/w concentration. Dissolution studies of HME extrudates using simulated salivary medium exhibited ∼threefold less release compared to physical mixture at the end of 5 min (the lesser drug release, better the taste masking efficiency). Furthermore, the results from the sensory evaluation of products in human panel demonstrated strong bitter taste in the case of physical mixture compared to the HME formulation, suggesting the potential of Kleptose Linecaps DE17 as taste masking polymer in melt extruded form.

  20. Investigation of solubility of carbon dioxide in anhydrous milk fat by lab-scale manometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Tuyen; Palmer, Martin; Bansal, Nidhi; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-12-15

    This study aims to examine the solubility of CO 2 in anhydrous milk fat (AMF) as functions of partial pressure, temperature, chemical composition and physical state of AMF. AMF was fractionated at 21°C to obtain stearin and olein fractions. The CO 2 solubility was measured using a home-made experimental apparatus based on changes of CO 2 partial pressures. The apparatus was found to be reliable as the measured and theoretical values based on the ideal gas law were comparable. The dissolved CO 2 concentration in AMF increased with an increase in CO 2 partial pressure (0-101kPa). The apparent CO 2 solubility coefficients (molkg -1 Pa -1 ) in the AMF were 5.75±0.16×10 -7 , 3.9±0.19×10 -7 and 1.19±0.14×10 -7 at 35, 24 and 4°C, respectively. Higher liquid oil proportions resulted in higher CO 2 solubility in the AMF. There was insignificant difference in the dissolved CO 2 concentration among the AMF, stearin and olein fractions in their liquid state at 40°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation and characterization of 1,6 anhydrous Β-D-Glucopyranose from starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Lopez, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    In order to prepare 2-deoxi-2-fluoride-D-glucosa (2FDG) in an inert form there are several synthesis methods, but the more interesting one for our study is based in a reaction from the 1,6 anhydrous, Β-D-glucopyranose (1,6AGP), in an attempt to compare the labelling efficiency rate of 2FDG with F-18, which is highly used in nuclear medicine. In the present paper the attainment of starch from white potatoe, infrared analysis of this starch and fusion point are included. Also results are compared with an analytical reactive standard. The process of preparation of 1,6AGP by pyrolysis of starch under reduced pressure, its separation and purification by crystallization and infrared characterization of 1,6AGP, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are also included. 10 kg. of potatoes were used, and 93059 g. ±5.8 of starch with an efficiency rate of 9.32 ±0.631; fusion point was 272 o C and there was a 9.83 ± 1.48 % of humidity. After the pyrolysis, crystallization an purification processes, 1.71 ±0.54 % of 1,6AGP were obtained. Later results of compound characterization, nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry were compared with a commercial product and it was proved that it corresponds to such pure compound. (Author)

  2. Structure, Solubility and Stability of Orbifloxacin Crystal Forms: Hemihydrate versus Anhydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Maria Martins Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbifloxacin (ORBI is a widely used antimicrobial drug of the fluoroquinolone class. In the official pharmaceutical compendia the existence of polymorphism in this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API is reported. No crystal structure has been reported for this API and as described in the literature, its solubility is very controversial. Considering that different solid forms of the same API may have different physicochemical properties, these different solubilities may have resulted from analyses inadvertently carried out on different polymorphs. The solubility is the most critical property because it can affect the bioavailability and may compromise the quality of a drug product. The crystalline structure of ORBI determined by SCXRD is reported here for the first time. The structural analysis reveals that the ORBI molecule is zwitterionic and hemihydrated. ORBI hemihydrated form was characterized by the following techniques: TG/DTA, FTIR-ATR, and PXRD. A second crystalline ORBI form is also reported: the ORBI anhydrous form was obtained by heating the hemihydrate. These ORBI solid forms were isomorphous, since no significant change in unit cell and space group symmetry were observed. The solid-state phase transformation between these forms is discussed and the equilibrium solubility data were examined in order to check the impact of the differences observed in their crystalline structures.

  3. Monosodium glutamate in its anhydrous and monohydrate form: Differentiation by Raman spectroscopies and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peica, N.; Lehene, C.; Leopold, N.; Schlücker, S.; Kiefer, W.

    2007-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a common flavor enhancer, is detected in aqueous solutions by Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectroscopies at the micromolar level. The presence of different species, such as protonated and unprotonated MSG, is demonstrated by concentration and pH dependent Raman and SERS experiments. In particular, the symmetric bending modes of the amino group and the stretching modes of the carboxy moiety are employed as marker bands. The protonation of the NH 2 group at acidic pH values, for example, is detected in the Raman spectra. From the measured SERS spectra, a strong chemical interaction of MSG with the colloidal particles is deduced and a geometry of MSG adsorbed on the silver surface is proposed. In order to assign the observed Raman bands, calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) were performed. The calculated geometries, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and Raman scattering activities for both MSG forms are in good agreement with experimental data. The set of theoretical data enables a complete vibrational assignment of the experimentally detected Raman spectra and the differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrate forms of MSG.

  4. Partition of five aroma compounds between air and skim milk, anhydrous milk fat or full-fat cream

    OpenAIRE

    Meynier, Anne; Garillon, Aurélie; Lethuaut, Laurent; Genot, Claude

    2003-01-01

    International audience; The present study deals with the physicochemical interactions between aroma compounds and various dairy media used as models of complex food matrices, as well as the consequences of the interactions on aroma partitioning between the air and matrix. Five aroma compounds were investigated: amyl and isoamyl acetate, ethyl pentanoate, hexanal and t-2-hexenal. Skim milk, anhydrous milk fat and full-fat cream were chosen as dairy media, while water was used as a reference me...

  5. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vilmer

    Full Text Available The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO is then performed, starting from an estimation of the transit time of the inter-planetary perturbation from the Sun to the Earth, assumed to be achieved at a constant speed (i.e. the speed measured at 1 AU. EIT/SOHO and Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH observations are also used as proxies in this identification for the cases when LASCO observations do not allow one to firmly establish the association. The last part of the analysis concerns the identification of the solar source of the CMEs, performed using a large set of solar observations from X-ray to radio wavelengths. In the present study, this association is based on a careful examination of many data sets (EIT, NRH and H images and not on the use of catalogs and of Solar Geophysical Data reports. An association between inter-planetary disturbances and LASCO/CMEs or proxies on the disk is found for 36 interplanetary events. For 32 events, the solar source of activity can also be identified. A large proportion of cases is found to be associated with a flare signature in an active region, not excluding of course the involvement of a filament. Conclusions are finally drawn on the propagation of the disturbances in the interplanetary medium, the preferential association of disturbances detected close to the Earth’s orbit with halos or wide CMEs and the location on the solar disk of solar sources of the interplanetary disturbances during that period

  6. Instrument study of the Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX) for a lunar lander mission II: Laboratory model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Strack, Heiko; Bugiel, Sebastian; Wu, Yiyong; Srama, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    A dust trajectory detector placed on the lunar surface is exposed to extend people's knowledge on the dust environment above the lunar surface. The new design of Lunar Dust eXplorer (LDX) is well suited for lunar or asteroid landers with a broad range of particle charges (0.1-10 fC), speeds (few m s-1 to few km s-1) and sizes (0.1-10 μ m). The calibration of dust trajectory detector is important for the detector development. We do present experimental results to characterize the accuracy of the newly developed LDX laboratory model. Micron sized iron particles were accelerated to speed between 0.5 and 20 km s-1 with primary charges larger than 1 fC. The achieved accuracies of the detector are ± 5 % and ± 7 % for particle charge and speed, respectively. Dust trajectories can be determined with measurement accuracy better than ± 2°. A dust sensor of this type is suited for the exploration of the surface of small bodies without an atmosphere like the Earth's moon or asteroids in future, and the minisatellites are also suitable carriers for the study of interplanetary dust and manned debris on low Earth orbits.

  7. A new instrument to measure charged and neutral cometary dust particles at low and high impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economon, T.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of dust particle detector, the PVDF dust detector, was designed for space missions such as the Halley Comet missions where the particle impact velocity is very high. It is demonstrated that this same PVDF detector (operating in a different mode) also has the capability of detecting dust particles having low velocity (approx. 100 m/s). This low velocity detection capability is extremely important in terms of planned missions requiring measurement of low velocity dust particles such as comet rendezvous missions. An additional detecting element (charge induction cylinder) was also developed which, when combined with a PVDF detector, yields a system which will measure the charge (magnitude and sign) carried by a cometary particle as well as the particle velocity and mass for impact velocities in the range 100 to 500 m/s. Since the cylinder-PVDF detector system has a relatively small geometry factors, an array of PVDF detectors was included having a total sensing area of 0.1 sq m for measurements in regions of space where the dust flux is expected to be low. The characteristics of the detectors in this array have been chosen to provide optimum mass sensitivity for both low-velocity cometary dust as well as high-velocity asteroid associated and interplanetary dust.

  8. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  9. Production of High-Purity Anhydrous Nickel(II Perrhenate for Tungsten-Based Sintered Heavy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Leszczyńska-Sejda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the production of high-purity anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate. The method comprises sorption of nickel(II ions from aqueous nickel(II nitrate solutions, using strongly acidic C160 cation exchange resin, and subsequent elution of sorbed nickel(II ions using concentrated perrhenic acid solutions. After the neutralization of the resulting rhenium-nickel solutions, hydrated nickel(II perrhenate is then separated and then dried at 160 °C to obtain the anhydrous form. The resulting compound is reduced in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia in order to produce a Re-Ni alloy powder. This study provides information on the selected properties of the resulting Re-Ni powder. This powder was used as a starting material for the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni heavy alloys. Microstructure examination results and selected properties of the produced sintered heavy alloys were compared to sintered alloys produced using elemental W, Re, and Ni powders. This study showed that the application of anhydrous nickel(II perrhenate in the production of 77W-20Re-3Ni results in better properties of the sintered alloys compared to those made from elemental powders.

  10. High temperature proton exchange membranes prepared from epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid as anhydrous proton conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cheng; Shen, Chunhui; Kong, Gengjin; Gao, Shanjun

    2013-01-01

    High temperature anhydrous proton exchange membranes based on phosphonic acid were prepared from epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane (EHTMS) and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) by sol–gel process. The structures and properties of membranes with different phosphonic acid content were extensively characterized by FTIR, TG-DSC and XRD. Their proton conductivity under dry condition was also investigated under different temperature. The results show that the proton conductivity of the prepared membranes strongly depends on temperature, and the proton conductivity ranges from 8.81 × 10 −5 S cm −1 at 20 °C to 4.65 × 10 −2 S cm −1 at 140 °C under anhydrous condition. It indicates that the increasing temperature is favorable for congregating of the grafted–PO 3 H 2 and increasing of the proton mobility. In addition, from the results of AFM images, it was confirmed that the continuous distribution of phosphonic acid groups is favorable for the formation of the proton transport channel, which can significantly enhance the proton conductivity of the membranes. Highlights: ► Hybrid membranes of Epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane and Amino trimethylene phosphonic acid. ► The proton conductivity is 4.65 × 10 −2 S cm −1 at 140 °C under anhydrous condition. ► Continuous uniform distributions of phosphonic acid groups can be observed by AFM. ► There could be hydrogen bond network within high temperature membranes

  11. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chang; Zhang Xiulian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  12. Dust in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1980-01-01

    A two-component dust model is suggested to explain the infrared emission from planetary nebulae. A cold dust component located in the extensive remnant of the red-giant envelope exterior to the visible nebula is responsible for the far-infrared emission. A ward dust component, which is condensed after the formation of the planetary nebula and confined within the ionized gas shell, emits most of the near- and mid-infrared radiation. The observations of NGC 7027 are shown to be consisten with such a model. The correlation of silicate emission in several planetary nebulae with an approximately +1 spectral index at low radio frequencies suggests that both the silicate and radio emissions originate from the remnant of the circumstellar envelope of th precursor star and are observable only while the planetary nebula is young. It is argued that oxygen-rich stars as well as carbon-rich stars can be progenitors of planetary nebulae

  13. Laboratory Studies of the Formation of Carbonaceous Cosmic Dust from PAH Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, C. S.

    2012-05-01

    The study of the formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. PAHs are important chemical building blocks of interstellar dust. They are detected in interplanetary dust particles and in meteoritic samples and are an important, ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. The formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, it is imperative that laboratory experiments be conducted to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation from PAH precursors. Studies of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include O, N, and S, have recently been performed using the COSmIC facility in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS), thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. We report the measurements obtained in these experiments. Studies with hydrocarbon precursors show the feasibility of specific molecules to form PAHs, while studies with carbon ring systems (benzene and derivatives, PAHs) precursors provide information on pathways toward larger carbonaceous molecules. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the size and the structure of interstellar dust grain particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Acknowledgements: This research is

  14. PROGRA2 experiment: new results for dust clouds and regoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, J.-B.; Hadamcik, E.; Worms, J.-C.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.-C.; Daugeron, D.

    With the CNES-sponsored PROGRA2 facility, linear polarization of scattered light is performed on various types of dust clouds in microgravity during parabolic flights onboard the CNES- and ESA-sponsored A300 Zéro-G aircraft. Clouds of fluffy aggregates are also studied on the ground when lifted by an air-draught. The effect of the physical properties of the particles, such as the grains size and size distribution, the real part of the refractive index, and the structure is currently being studied. The size distribution of the agglomerates is measured in the field of view from the polarized component images. The large number of phase curves already obtained in the various conditions of measurements, in order to build a database (about 160 curves) allows us to better connect the physical properties with the observed polarization of the dust in the clouds. The aim is to compare these curves with those obtained in the solar system by remote-sensing and in-situ techniques for interplanetary dust, cometary coma, and solid particles in planetary atmospheres (Renard et al., 2003). Measurements on layers of particles (i.e. on the ground) are then compared with remote measurements on asteroidal regoliths and planetary surfaces. New phase curves will be presented and discussed i.e. for quartz samples, crystals, fluffy mixtures of alumina and silica, and a high porosity ``regolith'' analogue made of micron-sized silica spheres. This work will contribute to the choice of the samples to be studied with the IMPACT/ICAPS instrument onboard the ISS. J.-B. Renard, E. Hadamcik, T. Lemaire, J.-C. Worms and A.-C. Levasseur-Regourd (2003). Polarization imaging of dust cloud particles: improvement and applications of the PROGRA2 instrument, ASR 31, 12, 2511-2518.

  15. Propagation Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections from the Sun Far into Interplanetary Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun far into interplanetary space is not well understood, due to limited observations. In this study we examine the propagation characteristics of two geo-effective CMEs, which occurred on 2005 May 6 and 13, respectively. Significant heliospheric consequences associated with the two CMEs are observed, including interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) at the Earth and Ulysses , interplanetary shocks, a long-duration type II radio burst, and intense geomagnetic storms. We use coronagraph observations from SOHO /LASCO, frequency drift of the long-duration type II burst, in situ measurements at the Earth and Ulysses , and magnetohydrodynamic propagation of the observed solar wind disturbances at 1 au to track the CMEs from the Sun far into interplanetary space. We find that both of the CMEs underwent a major deceleration within 1 au and thereafter a gradual deceleration when they propagated from the Earth to deep interplanetary space, due to interactions with the ambient solar wind. The results also reveal that the two CMEs interacted with each other in the distant interplanetary space even though their launch times on the Sun were well separated. The intense geomagnetic storm for each case was caused by the southward magnetic fields ahead of the CME, stressing the critical role of the sheath region in geomagnetic storm generation, although for the first case there is a corotating interaction region involved.

  16. Dust-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our theoretical research under this grant over the past 3 years was to develop new understanding in a range of topics in the physics of dust-plasma interactions, with application to space and the laboratory. We conducted studies related to the physical properties of dust, waves and instabilities in both weakly coupled and strongly coupled dusty plasmas, and innovative possible applications. A major consideration in our choice of topics was to compare theory with experiments or observations, and to motivate new experiments, which we believe is important for developing this relatively new field. Our research is summarized, with reference to our list of journal publications.

  17. Shock parameter calculations at weak interplanetary shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Gloag

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A large set of interplanetary shock waves observed using the Ulysses spacecraft is analysed in order to determine their local parameters. For the first time a detailed analysis is extended to the thermodynamic properties of a large number of events. The intention is to relate the shock parameters to the requirements set by MHD shock theory. A uniform approach is adopted in the selection of up and downstream regions for this analysis and applied to all the shock waves. Initially, the general case of a 3 component adiabatic plasma is considered. However, the calculation of magnetosonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers and the ratio of downstream to upstream entropy produce some unexpected results. In some cases there is no clear increase in entropy across the shock and also the magnetosonic Mach number can be less than 1. It is found that a more discerning use of data along with an empirical value for the polytropic index can raise the distribution of downstream to upstream entropy ratios to a more acceptable level. However, it is also realised that many of these shocks are at the very weakest end of the spectrum and associated phenomena may also contribute to the explanation of these results.

  18. Multi-Objective Hybrid Optimal Control for Interplanetary Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary design of low-thrust interplanetary missions is a highly complex process. The mission designer must choose discrete parameters such as the number of flybys, the bodies at which those flybys are performed, and in some cases the final destination. Because low-thrust trajectory design is tightly coupled with systems design, power and propulsion characteristics must be chosen as well. In addition, a time-history of control variables must be chosen which defines the trajectory. There are often many thousands, if not millions, of possible trajectories to be evaluated. The customer who commissions a trajectory design is not usually interested in a point solution, but rather the exploration of the trade space of trajectories between several different objective functions. This can be very expensive process in terms of the number of human analyst hours required. An automated approach is therefore very desirable. This work presents such an approach by posing the mission design problem as a multi-objective hybrid optimal control problem. The methods is demonstrated on hypothetical mission to the main asteroid belt and to Deimos.

  19. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  20. Impact of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds On The Earthss Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.

    We present data collected by Wind in March 2001 for magnetic clouds along with the Dst index and IMAGE/RPI sounder data in the magnetosphere. The normal state of the solar wind is characterized by a solar wind quasi-invariant (QI = (B2/8)/(v2/2) ) where B is the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field , v is the bulk solar wind speed and is the plasma density. While the yearly median QI follows sunspot num- bers with a 98 per cent correlation (Osherovich et al 1999), the arrival of a magnetic cloud increases QI by two orders of magnitude (Osherovich et al. 1997). Sounder stimulated resonances such as harmonics of the electron gyro frequency fce, electron plasma resonance fpe, Bernstein mode resonances Qn with frequencies above fpe and Dn resonances with frequencies below fpe are used to deduce the ratio between the electron gyro radius rce and the Debye radius rde. We suggest that the ratio rce/rde as a measure of the magnetospheric response to the magnetic cloud. We show that profiles of QI and rce/rde are similar and we find the delay time between the signal (QI) and the response (rce/rde). References: Osherovich, V.A., et al., Proc. 31st ESLAB Symp., ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Nether- lands, 171, 1997. Osherovich, V.A. , J. Fainberg and R.G. Stone, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26(16), 2597, 1999.

