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Sample records for anhydrases ca ii

  1. A DFT-Based QSARs Study of Acetazolamide/Sulfanilamide Derivatives with Carbonic Anhydrase (CA-II Isozyme Inhibitory Activity

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    Oral Oltulu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR studyon a pool of 18 bio-active sulfonamide compounds which includes five acetazolamidederivatives, eight sulfanilamide derivatives and five clinically used sulfonamides moleculesas drugs namely acetazolamide, methazolamide, dichlorophenamide, ethoxolamide anddorzolamide. For all the compounds, initial geometry optimizations were carried out with amolecular mechanics (MM method using the MM force fields. The lowest energyconformations of the compounds obtained by the MM method were further optimized by theDensity Functional Theory (DFT method by employing Becke’s three-parameter hybridfunctional (B3LYP and 6-31G (d basis set. Molecular descriptors, dipole moment,electronegativity, total energy at 0 K, entropy at 298 K, HOMO and LUMO energiesobtained from DFT calculations provide valuable information and have a significant role inthe assessment of carbonic anhydrase (CA-II inhibitory activity of the compounds. By usingthe multiple linear regression technique several QSAR models have been drown up with thehelp these calculated descriptors and carbonic anhydrase (CA-II inhibitory data of themolecules. Among the obtained QSAR models presented in the study, statistically the mostsignificant one is a five parameters linear equation with the squared correlation coefficient R2 values of ca. 0.94 and the squared cross-validated correlation coefficient R2CV values of ca. 0.85. The results were discussed in the light of the main factors that influence theinhibitory activity of the carbonic anhydrase (CA-II isozyme.

  2. Alkyl sulfonic acide hydrazides: Synthesis, characterization, computational studies and anticancer, antibacterial, anticarbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) activities

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    O. Ozdemir, Ummuhan; İlbiz, Firdevs; Balaban Gunduzalp, Ayla; Ozbek, Neslihan; Karagoz Genç, Zuhal; Hamurcu, Fatma; Tekin, Suat

    2015-11-01

    Methane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3SO2NHNH2 (1), ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2SO2NHNH2 (2), propane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (3) and butane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (4) have been synthesized as homologous series and characterized by using elemental analysis, spectrophotometric methods (1H-13C NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS). In order to gain insight into the structure of the compounds, we have performed computational studies by using 6-311G(d, p) functional in which B3LYP functional were implemented. The geometry of the sulfonic acide hydrazides were optimized at the DFT method with Gaussian 09 program package. A conformational analysis of compounds were performed by using NMR theoretical calculations with DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level of theory by applying the (GIAO) approach. The anticancer activities of these compounds on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line investigated by comparing IC50 values. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Bacillus cereus NRRL-B-3711, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 70063 by using the disc diffusion method. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II enzyme (hCA II) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values. The biological activity screening shows that butane sulfonic acide hydrazide (4) has more activity than the others against tested breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, Gram negative/Gram positive bacteria and carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) isoenzyme.

  3. Kinetics of Formation of Cobalt(II)- and Nickel(II) Carbonic Anhydrase.

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    McQuate, Robert S.; Reardon, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the kinetic behavior associated with the interaction of metal ions with apocarbonic anhydrase, focusing on the formation of two metallocarbonic anhydrase--the biochemically active Co(II) and the inactive Ni(II)derivatives. (GA)

  4. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with secondary sulfonamides incorporating benzothiazole scaffolds.

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    Petrou, Anthi; Geronikaki, Athina; Terzi, Emine; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. A series of benzothiazole-based sulfonamides were synthesized and tested as possible CA inhibitors. Their inhibitory activity was assessed against the cytosolic human isoforms hCA I and hCA II and the transmembrane hCA IX and hCA XII. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting hCA IX and hCA XII over the off-target ones hCA I and hCA II. Furthermore, computational procedures were used to investigate the binding mode of this class of compounds, within the active site of hCA IX.

  5. Increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II in the developing Down syndrome brain.

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    Palminiello, Sonia; Kida, Elizabeth; Kaur, Kulbir; Walus, Marius; Wisniewski, Krystyna E; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Rabe, Ausma; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2008-01-23

    By using a proteomic approach, we found increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Further immunoblot analyses showed that the levels of CA II are increased not only in the brain of adult Ts65Dn mice but also in the brain of infants and young children with DS. Cellular localization of the enzyme in human brain, predominantly in the oligodendroglia and primitive vessels in fetal brain and in the oligodendroglia and some GABAergic neurons postnatally, was similar in DS subjects and controls. Given the role of CA II in regulation of electrolyte and water balance and pH homeostasis, up-regulation of CA II may reflect a compensatory mechanism mobilized in response to structural/functional abnormalities in the developing DS brain. However, this up-regulation may also have an unfavorable effect by increasing susceptibility to seizures of children with DS.

  6. Virtual screening of combinatorial library of novel benzenesulfonamides on mycobacterial carbonic anhydrase II

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    Dikant F.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial library of novel benzenesulfonamides was docked (Schrodinger Glide into mycobacterial carbonic anhydrase (mtCA II and human (hCA II isoforms with an aim to find drug candidates with selective activity on mtCA II. The predicted selectivity was calculated based on optimized MM-GBSA free energies for ligand enzyme interactions. Selectivity, LogP (o/w and interaction energy were used to calculate the selection index which determined the subset of best scoring molecules selected for further evaluation. Structure-activity relationship was found for fragment subsets, showing us the possible way regarding how to influence lipophilicity without affecting ligand-enzyme binding properties.

  7. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase II by thioxolone: a mechanistic and structural study.

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    Barrese, Albert A; Genis, Caroli; Fisher, S Zoe; Orwenyo, Jared N; Kumara, Mudalige Thilak; Dutta, Subodh K; Phillips, Eric; Kiddle, James J; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert; Tripp, Brian C

    2008-03-11

    This paper examines the functional mechanism of thioxolone, a compound recently identified as a weak inhibitor of human carbonic anhydrase II by Iyer et al. (2006) J. Biomol. Screening 11, 782-791 . Thioxolone lacks sulfonamide, sulfamate, or hydroxamate functional groups that are typically found in therapeutic carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, such as acetazolamide. Analytical chemistry and biochemical methods were used to investigate the fate of thioxolone upon binding to CA II, including Michaelis-Menten kinetics of 4-nitrophenyl acetate esterase cleavage, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), oxygen-18 isotope exchange studies, and X-ray crystallography. Thioxolone is proposed to be a prodrug inhibitor that is cleaved via a CA II zinc-hydroxide mechanism known to catalyze the hydrolysis of esters. When thioxolone binds in the active site of CA II, it is cleaved and forms 4-mercaptobenzene-1,3-diol via the intermediate S-(2,4-thiophenyl)hydrogen thiocarbonate. The esterase cleavage product binds to the zinc active site via the thiol group and is therefore the active CA inhibitor, while the intermediate is located at the rim of the active-site cavity. The time-dependence of this inhibition reaction was investigated in detail. Because this type of prodrug inhibitor mechanism depends on cleavage of ester bonds, this class of inhibitors may have advantages over sulfonamides in determining isozyme specificity. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study with a series of structural analogues of thioxolone yielded similar estimates of inhibition constants for most compounds, although two compounds with bromine groups at the C1 carbon of thioxolone were not inhibitory, suggesting a possible steric effect.

  8. Influence of pesticide exposure on carbonic anhydrase II from sheep stomach.

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    Kılınç, Namık; İşgör, Mehmet Mustafa; Şengül, Bülent; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2015-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a widely distributed enzyme and has a crucial role in the cells, tissues and organs of living organisms. It is found that CA-II is one of the most abundant CA isoenzymes in the gastrointestinal system. It plays an important role in the gastric acid secretion in stomach. In this study, we purified CA-II isoenzyme from sheep stomach with a 615.2 purification fold, 78% purification yield and 5562.02 specific activity. Moreover, the in vitro effects of some commonly used pesticides including chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, glyphosate isopropylamine and lambda cyhalomethrin on the enzyme activity were investigated. Of these compounds, glyphosate isopropylamine and dichlorvos showed an inhibition on CA-II esterase activity. They have IC50 values of 0.155 µM and 2.690 µM and Ki values of 0.329 µM and 3.654 µM, respectively. Both glyphosate isopropylamine and dichlorvos inhibited CA-II isoenzyme in a noncompetitive manner.

  9. Building reactive copper centers in human carbonic anhydrase II.

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    Song, He; Weitz, Andrew C; Hendrich, Michael P; Lewis, Edwin A; Emerson, Joseph P

    2013-08-01

    Reengineering metalloproteins to generate new biologically relevant metal centers is an effective a way to test our understanding of the structural and mechanistic features that steer chemical transformations in biological systems. Here, we report thermodynamic data characterizing the formation of two type-2 copper sites in carbonic anhydrase and experimental evidence showing one of these new, copper centers has characteristics similar to a variety of well-characterized copper centers in synthetic models and enzymatic systems. Human carbonic anhydrase II is known to bind two Cu(2+) ions; these binding events were explored using modern isothermal titration calorimetry techniques that have become a proven method to accurately measure metal-binding thermodynamic parameters. The two Cu(2+)-binding events have different affinities (K a approximately 5 × 10(12) and 1 × 10(10)), and both are enthalpically driven processes. Reconstituting these Cu(2+) sites under a range of conditions has allowed us to assign the Cu(2+)-binding event to the three-histidine, native, metal-binding site. Our initial efforts to characterize these Cu(2+) sites have yielded data that show distinctive (and noncoupled) EPR signals associated with each copper-binding site and that this reconstituted enzyme can activate hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the oxidation of 2-aminophenol.

  10. Azobenzene-based inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrase II

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    Leander Simon Runtsch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aryl sulfonamides are a widely used drug class for the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. In the context of our program of photochromic pharmacophores we were interested in the exploration of azobenzene-containing sulfonamides to block the catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII. Herein, we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a small library of nine photochromic sulfonamides towards hCAII. All molecules are azobenzene-4-sulfonamides, which are substituted by different functional groups in the 4´-position and were characterized by X-ray crystallography. We aimed to investigate the influence of electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents on the inhibitory constant Ki. With the aid of an hCAII crystal structure bound to one of the synthesized azobenzenes, we found that the electronic structure does not strongly affect inhibition. Taken together, all compounds are strong blockers of hCAII with Ki = 25–65 nM that are potentially photochromic and thus combine studies from chemical synthesis, crystallography and enzyme kinetics.

  11. Modification of carbonic anhydrase II with acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, leads to decreased enzyme activity.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, can generate covalent modifications of proteins and cellular constituents. However, functional consequences of such modification remain poorly defined. In the present study, we examined acetaldehyde reaction with human carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozyme II, which has several features that make it a suitable target protein: It is widely expressed, its enzymatic activity can be monitored, its structural and catalytic properties are...

  12. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

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    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease.

  13. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

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    Mayank Aggarwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3−, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the `in' and `out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations the activity of H64A CA II.

  14. Mono- and di-halogenated histamine, histidine and carnosine derivatives are potent carbonic anhydrase I, II, VII, XII and XIV activators.

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    Saada, Mohamed-Chiheb; Vullo, Daniela; Montero, Jean-Louis; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and di-halogenated histamines, l-histidine methyl ester derivatives and carnosine derivatives incorporating chlorine, bromine and iodine were prepared and investigated as activators of five carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic hCA I, II and VII, and the transmembrane hCA XII and XIV. All of them were activated in a diverse manner by the investigated compounds, with a distinct activation profile.

  15. High-resolution structure of human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with acetazolamide reveals insights into inhibitor drug design.

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    Sippel, Katherine H; Robbins, Arthur H; Domsic, John; Genis, Caroli; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) complexed with the inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) has been determined at 1.1 A resolution and refined to an R(cryst) of 11.2% and an R(free) of 14.7%. As observed in previous CA II-inhibitor complexes, AZM binds directly to the zinc and makes several key interactions with active-site residues. The high-resolution data also showed a glycerol molecule adjacent to the AZM in the active site and two additional AZMs that are adventitiously bound on the surface of the enzyme. The co-binding of AZM and glycerol in the active site demonstrate that given an appropriate ring orientation and substituents, an isozyme-specific CA inhibitor may be developed.

  16. Structural elucidation of the hormonal inhibition mechanism of the bile acid cholate on human carbonic anhydrase II

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    Boone, Christopher D. [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Tu, Chingkuang [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with cholate has been determined to 1.54 Å resolution. Elucidation of the novel inhibition mechanism of cholate will aid in the development of a nonsulfur-containing, isoform-specific therapeutic agent. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of CO{sub 2} into bicarbonate and a proton. Human isoform CA II (HCA II) is abundant in the surface epithelial cells of the gastric mucosa, where it serves an important role in cytoprotection through bicarbonate secretion. Physiological inhibition of HCA II via the bile acids contributes to mucosal injury in ulcerogenic conditions. This study details the weak biophysical interactions associated with the binding of a primary bile acid, cholate, to HCA II. The X-ray crystallographic structure determined to 1.54 Å resolution revealed that cholate does not make any direct hydrogen-bond interactions with HCA II, but instead reconfigures the well ordered water network within the active site to promote indirect binding to the enzyme. Structural knowledge of the binding interactions of this nonsulfur-containing inhibitor with HCA II could provide the template design for high-affinity, isoform-specific therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases/pathological states, including cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy and osteoporosis.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Provides a Plausible Explanation for the Generation of a Free Radical Adduct of Thioxolone in Mutant Carbonic Anhydrase II.

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    Sippel, Katherine H; Genis, Caroli; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Kiddle, James J; Tripp, Brian C; McKenna, Robert

    2010-10-07

    Thioxolone acts as a prodrug in the presence of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), whereby the molecule is cleaved by thioester hydrolysis to the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, 4-mercaptobenzene-1,3-diol (TH0). Thioxolone was soaked into the proton transfer mutant H64A of CA II in an effort to capture a reaction intermediate via X-ray crystallography. Structure determination of the 1.2 Å resolution data revealed the TH0 had been modified to a 4,4'-disulfanediyldibenzene-1,3-diol, a product of crystallization conditions, and a zinc ligated 2,4-dihydroxybenzenesulfenic acid, most likely induced by radiation damage. Neither ligand was likely a result of an enzymatic mechanism.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro inhibition of metal complexes of pyrazole based sulfonamide on human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

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    Büyükkıdan, Nurgün; Büyükkıdan, Bülent; Bülbül, Metin; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; Mert, Samet

    2017-12-01

    Sulfonamides represent an important class of biologically active compounds. A sulfonamide possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties obtained from a pyrazole based sulfonamide, ethyl 1-(3-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-3-((5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (1), and its metal complexes with the Ni(II) for (2), Cu(II) for (3) and Zn(II) for (4) have been synthesized. The structures of metal complexes (2-4) were established on the basis of their elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-Vis and MS spectral data. The inhibition of two human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes I and II, with 1 and synthesized complexes (2-4) and acetazolamide (AAZ) as a control compound was investigated in vitro by using the hydratase and esterase assays. The complexes 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibition constant in the range 0.1460-0.3930 µM for hCA-I and 0.0740-0.0980 µM for hCA-II, and they had effective more inhibitory activity on hCA-I and hCA-II than corresponding free ligand 1 and than AAZ.

  19. The Cellular Physiology of Carbonic Anhydrases

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    Breton S

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO(2 to form HCO(3(- and protons according to the following reaction: CO(2 + H(2O = H(2CO(3 = HCO(3(- + H(+. The first reaction is catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase and the second reaction occurs instantaneously. The carbonic anhydrase (CA gene family includes ten enzymatically active members, which are major players in many physiological processes, including renal and male reproductive tract acidification, bone resorption, respiration, gluconeogenesis, signal transduction, and formation of gastric acid. The newly identified CA IX (previously called MN and CA XII are related to cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Carbonic anhydrase isozymes have different kinetic properties and they are present in various tissues and in various cell compartments. CA I, II, III and VII are cytoplasmic, CA V is mitochondrial, and CA VI is present in salivary secretions. CA IV, IX, XII and XIV are membrane proteins: CA IV is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, and CA IX, XII and XIV are transmembrane proteins. The present work will focus on the roles of CA II and CA IV in transepithelial proton secretion and bicarbonate reabsorption processes. The localization of these isoforms in selected epithelia that are involved in net acid/base transport, such as kidney proximal tubules and collecting ducts, and tubules from the male reproductive tract will be reviewed.

  20. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase CA VB: Differences in tissue distribution and pattern of evolution from those of CA VA suggest distinct physiological roles

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    Shah, Gul N.; Hewett-Emmett, David; Grubb, Jeffrey H.; Migas, Mary C.; Fleming, Robert E.; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S.

    2000-01-01

    A cDNA for a second mouse mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) called CA VB was identified by homology to the previously characterized murine CA V, now called CA VA. The full-length cDNA encodes a 317-aa precursor that contains a 33-aa classical mitochondrial leader sequence. Comparison of products expressed from cDNAs for murine CA VB and CA VA in COS cells revealed that both expressed active CAs that localized in mitochondria, and showed comparable activities in crude extracts and in mitoc...

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

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    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase II increases the activity of the human electrogenic Na+/HCO3- cotransporter.

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    Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2007-05-04

    Several acid/base-coupled membrane transporters, such as the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), have been shown to bind to different carbonic anhydrase isoforms to create a "transport metabolon." We have expressed NBCe1 derived from human kidney in oocytes of Xenopus leavis and determined its transport activity by recording the membrane current in voltage clamp, and the cytosolic H(+) and Na(+) concentrations using ion-selective microelectrodes. When carbonic anhydrase isoform II (CAII) had been injected into oocytes, the membrane current and the rate of cytosolic Na(+) rise, indicative for NBCe1 activity, increased significantly with the amount of injected CAII (2-200 ng). The CAII inhibitor ethoxyzolamide reversed the effects of CAII on the NBCe1 activity. Co-expressing wild-type CAII or NH(2)-terminal mutant CAII together with NBCe1 provided similar results, whereas co-expressing the catalytically inactive CAII mutant V143Y had no effect on NBCe1 activity. Mass spectrometric analysis and the rate of cytosolic H(+) change following addition of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) confirmed the catalytic activity of injected and expressed CAII in oocytes. Our results show that the transport capacity of NBCe1 is enhanced by the catalytic activity of CAII, in line with the notion that CAII forms a transport metabolon with NBCe1.

  3. Synthesis of novel bisindolylmethanes: New carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors, docking, and 3D pharmacophore studies.

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    Imran, Syahrul; Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Fayyaz, Sharmeen; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2016-10-01

    In this study, 45 bisindolylmethanes having sulfonamide moiety had been synthesized through 3 steps. In vitro assay for inhibition of carbonic anhydrase showed that some of the compounds having sulfonamide moiety are capable of inhibiting carbonic anhydrase II. Bisindoles having halogens at fifth position showed better inhibitory activity as compared to unsubstituted bisindoles. The results obtained from in vitro inhibitory activity were subjected through 3D QSAR and docking studies to identify important features contributing to the activity and further improve the structure. Pharmacophore studies suggest that bisindolylmethane moiety is contributing significantly towards the inhibition activity. Docking studies showed that compounds having nitro substituent (5g and 5i) were found to be able interact with Zn(2+) ion, Thr199, His94, His96, and His119, which interferes with the ZnOHThr199Glu106 hydrogen bond network. Bulky nitro substituent at ortho position for compound 5g prevents the compound from interacting with other residues like Thr199 and Thr200. Methyl substituent at ortho position for Compound 5i induces less steric hindrance effect, thus allowing second oxygen atom of sulfonamide to interact with Thr199 (2.51Å). Hydrogen bonding between NH on indole ring with Glu69 might have increased stability of ligand-receptor complex.

  4. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with novel Schiff bases: identification of selective inhibitors for the tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

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    Sarikaya, Busra; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-11-01

    A series of new Schiff bases was obtained from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes incorporating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. The obtained sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic CA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII. Most derivatives were medium potency or weak hCA I/II inhibitors, but several of them showed nanomolar affinity for CA IX and/or XII, making them an interesting example of isoform-selective compounds. The nature of the aryl/hetaryl moiety present in the initial aldehyde was the main factor influencing potency and isoform selectivity. The best and most CA IX-selective compounds incorporated moieties such as 4-methylthiophenyl, 4-cyanophenyl-, 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl and the 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide scaffold. The best hCA XII inhibitors, also showing selectivity for this isoform, incorporated 2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl and 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl functionalities and were also derivatives of 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide. The sulfanilamide and 3-fluorosulfanilamide derived Schiff bases were less active compared to the corresponding 4-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonamide derivatives. As hCA IX/XII selective inhibition is attractive for obtaining antitumor agents/diagnostic tools with a new mechanism of action, compounds of the type described here may be considered interesting preclinical candidates.

  5. Design and synthesis of benzothiazole-6-sulfonamides acting as highly potent inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Diaa A; Lasheen, Deena S; Zaky, Maysoun Y; Ibrahim, Amany W; Vullo, Daniela; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel 2-aminobenzothiazole derivatives bearing sulfonamide at position 6 was designed, synthesized and investigated as inhibitors of four isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the cytosolic CA I and II, and the tumor-associated isozymes CA IX and XII. Docking and binding energy studies were carried out to reveal details regarding the favorable interactions between the scaffolds of these new inhibitors and the active sites of the investigated CA isoforms. Most of the novel compounds were acting as highly potent inhibitors of the tumor-associated hCA IX and hCA XII with KIs in the nanomolar range. The ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozyme hCA II was also inhibited with KIs ranging from 3.5 to 45.4 nM. The favorable interactions between some of the new compounds and the active site of different CA isoforms were delineated by using molecular docking which may be useful for designing compounds with high affinity and selectivity for some CAs with biomedical applications.

  6. Design and simulation of rate-based CO2 capture processes using carbonic anhydrase (CA) applied to biogas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gaspar, Jozsef; Jacobsen, Bjartur

    2017-01-01

    a potential to create negative emissions using bio-energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS). All sectors are still in the need for applying more sustainable carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies which result in lower energy consumption while reducing the impact on the environment. Recently several....... The advantage is a noticeably lower regeneration energy compared to primary and secondary amines. As a result the cost for stripping is significantly lower. Reactivated slow tertiary amines are applied in this study with the aim of reducing energy consumption. This is achieved byusing carbonic anhydrase (CA...

  7. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase CA VB: differences in tissue distribution and pattern of evolution from those of CA VA suggest distinct physiological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, G N; Hewett-Emmett, D; Grubb, J H; Migas, M C; Fleming, R E; Waheed, A; Sly, W S

    2000-02-15

    A cDNA for a second mouse mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) called CA VB was identified by homology to the previously characterized murine CA V, now called CA VA. The full-length cDNA encodes a 317-aa precursor that contains a 33-aa classical mitochondrial leader sequence. Comparison of products expressed from cDNAs for murine CA VB and CA VA in COS cells revealed that both expressed active CAs that localized in mitochondria, and showed comparable activities in crude extracts and in mitochondria isolated from transfected COS cells. Northern blot analyses of total RNAs from mouse tissues and Western blot analyses of mouse tissue homogenates showed differences in tissue-specific expression between CA VB and CA VA. CA VB was readily detected in most tissues, while CA VA expression was limited to liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The human orthologue of murine CA VB was recently reported also. Comparison of the CA domain sequence of human CA VB with that reported here shows that the CA domains of CA VB are much more highly conserved between mouse and human (95% identity) than the CA domains of mouse and human CA VAs (78% identity). Analysis of phylogenetic relationships between these and other available human and mouse CA isozyme sequences revealed that mammalian CA VB evolved much more slowly than CA VA, accepting amino acid substitutions at least 4.5 times more slowly since each evolved from its respective human-mouse ancestral gene around 90 million years ago. Both the differences in tissue distribution and the much greater evolutionary constraints on CA VB sequences suggest that CA VB and CA VA have evolved to assume different physiological roles.

  8. Conformational effects on the circular dichroism of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II: a multilevel computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana G Karabencheva-Christova

    Full Text Available Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating conformational changes in proteins and therefore has numerous applications in structural and molecular biology. Here a computational investigation of the CD spectrum of the Human Carbonic Anhydrase II (HCAII, with main focus on the near-UV CD spectra of the wild-type enzyme and it seven tryptophan mutant forms, is presented and compared to experimental studies. Multilevel computational methods (Molecular Dynamics, Semiempirical Quantum Mechanics, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory were applied in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of interaction between the aromatic chromophores within the protein environment and understand how the conformational flexibility of the protein influences these mechanisms. The analysis suggests that combining CD semi empirical calculations, crystal structures and molecular dynamics (MD could help in achieving a better agreement between the computed and experimental protein spectra and provide some unique insight into the dynamic nature of the mechanisms of chromophore interactions.

  9. Crystal structure and kinetic studies of a tetrameric type II β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a zinc enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) and a proton. CAs have been extensively investigated owing to their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Currently, CA inhibitors are widely used as antiglaucoma, anticancer and anti-obesity drugs and for the treatment of neurological disorders. Recently, the potential use of CA inhibitors to fight infections caused by protozoa, fungi and bacteria has emerged as a new research direction. In this article, the cloning and kinetic characterization of the β-CA from Vibrio cholerae (VchCAβ) are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of this new enzyme was solved at 1.9 Å resolution from a crystal that was perfectly merohedrally twinned, revealing a tetrameric type II β-CA with a closed active site in which the zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated to Cys42, Asp44, His98 and Cys101. The substrate bicarbonate was found bound in a noncatalytic binding pocket close to the zinc ion, as reported for a few other β-CAs, such as those from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. At pH 8.3, the enzyme showed a significant catalytic activity for the physiological reaction of the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: a kcat of 3.34 × 10(5) s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The new enzyme, on the other hand, was poorly inhibited by acetazolamide (Ki of 4.5 µM). As this bacterial pathogen encodes at least three CAs, an α-CA, a β-CA and a γ-CA, these enzymes probably play an important role in the life cycle and pathogenicity of Vibrio, and it cannot be excluded that interference with their activity may be exploited therapeutically to obtain antibiotics with a different mechanism of action.

  10. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1 catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−, and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an Rcryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along with only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity (Ki for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 nM. The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.

  11. Rate-based modelling and validation of a pilot absorber using MDEA enhanced with carbonic anhydrase (CA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Gladis, Arne; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    The great paradox of the 21st century is that we must meet the increasing global demand for energy and products while simultaneously mitigating the climate change. If both these criteria are to be met, carbon capture and storage is an imperative technology for sustainable energy infrastructure...... development. Post-combustion capture is a mature capture technology, however, to make it economically attractive, design of innovative solvents and process optimization is of crucial importance. An example for promising solvent is MDEA enhanced with carbonic anhydrase (CA), due to its fast kinetics and low...... for different L/G ratios, lean CO2 loadings, gas CO2 content and packing height. We show that the developed model is suitable for CO2 capture simulation and optimization using MDEA and MDEA enhanced with CA. Furthermore, we investigate the accuracy of the General Method (GM) enhancement factor model for CO2...

  12. Solar Ca II K Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, computational studies, antimicrobial activities and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor effects of 2-hydroxy acetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Memmi, Burcu Koçak; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Bahçeci, Zafer; Alyar, Hamit

    2017-01-01

    2-Hydroxyacetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (afptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes were synthesized for the first time. Synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, 1Hsbnd 13C NMR, LC-MS, UV-vis), magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure of ligand were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The vibrational band assignments were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) theory level combined with scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by using microdilution and disc diffusion methods. In vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of the compounds were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The enzyme activities against human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) were evaluated as IC50 (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) values. It was found that afptsmh and its metal complexes have inhibitory effects on hCA II isoenzyme. General esterase activities were determined using alpha and beta naphtyl acetate substrates (α- and β-NAs) of Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Activity results show that afptsmh does not strongly affect the bacteria strains and also shows poor inhibitory activity against hCAII isoenzyme whereas all complexes posses higher biological activities.

  14. Functional role of a putative carbonic anhydrase II-binding domain in the electrogenic Na+ -HCO₃- cotransporter NBCe1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hideomi; Horita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masashi; Fujita, Toshiro; Seki, George

    2011-01-01

    The electrogenic Na+ -HCO₃⁻ cotransporter NBCe1 plays essential roles in the regulation of systemic and/or local pH. Homozygous inactivating mutations in NBCe1 cause proximal renal tubular acidosis associated with ocular abnormalities. We recently showed that defective membrane expression of NBCe1, caused by several mutations such as Delta65bp (S982NfsX4), is also associated with familial migraine. The Delta65bp mutant is quite unique in that it lacks a putative carbonic anhydrase (CA) II-binding domain but still shows an apparently normal transport activity in Xenopus oocytes. In this addendum, we show that the co-expression of CAII together with the wild-type NBCe1 or the Delta65bp mutant does not enhance the NBCe1 activities in oocytes. Moreover, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide fails to inhibit the wild-type or the Delta65bp activities co-expressed with CAII. These results indicate that a bicarbonate transport metabolon proposed for the interaction between CAII and NBCe1 does not work at least in Xenopus oocytes.

  15. Common genetic denominators for Ca++-based skeleton in Metazoa: role of osteoclast-stimulating factor and of carbonic anhydrase in a calcareous sponge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner E G Müller

    Full Text Available Calcium-based matrices serve predominantly as inorganic, hard skeletal systems in Metazoa from calcareous sponges [phylum Porifera; class Calcarea] to proto- and deuterostomian multicellular animals. The calcareous sponges form their skeletal elements, the spicules, from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC. Treatment of spicules from Sycon raphanus with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl results in the disintegration of the ACC in those skeletal elements. Until now a distinct protein/enzyme involved in ACC metabolism could not been identified in those animals. We applied the technique of phage display combinatorial libraries to identify oligopeptides that bind to NaOCl-treated spicules: those oligopeptides allowed us to detect proteins that bind to those spicules. Two molecules have been identified, the (putative enzyme carbonic anhydrase and the (putative osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSTF, that are involved in the catabolism of ACC. The complete cDNAs were isolated and the recombinant proteins were prepared to raise antibodies. In turn, immunofluorescence staining of tissue slices and qPCR analyses have been performed. The data show that sponges, cultivated under standard condition (10 mM CaCl(2 show low levels of transcripts/proteins for carbonic anhydrase or OSTF, compared to those animals that had been cultivated under Ca(2+-depletion condition (1 mM CaCl(2. Our data identify with the carbonic anhydrase and the OSTF the first two molecules which remain conserved in cells, potentially involved in Ca-based skeletal dissolution, from sponges (sclerocytes to human (osteoclast.

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  17. Carbonic Anhydrase II: A Model System for Artificial Copper Center Design, Protein-guided Cycloadditions, Tethering Screenings and Fragment-based Lead Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze Wischeler, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a variety of quite different fragment-based lead discovery approaches have been applied to the target protein carbonic anhydrase II. The different projects were strongly supported and methodologically tailored towards protein crystallography; a method which is currently emerging as a routine analytical tool. This maturation mainly results from improved radiation sources and enhanced computing power. About 200-250 da...

  18. 3D QSAR studies, pharmacophore modeling, and virtual screening of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives as a template to obtain new inhibitors, using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari Heravi, Yeganeh; Sereshti, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Jahan; Amirmostofian, Marzieh; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-12-01

    A 3D-QSAR modeling was performed on a series of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives acting as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The compounds were collected from two datasets with the same scaffold, and utilized as a template for a new pharmacophore model to screen the ZINC database of commercially available derivatives. The datasets were divided into training, test, and validation sets. As the first step, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), CoMFA region focusing and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) in parallel with docking studies were applied to a set of 41 human (h) CA II inhibitors. The validity and the prediction capacity of the resulting models were evaluated by leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach. The reliability of the model for the prediction of possibly new CA inhibitors was also tested.

  19. The synthesis of novel pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxamides bearing 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide moiety with effective inhibitory activity against the isoforms of human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Samet; Alım, Zuhal; İşgör, Mehmet Mustafa; Beydemir, Şükrü; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi

    2016-10-01

    A series of 1-(3-substituted-phenyl)-5-phenyl-N(3),N(4)-bis(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxamides (4-15) were synthesized. The structures of these pyrazole-sulfonamides were confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and elemental analysis methods. Human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes (hCA I and II) were purified from erythrocyte cells by affinity chromatography. The inhibitory effects of newly synthesized derivatives (4-15) were investigated in vitro on esterase activities of these isozymes. The Ki values were determined as 0.119-3.999μM for hCA I and 0.084-0.878μM for hCA II. The results showed that the compound 6 for hCA I and the compound 11 for hCA II had the highest inhibitory effect. Beside that, the compound 8 had the lowest inhibition effect on both isozymes.

  20. Comparative analysis of 10 small molecules binding to carbonic anhydrase II by different investigators using Biacore technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Leavitt, Stephanie; Bynum, Maggie A; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Wilton, Rosemarie; Qiu, Huawei; Steukers, Mieke; Wang, Siming; Bindu, Lakshman; Phogat, Sanjay; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ryan, Thomas E; Pudlak, Victoria A; Matusiewicz, Katarzyna; Michelson, Klaus M; Nowakowski, Agnes; Pham-Baginski, Anh; Brooks, Jonathan; Tieman, Bryan C; Bruce, Barry D; Vaughn, Michael; Baksh, Michael; Cho, Yun Hee; Wit, Mieke De; Smets, Alexandra; Vandersmissen, Johan; Michiels, Lieve; Myszka, David G

    2006-12-01

    In this benchmark study, 26 investigators were asked to characterize the kinetics and affinities of 10 sulfonamide inhibitors binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II using Biacore optical biosensors. A majority of the participants collected data that could be fit to a 1:1 interaction model, but a subset of the data sets obtained from some instruments were of poor quality. The experimental errors in the k(a), k(d), and K(D) parameters determined for each of the compounds averaged 34, 24, and 37%, respectively. As expected, the greatest variation in the reported constants was observed for compounds with exceptionally weak affinity and/or fast association rates. The binding constants determined using the biosensor correlated well with solution-based titration calorimetry measurements. The results of this study provide insight into the challenges, as well as the level of experimental variation, that one would expect to observe when using Biacore technology for small molecule analyses.

  1. Saccharin: a lead compound for structure-based drug design of carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Brian P; Hendon, Alex M; Driscoll, Jenna M; Rankin, Gregory M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition.