  1. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-12-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking. Six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients

  2. Coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions in interplanetary space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kilpua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs are large-scale heliospheric transients that originate from the Sun. When an ICME is sufficiently faster than the preceding solar wind, a shock wave develops ahead of the ICME. The turbulent region between the shock and the ICME is called the sheath region. ICMEs and their sheaths and shocks are all interesting structures from the fundamental plasma physics viewpoint. They are also key drivers of space weather disturbances in the heliosphere and planetary environments. ICME-driven shock waves can accelerate charged particles to high energies. Sheaths and ICMEs drive practically all intense geospace storms at the Earth, and they can also affect dramatically the planetary radiation environments and atmospheres. This review focuses on the current understanding of observational signatures and properties of ICMEs and the associated sheath regions based on five decades of studies. In addition, we discuss modelling of ICMEs and many fundamental outstanding questions on their origin, evolution and effects, largely due to the limitations of single spacecraft observations of these macro-scale structures. We also present current understanding of space weather consequences of these large-scale solar wind structures, including effects at the other Solar System planets and exoplanets. We specially emphasize the different origin, properties and consequences of the sheaths and ICMEs.

  3. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Zakharov, L.E.; Gorelenkova, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration

  4. Solar flare nuclear gamma-rays and interplanetary proton events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E.W.; Forrest, D.J.; Cane, H.V.; Reames, D.V.; Mcguire, R.E.; Von Rosenvinge, T.T.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray line (GRL) and solar energetic proton (SEP) events observed from February 1980 through January 1985 are compared in order to substantiate and better characterize the lack of correlation between GRL fluences and SEP event peak fluxes. The scatter plot of SEP event peak flux vs. GRL fluence is presented, and the ratio of 'solar' to 'interplanetary', about 10 MeV protons, is presented. It is shown that, while even large SEP events can originate in flares lacking detectable GRL emission, the converse case of flares with a significant GRL line fluence by lacking protons in space is rare. The ratio R of the number of about 10 MeV protons that produce GRL emission at the flare site to the number of about 10 MeV protons detected in space can vary from event to event by four orders of magnitude. There is a clear tendency for impulsive flares to have larger values of R than long-duration flares, where the flare time scale is given by the e-folding decay time of the associated soft X-ray emission. 103 refs

  5. The Characteristic Response of Whistler Mode Waves to Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Chen, Lunjin; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard M.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Li, Jinxing; An, Xin; Zhou, Chen; Kletzing, Craig; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2017-10-01

    Magnetospheric whistler mode waves play a key role in regulating the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. Recent satellite observations indicate a significant influence of interplanetary (IP) shocks on whistler mode wave power in the inner magnetosphere. In this study, we statistically investigate the response of whistler mode chorus and plasmaspheric hiss to IP shocks based on Van Allen Probes and THEMIS satellite observations. Immediately after the IP shock arrival, chorus wave power is usually intensified, often at postmidnight to prenoon sector, while plasmaspheric hiss wave power predominantly decreases near the dayside but intensifies near the nightside. We conclude that chorus wave intensification outside the plasmasphere is probably associated with the suprathermal electron flux enhancement caused by the IP shock. Through a simple ray tracing modeling assuming the scenario that plasmaspheric hiss is originated from chorus, we find that the solar wind dynamic pressure increase changes the magnetic field configuration to favor ray penetration in the nightside and promote ray refraction away from the dayside, potentially explaining the magnetic local time-dependent responses of plasmaspheric hiss waves following IP shock arrivals.

  6. The structure of plasma density irregularities in the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Observations of the scintillation of sources 3C273 and 3C279 at 2292 MHz are described. The interpretation of the scintillation in terms of the structure of the plasma-density irregularities in the interplanetary medium is discussed. Scintillation index measurements obtained during these observations are combined with similar measurements at other frequencies reported in the literature. The resulting variation of the scintillation-index and observing-frequency product with source elongation is interpreted in terms of irregularities with a spatial spectrum of electron density which is of power law form. This result is reinforced by an analysis of the spectra of the observed scintillations. Several tests are applied to both the Fourier and Bessel spectra which illustrate conclusively that the irregularity spatial spectrum is of power law form, rather than the Gaussian form suggested by some workers. The spectra also show that the irregularities are isotopic within 0.2 AU of the sun, while there is some evidence that a degree of elongation normal to the direction of the motion of the irregularities may develop at slightly greater solar distances. The irregularity velocities determined are consistent with solar wind velocities. (author)

  7. Paleo-dust insights onto dust-climate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust emissions are affected by changing climate conditions, and in turn dust impacts the atmospheric radiation budget, clouds and biogeochemical cycles. Climate and public health dust-related issues call for attention on the fate of the dust cycle in the future, and the representation of the dust cycle is now part of the strategy of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 4 and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 6 (PMIP4-CMIP6). Since mineral aerosols are one of the most important natural aerosols, understanding past dust responses to climate in the paleoclimate will allow us to better understand mineral aerosol feedbacks with climate and biogeochemistry in the Anthropocene. Modern observations and paleoclimate records offer the possibility of multiple, complementary views on the global dust cycle, and allow to validate and/or constrain the numerical representation of dust in climate and Earth system models. We present our results from a set of simulations with the Community Earth System Model for different climate states, including present and past climates such as the pre-industrial, the mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum. A set of simulations including a prognostic dust cycle was thoroughly compared with a wide set of present day observations from different platforms and regions, in order to realistically constrain the magnitude of dust load, surface concentration, deposition, optical properties, and particle size distributions. The magnitude of emissions for past climate regimes was constrained based on compilations of paleodust mass accumulation rates and size distributions, as well as based on information on dust provenance. The comparison with a parallel set of simulations without dust allows estimating the impacts of dust on surface climate. We analyze impacts of dust on the mean and variability of surface temperature and precipitation in each climate state, as well as the impacts that changing dust emissions had

  8. 75 FR 32142 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... Combustible Dust AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of combustible dust Web Chat. SUMMARY: OSHA invites interested parties to participate in a Web Chat on the workplace hazards of combustible dust. OSHA plans to use the information gathered in response to this Web...

  9. The dust that lights up the Zodiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; McDonnell, T.; Carey, B.

    1985-01-01

    The article concerns cosmic dust particles, which vary in size from fine dust to large dust particles which burn-up in the atmosphere as meteors. The composition and properties of cosmic dust; zodiacal light; brownlee particles; capture cell for collecting dust samples in space and hypervelocity impacts of cosmic dust on the cell; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  11. Dust pollution from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine dust particles emitted from agricultural facilities, lands and operations are considered pollutants when they affect public health and welfare. These particles, with a diameter of less than or equal to 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and less than or equal to 10 µm (PM10), are regulated by government agencies. ...

  12. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and box springs. House dust may also contain tiny particles of pollen, mold, fibers from clothing and fabrics, and detergents. All of these can also trigger allergies and asthma. Choose the Right Home Furnishings You can do many things to limit ...

  13. Signatures of interplanetary transients behind shocks and their associated near-surface solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bravo

    Full Text Available Interplanetary transients with particular signatures different from the normal solar wind have been observed behind interplanetary shocks and also without shocks. In this paper we have selected four well-known transient interplanetary signatures, namely: magnetic clouds, helium enhancements and bidirectional electron and ion fluxes, found in the solar wind behind shocks, and undertaken a correlative study between them and the corresponding solar observations. We found that although commonly different signatures appear in a single interplanetary transient event, they are not necessarily simultaneous, that is, they may belong to different plasma regions within the ejecta, which suggests that they may be generated by complex processes involving the ejection of plasma from different solar regions. We also found that more than 90% of these signatures correspond to cases when an Hα flare and/or the eruption of a filament occurred near solar central meridian between 1 and 4 days before the observation of the disturbance at 1 AU, the highest association being with flares taking place between 2 and 3 days before. The majority of the Hα flares were also accompanied by soft X-ray events. We also studied the longitudinal distribution of the associated solar events and found that between 80% and 90% of the interplanetary ejecta were associated with solar events within a longitudinal band of ±30° from the solar central meridian. An east-west asymmetry in the associated solar events seems to exist for some of the signatures. We also look for coronal holes adjacent to the site of the explosive event and find that they were present almost in every case.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics · Interplanetary shocks · Solar wind plasma · Solar physics · Flares and mass ejections

  14. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... the supersaturated alloy, into a diverse carbide network. Finally, the foils turn into metal dust accompanied by a thinning and disappearance of the foils. Investigations of TEM samples, prepared by means of FIB, on the carbide network revealed a lamellar structure with carbides and austenite. Finally, the mutual...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting...

  15. Severe geomagnetic storms and Forbush decreases: interplanetary relationships reexamined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe storms (Dst and Forbush decreases (FD during cycle 23 showed that maximum negative Dst magnitudes usually occurred almost simultaneously with the maximum negative values of the Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field B, but the maximum magnitudes of negative Dst and Bz were poorly correlated (+0.28. A parameter Bz(CP was calculated (cumulative partial Bz as sum of the hourly negative values of Bz from the time of start to the maximum negative value. The correlation of negative Dst maximum with Bz(CP was higher (+0.59 as compared to that of Dst with Bz alone (+0.28. When the product of Bz with the solar wind speed V (at the hour of negative Bz maximum was considered, the correlation of negative Dst maximum with VBz was +0.59 and with VBz(CP, 0.71. Thus, including V improved the correlations. However, ground-based Dst values have a considerable contribution from magnetopause currents (several tens of nT, even exceeding 100 nT in very severe storms. When their contribution is subtracted from Dst(nT, the residue Dst* representing true ring current effect is much better correlated with Bz and Bz(CP, but not with VBz or VBz(CP, indicating that these are unimportant parameters and the effect of V is seen only through the solar wind ram pressure causing magnetopause currents. Maximum negative Dst (or Dst* did not occur at the same hour as maximum FD. The time evolutions of Dst and FD were very different. The correlations were almost zero. Basically, negative Dst (or Dst* and FDs are uncorrelated, indicating altogether different mechanism.

  16. Acceleration of energetic protons by interplanetary shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesses, M.E.

    1979-01-01

    The acceleration of energetic protons in interplanetary magnetosonic fast-mode shock waves is studied via analytical modelling, numerical simulations and in situ observations. It is found that the only physical process by which energetic particles can gain energy from magnetosonic fast-mode shock waves is the one in which the particles cross the shock front several times during a shock encounter and the particle guiding centers gradient B and/or curvature drift at the shock front in the vector V x vector B electric field that exists in the shock rest frame. It is shown that it is physically impossible for charged particles to be Fermi accelerated by MHD shock waves or discontinuities. An analytical model is presented in which the particle-shock interaction is viewed in an intermediate frame in which the upstream and downstream vector V x vector B and partial derivative of vector B with respect to the electric fields are simultaneously zero. It is shown by numerical simulations that both reflected and transmitted particles conserve the first adiabatic invariant in the vector E = 0 frame for quasi-perpendicular shocks psi greater than or equal to 70 0 . The analytical predictions of post-shock energies and pitch angles and shock reflection and transmission coefficients are shown to be in excellent agreement with numerical simulation results. It is found that the 2 to 3 orders of magnitude increases in the Ca 1 MeV proton intensity frequently observed around the time of shock passage apparently cannot be produced by protons encountering the shocks just once, and that the average particle probably encounters the shocks several times prior to observation at Ca 1 MeV. The combination of vector V x vector B electric field mechanism and multiple shock encounters is shown to lead naturally to a differential energy spectrum that is an exponential in momentum

  17. The use of various interplanetary scintillation indices within geomagnetic forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available Interplanetary scintillation (IPS, the twinkling of small angular diameter radio sources, is caused by the interaction of the signal with small-scale plasma irregularities in the solar wind. The technique may be used to sense remotely the near-Earth heliosphere and observations of a sufficiently large number of sources may be used to track large-scale disturbances as they propagate from close to the Sun to the Earth. Therefore, such observations have potential for use within geomagnetic forecasts. We use daily data from the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, made available through the World Data Centre, to test the success of geomagnetic forecasts based on IPS observations. The approach discussed here was based on the reduction of the information in a map to a single number or series of numbers. The advantages of an index of this nature are that it may be produced routinely and that it could ideally forecast both the occurrence and intensity of geomagnetic activity. We start from an index that has already been described in the literature, INDEX35. On the basis of visual examination of the data in a full skymap format modifications were made to the way in which the index was calculated. It was hoped that these would lead to an improvement in its forecasting ability. Here we assess the forecasting potential of the index using the value of the correlation coefficient between daily Ap and the IPS index, with IPS leading by 1 day. We also compare the forecast based on the IPS index with forecasts of Ap currently released by the Space Environment Services Center (SESC. Although we find that the maximum improvement achieved is small, and does not represent a significant advance in forecasting ability, the IPS forecasts at this phase of the solar cycle are of a similar quality to those made by SESC.

  18. Automated trajectory planning for multiple-flyby interplanetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Jacob

    Many space mission planning problems may be formulated as hybrid optimal control problems (HOCP), i.e. problems that include both real-valued variables and categorical variables. In interplanetary trajectory design problems the categorical variables will typically specify the sequence of planets at which to perform flybys, and the real-valued variables will represent the launch date, ight times between planets, magnitudes and directions of thrust, flyby altitudes, etc. The contribution of this work is a framework for the autonomous optimization of multiple-flyby interplanetary trajectories. The trajectory design problem is converted into a HOCP with two nested loops: an "outer-loop" that finds the sequence of flybys and an "inner-loop" that optimizes the trajectory for each candidate yby sequence. The problem of choosing a sequence of flybys is posed as an integer programming problem and solved using a genetic algorithm (GA). This is an especially difficult problem to solve because GAs normally operate on a fixed-length set of decision variables. Since in interplanetary trajectory design the number of flyby maneuvers is not known a priori, it was necessary to devise a method of parameterizing the problem such that the GA can evolve a variable-length sequence of flybys. A novel "null gene" transcription was developed to meet this need. Then, for each candidate sequence of flybys, a trajectory must be found that visits each of the flyby targets and arrives at the final destination while optimizing some cost metric, such as minimizing ▵v or maximizing the final mass of the spacecraft. Three different classes of trajectory are described in this work, each of which requireda different physical model and optimization method. The choice of a trajectory model and optimization method is especially challenging because of the nature of the hybrid optimal control problem. Because the trajectory optimization problem is generated in real time by the outer-loop, the inner

  19. Dust Growth in Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, R.; Tsytovich, V. N.

    2002-12-01

    Dust formation in space is important in diverse environments such as dust molecular clouds, proto-planetary nebulae, stellar outbursts, and supernova explosions. The formation of dust proceeds the formation of stellar objects and planets. In all these environments the dust particles interact with both neutral and plasma particles as well as with (ultraviolet) radiation and cosmic rays. The conventional view of grain growth is one based on accretion by the Van der Waals and chemical forces [Watson and Salpeter [14] considered in detail both theoretically and numerically (Kempf at all [6],Meaking [7]( and confirmed recently by micro-gravity experiments Blum et all [2]). The usual point of view is that the dust grow is occurring in dust molecular clouds at very low temperatures ~ (10 - 30)° K and is a slow process - dust grows to a size of about 0.1 μm in 106 - 109 years. This contradicts recent observations of dust growing in winds of C-stars in about 10 years and behind the supernova SN1987A shock in about 500 days. Also recent observation of star formation at the edge of irradiated dust clouds suggests that new plasma mechanism operates in star formation. Dusty plasma mechanisms of agglomeration are analyzed as an explanation of the new astrophysical observation. New micro-gravity experiments are proposed for observing the plasma mechanisms of dust agglomeration at gas pressures substantially higher than used in ([2]. Calculations for the growth rates of dust agglomeration due to plasma mechanisms are presented. It is shown that at large neutral gas densities the dust plasma attraction provides an explanation of dust grow in about 10 days observed in H-star winds. Ionization by cosmic rays and by radioactive dust can provide the dust attraction necessary for forming dust clumping observed in molecular clouds and the fractal plasma clumping can enhance the time to reach the gravitational contraction phase operating at the final stage of star formation. A new

  20. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  1. Education and Public Outreach for Stardust@home: An Interactive Internet-based Search for Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Bryan J.; Westphal, A. J.; Butterworth, A. L.; Craig, N.

    2006-12-01

    On January 15, 2006, NASA’s Stardust mission returned to Earth after nearly seven years in interplanetary space. During its journey, Stardust encountered comet Wild 2, collecting dust particles from it in a special material called aerogel. At two other times in the mission, aerogel collectors were also opened to collect interstellar dust. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector is being scanned by an automated microscope at the Johnson Space Center. There are approximately 700,000 fields of view needed to cover the entire collector, but we expect only a few dozen total grains of interstellar dust were captured within it. Finding these particles is a daunting task. We have recruited many thousands of volunteers from the public to aid in the search for these precious pieces of space dust trapped in the collectors. We call the project Stardust@home. Through Stardust@home, volunteers from the public search fields of view from the Stardust aerogel collector using a web-based Virtual Microscope. Volunteers who discover interstellar dust particles have the privilege of naming them. The interest and response to this project has been extraordinary. Many people from all walks of life are very excited about space science and eager to volunteer their time to contribute to a real research project such as this. We will discuss the progress of the project and the education and outreach activities being carried out for it.