  2. The most recently discovered carbonic anhydrase, CA XV, is expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle and in the collecting ducts of mouse kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Saari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrases (CAs are key enzymes for physiological pH regulation, including the process of urine acidification. Previous studies have identified seven cytosolic or membrane-bound CA isozymes in the kidney. Recently, we showed by in situ hybridization that the mRNA for the most novel CA isozyme, CA XV, is present in the renal cortex. CA XV is a unique isozyme among mammalian CAs, because it has become a pseudogene in primates even though expressed in several other species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we raised a polyclonal antibody against recombinant mouse CA XV that was produced in a baculovirus/insect cell expression system, and the antibody was used for immunohistochemical analysis in different mouse tissues. Positive immunoreactions were found only in the kidney, where the enzyme showed a very limited distribution pattern. Parallel immunostaining experiments with several other anti-CA sera indicated that CA XV is mainly expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle and collecting ducts, and the reactions were most prominent in the cortex and outer medulla. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Although other studies have proposed a role for CA XV in cell proliferation, its tightly limited distribution may point to a specialized function in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis.

  3. The importance of carbonic anhydrase II in red blood cells during exposure of chicken embryos to CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaert, N; Willemsen, H; Hulikova, A; Brown, H; Decuypere, E; Swietach, P; Bruggeman, V

    2010-07-31

    The importance of carbonic anhydrase (CA) during exposure of chicken embryos to CO(2) during the second half of incubation was investigated. The protein abundance and activity of CAII in erythrocytes was significantly higher in CO(2)-exposed embryos compared to normal conditions. Daily injections of acetazolamide (ATZ), an inhibitor of CA, increased blood P(CO2) and decreased blood pH in both control and CO(2)-incubated embryos. ATZ increased blood bicarbonate concentration in embryos exposed to normal atmosphere and in day-12 embryos exposed to high CO(2). The tendency of an increased blood potassium concentration in ATZ-injected embryos under standard atmospheric conditions might indicate that protons were exchanged with intracellular potassium. However, there was no evidence for such an exchange in CO(2)-incubated ATZ-treated embryos. This study shows for the first time that chicken embryos adapt to CO(2) during the second half of incubation by increasing CAII protein expression and function in red blood cells. This response may serve to "buffer" elevated CO(2) levels.

  4. 1. alpha. ,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 regulates the expression of carbonic anhydrase II in nonerythroid avian bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billecocq, A.; Emanuel, J.R.; Levenson, R.; Baron, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-08-01

    1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}), the active metabolite of the steroid hormone vitamin D, is a potent regulator of macrophage and osteoclast differentiation. The mature osteoclast, unlike the circulating monocyte or the tissue macrophage, expresses high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). This enzyme generates protons and bicarbonate from water and carbon dioxide and is involved in bone resorption and acid-base regulation. To test whether 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} could induce the differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors toward osteoclasts rather than macrophages, analyzed its effects on the expression of CAII in bone marrow cultures containing precursors common to both cell types. The expression of CAII was markedly increased by 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in a dose-and time-dependent manner. In bone marrow, this increase occurred at the mRNA and protein levels and was detectable as early as 24 hr after stimulation. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was also found to induce CAII expression in a transformed myelomonocytic avian cell line. These results suggest that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} regulates the level at which myelomonocytic precursors express CAII, an enzyme that is involved in the function of the mature osteoclast.

  5. Carbonic Anhydrases and Their Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert McKenna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbonic anhydrases (CAs are mostly zinc-containing metalloenzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of carbon dioxide/bicarbonate. The CAs have been extensively studied because of their broad physiological importance in all kingdoms of life and clinical relevance as drug targets. In particular, human CA isoform II (HCA II has a catalytic efficiency of 108 M−1 s−1, approaching the diffusion limit. The high catalytic rate, relatively simple procedure of expression and purification, relative stability and extensive biophysical studies of HCA II has made it an exciting candidate to be incorporated into various biomedical applications such as artificial lungs, biosensors and CO2 sequestration systems, among others. This review highlights the current state of these applications, lists their advantages and limitations, and discusses their future development.

  6. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer pathways in human carbonic anhydrase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Roy; Srabani Taraphder

    2007-09-01

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic interactions are modelled.

  7. 4-Amino-substituted Benzenesulfonamides as Inhibitors of Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Rutkauskas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives and diazobenzenesulfonamides containing aliphatic rings were designed, synthesized, and their binding to carbonic anhydrases (CA I, II, VI, VII, XII, and XIII was studied by the fluorescent thermal shift assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. The results showed that 4-substituted diazobenzenesulfonamides were more potent CA binders than N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives. Most of the N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives showed better affinity for CA II while diazobenzenesulfonamides possessed nanomolar affinities towards CA I isozyme. X-ray crystallographic structures showed the modes of binding of both compound groups.

  8. The history and rationale of using carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in the treatment of peptic ulcers. In memoriam Ioan Puşcaş (1932-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György M; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) started to be used in the treatment of peptic ulcers in the 1970s, and for more than two decades, a group led by Ioan Puşcaş used them for this purpose, assuming that by inhibiting the gastric mucosa CA isoforms, hydrochloric acid secretion is decreased. Although acetazolamide and other sulfonamide CAIs are indeed effective in healing ulcers, the inhibition of CA isoforms in other organs than the stomach led to a number of serious side effects which made this treatment obsolete when the histamine H2 receptor antagonists and the proton pump inhibitors became available. Decades later, in 2002, it has been discovered that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterial pathogen responsible for gastric ulcers and cancers, encodes for two CAs, one belonging to the α-class and the other one to the β-class of these enzymes. These enzymes are crucial for the life cycle of the bacterium and its acclimation within the highly acidic environment of the stomach. Inhibition of the two bacterial CAs with sulfonamides such as acetazolamide, a low-nanomolar H. pylori CAI, is lethal for the pathogen, which explains why these compounds were clinically efficient as anti-ulcer drugs. Thus, the approach promoted by Ioan Puşcaş for treating this disease was a good one although the rationale behind it was wrong. In this review, we present a historical overview of the sulfonamide CAIs as anti-ulcer agents, in memoriam of the scientist who was in the first line of this research trend.

  9. Future Perspective in Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors and its Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Petchimuthu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Through this review it is contemplated that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, were a traditional drugs of choice for the treatment of glaucoma with a myriad of side effects and inadequate topical effectiveness, may be formulated into a topically effective agent by utilizing various newer formulation approaches of ocular drug delivery. Even though the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (ACZ has a poor solubility and penetration power (BCS Class IV, various studies mentioned in the review indicate that it is possible to successfully formulate topically effective ACZ by using:(i High concentration of the drug, (ii Surfactant gel preparations of ACZ, (iii ACZ loaded into liposomes, (iv Cyclodextrins to increase the solubility and hence bioavailability of ACZ, and Viscolyzers and other polymers either alone or in combination with cyclodextrins. With the advent of newer topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs like dorzolamide and brinzolamide, a localized effect with fewer side effects is expected.But whenever absorbed systemically, a similar range of adverse effects (attributable to sulphonamides may occur upon use. Furthermore, oral ACZ is reported to be more physiologically effective than 2% dorzolamide hydrochloridead ministered topically, even though in isolated tissues dorzolamide appears to be the most active as it shows the lowest IC50 values for CA-II and CA-IV. Hence, there exists considerable scope for the development of more/equally effective and inexpensive topically effective formulations of ACZ. The use of various formulation technologies discussed in this review can provide a fresh impetus to research in this area.

  10. Expression and characterization of a recombinant psychrophilic γ-carbonic anhydrase (NcoCA) identified in the genome of the Antarctic cyanobacteria belonging to the genus Nostoc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Carginale, Vincenzo; Di Fonzo, Pietro; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the CO2 hydration/dehydration reversible reaction: CO2 + H2O ⇄ [Formula: see text] + H(+). Living organisms encode for at least six distinct genetic families of such catalyst, the α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ζ- and η-CAs. The main function of the CAs is to quickly process the CO2 derived by metabolic processes in order to regulate acid-base homeostasis, connected to the production of protons (H(+)) and bicarbonate. Few data are available in the literature on Antarctic CAs and most of the scientific information regards CAs isolated from mammals or prokaryotes (as well as other mesophilic sources). It is of great interest to study the biochemical behavior of such catalysts identified in organism living in the Antarctic sea where temperatures average -1.9 °C all year round. The enzymes isolated from Antarctic organisms represent a useful tool to study the relations among structure, stability and function of proteins in organisms adapted to living at constantly low temperatures. In the present paper, we report in detail the cloning, purification, and physico-chemical properties of NcoCA, a γ-CA isolated from the Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. This enzyme showed a higher catalytic efficiency at lower temperatures compared to mesophilic counterparts belonging to α-, β-, γ-classes, as well as a limited stability at moderate temperatures.

  11. Capsaicin: A Potent Inhibitor of Carbonic Anhydrase Isoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Arabaci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1 is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 and water (H2O into a proton (H+ and bicarbonate (HCO3– ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  12. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-07-10

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  13. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S. Z., E-mail: zfisher@lanl.gov; Kovalevsky, A. Y. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Domsic, J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Mustyakimov, M. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Silverman, D. N. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, PO Box 100267, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Langan, P. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  14. Ca II Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Sardane, Gendith M; Rao, Sandhya M

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for CaII 3934,3969 absorption-line systems culled from ~ 95,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and Data Release 9 quasar spectra. With 435 doublets identified in the catalog, this list is the largest CaII catalog compiled to date, spanning redshifts z = 0.3 A, is n_0=0.017 +/- 0.001. In comparison to MgII surveys, we found that only 3% of MgII systems in the SDSS have CaII, confirming that it is rare to identify CaII in quasar absorption-line surveys. We also report on some preliminary investigations of the nature of the two populations of CaII absorbers, and show that they can likely be distinguished using their MgII properties.

  15. Characterization of human carbonic anhydrase III from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Shiels, A; Edwards, Y; Tipler, T; Hopkinson, D A

    1979-10-01

    A third form of human carbonic anhydrase (CA III), found at high concentrations in skeletal muscle, has been purified and characterized. This isozyme shows relatively poor hydratase and esterase activities compared to the red cell isozymes, CA I and CA II, but is similar to these isozymes in subunit structure (monomer) and molecular size (28,000). CA III is liable to posttranslational modification by thiol group interaction. Monomeric secondary isozymes, sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, are found in both crude and purified material and can be generated in vitro by the addition of thiol reagents. Active dimeric isozymes, generated apparently by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bridges, also occur but account for only a small proportion of the total protein and appear only when the concentration of CA III is particularly high.

  16. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  17. Fast inversion of solar Ca II spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Rezaei, R; Louis, R E

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast (<< 1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log tau ~ -3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log tau = -6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  18. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M against isozyme CAI. PMID:18472784

  19. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  20. Intrinsic Thermodynamics and Structure Correlation of Benzenesulfonamides with a Pyrimidine Moiety Binding to Carbonic Anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglė Kišonaitė

    Full Text Available The early stage of drug discovery is often based on selecting the highest affinity lead compound. To this end the structural and energetic characterization of the binding reaction is important. The binding energetics can be resolved into enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding Gibbs free energy. Most compound binding reactions are coupled to the absorption or release of protons by the protein or the compound. A distinction between the observed and intrinsic parameters of the binding energetics requires the dissection of the protonation/deprotonation processes. Since only the intrinsic parameters can be correlated with molecular structural perturbations associated with complex formation, it is these parameters that are required for rational drug design. Carbonic anhydrase (CA isoforms are important therapeutic targets to treat a range of disorders including glaucoma, obesity, epilepsy, and cancer. For effective treatment isoform-specific inhibitors are needed. In this work we investigated the binding and protonation energetics of sixteen [(2-pyrimidinylthioacetyl]benzenesulfonamide CA inhibitors using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescent thermal shift assay. The compounds were built by combining four sulfonamide headgroups with four tailgroups yielding 16 compounds. Their intrinsic binding thermodynamics showed the limitations of the functional group energetic additivity approach used in fragment-based drug design, especially at the level of enthalpies and entropies of binding. Combined with high resolution crystal structural data correlations were drawn between the chemical functional groups on selected inhibitors and intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of CA-inhibitor complex formation.

  1. Design of a carbonic anhydrase IX active-site mimic to screen inhibitors for possible anticancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Caroli; Sippel, Katherine H; Case, Nicolette; Cao, Wengang; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara; Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David N; Rosser, Charles J; McKenna, Robert

    2009-02-17

    Recently, a convincing body of evidence has accumulated suggesting that the overexpression of carbonic anhydrase isozyme IX (CA IX) in some cancers contributes to the acidification of the extracellular matrix, which in turn promotes the growth and metastasis of the tumor. These observations have made CA IX an attractive drug target for the selective treatment of certain cancers. Currently, there is no available X-ray crystal structure of CA IX, and this lack of availability has hampered the rational design of selective CA IX inhibitors. In light of these observations and on the basis of structural alignment homology, using the crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and the sequence of CA IX, a double mutant of CA II with Ala65 replaced by Ser and Asn67 replaced by Gln has been constructed to resemble the active site of CA IX. This CA IX mimic has been characterized kinetically using (18)O-exchange and structurally using X-ray crystallography, alone and in complex with five CA sulfonamide-based inhibitors (acetazolamide, benzolamide, chlorzolamide, ethoxzolamide, and methazolamide), and compared to CA II. This structural information has been evaluated by both inhibition studies and in vitro cytotoxicity assays and shows a correlated structure-activity relationship. Kinetic and structural studies of CA II and CA IX mimic reveal chlorzolamide to be a more potent inhibitor of CA IX, inducing an active-site conformational change upon binding. Additionally, chlorzolamide appears to be cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells. This preliminary study demonstrates that the CA IX mimic may provide a useful model to design more isozyme-specific CA IX inhibitors, which may lead to development of new therapeutic treatments of some cancers.

  2. Inhibitory Effect of Furosemide on Carbonic Anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jianli; ZHAO Tongjin; JIANG Yan; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a high efficiency diuretic, furosemide, on carbonic anhydrase (CA). First, comparing the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide, a low efficiency diuretic, on CA, shows that furosemide or acetazolamide can quickly make CA inactive when its concentration is close to the enzyme concentration, different from the usual inhibitory kinetics in which the concentration of the inhibitor is far higher than the enzyme concentration. Secondly, the reaction of the enzyme indicates that the inhibitory effect of furosemide or acetazolamide on carbonic anhydrase is quickly reversible. Finally, the degree of the inhibitory effect of furosemide and of acetazolamide on CA are compared. The results show that furosemide inhibits CA less than acetazolamide.

  3. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors with dual-tail moieties to match the hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the carbonic anhydrase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpure, Rajendra P; Ren, Bin; Peat, Thomas S; Bornaghi, Laurent F; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2015-02-12

    We present a new approach to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) inhibitor design that enables close interrogation of the regions of the CA active site where there is the greatest variability in amino acid residues among the different CA isozymes. By appending dual tail groups onto the par excellence CA inhibitor acetazolamide, compounds that may interact with the distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the CA II active site were prepared. The dual-tail combinations selected included (i) two hydrophobic moieties, (ii) two hydrophilic moieties, and (iii) one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic moiety. The CA enzyme inhibition profile as well as the protein X-ray crystal structure of compound 3, comprising one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic tail moiety, in complex with CA II is described. This novel dual-tail approach has provided an enhanced opportunity to more fully exploit interactions with the CA active site by enabling these molecules to interact with the distinct halves of the active site. In addition to the dual-tail compounds, a corresponding set of single-tail derivatives was synthesized, enabling a comparative analysis of the single-tail versus dual-tail compound CA inhibition profile.

  4. CaII Κ Imaging to Understand UV Irradiance Variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa

    2000-09-01

    To identify and understand the underlying physical mechanisms of total solar and UV irradiance variability and to estimate the contribution of various chromospheric features to UV irradiance, detailed analysis of spatially resolved data is required. The various chromospheric features have been segregated and different parameters have been derived from CaII Κ Spectroheliograms of NSO/Sac Peak and Kodaikanal Observatory and compared with UV irradiance flux measured in MgII h and k lines by NOAA 9 satellite. The important results of this detailed analysis of CaII Κ Images of 1992 together with UV irradiance data will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  6. Gene fusions with human carbonic anhydrase II for efficient expression and rapid single-step recovery of recombinant proteins: expression of the Escherichia coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heeke, G; Shaw, R; Schnizer, R; Couton, J M; Schuster, S M; Wagner, F W

    1993-08-01

    A new expression vector was constructed which allows the overproduction in Escherichia coli of tripartite proteins consisting of human carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (hCAII), a peptide linker containing an enterokinase cleavage site, and a target protein of interest. Carbonic anhydrase is soluble and stable in E. coli and serves as a highly specific purification tag in the recovery of the fusion protein by a single affinity chromatography step. The enterokinase cleavage site was engineered into the construct to allow accurate and efficient release of the target protein. To demonstrate the practical value of this vector, the E. coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit was expressed as a fusion with hCAII. After a single purification step, biologically active recombinant E. coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit was recovered following proteolytic removal of the hCAII moiety.

  7. Major contribution of the type II beta carbonic anhydrase CanB (Cj0237) to the capnophilic growth phenotype of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haideri, Halah; White, Michael A; Kelly, David J

    2016-02-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, requires low environmental oxygen and high carbon dioxide for optimum growth, but the molecular basis for the carbon dioxide requirement is unclear. One factor may be inefficient conversion of gaseous CO2 to bicarbonate, the required substrate of various carboxylases. Two putative carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are encoded in the genome of C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 (Cj0229 and Cj0237). Here, we show that the deletion of the cj0237 (canB) gene alone prevents growth in complex media at low (1% v/v) CO2 and significantly reduces the growth rate at high (5% v/v) CO2. In minimal media incubated under high CO2, the canB mutant grew on L-aspartate but not on the key C3 compounds L-serine, pyruvate and L-lactate, showing that CanB is crucial in bicarbonate provision for pyruvate carboxylase-mediated oxaloacetate synthesis. Nevertheless, purified CanB (a dimeric, anion and acetazolamide sensitive, zinc-containing type II beta-class enzyme) hydrates CO2 actively only above pH 8 and with a high Km (∼ 34 mM). At typical cytoplasmic pH values and low CO2, these kinetic properties might limit intracellular bicarbonate availability. Taken together, our data suggest CanB is a major contributor to the capnophilic growth phenotype of C. jejuni.

  8. Identification of putative unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-tyr of human carbonic anhydrase II in a multidimensional property space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Puspita; Taraphder, Srabani

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we develop an extensive search procedure of the multi-dimensional folding energy landscape of a protein. Our aim is to identify different classes of structures that have different aggregation propensities and catalytic activity. Following earlier studies by Daggett et al. [Jong, D. D.; Riley, R.: Alonso, D.O.: Dagett, V. J. Mol. Biol. 2002, 319, 229], a series of high temperature all-atom classical molecular simulation studies has been carried out to derive a multi-dimensional property space. Dynamical changes in these properties are then monitored by projecting them along a one-dimensional reaction coordinate, dmean . We have focused on the application of this method to partition a wide array of conformations of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) and its unstable mutant His-107-Tyr along dmean by sampling a 35-dimensional property space. The resultant partitioning not only reveals the distribution of conformations corresponding to stable structures of HCA II and its mutant, but also allows the monitoring of several partially unfolded and less stable conformations of the mutant. We have investigated the population of these conformations at different stages of unfolding and collected separate sets of structures that are widely separated in the property space. The dynamical diversity of these sets are examined in terms of the loading of their respective first principal component. The partially unfolded structures thus collected are qualitatively mapped on to the experimentally postulated light molten globule (MGL) and molten globule (MG) intermediates with distinct aggregation propensities and catalytic activities. Proteins 2016; 84:726-743. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Correlation Between Sunspot Number and ca II K Emission Index

    CERN Document Server

    Bertello, Luca; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-01-01

    Long-term synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K constitute a fundamental database for a variety of retrospective analyses of the state of the solar magnetism. Synoptic Ca II K observations began in late 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory, in India. In early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility. These different data sets can be combined into a single disk-integrated Ca II K index time series that describes the average properties of the chromospheric emission over several solar cycles. We present such a Ca II K composite and discuss its correlation with the new entirely revised sunspot number data series. For this preliminary investigation, the scaling factor between pairs of time series was determined assuming a simple linear model for the relationship betwe...

  10. Correlation Between Sunspot Number and Ca ii K Emission Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-11-01

    Long-term synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca ii K constitute a fundamental database for a variety of retrospective analyses of the state of the solar magnetism. Synoptic Ca ii K observations began in late 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory in India. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca ii K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility. These different data sets can be combined into a single disk-integrated Ca ii K index time series that describes the average properties of the chromospheric emission over several solar cycles. We present such a Ca ii K composite and discuss its correlation with the new entirely revised sunspot number data series. For this preliminary investigation, the scaling factor between pairs of time series was determined assuming a simple linear model for the relationship between the monthly mean values during the duration of overlapping observations.

  11. The Infrared Ca II triplet as metallicity indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, Ricardo; Pancino, Elena; Zinn, Robert

    2007-01-01

    From observations of almost 500 RGB stars in 29 Galactic open and globular clusters, we have investigated the behaviour of the infrared Ca II triplet (8498, 8542 and 8662 \\AA) in the age range 13$\\leq$Age/Gyr$\\leq$0.25 and the metallicity range $-2.2\\leq$ [Fe/H] $\\leq$+0.47. These are the widest ranges of ages and metallicities in which the behaviour of the Ca II triplet lines has been investigated in a homogeneous way. We report the first empirical study of the variation of the CaII triplet lines strength, for given metallicities, with respect to luminosity. We find that the sequence defined by each cluster in the Luminosity-$\\Sigma$Ca plane is not exactly linear. However, when only stars in a small magnitude interval are observed, the sequences can be considered as linear. We have studied the the Ca II triplet lines on three metallicities scales. While a linear correlation between the reduced equivalent width ($W'_V$ or $W'_I$) versus metallicity is found in the \\citet{cg97} and \\citet{ki03} scales, a secon...

  12. The non-active stellar chromosphere: Ca II basal flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Martínez, M. I.; Schröder, K.-P.; Hauschildt, P.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse high-resolution, high-s/n European Southern Observatories (ESO)-archive spectra (from UVES, the UV echelle spectrograph) of 76 inactive or modestly active stars of spectral type G to M, main sequence and giants. Using PHOENIX model photospheres with Ca II K lines that match the observed line profiles, we (i) revise the effective temperatures, (ii) obtain a precise surface flux scale for each star and (iii) directly determine the exact surface fluxes of each Ca II K chromospheric emission with respect to the photospheric line profile. We find that our stellar sample exhibits a lower boundary to its chromospheric surface flux distribution with an unprecedented definition. From a subsample of the 25 least active stars, we obtain a simple empirical formula for the basal Ca II flux as a function of effective temperature: log {F^basal_{Ca II(H+K)}} = 7.05(± 0.31) log {T_eff} - 20.86(± 1.15). This is in good agreement with the Mg II basal flux. In a direct comparison with the large body of Mt Wilson S-measurements of the chromospheric Ca II emission and its well-defined cut-off, excellent agreement is achieved as well. A new result, however, is the small scatter of the least active star's fluxes about the basal flux. It is about 25 per cent and equals the residual uncertainties of our approach. At the same time, we do not find any evidence for a gravity dependence within these limits. This strongly confirms the basal flux as a well-defined and universal phenomenon, which characterizes every inactive chromosphere.

  13. Morphological Properties of Slender Ca ii H Fibrils Observed by Sunrise II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafeira, R.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Jafarzadeh, S.; van Noort, M.; Barthol, P.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Knölker, M.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Schmidt, W.

    2017-03-01

    We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca ii H data obtained by the Sunrise observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SuFI instrument in the Ca ii H line during the second scientific flight of the Sunrise observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After identification, we analyze theses structures to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca ii H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, length between 500 and 4000 km, average lifetime of ≈400 s, and average curvature of 0.002 arcsec‑1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ≈2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca ii K fibrils.

  14. Morphological properties of slender Ca II H fibrils observed by SUNRISE II

    CERN Document Server

    Gafeira, R; Solanki, Sami K; Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Van Noort, M; Barthol, P; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knolker, M; Suarez, D Orozco; Riethmüller, T L; Schmidt, W

    2016-01-01

    We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca II H data obtained by the SUNRISE observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SUFI instrument in the Ca II H line during the second scientific flight of the SUNRISE observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After the identification, we analyze theses structures in order to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, a length between 500 km and 4000 km, an average lifetime of ~400 s, and an average curvature of 0.002 arcsec^-1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ~2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca II K fibrils.

  15. Spectropolarimetric capabilities of Ca II 8542 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, C Quintero; Rodríguez, J de la Cruz; Katsukawa, Y; Ichimoto, K; Anan, T; Suematsu, Y

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of space and ground-based solar missions aim to study the magnetic properties of the solar chromosphere using the infrared Ca II lines and the He I 10830 {\\AA} line. The former seem to be the best candidates to study the stratification of magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere and their relation to the other thermodynamical properties underlying the chromospheric plasma. The purpose of this work is to provide a detailed analysis of the diagnostic capabilities of the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line, anticipating forthcoming observational facilities. We study the sensitivity of the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line to perturbations applied to the physical parameters of reference semi-empirical 1D model atmospheres using response functions and we make use of 3D MHD simulations to examine the expected polarization signals for moderate magnetic field strengths. Our results indicate that the Ca II 8542 {\\AA} line is mostly sensitive to the layers enclosed between $\\log$ $\\tau=[0,-5.5]$, under the physical conditio...

  16. Synthesis, characterization and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of novel benzothiazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Buğday, Nesrin; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-protected amino acids were reacted with substituted benzothiazoles to give the corresponding N-protected amino acid-benzothiazole conjugates (60-89%). Their structures were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR), IR and elemental analysis. Their carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activities were determined against two cytosolic human isoforms (hCA I and hCA II), one membrane-associated (hCA IV) and one transmembrane (hCA XII) enzyme by a stopped-flow CO2 hydrase assay method. The new compounds showed rather weak, micromolar inhibitory activity against most of these enzymes.

  17. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase XIII in the erythrocytes of the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, A J; Secor, S M; Grosell, M

    2015-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is one of the most abundant proteins found in vertebrate erythrocytes with the majority of species expressing a low activity CA I and high activity CA II. However, several phylogenetic gaps remain in our understanding of the expansion of cytoplasmic CA in vertebrate erythrocytes. In particular, very little is known about isoforms from reptiles. The current study sought to characterize the erythrocyte isoforms from two squamate species, Python molurus and Nerodia rhombifer, which was combined with information from recent genome projects to address this important phylogenetic gap. Obtained sequences grouped closely with CA XIII in phylogenetic analyses. CA II mRNA transcripts were also found in erythrocytes, but found at less than half the levels of CA XIII. Structural analysis suggested similar biochemical activity as the respective mammalian isoforms, with CA XIII being a low activity isoform. Biochemical characterization verified that the majority of CA activity in the erythrocytes was due to a high activity CA II-like isoform; however, titration with copper supported the presence of two CA pools. The CA II-like pool accounted for 90 % of the total activity. To assess potential disparate roles of these isoforms a feeding stress was used to up-regulate CO2 excretion pathways. Significant up-regulation of CA II and the anion exchanger was observed; CA XIII was strongly down-regulated. While these results do not provide insight into the role of CA XIII in the erythrocytes, they do suggest that the presence of two isoforms is not simply a case of physiological redundancy.

  18. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Zoccola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1 a change in gene expression under OA (2 an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  19. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-06-03

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  20. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity. PMID:27271641

  1. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  2. Catalase, carbonic anhydrase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Beyaztas, Serap; Gokce, Basak; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In several studies the relationship between catalase (CAT), human cytosolic carbonic anhydrases (CA; hCA-I and hCA-II) and xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme activities have been investigated in various types of cancers but carbonic anhydrase, catalase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with MF have not been previously reported. Therefore, in this preliminary study we aim to investigate CAT, CA and XO activities in patients with MF. This study enrolled 32 patients with MF and 26 healthy controls. According to the results, CA and CAT activities were significantly lower in patients with mycosis fungoides than controls (p < 0.001) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in XO activity between patient and control group (p = 0.601). Within these findings, we believe these enzyme activity levels might be a potentially important finding as an additional diagnostic biochemical tool for MF.

  3. Characterization of Carbonic Anhydrase 9 in the Alimentary Canal of Aedes aegypti and Its Relationship to Homologous Mosquito Carbonic Anhydrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Daniel P; Van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J

    2017-02-21

    In the mosquito midgut, luminal pH regulation and cellular ion transport processes are important for the digestion of food and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. pH regulation in the mosquito gut is affected by the vectorial movement of the principal ions including bicarbonate/carbonate and protons. As in all metazoans, mosquitoes employ the product of aerobic metabolism carbon dioxide in its bicarbonate/carbonate form as one of the major buffers of cellular and extracellular pH. The conversion of metabolic carbon dioxide to bicarbonate/carbonate is accomplished by a family of enzymes encoded by the carbonic anhydrase gene family. This study characterizes Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrases using bioinformatic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods. Our analyses show that there are fourteen Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase genes, two of which are expressed as splice variants. The carbonic anhydrases were classified as either integral membrane, peripheral membrane, mitochondrial, secreted, or soluble cytoplasmic proteins. Using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, one of the carbonic anhydrases, Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase 9, was analyzed and found in each life stage, male/female pupae, male/female adults, and in the female posterior midgut. Next, carbonic anhydrase 9 was analyzed in larvae and adults using confocal microscopy and was detected in the midgut regions. According to our analyses, carbonic anhydrase 9 is a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme found in the alimentary canal of larvae and adults and is expressed throughout the life cycle of the mosquito. Based on previous physiological analyses of adults and larvae, it appears AeCA9 is one of the major carbonic anhydrases involved in producing bicarbonate/carbonate which is involved in pH regulation and ion transport processes in the alimentary canal. Detailed understanding of the molecular bases of ion homeostasis in mosquitoes will provide targets for novel mosquito control strategies into the

  4. Characterization of Carbonic Anhydrase 9 in the Alimentary Canal of Aedes aegypti and Its Relationship to Homologous Mosquito Carbonic Anhydrases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Daniel P.; Van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    In the mosquito midgut, luminal pH regulation and cellular ion transport processes are important for the digestion of food and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. pH regulation in the mosquito gut is affected by the vectorial movement of the principal ions including bicarbonate/carbonate and protons. As in all metazoans, mosquitoes employ the product of aerobic metabolism carbon dioxide in its bicarbonate/carbonate form as one of the major buffers of cellular and extracellular pH. The conversion of metabolic carbon dioxide to bicarbonate/carbonate is accomplished by a family of enzymes encoded by the carbonic anhydrase gene family. This study characterizes Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrases using bioinformatic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods. Our analyses show that there are fourteen Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase genes, two of which are expressed as splice variants. The carbonic anhydrases were classified as either integral membrane, peripheral membrane, mitochondrial, secreted, or soluble cytoplasmic proteins. Using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, one of the carbonic anhydrases, Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase 9, was analyzed and found in each life stage, male/female pupae, male/female adults, and in the female posterior midgut. Next, carbonic anhydrase 9 was analyzed in larvae and adults using confocal microscopy and was detected in the midgut regions. According to our analyses, carbonic anhydrase 9 is a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme found in the alimentary canal of larvae and adults and is expressed throughout the life cycle of the mosquito. Based on previous physiological analyses of adults and larvae, it appears AeCA9 is one of the major carbonic anhydrases involved in producing bicarbonate/carbonate which is involved in pH regulation and ion transport processes in the alimentary canal. Detailed understanding of the molecular bases of ion homeostasis in mosquitoes will provide targets for novel mosquito control strategies into the

  5. Radiative emission of solar features in Ca II K

    CERN Document Server

    Criscuoli, S; Fontenla, J; Giorgi, F; Rast, M; Solanki, S; Uitenbroek, H

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the radiative emission of different types of solar features in the spectral range of the Ca II K line. We analyzed full-disk 2k x 2k observations from the PSPT Precision Solar Photometric Telescope. The data were obtained by using three narrow-band interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different pass bands. Two filters are centered in the line core, the other in the red wing of the line. We measured the intensity and contrast of various solar features, specifically quiet Sun (inter-network), network, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage (facula) regions. Moreover, we compared the results obtained with those derived from the numerical synthesis performed for the three PSPT filters with a widely used radiative code on a set of reference semi-empirical atmosphere models.

  6. Study on Effect of Gd (III) Speciation on Ca (II) Speciation in Human Blood Plasma by Computer Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ca (II) speciation and effect of Gd (III) speciation on Ca (II) speciation in human blood plasma were studied by computer simulation. [CaHCO3]+ is a predominant compound species of Ca (II). Gd (III) can compete with Ca (II) for biological molecules. The presence of Gd (III) results in a increase of concentration of free Ca (II) and a decrease of concentration of Ca (II) compounds.

  7. A class of sulfonamides with strong inhibitory action against the α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel-Akdemir, Özlen; Akdemir, Atilla; Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane B; Parkkila, Seppo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-07-25

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes for an α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) possessing high catalytic activity (TcCA) which was recently characterized (Pan et al. J. Med. Chem. 2013, 56, 1761-1771). A new class of sulfonamides possessing low nanomolar/subnanomolar TcCA inhibitory activity is described here. Aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides incorporating halogeno/methoxyphenacetamido tails inhibited TcCA with KIs in the range of 0.5-12.5 nM, being less effective against the human off-target isoforms hCA I and II. A homology model of TcCA helped us to rationalize the excellent inhibition profile of these compounds against the protozoan enzyme, a putative new antitrypanosoma drug target. These compounds were ineffective antitrypanosomal agents in vivo due to penetrability problems of these highly polar molecules that possess sulfonamide moieties.

  8. New natural product carbonic anhydrase inhibitors incorporating phenol moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Bilia, Anna-Rita; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. The need to find selective CA inhibitors (CAIs) triggered the investigation of natural product libraries, which proved to be a valid source of agents with such an activity, as demonstrated for the phenols, polyamines and coumarins. Herein we report an in vitro inhibition study of human (h) CA isoforms hCAs I, II, IV, VII and XII with a panel of natural polyphenols including flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, isoflavones and depsides, some of which extracted from Quercus ilex and Salvia miltiorrhiza. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting some important isoforms over the off-target ones hCA I and II.

  9. Probing low-redshift galaxies using quasar absorption lines with an emphasis on Ca II absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardane, Gendith M.