  2. Nucleus structure and dust morphology: Post-Rosetta understanding and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A.; Bentley, Mark; Ciarletti, Valérie; Kofman, Woldek; Lasue, Jeremie; Mannel, Thurid; Herique, Alain

    2017-10-01

    The structure of cometary nuclei and the morphology of dust particles they eject have long been unknowns in cometary science. The combination of these two subjects, as revealed by the Rosetta mission at 67P/C-G, is currently providing an unprecedented insight about Solar System formation and early evolution.Rosetta has established that the bulk porosity of 67P/C-G nucleus is high, in the 70% to 85% range, both from the determination of its density and from permittivity measurements with CONSERT bistatic radar experiment [1-2]. CONSERT, through operations after Philae landing on 12-13 November 2014, has also allowed us to estimate that i) the porosity is likely to be higher inside the nucleus than on its subsurface, ii) a major component of the nucleus is refractory carbonaceous compounds, and iii) the small lobe is homogeneous at a scale of a few wavelengths (i.e., about 10 m), while heterogeneities in the 3-m range (similar to the rounded nodules noticed on walls of large pits) cannot be ruled out [2-4].Rosetta has also established, through its 26 months rendezvous with 67P/C-G, the aggregated structure of dust particles within a wide range of sizes in the inner cometary coma. The MIDAS atomic force microscope experiment has given us evidence (from 3D topographic images with nano- to micrometer resolution) for i) a hierarchical structure of aggregated dust particles, down to tens of nm-sized grains, ii) one extremely porous dust particle, with a fractal dimension of (1.7 ± 0.1) [5-6]. The accuracy of comparisons between cometary dust particles and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere (including CP-IDPs) could thus be improved.Such results should further refine the main processes (e.g., low velocity aggregation) that allowed the formation of comets in the early Solar System, and the implications of a possible late heavy bombardment on the interplanetary dust clouds and on telluric planets.References. 1. Pätzold et al. Nature 530 63 2016. 2

  3. Composition of interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence that interstellar dust is composed partly of silicates, graphite, and water ice is reviewed. Indirect evidence, from recent studies of the chemical composition of interstellar gas, is assessed in terms of two possible models for the formation of the dust: condensation under thermal-equilibrium conditions and accretion under nonequilibrium conditions. It is concluded that probably the more refractory elements condense under equilibrium conditions and that probably the more volatile ones condense under nonequilibrium conditions. Equilibrium condensation may occur either in stellar atmospheres or in circumstellar nebulae, but arguments from stellar evolution favor the latter. If this is correct, all but a tiny fraction of the present interstellar medium has at least once been involved in circumstellar nebulae. This is consistent with the hypothesis that planetary systems are commonplace

  4. High temperature proton exchange membranes prepared from epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid as anhydrous proton conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, No. 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Shen, Chunhui, E-mail: shenchunhui@whut.edu.cn [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, No. 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kong, Gengjin; Gao, Shanjun [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, School of Material Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, No. 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-06-15

    High temperature anhydrous proton exchange membranes based on phosphonic acid were prepared from epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane (EHTMS) and amino trimethylene phosphonic acid (ATMP) by sol–gel process. The structures and properties of membranes with different phosphonic acid content were extensively characterized by FTIR, TG-DSC and XRD. Their proton conductivity under dry condition was also investigated under different temperature. The results show that the proton conductivity of the prepared membranes strongly depends on temperature, and the proton conductivity ranges from 8.81 × 10{sup −5} S cm{sup −1} at 20 °C to 4.65 × 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at 140 °C under anhydrous condition. It indicates that the increasing temperature is favorable for congregating of the grafted–PO{sub 3}H{sub 2} and increasing of the proton mobility. In addition, from the results of AFM images, it was confirmed that the continuous distribution of phosphonic acid groups is favorable for the formation of the proton transport channel, which can significantly enhance the proton conductivity of the membranes. Highlights: ► Hybrid membranes of Epoxycyclohexylethyltrimethoxysilane and Amino trimethylene phosphonic acid. ► The proton conductivity is 4.65 × 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at 140 °C under anhydrous condition. ► Continuous uniform distributions of phosphonic acid groups can be observed by AFM. ► There could be hydrogen bond network within high temperature membranes.

  5. Dust acoustic shock wave at high dust density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Susmita; Khan, Manoranjan; Avinash, K.; Gupta, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) shock wave at high dust density, i.e., the dust electroacoustic (DEA) or dust Coulomb (DC) shock wave has been investigated incorporating the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The nonlinear DEA (DC) shock wave is seen to be governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation, in which the Burger term is proportional to the nonadiabaticity generated dissipation. It is seen that the shock strength decreases but after reaching minimum, it increases as the dust space charge density |q d n d | increases and the shock strength of DA wave is greater than that of DEA (DC) wave. Moreover the DEA (DC) shock width increases appreciably with increase mass m i of the ion component of the dusty plasma but for DA shock wave the effect is weak

  6. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  7. In vitro study on the interaction of ketotifen fumarate with anhydrous theophylline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Aktar Sayeed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between ketotifen fumarate and anhydrous theophylline in aqueous media of various pH (1.2 and 6.8. Using Job's continuous-variation analysis and Ardon's spectrophotomeric measurement methods, the values of the stability constants of theophylline with ketotifen were determined at a fixed temperature (37 ºC at various pH. The stability constants, ranging between 5.66 and 9.92, were derived from Ardon's plot, indicating that comparatively stable complexes had formed as a result of an interaction between the drugs. However, following the interaction of theophylline with ketotifen, stability constants were O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a interação entre o fumarato de cetotifeno e a teofilina anidra em meios aquosos com vários pH (1,2 e 6,8. Utilizando a análise da variação contínua de Job e os métodos de medida espectrofotométrica de Ardon, os valores das constantes de estabilidade da teofilina com o cetotifeno foram determinados em temperatura fixa (37 oC em vários pH. As constantes de estabilidade, variando entre 5,66 e 9,92 derivaram-se a partir do delineamento de Ardon, indicando, comparativamente, que complexos estáveis se formaram como resultado da interação entre os fármacos. Entretanto, seguindo a interação da teofilina com o cetotifeno, as constantes de estabilidade foram <1, em pH gástrico (1,2 e intestinal (8,8. A administração concomitante de cetotifeno e teofilina poderia resultar na formação de complexo estável, o que reduz a atividade terapêutica de ambos os fármacos.

  8. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  9. Interplanetary Shocks and the Resulting Geomagnetically Induced Currents at the Equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Pradipta, R.; Halford, A. J.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by interplanetary shocks represent a serious space weather threat to modern technological infrastructure. The arrival of interplanetary shocks drives magnetosphere and ionosphere currents systems, which then induce electric currents at ground level. The impact of these currents at high latitudes has been extensively researched, but the magnetic equator has been largely overlooked. In this paper, we investigate the potential effects of interplanetary shocks on the equatorial region and demonstrate that their magnetic signature is amplied by the equatorial electrojet. This local amplication substantially increases the region's susceptibility to GICs. Importantly, this result applies to both geomagnetic storms and quiet periods, and thus represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of adverse space weather impacts on technological infrastructure.

  10. Large aperture electrostatic dust detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Hensley, R.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 V has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5 x 5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles

  11. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Hensley, R.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 v has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  12. Carbon-rich dust in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko measured by COSIMA/Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardyn, Anaïs; Baklouti, Donia; Cottin, Hervé; Fray, Nicolas; Briois, Christelle; Paquette, John; Stenzel, Oliver; Engrand, Cécile; Fischer, Henning; Hornung, Klaus; Isnard, Robin; Langevin, Yves; Lehto, Harry; Le Roy, Léna; Ligier, Nicolas; Merouane, Sihane; Modica, Paola; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silén, Johan; Thirkell, Laurent; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris; Kissel, Jochen; Hilchenbach, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Cometary ices are rich in CO2, CO and organic volatile compounds, but the carbon content of cometary dust was only measured for the Oort Cloud comet 1P/Halley, during its flyby in 1986. The COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyzer (COSIMA)/Rosetta mass spectrometer analysed dust particles with sizes ranging from 50 to 1000 μm, collected over 2 yr, from 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P), a Jupiter family comet. Here, we report 67P dust composition focusing on the elements C and O. It has a high carbon content (atomic {{C}}/{{Si}} = 5.5{{ }}_{ - 1.2}^{ + 1.4} {{on average}} ) close to the solar value and comparable to the 1P/Halley data. From COSIMA measurements, we conclude that 67P particles are made of nearly 50 per cent organic matter in mass, mixed with mineral phases that are mostly anhydrous. The whole composition, rich in carbon and non-hydrated minerals, points to a primitive matter that likely preserved its initial characteristics since the comet accretion in the outer regions of the protoplanetary disc.

  13. Constraining the Origin of Impact Craters on Al Foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Rhonda M.; Achilles, Cheri; Allen, Carlton; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Sasa; Bassim, Nabil; Bastien, Ron S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary examination (PE) of the aerogel tiles and Al foils from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector has revealed multiple impact features. Some are most likely due to primary impacts of interstellar dust (ISD) grains, and others are associated with secondary impacts of spacecraft debris, and possibly primary impacts of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) [1, 2]. The current focus of the PE effort is on constraining the origin of the individual impact features so that definitive results from the first direct laboratory analysis of contemporary ISD can be reported. Because crater morphology depends on impacting particle shape and composition, in addition to the angle and direction of impact, unique particle trajectories are not easily determined. However, elemental analysis of the crater residues can distinguish real cosmic dust from the spacecraft debris, due to the low cosmic abundance of many of the elements in the spacecraft materials. We present here results from the elemental analysis of 24 craters and discuss the possible origins of 4 that are identified as candidate ISD impacts

  14. Relationship between the amplitude of geomagnetic Pc 3 pulsations and parameters of the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuklin, G.V.; Parkhomov, V.A.; Vinogradov, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The dependence of Pc 3 amplitudes (T=10-45 s) on solar wind velocity, particle density, components of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and on the Mach-Alfven number (Msub(A)) are discussed. By means of a statistical multivariate analysis of experimental data it has been shown that the pulsation amplitude is most closely connected with the solar wind velocity. A significant but less close correlation was found between Pc 3 amplitudes and the components of the interplanetary magnetic field vector in the ecliptic plane. The nature of the relationship of Pc 3 with solar wind and IMF parameters are discussed. (author)

  15. Bakers' exposure to flour dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Hollund, Bjørg Eli; Riise, Trond; Eduard, Wijnand; Bråtveit, Magne; Storaas, Torgeir

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to characterize bakers' personal exposure to airborne flour dust with respect to the health-related aerosol fractions inhalable, extrathoracic, and thoracic dust, and to examine possible production-related determinants of dust exposure. Sixty-eight bakers from 7 bakeries in Bergen, Norway (2009-2012) participated in the exposure assessment, comprising full-shift personal samples of inhalable dust (n = 107) and thoracic dust (n = 61). The relation between possible determinants and exposure was estimated using mixed effects models, while associations between the various aerosol fractions across task groups and type of bakeries were described by Pearson's correlation coefficients. Bakers' overall geometric mean personal exposure to inhalable, extrathoracic, and thoracic dust were 2.6 mg/m 3 (95% CI: 2.0, 3.2), 2.2 mg/m 3 (95% CI: 1.9, 2.7), and 0.33 mg/m 3 (95% CI 0.3, 0.4), respectively. A total of 29% of the measurements of inhalable dust were above the Norwegian Occupational Exposure Limit of 3 mg/m 3 . The exposure variability of inhalable dust could not be explained by any of the examined production-related determinants, while the daily production volume explained 18% of the variance in thoracic dust exposure. Overall, the thoracic dust represented 15% of the inhalable dust, being rather stable across the production-related determinants. The overall correlation between inhalable and thoracic dust was nevertheless moderate (r = 0.52, p bakers (r = 0.62) and no correlation during dough forming (r = 0.01). Bakers are exposed to flour dust at a level that most likely represents an excess risk of developing chronic diseases of the respiratory system, and a decrease of present exposure level is imperative. Extrathoracic dust-likely the most relevant sub-fraction in respect to flour-induced sensitization and occupational rhinitis-represented the main proportion of the measured inhalable dust. The variation in correlation coefficients between the dust fractions

  16. Dust in cosmic plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Cosmic dust is invariably immersed in a plasma and a radiative environment. Consequently, it is charged to some electrostatic potential which depends on the properties of the environment as well as the nature of the dust. This charging affects the physical and dynamical properties of the dust. In this paper the basic aspects of this dust-plasma interaction in several cosmic environments - including planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere and the interstellar medium - are discussed. The physical and dynamical consequences of the interaction, as well as the pertinent observational evidence, are reviewed. Finally, the importance of the surface charge during the condensation process in plasma environments is stressed. (Auth.)

  17. Gravitational radiation from dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacson, R.A.; Welling, J.S.; Winicour, J.

    1985-01-01

    A dust cloud is examined within the framework of the general relativistic characteristic initial value problem. Unique gravitational initial data are obtained by requiring that the space-time be quasi-Newtonian. Explicit calculations of metric and matter fields are presented, which include all post-Newtonian corrections necessary to discuss the major physical properties of null infinity. These results establish a curved space version of the Einstein quadrupole formula, in the form ''news function equals third time derivative of transverse quadrupole moment,'' for this system. However, these results imply that some weakened notion of asymptotic flatness is necessary for the description of quasi-Newtonian systems

  18. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  19. Dust confinement and dust acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2005-10-01

    Systematic laboratory experiments on dust acoustic waves require the confinement of dust particles. Here we report on new experiments in a magnetized plasma region in front of an additional positively biased disk electrode in a background plasma which is generated in argon at 27MHz between a disk and grid electrode. The plasma diffuses through the grid along the magnetic field. The three-dimensional dust distribution is measured with a horizontal sheet of laser light and a CCD camera, which are mounted on a vertical translation stage. Depending on magnetic field and discharge current, cigar or donut-shaped dust clouds are generated, which tend to rotate about the magnetic field direction. Measurements with emissive probes show that the axial confinement of dust particles with diameters between 0.7-2 μm is achieved by a balance of ion-drag force and electric field force. Dust levitation and radial confinement is due to a strong radial electric field. Dust acoustic waves are destabilized by the ion flow or can be stimulated by a periodic bias on the disk electrode. The observed wave dispersion is compared with fluid and kinetic models of the dust acoustic wave.

  20. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  1. Formation and Evolution of Interstellar Dust - Bridging Astronomy and Laboratory Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2010-05-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust are essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. PAHs are important chemical building blocks of interstellar (IS) dust. They are detected in Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs, in their neutral and ionized forms, are an important, ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Carbonaceous materials extracts from mixtures of hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H4, and benzene) contain a high variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). (From Jager et al. Carbon 45 (2007) 2981-2994). Studies of large molecular and nano-sized interstellar dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments. The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc...) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected and characterized with a high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) coupled to a Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ReTOF-MS), thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the plasma. From these unique measurements, we derive information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of IS dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Acknowledgments: This research is supported by NASA APRA (Laboratory Astrophysics Program). C. S. C. & C. L. R. acknowledge the support of the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  2. Mixed sodium nickel-manganese sulfates: Crystal structure relationships between hydrates and anhydrous salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinova, Delyana M.; Zhecheva, Ekaterina N.; Kukeva, Rositsa R.; Markov, Pavel V. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nihtianova, Diana D. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, Radostina K., E-mail: radstoy@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2017-06-15

    The present contribution provides new structural and spectroscopic data on the formation of solid solutions between hydrated and dehydrated sulfate salts of sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese in a whole concentration range: Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·yH{sub 2}O, 0≤ x≤1.0. Using powder XRD, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), IR and Raman spectroscopy it has been found that double sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese salts form solid solutions Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O with a blödite-type of structure within a broad concentration range of 0≤x≤0.49, while the manganese rich compositions Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (0.97≤x≤1.0) crystallize in the kröhnkite-type of structure. The Ni-based blödites Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O dehydrate between 140 and 260 °C into anhydrous salts Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, 0≤ x≤0.44, with a structure where Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 6} octahedra are bridged into pairs by edge- and corner sharing SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups. Both TEM and EPR methods show that the Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} ions are homogenously distributed over three crystallographic positions of the large monoclinic cell. The dehydration of the kröhnkite phase Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O yields the alluaudite phase Na{sub 2+δ}Mn{sub 2-δ/2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where the Na-to-Mn ratio decreases and all Ni{sup 2+} dopants are released from the structure. The process of the dehydration is discussed in terms of structural aspects taking into account the distortion degree of the Ni,MnO{sub 6} and SO{sub 4} polyhedra. - Graphical abstract: Thermal dehydration of the blödite phase Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O (0≤ x≤0.49) yields nickel-manganese sulfates Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} (0≤ x≤0.44) with

  3. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Enrique H; Stein, Ariel F

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  4. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique H Bucher

    Full Text Available Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina, the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite, and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr, and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  5. Impact of Mars sand on dust on the design of space suits and life support equipment: A technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    Space suits and life support equipment will come in intimate contact with Martian soil as aerosols, wind blown particles and material thrown up by men and equipment on the Martian surface. For purposes of this discussion the soil is assumed to consist of a mixture of cominuted feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, quartz, titanomagnetite and other anhydrous and hydrous iron bearing oxides, clay minerals, scapolite and water soluble chlorides and sulfates. The soil may have photoactivated surfaces that acts as a strong oxidizer with behavior similar to hydrogen peroxide. The existing data about the Mars soil suggests that the dust and sand will require designs analogous to those uses on equipment exposed to salty air and blowing sand and dust. The major design challenges are in developing high performance radiators which can be cleaned after each EVA without degradation, designing seals that are readily cleaned and possibly in selecting materials which will not be degraded by any strong oxidants in the soil. The magnitude of the dust filtration challenge needs careful evaluation in terms of the trade off between fine-particle dust filters with low pressure drop that are either physically large and heavy, like filter baghouses require frequent replacement of filter elements, of low volume high pressure thus power consumption approaches, or washable filters. In the latter, filter elements are cleaned with water, as could the outsides of the space suits in the airlock.

  6. Evolution of Cometary Dust Particles to the Orbit of the Earth: Particle Size, Shape, and Mutual Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongu; Ishiguro, Masateru

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we numerically investigated the orbital evolution of cometary dust particles, with special consideration of the initial size–frequency distribution (SFD) and different evolutionary tracks according to the initial orbit and particle shape. We found that close encounters with planets (mostly Jupiter) are the dominating factor determining the orbital evolution of dust particles. Therefore, the lifetimes of cometary dust particles (∼250,000 yr) are shorter than the Poynting–Robertson lifetime, and only a small fraction of large cometary dust particles can be transferred into orbits with small semimajor axes. The exceptions are dust particles from 2P/Encke and, potentially, active asteroids that have little interaction with Jupiter. We also found that the effects of dust shape, mass density, and SFD were not critical in the total mass supply rate to the interplanetary dust particle (IDP) cloud complex when these quantities are confined by observations of zodiacal light brightness and SFD around the Earth’s orbit. When we incorporate a population of fluffy aggregates discovered in the Earth’s stratosphere and the coma of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko within the initial ejection, the initial SFD measured at the comae of comets (67P and 81P/Wild 2) can produce the observed SFD around the Earth’s orbit. Considering the above effects, we derived the probability of mutual collisions among dust particles within the IDP cloud for the first time in a direct manner via numerical simulation and concluded that mutual collisions can mostly be ignored.

  7. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  8. Dust forecasting system in JMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, M; Tanaka, T Y; Maki, T

    2009-01-01

    JMAs dust forecasting information, which is based on a GCM dust model, is presented through the JMA website coupled with nowcast information. The website was updated recently and JMA and MOE joint 'KOSA' website was open from April 2008. Data assimilation technique will be introduced for improvement of the 'KOSA' information.

  9. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  10. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-01-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form

  11. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Combustible Dust AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder meetings. SUMMARY: OSHA invites interested parties to participate in informal stakeholder meetings on the workplace hazards of combustible dust. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these...

  12. 75 FR 10739 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Combustible Dust AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder meetings. SUMMARY: OSHA invites interested parties to participate in informal stakeholder meetings on the workplace hazards of combustible dust. OSHA plans to use the information gathered at these...