    2016-05-01

    We searched for intervening CaII absorption in nearly 95,000 quasar spectra with i≤20 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS) data releases DR7+DR9. Our identification of >400 CaII systems is the largest compilation of CaII absorbers in a blind search. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase molecular switch occurs in the gills of metamorphic sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; McCormick, Stephen; Campos, A.; Lopes-Marques, M.; Osorio, H.; Coimbra, J.; Castro, L.F.C.; Wilson, Jonthan M

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase plays a key role in CO2 transport, acid-base and ion regulation and metabolic processes in vertebrates. While several carbonic anhydrase isoforms have been identified in numerous vertebrate species, basal lineages such as the cyclostomes have remained largely unexamined. Here we investigate the repertoire of cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrases in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), that has a complex life history marked by a dramatic metamorphosis from a benthic filter-feeding ammocoete larvae into a parasitic juvenile which migrates from freshwater to seawater. We have identified a novel carbonic anhydrase gene (ca19) beyond the single carbonic anhydrase gene (ca18) that was known previously. Phylogenetic analysis and synteny studies suggest that both carbonic anhydrase genes form one or two independent gene lineages and are most likely duplicates retained uniquely in cyclostomes. Quantitative PCR of ca19 and ca18 and protein expression in gill across metamorphosis show that the ca19 levels are highest in ammocoetes and decrease during metamorphosis while ca18 shows the opposite pattern with the highest levels in post-metamorphic juveniles. We propose that a unique molecular switch occurs during lamprey metamorphosis resulting in distinct gill carbonic anhydrases reflecting the contrasting life modes and habitats of these life-history stages.

  11. Comparison of QSAR models based on combinations of genetic algorithm, stepwise multiple linear regression, and artificial neural network methods to predict Kd of some derivatives of aromatic sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Alaei, Loghman; Faraji, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Four stepwise multiple linear regressions (SMLR) and a genetic algorithm (GA) based multiple linear regressions (MLR), together with artificial neural network (ANN) models, were applied for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling of dissociation constants (Kd) of 62 arylsulfonamide (ArSA) derivatives as human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) inhibitors. The best subsets of molecular descriptors were selected by SMLR and GA-MLR methods. These selected variables were used to generate MLR and ANN models. The predictability power of models was examined by an external test set and cross validation. In addition, some tests were done to examine other aspects of the models. The results show that for certain purposes GA-MLR is better than SMLR and for others, ANN overcomes MLR models.

  12. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively.

  13. Flavonoid Myricetin Modulates GABAA Receptor Activity through Activation of Ca2+ Channels and CaMK-II Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flavonoid myricetin is found in several sedative herbs, for example, the St. John's Wort, but its influence on sedation and its possible mechanism of action are unknown. Using patch-clamp technique on a brain slice preparation, the present study found that myricetin promoted GABAergic activity in the neurons of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by increasing the decay time and frequency of the inhibitory currents mediated by GABAA receptor. This effect of myricetin was not blocked by the GABAA receptor benzodiazepine- (BZ- binding site antagonist flumazenil, but by KN-62, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMK-II. Patch clamp and live Ca2+ imaging studies found that myricetin could increase Ca2+ current and intracellular Ca2+ concentration, respectively, via T- and L-type Ca2+ channels in rat PVN neurons and hypothalamic primary culture neurons. Immunofluorescence staining showed increased phosphorylation of CaMK-II after myricetin incubation in primary culture of rat hypothalamic neurons, and the myricetin-induced CaMK-II phosphorylation was further confirmed by Western blotting in PC-12 cells. The present results suggest that myricetin enhances GABAA receptor activity via calcium channel/CaMK-II dependent mechanism, which is distinctively different from that of most existing BZ-binding site agonists of GABAA receptor.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported.

  15. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 111. Synthesis and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity of Metal Complexes of 4,5-Disubstituted-3-Mercapto-1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Cavazza, Christine; Saramet, Ioana; Briganti, Fabrizio; Banciu, Mircea D.

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:18475819

  16. Complexes with biologically active ligands. Part 11. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, A; Cavazza, C; Supuran, C T; Saramet, I; Briganti, F; Banciu, M D

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma.

  17. Characterization of one Novel Flavone and four New Source Compounds from the Bark of Millettia ovalifolia and In-Vitro Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase-II by the Novel Flavonoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taj Ur Rahman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical examination of the extract of bark of Millettia ovalifolia yielded chemical constituents, which included one novel flavonoid 7-(4-methoxyphenyl-9H-furo [2, 3-f] chromen-9-one and four new source compounds characterized as 3,7-Dihydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one, (E-Ethyl-13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacrylate, (E-Methyl-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacrylate and N-Ethylacetamide. These compounds were characterized by using advance modern spectroscopic analytical techniques such as UV, IR, 1D, 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. The novel flavonoid (1 displayed significant inhibition of cytosolic form of bovine carbonic anhydrase-II with IC 50 value of 17.86 ± 0.07 µM. This flavonoid may be used as a new pharmacophore to treat cystic fibrosis, glaucoma, epilepsy, leaukomia and other disorders such as neurology etc.

  18. Human secreted carbonic anhydrase: cDNA cloning, nucleotide sequence, and hybridization histochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldred, P.; Fu, Ping; Barrett, G.; Penschow, J.D.; Wright, R.D.; Coghlan, J.P.; Fernley, R.T. (The Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, Parkville, Victoria (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for the human secreted carbonic anhydrase isozyme (CAVI) have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. These clones identify a 1.45-kb mRNA that is present in high levels in parotid submandibular salivary glands but absent in other tissues such as the sublingual gland, kidney, liver, and prostate gland. Hybridization histochemistry of human salivary glands shows mRNA for CA VI located in the acinar cells of these glands. The cDNA clones encode a protein of 308 amino acids that includes a 17 amino acid leader sequence typical of secreted proteins. The mature protein has 291 amino acids compared to 259 or 260 for the cytoplasmic isozymes, with most of the extra amino acids present as a carboxyl terminal extension. In comparison, sheep CA VI has a 45 amino acid extension. Overall the human CA VI protein has a sequence identity of 35 {percent} with human CA II, while residues involved in the active site of the enzymes have been conserved. The human and sheep secreted carbonic anhydrases have a sequence identity of 72 {percent}. This includes the two cysteine residues that are known to be involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond in the sheep CA VI. The enzyme is known to be glycosylated and three potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Thr/Ser) have been identified. Two of these are known to be glycosylated in sheep CA VI. Southern analysis of human DNA indicates that there is only one gene coding for CA VI.

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase: In the Driver's Seat for Bicarbonate Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterling D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are a widely expressed family of enzymes that catalyze the reversible reaction: CO(2 + H(2O = HCO(3(- + H(+. These enzymes therefore both produce HCO(3(- for transport across membranes and consume HCO(3(- that has been transported across membranes. Thus these enzymes could be expected to have a key role in driving the transport of HCO(3(- across cells and epithelial layers. Plasma membrane anion exchange proteins (AE transport chloride and bicarbonate across most mammalian membranes in a one-for-one exchange reaction and act as a model for our understanding of HCO(3(- transport processes. Recently it was shown that AE1, found in erythrocytes and kidney, binds carbonic anhydrase II (CAII via the cytosolic C-terminal tail of AE1. To examine the physiological consequences of the interaction between CAII and AE1, we characterized Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange activity in transfected HEK293 cells. Treatment of AE1-transfected cells with acetazolamide, a CAII inhibitor, almost fully inhibited anion exchange activity, indicating that endogenous CAII activity is essential for transport. Further experiments to examine the role of the AE1/CAII interaction will include measurements of the transport activity of AE1 following mutation of the CAII binding site. In a second approach a functionally inactive CA mutant, V143Y, will be co-expressed with AE1 in HEK293 cells. Since over expression of V143Y CAII would displace endogenous wild-type CAII from AE1, a loss of transport activity would be observed if binding to the AE1 C-terminus is required for transport.

  20. 碳酸酐酶Ⅸ(CA-Ⅸ)与HIF-1α在前列腺癌中的表达情况及相关性研究%The expression and correlation studies about Carbon anhydrase Ⅸ (CA-Ⅸ) and Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海; 韩金利; 姚友生; 谢文练; 黄健; 卢振权; 杜涛; 林天歆; 许可慰; 董文; 毕良宽; 郭正辉; 江春

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨碳酸酐酶Ⅸ(CA-Ⅸ)及缺氧诱导因子-1α (HIF-1α)在前列腺癌不同分期分级中的表达及其内在联系情况. 方法 采用免疫组织化学S-P法及Western-blot检测正常前列腺组织、前列腺癌组织以及前列腺癌细胞系PC-3、Lncap中CA-Ⅸ及HIF-1α的表达情况,结合临床资料进行统计分析,评价CA-Ⅸ及HIF-1α表达情况与前列腺组织癌变分化程度之间的关系,同时分析两者之间的相关性.结果 在正常前列腺组织中CA-Ⅸ及HIF-1α基本不表达,在前列腺癌组织石蜡切片中,HIF处于高表达,其表达情况与前列腺癌病理分级相关.低分化的前列腺癌组织中HIF-1α的表达量高于高分化的前列腺癌组织.CA-Ⅸ在前列腺癌组织中表达率为37.5%,高于正常组织,与肿瘤分化程度无关.CA-Ⅸ及HIF-1α在前列腺癌组织中的表达情况具有相关性.结论 CA-Ⅸ及HIF-1α与前列腺癌的发生成正相关,而且两者在前列腺癌组织中的表达具有相关性,同时提示了以缺氧诱导因子通路为基础的分子机制在前列腺癌的演进中起到一定的作用.%Objective To study the expression and correlation of Carbon anhydrase Ⅸ (CA-Ⅸ) and Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in prostate cancer.Methods The immunohistochemistry of S-P and western-blot were used to detect the expression of Carbon anhydrase Ⅸ (CA-Ⅸ) and Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in normal prostate tissue,prostate cancer tissue,and prostate cancer cell lines PC-3,Lncap.Combined with clinical data,the statistical analysis on the evaluation of CA-Ⅸ and HIF-1α expression and prostate tissue differentiation degree relationship was done and the correlation between the two factor was analysed.Results In normal prostate tissue,CA-Ⅸ and HIF-1α almost did not express,but in prostate cancer tissue paraffin section,HIF-1α was at a high expression, and its expression had relationship with pathological

  1. The Ca II triplet in red giant spectra: [Fe/H] determinations and the role of [Ca/Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Da Costa, G S

    2015-01-01

    Measurements are presented and analyzed of the strength of the Ca II triplet lines in red giants in Galactic globular and open clusters, and in a sample of red giants in the LMC disk that have significantly different [Ca/Fe] abundance ratios to the Galactic objects. The Galactic objects are used to generate a calibration between Ca II triplet line strength and [Fe/H], which is then used to estimate [Fe/H]_CaT for the LMC stars. The values are then compared with the [Fe/H]_spec determinations from high dispersion spectroscopy. After allowance for a small systematic offset the two abundance determinations are in excellent agreement. Further, as found in earlier studies, e.g., Battaglia et al. (2008), the difference is only a very weak function of the [Ca/Fe] ratio. For example, changing [Ca/Fe] from +0.3 to -0.2 causes the Ca II based abundance to underestimate [Fe/H]_spec by only ~0.15 dex, assuming a Galactic calibration. Consequently, the Ca II triplet approach to metallicity determinations can be used witho...

  2. Selective chelation of Cd(II) and Pb(II) versus Ca(II) and Zn(II) by using octadentate ligands containing pyridinecarboxylate and pyridyl pendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2009-12-07

    Herein we report the coordination properties toward Cd(II), Pb(II), Ca(II), and Zn(II) of a new octadentate ligand (py-H(2)bcpe) based on a ethane-1,2-diamine unit containing two picolinate and two pyridyl pendants, which is structurally derived from the previous reported ligand bcpe. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligand and the stability constants of the complexes with these cations. The introduction of the pyridyl pendants in bcpe provokes a very important increase of the logK(ML) values obtained for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) complexes, while this effect is less important in the case of the Zn(II) analogue. As a result, py-bcpe shows a certain selectivity for Cd(II) and Pb(II) over Zn(II) while keeping good Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Cd(II)/Ca(II) selectivities, and the new receptor py-bcpe can be considered as a new structural framework for the design of novel Cd(II) and Pb(II) extracting agents. Likewise, the stabilities of the Cd(II) and Pb(II) complexes are higher than those of the corresponding EDTA analogues. The X-ray crystal structure of [Zn(py-bcpe)] shows hexadentate binding of the ligand to the metal ion, the coordination polyhedron being best described as a severely distorted octahedron. However, the X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) analogue shows octadentate binding of the ligand to the metal ion. A detailed investigation of the structure in aqueous solution of the complexes by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP) shows that while in the Zn(II) complex the metal ion is six-coordinated, in the Pb(II) and Ca(II) analogues the metal ions are eight-coordinated. For the Cd(II) complex, our results suggest that in solution the complex exists as a mixture of seven- and eight-coordinated species. DFT calculations performed both in the gas phase and in aqueous solution have been also used to investigate the role of the Pb(II) lone pair in

  3. A sucrose-binding site provides a lead towards an isoform-specific inhibitor of the cancer-associated enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Melissa A; Aggarwal, Mayank; Mahon, Brian P; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) isoform IX (CA IX) is an extracellular zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), thereby playing a role in pH regulation. The majority of normal functioning cells exhibit low-level expression of CA IX. However, in cancer cells CA IX is upregulated as a consequence of a metabolic transition known as the Warburg effect. The upregulation of CA IX for cancer progression has drawn interest in it being a potential therapeutic target. CA IX is a transmembrane protein, and its purification, yield and crystallization have proven challenging to structure-based drug design, whereas the closely related cytosolic soluble isoform CA II can be expressed and crystallized with ease. Therefore, we have utilized structural alignments and site-directed mutagenesis to engineer a CA II that mimics the active site of CA IX. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of this CA IX mimic in complex with sucrose is presented and has been refined to a resolution of 1.5 Å, an Rcryst of 18.0% and an Rfree of 21.2%. The binding of sucrose at the entrance to the active site of the CA IX mimic, and not CA II, in a non-inhibitory mechanism provides a novel carbohydrate moiety binding site that could be further exploited to design isoform-specific inhibitors of CA IX.

  4. Transmembrane carbonic anhydrase isozymes IX and XII in the female mouse reproductive organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eija

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase (CA classically catalyses the reversible hydration of dissolved CO2 to form bicarbonate ions and protons. The twelve active CA isozymes are thought to regulate a variety of cellular functions including several processes in the reproductive systems. Methods The present study was designed to investigate the expression of transmembrane CAs, CA IX and XII, in the mouse uterus, ovary and placenta. The expression of CA IX and XII was examined by immunoperoxidase staining method and western blotting. CA II and XIII served as positive controls since they are known to be present in the mouse reproductive tract. Results The data of our study indicated that CA XII is expressed in the mouse endometrium. Only very faint signal was observed in the corpus luteum of the ovary and the placenta remained mainly negative. CA IX showed weak reaction in the endometrial epithelium, while it was completely absent in the ovary and placenta. Conclusion The conservation of CA XII expression in both mouse and human endometrium suggests a role for this isozyme in reproductive physiology.

  5. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of amino acid - coumarin/quinolinone conjugates incorporating glycine, alanine and phenylalanine moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-Protected amino acids (Gly, Ala and Phe) were reacted with amino substituted coumarin and quinolinone derivatives, leading to the corresponding N-protected amino acid-coumarin/quinolinone conjugates. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activity of the new compounds was assessed against various human (h) isoforms, such as hCA I, hCA II, hCA IV and hCA XII. The quinolinone conjugates were inactive as enzyme inhibitors, whereas the coumarins were ineffective hCA I/II inhibitors (KIs > 50 μM) but were submicromolar hCA IV and XII inhibitors, with inhibition constants ranging between 92 nM and 1.19 μM for hCA IV, and between 0.11 and 0.79 μM for hCA XII. These coumarin derivatives, as many others reported earlier, thus show an interesting selective inhibitory profile for the membrane-bound over the cytosolic CA isoforms.

  6. Bioindication potential of carbonic anhydrase activity in anemones and corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A L; Guzmán, H M

    2001-09-01

    Activity levels of carbonic anhydrase (CA) were assessed in anemones Condylactis gigantea and Stichodactyla helianthus with laboratory exposures to copper, nickel, lead, and vanadium, and also in animals collected from polluted vs pristine field sites. CA activity was found to be decreased with increase in metal concentration and also in animals collected from the polluted field site. Preliminary assessments to adapt the CA assay for use in the widespread coral Montastraea cavernosa show decreased CA activity in specimens from the polluted field site and provide an avenue for future research aimed at more thoroughly describing coral CA activity for potential application in bioindication.

  7. Localization of putative carbonic anhydrases in two marine diatoms, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaaki; Allen, Andrew E; Kikutani, Sae; Endo, Yuri; Bowler, Chris; Matsuda, Yusuke

    2011-09-01

    It is believed that intracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are essential components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in microalgae. In this study, putative CA-encoding genes were identified in the genome sequences of the marine diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Subsequently, the subcellular localizations of the encoded proteins were determined. Nine and thirteen CA sequences were found in the genomes of P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana, respectively. Two of the β-CA genes in P. tricornutum corresponded to ptca1 and ptca2 identified previously. Immunostaining transmission electron microscopy of a PtCA1:YFP fusion expressed in the cells of P. tricornutum clearly showed the localization of PtCA1 within the central part of the pyrenoid structure in the chloroplast. Besides these two β-CA genes, P. tricornutum likely contains five α- and two γ-CA genes, whereas T. pseudonana has three α-, five γ-, four δ-, and one ζ-CA genes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR performed on mRNA from the two diatoms grown in changing light and CO(2) conditions revealed that levels of six putative α- and γ-CA mRNAs in P. tricornutum did not change between cells grown in air-level CO(2) and 5% CO(2). However, mRNA levels of one putative α-CA gene, CA-VII in P. tricornutum, were reduced in the dark compared to that in the light. In T. pseudonana, mRNA accumulation levels of putative α-CA (CA-1), ζ-CA (CA-3) and δ-CA (CA-7) were analyzed and all levels found to be significantly reduced when cells were grown in 0.16% CO(2). Intercellular localizations of eight putative CAs were analyzed by expressing GFP fusion in P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana. In P. tricornutum, CA-I and II localized in the periplastidial compartment, CA-III, VI, VII were found in the chloroplast endoplasmic reticulum, and CA-VIII was localized in the mitochondria. On the other hand, T. pseudonana CA-1 localized in the stroma and CA-3 was found in the periplasm

  8. Multiple sources of carbonic anhydrase activity in pea thylakoids: soluble and membrane-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Natalia N; Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Ivanov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of pea thylakoids, thylakoid membranes enriched with photosystem I (PSI-membranes), or photosystem II (PSII-membranes) as well as both supernatant and pellet after precipitation of thylakoids treated with detergent Triton X-100 were studied. CA activity of thylakoids in the presence of varying concentrations of Triton X-100 had two maxima, at Triton/chlorophyll (triton/Chl) ratios of 0.3 and 1.0. CA activities of PSI-membranes and PSII-membranes had only one maximum each, at Triton/Chl ratio 0.3 or 1.0, respectively. Two CAs with characteristics of the membrane-bound proteins and one CA with characteristics of the soluble proteins were found in the medium after thylakoids were incubated with Triton. One of the first two CAs had mobility in PAAG after native electrophoresis the same as that of CA residing in PSI-membranes, and the other CA had mobility the same as the mobility of CA residing in PSII-membranes, but the latter was different from CA situated in PSII core-complex (Ignatova et al. 2006 Biochemistry (Moscow) 71:525-532). The properties of the "soluble" CA removed from thylakoids were different from the properties of the known soluble CAs of plant cell: apparent molecular mass was about 262 kD and it was three orders more sensitive to the specific CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, than soluble stromal CA. The data are discussed as indicating the presence of, at least, four CAs in pea thylakoids.

  9. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membrane and fragments enriched with PSI or PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Rudenko, Natalia N; Mudrik, Vilen A; Fedorchuk, Tat'yana P; Ivanov, Boris N

    2011-12-01

    The procedure of isolating the thylakoids and the thylakoid membrane fragments enriched with either photosystem I or photosystem II (PSI- and PSII-membranes) from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was developed. It differed from the one used with pea and spinach in durations of detergent treatment and centrifugation, and in concentrations of detergent and Mg(2+) in the media. Both the thylakoid and the fragments preserved carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities. Using nondenaturing electrophoresis followed by detection of CA activity in the gel stained with bromo thymol blue, one low molecular mass carrier of CA activity was found in the PSI-membranes, and two carriers, a low molecular mass one and a high molecular mass one, were found in the PSII-membranes. The proteins in the PSII-membranes differed in their sensitivity to acetazolamide (AA), a specific CA inhibitor. AA at 5 × 10(-7) M inhibited the CA activity of the high molecular mass protein but stimulated the activity of the low molecular mass carrier in the PSII-membranes. At the same concentration, AA moderately inhibited, by 30%, the CA activity of PSI-membranes. CA activity of the PSII-membranes was almost completely suppressed by the lipophilic CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide at 10(-9) M, whereas CA activity of the PSI-membranes was inhibited by this inhibitor even at 5 × 10(-7) M just the same as for AA. The observed distribution of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes from A. thaliana was close to the one found in the membranes of pea, evidencing the general pattern of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes of C3-plants.

  10. Thermodynamics of binding of a sulfonamide inhibitor to metal-mutated carbonic anhydrase as studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-01

    By affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), the thermodynamic binding constants of a sulfonamide (SA) inhibitor to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and metal mutated variants (M-CAs) were evaluated. 1-(4-Aminosulfonylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate was used as the SA in the electrophoretic buffer for ACE. The Scatchard analysis of the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of native CA on the SA concentration provided the binding constant to be Kb=(2.29±0.05)×10(6) M(-1) (at pH8.4, 25°C). On the other hand, apoCA showed far smaller value [Kb=(3.76±0.14)×10(2) M(-1)], suggesting that the coordination of SA to the Zn(II) center controlled the binding thermodynamics. The ACE of M-CAs showed the same behaviors as native CA but with different Kb values. For example, Co-CA adopting the same tetrahedral coordination geometry as native CA exhibited the largest Kb value [(2.55±0.05)×10(6) M(-1)] among the M-CAs. In contrast, Mn- and Ni-CA, which adopted the octahedral coordination geometry, had Kb values that were about two orders of magnitude lower. Because the hydrophobic cavity of CA around the active center pre-organized the orientation of SA, thereby fixing the ligating NH(-) moiety to the apex of the tetrahedron supported by three basal His3 of CA, metals such as Zn and Co at the center of M-CA gave the most stable CA-SA complex. However, pre-organization was not favored for octahedral geometry. Thus, pre-organization of SA was the key to facilitating the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Zn(II) active center of CA.

  11. K-band Imaging of strong CaII-absorber host galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We present K-band imaging of fields around 30 strong CaII absorption line systems, at 0.7CaII absorption of the form (L/L*)^0.7 reproduces the observations well. The luminosity-dependent cross-section for the CaII absorbers appears to be significantly stronger than the established (L/L*)^0.4 dependence for MgII absorbers. The associated galaxies lie at large physical distances from the CaII-absorbing gas; we find a mean impact parameter of 24kpc (H0=70km\\s\\Mpc). Combined with the observed number density of CaII absorbers the large physical separations result in an inferred filling factor of only ~10 per cent. The physical origin of the strong CaII absorption remains unclear,...

  12. Measurements of Ca II Infrared Triplet Lines of Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Moto'oka, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent widths and line widths of Ca II infrared triplet emission lines were measured in high-resolution optical spectra of 39 young stellar objects.We found that the equivalent widths of the emission lines decrease with stellar evolution. It has been often claimed that strong chromospheric activity is generated by a dynamo process caused by fast rotation of the photosphere. However, we found no clear correlation between the strength of the Ca II lines and the stellar rotation velocity. Instead, we found that the objects with high mass accretion rates had stronger Ca II emission lines. This correlation supports the turbulent chromosphere model or the magnetic accretion theory for classical T Tauri stars. We also noticed that the equivalent widths of Ca II lines of transitional disk objects are one-tenth of those of classical T Tauri stars, even if the masses of the circumstellar disks are comparable.

  13. The location of the Ca II ions in the beta Pictoris disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, D. E.; Lagrange-Henri, A. M.; Ferlet, R.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1988-01-01

    Echelle spectra of beta Pictoris have been obtained in the region of the Ca II 8542A line which arises from the metastable 3d 2D5/2 level. A narrow, weak, circumstellar absorption line is seen at the stellar radial velocity. A simple theory is developed of the radiative pumping of the metastable levels of the Ca II ions by the radiation from the star at the H and K lines. The relatively large fractional population, N3(Ca II)/N1(Ca II) of roughly 0.05, observed for the metastable level then requires that the calcium absorbers be largely concentrated within about 1 AU of the star. This result confirms two previous, independent estimates of the location of this gas. A time-variable circumstellar component of the 8542A line also is found at an infall velocity of about 15 km/s.

  14. Coumarin or benzoxazinone based novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Mert Olgun; Uslu, Harun; Sarı, Suat; Alagöz, Mehmet Abdullah; Karakurt, Arzu; Alıcı, Bülent; Bilen, Cigdem; Yavuz, Emre; Gencer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2016-10-01

    Among many others, coumarin derivatives are known to show human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitory activity. Since hCA inhibition is one of the underlying mechanisms that account for the activities of some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), hCA inhibitors are expected to have anti-seizure properties. There are also several studies reporting compounds with an imidazole and/or benzimidazole moiety which exert these pharmacological properties. In this study, we prepared fifteen novel coumarin-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride, nine novel benzoxazinone-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride derivatives and evaluated their hCA inhibitory activities and along with fourteen previously synthesized derivatives we scanned their anticonvulsant effects. As all compounds inhibited purified hCA isoforms I and II, some of them also proved protective against Maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and ScMet induced seizures in mice. Molecular docking studies with selected coumarin derivatives have revealed that these compounds bind to the active pocket of the enzyme in a similar fashion to that previously described for coumarin derivatives.

  15. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART CaII triplet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G.; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Irwin, M.; Parisi, P.; Hill, V.; Jablonka, P.

    2011-01-01

    We use Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) intermediate-resolution (R similar to 6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared Ca ii triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics

  16. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase from Apis mellifera: purification and inhibition by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Ercan; Güler, Ahmet; Bıyık, Selim; Şentürk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ekinci, Deniz

    2017-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have been shown to play an important role in ion transport and in pH regulation in several organisms. Despite this information and the wealth of knowledge regarding the significance of CA enzymes, few studies have been reported about bee CA enzymes and the hazardous effects of chemicals. Using Apis mellifera as a model, this study aimed to determine the risk of pesticides on Apis mellifera Carbonic anhydrase enzyme (Am CA). CA was initially purified from Apis mellifera spermatheca for the first time in the literature. The enzyme was purified with an overall purification of ∼35-fold with a molecular weight of ∼32 kDa. The enzyme was then exposed to pesticides, including tebuconazole, propoxur, carbaryl, carbofuran, simazine and atrazine. The six pesticides dose-dependently inhibited in vitro AmCA activity at low micromolar concentrations. IC50 values for the pesticides were 0.0030, 0.0321, 0.0031, 0.0087, 0.0273 and 0.0165 μM, respectively. The AmCA inhibition mechanism of these compounds is unknown at this moment.

  18. The evolution of metazoan α-carbonic anhydrases and their roles in calcium carbonate biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roy, Nathalie; Jackson, Daniel J.; Marie, Benjamin; Ramos-Silva, Paula; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) superfamily is a class of ubiquitous metallo-enzymes that catalyse the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. The ?-CA family, present in all metazoan clades, is a key enzyme involved in a wide range of physiological functions including pH regulation, respiration, photosynthesis, and biocalcification. This paper reviews the evolution of the ?-CA family, with an emphasis on metazoan ?-CA members involved in biocalcification. Phylogenetic analyses reveal...

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of New Phthalazine Urea and Thiourea Derivatives as Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Berber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of phthalazine substituted urea and thiourea derivatives were synthesized, and their inhibitory effects on the activity of purified human carbonic anhydrases (hCAs I and II were evaluated. 2H-Indazolo[2,1-b]phthalazine-trione derivative (1 was prepared with 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, dimedone, and phthalhydrazide in the presence of TFA in DMF, and nitro group was reduced to amine derivative (2 with SnCl2·2H2O. The compound was reacted with isocyanates and isothiocyanates to get the final products (3a–p. The results showed that all the synthesized compounds inhibited the CA isoenzymes activity. 3a (IC50 = 6.40 µM for hCA I and 6.13 µM for hCA II has the most inhibitory effect. The synthesized compounds are very bulky to be able to bind near the zinc ion, and they much more probably bind as the coumarin derivatives.

  20. Natural Product Polyamines That Inhibit Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan A. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural product compound collections have proven an effective way to access chemical diversity and recent findings have identified phenolic, coumarin, and polyamine natural products as atypical chemotypes that inhibit carbonic anhydrases (CAs. CA enzymes are implicated as targets of variable drug therapeutic classes and the discovery of selective, drug-like CA inhibitors is essential. Just two natural product polyamines, spermine and spermidine, have until now been investigated as CA inhibitors. In this study, five more complex natural product polyamines 1–5, derived from either marine sponge or fungi, were considered for inhibition of six different human CA isozymes of interest in therapeutic drug development. All compounds share a simple polyamine core fragment, either spermine or spermidine, yet display substantially different structure activity relationships for CA inhibition. Notably, polyamines 1–5 were submicromolar inhibitors of the cancer drug target CA IX, this is more potent than either spermine or spermidine.

  1. Metal Abundance Calibration of the Ca II Triplet Lines in RR Lyrae Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wallerstein, George; Huang, Wenjin

    2011-01-01

    The GAIA satellite is likely to observe thousands of RR Lyrae stars within a small spectral window, between 8470A and 8750A, at a resolution of 11,500. In order to derive the metallicity of RR Lyrae stars from Gaia, we have obtained numerous spectra of RR Lyrae stars at a resolution of 35,000 with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m echelle spectrograph. We have correlated the Ca II triplet line strengths with metallicity as derived from Fe II abundances, analogous to Preston's (1959) use of the Ca II K line to estimate the metallicity of RR Lyrae stars. The Ca II line at 8498A is the least blended with neighboring Paschen lines and thus provides the best correlation.

  2. IgM natural autoantibodies against bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells recognise carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonusys, A M; Cox, K O; Steele, E J

    1991-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from mouse erythrocyte membranes is recognised as an autoantigen in Western blotting experiments with FUB 1, a murine IgM monoclonal antibody that binds both phosphatidylcholine and bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC). Serum from mice stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-serum) also recognises CA. From SDS-PAGE, and blotting experiments with whole mouse erythrocytes, we found two closely spaced glycoprotein bands in the 30 kD region that reacted with both FUB 1 and LPS-serum. One of the molecular weight markers, bovine carbonic anhydrase which is of a molecular weight of about 30 kD, electrophoresed in the same 30 kD region also reacted with these antibodies. Carbonic anhydrases from a range of mammalian species were found to be crossreactive with FUB 1 and LPS-serum by Western blotting, whereas human glycophorin A and human asialoglycophorin were not recognised by the antibodies. FUB 1 specifically recognises both native and denatured bovine carbonic anhydrase in ELISA assays. The serological identity of the determinants of CA and BrMRBC was confirmed by specific absorption of both FUB 1 and LPS-serum with BrMRBC and normal mouse erythrocytes. We propose that a native autoantigenic epitope on erythrocytes may be revealed by the proteolytic action of bromelain and that this determinant is associated, at least in part, with carbonic anhydrase.

  3. Pilot absorption experiments with carbonic anhydrase enhanced MDEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; F. Lomholdt, Niels; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    -methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) solvent, with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). The absorption experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and agas phase carbon dioxide mole fraction of 0.13. During experiments liquid samples were withdrawn at each meter of column height and the solvent loading...... was determined by both a density method and the BaCl2 method. After the solvent was loaded to equilibrium it was heated up and reintroduced into the column, where CO2 was stripped off using air as stripping gas. The addition of CA increased the mass transfer significantly in all experiments. Lower absorption...

  4. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira Tomazett

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbonic anhydrases (CA belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4. In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1 and CA4 (rCA4, with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class and rCA4 (α-class were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration, arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, kinetic, docking and molecular dynamics analysis of novel glycine and phenylalanine sulfonamide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, İsmail; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Arslan, Mehmet; Şentürk, Murat; Durdagi, Serdar; Ekinci, Deniz; Şentürk, Esra; Coşgun, Sedat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II, with some novel glycine and phenylalanine sulfonamide derivatives were investigated. Newly synthesized compounds G1-4 and P1-4 showed effective inhibition profiles with KI values in the range of 14.66-315μM for hCA I and of 18.31-143.8μM against hCA II, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico docking studies were applied. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were performed for docking poses which utilize to illustrate the inhibition mechanism of used inhibitors into active site of CAII. These sulfonamide containing compounds generally were competitive inhibitors with 4-nitrophenylacetate as substrate. Some investigated compounds here showed effective hCA II inhibitory effects, in the same range as the clinically used sulfonamide, sulfanilamide or mafenide and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors possibly targeting other CA isoforms which have not been yet assayed for their interactions with such agents.

  6. Synthesis of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulphonamide derivatives and their inhibition effects on human carbonic anhydrase isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; Bülbül, Metin; Mert, Samet; Güleryüz, Hülya

    2011-04-01

    In this study, some novel inhibitors were synthesised from the further stage reactions of 4-benzoyl-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonyl chloride with 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulphonamide 1 (inhibitor 1). They were characterised by elemental and spectral (¹H NMR, ¹³C NMR, IR) analyses. Human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA-I and hCA-II) were purified from erythrocyte cells by affinity chromatography. The inhibitory effects of inhibitor 1, acetazolamide (2) and the 11 newly synthesised amides (8-18) on the hydratase and esterase activities of these isoenzymes (hCA-I and hCA-II) were studied in vitro. In relation to these activities, the inhibition equilibrium constants (K(i)) were determined. The K(i) values for the new compounds (8-18) were observed to be well below that of the parent compound inhibitor 1 and were also compared to 2 under the same experimental conditions. The comparison of the newly synthesised amides to inhibitor 1 and to 2 indicated that the new derivatives preferentially inhibited hCA-II and were more potent inhibitors of hCA-II than the parent inhibitor 1 and 2.

  7. The Strings of Eta Carina: The HST/STIS Spectra and [Ca II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, M. B.; Gull, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long linear, filamentary ejecta, are found to move at very high velocity external to the Homunculus, the circumstellar hourglass-shaped ejecta surrounding Eta Carinae. The origin of the strings is a puzzle. As an example, the Weigelt Blobs have N at 10X solar and C, O at 0.01X solar abundance, along with He/H significantly enhanced. This abundance pattern is evidence for extreme CNO-processing. Similarly, the Strontium Filament has Ti/Ni at 100X solar, presumably due to the lack of oxygen to form Ti-oxide precipitates onto dust grains. We have obtained 2-D spectra with the HST/STIS of the Strontium Filament and a portion of a string. These deep spectral exposures, at moderate dispersion, span much of the near red spectral region from 5000 to 9000A. We have identified twelve emission lines in these spectra with proper velocities and spatial structure of this string and obtained line ratios for [Ca II] (7293/7325A) and [Fe Ill (7157/8619A) which are useful for determining physical conditions in this nebulosity. In an attempt to use the [Ca II] ratio to determine the physical parameters, and ultimately the abundances in the strings, we have constructed a statistical equilibrium model for Ca II , including radiative and collisional rates. These results incorporate our newly calculated atomic data for levels n = 3,4,5 and 6 configurations of Ca II. The aim is to compute the [Ca II] line ratios and use them as a diagnostic of the physical parameters. Using the [Fe II] ratio we find that for Te=10,000 K, the electron density is Ne approx.10(exp 6)/cu cm. We plan to use the [Ca II] ratio to confirm this result. Then, we will extend the use of this multilevel model Ca II atom to study the physical conditions of the Strontium filament where eight lines of Ca II, both allowed and forbidden, had been identified. With the physical conditions determined, we will be able to derive reliable estimates for the gas phase abundances in the strings.

  8. Evolution of carbonic anhydrase in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-06-01

    During the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the intracellular location with most carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has changed. In Flaveria, the loss of the sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide from an ancestral C3 CA ortholog confined the C4 isoform to the mesophyll cell cytosol. Recent studies indicate that sequence elements and histone modifications controlling the expression of C4-associated CAs were likely present in the C3 ancestral chromatin, enabling the evolution of the C4 pathway. Almost complete abolishment of maize CA activity yields no obvious phenotype at ambient CO2 levels. This contrasts with results for Flaveria CA mutants, and has opened discussion on the role of CA in the C4 carbon concentrating mechanism.

  9. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  10. 3D Temperature Mapping of Solar Photospheric Fine Structure Using Ca II H Filtergrams

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques, V M J

    2012-01-01

    Context. The wings of the Ca II H and K lines provide excellent photospheric temperature diagnostics. At the Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope the blue wing of Ca II H is scanned with a narrowband interference filter mounted on a rotation stage. This provides up to 0"10 spatial resolution filtergrams at high cadence that are concurrent with other diagnostics at longer wavelengths. Aims. The aim is to develop observational techniques that provide the photospheric temperature stratification at the highest spatial resolution possible and use those to compare simulations and observations at different heights. Methods. We use filtergrams in the Ca II H blue wing obtained with a tiltable interference filter at the SST. Synthetic observations are produced from 3D HD and 3D MHD numerical simulations and degraded to match the observations. The temperature structure obtained from applying the method to the synthetic data is compared with the known structure in the simulated atmospheres and with observations of an active ...

  11. Effect of egg turning and incubation time on carbonic anhydrase gene expression in the blastoderm of the Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, P; Sugden, D; Baggott, G K

    2008-09-01

    1. The gene expression of carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme for the production of sub-embryonic fluid (SEF), was assessed in turned and unturned eggs of the Japanese quail. The plasma membrane-associated isoforms CA IV, CA IX, CA XII, CA XIV, and the cytoplasmic isoform CA II, were investigated in the extra-embryonic tissue of the blastoderm and in embryonic blood. 2. Eggs were incubated at 37.6 degrees C, c.60% RH, and turned hourly (90 degrees ) or left unturned. From 48 to 96 h of incubation mRNA was extracted from blastoderm tissue, reverse-transcribed to cDNA and quantified by real-time qPCR using gene-specific primers. Blood collected at 96 h was processed identically. 3. Blastoderm CA IV gene expression increased with the period of incubation only in turned eggs, with maxima at 84 and 96 h of incubation. Only very low levels were found in blood. 4. Blastoderm CA II gene expression was greatest at 48 and 54 h of incubation, subsequently declining to much lower levels and unaffected by turning. Blood CA II gene expression was about 25-fold greater than in the blastoderm. 5. The expression of CA IX in the blastoderm was the highest of all isoforms, yet unaffected by turning. CA XII did not amplify and CA XIV was present at unquantifiable low levels. 6. It is concluded that only gene expression for CA IV is sensitive to egg turning, and that increased CA IV gene expression could account for the additional SEF mass found at 84 to 96 h of incubation in embryos of turned eggs.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CaII-Mv Correlation (Wilson-Bappu Effect) (Wallerstein+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, G.; Machado-Pelaez, L.; Gonzalez, G.

    1999-07-01

    Hipparcos parallaxes were used to derive absolute visual magnitudes of G, K, and M stars with Ca II emission line widths previously measured by O.C. Wilson. A linear relationship similar to the one derived originally by Wilson & Bappu and improved by Lutz & Kelker was found from Mv=+7 to -2. For stars brighter than Mv=-2 a substantial number of stars show Ca II emission lines that are broader than expected from the linear fit. Most of those stars are bright giants and supergiants of type G. (3 data files).

  13. CaMK-II activation is essential for zebrafish inner ear development and acts through Delta-Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Sarah C; Lahvic, Jamie; Francescatto, Ludmila; McLeod, Jamie J A; Burgess, Shawn M; Tombes, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Zebrafish inner ear development is characterized by the crystallization of otoliths onto immotile kinocilia that protrude from sensory "hair" cells. The stereotypical formation of these sensory structures is dependent on the expression of key patterning genes and on Ca2+ signals. One potential target of Ca2+ signaling in the inner ear is the type II Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK-II), which is preferentially activated in hair cells, with intense activation at the base of kinocilia. In zebrafish, CaMK-II is encoded by seven genes; the expression of one of these genes (camk2g1) is enriched in hair cells. The suppression of camk2g1 expression by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides or inhibition of CaMK-II activation by the pharmacological antagonist, KN-93, results in aberrant otolith formation without preventing cilia formation. In fact, CaMK-II suppression results in additional ciliated hair cells and altered levels of Delta-Notch signaling members. DeltaA and deltaD transcripts are increased and DeltaD protein accumulates in hair cells of CaMK-II morphants, indicative of defective recycling and/or exocytosis. Our findings indicate that CaMK-II plays a critical role in the developing ear, influencing cell differentiation through extranuclear effects on Delta-Notch signaling. Continued expression and activation of CaMK-II in maculae and cristae in older embryos suggests continued roles in auditory sensory maturation and transduction.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  15. Observations of Chromospheric Anemone Jets with Hinode SOT and Hida Ca II Spectroheliogram

    CERN Document Server

    Morita, Satoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Kitai, Reizaburo; Otsuji, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    We present the first simultaneous observations of chromospheric "anemone" jets in solar active regions with Hinode SOT Ca II H broadband filetergram and Ca II K spetroheliogram on the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory. During the coordinated observation, 9 chromospheric anemone jets were simultaneously observed with the two instruments. These observations revealed three important features, i.e.: (1) the jets are generated in the lower chromosphere, (2) the length and lifetime of the jets are 0.4-5 Mm and 40-320 sec, (3) the apparent velocity of the jets with Hinode SOT are 3-24 km/s, while Ca II K3 component at the jets show blueshifts (in 5 events) in the range of 2- 6 km/s. The chromospheric anemone jets are associated with mixed polarity regions which are either small emerging flux regions or moving magnetic features. It is found that the Ca II K line often show red or blue asymmetry in K2/K1 component: the footpoint of the jets associated with emerging flux regions often show redshift (2-...

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Isolated Internetwork Ca II H Bright Points Observed by Sunrise

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, S; Feller, A; Lagg, A; Pietarila, A; Danilovic, S; Riethmüller, T L; Pillet, V Martínez

    2012-01-01

    We aim to improve our picture of the low chromosphere in the quiet-Sun internetwork by investigating the intensity, horizontal velocity, size and lifetime variations of small bright points (BPs; diameter smaller than 0.3 arcsec) observed in the Ca II H 3968 {\\AA} passband along with their magnetic field parameters, derived from photospheric magnetograms. Several high-quality time series of disc-centre, quiet-Sun observations from the Sunrise balloon-borne solar telescope, with spatial resolution of around 100 km on the solar surface, have been analysed to study the dynamics of BPs observed in the Ca II H passband and their dependence on the photospheric vector magnetogram signal. Parameters such as horizontal velocity, diameter, intensity and lifetime histograms of the isolated internetwork and magnetic Ca II H BPs were determined. Mean values were found to be 2.2 km/s, 0.2 arcsec (150 km), 1.48 average Ca II H quiet-Sun and 673 sec, respectively. Interestingly, the brightness and the horizontal velocity of B...

  17. CaII Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Element Abundances and Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Sardane, Gendith M; Rao, Sandhya M

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of element abundance ratios and dust in CaII~absorbers identified in SDSS DR7+DR9. In an earlier paper we formed a statistical sample of 435 CaII absorbers and postulated that their statistical properties might be representative of at least two populations of absorbers. Here we show that if the absorbers are roughly divided into two subsamples with CaII rest equivalent widths larger and smaller than $W_0^{\\lambda 3934} = 0.7$ \\AA, they are then representative of two physically different populations. Comparisons of abundance ratios between the two CaII absorber populations indicate that the weaker $W_0^{\\lambda 3934}$ absorbers have properties consistent with halo-type gas, while the stronger absorbers have properties intermediate between halo- and disk-type gas. We also show that, on average, the dust extinction properties of the overall sample is consistent with a LMC or SMC dust law, and the stronger absorbers are nearly 6 times more reddened than their weaker counterparts. The absor...

  18. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B;

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... in the reaction induces vasodilation in aortic rings. This reaction occurs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and in various tissues at physiological levels of CA and nitrite. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of the CO2 hydration, dorzolamide and acetazolamide, increase the CA-catalyzed production...... of vasoactive NO from nitrite. This enhancing effect may explain the known vasodilating effects of these drugs and indicates that CO2 and nitrite bind differently to the enzyme active site. Kinetic analyses show a higher reaction rate at high pH, suggesting that anionic nitrite participates more effectively...

  19. The Structure of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Is Adapted for Low-pH Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Brian P.; Bhatt, Avni; Socorro, Lilien; Driscoll, Jenna M.; Okoh, Cynthia; Lomelino, Carrie L.; Mboge, Mam Y.; Kurian, Justin J.; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Frost, Susan C; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (hCA IX) expression in many cancers is associated with hypoxic tumors and poor patient outcome. Inhibitors of hCA IX have been used as anticancer agents with some entering Phase I clinical trials. hCA IX is transmembrane protein whose catalytic domain faces the extracellular tumor milieu, which is typically associated with an acidic microenvironment. Here, we show that the catalytic domain of hCA IX (hCA IX-c) exhibits the necessary biochemical and biophysical prop...

  20. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  1. Theoretical study on the role of Ca(2+) at the S2 state in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingxiu; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Li, Can

    2014-12-11

    In photosynthesis, calcium is crucial for oxygen evolution. In the absence of Ca(2+), the Kok cycle has been proven to stop at S2 with Yz•. To explore the reason, photosystem II (PSII) S2 models (in total 32452 atoms) with different metal ions (Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and K(+)) or without Ca(2+) involved in the oxygen evolution complex (OEC) have been theoretically studied based on the previous dynamic study of PSII. It is found that the portion of the Mn1 d-orbital decreases in the highest occupied molecular orbitals for Ca(2+)-depleted PSII. This feature is unfavorable for the electron transfer from the OEC to the Yz•. Furthermore, the proton donor-acceptor distance was found elongated by the alternation of the binding water in the absence of Ca(2+). The isolated vibrational modes of the key water molecules along the path and their high frequency of the OH stretching modes also suggested the difficulty of the proton transfer from the OEC toward the proton exit channel. This work provides one mechanistic explanation for the inactivity of Ca(2+)-depleted PSII.

  2. Porous heterometallic Cd(II)-Ca(II)-terephthalate: Synthesis, structure, luminescent and gas adsorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiping; Dong, Yanli; Ren, Hailiang

    2016-03-01

    A new heterometallic poly(dihydrate-one and a half terephthalate-cadmium calcium) coordination polymer, namely [CdCa(pdc)1.5(H2O)2]n (1, H2pdc = terephthalic acid), has been successfully obtained by the solvothermal reactions of H2pdc, Cd(NO3)2·4H2O and Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compound 1 features a 3D porous framework based on 1D chain subunits. Moreover, compound 1 is luminescent and exhibits high adsorption capacities for H2, CH4 and CO2 at room temperature.

  3. Catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction is sensitive to carbonic anhydrase I activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puscas I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship between alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists and the activity of carbonic anhydrase I and II in erythrocyte, clinical and vessel studies. Kinetic studies were performed. Adrenergic agonists increased erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase as follows: adrenaline by 75%, noradrenaline by 68%, isoprenaline by 55%, and orciprenaline by 62%. The kinetic data indicated a non-competitive mechanism of action. In clinical studies carbonic anhydrase I from erythrocytes increased by 87% after noradrenaline administration, by 71% after orciprenaline and by 82% after isoprenaline. The increase in carbonic anhydrase I paralleled the increase in blood pressure. Similar results were obtained in vessel studies on piglet vascular smooth muscle. We believe that adrenergic agonists may have a dual mechanism of action: the first one consists of a catecholamine action on its receptor with the formation of a stimulus-receptor complex. The second mechanism proposed completes the first one. By this second component of the mechanism, the same stimulus directly acts on the carbonic anhydrase I isozyme (that might be functionally coupled with adrenergic receptors, so that its activation ensures an adequate pH for stimulus-receptor coupling for signal transduction into the cell, resulting in vasoconstriction.

  4. Slender Ca II H fibrils mapping magnetic fields in the low solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Solanki, S K; Wiegelmann, T; Riethmueller, T; van Noort, M; Szydlarski, M; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Barthol, P; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knoelker, M; Pillet, V Martinez; Suarez, D Orozco; Schmidt, W

    2016-01-01

    A dense forest of slender bright fibrils near a small solar active region is seen in high-quality narrow-band Ca II H images from the SuFI instrument onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The orientation of these slender Ca II H fibrils (SCF) overlaps with the magnetic field configuration in the low solar chromosphere derived by magnetostatic extrapolation of the photospheric field observed with Sunrise/IMaX and SDO/HMI. In addition, many observed SCFs are qualitatively aligned with small-scale loops computed from a novel inversion approach based on best-fit numerical MHD simulation. Such loops are organized in canopy-like arches over quiet areas that differ in height depending on the field strength near their roots.

  5. A Century of Solar Ca ii Measurements and Their Implication for Solar UV Driving of Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Peter; Bertello, Luca; Livingston, William C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Singh, Jagdev; Tlatov, Andrey G.; Ulrich, Roger K.

    2009-04-01

    Spectroheliograms and disk-integrated flux monitoring in the strong resonance line of Ca ii (K line) provide the longest record of chromospheric magnetic plages. We compare recent reductions of the Ca ii K spectroheliograms obtained since 1907 at the Kodaikanal, Mt. Wilson, and US National Solar Observatories. Certain differences between the individual plage indices appear to be caused mainly by differences in the spectral passbands used. Our main finding is that the indices show remarkably consistent behavior on the multidecadal time scales of greatest interest to global warming studies. The reconstruction of solar ultraviolet flux variation from these indices differs significantly from the 20th-century global temperature record. This difference is consistent with other findings that, although solar UV irradiance variation may affect climate through influence on precipitation and storm tracks, its significance in global temperature remains elusive.

  6. Density functional theory study of proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lidong; XIE Daiqian

    2005-01-01

    Proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase II has been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(D) level. The active site model consists of the zinc ion, four histidine residues, two threonine residues, and three water molecules. Our calculations showed that the proton of the zinc-bound water molecule could be transferred to the nearest water molecule and an intermediate containing H3O+ is then formed. The intermediate is only 1.3 kJ·mol-1 above the reactant complex, whereas the barrier height for the proton transfer is about 8.1 kJ·mol-1.

  7. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Honghong

    2009-12-13

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere.

  8. Radiative emission of solar features in the Ca II K line: comparison of measurements and models

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; Uitenbroek, H; Giorgi, F; Rast, M P; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    We study the radiative emission of various types of solar features, such as quiet Sun, enhanced network, plage, and bright plage regions, identified on filtergrams taken in the Ca II K line. We analysed fulldisk images obtained with the PSPT, by using three interference filters that sample the Ca II K line with different bandpasses. We studied the dependence of the radiative emission of disk features on the filter bandpass. We also performed a NLTE spectral synthesis of the Ca II K line integrated over the bandpass of PSPT filters. The synthesis was carried out by utilizing both the PRD and CRD with the most recent set of semi­empirical atmosphere models in the literature and some earlier atmosphere models. We measured the CLV of intensity values for various solar features identified on PSPT images and compared the results obtained with those derived from the synthesis. We find that CRD calculations derived using the most recent quiet Sun model, on average, reproduce the measured values of the quiet Sun regi...

  9. Long-term Synoptic Observations of Ca II K and Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, L.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    Long-term synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K and measurements of the solar magnetic flux over several decades constitute a fundamental database for a variety of retrospective analyzes of the state of the solar magnetism. These data archives may also hold the key for untangling some of the mysteries behind the solar dynamo, which in turn could result in a better predictive capability of current dynamo models. Synoptic Ca II K observations began in 1907 at the Kodaikanal observatory (India) and in 1915 at the Mt Wilson (California, USA) solar observatory. By the early 1970s a number of synoptic programs for solar magnetic observations were established that provided full disk magnetograms. These programs include measurements carried out at the Mt Wilson 150-foot solar tower, Wilcox observatory (California, USA), and by the National Solar Observatory (NSO, USA). Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility. We will review some of these historical observations, their properties, and their importance for understanding the behavior of the solar magnetic field over multidecadal time scales. We will also show recent results about using Ca II K spectroheliograms and sunspot magnetic field measurements to reconstruct homogeneous series of pseudo-magnetograms prior the magnetograph era.

  10. Ca II H sunspot tomography from the photosphere to the chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Kiselman, D.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We aim at gaining insight into the thermal properties of different small-scale structures related to sunspots. Methods: We use filtergrams in the Ca ii H filter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope to study the relationship between fine structure at different heights in a sunspot. Results: The methods for destretching and aligning the different image data work well. The magnetic spine structure in the outer parts of the sunspot penumbra is found to be associated with higher intensities in the Ca ii H wing passbands but with less steep vertical temperature gradients. Dark lanes in a light bridge behave very similarly to dark cores in penumbral filaments. Fibril structures are seen in the line-core images over the umbra and penumbra. Conclusions: The observations add support to the idea that penumbral filaments, light bridges, and umbral dots are caused by similar processes of overturning convection. Observations in the Ca ii H & K wings are a promising observable, complementing others, for testing simulation results for sunspots at high spatial resolution.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase in calcified endoskeleton: novel activity in biocalcification in alcyonarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a key enzyme in the chemical reaction of living organisms and has been found to be associated with calcification in a number of invertebrates including calcareous sponges, but until now no direct evidence has been advanced to show CA activity in alcyonarian corals. However, it is essential to understand the role of CA in the process of biocalcification in alcyonarian. Here we describe the novel activity of CA and its relationship to the formation of calcified hard tissues in alcyonarian coral, Lobophytum crassum. We find that two CA proteins, which were partially purified by electro-elution treatment, can control the morphology of CaCO(3) crystals and one of them is potentially involved in the process of biocalcification. Previously, we isolated CA from the total extract of alcyonarian, and further, we report here a single protein, which has both calcium-binding and CA activities and is responsible for CaCO(3) nucleation and crystal growth. This matrix protein inhibited the precipitation of CaCO(3) from a saturated solution containing CaCl(2) and NaHCO(3), indicating that it can act as a negative regulator for calcification in the sclerites of alcyonarians. The effect of an inhibitor on the enzyme activity was also examined. These findings strongly support the idea that carbonic anhydrase domain in alcyonarian is involved in the calcification process. Our observations strongly suggest that the matrix protein in alcyonarian coral is not only a structural protein but also a catalyst.

  12. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR, UV/VIS), thermogravimetric and antimicrobial studies of Ca(II), Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes of ferulic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, M.; Piekut, J.; Bruss, A.; Follet, C.; Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, J.; Świsłocka, R.; Rzączyńska, Z.; Lewandowski, W.

    2014-03-01

    The molecular structure of Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Ca(II) ferulates (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamates) was studied. The selected metal ferulates were synthesized. Their composition was established by means of elementary and thermogravimetric analysis. The following spectroscopic methods were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance (13C, 1H NMR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV/VIS). On the basis of obtained results the electronic charge distribution in studied metal complexes in comparison with ferulic acid molecule was discussed. The microbiological study of ferulic acid and ferulates toward Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris was done.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase isozymes Ⅸ and Ⅻ in gastric tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mari Leppilampi; Juha Saarnio; Tuomo J. Karttunen; Jyrki Kivel(a); Silvia Pastorekov(a); Jaromir Pastorek; Abdul Waheed; William S. Sly; Seppo Parkkila

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To systematically study the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isowmes Ⅸ and Ⅻ in gastric tumors.METHODS: We analyzed a representative series of specimens from non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and from various dysplastic and neoplastic gastric lesions for the expression of CA IX and XII. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using isozyme-specific antibodies and biotinstreptavidin complex method.RESULTS: CA IX was highly expressed in the normal gastric mucosa and remained positive in many gastric tumors. In adenomas, CA IX expression significantly decreased towards the high grade dysplasia. However, the expression resumed back to the normal level in well differentiated adenocarcinomas,while it again declined in carcinomas with less differentiation.In comparison, CA Ⅻ showed no or weak immunoreaction in the normal gastric mucosa and was slightly increased in tumors.CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CA Ⅸexpression is sustained in several types of gastric tumors.The variations observed in the CA Ⅸ levels support the concept that gastric adenomas and carcinomas are distinct entities and do not represent progressive steps of a single pathway.

  14. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Fusion-activated Ca(2+ entry: an "active zone" of elevated Ca(2+ during the postfusion stage of lamellar body exocytosis in rat type II pneumocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pika Miklavc

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ is essential for vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in virtually all types of regulated exocytoses. However, in contrast to the well-known effects of a high cytoplasmic Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](c in the prefusion phase, the occurrence and significance of Ca(2+ signals in the postfusion phase have not been described before.We studied isolated rat alveolar type II cells using previously developed imaging techniques. These cells release pulmonary surfactant, a complex of lipids and proteins, from secretory vesicles (lamellar bodies in an exceptionally slow, Ca(2+- and actin-dependent process. Measurements of fusion pore formation by darkfield scattered light intensity decrease or FM 1-43 fluorescence intensity increase were combined with analysis of [Ca(2+](c by ratiometric Fura-2 or Fluo-4 fluorescence measurements. We found that the majority of single lamellar body fusion events were followed by a transient (t(1/2 of decay = 3.2 s rise of localized [Ca(2+](c originating at the site of lamellar body fusion. [Ca(2+](c increase followed with a delay of approximately 0.2-0.5 s (method-dependent and in the majority of cases this signal propagated throughout the cell (at approximately 10 microm/s. Removal of Ca(2+ from, or addition of Ni(2+ to the extracellular solution, strongly inhibited these [Ca(2+](c transients, whereas Ca(2+ store depletion with thapsigargin had no effect. Actin-GFP fluorescence around fused LBs increased several seconds after the rise of [Ca(2+](c. Both effects were reduced by the non-specific Ca(2+ channel blocker SKF96365.Fusion-activated Ca(2+entry (FACE is a new mechanism that leads to [Ca(2+](c transients at the site of vesicle fusion. Substantial evidence from this and previous studies indicates that fusion-activated Ca(2+ entry enhances localized surfactant release from type II cells, but it may also play a role for compensatory endocytosis and other cellular functions.

  16. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase IV enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) is GPI-anchored to the outer membrane surface, catalyzing CO2/HCO3 (-) hydration-dehydration. We examined effects of heterologously expressed CA IV on intracellular-pH (pHi) and surface-pH (pHS) transients caused by exposing oocytes to CO2/HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50. CO2 influx causes a sustained pHi fall and a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA IV increases magnitudes of maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, and maximal pHS change (ΔpHS) and decreases time constants for pHi changes (τpHi ) and pHS relaxations (τpHS ). Decreases in time constants indicate that CA IV enhances CO2 fluxes. Extracellular acetazolamide blocks all CA IV effects, but not those of injected CA II. Injected acetazolamide partially reduces CA IV effects. Thus, extracellular CA is required for, and the equivalent of cytosol-accessible CA augments, the effects of CA IV. Increasing the concentration of the extracellular non-CO2/HCO3 (-) buffer (i.e., HEPES), in the presence of extracellular CA or at high [CO2], accelerates CO2 influx. Simultaneous measurements with two pHS electrodes, one on the oocyte meridian perpendicular to the axis of flow and one downstream from the direction of extracellular-solution flow, reveal that the downstream electrode has a larger (i.e., slower) τpHS , indicating [CO2] asymmetry over the oocyte surface. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (third paper in series) accounts for the above general features, and supports the conclusion that extracellular CA, which replenishes entering CO2 or consumes exiting CO2 at the extracellular surface, enhances the gradient driving CO2 influx across the cell membrane.

  17. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  18. On-disk counterparts of type II spicules in the Ca II 854.2 nm and Halpha lines

    CERN Document Server

    van der Voort, L Rouppe; De Pontieu, B; Carlsson, M; Vissers, G

    2009-01-01

    Recently a second type of spicules was discovered at the solar limb with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Japanese Hinode spacecraft. These previously unrecognized type II spicules are thin chromospheric jets that are shorter-lived (10-60 s) and that show much higher apparent upward velocities (of order 50-100 km/s) than the classical spicules. Since they have been implicated in providing hot plasma to coronal loops, their formation, evolution and properties are important ingredients for a better understanding of the mass and energy balance of the low solar atmosphere. Here we report on the discovery of the disk counterparts of type II spicules using spectral imaging data in the Ca II 854.2 nm and Halpha lines with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST) in La Palma. We find rapid blueward excursions in the line profiles of both chromospheric lines that correspond to thin, jet-like features that show apparent velocities of order 50 km/s. These blueward ex...

  19. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Gul N.; Rubbelke, Timothy S.; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D.; Sly, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium–potassium citrate-supplemented wate...

  20. The [Fe/H] Dependence on the Ca {\\sc ii}-$M_V$ Relationship

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Thomas; Pancino, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We examined the Wilson-Bappu effect, a relationship between the absolute magnitude of the star, $M_V$, and the logarithm of the Ca {\\sc ii} emission width, $W_0$, over the largest $M_V$ range to date, +13 to -5, covering M-dwarfs to type Ia supergiants. We used an extensive literature, the latest Hipparcos reduction, data from two globular clusters, and new observations from Apache Point Observatory to compile a sample that allowed us to study the effect of [Fe/H] on the Wilson-Bappu relationship. Our results include reporting the deviations from linearity and demonstrating that the Wilson-Bappu relationship is insensitive to metallicity.

  1. Composite CaWO4 Detectors for the CRESST-II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, M; Bauer, M; Bavykina, I; Bento, A; Brown, A; Bucci, C; Ciemniak, C; Coppi, C; Deuter, G; von Feilitzsch, F; Hauff, D; Henry, S; Huff, P; Imber, J; Ingleby, S; Isaila, C; Jochum, J; Kimmerle, M; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Lang, R F; Malek, M; McGowan, R; Mikhailik, V B; Pantic, E; Petricca, F; Pfister, S; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schmaler, J; Scholl, S; Seidel, W; Stodolsky, L; Tolhurst, A J B; Usherov, I; Westphal, W

    2009-01-01

    CRESST-II, standing for Cryogenic Rare Events Search with Superconducting Thermometers phase II, is an experiment searching for Dark Matter. In the LNGS facility in Gran Sasso, Italy, a cryogenic detector setup is operated in order to detect WIMPs by elastic scattering off nuclei, generating phononic lattice excitations and scintillation light. The thermometers used in the experiment consist of a tungsten thin-film structure evaporated onto the CaWO4 absorber crystal. The process of evaporation causes a decrease in the scintillation light output. This, together with the need of a big-scale detector production for the upcoming EURECA experiment lead to investigations for producing thermometers on smaller crystals which are glued onto the absorber crystal. In our Run 31 we tested composite detectors for the first time in the Gran Sasso setup. They seem to produce higher light yields as hoped and could provide an additional time based discrimination mechanism for low light yield clamp events.

  2. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, R.H.F. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Quintas, L.E.M. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Noel, F. [Programa de Desenvolvimento de Fármacos, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Einicker-Lamas, M. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, V.M.N. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-19

    Ca{sup 2+} pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub 0.5} = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC{sub 50} = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca{sup 2+} and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} pumping activity.

  3. Thermodynamics of calmodulin trapping by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II: subpicomolar Kd determined using competition titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Joyce K Y; Giannetti, Anthony M; Bradshaw, J Michael

    2007-04-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) trapping by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a phenomenon whereby the affinity of CaM for CaMKII increases >1000-fold following CaMKII autophosphorylation. The molecular basis of this effect is not entirely understood. Binding of CaM to the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated states of CaMKII is well mimicked by the interaction of CaM with two different length peptides taken from the CaM-binding region of CaMKII, peptides we refer to as the long and intermediate peptides. To better understand the conformational change accompanying CaM trapping, we have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to compare the binding thermodynamics of CaM to these peptides as well as to a shorter CaMKII-based peptide. Calorimetric analysis revealed that the enthalpy, rather than the entropy, distinguished binding of these three peptides. Furthermore, the heat capacity change was found to be similar for the long and intermediate peptides but smaller in magnitude for the short peptide. Direct titration of CaM with peptide provided the Kd value for the short peptide (Kd = 5.9 +/- 2.4 microM), but a novel, two-phased competitive binding strategy was necessary to ascertain the affinities of the intermediate (Kd = 0.17 +/- 0.06 nM) and long (Kd = 0.07 +/- 0.04 pM) peptides. To our knowledge, the Kd for the long peptide is the most potent measured to date using ITC. Together, the findings reported here support a model whereby the final conformational change accompanying CaM trapping buries little additional surface area but does involve formation of new hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts that contribute to formation of the high-affinity, CaM-trapped state.

  4. Co-production of carbonic anhydrase and phycobiliproteins by Spirulina sp. and Synechococcus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ores, Joana da Costa; Amarante, Marina Campos Assumpção de; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the co-production of the carbonic anhydrase, C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin during cyanobacteria growth. Spirulina sp. LEB 18 demonstrated a high potential for simultaneously obtaining the three products, achieving a carbonic anhydrase (CA) productivity of 0.97U/L/d and the highest C-phycocyanin (PC, 5.9μg/mL/d) and allophycocyanin (APC, 4.3μg/mL/d) productivities. In the extraction study, high extraction yields were obtained from Spirulina using an ultrasonic homogenizer (CA: 25.5U/g; PC: 90mg/g; APC: 70mg/g). From the same biomass, it was possible to obtain three biomolecules that present high industrial value.

  5. Colocalization of carbonic anhydrase 9 expression and cell proliferation in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, I.J.; Marres, H.A.M.; Wijffels, K.I.E.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Peters, J.P.W.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Oosterwijk, E.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor cells undergo a variety of biological changes under sustained hypoxic conditions, allowing cells to survive and retain their clonogenic potential. The purpose of this study is to relate the expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) to the uptake of iododeoxyuridine (

  6. Degradation products of the artificial azo dye, Allura red, inhibit esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase II: A basic in vitro study on the food safety of the colorant in terms of enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Khaledian, Koestan; Adibi, Hadi; Rouhani, Shohre; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-12-15

    Allura red is a widely used food colorant, but there is debate on its potential security risk. In the present study, we found that degradation products of the dye were more potent agents with higher carbonic anhydrase inhibitory action than the parent dye. The mechanism by which the compounds inhibit the enzyme activity has been determined as competitive mode. In addition, the enzyme binding properties of the compounds were investigated employing different spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking. The analyses of fluorescence quenching data revealed the existence of the same binding site for the compounds on the enzyme molecule. The thermodynamic parameters of ligand binding were not similar, which indicates that different interactions are responsible in binding of the parent dye and degradation products to the enzyme. It appears that enzyme inhibition should be considered, more seriously, as a new opened dimension in food safety.

  7. On the migration of Ca II H bright points in the internetwork

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, S; Solanki, S K; Pietarila, A; Feller, A; Lagg, A; Gandorfer, A

    2014-01-01

    The migration of magnetic bright point-like features (MBP) in the lower solar atmosphere reflects the dispersal of magnetic flux as well as the horizontal flows of the atmospheric layer they are embedded in. We analyse trajectories of the proper motion of intrinsically magnetic, isolated internetwork Ca II H MBPs (mean lifetime 461 +- 9 sec) to obtain their diffusivity behaviour. We use seeing-free high spatial and temporal resolution image sequences of quiet-Sun, disc-centre observations obtained in the Ca II H 3968 {\\AA} passband of the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. Small MBPs in the internetwork are automatically tracked. The trajectory of each MBP is then calculated and described by a diffusion index ({\\gamma}) and a diffusion coefficient (D). We further explore the distribution of the diffusion indices with the help of a Monte Carlo simulation. We find {\\gamma} = 1.69 +- 0.08 and D = 257 +- 32 km^2/s averaged over all MBPs. Trajectories of most MBPs are...

  8. Ca II H and K Chromospheric Emission Lines in Late K and M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, E; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Rauscher, Emily

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the profiles of the Ca II H and K chromospheric emission lines in 147 main sequence stars of spectral type M5-K7 (0.30-0.55 solar masses) using multiple high resolution spectra obtained during six years with the HIRES spectrometer on the Keck 1 telescope. Remarkably, the average FWHM, equivalent widths, and line luminosities of Ca II H and K increase by a factor of 3 with increasing stellar mass over this small range of stellar masses. We fit the H and K lines with a double Gaussian model to represent both the chromospheric emission and the non-LTE central absorption. Most of the sample stars display a central absorption that is typically redshifted by ~0.1 km/s relative to the emission, but the nature of this velocity gradient remains unknown. The FWHM of the H and K lines increase with stellar luminosity, reminiscent of the Wilson-Bappu effect in FGK-type stars. Both the equivalent widths and FWHM exhibit modest temporal variability in individual stars. At a given value of M_v, stars exhibi...

  9. Butterfly Diagram and Carrington Maps for Century-Long Ca II K Spectroheliograms from Kodaikanal Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhamoy; Ravindra, B

    2016-01-01

    The century-long (1907-2007) Ca II K spectroheliograms from Kodaikanal Solar Observatory (KSO) are calibrated, processed and analysed in the present study to follow the evolution of bright on disc structures called plages, the possible representatives of magnetic activity on the Sun. This has been the longest dataset studied in Ca II K till date covering about 9.5 cycles of 11 year periods. Plages were segmented with area $\\geq 1\\:\\textrm {arcmin}^2$ using global thresholds for individual full disc images and subsequent application of morphological closing operation. Plage index was calculated and seen to have close positive correlation with fractional disc area covered by plages. The newly generated plage area cycle (from KSO) was compared with the same from Mount Wilson observatory (Correlation~$95.6\\%$) for the overlapping years i.e. 1915-2000. Study illustrated time-latitude distribution of plage centroids rendering butterfly diagram (as observed for sunspots). The 3D visualisation of the diagram showed o...