  13. Nonlinear generation of the fundamental radiation of interplanetary type III radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, A.C.L.; Alves, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A new generation mechanism of interplanetary type III radio bursts at the fundamental electron plasma frequency is discussed. It is shown that the electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability, driven by two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, can account for the experimental observations. In particular, the major difficulties encountered by the previously considered electromagnetic decay instability are removed. 19 references

  14. Relation of geomagnetic activity index variations with parameters of interplanetary scintillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.I.; Shishov, V.I.; Shishova, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    A correlation between the Asub(p)-index of geomagnetic activity, index of interplanetary scintillations and solar wind velocity, has been considered depending on the spatial position of the interplanetary plasma (IPP) regions under study. It is shown, that the scintillation index can be used to forecast the geomagnetic activity, whereas the solar wind velocity can not be used for the purpose. Heliolongitudinal dependence of geoeffectiveness of IPP sreading perturbations agrees well with their structure in the heliolongitudinal cross section (and, on the whole, with the angular structure and direction of IPP perturbation spread). To use interplanetary scintillations in forecasting the geomagnetic activity (on the level of correlation not below 0.5), the angular distance of the investigated IPP regions relative to the Sun-Earth line on the average should not exceed 30-40 deg. The time of delay between the moments of observation of variations in the scintillation index the time of passage of the corresponding heliocentric distances at an average rate of the interplanetary perturbation spread approximately 500 km/s

  15. Integrated Vehicle and Trajectory Design of Small Spacecraft with Electric Propulsion for Earth and Interplanetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangelo, Sara; Dalle, Derek; Longmier, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of Earth-transfer and interplanetary mission architectures for miniaturized spacecraft using emerging small solar electric propulsion technologies. Emerging small SEP thrusters offer significant advantages relative to existing technologies and will enable U-class systems to perform trajectory maneuvers with significant Delta V requirements. The approach in this paper is unique because it integrates trajectory design with vehicle sizing and accounts for the system and operational constraints of small U-class missions. The modeling framework includes integrated propulsion, orbit, energy, and external environment dynamics and systems-level power, energy, mass, and volume constraints. The trajectory simulation environment models orbit boosts in Earth orbit and flyby and capture trajectories to interplanetary destinations. A family of small spacecraft mission architectures are studied, including altitude and inclination transfers in Earth orbit and trajectories that escape Earth orbit and travel to interplanetary destinations such as Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Results are presented visually to show the trade-offs between competing performance objectives such as maximizing available mass and volume for payloads and minimizing transfer time. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using small spacecraft to perform significant Earth and interplanetary orbit transfers in less than one year with reasonable U-class mass, power, volume, and mission durations.

  16. Interplanetary Space Weather Effects on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Avalanche Photodiode Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, E. B.; Carlton, A. K.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Sun, X.; Cahoy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Space weather is a major concern for radiation-sensitive space systems, particularly for interplanetary missions, which operate outside of the protection of Earth's magnetic field. We examine and quantify the effects of space weather on silicon avalanche photodiodes (SiAPDs), which are used for interplanetary laser altimeters and communications systems and can be sensitive to even low levels of radiation (less than 50 cGy). While ground-based radiation testing has been performed on avalanche photodiode (APDs) for space missions, in-space measurements of SiAPD response to interplanetary space weather have not been previously reported. We compare noise data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) SiAPDs with radiation measurements from the onboard Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument. We did not find any evidence to support radiation as the cause of changes in detector threshold voltage during radiation storms, both for transient detector noise and long-term average detector noise, suggesting that the approximately 1.3 cm thick shielding (a combination of titanium and beryllium) of the LOLA detectors is sufficient for SiAPDs on interplanetary missions with radiation environments similar to what the LRO experienced (559 cGy of radiation over 4 years).

  17. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind parameters...

  18. Non-radial solar wind flows induced by the motion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the non-radial flows (NRFs during nearly five years of interplanetary observations revealed the average non-radial speed of the solar wind flows to be ~30km/s, with approximately one-half of the large (>100km/s NRFs associated with ICMEs. Conversely, the average non-radial flow speed upstream of all ICMEs is ~100km/s, with just over one-third preceded by large NRFs. These upstream flow deflections are analysed in the context of the large-scale structure of the driving ICME. We chose 5 magnetic clouds with relatively uncomplicated upstream flow deflections. Using variance analysis it was possible to infer the local axis orientation, and to qualitatively estimate the point of interception of the spacecraft with the ICME. For all 5 events the observed upstream flows were in agreement with the point of interception predicted by variance analysis. Thus we conclude that the upstream flow deflections in these events are in accord with the current concept of the large-scale structure of an ICME: a curved axial loop connected to the Sun, bounded by a curved (though not necessarily circular cross section.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (flare and stream dynamics; interplanetary magnetic fields; interplanetary shocks

  19. Mie scattering of the interplanetary magnetic field by the whole moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonett, C. P.; Colburn, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Based on the results of the Apollo magnetometer experiments, it is shown that the wavelength spectrum of the fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field includes scales consistent with the radius of the moon. Quadrupole and possibly octupole magnetic multipoles are found in the data and indicate that the moon is excited in several modes.

  20. Impact of interplanetary shock on parameters of plasma turbulence in the Earth's magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanova, L. S.; Riazantseva, M. O.; Borodkova, N. L.; Sapunova, O. V.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2017-11-01

    Data from the BMSW spectrometer, which measures the ion flux value and sometimes plasma parameters with a time resolution of 31 ms, allow the study of the parameters of turbulence of the solar wind and magnetosheath plasma on kinetic scales. In this work, the frequency spectra of the ion flux fluctuations before and after recording the interplanetary shock front in the Earth's magnetosheath are compared based on these data. It is shown that, in contrast to the solar wind, where the exponential decay of the spectrum often occurs after the shock front on the kinetic scales, no such phenomenon is observed in the magnetosheath: the spectrum on these scales can be approximated by a power function in all the cases considered. In half of these cases, the spectrum slope on the kinetic scales does not change during the interplanetary shock propagation. The results indicate a weak impact of interplanetary shock waves on the parameters of the plasma turbulence. In addition, it is shown that an interplanetary shock does not change the level of intermittency of the ion flux in the magnetosheath at both low and high level before the front.

  1. DECLINE AND RECOVERY OF THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD DURING THE PROTRACTED SOLAR MINIMUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; DeForest, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is determined by the amount of solar magnetic flux that passes through the top of the solar corona into the heliosphere, and by the dynamical evolution of that flux. Recently, it has been argued that the total flux of the IMF evolves over the solar cycle due to a combination of flux that extends well outside of 1 AU and is associated with the solar wind, and additionally, transient flux associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In addition to the CME eruption rate, there are three fundamental processes involving conversion of magnetic flux (from transient to wind-associated), disconnection, and interchange reconnection that control the levels of each form of magnetic flux in the interplanetary medium. This is distinct from some earlier models in which the wind-associated component remains steady across the solar cycle. We apply the model of Schwadron et al. that quantifies the sources, interchange, and losses of magnetic flux to 50 yr of interplanetary data as represented by the Omni2 data set using the sunspot number as a proxy for the CME eruption rate. We do justify the use of that proxy substitution. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed interplanetary magnetic flux. In the absence of sufficient CME eruptions, the IMF falls on the timescale of ∼6 yr. A key result is that rising toroidal flux resulting from CME eruption predates the increase in wind-associated IMF

  2. The smallest source region of an interplanetary magnetic cloud: A mini-sigmoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Pohjolainen, S.; Dasso, S.; Green, L. M.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Foley, C.; Copperwheat, C.

    We provide evidence for the smallest sigmoid eruption - CME - interplanetary magnetic cloud event ever observed by combining multi-wavelength remote sensing and in situ observations, as well as computing the coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields. The tiny bipole had 100 times less flux than an average active region (AR). It had a sigmoidal structure in the corona and we detected a very high level of twist in its magnetic field. On 11 May 1998, at about 8 UT, the sigmoid underwent eruption evidenced by expanding elongated EUV loops, dimmings and formation of a cusp. The Wind spacecraft, 4.5 days later, detected one of the smallest magnetic clouds (MC) ever identified (100 times less magnetic flux than an average MC). The link between the EUV bright point eruption and the interplanetary MC is supported by several pieces of evidence: timing, same coronal loop and MC orientation relative to the ecliptic, same magnetic field direction and magnetic helicity sign in the coronal loops and in the MC, comparable magnetic flux measured in the dimming regions and in the interplanetary MC and, most importantly, the pre- to post-event change of magnetic helicity in the solar corona is found to be comparable to the helicity content of the cloud.

  3. High-latitude ionospheric convection during strong interplanetary magnetic field B-y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Sofko, G.J.; Murr, D.

    1999-01-01

    . The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions corresponding to the occurrence of the ionospheric convection were B-x approximate to 1 nT, B-y approximate to 10 nT, and B-z y). We have compared our observations with statistical patterns and MHD numerical models for similar IMF...

  4. Effect of Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Disturb Storm Time on H ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E). We also study the effect of vertical component of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the variation of the magnitude of H component during storm time of April, July and. November 2004. Results show that before sudden storm commencement. (SSC) time magnitude of H component and IMF show smooth variation but.

  5. Effect of Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Disturb Storm Time on H ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are three panels (I–II–III) in Fig. 1. First panel shows the Dst of successive magnetic storm while second and third panels show the variation in H component deviation and Interplanetary Magnetic Field respectively. Graphs show the results of three magnetic storms dated 9 April, 10 April and 12 April, 2004. The upper.

  6. The measurement of interplanetary scintillations in conditions of strong radio interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffett-Smith, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary scintillations (IPS) are often severely limited by interference from man-made transmissions within the receiver pass-band. A new method of measuring IPS is described which can give useful data even in conditions of bad interference. (author)

  7. Hysteresis loops of Cosmic Ray intensity decreases versus solar and interplanetary parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between CR (Cosmic Ray intensity and solar, interplanetary and terrestrial parameters. The hysteresis loops of (CR versus those of several solar parameters showed narrow loops in even cycles 20, 22 and broad loops in odd cycles 19, 21, as also in the recent odd cycle 23. Hysteresis plots for CR versus interplanetary number density N and speed V were erratic and uncertain (broad and narrow, all mixed up. Plots of CR versus Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF B seemed to be narrow for even as well as odd cycles. Hysteresis loops between CR and other interplanetary parameters were not clear-cut. The same was true for terrestrial parameters. During sunspot maximum years 2000–2003 of cycle 23, there is a double peak structure in all parameters. Whereas CR have a peak spacing of ~30 months, sunspots and Tilt angle have a spacing of only ~20 months. The solar open magnetic flux and the Voyager 1 magnetic field have a spacing of ~25 months. The solar polar magnetic field reverses later than the first peak of all parameters and hence, could not be a direct cause (as if effect started before the cause and lasted for several months more after the cause disappeared. It seems that CR modulation is mainly guided by magnetic configurations deep in the heliosphere, which may not have a simple relationship with parameters near Earth or near Sun.

  8. Long-term Regularities in Distribution of Global Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrož, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 637-642 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : interplanetary magnetic field * solar wind Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  9. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  10. Dust in flowing magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Birendra P.; Samarian, Alex A.; Vladimirov, Sergey V.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma flows occur in almost every laboratory device and interactions of flowing plasmas with near-wall impurities and/or dust significantly affects the efficiency and lifetime of such devices. The charged dust inside the magnetized flowing plasma moves primarily under the influence of the plasma drag and electric forces. Here, the charge on the dust, plasma potential, and plasma density are calculated self-consistently. The electrons are assumed non-Boltzmannian and the effect of electron magnetization and electron-atom collisions on the dust charge is calculated in a self-consistent fashion. For various plasma magnetization parameters viz. the ratio of the electron and ion cyclotron frequencies to their respective collision frequencies, plasma-atom and ionization frequencies, the evolution of the plasma potential and density in the flow region is investigated. The variation of the dust charge profile is shown to be a sensitive function of plasma parameters. (author)

  11. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angeli, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Laguardia, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Apicella, M. L.; Conti, C.; Giacomi, G.; Grosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO2, LiOH, and Li2CO3. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li2CO3 is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  12. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  13. The interaction of a very large interplanetary magnetic cloud with the magnetosphere and with cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepping, R.P.; Burlaga, L.F.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Lazarus, A.J.; Evans, D.S.; Klein, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    A large interplanetary magnetic cloud has been observed in the mid-December 1982 data from ISEE 3. It is estimated to have a heliocentric radial extent of approx-gt 0.4 AU, making it one of the largest magnetic clouds yet observed at 1 AU. The magnetic field measured throughout the main portion of the cloud was fairly tightly confined to a plane as it changed direction by 174 degree while varying only moderately in magnitude. Throughout nearly the entire duration of the cloud's passage, IMP 8 was located in the Earth's dawn magnetosheath providing observations of this cloud's interaction with the bow shock and magnetopause; the cloud is shown to maintain its solar wind characteristics during the interaction. Near the end of the cloud passage, at 0806 UT on December 17, ISEE 3 (and IMP 8 at nearly the same time) observed an oblique fast forward interplanetary shock closely coincident in time with a geomagnetic storm sudden commencement. The shock, moving much faster than the cloud (radial speeds of 700 and 390 km/s, respectively, on the average), was in the process of overtaking the cloud. The index Dst decreased monotonically by ∼ 130 nT during the 2-day cloud passage by the Earth and was well correlated with the B z component of the interplanetary magnetic field. There was no significant decrease in the cosmic ray intensity recorded by ground-based neutron monitors at this time of rather strong, smoothly changing fields. However, a Forbush decrease did occur immediately after the interplanetary shock, during a period of significant field turbulence. Thus a large, smooth, interplanetary helical magnetic field configuration engulfing the Earth does not necessarily deflect cosmic rays sufficiently to cause a Forbush decrease, but there is a suggestion that such a decrease may be caused by particle scattering by turbulent magnetic fields

  14. The Geomagnetically Induced Currents at the Equator Associated with Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizengaw, E.; Doherty, P.; Carter, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    The arrival of interplanetary shocks drives magnetosphere and ionosphere current systems, which then can cause magnetic field variability at ground. The strength of these currents can be detected by the time derivation of the magnetometer observation (dB/dt) on the ground. The stronger dB/dt magnetic spikes at the arrival of interplanetary shocks may be able to cause significant geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) and electric fields that may have damaging effects on modern ground-based technological infrastructures. Although significant attention has been given to the impact of GICs at high-latitude regions, mainly in the auroral region where it gets amplified by the auroral electroject (AE), its impact at the geomagnetic equator has been largely overlooked until recently. It is well known that the interplanetary shocks-driven magnetopause current penetrates into the inner-magnetosphere and almost instantaneously extends down to the equatorial ionosphere through the TM0 (zero order transverse magnetic) mode waves in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. These currents, which get amplified by the equatorial electroject (EEJ) in the same way the AE does to it, can cause bursts of GIC onto the power lines that are located in the vicinity of geomagnetic equator. Importantly, there are many cases in which interplanetary shocks that drive strong magnetopause currents sometimes do not cause geomagnetic storms and are followed by completely quiet conditions. This indicates that significant GIC can occur at high and equatorial regions not only during geomagnetic storm time but also during geomagnetically quiet periods. In this paper, using ground- and space-based observations, we demonstrate that the interplanetary shocks driven GIC bursts have potential effects at the equatorial region both during geomagnetically quiet and storm periods.

  15. COLLIDING DECIMETER DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J., E-mail: johannes.deckers@uni-due.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    Collisional evolution is a key process in planetesimal formation and decimeter bodies play a key role in the different models. However, the outcome of collisions between two dusty decimeter bodies has never been studied experimentally. Therefore, we carried out microgravity collision experiments in the Bremen drop tower. The agglomerates consist of quartz with irregularly shaped micrometer-sized grains and the mean volume filling factor is 0.437 {+-} 0.004. The aggregates are cylindrical with 12 cm in height and 12 cm in diameter, and typical masses are 1.5 kg. These are the largest and most massive dust aggregates studied in collisions to date. We observed rebound and fragmentation but no sticking in the velocity range between 0.8 and 25.7 cm s{sup -1}. The critical fragmentation velocity for split up of an aggregate is 16.2 {+-} 0.4 cm s{sup -1}. At lower velocities the aggregates bounce off each other. In this velocity range, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing collision velocity from 0.8 to 0.3. While the aggregates are very weak, the critical specific kinetic energy for fragmentation Q{sub {mu}=1} is a factor of six larger than expected. Collisions of large bodies in protoplanetary disks are supposed to be much faster and the generation of smaller fragments is likely. In planetary rings, collision velocities are of the order of a few cm s{sup -1} and are thereby in the same range investigated in these experiments. The coefficient of restitution of dust agglomerates and regolith-covered ice particles, which are common in planetary rings, are similar.

  16. Automatic synthesis of [11C]NKY-722 with high specific activity, using anhydrous [11C] methanol as a precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Inoue, Osamu; Itoh, Takashi; Nemoto, Kazuyoshi; Oosumi, Seimei; Miwa, Soichi.

    1992-01-01

    3-(4-allyl-1-piperazinyl)-2,2-dimethylpropyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl- 4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridine dicarboxylate (NKY-722) was labeled with carbon-11 using anhydrous [ 11 C] methanol. Using a computer controlled equipment, a few GBq of [ 11 C] NKY-722 with the specific activity of 120 - 180 GBq/μmol could by synthesized at the radiochemical purity of > 99% in 10 ml of physiological saline containing Polysolvate-80 (1.5 vol%) and ethyl alcohol (0.75 vol%). Preliminary PET experiments using rats and a rhesus monkey have bee done, and very low accumulation of the compound into the brain, however comparatively higher accumulation in the heart were observed. (author)

  17. Immunogold electron microscopic localization of timothy grass (Phleum pratense) pollen major allergens Phl p I and Phl p V after anhydrous fixation in acrolein vapor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, M.; Dolecek, C.; van Ree, R.; Valenta, R.

    1994-01-01

    We used the vapor phase of acrolein as an anhydrous fixative for timothy grass pollen in an immunogold double-labeling localization study of two different major allergens, Phl p I and Phl p V. More than 48 hr of fixation were needed for the subcellular pollen structures to be satisfactorily

  18. Control of powdery mildew on glasshouse-grown roses and tomatoes in the Netherlands using anhydrous milk fat and soybean oil emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurms, K.V.; Hofland-Zijlstra, Jantineke

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a very serious disease affecting glasshouse-grown roses and tomatoes in the Netherlands. Control is limited because of resistance to existing fungicides. Anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and soybean oil (SBO) emulsions were evaluated for control of PM in roses and tomatoes. Both

  19. Dust Around T Tauri Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To reproduce the multiple broad peaks and the fine spectral features in the spectral energy distributions (SEDs of T Tauri stars, we model dust around T Tauri stars using a radiative transfer model for multiple isothermal circumstellar dust shells. We calculate the radiative transfer model SEDs for multiple dust shells using the opacity functions for various dust grains at different temperatures. For six sample stars, we compare the model results with the observed SEDs including the Spitzer spectral data. We present model parameters for the best fit model SEDs that would be helpful to understand the overall structure of dust envelopes around classical T Tauri stars. We find that at least three separate dust components are required to reproduce the observed SEDs. For all the sample stars, an innermost hot (250-550 K dust component of amorphous (silicate and carbon and crystalline (corundum for all objects and forsterite for some objects grains is needed. Crystalline forsterite grains can reproduce many fine spectral features of the sample stars. We find that crystalline forsterite grains exist in cold regions (80-100 K as well as in hot inner shells.

  20. Risk Assessment of Cassini Sun Sensor Integrity Due to Hypervelocity Impact of Saturn Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    A sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini is one of the heaviest and most sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft humans have ever built and launched. Since achieving orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for first and second extended missions through September 2017. In late 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will begin a daring set of ballistic orbits that will hop the rings and dive between the upper atmosphere of Saturn and its innermost D-ring twenty-two times. The "dusty" environment of the inner D-ring region the spacecraft must fly through is hazardous because of the possible damage that dust particles, travelling at speeds as high as 31.4 km/s, can do to spacecraft hardware. During hazardous proximal ring-plane crossings, the Cassini mission operation team plans to point the high-gain antenna to the RAM vector in order to protect most of spacecraft instruments from the incoming energetic ring dust particles. However, this particular spacecraft attitude will expose two Sun sensors (that are mounted on the antenna dish) to the incoming dust particles. High-velocity impacts on the Sun sensor cover glass might penetrate the 2.54-mm glass cover of the Sun sensor. Even without penetration damage, craters created by these impacts on the surface of the cover glass will degrade the transmissibility of light through it. Apart from being directly impacted by the dust particles, the Sun sensors are also threatened by some fraction of ricochet ejecta that are produced by dust particle impacts on the large antenna dish (made of graphite fiber epoxy composite material). Finally, the spacecraft attitude control system must cope with disturbances due to both the translational and angular impulses imparted on the large antenna dish and the long magnetometer boom by the incoming high-velocity projectiles. Analyses performed to quantify the risks the Sun sensors must contend

  1. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  2. Spitzer IRS Spectroscopy of the 10 Myr-Old EF Cha Debris Disk: Evidence for Phyllosilicate-Rich Dust in the Terrestrial Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Lisse, Carey M.; Sicillia-Aguilar, Aurora; Rieke, George H.; Su, Kate Y. L.

    2011-01-01

    We describe Spitzer IRS spectroscopic observations of the approx. 10 Myr-old star, EF Chao Compositional modeling of the spectra from 5 micron to 35 micron confirms that it is surrounded by a luminous debris disk with L(sub D)/L(sub *) approx. 10(exp -3), containing dust with temperatures between 225 K and 430 K characteristic of the terrestrial zone. The EF Cha spectrum shows evidence for many solid-state features, unlike most cold, low-luminosity debris disks but like some other 10-20 Myr-old luminous, warm debris disks (e.g. HD 113766A). The EF Cha debris disk is unusually rich in a species or combination of species whose emissivities resemble that of finely-powdered, laboratory-measured phyllosilicate species (talc, saponite, and smectite), which are likely produced by aqueous alteration of primordial anhydrous rocky materials. The dust and, by inference, the parent bodies of the debris also contain abundant amorphous silicates and metal sulfides, and possibly water ice. The dust's total olivine to pyroxene ratio of approx. 2 also provides evidence of aqueous alteration. The large mass volume of grains with sizes comparable to or below the radiation blow-out limit implies that planetesimals may be colliding at a rate high enough to yield the emitting dust but not so high as to devolatize the planetesimals via impact processing. Because phyllosilicates are produced by the interactions between anhydrous rock and warm, reactive water, EF Cha's disk is a likely signpost for water delivery to the terrestrial zone of a young planetary system.

  3. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    Observations of a lunar "horizon glow" by several Surveyor spacecraft in the 1960s opened the study of the dynamics of charged dust particles near planetary surfaces. The surfaces of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies in the solar system (asteroids, and other moons) are directly exposed to the solar wind and ionizing solar ultraviolet radiation, resulting in a time-dependent electric surface potential. Because these same objects are also exposed to bombardment by micrometeoroids, the surfaces are usually characterized by a power-law size distribution of dust that extends to sub-micron-sized particles. Individual particles can acquire a charge different from their surroundings leading to electrostatic levitation. Once levitated, particles may simply return to the surface on nearly ballistic trajectories, escape entirely from the moon or asteroid if the initial velocity is large, or in some cases be stably levitated for extended periods of time. All three outcomes have observable consequences. Furthermore, the behavior of charged dust near the surface has practical implications for planned future manned and unmanned activities on the lunar surface. Charged dust particles also act as sensitive probes of the near-surface plasma environment. Recent numerical modeling of dust levitation and transport show that charged micron-sized dust is likely to accumulate in topographic lows such as craters, providing a mechanism for the creation of dust "ponds" observed on the asteroid 433 Eros. Such deposition can occur when particles are supported by the photoelectron sheath above the dayside and drift over shadowed regions of craters where the surface potential is much smaller. Earlier studies of the lunar horizon glow are consistent with those particles being on simple ballistic trajectories following electrostatic launching from the surface. Smaller particles may be accelerated from the lunar surface to high altitudes consistent with observations of high altitude

  4. 30 CFR 75.402 - Rock dusting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock dusting. 75.402 Section 75.402 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Combustible Materials and Rock Dusting § 75.402 Rock dusting... or too high in incombustible content to propagate an explosion, shall be rock dusted to within 40...

  5. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  6. Dust Transport from Enceladus to the moons of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, A.; Hsu, H. W.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Saturn's vast E-ring engulfs the satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rea, reaching even beyond Titan, while its inner edge is adjacent with the outskirts of the A-ring. The E-ring is comprised of characteristically micron and submicron sized particles, originating mainly from the active plumes of Enceladus, and possibly the other moons as well due to their continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles. The dynamics of the E-ring grains can be surprising as in addition to the gravity of Saturn and its moons, their motion is governed by radiation pressure, plasma drag, and electromagnetic forces as they collect charges interacting with the magnetospheric plasma environment of Saturn. Due to sputtering, their mass is diminishing and, hence, their charge-to-mass ratio is increasing in time. A "young" gravitationally dominated micron-sized particle will "mature" into a nanometer-sized grain whose motion resembles that of a heavy ion. Simultaneously with their mass loss, the dust particles are pushed outwards by plasma drag. Time to time, their evolving orbits intersect the orbits of the Saturnian moons and the E-ring particles can be deposited onto their surfaces, possibly altering their makeup and spectral properties. Using the Cassini magnetospheric observations, we have followed the orbital evolution of E-ring particles, through their entire life, starting at Enceladus, ending in: a) a collision with the A-ring or any of the satellites; or b) losing all their mass due to sputtering; or c) leave the magnetosphere of Saturn. This presentation will focus on the deposition rates and maps of E-ring particles to the surfaces of the moons.

  7. Regarding Electrified Martian Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the dynamic competition between dust devil/storm charging currents and dissipating atmospheric currents. A question: Can high-current lightning be a dissipation product of this competition? Most likely not but there are exceptions.

  8. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  9. Dust Availability in Desert Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    RAVIKOVIrCIl, 1953: KAPLAN , 19119. Si ATKINE. 1960). From Yaalon & Ginzhourg (1988). B.8 AMOUNTS AND CONCENTRATIONS OFl DUST IN THE ATMOSPHERE (see also...deposits of comparable origin and age further north along the Dead Sea Rift. Another exampie is the lava flows of latest Pleisto- cene age in the Cima ...the Cima Volcanic Field in the southern Mojave Desert, located downwind of extensive dust-producing playa surfaces. More than 1 m of a gravel-free B

  10. Global Optimization of Interplanetary Missions with, Hybrid Propulsion, Multi-Stage Spacecraft, Aerocapture, and Planetary Atmospheric Probes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this IRAD is to expand the capability of Goddard’s interplanetary trajectory preliminary design tool, the Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator...

  11. Suspended dust in Norwegian cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    According to calculations, at least 80 000 people in Oslo and 8 000 in Trondheim were annoyed by too much suspended dust in 2000. The dust concentration is greatest in the spring, presumably because dust is swirling up from melting snow and ice on the streets. Car traffic is the main source of the dust, except for some of the most highly exposed regions where wood-firing from old stoves contributes up to 70 percent of the dust. National targets for air quality include suspended dust, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and benzene. Calculations show that nitrogen dioxide emissions exceeding the limit affected 4 000 people in Oslo and 1 000 people in Trondheim. The sulphur dioxide emissions in the major cities did non exceed the national quality limit; they did exceed the limit in some of the smaller industrial centres. In Trondheim, measurements show that the national limit for benzene was exceeded. Most of the emission of nitrogen dioxide comes from the road traffic. Local air pollution at times causes considerable health- and well-being problems in the larger cities and industrial centres, where a great part of the population may be at risk of early death, infection of the respiratory passage, heart- and lung diseases and cancer

  12. A Free-Return Earth-Moon Cycler Orbit for an Interplanetary Cruise Ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Aldrin, Buzz

    2015-01-01

    A periodic circumlunar orbit is presented that can be used by an interplanetary cruise ship for regular travel between Earth and the Moon. This Earth-Moon cycler orbit was revealed by introducing solar gravity and modest phasing maneuvers (average of 39 m/s per month) which yields close-Earth encounters every 7 or 10 days. Lunar encounters occur every 26 days and offer the chance for a smaller craft to depart the cycler and enter lunar orbit, or head for a Lagrange point (e.g., EM-L2 halo orbit), distant retrograde orbit (DRO), or interplanetary destination such as a near-Earth object (NEO) or Mars. Additionally, return-to-Earth abort options are available from many points along the cycling trajectory.

  13. Correlated variations in the azimuthal and elevation angles of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, N.; Smith, E. J.; Goldstein, B.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of data collected during the in-ecliptic phase of the Ulysses mission shows that there are periods during which deviations from the Parker spiral direction in the azimuthal and elevation angles of the interplanetary magnetic field are correlated. There are a number of solar wind structures which might be expected to introduce such a correlation into the data, e.g., CMEs, Stream-stream interfaces or helicity carried by the solar wind. These potential sources fall into two categories: Those produced at or close to the solar wind source region and those produced by extended interactions as the solar wind expands. We will distinguish the contributions of these two source categories and assess the impact on the evolution on the interplanetary magnetic field.

  14. Estimating the Effects of Astronaut Career Ionizing Radiation Dose Limits on Manned Interplanetary Flight Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Rojdev, Kristina; Valle, Gerard D.; Zipay, John J.; Atwell, William S.

    2013-01-01

    The Hybrid Inflatable DSH combined with electric propulsion and high power solar-electric power systems offer a near TRL-now solution to the space radiation crew dose problem that is an inevitable aspect of long term manned interplanetary flight. Spreading program development and launch costs over several years can lead to a spending plan that fits with NASA's current and future budgetary limitations, enabling early manned interplanetary operations with space radiation dose control, in the near future while biomedical research, nuclear electric propulsion and active shielding research and development proceed in parallel. Furthermore, future work should encompass laboratory validation of HZETRN calculations, as previous laboratory investigations have not considered large shielding thicknesses and the calculations presented at these thicknesses are currently performed via extrapolation.

  15. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  16. High-latitude ionospheric convection during strong interplanetary magnetic field B-y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Sofko, G.J.; Murr, D.

    1999-01-01

    . The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions corresponding to the occurrence of the ionospheric convection were B-x approximate to 1 nT, B-y approximate to 10 nT, and B-z ...An unusual high-latitude ionospheric pattern was observed on March 23, 1995. ionospheric convection appeared as clockwise merging convection cell focused at 84 degrees magnetic latitude around 1200 MLT. No signature of the viscous convection cell in the afternoon sector was observed...

  17. Strong geomagnetic activity forecast by neural networks under dominant southern orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, F.; Bochníček, Josef; Hejda, Pavel; Revallo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2014), s. 589-598 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300120608; GA MŠk OC09070 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geomagnetic activity * interplanetary magnetic field * artificial neural network * ejection of coronal mass * X-ray flares Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.358, year: 2014

  18. An analysis of interplanetary scintillation as a method of measuring the angular sizes of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajivassiliou, C.A.; Duffett-Smith, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation has been widely used at metre wavelengths for estimating the angular sizes of radio sources in the range 0.1-2.0 arcsec. The estimates are based on observations of either the width of the temporal power spectrum or the shape of the scintillation index-elongation curve. We present a mathematical model of the latter procedure which reveals the biases introduced into an IPS survey as a result of the estimation process. (author)

  19. Dust Particle Size Distributions during Spring in Yinchuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangfeng Shao; Jiandong Mao

    2016-01-01

    Dust particle size distributions in Yinchuan, China, were measured during March and April 2014, using APS-3321 sampler. The distributions were measured under different dust conditions (background, floating dust, blowing dust, and dust storm) and statistical analyses were performed. The results showed that, under different dust conditions, the instantaneous number concentrations of dust particles differed widely. For example, during blowing sand and dust storm conditions, instantaneous dust pa...

  20. The Cubesat mission to study Solar Particles (CuSP), an interplanetary cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, E. R.; Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Jahn, J. M.; Kanekal, S.; Livi, S. A.; Murphy, N.; Ogasawara, K.; Paschalidis, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cubesat mission to study Solar Particles (CuSP) is a funded 6U interplanetary cubesat scheduled to fly on the EM-1 SLS launch in 2018. CuSP has three small but capable instruments from the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Its primary scientific goal is high-cadence precise measurements of the suprathermal (ST) tail in the solar wind. The suprathermal tail is the critical bridge between the thermal solar wind plasma and the dangerous high-energy solar energetic particles. CuSP also measures the energy spectra and composition of the ~1-50 MeV/nucleon H-Fe ions that evolve from the STs and the interplanetary magnetic field that is closely coupled to the particle distributions. CuSP is a stepping-stone to future interplanetary cubesats, smallsats, and constellations for both scientific and space weather applications. The challenges for this mission and future missions will also be discussed.

  1. Design for CubeSat-based dust and radiation studies at Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashish; Krishnamoorthy, Siddharth; Swenson, Travis; West, Stephen; Li, Alan; Crew, Alexander; Phillips, Derek James; Screve, Antoine; Close, Sigrid

    2017-07-01

    Europa is one of the icy moons of Jupiter and the possibility of an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy crust makes it one of the most fascinating destinations for exploration in the solar system. NASA's Europa Multiple Flyby Mission (EMFM, formerly Europa Clipper) is slated to visit the icy moon in a timeframe near the year 2022 to study the habitability of Europa. CubeSats carried along by the primary mission can supplement the measurements made, at a relatively low cost, and with the added benefits of involving students at universities in this challenging endeavor. Further, such a mission holds the key to extending the applicability of CubeSats to interplanetary missions. In this paper, we present the design of the Europa Radiation and Dust Observation Satellite (ERDOS), a 3U CubeSat designed to be deployed by the Europa Multiple Flyby Mission to carry out measurements of the radiation and dust environment, before impacting Europa's surface. We present a detailed design for a CubeSat-based secondary mission, and discuss the science goals that may be accomplished by such a mission. Further, we discuss results from a comprehensive analysis of various engineering challenges associated with an interplanetary CubeSat mission, such as radiation shielding and thermal environment control. Our results show that a short duration CubeSat-based flyby mission is feasible when the CubeSat is carried on board the primary mission until the Jovian system is reached. Such a flyby mission can provide important supplementary information to the primary mission about Europa's environment at a closer range and lead to a substantial increase in scientific knowledge about surface processes on Europa.

  2. Identifying Biases in Dust Source Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, A. T.; Wang, W.; Zhao, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Sahara is the largest desert in the world and accounts for more than 50% of global dust emission. However, it is difficult to identify dust source regions as the Sahara is vastly uninhabited. In order to model North African dust, previous works have used satellite data to construct so-called dust source functions. Here we examine such dust source function using output from multi-year runs with the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model. We find that dust source functions based on satellite data overestimate DOD in the Sahel and the western Sahara region. To eliminate the biases of the dust source function due to advection, we develop a new source function using DOD in the lowest 1 km from the model. This work suggests that dust source functions constructed with satellite retrievlas of optical depth may overestimate dust emission in the downwind regions and DOD may not be a good proxy for the source function.

  3. Open-Framework Structures of Anhydrous Sr(CF3COO)2 and Ba(CF3COO)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, K Tauni; Mendoza, Laura M; Martin, Philip D; Suescun, Leopoldo; Rabuffetti, Federico A

    2016-01-04

    Anhydrous Sr(CF3COO)2 and Ba(CF3COO)2 open-framework structures featuring three-dimensional connectivity of metal-oxygen polyhedra were crystallized from a mixture of water and CF3COOH. Crystallization was induced via evaporation of the solvent mixture under a dry nitrogen flow. This approach differs from that routinely employed for crystallization of metal trifluoroacetates, which achieves solvent evaporation by heating under air and yields hydrated salts. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis as well as single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction were employed to characterize the alkaline-earth trifluoroacetate products. Neither thermal analysis nor single-crystal X-ray diffraction detected the presence of crystallization water molecules, demonstrating these trifluoroacetates can be obtained in anhydrous form. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed that Sr(CF3COO)2 and Ba(CF3COO)2 are isostructural and crystallize in the rhombohedral R3̅ space group. Both compounds belong to the class of organic-inorganic extended hybrids and exhibit an open-framework structural motif with three-dimensional connectivity of the metal-oxygen polyhedra and one-dimensional channels along the c axis. The channels are decorated with the trifluoromethyl groups of the trifluoroacetate ligands, and their average (minimum) diameters are ∼3.75 (2.60) and 3.45 (2.25) Å for Sr(CF3COO)2 and Ba(CF3COO)2, respectively. This size range is comparable to the kinetic diameter of small molecules such as hydrogen (2.3 Å). Chemical substitution of barium for strontium affects not only the diameter of the channels but also the spatial arrangement of the trifluoromethyl groups within the channels and the coordination environment of the metal atoms. The different coordination requirements of the strontium and barium atoms are accommodated through the displacement of one of the two chemically distinct trifluoroacetate ligands relative to the metal center.