  10. Dynamo Sensitivity in Solar Analogs with 50 Years of Ca II H & K Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Ricky; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C; Pevtsov, Alexei A; Henry, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    The Sun has a steady 11-year cycle in magnetic activity most well-known by the rising and falling in the occurrence of dark sunspots on the solar disk in visible bandpasses. The 11-year cycle is also manifest in the variations of emission in the Ca II H & K line cores, due to non-thermal (i.e. magnetic) heating in the lower chromosphere. The large variation in Ca II H & K emission allows for study of the patterns of long-term variability in other stars thanks to synoptic monitoring with the Mount Wilson Observatory HK photometers (1966-2003) and Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (1994-present). Overlapping measurements for a set of 27 nearby solar-analog (spectral types G0-G5) stars were used to calibrate the two instruments and construct time series of magnetic activity up to 50 years in length. Precise properties of fundamental importance to the dynamo are available from Hipparcos, the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and CHARA interferometry. Using these long time series and measurements of fu...

  11. The Appearance of Spicules in High Resolution Observations of Ca II H and Hα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-06-01

    Solar spicules are chromospheric fibrils that appear everywhere on the Sun, yet their origin is not understood. Using high resolution observations of spicules obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope, we aim to understand how spicules appear in filtergrams and Dopplergrams, how they compare in Ca ii H and Hα filtergrams, and what can make them appear and disappear. We find that spicules display a rich and detailed spatial structure, and show a distribution of transverse velocities that, when aligned with the line of sight, can make them appear at different Hα wing positions. They become more abundant at positions closer to the line core, reflecting a distribution of Doppler shifts and widths. In Hα width maps they stand out as bright features both on disk and off limb, reflecting their large Doppler motions and possibly higher temperatures than in the typical Hα formation region. Spicule lifetimes measured from narrowband images at only a few positions will be an underestimate because Doppler shifts can make them disappear prematurely from such images; for such cases, width maps are a more robust tool. In Hα and Ca ii H filtergrams, off-limb spicules essentially have the same properties, appearance, and evolution. We find that the sudden appearance of spicules can be explained by Doppler shifts from their transverse motions, and does not require other convoluted explanations.

  12. Transverse oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils observed with Sunrise/SuFI

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin; Gafeira, R; van Noort, M; Barthol, P; Rodriguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Knoelker, M; Suarez, D Orozco; Riethmueller, T L; Schmidt, W

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of transverse oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) in the lower solar chromosphere. We use a 1-hour long time series of high (spatial and temporal) resolution, seeing-free observations in a 0.11 nm wide passband covering the line core of Ca II H 396.9 nm from the second flight of the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The entire field of view, spanning the polarity inversion line of an active region close to the solar disk center, is covered with bright, thin, and very dynamic fine structures. Our analysis reveals the prevalence of transverse waves in SCFs with median amplitudes and periods on the order of 2.4+-0.8 km/s and 83+-29 s, respectively (with standard deviations given as uncertainties). We find that the transverse waves often propagate along (parts of) the SCFs with median phase speeds of 9+-14 km/s. While the propagation is only in one direction along the axis in some of the SCFs, propagating waves in both directions, as well as standing waves are also observ...

  13. Spectropolarimetric observations of the Ca II 8498 A and 8542 A lines in the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Pietarila, A; Bogdan, T

    2007-01-01

    The Ca II infrared triplet is one of the few magnetically sensitive chromospheric lines available for ground-based observations. We present spectropolarimetric observations of the 8498 A and 8542 A lines in a quiet Sun region near a decaying active region and compare the results with a simulation of the lines in a high plasma-beta regime. Cluster analysis of Stokes V profile pairs shows that the two lines, despite arguably being formed fairly close, often do not have similar shapes. In the network, the local magnetic topology is more important in determining the shapes of the Stokes V profiles than the phase of the wave, contrary to what our simulations show. We also find that Stokes V asymmetries are very common in the network, and the histograms of the observed amplitude and area asymmetries differ significantly from the simulation. Both the network and internetwork show oscillatory behavior in the Ca II lines. It is stronger in the network, where shocking waves, similar to those in the high-beta simulation...

  14. Mechanochemical synthesis and intercalation of Ca(II)Fe(III)-layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferencz, Zs.; Szabados, M.; Varga, G.; Csendes, Z. [Department of Organic Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 8, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kukovecz, Á. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Kónya, Z. [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); MTA-SZTE Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research Group, Rerrich Béla tér 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Carlson, S. [MAX IV Laboratory, Ole Römers väg 1, Lund SE-223 63 (Sweden); Sipos, P. [Materials and Solution Structure Research Group, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 7, Szeged H-6720 (Hungary); and others

    2016-01-15

    A mechanochemical method (grinding the components without added water – dry grinding, followed by further grinding in the presence of minute amount of water or NaOH solution – wet grinding) was used in this work for the preparation and intercalation of CaFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Both the pristine LDHs and the amino acid anion (cystinate and tyrosinate) intercalated varieties were prepared by the two-step grinding procedure in a mixer mill. By systematically changing the conditions of the preparation method, a set of parameters could be determined, which led to the formation of close to phase-pure LDH. The optimisation procedure was also applied for the intercalation processes of the amino acid anions. The resulting materials were structurally characterised by a range of methods (X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray absorption and infra-red spectroscopies). It was proven that this simple mechanochemical procedure was able to produce complex organic–inorganic nanocomposites: LDHs intercalated with amino acid anions. - Graphical abstract: Amino acid anion-Ca(II)Fe(III)-LDHs were successfully prepared by a two-step milling procedure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of pristine and amino acid intercalated CaFe-LDHs by two-step milling. • Identifying the optimum synthesis and intercalation parameters. • Characterisation of the samples with a range of instrumental methods.

  15. Study of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy from the DART CaII triplet survey

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Irwin, M; Parisi, P; Hill, V; Jablonka, P

    2010-01-01

    We use VLT/FLAMES intermediate resolution (R~6500) spectra of individual red giant branch stars in the near-infrared CaII triplet (CaT) region to investigate the wide-area metallicity properties and internal kinematics of the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). Our final sample consists of 174 probable members of Sextans with accurate line-of-sight velocities (+- 2 km/s) and CaT [Fe/H] measurements (+- 0.2 dex). We use the MgI line at 8806.8 \\AA\\, as an empirical discriminator for distinguishing between probable members of the dSph (giant stars) and probable Galactic contaminants (dwarf stars). Sextans shows a similar chemo-dynamical behaviour to other Milky Way dSphs, with its central regions being more metal rich than the outer parts and with the more metal-rich stars displaying colder kinematics than the more metal-poor stars. Hints of a velocity gradient are found along the projected major axis and along an axis at P.A.=191 deg, however a larger and more spatially extended sample may be necessary to p...

  16. Thermostable Carbonic Anhydrases in Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Di Fiore

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are ubiquitous metallo-enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in bicarbonate ions and protons. Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the utilization of these enzymes in CO2 capture and storage processes. However, since this use is greatly limited by the harsh conditions required in these processes, the employment of thermostable enzymes, both those isolated by thermophilic organisms and those obtained by protein engineering techniques, represents an interesting possibility. In this review we will provide an extensive description of the thermostable carbonic anhydrases so far reported and the main processes in which these enzymes have found an application.

  17. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiwei, Zhang [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hu, Renming, E-mail: taylorzww@gmail.com [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  18. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields affect lipid-linked carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Pepe, Isidoro Mario; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2011-06-01

    In the last years, the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on the activity of different enzymes were investigated. Only the membrane-anchored enzymes did decrease their activity, up to 50%. In this work, the effect of ELF-EMF on bovine lung membrane carbonic anhydrase (CA) were studied. Carbonic anhydrases are a family of 14 zinc-containing isozymes catalyzing the reversible reaction: CO(2)+H(2)O = HCO(3)(- )+H(+). CA differ in catalytic activity and subcellular localization. CA IV, IX, XII, XIV, and XV are membrane bound. In particular, CA IV, which is expressed in the lung, is glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol-linked to the membrane, therefore it was a candidate to inhibition by ELF-EMF. Exposure to the membranes to a field of 75 Hz frequency and different amplitudes caused CA activity to a reproducible decrease in enzymatic activity by 17% with a threshold of about 0.74 mT. The decrease in enzymatic activity was independent of the time of permanence in the field and was completely reversible. When the source of enzyme was solubilized with Triton, the field lost its effect on CA enzymatic activity, suggesting a crucial role of the membrane, as well as of the particular linkage of the enzyme to it, in determining the conditions for CA inactivation. Results are discussed in terms of the possible physiologic effects of CA inhibition in target organs.

  19. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  20. Relationship between breakthrough curve and adsorption isotherm of Ca(II) imprinted chitosan microspheres for metal adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yangcheng Lu; Jing He; Longwen Wu; Guangsheng Luo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an equilibrium-dispersion model was successfully established to describe the breakthrough performance of Ca(II) imprinted chitosan (Ca(II)-CS) microspheres packed column for metal adsorption, and the assumptions of Langmuir isotherms and axial dispersion controlled mass transfer process were confirmed. The axial dispersion coefficient in Ca(II)-CS microspheres packed column was found to be almost proportional to the linear velocity and fit for prediction through single breakthrough test. Sensitivity analysis for breakthrough curve indicated the axial dispersion coefficient as well as Langmuir coefficient was sensitive variable for deep removal requirement. The retrieval of the adsorption isotherms of Ca(II)-CS microspheres from breakthrough curve was fulfilled by model ing calibration. A strategy based on the correlation between adsorption isotherms and breakthrough performance was further proposed to simplify the column adsorption design using absorbents with smal/uniform size and fast adsorption kinetics like Ca(II)-CS microspheres to cut down the gap between lab and industry.

  1. Carbonic anhydrases in normal gastrointestinal tract and gastrointestinal tumours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti J. Kivel(a); Jyrki Kivel(a); Juha Saarnio; Seppo Parkkila

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) catalyse the hydration of CO2to bicarbonate at physiological pH. This chemical interconversion is crucial since HCO3- is the substrate for several biosynthetic reactions. This review is focused on the distribution and role of CA isoenzymes in both normal and pathological gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues. It has been known for many years that CAs are widely present in the GI tract and play important roles in several physiological functions such as production of saliva, gastric acid, bile, and pancreatic juice as well as in absorption of salt and water in intestine. New information suggests that these enzymes participate in several processes that were not envisioned earlier. Especially, the recent reports on plasma membranebound isoenzymes Ⅸ and Ⅻ have raised considerable interest since they were reported to participate in cancer invasion and spread. They are induced by tumour hypoxia and may also play a role in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated carcinogenesis.

  2. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 19(3):199-229. Review. Citation on PubMed Shah GN, Rubbelke TS, Hendin J, Nguyen H, Waheed A, Shoemaker JD, Sly WS. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose ...

  4. Kinetic study of a novel thermo-stable α-carbonic anhydrase for biomimetic CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Maria Elena; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Capasso, Clemente; De Luca, Viviana; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero; Rossi, Mosè

    2013-09-10

    Biomimetic CO2 capture includes environmentally friendly solutions based on carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that increases CO2 absorption rate in conventional acid-gas scrubbing processes. The present contribution reports the characterization of a new recombinant carbonic anhydrase, SspCA, isolated from the thermophile bacterium Sulphurhydrogenibium yellowstonense sp. YO3AOP1. The kinetics of SspCA was characterized in terms of first order CO2 hydration rate according to a procedure based on CO2 absorption tests in a stirred cell apparatus. The first order kinetic constant at 25°C was 9.16 × 10(6) L/(mols). An appropriate investigation on SspCA stability was carried out to assess its long-term resistance to high temperatures as in all capture processes based on absorption/vacuum-desorption cycles. Its half-life was 53 and 8 days at 40 °C and 70 °C, respectively.

  5. Quantification of carbonic anhydrase gene expression in ventricle of hypertrophic and failing human heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Bernardo V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase enzymes (CA catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate in mammalian cells. Trans-membrane transport of CA-produced bicarbonate contributes significantly to cellular pH regulation. A body of evidence implicates pH-regulatory processes in the hypertrophic growth pathway characteristic of hearts as they fail. In particular, Na+/H+ exchange (NHE activation is pro-hypertrophic and CA activity activates NHE. Recently Cardrase (6-ethoxyzolamide, a CA inhibitor, was found to prevent and revert agonist-stimulated cardiac hypertrophy (CH in cultured cardiomyocytes. Our goal thus was to determine whether hypertrophied human hearts have altered expression of CA isoforms. Methods We measured CA expression in hypertrophied human hearts to begin to examine the role of carbonic anhydrase in progression of human heart failure. Ventricular biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery (CS, n = 14, or heart transplantation (HT, n = 13. CS patients presented mild/moderate concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and normal right ventricles, with preserved ventricular function; ejection fractions were ~60%. Conversely, HT patients with failing hearts presented CH or ventricular dilation accompanied by ventricular dysfunction and EF values of 20%. Non-hypertrophic, non-dilated ventricular samples served as controls. Results Expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP were markers of CH. Hypertrophic ventricles presented increased expression of CAII, CAIV, ANP, and BNP, mRNA levels, which increased in failing hearts, measured by quantitative real-time PCR. CAII, CAIV, and ANP protein expression also increased approximately two-fold in hypertrophic/dilated ventricles. Conclusions These results, combined with in vitro data that CA inhibition prevents and reverts CH, suggest that increased carbonic anhydrase expression is a prognostic molecular marker of cardiac

  6. Inhibition studies of bacterial, fungal and protozoan β-class carbonic anhydrases with Schiff bases incorporating sulfonamide moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Alothman, Zeid; Monti, Simona Maria; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-08-01

    A series of new Schiff bases derived from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide containing either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic tail, have been investigated as inhibitors of three β-carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from three different microorganisms. Their antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoan activities have been determined against the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the bacterial pathogen Brucella suis and the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani chagasi, responsible for Leishmaniasis. The results of these inhibition studies show that all three enzymes were efficiently inhibited by the Schiff base sulfonamides with KI values in the nanomolar or submicromolar range, depending on the nature of the tail, coming from the aryl/heteroaryl moiety present in the starting aldehyde employed in the synthesis. Furthermore, the compounds hereby investigated revealed high β-CAs selectivity over the ubiquitous, physiologically relevant and off-target human isoforms (CA I and II) and to be more potent as antifungal and antibacterial than as antiprotozoan potential drugs.

  7. Cloning, characterization and sulfonamide inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the living fossil sponge Astrosclera willeyana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohradanova, Anna; Vullo, Daniela; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Jackson, Daniel J; Wörheide, Gert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-15

    The α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) Astrosclerin-3 previously isolated from the living fossil sponge Astrosclera willeyana (Jackson et al., Science 2007, 316, 1893), was cloned, kinetically characterized and investigated for its inhibition properties with sulfonamides and sulfamates. Astrosclerin-3 has a high catalytic activity for the CO(2) hydration reaction to bicarbonate and protons (k(cat) of 9.0×10(5) s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m) of 1.1×10(8) M(-1) × s(-1)), and is inhibited by various aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and sulfamates with inhibition constants in the range of 2.9 nM-8.85 μM. Astrosclerin, and the human isoform CA II, display similar kinetic properties and affinities for sulfonamide inhibitors, despite more than 550 million years of independent evolution. Because Astrosclerin-3 is involved in biocalcification, the inhibitors characterized here may be used to gain insights into such processes in other metazoans.

  8. Chromospheric Sunspot Oscillations in H-alpha and Ca II 8542A

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, Ram Ajor; Park, Hyungmin; Yang, Heesu; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyuhyoun

    2013-01-01

    We study chromospheric oscillations including umbral flashes and running penumbral waves in a sunspot of active region (AR) using scanning spectroscopy in H-alpha and Ca II 8542A, with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph (FISS) at the 1.6 meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. A bisector method is applied to spectral observations to construct chromospheric Doppler velocity maps. Temporal sequence analysis of these shows enhanced high-frequency oscillations inside the sunspot umbra in both lines. Their peak frequency gradually decreases outward from the umbra. The oscillation power is found to be associated with magnetic-field strength and inclination, with different relationships in different frequency bands.

  9. The Hanle and Zeeman polarization signals of the solar Ca II 8542 \\AA\\ line

    CERN Document Server

    Štěpán, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the main results of a three-dimensional (3D) multilevel radiative transfer investigation about the solar disk-center polarization of the Ca {\\sc ii} 8542 \\AA\\ line. First, we investigate the linear polarization due to the atomic level polarization produced by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation in a 3D model of the solar atmosphere, taking into account the symmetry breaking effects caused by its thermal, dynamic and magnetic structure. Second, we study the contribution of the Zeeman effect to the linear and circular polarization. Finally, we show examples of the Stokes profiles produced by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. We find that the Zeeman effect tends to dominate the linear polarization signals only in the localized patches of opposite magnetic polarity where the magnetic field is relatively strong and slightly inclined, while outside such very localized patches the linear polarization is often dominated by the contribution ...

  10. Chromospheric diagnosis with Ca II lines: forward modeling in forward scattering (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Carlin, E S

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the first synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the CaII 8498, 8542 and 3934 A lines by solving the NLTE (non-local thermodynamical equilibrium) RT (radiative transfer) problem of the second kind in a 3D atmosphere model obtained from realistic MHD (magneto-hydrodynamical) simulations. Maps of circular polarization were calculated neglecting atomic polarization. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy and Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthetize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at disk center. It allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization for discriminating them observationally. Our results suggest new ideas for chromospheric diagno...

  11. Simulations of the Mg II k and Ca II 8542 lines from an Alfv\\'en Wave-heated flare chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Russell, Alexander J B; Allred, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamic simulations to examine two models of solar flare chromospheric heating: Alfv\\'en wave dissipation and electron beam collisional losses. Both mechanisms are capable of strong chromospheric heating, and we show that the distinctive atmospheric evolution in the mid-to-upper chromosphere results in Mg II k-line emission that should be observably different between wave-heated and beam-heated simulations. We also present Ca II 8542A profiles which are formed slightly deeper in the chromosphere. The Mg II k-line profiles from our wave-heated simulation are quite different from those from a beam-heated model and are more consistent with IRIS observations. The predicted differences between the Ca II 8542A in the two models are small. We conclude that careful observational and theoretical study of lines formed in the mid-to-upper chromosphere holds genuine promise for distinguishing between competing models for chromospheric heating in flares.

  12. Phosphorylation controls the localization and activation of the lumenal carbonic anhydrase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Blanco-Rivero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cah3 is the only carbonic anhydrase (CA isoform located in the thylakoid lumen of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Previous studies demonstrated its association with the donor side of the photosystem II (PSII where it is required for the optimal function of the water oxidizing complex. However this enzyme has also been frequently proposed to perform a critical function in inorganic carbon acquisition and CO(2 fixation and all mutants lacking Cah3 exhibit very poor growth after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: In the present work we demonstrate that after transfer to low CO(2, Cah3 is phosphorylated and that phosphorylation is correlated to changes in its localization and its increase in activity. When C. reinhardtii wild-type cells were acclimated to limiting CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 activity increased about 5-6 fold. Under these conditions, there were no detectable changes in the level of the Cah3 polypeptide. The increase in activity was specifically inhibited in the presence of Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, suggesting that the Cah3 protein was post-translationally regulated via phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro dephosphorylation experiments confirm this hypothesis. In vivo phosphorylation analysis of thylakoid polypeptides indicates that there was a 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation signal of the Cah3 polypeptide within the first two hours after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. The increase in the phosphorylation signal was correlated with changes in the intracellular localization of the Cah3 protein. Under high CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 protein was only associated with the donor side of PSII in the stroma thylakoids. In contrast, in cells grown at limiting CO(2 the protein was partly concentrated in the thylakoids crossing the pyrenoid, which did not contain PSII and were surrounded by Rubisco molecules. SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a CA being post

  13. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  14. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF A Ca (II COORDINATION POLYMER BASED ON 3-AMINO-2-PYRAZINECARBOXYLIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XI-SHI TAI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new Ca(II coordination polymer has been obtained by reaction of Ca(ClO42·H2O with 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid in CH3CH2OH/H2O. It was characterized by IR, 1HNMR, thermal analysis and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. X-ray analysis reveals that each Ca(II center is seven-coordination with a N2O5 distorted pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. The Ca(II ions are linked through the O atoms of 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid ligands to form 1D chain structure. And then a 3D network structure is constructed by hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking. The antitumor activity of 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid ligand and its Ca(II coordination polymer against human intestinal adenocarcinoma HCT-8 cells, lung adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells line have been investigated.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of the competitive binding of Eu(III), Ca(II), and Cu(II) to a sedimentary originated humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marang, L.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA Saclay, Nucl Energy Div, DPC SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Marang, L.; Benedetti, M.F. [Univ Paris 07, Lab Geochim Eaux, IPGP UMR CNRS 7154, F-75205 Paris 13 (France); Eidner, S.; Kumke, M.U. [Univ Potsdam, Inst Chem, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The competition between REE, alkaline earth and d-transition metals for organic matter binding sites is still an open field of research; particularly, the mechanisms governing these phenomena need to be characterized in more detail. In this study, we examine spectroscopically the mechanisms of competitive binding of Eu(III)/Cu(II) and Eu(III)/Ca(II) pair to Gorleben humic acid (HA), as previously proposed in the framework of the NICA-Donnan model. The evolution of time-resolved laser induced luminescence spectra of humic-complexed Eu(Ill) showed two strikingly different environments for a comparable bound proportion for Cu(II) and Ca(II). Cu(II) seems to compete more effectively with Eu(III) inducing its release into the Donnan phase, and into the bulk solution as free Eu{sup 3+}. This is evidenced both by the shapes of the spectra and by the decrease in the luminescence decay times. In contrast with that, Ca(II) induces a modification of the HA structure, which enhances the luminescence of humic-bound Eu(III), and causes a minor modification of the chemical environment of the complexed rare earth ion. (authors)

  16. Shaping of action potentials by type I and type II large-conductance Ca²+-activated K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, D B; Wang, B; Brenner, R

    2011-09-29

    The BK channel is a Ca(2+) and voltage-gated conductance responsible for shaping action potential waveforms in many types of neurons. Type II BK channels are differentiated from type I channels by their pharmacology and slow gating kinetics. The β4 accessory subunit confers type II properties on BK α subunits. Empirically derived properties of BK channels, with and without the β4 accessory subunit, were obtained using a heterologous expression system under physiological ionic conditions. These data were then used to study how BK channels alone (type I) and with the accessory β4 subunit (type II) modulate action potential properties in biophysical neuron models. Overall, the models support the hypothesis that it is the slower kinetics provided by the β4 subunit that endows the BK channel with type II properties, which leads to broadening of action potentials and, secondarily, to greater recruitment of SK channels reducing neuronal excitability. Two regions of parameter space distinguished type II and type I effects; one where the range of BK-activating Ca(2+) was high (>20 μM) and the other where BK-activating Ca(2+) was low (∼0.4-1.2 μM). The latter required an elevated BK channel density, possibly beyond a likely physiological range. BK-mediated sharpening of the spike waveform associated with the lack of the β4 subunit was sensitive to the properties of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels due to electrogenic effects on spike duration. We also found that depending on Ca(2+) dynamics, type II BK channels may have the ability to contribute to the medium AHP, a property not generally ascribed to BK channels, influencing the frequency-current relationship. Finally, we show how the broadening of action potentials conferred by type II BK channels can also indirectly increase the recruitment of SK-type channels decreasing the excitability of the neuron.

  17. Desorption of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on extracellular polymeric substances: effects of pH, EDTA, Ca(II) and temperature shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) existed ubiquitously in biological systems affect the mobility and availability of heavy metals in the environments. The adsorption-desorption behaviors of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on EPS were investigated. The sorption rates follow Sb(V) > Hg(II), and the desorption rates follow reverse order. Applications of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Ca(II) and pH shocks affect desorption rates and desorbed quantities of Hg(II) from EPS-Hg complex. Temperature shock minimally affects the desorption rate of Hg(II). Conversely, the EPS-Sb complex is stable subjected to EDTA, Ca(II), temperature or pH shocks. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and fast-Fourier (FT-IR) analysis showed that Hg(II) and Sb(V) principally interacted with polysaccharides and protein-like compounds in the EPS, respectively. The EPS-Hg complex presents a time bomb that may release high levels of Hg(II) in short time period under environmental shocks.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the Co(II) and Ni(II) ions removal from aqueous solutions by Ca-Mg phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanets, A I; Srivastava, V; Kitikova, N V; Shashkova, I L; Sillanpää, M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the sorption kinetics and thermodynamics of Co(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions by sorbents on the basis of hydrogen (PD-1) and tertiary (PD-2) Ca-Mg phosphates depending on the solution temperature and sorbents chemical composition. Kinetic studies of adsorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions onto samples of phosphate sorbents were performed in batch experiment at the temperatures 288, 303, 318 and 333 K. The sorbent dose was fixed at 10 g L(-1), initial pH value 2.6, and contact time varied from 5 to 600 min. The kinetics of Co(II) and Ni(II) adsorption were analyzed by using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) for the sorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) were determined using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. The calculated kinetic parameters and corresponding correlation coefficients revealed that Co(II) and Ni(II) uptake process followed the pseudo-second order rate expression. Thermodynamic studies confirmed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of removal process which indicate that sorption of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions onto both phosphate sorbents is favoured at higher temperatures and has the chemisorptive mechanism. The data thus obtained would be useful for practical application of the low cost and highly effective Ca-Mg phosphate sorbents.

  19. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. METHODS: Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. RESULTS: In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  20. Screening and docking studies of natural phenolic inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huo-Qiang; PAN Xu-Lin; JI Chang-Jiu; ZENG Guang-Zhi; JIANG Li-Hua; FU Xiang; LIU Ji-Kai; HAO Xiao-Jiang; ZHANG Ying-Jun; TAN Ning-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ (CAⅡ) is an Important enzyme complex with Zn2+, which is involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as calcification, glaucoma and tumorigenicity. In order to search for novel inhibitors of CA Ⅱ, inhibition assay of carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ was performed, by which seven natural phenolic compounds, including four phenolics (grifolln, 4-O-methyl-grifolic acid, grifolic acid, and isovanillic acid) and three flavones (eriodictyol, quercetin and puerin A), showed in-hibitory activities against CAⅡ with IC50s in the range of 6.37-71.73 μmol/L. Grifolic acid is the most active one with IC50 of 6.37 μmol/L. These seven phenolic compounds were proved to be novel natural carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ inhibitors, which were obtained in flexible docking study with GOLD 3.0 soft-ware. Results indicated that the aliphatic chain and polar groups of hydroxyl and carboxyl are impor-tant to their inhibitory activities, providing a new insight into study on CA Ⅱ potent inhibitors.

  1. Cloning, characterization, and sulfonamide and thiol inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Capaci Rodrigues, Giseli; Scozzafava, Andrea; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Parkkila, Seppo; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-02-28

    An α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has been identified, cloned, and characterized from the unicellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The enzyme (TcCA) has a very high catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, being similar kinetically to the human (h) isoform hCA II, although it is devoid of the His64 proton shuttle. A large number of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and some 5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazoles were investigated as TcCA inhibitors. The aromatic sulfonamides were weak inhibitors (K(I) values of 192 nM to 84 μM), whereas some heterocyclic compounds inhibited the enzyme with K(I) values in the range 61.6-93.6 nM. The thiols were the most potent in vitro inhibitors (K(I) values of 21.1-79.0 nM), and some of them also inhibited the epimastigotes growth of two T. cruzi strains in vivo.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) diclofenac sodium complexes as anti-inflammatory drug and their protective effects on renal functions impairment and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hamza, Reham Z; Refat, Moamen S

    2015-01-25

    The main task of our present study is the preparation of newly complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) with diclofenac which succeeded to great extent in alleviating the side effects of diclofenac alone and ameliorating the kidney function parameters and antioxidant capacities with respect to diclofenac treated group alone. The Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) with diclofenac have been synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic and (1)H NMR spectral, thermogravimetric and conductivity measurements. The diclofenac ligand has been found to act as bidentate chelating agent. Diclofenac complexes coordinate through the oxygen's of the carboxyl group. The molar ratio chelation is 1:2 (M(2+)-dic) with general formula [M(dic)2(H2O)2]⋅nH2O. Antibacterial screening of the alkaline earth metal complexes against Escherichia coli (Gram-ve), Bacillus subtilis (Gram+ve) and anti-fungal (Asperagillus oryzae, Asperagillus niger, Asperagillus flavus) were investigated. The kidney functions in male albino rats were ameliorated upon treatment with metal complexes of dic, which are represented by decreasing the levels of urea and uric acid to be located within normal values. The other looks bright spot in this article is the assessment of antioxidant defense system including SOD, CAT and MDA with the help of Sr(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)-dic complexes. The hormones related to kidney functions and stresses have been greatly ameliorated in groups treated with dic complexes in comparable with dic treated group.

  3. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  4. An ultra fast detection method reveals strain-induced Ca(2+) entry via TRPV2 in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fois, Giorgio; Wittekindt, Oliver; Zheng, Xing; Felder, Erika Tatiana; Miklavc, Pika; Frick, Manfred; Dietl, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2012-09-01

    A commonly used technique to investigate strain-induced responses of adherent cells is culturing them on an elastic membrane and globally stretching the membrane. However, it is virtually impossible to acquire microscopic images immediately after the stretch with this method. Using a newly developed technique, we recorded the strain-induced increase of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in rat primary alveolar type II (ATII) cells at an acquisition rate of 30ms and without any temporal delay. We can show that the onset of the mechanically induced rise in [Ca(2+)](c) was very fast (<30 ms), and Ca(2+) entry was immediately abrogated when the stimulus was withdrawn. This points at a direct mechanical activation of an ion channel. RT-PCR revealed high expression of TRPV2 in ATII cells, and silencing TRPV2, as well as blocking TRPV channels with ruthenium red, significantly reduced the strain-induced Ca(2+) response. Moreover, the usually homogenous pattern of the strain-induced [Ca(2+)](c) increase was converted into a point-like response after both treatments. Also interfering with actin/myosin and integrin binding inhibited the strain-induced increase of [Ca(2)](c). We conclude that TRPV2 participates in strain-induced Ca(2+) entry in ATII cells and suggest a direct mechanical activation of the channel that depends on FAs and actin/myosin. Furthermore, our results underline the importance of cell strain systems that allow high temporal resolution.

  5. Fluxes in H\\alpha and Ca II H and K for a sample of Southern stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cincunegui, C; Mauas, P J D; Cincunegui, Carolina; D\\'iaz, Rodrigo F.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2007-01-01

    The main chromospheric activity indicator is the S index, which is esentially the ratio of the flux in the core of the Ca II H and K lines to the continuum nearby, and is well studied basically for stars from F to K. Another usual chromospheric proxy is the H\\alpha line, which is beleived to be tightly correlated with the Ca II index. In this work we characterize both chromospheric activity indicators, one associated with the H and K Ca II lines and the other with H\\alpha, for the whole range of late type stars, from F to M. We present periodical medium-resolution echelle observations covering the complete visual range, which were taken at the CASLEO Argentinean Observatory. These observations are distributed along 7 years. We use a total of 917 flux-calibrated spectra for 109 stars which range from F6 to M5. We statistically study these two indicators for stars of different activity levels and spectral types. We directly derive the conversion factor which translate the known S index to flux in the Ca II core...

  6. The NIR Ca II triplet at low metallicity : Searching for extremely low-metallicity stars in classical dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, E.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J.I.; Irwin, M.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Jablonka, P.; Tafelmeyer, M.; Shetrone, M.; Venn, K.; de Boer, T.

    2010-01-01

    The NIR Ca II triplet absorption lines have proven to be an important tool for quantitative spectroscopy of individual red giant branch stars in the Local Group, providing a better understanding of metallicities of stars in the Milky Way and dwarf galaxies and thereby an opportunity to constrain the

  7. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  8. Ca(II) Binding Regulates and Dominates the Reactivity of a Transition-Metal-Ion-Dependent Diesterase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Larrabee, James A; Ely, Fernanda; Gwee, Shuhui E; Mitić, Nataša; Ollis, David L; Gahan, Lawrence R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2016-01-18

    The diesterase Rv0805 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a dinuclear metallohydrolase that plays an important role in signal transduction by controlling the intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides. As Rv0805 is essential for mycobacterial growth it is a promising new target for the development of chemotherapeutics to treat tuberculosis. The in vivo metal-ion composition of Rv0805 is subject to debate. Here, we demonstrate that the active site accommodates two divalent transition metal ions with binding affinities ranging from approximately 50 nm for Mn(II) to about 600 nm for Zn(II) . In contrast, the enzyme GpdQ from Enterobacter aerogenes, despite having a coordination sphere identical to that of Rv0805, binds only one metal ion in the absence of substrate, thus demonstrating the significance of the outer sphere to modulate metal-ion binding and enzymatic reactivity. Ca(II) also binds tightly to Rv0805 (Kd ≈40 nm), but kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic data indicate that two Ca(II) ions bind at a site different from the dinuclear transition-metal-ion binding site. Ca(II) acts as an activator of the enzymatic activity but is able to promote the hydrolysis of substrates even in the absence of transition-metal ions, thus providing an effective strategy for the regulation of the enzymatic activity.

  9. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  10. Urotensin II induction of neonatal cardiomyocyte hypertrophy involves the CaMKII/PLN/SERCA 2a signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongtao; Han, Qinghua; Xu, Jianrong; Liu, Wenyuan; Chu, Tingting; Zhao, Li

    2016-05-25

    Although studies have shown that Urotensin II (UII) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model has been widely used for hypertrophy research, but its precise mechanism remains unknown. Recent researches have demonstrated that UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy has a relationship with the changes of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by UII and to explore whether the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated up-regulating of phospholamban (PLN) Thr17-phosphorylation signaling pathway contributed to UII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated for 48h with UII. Cell size, protein/DNA contents and intracellular Ca(2+) were determined. Phosphorylated and total forms of CaMKII, PLN and the total amount of serco/endo-plasmic reticulum ATPases (SERCA 2a) were quantified by western blot. The responses of cardiomyocytes to UII were also evaluated after pretreatment with the CaMKII inhibitor, KN-93. These results showed that UII increased cell size, protein/DNA ratio and intracellular Ca(2+), consistent with a hypertrophic response. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of CaMKII and its downstream target PLN (Thr17), SERCA 2a levels were up-regulated by UII treatment. Conversely, treatment with KN-93 reversed all those effects of UII. Taken together, the results suggest that UII can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through CaMKII-mediated up-regulating of PLN Thr17-phosphorylation signaling pathway.