  4. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Charged dust in saturn's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendis, D.A.; Hill, J.R.; Houpis, H.L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Gravito-electrodynamic theory of charged dust grains is used to explain a variety of phenomena in those portions of the Saturnian ring system that are known to be dominated by fine (micron- and submicron-sized) dust, and in which collisional forces and Coulomb drag can be neglected. Among the phenomena discussed are the formation and evolution of the rotating near-radial spokes in the B-ring, the formation of waves in the F-ring, the cause of eccentricities of certain isolated ringlets, and the origin and morphology of the broad diffuse E-ring. Several novel processes predicted by the gravitoelectrodynamic theory, including 'magneto-gravitational capture' of exogenic dust by the magnetosphere, '1:1 magneto-gravitational orbital resonances' of charged dust with nearby satellites, and 'gyro-orbital resonances,' are used to explain individual observations. The effect of a ring current associated with this charged dust is also evaluated. Finally, the cosmogonic implications of the magneto-gravitational theory are briefly discussed. While several (although not all) of these processes have been discussed by one or more of the present authors elsewhere, the purpose of this paper is to synthesize all these processes within the framework of gravito-electrodynamics, and also to show its range of applicability within Saturn's ring system

  6. Constraints on astronomical silicate dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrell, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical radiative-transfer models are used to discuss the properties of circumstellar dust grains around the premain-sequence star AB Aur (HD 31293). It is assumed that the dust consists of a silicate-graphite mixture with Draine and Lee (1984) optical properties. The modeling technique is to match the observed FUV through FIR energy distribution with the spectral energy distribution predicted for a spherical dust shell around a luminous hot star. Special attention is given to matching the observed 10-micron silicate emission feature and the observed circumstellar absorption curve at UV wavelengths, making it possible to strengthen constraints on dust-grain opacity and chemical composition. It is concluded that, although silicate grains can explain the observed 10-micron emission feature, the Draine and Lee silicate-graphite mixture cannot explain the observed FUV circumstellar absorption at the same time. The dust shell around AB Aur contains an additional population of small particles, the most likely candidate being amorphous carbon grains in a nonhydrogenated form. 18 refs

  7. Constraints on astronomical silicate dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Wilfred H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical radiative-transfer models are used to discuss the properties of circumstellar dust grains around the premain-sequence star AB Aur (HD 31293). It is assumed that the dust consists of a silicate-graphite mixture with Draine and Lee (1984) optical properties. The modeling technique is to match the observed FUV through FIR energy distribution with the spectral energy distribution predicted for a spherical dust shell around a luminous hot star. Special attention is given to matching the observed 10-micron silicate emission feature and the observed circumstellar absorption curve at UV wavelengths, making it possible to strengthen constraints on dust-grain opacity and chemical composition. It is concluded that, although silicate grains can explain the observed 10-micron emission feature, the Draine and Lee silicate-graphite mixture cannot explain the observed FUV circumstellar absorption at the same time. The dust shell around AB Aur contains an additional population of small particles, the most likely candidate being amorphous carbon grains in a nonhydrogenated form.

  8. Comment on "Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses" [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, K; Wlodarczyk, P; Paluch, M

    2011-10-28

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  9. Comment on ``Study of dielectric relaxations of anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses'' [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, K.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.

    2011-10-01

    Very recently Kwon et al. [H.-J. Kwon, J.-A. Seo, H. K. Kim, and Y. H. Hwang, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014508 (2011)] published an article on the study of dielectric relaxation in trehalose and maltose glasses. They carried out broadband dielectric measurements at very wide range of temperatures covering supercooled liquid as well as glassy state of both saccharides. It is worth to mention that authors have also applied a new method for obtaining anhydrous glasses of trehalose and maltose that enables avoiding their caramelization. Four relaxation processes were identified in dielectric spectra of both saccharides. The slower one was identified as structural relaxation process the next one, not observed by the others, was assigned as Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, while the last two secondary modes were of the same nature as found by Kaminski et al. [K. Kaminski, E. Kaminska, P. Wlodarczyk, S. Pawlus, D. Kimla, A. Kasprzycka, M. Paluch, J. Ziolo, W. Szeja, and K. L. Ngai, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 12816 (2008)]. In this comment we show that the authors mistakenly assigned the slowest relaxation process as structural mode of disaccharides. We have proven that this relaxation process is an effect of formation of thin layer of air or water between plate of capacitor and sample. The same effect can be observed if plates of capacitor are oxidized. Thus, we concluded that their slowest mode is connected to the dc conduction process while their β JG process is primary relaxation of trehalose and maltose.

  10. High DNA stability in white blood cells and buffy coat lysates stored at ambient temperature under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Fabre

    Full Text Available Conventional storage of blood-derived fractions relies on cold. However, lately, ambient temperature preservation has been evaluated by several independent institutions that see economic and logistic advantages in getting rid of the cold chain. Here we validated a novel procedure for ambient temperature preservation of DNA in white blood cell and buffy coat lysates based on the confinement of the desiccated biospecimens under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in original hermetic minicapsules. For this validation we stored encapsulated samples either at ambient temperature or at several elevated temperatures to accelerate aging. We found that DNA extracted from stored samples was of good quality with a yield of extraction as expected. Degradation rates were estimated from the average fragment size of denatured DNA run on agarose gels and from qPCR reactions. At ambient temperature, these rates were too low to be measured but the degradation rate dependence on temperature followed Arrhenius' law, making it possible to extrapolate degradation rates at 25°C. According to these values, the DNA stored in the encapsulated blood products would remain larger than 20 kb after one century at ambient temperature. At last, qPCR experiments demonstrated the compatibility of extracted DNA with routine DNA downstream analyses. Altogether, these results showed that this novel storage method provides an adequate environment for ambient temperature long term storage of high molecular weight DNA in dehydrated lysates of white blood cells and buffy coats.

  11. Methods for the preparation of ultra-pure anhydrous zirconium tetrafluoride from zirconium tetraborohydride, researches in connection with halide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortevois, R.

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ultrapure zirconium tetrafluoride, the main component of fluorozirconate based optical fibers, was successfully attempted from zirconium tetraborohydride. Of the fluorinating agents used, nitrogen trifluoride doesn't react with zirconium tetraborohydride while xenon difluoride reacts too violently and leads to phases which contain boron. The fluorination in a compatible solvent enabled us to minimize the degradation. The best results were obtained with the fluorination of Zr(BH 4 ) 4 dissolved in CFCl 3 at -40 deg C by anhydrous HF. Using several analytical methods such as graphite furnace atomic absorption and proton activation, we analyzed the purity. The degree of transition element impurities is less than the ppm level for ZrF 4 . The dehydration of ZrF 4 ,H 2 O and ZrF 4 ,3H 2 O at room temperature by CIF 3 in gaseous and liquid state was also investigated. At exceptionally low temperature, this process allows oxide and oxyfluoride components to be reduced

  12. High DNA stability in white blood cells and buffy coat lysates stored at ambient temperature under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Aurélie; Colotte, Marthe; Tuffet, Sophie; Bonnet, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Conventional storage of blood-derived fractions relies on cold. However, lately, ambient temperature preservation has been evaluated by several independent institutions that see economic and logistic advantages in getting rid of the cold chain. Here we validated a novel procedure for ambient temperature preservation of DNA in white blood cell and buffy coat lysates based on the confinement of the desiccated biospecimens under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in original hermetic minicapsules. For this validation we stored encapsulated samples either at ambient temperature or at several elevated temperatures to accelerate aging. We found that DNA extracted from stored samples was of good quality with a yield of extraction as expected. Degradation rates were estimated from the average fragment size of denatured DNA run on agarose gels and from qPCR reactions. At ambient temperature, these rates were too low to be measured but the degradation rate dependence on temperature followed Arrhenius’ law, making it possible to extrapolate degradation rates at 25°C. According to these values, the DNA stored in the encapsulated blood products would remain larger than 20 kb after one century at ambient temperature. At last, qPCR experiments demonstrated the compatibility of extracted DNA with routine DNA downstream analyses. Altogether, these results showed that this novel storage method provides an adequate environment for ambient temperature long term storage of high molecular weight DNA in dehydrated lysates of white blood cells and buffy coats. PMID:29190767

  13. Reactive Precipitation of Anhydrous Alkali Sulfide Nanocrystals with Concomitant Abatement of Hydrogen Sulfide and Cogeneration of Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemin; Zhao, Yangzhi; Brennan, Alice; McCeig, Miranda; Wolden, Colin A; Yang, Yongan

    2017-07-21

    Anhydrous alkali sulfide (M 2 S, M=Li or Na) nanocrystals (NCs) are important materials central to the development of next generation cathodes and solid-state electrolytes for advanced batteries, but not commercially available at present. This work reports an innovative method to directly synthesize M 2 S NCs through alcohol-mediated reactions between alkali metals and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). In the first step, the alkali metal is complexed with alcohol in solution, forming metal alkoxide (ROM) and releasing hydrogen (H 2 ). Next, H 2 S is bubbled through the ROM solution, where both chemicals are completely consumed to produce phase-pure M 2 S NC precipitates and regenerate alcohol that can be recycled. The M 2 S NCs morphology may be tuned through the choice of the alcohol and solvent. Both synthetic steps are thermodynamically favorable (ΔG m o <-100 kJ mol -1 ), proceeding rapidly to completion at ambient temperature with almost 100 % atom efficiency. The net result, H 2 S+2 m→M 2 S+H 2 , makes good use of a hazardous chemical (H 2 S) and delivers two value-added products that naturally phase separate for easy recovery. This scalable approach provides an energy-efficient and environmentally benign solution to the production of nanostructured materials required in emerging battery technologies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Effect of pulverization of the bulk powder on the hydration of creatine anhydrate tablets and their pharmaceutical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yukoh; Shiraishi, Sumihiro; Otsuka, Makoto

    2005-12-10

    The hydration behavior and expansion properties of untreated and pulverized creatine anhydrate (CRA) tablets were studied under 60 and 75%RH at 25 degrees C by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The tablet hardness of untreated and pulverized CRA tablets was significantly decreased after hydration. There was a linear relationship between the degree of hydration and the tablet hardness of untreated CRA tablets compressed at 1000 kg/cm2. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of hydration and the tablet hardness of pulverized CRA tablets was nonlinear. These results suggest that the reduction in hardness of pulverized CRA tablets does not depend solely on the hydration level of crystal water. PXRD analysis indicated that the diffraction pattern of the pulverized CRA powder was similar to that of the untreated CRA powder. However, the diffraction intensity of the pulverized CRA powder was slightly lower than that of the untreated CRA powder at high angle. The micropore radius of both untreated and pulverized CRA tablets was significantly increased after hydration, but analysis of the relationship between micropore radius and fractional hydration of crystal water showed that untreated CRA tablets were more affected than pulverized CRA tablets. Therefore, the reduction in tablet hardness depends not only on the hydration behavior but also on the crystal orientation of the CRA powder.

  15. Pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate matrix tablets for in vitro controlled release of water-soluble drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Pseidy Luz; Ruiz-Caro, Roberto; Veiga, María Dolores

    2015-10-15

    Different pectin/anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (ADCP) matrix tablets have been developed in order to obtain controlled release of a water-soluble drug (theophylline). Swelling, buoyancy and dissolution studies have been carried out in different aqueous media (demineralized water, progressive pH medium, simulated gastric fluid, simulated intestinal fluid and simulated colonic fluid), to characterize the matrix tablets. When the pectin/ADCP ratio was ≥0.26 (P1, P2, P3 and P4 tablets) a continuous swelling and low theophylline dissolution rate from the matrices were observed. So, pectin gel forming feature predominated over the ADCP properties, yielding pH-independent drug release behavior from these matrices. On the contrary, pectin/ADCP ratios ≤0.11 (P5 and P6 tablets) allowed to achieve drug dissolution pH dependent. Consequently, the suitable selection of the pectin/ADCP ratio will allow to tailor matrix tablets for controlled release of water-soluble drugs in a specific manner in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Methods, setup and safe handling for anhydrous hydrogen fluoride cleavage in Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttenthaler, Markus; Albericio, Fernando; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) using tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc)/benzyl (Bzl) chemistry is an indispensable technique in many laboratories around the globe, and it provides peptides to the pharmaceutical industry and to thousands of scientists working in basic research. The Boc/Bzl strategy has several advantages, including reliability in the synthesis of long and difficult polypeptides, alternative orthogonality regarding protecting groups and ease of producing C-terminal thioesters for native chemical ligation applications. In this process, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) is used to remove the side chain protecting groups of the assembled peptide and to release the peptide from the resin, a process typically described as 'HF cleavage'. This protocol describes the general methodology, apparatus setup and safe handling of HF, with the aim of providing comprehensive information on the safe use of this valuable, well-studied and validated cleavage technique. We explain the cleavage mechanism, the physicochemical properties and risks of HF, first aid measures and the correct use of the apparatus. In addition, we provide advice on scavenger selection, as well as a troubleshooting section and video material illustrating key steps of the procedure. The protocol comprises precleavage sample preparation (30 min-2.5 h), complete HF cleavage procedure (2 h) and reaction workup (30 min).

  17. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  18. A third study on the use of orally administered anhydrous crystalline maltose for relief of dry mouth in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip C; Cummins, Martin J; Cummins, Joseph M

    2002-10-01

    To examine the safety and efficacy of anhydrous crystalline maltose for treatment of dry mouth and other symptoms of dryness in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Anhydrous crystalline maltose was delivered orally as a 200-mg lozenge given three times daily over a 24-week period to a total of 100 subjects. All participants had prominent complaints of persistent dry mouth associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Patients were examined at baseline and every 6 weeks of treatment. Patients were seen in outpatient clinics at a total of 27 sites within the United States. Unstimulated whole saliva output, a measure of basal salivary gland function, was determined at each visit. Symptoms associated with oral and ocular dryness were assessed at the same time with the use of 100-mm visual analogue scales. Safety was assessed by physical examination and laboratory studies. During this clinical trial, a majority of evaluable subjects (39/76) demonstrated an increase in unstimulated whole saliva output, and the treatment exhibited an excellent safety profile. The anhydrous crystalline maltose treatment led to significant improvement in several subjective measures of oral and ocular comfort. In this study, anhydrous crystalline maltose lozenges administered three times daily for 24 weeks improved salivary output and decreased complaints of dry mouth and eyes in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Side-effects were minimal, and treatment was without significant adverse events. These results are similar to the benefits observed in two prior studies reported by the authors. This safe and simple intervention appears to provide clinical benefit to primary Sjögren's syndrome patients with distressing dry mouth symptoms.

  19. Determining the amount of anhydrous alcohol evaporated in vertical cylindrical tanks; Determinacao da quantidade de alcool etilico anidro evaporado em tanques cilindricos verticais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Elcio Cruz de [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In order to assess the anhydrous alcohol evaporated amount in vertical cylindrical tanks was developed a calculation methodology based on the rate of mass transfer of the product, the Reynolds number and the mass transfer coefficient. An Excel spreadsheet was prepared with data entry of the tank and physical and chemical properties of the product (temperature and density). For a temperature of 50 deg C, the volume evaporated reaches values of 0.8% by day. (author)

  20. Tensile Properties and Water Absorption of Recycle Polypropylene (rPP) / Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) Composites: The Effect of Maleic Anhydrate-g-Polypropylene (MAPP) Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Halimatuddahliana

    2015-01-01

    Halimatuddahliana Nasution The effects of maleic anhydrate (MAPP) as compatibilizer on tensile properties and water absorption of recycle polypropylene (rPP)/oil palm empty bunch fruit (OPEFB) composites were investigated. Several contents of MAPP viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 wt.% were prepared. Corresponding rPP/OPEFB composite without MAPP addition was also made for comparison. The OPEFB composition was fixed at 30 wt.%, while rPP was 70 wt.% and reduced correspondingly on the addition of MAPP. Co...

  1. The use of anhydrous CeCl3 as a recyclable and selective catalyst for the acetalization of aldehydes and ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Claudio C.; Mendes, Samuel R.; Ziembowicz, Francieli I.; Lenardao, Eder J.; Perin, Gelson

    2010-01-01

    An efficient, clean, chemoselective and solvent-free method for the synthesis of ketone and aldehyde dimethyl acetals was developed using trimethyl orthoformate and commercially available anhydrous CeCl 3 as a recyclable catalyst. The method is general and affords the protected carbonyl compounds in good yields and under mild conditions, including aryl and alkyl ketones and activated aldehydes. The catalyst could be utilised directly for 3 cycles, without significant loss of activity. (author)

  2. Dust-mites: effect on lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atambay, Metin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Aycan, Ozlem Makbule; Kilic, Eser; Yazar, Suleyman; Saraymen, Recep; Karaman, Ulku; Daldal, Nilgun

    2006-01-01

    Dust-mites are present in our homes, feed on dead exfoliated skin and other organic material. It is also known that oxidative stress may lead to cellular damage that can be confirmed by markers of cellular disruption. Oxidative stress in various infective processes has been documented. We investigated whether house dust-mites cause oxidative stress in patients. Products of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes and lymphocytes were assessed by measuring malondialdehyde concentration. Our results showed that patients who had a positive skin test for dust-mite antigens and had dust-mites present in their houses (dust-mite positive) had increased erythrocyte malondialdehyde levels (62.39 [18.56] nmol/g-Hb) compared with those who were skin test positive, dust-mite negative (45.45 [10.82]) or skin test negative, dust-mite negative (42.20 [5.68]). They also had significantly higher levels of lymphocyte malondialdehyde (4.22 [0.55] nmol/g-protein) compared with those who were skin test positive, dust-mite negative (3.46 [0.29]) or skin test negative, dust-mite negative (1.25 [0.31]; p dust-mite negative/skin test positive and dust-mite negative/skin test negative patients. Increased malondialdehyde activity in lymphocytes and erythrocytes in the dust-mite positive/skin test positive group shows the presence of the oxidative stress in patients with dust-mite infestation.

  3. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different...... analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate in water...... was shorter than for DOPC/SDS but still faster than the conversion seen in fed and fasted state micellar media. The conversion of CBZ anhydrate to hydrate was the slowest in the solution containing bile salt alone. In contrast, the solution-mediated phase transformations of NF did only show limited kinetic...

  4. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  5. The influence of excipients on the stability of the moisture sensitive drugs aspirin and niacinamide: comparison of tablets containing lactose monohydrate with tablets containing anhydrous lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Hoag, S W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that in tablet formulations, moisture-sensitive drugs formulated with lactose monohydrate have the same stability as formulations containing anhydrous lactose, and to characterize the kinetics of niacinamide degradation in the solid state. Aspirin and niacinamide decomposition were used as indicators of stability. Aspirin and niacinamide tablets containing either lactose monohydrate or anhydrous lactose were separately investigated at different temperatures and relative humidities; the stability tests were done at 25 degrees C--60% RH, 40 degrees C--80% RH, 60 degrees C--60% RH, 60 degrees C--80% RH, and 80 degrees C--80% RH. Official U.S. Pharmacopeia methods were used for the aspirin and niacinamide assays. Statistical analysis showed that tablets containing lactose monohydrate have the same stability as tablets containing anhydrous lactose, which means that even though water is present in the crystal structure, the bound water does not influence the reaction rate. In addition, niacinamide degradation in the solid-state can be described by a third order rate equation.

  6. Reconstruction of geomagnetic activity and near-Earth interplanetary conditions over the past 167 yr – Part 2: A new reconstruction of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new reconstruction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, B for 1846–2012 with a full analysis of errors, based on the homogeneously constructed IDV(1d composite of geomagnetic activity presented in Part 1 (Lockwood et al., 2013a. Analysis of the dependence of the commonly used geomagnetic indices on solar wind parameters is presented which helps explain why annual means of interdiurnal range data, such as the new composite, depend only on the IMF with only a very weak influence of the solar wind flow speed. The best results are obtained using a polynomial (rather than a linear fit of the form B = χ · (IDV(1d − βα with best-fit coefficients χ = 3.469, β = 1.393 nT, and α = 0.420. The results are contrasted with the reconstruction of the IMF since 1835 by Svalgaard and Cliver (2010.