  11. Chromospheric Diagnosis with Ca II Lines: Forward Modeling in Forward Scattering. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, E. S.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the Ca II 8498, 8542, and 3934 Å lines by solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem of the second kind in a three-dimensional atmosphere model obtained from realistic magneto-hydrodynamical simulations. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy, and the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthesize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at the disk center. This allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization in order to discriminate them observationally. Our results suggest some ideas for chromospheric diagnosis that will be developed throughout a series of papers. In particular, Hanle polarity inversion lines and dynamic Hanle diagrams are two concepts introduced in the present work. We find that chromospheric dynamics and magnetic field topology create spatial polarization fingerprints that trace the dynamic situation of the plasma and the magnetic field. This allows us to reconstruct the magnetic field intensity in the middle chromosphere using Stokes V along grooves of null linear polarization. We finally address the problems of diagnosing Hanle saturation and kinematic amplification of scattering signals using Hanle diagrams.

  12. A STIS Atlas of CaII Triplet Absorption Line Kinematics in Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Batcheldor, D; Valluri, M; Mandalou, J; Merritt, D

    2013-01-01

    The relations observed between supermassive black holes and their host galaxies suggest a fundamental link in the processes that cause these two objects to evolve. A more comprehensive understanding of these relations could be gained by increasing the number of supermassive black hole mass (M) measurements. This can be achieved, in part, by continuing to model the stellar dynamics at the centers of galactic bulges using data of the highest possible spatial resolution. Consequently, we present here an atlas of galaxies in the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) data archive that may have spectra suitable for new M estimates. Archived STIS G750M data for all non-barred galactic bulges are co-aligned and combined, where appropriate, and the radial signal-to-noise ratios calculated. The line-of-sight velocity distributions from the CaII triplet are then determined using a maximum penalized likelihood method. We find 19 out of 42 galaxies may provide useful new M estimates since they are found to have data...

  13. Observational Searches for Chromospheric -Mode Oscillations from CaII H-Line Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Kariyappa; L. Damé; K. M. Hiremath

    2006-06-01

    We have used a high spatial and temporal resolution of long time sequence of spectra in CaII H-line obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) of the Sacramento Peak Observatory on a quiet region at the center of the solar disk over a large number of bright points and network elements to search for atmospheric (chromospheric) -mode oscillations. An important parameter of the H-line profile, intensity at H2V(IH2V), has been derived from a large number of line profiles. We derived the light curves of all the bright points and network elements. The light curves represent the main pulse with large intensity amplitude and followed by several follower pulses with lower intensity amplitudes. The light curves of these bright points would give an impression that one can as well draw curves towards and away from the highest peak (main pulse) showing an exponential growth and decay of the amplitudes. An exponential decaying function has been fitted for all the light curves of the bright points to determine the damping time of the modes that are more or less the same, and one value of the coefficient of exponent can represent reasonably well the decay for all the cases. The FFT analysis of temporal variation of both the bright points and the network elements indicates around 10-min periodicity. We speculate that this longer period of oscillation may be related to chromospheric -mode oscillations.

  14. The Appearance of Spicules in High Resolution Observations of Ca II H and H-alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Tiago M D; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Solar spicules are chromospheric fibrils that appear everywhere on the Sun, yet their origin is not understood. Using high resolution observations of spicules obtained with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope we aim to understand how spicules appear in filtergrams and Dopplergrams, how they compare in Ca II H and H-alpha, and what can make them appear and disappear. We find spicules display a rich and detailed spatial structure, and show a distribution of transverse velocities that when aligned with the line of sight can make them appear at different H-alpha wing positions. They become more abundant at positions closer to the line core, reflecting a distribution of Doppler shifts and widths. In H-alpha width maps they stand out as bright features both on disk and off-limb, reflecting their large Doppler motions and possibly higher temperatures than in the typical H-alpha formation region. Spicule lifetimes measured from narrowband images at only a few positions will be an underestimate because Doppler shifts can ...

  15. Ca II triplet spectroscopy of RGB stars in NGC 6822: kinematics and metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, Jesse; Tolstoy, Eline; Irwin, Mike J

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the chemistry and kinematics of red giants in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Spectroscopy at 8500 Angstroms was acquired for 72 red giant stars across two fields using FORS2 at the VLT. Line of sight extinction was individually estimated for each target star to accommodate the variable reddening across NGC 6822. The mean radial velocity was found to be v_helio = (52.8 +/- 2.2) km/s with dispersion rms = 24.1 km/s, in agreement with other studies. Ca II triplet equivalent widths were converted into [Fe/H] metallicities using a V magnitude proxy for surface gravity. The average metallicity was [Fe/H] = (-0.84 +/- 0.04) with dispersion rms = 0.31 dex and interquartile range 0.48. Our assignment of individual reddening values makes our analysis more sensitive to spatial variations in metallicity than previous studies. We divide our sample into metal-rich and metal-poor stars; the former are found to cluster towards small radii with the metal-poor stars more evenly distribut...

  16. ADSORPTION OF Ca(II FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ONTO CELLULOSIC FIBERS AND ITS IMPACT ON THE PAPERMAKING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxiang Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium(II is one of the most common metal ions in papermaking systems. However, the effect of Ca2+ on papermaking processes has not drawn much attention. The adsorption of Ca2+ from aqueous solutions onto bleached Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulp fibers was investigated. Thermodynamic results indicate that the adsorption of Ca2+ onto bleached E. globulus kraft pulp fibers was exothermic, reversible, and spontaneous. The equilibrium data followed Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption basically agrees with the ionic reaction model between carboxyl groups of fibers and Ca2+ in which the molar ratio of carboxyl to Ca2+ is close to 2:1. The binding capacity with carboxyl groups is so strong that the anionic charge of the adsorption sites in fibers can be screened, leading to decreased performance of cationic polyacrylamide for retention and drainage, Alkyl Ketene Dimer (AKD for sizing, and cationic starch for dry strength. The precipitation effect of Ca2+ with three kinds of dissolved and colloidal substances (sodium rosinate, sodium stearate, sodium oxalate also was investigated. The results showed that deposits formed by Ca2+ and dissolved and colloidal substances, which could adsorb to the surfaces of fibers, would affect drainage and retention abilities of cationic polyacrylamide.

  17. Pavlovian fear conditioning regulates Thr286 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at lateral amygdala synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; Farb, Claudia R; Bauer, Elizabeth P; LeDoux, Joseph E; Schafe, Glenn E

    2004-03-31

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation in a variety of learning systems and species. The present experiments examined the role of CaMKII in the circuitry underlying pavlovian fear conditioning. First, we reveal by immunocytochemical and tract-tracing methods that alphaCaMKII is postsynaptic to auditory thalamic inputs and colocalized with the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, we show that fear conditioning results in an increase of the autophosphorylated (active) form of alphaCaMKII in lateral amygdala (LA) spines. Next, we demonstrate that intra-amygdala infusion of a CaMK inhibitor, 1-[NO-bis-1,5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl-4-phenylpiperazine, KN-62, dose-dependently impairs the acquisition, but not the expression, of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Finally, in electrophysiological experiments, we demonstrate that an NMDA receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation at thalamic input synapses to the LA is impaired by bath application of KN-62 in vitro. Together, the results of these experiments provide the first comprehensive view of the role of CaMKII in the amygdala during fear conditioning.

  18. Screening and docking studies of natural phenolic inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ (CAⅡ) is an important enzyme complex with Zn2+,which is involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as calcification, glaucoma and tumorigenicity. In order to search for novel inhibitors of CAⅡ, inhibition assay of carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ was performed, by which seven natural phenolic compounds, including four phenolics (grifolin, 4-O-methyl-grifolic acid, grifolic acid, and isovanillic acid) and three flavones (eriodictyol, quercetin and puerin A), showed in-hibitory activities against CAⅡ with IC50s in the range of 6.37-71.73 μmol/L. Grifolic acid is the most active one with IC50 of 6.37 μmol/L. These seven phenolic compounds were proved to be novel natural carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ inhibitors, which were obtained in flexible docking study with GOLD 3.0 soft-ware. Results indicated that the aliphatic chain and polar groups of hydroxyl and carboxyl are impor-tant to their inhibitory activities, providing a new insight into study on CA Ⅱ potent inhibitors.

  19. Ca(II, Zn(II and Au(III sulfamethoxazole sulfa-drug complexes: Synthesis, spectroscopic and anticancer evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima A.I. Al-Khodir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein in this article, three new Ca(II, Zn(II and Au(III complexes of sulfamethoxazole (SZ (sulfa-drug have been synthesized for the first time. The sulfa-drugs have a great attentions because of their therapeutic applications against bacterial infections. The SZ complexes were discussed with the help of elemental analyses, molar conductance and spectroscopic instruments e.g. IR, 1H-NMR, and electronic spectra. Investigations of the infrared spectra of the SZ and their metal complexes indicated the vibrations due to the sulfonamido (SO2 and –NH and isoxazole (C=N groups are shifted with respect to the free molecule in line with their coordination to the metal. In case of calcium(II an zinc(II complexes, the coordination site of SZ are the sulfonyl oxygen and SO2-NH sulfonamide nitrogen, but in gold(III complex, the gold metal ions coordinates through the sulfonyl oxygen and isoxazole nitrogen. These complexes are formulated as: [Ca(SZ(Cl2].8H2O (1, [Zn(SZ(Cl2].2H2O (2 and [Au(SZ(Cl2].Cl (3. The molar conductance data reveals that both Ca(II and Zn(II complexes are non-electrolyte but gold(III complex is electrolyte. The morphological nano structures of SZ complexes were checked using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The gold(III complex was recorded good anticancer behavior against Human colon carcinoma (HCT-116 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2 cells.

  20. Intrinsic Thermodynamics and Structures of 2,4- and 3,4-Substituted Fluorinated Benzenesulfonamides Binding to Carbonic Anhydrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrienė, Asta; Smirnov, Alexey; Dudutienė, Virginija; Timm, David D; Matulienė, Jurgita; Michailovienė, Vilma; Zakšauskas, Audrius; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas

    2017-01-20

    The goal of rational drug design is to understand structure-thermodynamics correlations in order to predict the chemical structure of a drug that would exhibit excellent affinity and selectivity for a target protein. In this study we explored the contribution of added functionalities of benzenesulfonamide inhibitors to the intrinsic binding affinity, enthalpy, and entropy for recombinant human carbonic anhydrases (CA) CA I, CA II, CA VII, CA IX, CA XII, and CA XIII. The binding enthalpies of compounds possessing similar chemical structures and affinities were found to be very different, spanning a range from -90 to +10 kJ mol(-1) , and are compensated by a similar opposing entropy contribution. The intrinsic parameters of binding were determined by subtracting the linked protonation reactions. The sulfonamide group pKa values of the compounds were measured spectrophotometrically, and the protonation enthalpies were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Herein we describe the development of meta- or ortho-substituted fluorinated benzenesulfonamides toward the highly potent compound 10 h, which exhibits an observed dissociation constant value of 43 pm and an intrinsic dissociation constant value of 1.1 pm toward CA IX, an anticancer target that is highly overexpressed in various tumors. Fluorescence thermal shift assays, ITC, and X-ray crystallography were all applied in this work.

  1. Expression of proteins encoded by the Escherichia coli cyn operon: carbon dioxide-enhanced degradation of carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozliak, E I; Guilloton, M B; Gerami-Nejad, M; Fuchs, J A; Anderson, P M

    1994-09-01

    Cyanase catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give 2CO2. The cynS gene encoding cyanase, together with the cynT gene for carbonic anhydrase, is part of the cyn operon, the expression of which is induced in Escherichia coli by cyanate. The physiological role of carbonic anhydrase is to prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 (M.B. Guilloton, A.F. Lamblin, E. I. Kozliak, M. Gerami-Nejad, C. Tu, D. Silverman, P.M. Anderson, and J.A. Fuchs, J. Bacteriol. 175:1443-1451, 1993). A delta cynT mutant strain was extremely sensitive to inhibition of growth by cyanate and did not catalyze decomposition of cyanate (even though an active cyanase was expressed) when grown at a low pCO2 (in air) but had a Cyn+ phenotype at a high pCO2. Here the expression of these two enzymes in this unusual system for cyanate degradation was characterized in more detail. Both enzymes were found to be located in the cytosol and to be present at approximately equal levels in the presence of cyanate. A delta cynT mutant strain could be complemented with high levels of expressed human carbonic anhydrase II; however, the mutant defect was not completely abolished, perhaps because the E. coli carbonic anhydrase is significantly less susceptible to inhibition by cyanate than mammalian carbonic anhydrases. The induced E. coli carbonic anhydrase appears to be particularly adapted to its function in cyanate degradation. Active cyanase remained in cells grown in the presence of either low or high pCO2 after the inducer cyanate was depleted; in contrast, carbonic anhydrase protein was degraded very rapidly (minutes) at a high pCO2 but much more slowly (hours) at a low pCO2. A physiological significance of these observations is suggested by the observation that expression of carbonic anhydrase at a high pCO2 decreased the growth rate.

  2. Unveiling Vela - Time Variability of Interstellar Lines in the Direction of the Vela Supernova Remnant II. Na D and Ca II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L.; Reddy, Arumalla B. S.; Gupta, Ranjan; Muneer, S.; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-01-01

    In a survey conducted between 2011-12 of interstellar Na I D line profiles in the direction of the Vela supernova remnant, a few lines of sight showed dramatic changes in low velocity absorption components with respect to profiles from 1993-1994 reported by Cha & Sembach. Three stars - HD 63578, HD 68217 and HD 76161 showed large decrease in strength over the 1993-2012 interval. HD 68217 and HD 76161 are associated with the Vela SNR whereas HD 63578 is associated with γ2 Velorum wind bubble. Here, we present high spectral resolution observations of Ca II K lines obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) towards these three stars along with simultaneous observations of Na I D lines. These new spectra confirm that the Na D interstellar absorption weakened drastically between 1993-1994 and 2011-2012 but show for the first time that the Ca II K line is unchanged between 1993-1994 and 2015. This remarkable contrast between the behaviour of Na D and Ca II K line absorption lines is a puzzle concerning gas presumably affected by the outflow from the SNR and the wind from γ2 Velorum.

  3. Physicochemical impact studies of gamma rays on "aspirin" analgesics drug and its metal complexes in solid form: Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological assessment of Ca(II), Mg(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) aspirinate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Sharshar, T.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.; Heiba, Zein K.

    2013-09-01

    Metal aspirinate complexes, M2(Asp)4, where M is Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) or Ba(II) are formed by refluxed of aspirin (Asp) with divalent non-transition metal ions of group (II) and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic measurements (infrared, electronic, 1H NMR, Raman, X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Elemental analysis of the chelates suggests the stoichiometry is 1:2 (metal:ligand). Infrared spectra of the complexes agree with the coordination to the central metal atom through three donation sites of two oxygen atoms of bridge bidentate carboxylate group and oxygen atom of sbnd Cdbnd O of acetyl group. Infrared spectra coupled with the results of elemental analyzes suggested a distorted octahedral structure for the M(II) aspirinate complexes. Gamma irradiation was tested as a method for stabilization of aspirin as well as their complexes. The effect of gamma irradiation, with dose of 80 Gy, on the properties of aspirinate complexes was studied. The aspirinate chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial activity than the free aspirin chelate.

  4. Ca II 854.2 nm Spectromagnetograms: A Powerful Chromospheric Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.; Bertello, Luca; Branston, D.; Britanik, J.; Bulau, S.; Cole, L.; Gosain, Sanjay; Harker, Brian; Jones, Harrison P.; Marble, A.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Pevtsov, A.; Schramm, K.; Streander, Kim; Villegas, H.

    2016-05-01

    The transition from physical dominance by plasma flows in the photosphere to magnetic pressure in the solar chromosphere motivates as many diagnostic observations as possible across this important region. Among the few ground-accessible spectral lines formed within the chromosphere, the Ca II 854.2 nm line has the desirable properties of presence everywhere on the solar disk, Zeeman sensitivity, and narrow line width. Mapped observations of circular polarization within this line (spectromagnetograms) have been made at NSO infrequently since 1974, with regular daily full-disk observations starting in August 1996. Full-disk spectral observations of the complete Stokes polarization vector are now being made regularly since November 2015. It is not easy to estimate chromospheric magnetic field properties from the 854.2 nm line profile polarization. To provide rough quick-look vector field maps we found that the weak-field approximation provides a fair first estimate of the line-of-sight component but appears to be too simple to interpret the transverse magnetic field from frequently asymmetric, linearly-polarized line profiles. More realistic estimates of the chromospheric vector field, short of extremely lengthy, full 3D, non-local radiative transfer inversions, are being investigated. We briefly introduce recent instrumental modifications and observational characteristics, sample observations, and results concerning the expansion of the chromospheric field with increasing height, the presence of large areas of weak, nearly horizontal fields, and field estimates in plages, sunspots, flares, filaments, and filament channels. The Stokes spectra will be freely available to the community.This work utilizes SOLIS data obtained by the NSO Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP), managed by the National Solar Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  5. Ca II triplet spectroscopy of RGB stars in NGC 6822: kinematics and metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J.; Cole, A. A.; Tolstoy, E.; Irwin, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the chemistry and kinematics of red giants in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Spectroscopy at ≈8500 Å was acquired for 72 red giant stars across two fields using FORS2 at the VLT. Line-of-sight extinction was individually estimated for each target star to accommodate the variable reddening across NGC 6822. The mean radial velocity was found to be = -52.8 ± 2.2 km s-1 with dispersion σv = 24.1 km s-1, in agreement with other studies. Ca II triplet equivalent widths were converted into [Fe/H] metallicities using a V magnitude proxy for surface gravity. The average metallicity was = -0.84 ± 0.04 with dispersion σ = 0.31 dex and interquartile range 0.48. Our assignment of individual reddening values makes our analysis more sensitive to spatial variations in metallicity than previous studies. We divide our sample into metal-rich and metal-poor stars; the former were found to cluster towards small radii with the metal-poor stars more evenly distributed across the galaxy. The velocity dispersion of the metal-poor stars was found to be higher than that of the metal-rich stars (σ _{v_MP}=27.4 km s-1; σ _{v_MR}=21.1 km s-1); combined with the age-metallicity relation this indicates that the older populations have either been dynamically heated during their lifetimes or were born in a less disc-like distribution than the younger stars.. The low ratio vrot/σv suggests that within the inner 10 arcmin, NGC 6822's stars are dynamically decoupled from the H I gas, and possibly distributed in a thick disc or spheroid structure.

  6. Stimulation of fibroblast proliferation by neokyotorphin requires Ca influx and activation of PKA, CaMK II and MAPK/ERK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V; Blishchenko, Elena Yu; Tolmazova, Anna G; Khachin, Dmitry P; Leontiev, Konstantin V; Karelin, Andrey A; Ivanov, Vadim T

    2007-01-01

    Neokyotorphin [TSKYR, hemoglobin alpha-chain fragment (137-141)] has previously been shown to enhance fibroblast proliferation, its effect depending on cell density and serum level. Here we show the dependence of the effect of neokyotorphin on cell type and its correlation with the effect of protein kinase A (PKA) activator 8-Br-cAMP, but not the PKC activator 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA). In L929 fibroblasts, the proliferative effect of neokyotorphin was suppressed by the Ca2+ L-type channel inhibitors verapamil or nifedipine, the intracellular Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester, kinase inhibitors H-89 (PKA), KN-62 (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) and PD98059 (mitogen-activated protein kinase). The proliferative effect of 8-Br-cAMP was also suppressed by KN-62 and PD98059. PKC suppression (downregulation with PMA or inhibition with bisindolylmaleimide XI) did not affect neokyotorphin action. The results obtained point to a cAMP-like action for neokyotorphin.

  7. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Gwan Lee

    Full Text Available Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine, is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3 with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg

  8. Knock-down of hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases IX and XII radiosensitizes tumor cells by increasing intracellular acidosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between acidosis within the tumor microenvironment and radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells remains unclear. Previously we reported that hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases (CA) IX and CAXII constitute a robust intracellular pH (pHi)-regulating system that confers a survival advantage on hypoxic human colon carcinoma LS174Tr cells in acidic microenvironments. Here we investigate the role of acidosis, CAIX and CAXII knock-down in combination with ionizing radiation. Fibrobla...

  9. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Tori A.; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W.; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI ...

  10. A Butterfly Diagram and Carrington Maps for Century-long CA II K Spectroheliograms from The Kodaikanal Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Subhamoy; Banerjee, Dipankar; Ravindra, B.

    2016-08-01

    The century-long (1907-2007) Ca ii K spectroheliograms from the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory (KSO) are calibrated, processed, and analyzed to follow the evolution of the bright on-disc structures called plages, possible representatives of magnetic activity on the Sun. This is the longest data set studied in Ca ii K to date, covering about 9.5 cycles of 11 yr periods. Plages are segmented with area ≥slant 1 {{arcmin}}2 using global thresholds for individual full disc images and subsequent application of a morphological closing operation. The plage index is calculated and is seen to have a close positive correlation with the fractional disc area covered by plages. The newly generated plage area cycle (from KSO) was compared with the same from the Mount Wilson Observatory (correlation 95.6%) for the overlapping years, i.e., 1915-2000. This study illustrates the time-latitude distribution of plage centroids by rendering a butterfly diagram (as observed for sunspots). The 3D visualization of the diagram shows one-to-one mapping between plage location, time, and area. This work further delineates the positional correlation between magnetic patches and plage regions through the comparison of synoptic maps derived from both KSO Ca ii K images and space-based full disc line-of-sight magnetograms. Regular synoptic magnetograms from ground-based observatories are available only after 1970s. Thus the long term Ca ii K data from KSO can be used as a proxy for estimating magnetic activity locations and their strengths at earlier times.

  11. Simulations of the Mg II k and Ca II 8542 lines from an AlfvÉn Wave-heated Flare Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Graham S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay.; Russell, Alexander J. B.; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamic simulations to examine two models of solar flare chromospheric heating: Alfvén wave dissipation and electron beam collisional losses. Both mechanisms are capable of strong chromospheric heating, and we show that the distinctive atmospheric evolution in the mid-to-upper chromosphere results in Mg ii k-line emission that should be observably different between wave-heated and beam-heated simulations. We also present Ca ii 8542 Å profiles that are formed slightly deeper in the chromosphere. The Mg ii k-line profiles from our wave-heated simulation are quite different from those from a beam-heated model and are more consistent with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph observations. The predicted differences between the Ca ii 8542 Å in the two models are small. We conclude that careful observational and theoretical study of lines formed in the mid-to-upper chromosphere holds genuine promise for distinguishing between competing models for chromospheric heating in flares.

  12. Efficient biosorption of lead(II) and cadmium(II) ions from aqueous solutions by functionalized cell with intracellular CaCO3 mineral scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoming; Cui, Weigang; Yang, Lin; Yang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Huifeng; Wang, Kui

    2015-06-01

    The functionalized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell with biogenic intracellular CaCO3 mineral scaffold, synthesized via a simple and environmentally friendly approach, was efficient for removing lead (II) and cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solutions. The CaCO3 mineral scaffold could promote the uptake of the heavy metal ions and increase the biosorption capabilities of the adsorbent. Compared with the Freundlich isotherm, Langmuir model more fitted the equilibrium data. The maximum removal capacity of functionalized cells for Pb(II) and Cd(II) was 116.69 and 42.63mgg(-1), respectively. Further investigation showed that the adsorbent had high removal efficiency for trace amount of heavy metal ions. Adsorption data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion kinetics equations. The results indicated that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and intra-particle diffusion model could better describe the adsorption kinetics. The heavy metal ions might be removed by functionalized cells via membrane transport of metal ions and precipitation transformation.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and anticancer studies of metal-antibiotic chelations: Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) chloramphenicol complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khodir, Fatima A. I.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2016-09-01

    Four Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) complexes of chloramphenicol drug have been synthesized and well characterized using elemental analyses, (infrared, electronic, and 1H-NMR) spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurement, and thermal analyses. Infrared spectral data show that the chloramphenicol drug coordinated to Ca(II), Pd(II) and Au(III) metal ions through two hydroxyl groups with 1:1 or 1:2 M ratios, but Fe(III) ions chelated towards chloramphenicol drug via the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of amide group with 1:2 ratio based on presence of keto↔enol form. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to identify the nano-size particles of both iron(III) and gold(III) chloramphenicol complexes. The antimicrobial assessments of the chloramphenicol complexes were scanned and collected the results against of some kind of bacteria and fungi. The cytotoxic activity of the gold(III) complex was tested against the human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2) tumor cell lines.

  14. Empirical calibration of the near-IR Ca II triplet - I. The stellar library and index definition

    CERN Document Server

    Cenarro, A J; Gorgas, J; Peletier, R F; Vazdekis, A; Prada, F

    2001-01-01

    A new stellar library at the near-IR spectral region developed for the empirical calibration of the Ca II triplet and stellar population synthesis modeling is presented. The library covers the range 8348-9020 Angstrom at 1.5 Angstrom (FWHM) spectral resolution, and consists of 706 stars spanning a wide range in atmospheric parameters. We have defined a new set of near-IR indices, CaT*, CaT and PaT, which mostly overcome the limitations of previous definitions, the former being specially suited for the measurement of the Ca II triplet strength corrected for the contamination from Paschen lines. We also present a comparative study of the new and the previous calcium indices, as well as the corresponding transformations between the different systems. A thorough analysis of the sources of index errors and the procedure to calculate them is given. Finally, index and error measurements for the whole stellar library are provided together with the final spectra.

  15. The behaviour of the excess CaII H & K and H$\\varepsilon$ emissions in chromospherically active binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, D; Cornide, M; De Castro, E

    1995-01-01

    In this work we analyze the behaviour of the excess Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K and H\\epsilon emissions in a sample of 73 chromospherically active binary systems (RS~CVn and BY~Dra classes), of different activity levels and luminosity classes. This sample includes the 53 stars analyzed by Fern\\'andez-Figueroa et al. (1994) and the observations of 28 systems described by Montes et al. (1995c). By using the spectral subtraction technique (subtraction of a synthesized stellar spectrum constructed from reference stars of spectral type and luminosity class similar to those of the binary star components) we obtain the active-chromosphere contribution to the Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K lines in these 73 systems. We have determined the excess Ca~{\\sc ii} H \\& K emission equivalent widths and converted them into surface fluxes. The emissions arising from each component were obtained when it was possible to deblend both contributions. We have found that the components of active binaries are generally stronger emitters than s...

  16. Intracellular angiotensin II elicits Ca2+ increases in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Brailoiu, E; Kok, JW; Henning, RH; De Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, SA

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies show that angiotensin II can act within the cell, possibly via intracellular receptors pharmacologically different from typical plasma membrane angiotensin II receptors. The signal transduction of intracellular angiotensin LI is unclear. Therefore. we investigated the effects of intra

  17. Comparison of amino and epoxy functionalized SBA-15 used for carbonic anhydrase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiaoyao; Chen, Shaoyun; Liu, Dai; Huang, Chunjie; Zhang, Yongchun

    2016-09-01

    Two functionalized SBA-15 [amine-functionalized SBA-15 (AFS) and epoxy-functionalized SBA-15 (GFS)] with different types of functional groups were synthesized by a hydrothermal process and post functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), respectively. They were used for the immobilization of carbonic anhydrase (CA). The physicochemical properties of the functionalized SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, (13)C, (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Before and after CA was immobilized on AFS and GFS, the effects of temperature and pH value on the enzyme activity, storage stability, and reusability were investigated using para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) assay. CA/GFS showed a better performance with respect to storage stability and reusability than CA/AFS. Moreover, the amount of CaCO3 precipitated over CA/AFS was less than that precipitated over CA/GFS, which was almost equal to that precipitated over the free CA. The results indicate that the epoxy group is a more suitable functional group for covalent bonding with CA than the amino group, and GFS is a promising support for CA immobilization.

  18. Angiotensin II increases nerve-evoked contractions in mouse tail artery by a T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Trent F; Callaghan, Brid P; Brock, James A

    2015-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) increases sympathetic nerve-evoked contractions of arterial vessels. Here the mechanisms underlying this effect were investigated in mouse tail artery. Isometrically mounted segments of mouse distal tail artery were used to investigate the effects of endothelium denudation, blocking Ca(2+) channels and inhibiting superoxide signalling on Ang II-induced facilitation of nerve-evoked contractions. In addition, in situ amperometry was used to assess effects of Ang II on noradrenaline release. Ang II (0.1-1nM) increased nerve-evoked contractions but did not change noradrenaline release. Losartan (Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist), but not PD 123319 (Ang II type 2 receptor antagonist), blocked the facilitatory effect of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions. Ang II increased vascular muscle reactivity to phenylephrine and UK-14304 (α1- and α2-adrenoceptor agonists, respectively). Endothelial denudation increased nerve-evoked contractions and reduced the facilitatory effect of Ang II on these responses. Efonidipine (L- and T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and NNC 55-0396 (T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) also attenuated this effect of Ang II, while nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) did not. Blockers of superoxide generation/signalling did not change the facilitatory effect of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions. The findings indicate that Ang II increases the contribution of T-type Ca(2+) channels to neural activation of the vascular muscle. In addition, Ang II appears to reduce the inhibitory influence of the endothelium on nerve-evoked contractions.

  19. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars I: The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Ribas, Ignasi

    2016-01-01

    Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures, metallicity, and gravities avoiding the degeneracy present in photo...

  20. Synoptic and fast events on the sun according to observations at the center and wings of the Ca II K line at the Kislovodsk Mountain station patrol telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlatov, A. G.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Kirpichev, R. V.; Pashchenko, M. P.; Shramko, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations performed at the solar telescope-spectroheliograph, which has continuously automatically operated at MAS MAO RAS, were analyzed. Measurements of the activity index in the Ca II K line, which were performed according to the program of synoptic observations, are presented. The development of the solar flares observed at the center and on the wings of the Ca II K line was compared with observations in the X-ray and radio bands. It was shown that the time variations in the intensity in the 1-8 Å range according to the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellites' (GOES) data and in the Ca II K line are close to each other and that the total X-ray flux and Ca II K intensity amplitude substantially correlate during the entire flare.

  1. Malaria parasite carbonic anhydrase: inhibition of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and its therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2011-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) is responsible for the majority of life-threatening cases of human malaria, causing 1.5-2.7 million annual deaths. The global emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites necessitates identification and characterization of novel drug targets and their potential inhibitors. We identified the carbonic anhydrase (CA) genes in P. falciparum. The pfCA gene encodes anα-carbonic anhydrase, a Zn(2+)-metalloenzme, possessing catalytic properties distinct from that of the human host CA enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the pfCA enzyme is different from the analogous protozoan and human enzymes. A library of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing a large diversity of scaffolds were found to be very good inhibitors for the malarial enzyme at moderate-low micromolar and submicromolar inhibitions. The structure of the groups substituting the aromatic-ureido- or aromatic-azomethine fragment of the molecule and the length of the parent sulfonamide were critical parameters for the inhibitory properties of the sulfonamides. One derivative, that is, 4- (3, 4-dichlorophenylureido)thioureido-benzenesulfonamide (compound 10) was the most effective in vitro Plasmodium falciparum CA inhibitor, and was also the most effective antimalarial compound on the in vitro P. falciparum growth inhibition. The compound 10 was also effective in vivo antimalarial agent in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, an animal model of drug testing for human malaria infection. It is therefore concluded that the sulphonamide inhibitors targeting the parasite CA may have potential for the development of novel therapies against human malaria.

  2. Effect of lipid matrix and cytoskeleton proteins on Ca2+-activated K+ channels in erythrocytes of alcoholic and II type diabetes mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop'eva, V D; Petrova, I V; Sitozhevskii, A V; Kremeno, S V; Koryukin, V I; Baskakov, M B; Bokhan, N A; Novitskii, V V

    2002-10-01

    We studied the effect of changes in erythrocyte volume and irreversible thermal denaturation of cytoskeleton proteins and lipid matrix on activity of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels in erythrocytes of alcoholic and patients with II type diabetes mellitus. Changes in Ca(2+)-dependent potassium permeability of erythrocyte membrane in alcoholic patients and patients with II type diabetes mellitus are related to modification of cytoskeleton, rather than to changes in lipid matrix.

  3. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Antitumor Activity of a Ca(II Coordination Polymer Based on 1,6-Naphthalenedisulfonate and 4,4′-Bipyridyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xishi Tai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel Ca(II coordination polymer, [CaL(4,4′-bipyridyl(H2O4]n (L = 1,6-naphthalenedisulfonate, was synthesized by reaction of calcium perchlorate with 1,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt and 4,4′-bipyridyl in CH3CH2OH/H2O. It was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, molar conductivity and thermogravimetric analysis. X-ray crystallography reveals that the Ca(II coordination polymer belongs to the orthorhombic system, with space group P212121. The geometry of the Ca(II ion is a distorted CaNO6 pengonal bipyramid, arising from its coordination by four water molecules, one nitrogen atom of 4,4′-bipyridyl molecule, and two oxygen atoms from two L ligands. The complex molecules form a helical chain by self-assembly. The antitumor activity of 1,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt and the Ca(II coordination polymer against human hepatoma smmc-7721 cell line and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line reveals that the Ca(II coordination polymer inhibits cell growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line with IC50 value of 27 μg/mL, and is more resistive to human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line as compared to 1,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid disodium salt.

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase and Metalloderivatives: A Bioinorganic Chemistry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses selected bioinorganic aspects of carbonic anhydrase and describes experiments that will reinforce the students' understanding of the presence and essential role that metal ions have in some biological systems. (SL)

  5. Scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals for the CRESST-II and EURECA dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivers, Moritz v.; Ertl, Andreas; Guetlein, Achim; Lanfranchi, Jean-Come; Muenster, Andrea; Neumann, Felix; Potzel, Walter; Roth, Sabine; Schoenert, Stefan; Wawozcny, Stephan; Willers, Michael; Zoeller, Andreas [Physik Department, E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Erb, Andreas [Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperatur Forschung, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strauss, Raimund; Wuestrich, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The CRESST-II experiment for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter uses scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals that are operated as low-temperature detectors. EURECA is a joint collaboration of existing cryogenic direct dark matter searches to develop a future multi-material experiment with a target mass of up to one ton. While in the past crystals were obtained from external suppliers, we recently started producing CaWO{sub 4} single crystals with a dedicated Czochralski furnace at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen to have a direct influence on the radiopurity and scintillation properties. We present here an overview of the growth process as well as measurements of the crystals' scintillation properties and radiopurity.

  6. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.F. [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); Laranja, G.A.T. [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva-Neto, M.A.C. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil); Costa, S.C. Goncalves da [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Paes, M.C., E-mail: mcpaes@uerj.br [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil)

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  7. Influence of temperature and solvent concentration on the kinetics of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase in carbon capture technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: the primary amine monoethanolamine (MEA), the sterically hindered primary amine 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), the tertiary amine N......-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) and the carbonate salt solution K2CO3 were compared in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt% in a temperature range of 298–328 K with and without enzyme. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined...... and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) dramatically increases the liquid side mass transfer coefficient for MDEA, and K2CO3; AMP has a moderate increase whereas MEA was unchanged. The results confirm that just bicarbonate forming systems...

  8. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti α-Type Carbonic Anhydrase and Its Role in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an α-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically character...

  9. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca II triplet spectroscopy of open clusters II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245

    CERN Document Server

    Carrera, R; Ospina, N; Balaguer-Nuñez, L; Jordi, C; Monteagudo, L

    2015-01-01

    Context: Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R~8000) in the infrared region Ca II triplet lines (~8500 AA) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5~m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca II lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain = 48.6+/-3.4, -58.4+/-6.8, 26.0+/-4.3 and -65.3+/-3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603 and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [Fe/H] =-0.25+...

  10. Carbonic anhydrase: a key regulatory and detoxifying enzyme for Karst plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Qiang, Li; Schröder, Heinz C; Hönig, Natalie; Yuan, Daoxian; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Mussino, Francesca; Giovine, Marco; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Karstification is a rapid process during which calcidic stones/limestones undergo dissolution with the consequence of a desertification of karst regions. A slow-down of those dissolution processes of Ca-carbonate can be approached by a reforestation program using karst-resistant plants that can resist alkaline pH and higher bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) concentrations in the soil. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) are enzymes that mediate a rapid and reversible interconversion of CO₂ and HCO₃⁻. In the present study, the steady-state expression of a CA gene, encoding for the plant carbonic anhydrase from the parsley Petroselinum crispum, is monitored. The studies were primarily been performed during germination of the seeds up to the 12/14-day-old embryos. The CA cDNA was cloned. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis revealed that the gene expression level of the P. crispum CA is strongly and significantly affected at more alkaline pH in the growth medium (pH 8.3). This abolishing effect is counteracted both by addition of HCO₃⁻ and by addition of polyphosphate (polyP) to the culture medium. In response to polyP, the increased pH in the vacuoles of the growing plants is normalized. The effect of polyP let us to propose that this polymer acts as a buffer system that facilitates the adjustment of the pH in the cytoplasm. In addition, it is proposed that polyP has the potential to act, especially in the karst, as a fertilizer that allows the karstic plants to cope with the adverse pH and HCO₃⁻ condition in the soil.

  11. APE1/Ref-1 promotes the effect of angiotensin II on Ca2+ -activated K+ channel in human endothelial cells via suppression of NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won Sun; Ko, Eun A; Jung, In Duk; Son, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Nari; Park, So Youn; Hong, Ki Whan; Park, Yeong-Min; Choi, Tae-Hoon; Han, Jin

    2008-10-01

    The effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on whole-cell large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) currents was investigated in control and Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1)-overexpressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Ang II blocked the BK(Ca) current in a dose-dependent fashion, and this inhibition was greater in APE1/Ref-1-overexpressing HUVECs than in control HUVECs (half-inhibition values of 102.81+/-9.54 nM and 11.34+/-0.39 nM in control and APE1/Ref-1-overexpressing HUVECs, respectively). Pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) or knock down of NADPH oxidase (p22 phox) using siRNA increased the inhibitory effect of Ang II on the BK(Ca) currents, similar to the effect of APE1/Ref-1 overexpression. In addition, application of Ang II increased the superoxide and hydrogen peroxide levels in the control HUVECs but not in APE1/Ref-1-overexpressing HUVECs. Furthermore, direct application of hydrogen peroxide increased BK(Ca) channel activity. Finally, the inhibitory effect of Ang II on the BK(Ca) current was blocked by an antagonist of the Ang II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor in both control and APE1/Ref-1-overexpressing HUVECs. From these results, we conclude that the inhibitory effect of Ang II on BK(Ca) channel function is NADPH oxidase-dependent and may be promoted by APE1/Ref-1.

  12. RG-II from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer suppresses asthmatic reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Duk Jung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In asthma, T helper 2 (TH2-type cytokines such as interleukin(IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 are produced by activated CD4+ T cells.Dendritic cells played an important role in determining thefate of naïve T cells into either TH1 or TH2 cells. Wedetermined whether RG-II regulates the TH1/TH2 immuneresponse by using an ovalbumin-induced murine model ofasthma. RG-II reduced IL-4 production but increased interferon-gamma production, and inhibited GATA-3 geneexpression. RG-II also inhibited asthmatic reactions includingan increase in the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolarlavage fluid, an increase in inflammatory cell infiltration inlung tissues, airway luminal narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness.This study provides evidence that RG-II plays acritical role in ameliorating the pathogenic process ofasthmatic inflammation in mice. These findings provide newinsights into the immunotherapeutic role of RG-II in terms ofits effects in a murine model of asthma. [BMB reports 2012;45(2: 79-84

  13. Inhibition of the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Manole, Gheorghe; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly inhibited by weak acids although the mechanism by which these compounds act is not completely understood. A series of substituted benzoic acids, nipecotic acid, ortho- and para-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid were investigated as inhibitors of three β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from this pathogen, mtCA 1 (Rv1284), mtCA 2 (Rv3588c) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). All three enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the submicromolar to the micromolar one, depending on the scaffold present in the carboxylic acid. mtCA 3 was the isoform mostly inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s in the range of 0.11-0.97 µM); followed by mtCA 2 (K(I)s in the range of 0.59-8.10 µM), whereas against mtCA 1, these carboxylic acids showed inhibition constants in the range of 2.25-7.13 µM. This class of relatively underexplored β-CA inhibitors warrant further in vivo studies, as they may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug or extensive multi-drug resistance.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase promotes the absorption rate of CO2 in post-combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Grace, Andrews Nirmala; Kim, Dae Hoon; Yoon, Yeoil; Nam, Sung Chan; Baek, Il Hyun; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2013-05-09

    The rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by monoethanol amine (MEA), diethanol amine (DEA), N-methyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl 1-propanol (AMP) solutions was found to be enhanced by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA), has been investigated using a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) device. The enthalpy (-ΔHabs) of CO2 absorption and the absorption capacities of aqueous amines were measured in the presence and/or absence of CA enzyme via differential reaction calorimeter (DRC). The reaction temperature (ΔT) under adiabatic conditions was determined based on the DRC analysis. Bicarbonate and carbamate species formation mechanisms were elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analysis. The overall CO2 absorption rate (flux) and rate constant (kapp) followed the order MEA > DEA > AMP > MDEA in the absence or presence of CA. Hydration of CO2 by MDEA in the presence of CA directly produced bicarbonate, whereas AMP produced unstable carbamate intermediate, then underwent hydrolytic reaction and converted to bicarbonate. The MDEA > AMP > DEA > MEA reverse ordering of the enhanced CO2 flux and kapp in the presence of CA was due to bicarbonate formation by the tertiary and sterically hindered amines. Thus, CA increased the rate of CO2 absorption by MDEA by a factor of 3 relative to the rate of absorption by MDEA alone. The thermal effects suggested that CA yielded a higher activity at 40 °C.

  15. Using the Ca II Triplet to Trace Abundance Variations in Individual Red Giant Branch stars in Three Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E; Cole, A A; Pasquini, L; Gilmozzi, R; Gallagher, J S; Tolstoy, Eline; Irwin, Michael J.; Cole, Andrew A.

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic abundance determinations for stars spanning a Hubble time in age are necessary in order to unambiguously determine the evolutionary histories of galaxies. Using FORS1 in Multi-Object Spectroscopy mode on ANTU (UT1) at the ESO-VLT on Paranal we obtained near infrared spectra from which we measured the equivalent widths of the two strongest Ca II triplet lines to determine metal abundances for a sample of Red Giant Branch stars, selected from ESO-NTT optical (I, V-I) photometry of three nearby, Local Group, galaxies: the Sculptor Dwarf Spheroidal, the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal and the Dwarf Irregular NGC 6822. The summed equivalent width of the two strongest lines in the Ca II triplet absorption line feature, centered at 8500A, can be readily converted into an [Fe/H] abundance using the previously established calibrations by Armandroff & Da Costa (1991) and Rutledge, Hesser & Stetson (1997). We measured metallicities for 37 stars in Sculptor, 32 stars in Fornax, and 23 stars in NGC 6822, yie...

  16. The effect of isotopic splitting on the bisector and inversions of the solar Ca II 854.2 nm line

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; Kochukhov, Oleg; Carlsson, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The Ca II 854.2 nm spectral line is a common diagnostic of the solar chromosphere. The average line profile shows an asymmetric core, and its bisector shows a characteristic inverse-C shape. The line actually consists of six components with slightly different wavelengths depending on the isotope of calcium. This isotopic splitting of the line has been taken into account in studies of non-solar stars, but never for the Sun. We performed non-LTE radiative transfer computations from three models of the solar atmosphere and show that the asymmetric line-core and inverse C-shape of the bisector of the 854.2 nm line can be explained by isotopic splitting. We confirm this finding by analysing observations and showing that the line asymmetry is present irrespective of conditions in the solar atmosphere. Finally, we show that inversions based on the Ca II 854.2 nm line should take the isotopic splitting into account, otherwise the inferred atmospheres will contain erroneous velocity gradients and temperatures.

  17. Complexin II plays a positive role in Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by facilitating vesicle priming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Haijiang; Reim, Kerstin; Varoqueaux, Frederique

    2008-01-01

    the complex and inhibiting membrane fusion. However, several other studies also suggest that CPXs are positive regulators of neurotransmitter release. Thus, whether CPXs are positive or negative regulators of exocytosis is not known, much less the stage in the vesicle life cycle at which they function. Here...... regulate the size of the primed vesicle pools and have a positive role in Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis....

  18. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitterberger, Maria C. [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kim, Geumsoo [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8012 (United States); Rostek, Ursula [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Levine, Rodney L. [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8012 (United States); Zwerschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.zwerschke@oeaw.ac.at [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  19. Cadmium-Containing Carbonic Anhydrase CDCA1 in Marine Diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Alterio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Carbon Concentration Mechanism (CCM allows phytoplakton species to accumulate the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC necessary for an efficient photosynthesis even under carbon dioxide limitation. In this mechanism of primary importance for diatoms, a key role is played by carbonic anhydrase (CA enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2, thus taking part in the acquisition of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis. A novel CA, named CDCA1, has been recently discovered in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. CDCA1 is a cambialistic enzyme since it naturally uses Cd2+ as catalytic metal ion, but if necessary can spontaneously exchange Cd2+ to Zn2+. Here, the biochemical and structural features of CDCA1 enzyme will be presented together with its putative biotechnological applications for the detection of metal ions in seawaters.

  20. Knock-down of hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases IX and XII radiosensitizes tumor cells by increasing intracellular acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eDoyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between acidosis within the tumor microenvironment and radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells remains unclear. Previously we reported that hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases CAIX and CAXII constitute a robust pHi-regulating system that confers a survival advantage on hypoxic human colon carcinoma LS174Tr cells in acidic microenvironments. Here we investigate the role of acidosis, CAIX and CAXII knock-down in combination with ionizing radiation. Fibroblasts cells (-/+ CAIX and LS174Tr cells (inducible knock-down for ca9/ca12 were analyzed for cell cycle phase distribution and survival after irradiation in extracellular pHo manipulations and hypoxia (1% O2 exposure. Radiotherapy was used to target ca9/ca12-silenced LS174Tr tumors grown in nude mice. We found that diminishing the pHi-regulating capacity of fibroblasts through inhibition of NHE-1 sensitize cells to radiation-induced cell death. Secondly, the pHi-regulating function of CAIX plays a key protective role in irradiated fibroblasts in an acidic environment as accompanied by a reduced number of cells in the radiosensitive phases of the cell cycle. Thirdly, we demonstrate that irradiation of LS174Tr spheroids, silenced for either ca9 or both ca9/ca12, showed a respective 50% and 75% increase in cell death as a result of a decrease in cell number in the radioresistant S phase and a disruption of CA-mediated pHi regulation. Finally, LS174Tr tumor progression was strongly decreased when ca9/ca12 silencing was combined with irradiation in vivo. These findings highlight the combinatory use of radiotherapy with targeting of the pHi-regulating carbonic anhydrases as an anti-cancer strategy.

  1. The Ca²⁺-calmodulin-Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II signaling pathway is involved in oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and apoptosis in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Flavia D; Pérez, Leonardo M; Basiglio, Cecilia L; Ochoa, Justina E; Sanchez Pozzi, Enrique J; Roma, Marcelo G

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a common event in most hepatopathies, leading to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) formation and further exacerbation of both OS from mitochondrial origin and cell death. Intracellular Ca²⁺ increase plays a permissive role in these events, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly known. We examined in primary cultured rat hepatocytes whether the Ca²⁺/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling pathway is involved in this process, by using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) as a pro-oxidant, model compound. tBOOH (500 μM, 15 min) induced MPTP formation, as assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane depolarization as a surrogate marker, and increased lipid peroxidation in a cyclosporin A (CsA)-sensitive manner, revealing the involvement of MPTPs in tBOOH-induced radical oxygen species (ROS) formation. Intracellular Ca²⁺ sequestration with BAPTA/AM, CaM blockage with W7 or trifluoperazine, and CaMKII inhibition with KN-62 all fully prevented tBOOH-induced MPTP opening and reduced tBOOH-induced lipid peroxidation to a similar extent to CsA, suggesting that Ca²⁺/CaM/CaMKII signaling pathway fully mediates MPTP-mediated mitochondrial ROS generation. tBOOH-induced apoptosis, as shown by flow cytometry of annexin V/propidium iodide, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and increase in the Bax-to-Bcl-xL ratio, and the Ca²⁺/CaM/CaMKII signaling antagonists fully prevented these effects. Intramitochondrial CaM and CaMKII were partially involved in tBOOH-induced MPTP formation, since W7 and KN-62 both attenuated the tBOOH-induced, MPTP-mediated swelling of isolated mitochondria. We concluded that Ca²⁺/CaM/CaMKII signaling pathway is a key mediator of OS-induced MPTP formation and the subsequent exacerbation of OS from mitochondrial origin and apoptotic cell death.

  2. The large- and small-scale CaII K structure of the Milky Way from observations of Galactic and Magellanic sightlines

    CERN Document Server

    Smoker, J V; Fox, A J

    2015-01-01

    Aims: By utilising spectra of early-type stellar probes of known distances in the same region of the sky, the large and small-scale (pc) structure of the Galactic ISM can be investigated. This paper determines the variation in line strength of CaII at 3933.661 A, as a function of probe separation for a sample of stars, including many sightlines in the Magellanic Clouds. Methods: FLAMES-GIRAFFE data taken with the VLT towards early-type stars in 3 Galactic & 4 Magellanic open clusters in CaII are used to obtain the velocity, EW, column density and line width of IS Galactic Ca for a total of 657 stars, of which 443 are Magellanic sightlines. In each cluster there are 43-110 stars observed. Additionally, FEROS and UVES CaII & NaI spectra of 21 Galactic & 154 Magellanic early-type stars are presented and combined with data from the literature to study the Ca column density/parallax relationship. Results: For the four Magellanic clusters studied with FLAMES, the strength of the Galactic IS CaII K EW ov...

  3. Characterization of urease and carbonic anhydrase producing bacteria and their role in calcite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2011-03-01

    Urease and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are key enzymes in the chemical reaction of living organisms and have been found to be associated with calcification in a number of microorganisms and invertebrates. Three bacterial strains designated as AP4, AP6, and AP9 were isolated from highly alkaline soil samples using the enrichment culture technique. On the basis of various physiological tests and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these three bacteria were identified as Bacillus sp., B. megaterium, and B. simplex. Further, these Bacillus species have been characterized for the production of urease and CA in the process of biocalcification. One of the isolates, AP6 produced 553 U/ml of urease and 5.61 EU/ml CA. All the strains were able to produce significant amount of exopolymeric substances and biofilm. Further, efficacy of these strains was tested for calcite production ability and results were correlated with urease and CA. Isolate AP6 precipitated 2.26 mg calcite/cell dry mass (mg). Our observations strongly suggest that it is not only urease but CA also plays an important role in microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation process. The current work demonstrates that urease and CA producing microbes can be utilized in biocalcification as a sealing agent for filling the gaps or cracks and fissures in constructed facilities and natural formations alike.

  4. Linking Carbonic Anhydrase Abundance and Diversity in Soils to Ecological Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, E.; Meredith, L. K.; Welander, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is an ancient enzyme widespread among bacteria, archaea, and eukarya that catalyzes the following reaction: CO2 + H2O ⇌ HCO3- + H+. Its functions are critical for key cellular processes such as concentrating CO2 for autotrophic growth, pH regulation, and pathogen survival in hosts. Currently, there are six known CA classes (α, β, γ, δ, η, ζ) arising from several distinct evolutionary lineages. CA are widespread in sequenced genomes, with many organisms containing multiple classes of CA or multiple CA of the same class. Soils host rich microbial communities with diverse and important ecological functions, but the diversity and abundance of CA in soils has not been explored. CA appears to play an important, but poorly understood, role in some biogeochemical cycles such as those of CO2 and its oxygen isotope composition and also carbonyl sulfide (COS), which are potential tracers in predictive carbon cycle models. Recognizing the prevalence and functional significance of CA in soils, we used a combined bioinformatics and molecular biology approach to address fundamental questions regarding the abundance, diversity, and function of CA in soils. To characterize the abundance and diversity of the different CA classes in soils, we analyzed existing soil metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute databases. Out of the six classes of CA, we only found the α, β, and γ classes to be present in soils, with the β class being the most abundant. We also looked at genomes of sequenced soil microorganisms to learn what combination of CA classes they contain, from which we can begin to predict the physiological role of CA. To characterize the functional roles of the different CA classes in soils, we collected soil samples from a variety of biomes with diverse chemical and physical properties and quantified the rate of two CA-mediated processes: soil uptake of COS and acceleration of the oxygen isotope exchange

  5. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha is required for the initiation and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of opioids not only leads to tolerance and dependence, but also results in nociceptive enhancement called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Nociceptive mediators involved in OIH generation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-depent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) is critical for OIH. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia was produced by repeated morphine administration or pellet implantation in mice. Correlating with the development of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, spinal CaMKIIalpha activity was significantly increased in OIH. KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, dose- and time-dependently reversed OIH and CaMKII activation without impairing locomotor coordination. To elucidate the specific CaMKII isoform involved, we targeted CaMKIIalpha by using small interfering RNA and demonstrated that knockdown of spinal CaMKIIalpha attenuated OIH. Furthermore, morphine failed to induce OIH in CaMKIIalpha(T286A) point mutant mice, although wild-type littermate mice developed robust OIH after repeated treatments with morphine. These data implicate, for the first time, an essential role of CaMKIIalpha as a cellular mechanism leading to and maintaining opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  6. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  7. Toxicity and Physiological Actions of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors to Aedes aegypti and Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena A. M. Francis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological role of carbonic anhydrases in pH and ion regulation is crucial to insect survival. We examined the toxic and neurophysiological effects of five carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs against Aedes aegypti. The 24 h larvicidal toxicities followed this rank order of potency: dichlorphenamide > methazolamide > acetazolamide = brinzolamide = dorzolamide. Larvicidal activity increased modestly in longer exposures, and affected larvae showed attenuated responses to probing without overt tremors, hyperexcitation, or convulsions. Acetazolamide and dichlorphenamide were toxic to adults when applied topically, but were of low potency and had an incomplete effect (<50% at 300 ng/mosquito even after injection. Dichlorphenamide was also the most toxic compound when fed to adult mosquitoes, and they displayed loss of posture and occasionally prolonged fluttering of the wings. Co-exposure with 500 ng of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO increased the toxicity of dichlorphenamide ca. two-fold in feeding assays, indicating that low toxicity was not related to oxidative metabolism. Dichlorphenamide showed mild depolarizing and nerve discharge actions on insect neuromuscular and central nervous systems, respectively. These effects were increased in low buffer salines, indicating they were apparently related to loss of pH control in these tissues. Overall, sulfonamides displayed weak insecticidal properties on Aedes aegypti and are weak lead compounds.

  8. The structural comparison between membrane-associated human carbonic anhydrases provides insights into drug design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterio, Vincenzo; Pan, Peiwen; Parkkila, Seppo; Buonanno, Martina; Supuran, Claudiu T; Monti, Simona M; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2014-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrase isoform XIV (CA XIV) is the last member of the human (h) CA family discovered so far, being localized in brain, kidneys, colon, small intestine, urinary bladder, liver, and spinal cord. It has recently been described as a possible drug target for treatment of epilepsy, some retinopathies as well as some skin tumors. Human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) XIV is a membrane-associated protein consisting of an N-terminal extracellular domain, a putative transmembrane region, and a small cytoplasmic tail. In this article, we report the expression, purification, and the crystallographic structure of the entire extracellular domain of this enzyme. The analysis of the structure revealed the typical α-CA fold, in which a 10-stranded β-sheet forms the core of the molecule, while the comparison with all the other membrane associated isoforms (hCAs IV, IX, and XII) allowed to identify the diverse oligomeric arrangement and the sequence and structural differences observed in the region 127-136 as the main factors to consider in the design of selective inhibitors for each one of the membrane associated α-CAs.

  9. C4 photosynthesis evolution in the transitional grass Neurachne: loss of a carbonic anhydrase chloroplast transit peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Harmony; Saladié, Montserrat; Rolland, Vivien; Sharwood, Robert E; Macfarlane, Terry; Ludwig, Martha

    2017-02-02

    Neurachne is the only known grass lineage containing closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate and C4 species, making it an ideal taxon with which to study the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses. To begin dissecting the molecular changes that led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in this group, the cDNAs encoding four distinct β-carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were characterized from leaf tissue of Neurachne munroi (C4), N. minor (C3-C4), and N. alopecuroidea (C3). Two genes (CA1 and CA2) each encode two different isoforms: CA1a, CA1b, CA2a and CA2b. Transcript analyses found CA1 mRNAs were significantly more abundant than transcripts from the CA2 gene in the leaves of each species examined, comprising approximately 99% of all β-CA transcripts measured. Localization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that while CA1b is a cytosolic CA in all three species, the CA1a proteins are differentially localized. The N. alopecuroidea and N. minor CA1a isoforms were imported into chloroplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells whereas N. munroi CA1a localized to the cytosol. Sequence analysis indicated an 11 amino acid deletion in the N-terminus of N. munroi CA1a relative to the C3 and C3-C4 proteins, suggesting chloroplast targeting of CA1a is the ancestral state, and that loss of a functional chloroplast transit peptide in N. munroi CA1a is associated with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in Neurachne. Remarkably, this mechanism is homoplastic with evolution of the C4-associated CA in the dicotyledonous Flaveria, although the actual mutations in the two lineages differ.

  10. A High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Psychrohalophilic α–Carbonic Anhydrase from Photobacterium profundum Reveals a Unique Dimer Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somalinga, Vijayakumar; Buhrman, Greg; Arun, Ashikha; Rose, Robert B.; Grunden, Amy M. (NCSU)

    2016-12-09

    Bacterial α–carbonic anhydrases (α-CA) are zinc containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the rapid interconversion of CO2 to bicarbonate and a proton. We report the first crystal structure of a pyschrohalophilic α–CA from a deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. Size exclusion chromatography of the purified P. profundum α–CA (PprCA) reveals that the protein is a heterogeneous mix of monomers and dimers. Furthermore, an “in-gel” carbonic anhydrase activity assay, also known as protonography, revealed two distinct bands corresponding to monomeric and dimeric forms of PprCA that are catalytically active. The crystal structure of PprCA was determined in its native form and reveals a highly conserved “knot-topology” that is characteristic of α–CA’s. Similar to other bacterial α–CA’s, PprCA also crystallized as a dimer. Furthermore, dimer interface analysis revealed the presence of a chloride ion (Cl-) in the interface which is unique to PprCA and has not been observed in any other α–CA’s characterized so far. Molecular dynamics simulation and chloride ion occupancy analysis shows 100% occupancy for the Cl- ion in the dimer interface. Zinc coordinating triple histidine residues, substrate binding hydrophobic patch residues, and the hydrophilic proton wire residues are highly conserved in PprCA and are identical to other well-studied α–CA’s.

  11. Probing Our Heliospheric History I: High-Resolution Observations of Na I and Ca II Along the Solar Historical Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Wyman, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of its motion through the Galaxy, our solar system has encountered many interstellar environments of varying characteristics. Interstellar medium (ISM) density variations spanning seven orders of magnitude are commonly seen throughout the general Galactic environment, and a sufficiently dense cloud within this range has the potential to dramatically alter the structure of the heliosphere. We present observations of the ISM environments the Sun has most recently encountered based on high-resolution optical spectra toward nearby stars in the direction of the historical solar trajectory. The data were obtained with the highest-resolution spectrographs available, including the Tull Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory and the Ultra-High-Resolution Facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. Observations were made of interstellar Na I and Ca II doublet absorption toward 43 bright stars within about 500 pc. No absorption is seen ou...

  12. Ca(ii) and Ce(iii) homogeneous alginate hydrogels from the parent alginic acid precursor: a structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonego, Juan Manuel; Santagapita, Patricio R; Perullini, Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías

    2016-06-14

    Alginate hydrogels are suitable for the encapsulation of biomolecules and microorganisms for the building of bioactive materials. Several alternatives to the conventional alginate formulation are being studied for a broad range of biotechnological applications; among them the crosslinking of alginate by lanthanide cations, Ln(iii), envisages expanded biomedical applications. The performance of these functional materials is highly related to the microstructure of the alginate matrix, which in turn is affected by the conditions of synthesis. In particular, when a diffusing gradient of the crosslinking cation is involved, microstructure inhomogeneities are expected at the macroscopic level. Here we discuss the subtle differences in the microstructure, as assessed by SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering), established in the direction of the gradient of diffusion of Ca(ii) or Ce(iii).

  13. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  14. Gentamicin Blocks the ACh-Induced BK Current in Guinea Pig Type II Vestibular Hair Cells by Competing with Ca2+ at the l-Type Calcium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II contain big-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channels (BK and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca2+ ions through l-type Ca2+ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs. Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM, are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC50 value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca2+ currents activated by (--Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca2+ at the l-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  15. CA II TRIPLET SPECTROSCOPY OF SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD RED GIANTS. III. ABUNDANCES AND VELOCITIES FOR A SAMPLE OF 14 CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Marcionni, N. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, Córdoba, CP 5000 (Argentina); Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Sarajedini, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Grocholski, A. J., E-mail: celeste@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: nmarcionni@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the Ca ii lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope. We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km s{sup −1}, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at −1.1 and −0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from Ca ii triplet spectra of a large sample of field stars. This may be revealing possible differences in the chemical history of clusters and field stars. Our clusters show a significant dispersion of metallicities, whatever age is considered, which could be reflecting the lack of a unique age–metallicity relation in this galaxy. None of the chemical evolution models currently available in the literature satisfactorily represents the global chemical enrichment processes of SMC clusters.

  16. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  17. Ca II Triplet Spectroscopy of Small Magellanic Cloud Red Giants. III. Abundances and Velocities for a Sample of 14 Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parisi, M C; Clariá, J J; Villanova, S; Marcionni, N; Sarajedini, A; Grocholski, A J

    2015-01-01

    We obtained spectra of red giants in 15 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters in the region of the CaII lines with FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We determined the mean metallicity and radial velocity with mean errors of 0.05 dex and 2.6 km/s, respectively, from a mean of 6.5 members per cluster. One cluster (B113) was too young for a reliable metallicity determination and was excluded from the sample. We combined the sample studied here with 15 clusters previously studied by us using the same technique, and with 7 clusters whose metallicities determined by other authors are on a scale similar to ours. This compilation of 36 clusters is the largest SMC cluster sample currently available with accurate and homogeneously determined metallicities. We found a high probability that the metallicity distribution is bimodal, with potential peaks at -1.1 and -0.8 dex. Our data show no strong evidence of a metallicity gradient in the SMC clusters, somewhat at odds with recent evidence from CaT spectra of a lar...

  18. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF......Replication factor C (RF-C) is a heteropentameric protein essential for DNA replication and DNA repair. It is a molecular matchmaker required for loading of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp onto double-strand DNA and for PCNA-dependent DNA synthesis by DNA polymerases...

  19. Mechanochemical synthesis and intercalation of Ca(II)Fe(III)-layered double hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Zs.; Szabados, M.; Varga, G.; Csendes, Z.; Kukovecz, Á.; Kónya, Z.; Carlson, S.; Sipos, P.; Pálinkó, I.

    2016-01-01

    A mechanochemical method (grinding the components without added water - dry grinding, followed by further grinding in the presence of minute amount of water or NaOH solution - wet grinding) was used in this work for the preparation and intercalation of CaFe-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Both the pristine LDHs and the amino acid anion (cystinate and tyrosinate) intercalated varieties were prepared by the two-step grinding procedure in a mixer mill. By systematically changing the conditions of the preparation method, a set of parameters could be determined, which led to the formation of close to phase-pure LDH. The optimisation procedure was also applied for the intercalation processes of the amino acid anions. The resulting materials were structurally characterised by a range of methods (X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray absorption and infra-red spectroscopies). It was proven that this simple mechanochemical procedure was able to produce complex organic-inorganic nanocomposites: LDHs intercalated with amino acid anions.

  20. Innovative molecular diagnosis of Trichinella species based on β-carbonic anhydrase genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Näreaho, Anu; Sukura, Antti; Parkkila, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Trichinellosis is a helminthic infection where different species of Trichinella nematodes are the causative agents. Several molecular assays have been designed to aid diagnostics of trichinellosis. These assays are mostly complex and expensive. The genomes of Trichinella species contain certain parasite-specific genes, which can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. We selected β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) gene as a target, because it is present in many parasites genomes but absent in vertebrates. We developed a novel β-CA gene-based method for detection of Trichinella larvae in biological samples. We first identified a β-CA protein sequence from Trichinella spiralis by bioinformatic tools using β-CAs from Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Thereafter, 16 sets of designed primers were tested to detect β-CA genomic sequences from three species of Trichinella, including T. spiralis, Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinella nativa. Among all 16 sets of designed primers, the primer set No. 2 efficiently amplified β-CA genomic sequences from T. spiralis, T. pseudospiralis and T. nativa without any false-positive amplicons from other parasite samples including Toxoplasma gondii, Toxocara cati and Parascaris equorum. This robust and straightforward method could be useful for meat inspection in slaughterhouses, quality control by food authorities and medical laboratories.

  1. The role of carbonic anhydrase in C4 photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Anthony [Life Sciences Research Foundation, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Current pressures on the global food supply have accelerated the urgency for a second green revolution using novel and sustainable approaches to increase crop yield and efficiency. This proposal outlines experiments to address fundamental questions regarding the biology of C4 photosynthesis, the method of carbon fixation utilized by the most productive food, feed and bioenergy crops. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions including nitrogen metabolism, water use efficiency, and photosynthesis. CA catalyzes the first dedicated step in C4 photosynthesis, the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate, and is potentially rate limiting in C4 grasses. Using insertional mutagenesis, we have generated CA mutants in maize, and propose the characterization of these mutants using phenotypic, physiological, and transcriptomic profiling to assay the plant’s response to altered CA activity. In addition, florescent protein tagging experiments will be employed to study the subcellular localization of CA paralogs, providing critical data for modeling carbon fixation in C4 plants. Finally, I propose parallel experiments in Setaria viridis to explore its relevance as model C4 grass. Using a multifaceted approach, this proposal addresses important questions in basic biology, as well as the need for translation research in response to looming global food challenges.

  2. Active Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII Regulates NMDA Receptor Mediated Postischemic Long-Term Potentiation (i-LTP by Promoting the Interaction between CaMKII and NMDA Receptors in Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Active calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII has been reported to take a critical role in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP. Changes in CaMKII activity were detected in various ischemia models. It is tempting to know whether and how CaMKII takes a role in NMDA receptor (NMDAR-mediated postischemic long-term potentiation (NMDA i-LTP. Here, we monitored changes in NMDAR-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDA fEPSPs at different time points following ischemia onset in vitro oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD ischemia model. We found that 10 min OGD treatment induced significant i-LTP in NMDA fEPSPs, whereas shorter (3 min or longer (25 min OGD treatment failed to induce prominent NMDA i-LTP. CaMKII activity or CaMKII autophosphorylation displays a similar bifurcated trend at different time points following onset of ischemia both in vitro OGD or in vivo photothrombotic lesion (PT models, suggesting a correlation of increased CaMKII activity or CaMKII autophosphorylation with NMDA i-LTP. Disturbing the association between CaMKII and GluN2B subunit of NMDARs with short cell-permeable peptides Tat-GluN2B reversed NMDA i-LTP induced by OGD treatment. The results provide support to a notion that increased interaction between NMDAR and CaMKII following ischemia-induced increased CaMKII activity and autophosphorylation is essential for induction of NMDA i-LTP.

  3. Construction of a Ca II Core-to-Wing Ratio Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, H.

    2015-12-01

    To understand Earth's climate, we must first understand the Sun. However, there are still significant uncertainties associated with both the fundamental mechanisms of solar variability and how they enter into the Earth's climate system. An important method to study the causes of solar variability can be found through the analysis of solar images. The Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) acquires images of the Sun in three different photometric bands to monitor the evolution of solar surface features that change over the course of a solar cycle. These images provide a complete knowledge about the Sun by targeting different layers of the solar atmosphere. Though raw images are meaningful and important, precision image processing is required to remove instrumental artifacts and false features that may appear in these images prior to usage for scientific purposes. A scientific application of the high precision solar images is investigated by analyzing a set of narrow band of Calcium II K core and wing images. The Core and Wing images are processed to remove the influence of the center-to-limb variation; the resultant core-to-wing ratio image enhances the appearance of network structures on the entire solar disk along with the more obvious facula and plage brightening associated with the passage of active regions.