  7. The double-dust solution

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    An exact solution describing the static gravitational field produced by the superposition of two dust beams of equal mass density but opposite propagation direction is given in a closed form. In particular, the cylindrically symmetric situation is considered in which the two dust components move on trajectories screwing around the axis. In this case, the solution can be matched to the Levi-Civita external vacuum solution at any value of the radial coordinate. The axis is regular and the mass density is positive everywhere in the interior region of the global solution. The dominant energy condition is satisfied.

  8. Intergalactic dust and quasar distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    Non-homogeneous intergalactic extinction may considerably affect the quasar distribution. Especially samples of quasars isolated on the basis of B-V colours are subject to this phenomenon. Apparent grouping and close pairs of quasars reported in the literature may be a result of intergalactic dust. Using surface distribution of faint blue objects selected by Hawkins and Reddish it is estimated that intergalactic extinction in B should reach approximately 1 mag out to the redshift of approximately 1. This is slightly larger than predicted by theory and comparable to the mean dust density derived from observations. (Author)

  9. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans.

  10. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or coccidioidomycosis. These spores live in the desert soil of semi-arid areas and are native to the ... this topic. Web Links from MedlinePlus (National Library of Medicine) Air Pollution Asthma Valley Fever More Links Dust Control On ...

  11. The global distribution of mineral dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegen, I; Schepanski, K

    2009-01-01

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  12. The global distribution of mineral dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, I; Schepanski, K [Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (Germany)], E-mail: itegen@mail.tropos.de

    2009-03-01

    Dust aerosol particles produced by wind erosion in arid and semi arid regions affect climate and air quality, but the magnitude of these effects is largely unquantified. The major dust source regions include the Sahara, the Arabian and Asian deserts; global annual dust emissions are currently estimated to range between 1000 and 3000 Mt/yr. Dust aerosol can be transported over long distances of thousands of kilometers, e.g. from source regions in the Saharan desert over the North Atlantic, or from the Asian deserts towards the Pacific Ocean. The atmospheric dust load varies considerably on different timescales. While dust aerosol distribution and dust effects are important on global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales.

  13. Electrostatic Dust Detector with Improved Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, D.P.; Skinner, C.H.; Roquemore, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    Methods to measure the inventory of dust particles and to remove dust if it approaches safety limits will be required in next-step tokamaks such as ITER. An electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces, biased to 30 or 50 V, has been developed for the detection of dust on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Gaining operational experience of dust detection on surfaces in tokamaks is important, however the level of dust generated in contemporary short-pulse tokamaks is comparatively low and high sensitivity is necessary to measure dust on a shot-by-shot basis. We report on modifications in the detection electronics that have increased the sensitivity of the electrostatic dust detector by a factor of up to 120, - a level suitable for measurements on contemporary tokamaks.

  14. Clinical effect of ultrasound-guided injection of lauromacrogol versus anhydrous ethanol as sclerotherapy for simple hepatic cyst: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG Jinbin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical effect of ultrasound-guided injection of lauromacrogol versus anhydrous ethanol as the sclerotherapy for simple hepatic cyst, as well as the incidence rates of adverse events and changes in liver function and the results of routine blood test after surgery, and to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these two sclerosing agents in the treatment of simple hepatic cyst. MethodsA total of 62 patients with simple hepatic cyst who were treated in Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Pudong New Area Gongli Hospital were enrolled and randomly divided into observation group (lauromacrogol group and control group (anhydrous ethanol group. The patients in these two groups were given ultrasound-guided injection of lauromacrogol and anhydrous ethanol, respectively. The incidence rates of intraoperative and postoperative adverse events, cure rate, changes in the serum levels of serum total bilirubin (TBil, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, cholinesterase (CHE, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and changes in the results of routine blood test within 24 hours after surgery were compared between the two groups. The t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, and the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups. Results Compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly lower incidence rates of adverse events and a significantly lower blood alcohol concentration (both P<0.05. The cure rate (1 and 6 months after surgery and the changes in the results of routine blood test within 24 hours after surgery showed no significant differences between the two groups (both P >0.05. At 1 week after surgery, theserum levels of ALT and AST showed significant differences between the observation group and the control group for single hepatic cyst (t=-3.680 and -5.571, P=0.001 and <0.001, while the serum levels of ALT and AST

  15. Dust Measurements Onboard the Deep Space Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Malaspina, D.; Poppe, A.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Szalay, J.

    2018-02-01

    A dust instrument onboard the Deep Space Gateway will revolutionize our understanding of the dust environment at 1 AU, help our understanding of the evolution of the solar system, and improve dust hazard models for the safety of crewed and robotic missions.

  16. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate fur...

  17. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer

  18. House dust extracts contain potent immunological adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukelman, C.J.; Dijk, H. van; Aerts, P.C.; Rademaker, P.M.; Berrens, L.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1987-01-01

    A crude aqueous extract of house dust and two house dust subfractions were tested for adjuvant activity in a sensitivity assay performed in mice. Evidence is presented that house dust contains at least two potent immunological adjuvants. One of these, present in both subfractions, was probably

  19. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    Aims. We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods. Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (similar to 0.40 '') resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 mu m, of the nuclei of a sample of 27

  20. Meteors, meteorites and cosmic dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedinets, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of meteorite origin and meteorite composition is discussed. Nowadays, most scientists suppose that the giant Oort cloud consisting of ice comet nuclei is the sourse of the meteor matter. A principle unity of the matter of meteorites falling to the Earth and cosmic dust is noted as well as that of meteorite bodies evaporating in the atmosphere and bearing meteors and bodies

  1. The global transport of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    By some estimates as much as two billion metric tons of dust are lifted into the Earth's atmosphere every year. Most of this dust is stirred up by storms, the more dramatic of which are aptly named dust storms. But more than mere dirt is carried aloft. Drifting with the suspended dust particles are soil pollutants such as herbicides and pesticides and a significant number of microorganisms-bacteria, viruses and fungi. We can gain some appreciation of how much microbial life is actually floating in our atmosphere by performing a quick calculation. There are typically about one million bacteria per gram of soil, but let's be conservative and suppose there are only 10,000 bacteria per gram of airborne sediment. Assuming a modest one billion metric tons of sediment in the atmosphere, these numbers translate into a quintillion (1018) sediment-borne bacteria moving around the planet each year-enough to form a microbial bridge between Earth and Jupiter. Here we consider what we've learned about the airborne transport of sediment across the globe, and review some of the remarkable studies in this reemerging field that had it origins more than 100 years ago.

  2. An Integrated Tool for Low Thrust Optimal Control Orbit Transfers in Interplanetary Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargent, T.; Martinot, V.

    In the last recent years a significant progress has been made in optimal control orbit transfers using low thrust electrical propulsion for interplanetary missions. The system objective is always the same: decrease the transfer duration and increase the useful satellite mass. The optimum control strategy to perform the minimum time to orbit or the minimum fuel consumption requires the use of sophisticated mathematical tools, most of the time dedicated to a specific mission and therefore hardly reusable. To improve this situation and enable Alcatel Space to perform rather quick trajectory design as requested by mission analysis, we have developed a software tool T-3D dedicated to optimal control orbit transfers which integrates various initial and terminal rendezvous conditions - e.g. fixed arrival time for planet encounter - and engine thrust profiles -e.g. thrust law variation with respect to the distance to the Sun -. This single and quite versatile tool allows to perform analyses like minimum consumption for orbit insertions around a planet from an hyperbolic trajectory, interplanetary orbit transfers, low thrust minimum time multiple revolution orbit transfers, etc… From a mathematical point of view, the software relies on the minimum principle formulation to find the necessary conditions of optimality. The satellite dynamics is a two body model and relies of an equinoctial formulation of the Gauss equation. This choice has been made for numerical purpose and to solve more quickly the two point boundaries values problem. In order to handle the classical problem of co-state variables initialization, problems simpler than the actual one can be solved straight forward by the tool and the values of the co-state variables are kept as first guess for a more complex problem. Finally, a synthesis of the test cases is presented to illustrate the capacities of the tool, mixing examples of interplanetary mission, orbit insertion, multiple revolution orbit transfers

  3. Trapping Dust to Form Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Growing a planet from a dust grain is hard work! A new study explores how vortices in protoplanetary disks can assist this process.When Dust Growth FailsTop: ALMA image of the protoplanetary disk of V1247 Orionis, with different emission components labeled. Bottom: Synthetic image constructed from the best-fit model. [Kraus et al. 2017]Gradual accretion onto a seed particle seems like a reasonable way to grow a planet from a grain of dust; after all, planetary embryos orbit within dusty protoplanetary disks, which provides them with plenty of fuel to accrete so they can grow. Theres a challenge to this picture, though: the radial drift problem.The radial drift problem acknowledges that, as growing dust grains orbit within the disk, the drag force on them continues to grow as well. For large enough dust grains perhaps around 1 millimeter the drag force will cause the grains orbits to decay, and the particles drift into the star before they are able to grow into planetesimals and planets.A Close-Up Look with ALMASo how do we overcome the radial drift problem in order to form planets? A commonly proposed mechanism is dust trapping, in which long-lived vortices in the disk trap the dust particles, preventing them from falling inwards. This allows the particles to persist for millions of years long enough to grow beyond the radial drift barrier.Observationally, these dust-trapping vortices should have signatures: we would expect to see, at millimeter wavelengths, specific bright, asymmetric structures where the trapping occurs in protoplanetary disks. Such disk structures have been difficult to spot with past instrumentation, but the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has made some new observations of the disk V1247 Orionis that might be just what were looking for.Schematic of the authors model for the disk of V1247 Orionis. [Kraus et al. 2017]Trapped in a Vortex?ALMAs observations of V1247 Orionis are reported by a team of scientists led by Stefan

  4. Interplanetary Trajectory Design for the Asteroid Robotic Redirect Mission Alternate Approach Trade Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Raymond Gabriel; Qu, Min; Vavrina, Matthew A.; Englander, Jacob A.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents mission performance analysis methods and results for the Asteroid Robotic Redirect Mission (ARRM) option to capture a free standing boulder on the surface of a 100 m or larger NEA. It details the optimization and design of heliocentric low-thrust trajectories to asteroid targets for the ARRM solar electric propulsion spacecraft. Extensive searches were conducted to determine asteroid targets with large pick-up mass potential and potential observation opportunities. Interplanetary trajectory approximations were developed in method based tools for Itokawa, Bennu, 1999 JU3, and 2008 EV5 and were validated by end-to-end integrated trajectories.

  5. Interplanetary conditions during 3-kHz radio-wave detections in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Gold, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma waves detected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft beyond about 12 AU that may be associated with the turbulence expected at the heliopause are interpreted in terms of the characteristics of the interplanetary medium at large heliocentric distances. The low-energy charged-particle environment in the outer heliosphere during the observations of the unusual plasma-wave signals is addressed. The particle data suggest that the outer heliosphere was unusually stable and free of transient shock and particle events for the roughly eight months during the wave observations.

  6. Interplanetary scintillations of the 3C 279 radiosource from RATAN-600 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishova, T.D.; Mingaliev, M.G.; AN SSSR, Nizhnij Arkhyz. Spetsial'naya Astrofizicheskaya Observatoriya)

    1980-01-01

    In 1976 and 1977 observations of interplanetary scintillations of the 3C 279 radiosource were carred out at the RATAN-600 at centimeter wavelengths. At Lambda=3.9 cm the index of scintillations gets suturated at the distance R approximately equal to 4 Rsub(Sun) from the Sun. The estimation of solar wind velocity is approximately 140 km/s at R=5Rsub(Sun); it grows up to approximately 400 km/s at R approximately equal to 10 Rsub(Sun)

  7. Precise localizations and counterpart searches of GRBs from the 2nd interplanetary network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hack, F.; Hurley, K.; Atteia, J.; Barat, C.; Niel, M.; Cline, T.; Dennis, B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Klebesadel, R.; Laros, J.; Kurt, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zenchenko, V.

    1994-01-01

    The second interplanetary network of GRB detectors operated between 1981 and 1984. It consisted of the Venera 13 and V14 spacecraft (SIGNE detectors), PVO, ICE, and SMM (HXRBS detector). Many of the approximately 90 cosmic GRBs it detected can be localized to a high accuracy. Such localizations will make a better estimate of the burster recurrence time possible and contribute to the search for quiescent counterparts. We will present a number of localizations to illustrate the potential of this network, discuss the techniques we use to perform multi-wavelength counterpart searches, and compare present and promising future localization techniques

  8. New evidence for interplanetary boulders?. [photometric observations of cometary nuclei orbit perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1973-01-01

    The method of detection, the magnitude and the rate of occurrence of sudden disturbances in the motions of some short period comets are discussed. The disturbances have recently been suggested as potential indicators of collisions between the comets and interplanetary boulders - minor objects whose existence was predicted. The character of explosive phenomena, caused by an impact of such a boulder on a comet's nuclear surface, depends significantly on the surface texture of the target body. A method is suggested which supplies a good deal of the missing information about the structure and optical properties of nuclear surfaces from precise photometric observations of cometary nuclei at large solar distances.

  9. Overview of cosmic rays, solar and interplanetary physics research (1987-1990)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A brief survey of recent U.S. investigations in the field of heliospheric plasmas and their manifestations is presented, introducing the following collection of detailed reviews (accessions A91-46959 to A91-46964). Topics examined include the large-scale structure of interplanetary plasmas, models of Galactic cosmic-ray production and propagation, solar-wind turbulence, long-period solar-terrestrial variability, the possible relation between solar-neutrino counts and the sunspot cycle, X-ray studies of solar flares and their implications for solar processes, and the near-sun magnetic field.

  10. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Context. Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Aims: Using events where the coronal radio emission above 100 MHz is exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited some long-standing questions regarding the relation between type III bursts and X-ray flares: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts? What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities? What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz? Methods: We analysed ten years of data from 2002 to 2011 starting with a selection of coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used X-ray flare information from RHESSI >6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28% of the initial sample of type III events. We then examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and whether there was an associated interplanetary radio signature in both radio and X-rays. Results: For our 321 events with radio and X-ray signatures, the X-ray emission at 6 keV usually lasted much longer than the groups of type III bursts at frequencies >100 MHz. The selected events were mostly associated with GOES B and C class flares. A weak correlation was found between the type III radio flux at frequencies below 327 MHz and the X-ray intensity at 25-50 keV, with an absence of events at high X-ray intensity and low type III radio flux. The weakness of the correlation is related to the coherent emission mechanism of radio type IIIs which can produce high radio fluxes by low density electron beams. Interplanetary type III bursts (103 SFU), relating to electron beams with more energetic electrons above 25 keV and events where magnetic flux tubes extend

  11. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhuang, Bin; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar/space physics and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. Although the effect of the twist on the behavior of MFRs had been widely studied in observations, theory, modeling, and numerical simulations, it is still unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably overestimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the model to 115 MCs observed at 1 AU, we find that (1) the twist angles of interplanetary MFRs generally follow a trend of about 0.6l/R radians, where l/R is the aspect ratio of a MFR, with a cutoff at about 12π radians AU-1, (2) most of them are significantly larger than 2.5π radians but well bounded by 2l/R radians, (3) strongly twisted magnetic field lines probably limit the expansion and size of MFRs, and (4) the magnetic field lines in the legs wind more tightly than those in the leading part of MFRs. These results not only advance our understanding of the properties and behavior of interplanetary MFRs but also shed light on the formation and eruption of MFRs in the solar atmosphere. A discussion about the twist and stableness of solar MFRs are therefore given.

  12. The Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Response to Interplanetary Shocks: Van Allen Probes HOPE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, L. M.; Denton, M.; Ferradas, C.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R. M.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes' Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) sensors measure ion and electron populations in the plasmasphere, plasma sheet, and lower-energy ring current, providing unique observations at low energies (0.001-50 keV) and low L-shell (down to 1.5 RE). We use the capabilities of these two spacecraft to probe changes in the low energy particles in response to interplanetary (IP) shocks. We focus on changes in the plasma energies, composition, and pitch angle distributions following IP shocks and storm sudden commencements from 2012-2017 through a comparison of HOPE observations preceding and post shock.

  13. The interplanetary shock event of November 11/12 1978, a comprehensive test of acceleration theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, K. P.; Sanderson, T. R.; Vannes, P.; Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Russell, C. T.; Parks, G. K.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the November 11/12, 1978 shock event based on energetic particle, solar wind, magnetic field and wave data from the ISEE-3, -1 and -2 spacecraft has been undertaken both from the energetic and the collisionless shock point of view. The energy density of 10-50 keV protons accelerated by the shock is found to be equivalent to the upstream magnetic field energy density. The observations are in quantitative agreement with Lee's (1983) self consistent theory for the excitation of hydromagnetic waves and the acceleration of ions upstream of interplanetary shocks.

  14. The interplanetary shock event of November 11/12 1978 - A comprehensive test of acceleration theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, K.-P.; Sanderson, T. R.; Van Nes, P.; Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Russell, C. T.; Parks, G. K.; Smith, E. J.; Feldman, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the November 11, 12, 1978 shock event based on energetic particle, solar wind, magnetic field and wave data from the ISEE-3, -1 and -2 spacecraft has been undertaken both from the energetic and the collisionless shock point of view. The energy density of 10-50 keV protons accelerated by the shock is found to be equivalent to the upstream magnetic field energy density. The observations are in quantitative agreement with Lee's (1983) self consistent theory for the excitation of hydromagnetic waves and the acceleration of ions upstream of interplanetary shocks.

  15. Distributed Interplanetary Delay/Disruption Tolerant Network (DTN) Monitor and Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shin-Ywan

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of Distributed interplanetary Delay Tolerant Network Monitor and Control System as a DTN system network management implementation in JPL is defined to provide methods and tools that can monitor the DTN operation status, detect and resolve DTN operation failures in some automated style while either space network or some heterogeneous network is infused with DTN capability. In this paper, "DTN Monitor and Control system in Deep Space Network (DSN)" exemplifies a case how DTN Monitor and Control system can be adapted into a space network as it is DTN enabled.

  16. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be

  17. Respiratory Toxicity of Lunar Highland Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Wallace, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar dust exposures occurred during the Apollo missions while the crew was on the lunar surface and especially when microgravity conditions were attained during rendezvous in lunar orbit. Crews reported that the dust was irritating to the eyes and in some cases respiratory symptoms were elicited. NASA s vision for lunar exploration includes stays of 6 months on the lunar surface hence the health effects of periodic exposure to lunar dust need to be assessed. NASA has performed this assessment with a series of in vitro and in vivo tests on authentic lunar dust. Our approach is to "calibrate" the intrinsic toxicity of lunar dust by comparison to a nontoxic dust (TiO2) and a highly toxic dust (quartz) using intratrachael instillation of the dusts in mice. A battery of indices of toxicity is assessed at various time points after the instillations. Cultures of selected cells are exposed to test dusts to assess the adverse effects on the cells. Finally, chemical systems are used to assess the nature of the reactivity of various dusts and to determine the persistence of reactivity under various environmental conditions that are relevant to a space habitat. Similar systems are used to assess the dissolution of the dust. From these studies we will be able to set a defensible inhalation exposure standard for aged dust and predict whether we need a separate standard for reactive dust. Presently-available data suggest that aged lunar highland dust is slightly toxic, that it can adversely affect cultured cells, and that the surface reactivity induced by grinding the dust persists for a few hours after activation.

  18. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  19. Lunar dust - Implications for astronomical observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Chua, Koon M.; Burns, Jack O.; Slane, Frederic A.

    1991-01-01

    The properties, origins, and previous operational experiences with lunar dust are discussed, with emphasis on the implications for world-class astronomy on the moon. The mechanisms that may govern the behavior of the fine particles are suggested, and working hypotheses for mitigating the dust hazard are advanced. Future experiments, both on the moon and in terrestrial simulations, that will assist in establishing effective and suitable means of limiting deleterious effects of dust on observatory operations are outlined. Dust studies of components returned by Surveyor 3 are presented. The performance of laser retroreflectors under conditions of moon dust is discussed.

  20. [Allergenic mites (Acariformes, Pyroglyphidae) in house dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhëltikova, T M; Petrova-Nikitina, A D; Kanchurin, A Kh; Berzhets, V M; Muzylëva, I L

    1987-01-01

    Paper is the second part of the literature review on house dust mites (including 1985). It deals with the diagnosis of the dust mite allergy, the nature of the mite allergens, distribution and population density of the mites in various premises, seasonal population dynamics and population age structure of the dermatophagoid mites, life cycle and breeding of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae on different food substrates. The methods of the house dust mite control are discussed. The original data on the house dust mite distribution in Moscow is shown. A comparative estimation of the results of mite antigens in the house dust discovering by the acarological and three immunological methods are given.

  1. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.V.; Greenberg, R.; Dermott, S.F.; Nicholson, P.D.; Burns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations. 32 refs

  2. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  3. Model Dust Envelopes Around Silicate Carbon Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled dust envelopes around silicate carbon stars using optical properties for a mixture of amorphous carbon and silicate dust grains paying close attention to the infrared observations of the stars. The 4 stars show various properties in chemistry and location of the dust shell. We expect that the objects that fit a simple detached silicate dust shell model could be in the transition phase of the stellar chemistry. For binary system objects, we find that a mixed dust chemistry model would be necessary.

  4. Motion of the sources for type II and type IV radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type II radio bursts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type IV radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves and bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the bottles behave quite differently from the waves and that the bottles are generally much slower than the waves. It has been suggested that the waves are related to flare-associated interplanetary disturbances which produce SSC geomagnetic storms. These disturbances may, therefore, be identified as interplanetary shock waves. The relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space is briefly discussed.

  5. Dust-acoustic waves and stability in the permeating dusty plasma. II. Power-law distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Jingyu; Du Jiulin; Liu Zhipeng

    2012-01-01

    The dust-acoustic waves and the stability theory for the permeating dusty plasma with power-law distributions are studied by using nonextensive q-statistics. In two limiting physical cases, when the thermal velocity of the flowing dusty plasma is much larger than, and much smaller than the phase velocity of the waves, we derived the dust-acoustic wave frequency, the instability growth rate, and the instability critical flowing velocity. As compared with the formulae obtained in part I [Gong et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 043704 (2012)], all formulae of the present cases and the resulting plasma characteristics are q-dependent, and the power-law distribution of each plasma component of the permeating dusty plasma has a different q-parameter and thus has a different nonextensive effect. Further, we make numerical analyses of an example that a cometary plasma tail is passing through the interplanetary space dusty plasma and we show that these power-law distributions have significant effects on the plasma characteristics of this kind of plasma environment.

  6. Pluto's interaction with its space environment: Solar wind, energetic particles, and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, F; Horányi, M; McComas, D J; McNutt, R L; Elliott, H A; Hill, M E; Brown, L E; Delamere, P A; Kollmann, P; Krimigis, S M; Kusterer, M; Lisse, C M; Mitchell, D G; Piquette, M; Poppe, A R; Strobel, D F; Szalay, J R; Valek, P; Vandegriff, J; Weidner, S; Zirnstein, E J; Stern, S A; Ennico, K; Olkin, C B; Weaver, H A; Young, L A

    2016-03-18

    The New Horizons spacecraft carried three instruments that measured the space environment near Pluto as it flew by on 14 July 2015. The Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument revealed an interaction region confined sunward of Pluto to within about 6 Pluto radii. The region's surprisingly small size is consistent with a reduced atmospheric escape rate, as well as a particularly high solar wind flux. Observations from the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument suggest that ions are accelerated and/or deflected around Pluto. In the wake of the interaction region, PEPSSI observed suprathermal particle fluxes equal to about 1/10 of the flux in the interplanetary medium and increasing with distance downstream. The Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter, which measures grains with radii larger than 1.4 micrometers, detected one candidate impact in ±5 days around New Horizons' closest approach, indicating an upper limit of <4.6 kilometers(-3) for the dust density in the Pluto system. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Industrial robot having dust-proof structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, N.; Ito, S.; Wakio, H.; Iwasaki, K

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes an industrial robot having a dust-proof structure comprising: at least one dust cover having an opening; a linearly moving unit extending through the opening of the dust cover and moved back and forth in the longitudinal direction thereof; a suction unit for exerting suction on an interior of the dust cover to cause an air stream to flow from outside the dust cover into the dust cover through the opening; and a ring member disposed at the opening of the dust cover in such a manner as to encompass the outer periphery of the linearly moving unit through a gap, the ring member being formed at the inner peripheral surface thereof with at least one annular groove for reserving air, encompassing the outer periphery of the linearly moving unit.

  8. [Determination of house dust mites in Eskisehir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Nihal; Aycan, Ozlem Makbule; Miman, Ozlem; Atambay, Metin; Daldal, Nilgün

    2008-01-01

    House dust contains various organic and inorganic materials. The most important parts of the house dust are dust mites causing allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis and seasonal keratoconjunctivitis. In this study, a total of 72 random house dust samples collected from various regions of Eskisehir were examined. The dust samples were examined by the lactic acid precipitation method which was modified from the Spieksma-Boezaman's method. The mite positive house dust rate was 16.67% including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Chortoglyphus arcuatus and Tyrophagus sp. It was concluded that investigation of a greater number of samples would lead to more precise rate of detection of mite positive dust and also that more mite species would be found.

  9. A study of solar and interplanetary parameters of CMEs causing major geomagnetic storms during SC 23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Oprea

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse 25 Earth-directed and strongly geoeffective interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs which occurred during solar cycle 23, using data provided by instruments on SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer and geomagnetic stations. We also examine the in situ parameters, the energy transfer into magnetosphere, and the geomagnetic indexes. We compare observed travel times with those calculated by observed speeds projected into the plane of the sky and de-projected by a simple model. The best fit was found with the projected speeds. No correlation was found between the importance of a flare and the geomagnetic Dst (disturbance storm time index. By comparing the in situ parameters with the Dst index we find a strong connection between some of these parameters (such as Bz, Bs · V and the energy transfer into the magnetosphere with the strength of the geomagnetic storm. No correlation was found with proton density and plasma temperature. A superposed epoch analysis revealed a strong dependence of the Dst index on the southward component of interplanetary magnetic field, Bz, and to the Akasofu coupling function, which evaluates the energy transfer between the ICME and the magnetosphere. The analysis also showed that the geomagnetic field at higher latitudes is disturbed before the field around the Earth's equator.

  10. Design of the VISITOR Tool: A Versatile ImpulSive Interplanetary Trajectory OptimizeR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpaccioli, Luca; Linskens, Harry; Komar, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The design of trajectories for interplanetary missions represents one of the most complex and important problems to solve during conceptual space mission design. To facilitate conceptual mission sizing activities, it is essential to obtain sufficiently accurate trajectories in a fast and repeatable manner. To this end, the VISITOR tool was developed. This tool modularly augments a patched conic MGA-1DSM model with a mass model, launch window analysis, and the ability to simulate more realistic arrival and departure operations. This was implemented in MATLAB, exploiting the built-in optimization tools and vector analysis routines. The chosen optimization strategy uses a grid search and pattern search, an iterative variable grid method. A genetic algorithm can be selectively used to improve search space pruning, at the cost of losing the repeatability of the results and increased computation time. The tool was validated against seven flown missions: the average total mission (Delta)V offset from the nominal trajectory was 9.1%, which was reduced to 7.3% when using the genetic algorithm at the cost of an increase in computation time by a factor 5.7. It was found that VISITOR was well-suited for the conceptual design of interplanetary trajectories, while also facilitating future improvements due to its modular structure.

  11. The Acceleration of Thermal Protons and Minor Ions at a Quasi-Parallel Interplanetary Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, J.; Lario, D.; Lepri, S. T.

    2017-12-01

    We compare the results from self-consistent hybrid simulations (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) and spacecraft observations of a strong, quasi-parallel interplanetary shock that crossed the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) on DOY 94, 2001. In our simulations, the un-shocked plasma-frame ion distributions are Maxwellian. Our simulations include protons and minor ions (alphas, 3He++, and C5+). The interplanetary shock crossed both the ACE and the Wind spacecraft, and was associated with significant increases in the flux of > 50 keV/nuc ions. Our simulation uses parameters (ion densities, magnetic field strength, Mach number, etc.) consistent with those observed. Acceleration of the ions by the shock, in a manner similar to that expected from diffusive shock acceleration theory, leads to a high-energy tail in the distribution of the post-shock plasma for all ions we considered. The simulated distributions are directly compared to those observed by ACE/SWICS, EPAM, and ULEIS, and Wind/STICS and 3DP, covering the energy range from below the thermal peak to the suprathermal tail. We conclude from our study that the solar wind is the most significant source of the high-energy ions for this event. Our results have important implications for the physics of the so-called `injection problem', which will be discussed.

  12. Source energy spectra from demodulation of solar particle data by interplanetary and coronal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.; Rivero, F.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The data on source energy spectra of solar cosmic rays (SCR), i.e. the data on the spectrum form and on the absolute SCR are of interest for three reasons: (1) the SCR contain the energy comparable to the total energy of electromagnetic flare radiation (less than or equal to 10 to the 32nd power ergs); (2) the source spectrum form indicates a possible acceleration mechanism (or mechanism); and (3) the accelerated particles are efficiently involved in nuclear electromagnetic and plasma processes in the solar atmosphere. Therefore, the data on SCR source spectra are necessary for a theoretical description of the processes mentioned and for the formulation of the consistent flare model. Below it is attempted to sound solar particle sources by means of SCR energy spectrum obtained near the Sun, at the level of the roots of the interplanetary field lines in the upper solar corona. Data from approx. 60 solar proton events (SPE) between 1956-1981. These data were obtained mainly by the interplanetary demodulation of observed fluxes near the Earth. Further, a model of coronal azimuthal transport is used to demodulate those spectra, and to obtain the source energy spectra.

  13. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz By By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  14. The structure of plasma-density irregularities in the interplanetary medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    The conflict in the literature as to whether the plasma-density spatial spectrum of the irregularities in the interplanetary medium is of Gaussian or power law form is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the interplanetary scintillation effects ascribed to these irregularities. It is shown that the phase-screen theory of scintillations can be invoked to devise a set of critical tests which provide a means of discriminating between the conflicting hypotheses. Differences in the predicted behaviour of the single sensor temporal spectra of the scintillations for the two irregularity forms provide the main tests of the conflicting hypotheses. However, it is also shown that the two hypotheses lead to different forms of the variation of scintillation index with the observing frequency and the solar elongation of the scintillating source. Consideration is given to the optimum conditions for observing the Fourier and Bessel temporal spectra modulation which is due to the Fresnel filtering of the spatial spectrum. Determination of irregularity shape, orientation and motion in terms of this modulation is also discussed. (author)

  15. Fundamental issues on kappa-distributions in space plasmas and interplanetary proton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leubner, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous in situ observations indicate clearly the presence of nonthermal electron and ion structures as ubiquitous and persistent feature in a variety of astrophysical plasma environments. In particular, the detected suprathermal particle populations are accurately represented by the family of κ-distributions, a power-law in particle speed. After clarifying the characteristics of high-energy tail distributions under various space plasma conditions, different generation mechanisms of energetic particles are introduced where numerical simulations of wave-particle interaction based on a Fokker-Planck approach demonstrate how Landau interaction ultimately leads to κ-like distributions. Because of lack of theoretical justification, the use of the analytical form of κ-functions was frequently criticized. It is shown that these distributions turn out as consequence of an entropy generalization favored by nonextensive thermo-statistics, thus providing the missing link for powerlaw models of suprathermal tails from fundamental physics, along with a physical interpretation of the structure parameter κ. Moreover, with regard to the full nonextensive formalism, compatible also with negative values of κ, it is demonstrated that core-halo distribution structures, as observed for instance under typical interplanetary plasma conditions, are a natural content of the pseudo-additive entropy concept. The significance of the complete κ-distribution family with regard to observed core-halo electron and double-humped ion velocity space characteristics is illuminated, where the observed peak separation scale of interplanetary proton distributions is compatible with a maximum entropy condition

  16. Sunward-propagating Solar Energetic Electrons inside Multiple Interplanetary Flux Ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Carcaboso, Fernando; Blanco, Juan J. [Dpto. de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad de Alcalá, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, University of Kiel, D-24118, Kiel (Germany); Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid [Institute of Physics/Kanzelhöhe Observatory, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Bučík, Radoslav [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany); Lario, David, E-mail: raul.gomezh@uah.es [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    On 2013 December 2 and 3, the SEPT and STE instruments on board STEREO-A observed two solar energetic electron events with unusual sunward-directed fluxes. Both events occurred during a time interval showing typical signatures of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The electron timing and anisotropies, combined with extreme-ultraviolet solar imaging and radio wave spectral observations, are used to confirm the solar origin and the injection times of the energetic electrons. The solar source of the ICME is investigated using remote-sensing observations and a three-dimensional reconstruction technique. In situ plasma and magnetic field data combined with energetic electron observations and a flux-rope model are used to determine the ICME magnetic topology and the interplanetary electron propagation path from the Sun to 1 au. Two consecutive flux ropes crossed the STEREO-A location and each electron event occurred inside a different flux rope. In both cases, the electrons traveled from the solar source to 1 au along the longest legs of the flux ropes still connected to the Sun. During the December 2 event, energetic electrons propagated along the magnetic field, while during the December 3 event they were propagating against the field. As found by previous studies, the energetic electron propagation times are consistent with a low number of field line rotations N < 5 of the flux rope between the Sun and 1 au. The flux rope model used in this work suggests an even lower number of rotations.

  17. Effective Acceleration Model for the Arrival Time of Interplanetary Shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-12-01

    In a previous work (Paouris and Mavromichalaki in Solar Phys. 292, 30, 2017), we presented a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) with as much information as possible. We developed a new empirical model for estimating the acceleration of these events in the interplanetary medium from this analysis. In this work, we present a new approach on the effective acceleration model (EAM) for predicting the arrival time of the shock that preceds a CME, using data of a total of 214 ICMEs. For the first time, the projection effects of the linear speed of CMEs are taken into account in this empirical model, which significantly improves the prediction of the arrival time of the shock. In particular, the mean value of the time difference between the observed time of the shock and the predicted time was equal to +3.03 hours with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 18.58 hours and a root mean squared error (RMSE) of 22.47 hours. After the improvement of this model, the mean value of the time difference is decreased to -0.28 hours with an MAE of 17.65 hours and an RMSE of 21.55 hours. This improved version was applied to a set of three recent Earth-directed CMEs reported in May, June, and July of 2017, and we compare our results with the values predicted by other related models.

  18. ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE measurements of interplanetary oxygen injection to the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a significant oxygen-rich interplanetary event was measure by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument. At the same time the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument recorded significant enhancements of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere. We present a detailed analysis of this event utilizing a new method of exploiting the EPAM Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data to precisely resolve helium and oxygen spectra within the 0.5 to 5 MeV/nuc range. We also present the flux, partial particle pressures, and pitch angle distributions of the ion measurements from RBSPICE. During this event, both EPAM and RBSPICE measured O:He ratios greater than 10:1. The pitch angle distributions from RBSPICE-B show a strong beam of oxygen at an L ~ 5.8 early on March 17th during orbit. The timing between the observations of the oxygen peak at ACE and the beam observed at RBSPICE-B is consistent with the travel-time required for energetic particle transport from L1 to Earth and access to the magnetosphere. We assert that the oxygen seen by RBSPICE during the initial phase of this event is the result of direct injection from the interplanetary medium of energetic ions. This poster contains the observations and detailed calculations to support this assertion.

  19. Interplanetary and terrestrial observations of an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Hari Om; Sharma, Som; Oza, R.; Iyer, K. N.; Chandra, H.; Sawant, H. S.; Deshpande, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we report interplanetary scintillation observations at 103 and 327 MHz of an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME) which occurred near the center of the solar disk at 0435 UT on May 12, 1997. The disturbance was found to have plasma density ˜4 times more than that of the ambient plasma at a distance of ˜ 0.5 AU from the Sun. The most peculiar aspect of this CME is that it appears that the disturbance moved slightly slower than the ambient medium. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) estimates of solar wind are quite different; it appears that the difference could be due to the projection effect of the SOHO image.Though the disturbance was not very severe, its impact on Earth's environment produced a geomagnetic storm. This event was associated with a two-ribbon flare.The ionospheric effects of soft X rays from this solar flare were observed by a digital ionosonde at Ahmedabad in the form of excess ionization (˜1200 el cm-3) in the D region of the ionosphere.

  20. Interaction of the interplanetary shock and tangential discontinuity in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Koval, Andriy; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir; Szabo, Adam; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the Earth. Fast forward interplanetary (IP) shocks driven by coronal mass ejections or by interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams can be encountered in the interplanetary space, while the bow shock is a standing fast reverse shock formed by the interaction of the supersonic solar wind with Earth's magnetic field. Both types of shocks are responsible for a transformation of a part of the energy of the directed solar wind motion to plasma heating and to acceleration of reflected particles to high energies. It is well known that the interaction of tangential discontinuities with the bow shock can create hot flow anomalies but interactions between IP shocks and tangential discontinuities in the solar wind are studied to a lesser extent due to lack of observations. A fortunate position of many spacecraft (Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, THEMIS, Spektr-R) on June 22, 2015 allows us detailed observations of an IP shock modification due to this interaction. We present an analysis of the event supported with MHD modeling that reveals basic features of the observed IP shock ramp splitting. However, a good matching of modeling and observations was found for DSCOVR and Spektr-R located above the ecliptic plane, whereas a timing of observations below this plane demonstrates problems of modeling of highly inclined discontinuities.