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase I Is Recognized by an SOD1 Antibody upon Biotinylation of Human Spinal Cord Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bowser

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the presence of a novel 32 kDa protein immunoreactive to a copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 antibody within the spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. This unique protein species was generated by biotinylation of spinal cord tissue extracts to detect conformational changes of SOD1 specific to ALS patients. To further characterize this protein, we enriched the protein by column chromatography and determined its protein identity by mass spectrometry. The protein that gave rise to the 32 kDa species upon biotinylation was identified as carbonic anhydrase I (CA I. Biotinylation of CA I from ALS spinal cord resulted in the generation of a novel epitope recognized by the SOD1 antibody. This epitope could also be generated by biotinylation of extracts from cultured cells expressing human CA I. Peptide competition assays identified the amino acid sequence in carbonic anhydrase I responsible for binding the SOD1 antibody. We conclude that chemical modifications used to identify pathogenic protein conformations can lead to the identification of unanticipated proteins that may participate in disease pathogenesis.

  5. Probing the accessibility of the Mn(4)Ca cluster in photosystem II : Channels calculation, noble gas derivatization, and cocrystallization with DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Broser, Matthias; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Using the 2.9 A resolution structure of the membrane-intrinsic protein-cofactor complex photosystem II (PSII) from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we calculated and characterized nine possible substrate/product channels leading to/away from the Mn(4)Ca cluster, where water is oxidi

  6. Mutations in the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin demonstrate the role of domain II and III in the specificity towards Spodoptera exigua larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrero Sendra, S.; González-Cabrera, J.; Ferré, J.; Bakker, P.L.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Several mutants of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin affected with regard to specific activity towards Spodoptera exigua were studied. Alanine was used to replace single residues in loops 2 and 3 of domain II (mutant pPB19) and to replace residues 541-544 in domain III (mutant pPB20). Addition

  7. Age-dependent targeting of protein phosphatase 1 to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by spinophilin in mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Baucum

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying age-dependent changes of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons are poorly understood. Spinophilin is an F-actin- and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-binding protein that targets PP1 to multiple downstream effectors to modulate dendritic spine morphology and function. We found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII directly and indirectly associates with N- and C-terminal domains of spinophilin, but F-actin can displace CaMKII from the N-terminal domain. Spinophilin co-localizes PP1 with CaMKII on the F-actin cytoskeleton in heterologous cells, and spinophilin co-localizes with synaptic CaMKII in neuronal cultures. Thr286 autophosphorylation enhances the binding of CaMKII to spinophilin in vitro and in vivo. Although there is no change in total levels of Thr286 autophosphorylation, maturation from postnatal day 21 into adulthood robustly enhances the levels of CaMKII that co-immunoprecipitate with spinophilin from mouse striatal extracts. Moreover, N- and C-terminal domain fragments of spinophilin bind more CaMKII from adult vs. postnatal day 21 striatal lysates. Total levels of other proteins that interact with C-terminal domains of spinophilin decrease during maturation, perhaps reducing competition for CaMKII binding to the C-terminal domain. In contrast, total levels of α-internexin and binding of α-internexin to the spinophilin N-terminal domain increases with maturation, perhaps bridging an indirect interaction with CaMKII. Moreover, there is an increase in the levels of myosin Va, α-internexin, spinophilin, and PP1 in striatal CaMKII immune complexes isolated from adult and aged mice compared to those from postnatal day 21. These changes in spinophilin/CaMKII interactomes may contribute to changes in striatal dendritic spine density, morphology, and function during normal postnatal maturation and aging.

  8. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the beta class carbonic anhydrases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Michael K; Tsikou, Daniela; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2010-07-01

    The beta class of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme family has been found in plants, yeast, bacteria and algae, but not in animals. Also, little is known concerning the CAs of C. elegans. Genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed by in silico analysis of the C. elegans genome. Amino acid sequence and 3D structure analysis revealed a resemblance to both plant and cab-type beta-CAs. Temporal expression patterns of the two genes, as well as changes in expression levels under different atmospheric conditions (stress) were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Recombinant enzymes, expressed in E. coli were used for in vitro measurement of CA activity, while a yeast complementation experiment was performed in order to assess their ability to complement the function of S. crevisieae beta-CA (NCE103) in vivo. RNAi by feeding was performed on wild-type populations that were then examined for a visible phenotype under normal or various stress conditions (pH, CO(2)/O(2)). Two genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed (bca-1 and y116a8c.28). Their products contain elements of both plant and cab-type CAs. Both assays showed that Y116a8c.28 is an active CA. Both genes showed significant levels of transcript accumulation during development, while they also responded to the stress conditions. No visible phenotype was scored under normal or stress conditions.

  9. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes.

  10. Oxygen Regulation of a Nodule-Located Carbonic Anhydrase in Alfalfa1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Susana; Hirsch, Ann M.; Wycoff, Keith L.; Hunt, Stephen; Layzell, David B.; Kondorosi, Adam; Crespi, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Control of the permeability to oxygen is critical for the function of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legume nodules. The inner cortex (IC) seems to be a primary site for this regulation. In alfalfa (Medicago sativa) nodules, expression of the Msca1 gene encoding a carbonic anhydrase (CA) was previously found to be restricted to the IC. We have now raised antibodies against recombinant Msca1 protein and used them, together with antibodies raised against potato leaf CA, to demonstrate the presence of two forms of CA in mature nodules. Each antibody recognizes a different CA isoform in nodule tissues. Immunolocalization revealed that leaf-related CAs were localized primarily in the nitrogen-fixing zone, whereas the Msca1 protein was restricted exclusively to the IC region, in indeterminate and determinate nodules. In alfalfa nodules grown at various O2 concentrations, an inverse correlation was observed between the external oxygen pressure and Msca1 protein content in the IC, the site of the putative diffusion barrier. Thus Msca1 is a molecular target of physiological processes occurring in the IC cells involved in gas exchange in the nodule. PMID:11080283

  11. Mutant carbonic anhydrase 4 impairs pH regulation and causes retinal photoreceptor degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenglin; Alvarez, Bernardo V; Chakarova, Christina; Jiang, Li; Karan, Goutam; Frederick, Jeanne M; Zhao, Yu; Sauvé, Yves; Li, Xi; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Hollander, Anneke I Den; Katz, Bradley; Baehr, Wolfgang; Cremers, Frans P; Casey, Joseph R; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Zhang, Kang

    2005-01-15

    Retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) belong to the metabolically most active tissues in the human body. Efficient removal of acid load from retina and RPE is a critical function mediated by the choriocapillaris. However, the mechanism by which pH homeostasis is maintained is largely unknown. Here, we show that a functional complex of carbonic anhydrase 4 (CA4) and Na+/bicarbonate co-transporter 1 (NBC1) is specifically expressed in the choriocapillaris and that missense mutations in CA4 linked to autosomal dominant rod-cone dystrophy disrupt NBC1-mediated HCO3- transport. Our results identify a novel pathogenic pathway in which a defect in a functional complex involved in maintaining pH balances, but not expressed in retina or RPE, leads to photoreceptor degeneration. The importance of a functional CA4 for survival of photoreceptors implies that CA inhibitors, which are widely used as medications, particularly in the treatment of glaucoma, may have long-term adverse effects on vision.

  12. Effects of reduced carbonic anhydrase activity on CO2 assimilation rates in Setaria viridis: a transgenic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Hannah L; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Sharwood, Robert E; Covshoff, Sarah; Evans, John R; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    In C4 species, the major β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) localized in the mesophyll cytosol catalyses the hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase uses in the first step of C4 photosynthesis. To address the role of CA in C4 photosynthesis, we generated transgenic Setaria viridis depleted in β-CA. Independent lines were identified with as little as 13% of wild-type CA. No photosynthetic defect was observed in the transformed lines at ambient CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). At low pCO2, a strong correlation between CO2 assimilation rates and CA hydration rates was observed. C(18)O(16)O isotope discrimination was used to estimate the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion from the intercellular air space to the mesophyll cytosol (gm) in control plants, which allowed us to calculate CA activities in the mesophyll cytosol (Cm). This revealed a strong relationship between the initial slope of the response of the CO2 assimilation rate to cytosolic pCO2 (ACm) and cytosolic CA activity. However, the relationship between the initial slope of the response of CO2 assimilation to intercellular pCO2 (ACi) and cytosolic CA activity was curvilinear. This indicated that in S. viridis, mesophyll conductance may be a contributing limiting factor alongside CA activity to CO2 assimilation rates at low pCO2.

  13. Membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in bone and cartilage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroudi, Maryam; Plaisance, Marc C; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    1α,25(OH)2D3 regulates osteoblasts and chondrocytes via its membrane-associated receptor, protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3) in caveolae. 1α,25(OH)2D3 binding to Pdia3 leads to phospholipase-A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA) activation, stimulating cytosolic PLA2 and resulting in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release and PKCα activation, subsequently stimulating differentiation. However, how PLAA transmits the signal to cPLA2 is unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation is required for PLA2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting a similar role in 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent signaling. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the roles of CaM and CaMKII as mediators of 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PLAA-dependent activation of cPLA2 and PKCα, and downstream biological effects. The results indicated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 and PLAA-peptide increased CaMKII activity within 9 min. Silencing Cav-1, Pdia3 or Plaa in osteoblasts suppressed this effect. Similarly, antibodies against Plaa or Pdia3 blocked 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent CaMKII. Caveolae disruption abolished activation of CaMKII by 1α,25(OH)2D3 or PLAA. CaMKII-specific and CaM-specific inhibitors reduced cPLA2 and PKC activities, PGE2 release and osteoblast maturation markers in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. Camk2a-silenced but not Camk2b-silenced osteoblasts showed comparable effects. Immunoprecipitation showed increased interaction of CaM and PLAA in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. The results indicate that membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 via Pdia3 triggered the interaction between PLAA and CaM, leading to dissociation of CaM from caveolae, activation of CaMKII, and downstream PLA2 activation, and suggest that CaMKII plays a major role in membrane-mediated actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3.

  14. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Tagging Promotes Dendritic Branch Variability through the Capture of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II α (CaMKIIα) mRNAs by the RNA-binding Protein HuD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosanya, Natasha M; Cacheaux, Luisa P; Workman, Emily R; Niere, Farr; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2015-06-26

    The fate of a memory, whether stored or forgotten, is determined by the ability of an active or tagged synapse to undergo changes in synaptic efficacy requiring protein synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. A synapse can be tagged, but without the "capture" of plasticity-related proteins, it will not undergo long lasting forms of plasticity (synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis). What the "tag" is and how plasticity-related proteins are captured at tagged synapses are unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα) is critical in learning and memory and is synthesized locally in neuronal dendrites. The mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that increases CaMKIIα protein expression; however, the mechanism and site of dendritic expression are unknown. Herein, we show that mTOR activity mediates the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα, favoring one secondary, daughter branch over the other in a single neuron. mTOR inhibition decreased the dendritic levels of CaMKIIα protein and mRNA by shortening its poly(A) tail. Overexpression of the RNA-stabilizing protein HuD increased CaMKIIα protein levels and preserved its selective expression in one daughter branch over the other when mTOR was inhibited. Unexpectedly, deleting the third RNA recognition motif of HuD, the domain that binds the poly(A) tail, eliminated the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα when mTOR was active. These results provide a model for one molecular mechanism that may underlie the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis where mTOR is the tag, preventing deadenylation of CaMKIIα mRNA, whereas HuD captures and promotes its expression in a branch-specific manner.

  15. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Tagging Promotes Dendritic Branch Variability through the Capture of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II α (CaMKIIα) mRNAs by the RNA-binding Protein HuD*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosanya, Natasha M.; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Workman, Emily R.; Niere, Farr; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of a memory, whether stored or forgotten, is determined by the ability of an active or tagged synapse to undergo changes in synaptic efficacy requiring protein synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. A synapse can be tagged, but without the “capture” of plasticity-related proteins, it will not undergo long lasting forms of plasticity (synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis). What the “tag” is and how plasticity-related proteins are captured at tagged synapses are unknown. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα) is critical in learning and memory and is synthesized locally in neuronal dendrites. The mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that increases CaMKIIα protein expression; however, the mechanism and site of dendritic expression are unknown. Herein, we show that mTOR activity mediates the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα, favoring one secondary, daughter branch over the other in a single neuron. mTOR inhibition decreased the dendritic levels of CaMKIIα protein and mRNA by shortening its poly(A) tail. Overexpression of the RNA-stabilizing protein HuD increased CaMKIIα protein levels and preserved its selective expression in one daughter branch over the other when mTOR was inhibited. Unexpectedly, deleting the third RNA recognition motif of HuD, the domain that binds the poly(A) tail, eliminated the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα when mTOR was active. These results provide a model for one molecular mechanism that may underlie the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis where mTOR is the tag, preventing deadenylation of CaMKIIα mRNA, whereas HuD captures and promotes its expression in a branch-specific manner. PMID:25944900

  16. Structural basis of the oxidative activation of the carboxysomal [gamma]-carbonic anhydrase, CcmM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, Kerry L.; Castel, Stephane E.; de Araujo, Charlotte; Espie, George S.; Kimber, Matthew S. (Guelph); (Toronto)

    2010-04-26

    Cyanobacterial RuBisCO is sequestered in large, icosahedral, protein-bounded microcompartments called carboxysomes. Bicarbonate is pumped into the cytosol, diffuses into the carboxysome through small pores in its shell, and is then converted to CO{sub 2} by carbonic anhydrase (CA) prior to fixation. Paradoxically, many {beta}-cyanobacteria, including Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, lack the conventional carboxysomal {beta}-CA, ccaA. The N-terminal domain of the carboxysomal protein CcmM is homologous to {gamma}-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) but recombinant CcmM derived from ccaA-containing cyanobacteria show no CA activity. We demonstrate here that either full length CcmM from T. elongatus, or a construct truncated after 209 residues (CcmM209), is active as a CA - the first catalytically active bacterial {gamma}-CA reported. The 2.0 {angstrom} structure of CcmM209 reveals a trimeric, left-handed {beta}-helix structure that closely resembles Cam, except that residues 198-207 form a third {alpha}-helix stabilized by an essential Cys194-Cys200 disulfide bond. Deleting residues 194-209 (CcmM193) results in an inactive protein whose 1.1 {angstrom} structure shows disordering of the N- and C-termini, and reorganization of the trimeric interface and active site. Under reducing conditions, CcmM209 is similarly partially disordered and inactive as a CA. CcmM protein in fresh E. coli cell extracts is inactive, implying that the cellular reducing machinery can reduce and inactivate CcmM, while diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, activates the enzyme. Thus, like membrane-bound eukaryotic cellular compartments, the {beta}-carboxysome appears to be able to maintain an oxidizing interior by precluding the entry of thioredoxin and other endogenous reducing agents.

  17. Detection of Low-Level Activities in Solar-Analog Stars from the Emission Strengths of Ca II 3934 Line

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Activity studies of solar-type stars, especially with reference to the status of our current Sun among them, have exposed the importance of (1) homogeneously selecting the sample stars and (2) reliably evaluating their activities down to a considerably low level. Motivated by these requirements, we conducted an extensive study on the activities of 118 solar-analog stars (of sufficiently similar properties to each other) by measuring the emission strength at the core of Ca II 3933.663 line (K line) on the high-dispersion spectrogram obtained by Subaru/HDS, where special attention was paid to correctly detecting the chromospheric emission by removing the wing-fitted photospheric profile calculated from the classical solar model atmosphere. This enabled us to detect low-level activities down to log R' ~ -5.4 (R' is the ratio of the chromospheric core emission flux to the total bolometric flux), by which we could detect subtle activity differences which were indiscernible in previous studies. Regarding the Sun, w...

  18. Full-Disk Chromospheric Vector Magnetograms with Ca II 854.2 nm line: Some Promising Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Sanjay; Harvey, J. W.; Harker, Brian; Pillet, V. M.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Marble, Andrew R.; Bertello, Luca; + SOLIS-Team

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, the focus of solar magnetometry has shifted outward from the photosphere to the chromospheric layers. The reasons for this are many. With regards to instrumentation faster detectors with more sensitivity have become available, as have fast electro-optic modulators. Also, there are several potential benefits of observing vector fields in the chromospheric layer as the magnetic field is more force-free in this layer as compared to the photosphere. Coronal force-free field extrapolations are more reliable using chromospheric fields as the lower boundary condition and free magnetic energy is readily computed using the magnetic virial theorem. Recently, a full Stokes polarimeter for the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm spectral line was developed and installed in the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope. We present details of this new polarimeter, full disk spectropolarimetric observations and vector magnetograms of the chromosphere, and examples of some promising applications (e.g., maps of normal component of electric current density in the chromosphere, free magnetic energy estimated using virial theorem, and non-potentiality parameter magnetic shear angle).This work utilizes SOLIS data obtained by the NSO Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP), managed by the National Solar Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation

  19. The wings of Ca II H and K as photospheric diagnostics and the reliability of one-dimensional photosphere modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sheminova, V A

    2012-01-01

    The extended wings of the Ca II H and K lines provide excellent diagnostics of the temperature stratification of the photosphere of the Sun and of other cool stars, thanks to their LTE opacities and source functions and their large span in formation height. The aim of this study is to calibrate the usage of the H and K wings in one-dimensional interpretation of spatially averaged spectra and in deriving per-pixel stratifications from resolved spectra. I use multi-dimensional simulations of solar convection to synthesize the H and K wings, derive one-dimensional models from these wings as if they were observed, and compare the resulting models to the actual simulation input. I find that spatially-averaged models constructed from the synthesized wings generally match the simulation averages well, except for the deepest layers of the photosphere where large thermal inhomogeneities and Planck-function nonlinearity gives large errors. The larger the inhomogeneity, the larger the latter. The presence of strong netw...

  20. High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

    2005-09-06

    The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

  1. Characterization of the first beta-class carbonic anhydrase from an arthropod (Drosophila melanogaster and phylogenetic analysis of beta-class carbonic anhydrases in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niederhauser Barbara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1 enzymes have been reported in a variety of organisms, but their existence in animals has been unclear. The purpose of the present study was to perform extensive sequence analysis to show that the β-CAs are present in invertebrates and to clone and characterize a member of this enzyme family from a representative model organism of the animal kingdom, e.g., Drosophila melanogaster. Results The novel β-CA gene, here named DmBCA, was identified from FlyBase, and its orthologs were searched and reconstructed from sequence databases, confirming the presence of β-CA sequences in 55 metazoan species. The corresponding recombinant enzyme was produced in Sf9 insect cells, purified, kinetically characterized, and its inhibition was investigated with a series of simple, inorganic anions. Holoenzyme molecular mass was defined by dynamic light scattering analysis and gel filtration, and the results suggested that the holoenzyme is a dimer. Double immunostaining confirmed predictions based on sequence analysis and localized DmBCA protein to mitochondria. The enzyme showed high CO2 hydratase activity, with a kcat of 9.5 × 105 s-1 and a kcat/KM of 1.1 × 108 M-1s-1. DmBCA was appreciably inhibited by the clinically-used sulfonamide acetazolamide, with an inhibition constant of 49 nM. It was moderately inhibited by halides, pseudohalides, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite and sulfate (KI values of 0.67 - 1.36 mM and more potently by sulfamide (KI of 0.15 mM. Bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic/boronic acids were much weaker inhibitors (KIs of 26.9 - 43.7 mM. Conclusions The Drosophila β-CA represents a highly active mitochondrial enzyme that is a potential model enzyme for anti-parasitic drug development.

  2. Identification of two carbonic anhydrases in the mantle of the European Abalone Haliotis tuberculata (Gastropoda, Haliotidae): phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE Roy, Nathalie; Marie, Benjamin; Gaume, Béatrice; Guichard, Nathalie; Delgado, Sidney; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie; Sire, Jean-Yves; Marin, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) represent a diversified family of metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide. They are involved in a wide range of functions, among which is the formation of CaCO(3) skeletons in metazoans. In the shell-forming mantle tissues of mollusks, the location of the CA catalytic activity is elusive and gives birth to contradicting views. In the present paper, using the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata, a key model gastropod in biomineralization studies, we identified and characterized two CAs (htCA1 and htCA2) that are specific of the shell-forming mantle tissue. We analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. Combining various approaches, including proteomics, activity tests, and in silico analyses, we showed that htCA1 is secreted but is not incorporated in the organic matrix of the abalone shell and that htCA2 is transmembrane. Together with previous studies dealing with molluskan CAs, our findings suggest two possible modes of action for shell mineralization: the first mode applies to, for example, the bivalves Unio pictorum and Pinctada fucata, and involves a true CA activity in their shell matrix; the second mode corresponds to, for example, the European abalone, and does not include CA activity in the shell matrix. Our work provides new insight on the diversity of the extracellular macromolecular tools used for shell biomineralization study in mollusks.

  3. Research progress of carbon dioxide capture by using carbonic anhydrase%碳酸酐酶用于二氧化碳捕集的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静

    2012-01-01

    碳酸酐酶(CA)可以加速捕集化石燃料燃烧产生的二氧化碳,从而降低CO2的排放量.主要介绍了CA的来源、活性、稳定性及作用.分析了使用新型生物方法对二氧化碳进行捕集和储存的优缺点,并对下一步的工作进行了展望.%It has been demonstrated that carbonic anhydrase has the potential of accelerating of carbon dioxide capture from fossil fuel and reduce the discharge of carbon dioxide. The source, activity, stability and functions of carbonic anhydrase are mainly presented. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of using new biological for carbon dioxide capture and storage are discussed and analyzed, and the further study is prospected.

  4. Interaction of anions with a newly characterized alpha carbonic anhydrase from Halomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Furkan; Şentürk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition and characterization of the α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the Halomonas sp. are reported for the first time. The enzyme was purified 91-fold with a yield of 39%, and a specific activity of 600 U/mg proteins was obtained. It has an optimum pH at 7.5, an optimum ionic strength at 20 mM and an optimum temperature at 20 °C. The following anions, SCN(-), Br(-), Cl(-), I(-), [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] showed inhibitory effects on the hydratase activity of the enzyme. Sulfate, sulfide, azide, nitrate, nitrite and iodide exhibited the strongest inhibitory activity, in the micromolar range (KI-s of 5.5-15.5 µM). SCN(-), Br(-), Cl(-), [Formula: see text] were moderate inhibitors, whereas other anions showed only weak activities. Our findings indicate that these anions inhibit the Halomonas sp. CA (HmCA) enzyme in a similar manner to other α-CAs from mammals investigated earlier, but the susceptibility to various anions differs significantly between the Halomonas sp. and other organism CAs.

  5. Carbon dioxide capture using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase in a foam bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart K; Han, Zhenlin; Su, Wei Wen; Deshusses, Marc A; Kan, Eunsung

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports CO2 capture and conversion to bicarbonate using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase (CA) on its cell surface in a novel foam bioreactor. The very large gas-liquid interfacial area in the foam bioreactor promoted rapid CO2 absorption while the CO2 in the aqueous phase was subsequently converted to bicarbonate ions by the CA. CO2 gas removal in air was investigated at various conditions such as gas velocity, cell density and CO2 inlet concentration. Regimes for kinetic and mass transfer limitations were defined. Very high removal rates of CO2 were observed: 9570 g CO2 m(-3) bioreactor h(-1) and a CO2 removal efficiency of 93% at 4% inlet CO2 when the gas retention time was 24 s, and cell concentration was 4 gdw L(-1). These performances are superior to earlier reports of experimental bioreactors using CA for CO2 capture. Overall, this bioreactor system has significant potential as an alternative CO2 capture technology.

  6. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  7. SWATH-based proteomics identified carbonic anhydrase 2 as a potential diagnosis biomarker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanzhang; Mok, Tin Seak; Lin, Xiuxian; Zhang, Wanling; Cui, Yizhi; Guo, Jiahui; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a serious threat to public health, and the biomarker discovery is of urgent needs. The data-independent mode (DIA) based sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) mass spectrometry (MS) has been proved to be precise in protein quantitation and efficient for cancer biomarker researches. In this study, we performed the first SWATH-MS analysis comparing the NPC and normal tissues. Spike-in stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (super-SILAC) MS was used as a shotgun reference. We identified and quantified 1414 proteins across all SWATH-MS analyses. We found that SWATH-MS had a unique feature to preferentially detect proteins with smaller molecular weights than either super-SILAC MS or human proteome background. With SWATH-MS, 29 significant differentially express proteins (DEPs) were identified. Among them, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) was selected for further validation per novelty, MS quality and other supporting rationale. With the tissue microarray analysis, we found that CA2 had an AUC of 0.94 in differentiating NPC from normal tissue samples. In conclusion, SWATH-MS has unique features in proteome analysis, and it leads to the identification of CA2 as a potentially new diagnostic biomarker for NPC. PMID:28117408

  8. Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II contributes to hypoxic ischemic cell death in neonatal hippocampal slice cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Lu

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that p38MAP kinase (p38MAPK stimulates ROS generation via the activation of NADPH oxidase during neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI brain injury. However, how p38MAPK is activated during HI remains unresolved and was the focus of this study. Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII plays a key role in brain synapse development, neural transduction and synaptic plasticity. Here we show that CaMKII activity is stimulated in rat hippocampal slice culture exposed to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD to mimic the condition of HI. Further, the elevation of CaMKII activity, correlated with enhanced p38MAPK activity, increased superoxide generation from NADPH oxidase as well as necrotic and apoptotic cell death. All of these events were prevented when CaMKII activity was inhibited with KN93. In a neonatal rat model of HI, KN93 also reduced brain injury. Our results suggest that CaMKII activation contributes to the oxidative stress associated with neural cell death after HI.

  9. The role of carbonic anhydrase in hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ibrahim Salihu

    2016-12-14

    Considerable efforts are being made daily to discover novel therapeutic targets to better understand the mechanism for designing drugs in treating diabetes. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by metformin remains the first line of oral therapy for managing type 2 diabetes. The link between rise in blood lactate level and reduction of hepatic glucose production with metformin usage remains to be determined. Carbonic anhydrase is proposed to be the link connecting blood lactate accumulation and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and thus could serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing hepatic glucose production. Understanding the link between rise in blood lactate level and the role of carbonic anhydrase in lactate uptake will be essential towards the development of a promising new antidiabetic medication.

  10. Synthesis and in Vivo Biological Evaluation of (68)Ga-Labeled Carbonic Anhydrase IX Targeting Small Molecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Niemans, Raymon; Bauwens, Matthias; Yaromina, Ala; van Kuijk, Simon J A; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Biemans, Rianne; Pooters, Ivo; Pellegrini, Paul A; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Tonissen, Kathryn F; Supuran, Claudiu T; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-07-14

    Tumor hypoxia contributes resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, while oxygenated tumors are sensitive to these treatments. The indirect detection of hypoxic tumors is possible by targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), an enzyme overexpressed in hypoxic tumors, with sulfonamide-based imaging agents. In this study, we present the design and synthesis of novel gallium-radiolabeled small-molecule sulfonamides targeting CA IX. The compounds display favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics and stability. We demonstrate that our lead compound, [(68)Ga]-2, discriminates CA IX-expressing tumors in vivo in a mouse xenograft model using positron emission tomography (PET). This compound shows specific tumor accumulation and low uptake in blood and clears intact to the urine. These findings were reproduced in a second study using PET/computed tomography. Small molecules investigated to date utilizing (68)Ga for preclinical CA IX imaging are scarce, and this is one of the first effective (68)Ga compounds reported for PET imaging of CA IX.

  11. Regulation of expression and biochemical characterization of a beta-class carbonic anhydrase from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simarjot; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil K

    2009-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; [EC 4.2.1.1]) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that supports various biochemical and physiological functions. Genome analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, a nonphotosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacterium, revealed an ORF with homology to beta-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Biochemical characteristics of the beta-class CA of A. brasilense, analysed after cloning the gene (designated as bca), overexpressing in Escherichia coli and purifying the protein by affinity purification, revealed that the native recombinant enzyme is a homotetramer, inhibited by the known CA inhibitors. CA activity in A. brasilense cell extracts, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that bca was constitutively expressed under aerobic conditions. Lower beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense cells harbouring bca promoter: lacZ fusion during the stationary phase or during growth on 3% CO(2) enriched air or at acidic pH indicated that the transcription of bca was downregulated by the stationary phase, elevated CO(2) levels and acidic pH conditions. These observations were also supported by RT-PCR analysis. Thus, beta-CA in A. brasilense seems to be required for scavenging CO(2) from the ambient air and the requirement of CO(2) hydration seems to be higher for the cultures growing exponentially at neutral to alkaline pH.

  12. In vivo imaging and quantification of carbonic anhydrase IX expression as an endogenous biomarker of tumor hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagna Bao

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX is a transmembrane protein that has been shown to be greatly upregulated under conditions of hypoxia in many tumor cell lines. Tumor hypoxia is associated with impaired efficacy of cancer therapies making CA IX a valuable target for preclinical and diagnostic imaging. We have developed a quantitative in vivo optical imaging method for detection of CA IX as a marker of tumor hypoxia based on a near-infrared (NIR fluorescent derivative of the CA IX inhibitor acetazolamide (AZ. The agent (HS680 showed single digit nanomolar inhibition of CA IX as well as selectivity over other CA isoforms and demonstrated up to 25-fold upregulation of fluorescent CA IX signal in hypoxic versus normoxic cells, which could be blocked by 60%-70% with unlabeled AZ. CA IX negative cell lines (HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231, as well as a non-binding control agent on CA IX positive cells, showed low fluorescent signal under both conditions. In vivo FMT imaging showed tumor accumulation and excellent tumor definition from 6-24 hours. In vivo selectivity was confirmed by pretreatment of the mice with unlabeled AZ resulting in >65% signal inhibition. HS680 tumor signal was further upregulated >2X in tumors by maintaining tumor-bearing mice in a low oxygen (8% atmosphere. Importantly, intravenously injected HS680 signal was co-localized specifically with both CA IX antibody and pimonidazole (Pimo, and was located away from non-hypoxic regions indicated by a Hoechst stain. Thus, we have established a spatial correlation of fluorescence signal obtained by non-invasive, tomographic imaging of HS680 with regions of hypoxia and CA IX expression. These results illustrate the potential of HS680 and combined with FMT imaging to non-invasively quantify CA IX expression as a hypoxia biomarker, crucial to the study of the underlying biology of hypoxic tumors and the development and monitoring of novel anti-cancer therapies.

  13. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi for the management of Chagas disease: an underexplored therapeutic opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    An α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) was recently discovered, cloned and characterized in the genome of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a neglected but widespread tropical disease. Inhibition of this α-CAs (TcCA) with anions, sulfonamides, sulfamates, thiols and hydroxamates has been investigated in detail, with several low nanomolar in vitro inhibitors. Although the sulfonamides were the best in vitro inhibitors, they showed no ex vivo anti-T. cruzi activity, due to poor penetration. However, some thiols and hydroxamates acting as low nanomolar TcCA inhibitors also showed significant antitrypanosomal ex vivo activity, making this enzyme an attractive yet underexplored drug target for the management of Chagas disease.

  14. The selective expression of carbonic anhydrase genes of Aspergillus nidulans in response to changes in mineral nutrition and CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Dong, Cuiling; Liu, Fanghua

    2016-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays an important role in the formation and evolution of life. However, to our knowledge, there has been no report on CA isoenzyme function differentiation in fungi. Two different CA gene sequences in Aspergillus nidulans with clear genetic background provide us a favorable basis for studying function differentiation of CA isoenzymes. Heterologously expressed CA1 was used to test its weathering ability on silicate minerals and real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect expression of the CA1 and CA2 genes at different CO2 concentrations and in the presence of different potassium sources. The northern blot method was applied to confirm the result of CA1 gene expression. Heterologously expressed CA1 significantly promoted dissolution of biotite and wollastonite, and CA1 gene expression increased significantly in response to soluble K-deficiency. The northern blot test further showed that CA1 participated in K-feldspar weathering. In addition, the results showed that CA2 was primary involved in adapting to CO2 concentration change. Taken together, A. nidulans can choose different CA to meet their survival needs, which imply that some environmental microbes have evolved different CAs to adapt to changes in CO2 concentration and acquire mineral nutrition so that they can better adapt to environmental changes. Inversely, their adaption may impact mineral weathering and/or CO2 concentration, and even global change.

  15. H,K-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase response to chronic systemic rat gastric hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulfah Lutfiah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia may induce gastric ulcer associated with excessive hidrogen chloride (HCl secretion. Synthesis of HCl involves 2 enzymes, H,K-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase (CA. This study aimed to clarify the underlying cause of gastric ulcer in chronic hypoxic condition, by investigating the H,K-ATPase and CA9 response in rats.Methods: This study was an in vivo experiment, to know the relationship between hypoxia to expression of H,K-ATPase and CA9 mRNA, and H,K-ATPase and total CA specific activity of chronic systemic rat gastric hypoxia. The result was compared to control. Data was analyzed by SPSS. If the data distribution was normal and homogeneous, ANOVA and LSD post-hoc test were used. However, if the distribution was not normal and not homogeneous, and still as such after transformation, data was treated in non-parametric using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Twenty five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: rats undergoing hypoxia for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days placed in hypoxia chamber (10% O2, 90% N2, and one control group. Following this treatment, stomach of the rats was extracted and homogenized. Expression of H,K-ATPase and CA9 mRNA was measured using real time RT-PCR. Specific activity of H,K-ATPase was measured using phosphate standard solution, and specific activity of total CA was measured using p-nitrophenol solution.Results: The expression of H,K-ATPase mRNA was higher in the first day (2.159, and drastically lowered from the third to seventh day (0.289; 0.108; 0.062. Specific activities of H,K-ATPase was slightly higher in the first day (0.765, then was lowered in the third (0.685 and fifth day (0.655, and was higher in the seventh day (0.884. The expression of CA9 mRNA was lowered progressively from the first to seventh day (0.84; 0.766; 0.736; 0.343. Specific activities of total CA was low in the first day (0.083, and was higher from the third to seventh day (0.111; 0.136; 0.144.Conclusion: In hypoxia

  16. Fine structure of the age-chromospheric activity relation in solar-type stars. I. The Ca II infrared triplet: Absolute flux calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Dutra-Ferreira, L.; Ribas, I.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Strong spectral lines are useful indicators of stellar chromospheric activity. They are physically linked to the convection efficiency, differential rotation, and angular momentum evolution and are a potential indicator of age. However, for ages > 2 Gyr, the age-activity relationship remains poorly constrained thus hampering its full application. Aims: The Ca II infrared triplet (IRT lines, λλ 8498, 8542, and 8662) has been poorly studied compared to classical chromospheric indicators. We report in this paper absolute chromospheric fluxes in the three Ca II IRT lines, based on a new calibration tied to up-to-date model atmospheres. Methods: We obtain the Ca II IRT absolute fluxes for 113 FGK stars from high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and high-resolution spectra covering an extensive domain of chromospheric activity levels. We perform an absolute continuum flux calibration for the Ca II IRT lines anchored in atmospheric models calculated as an explicit function of effective temperatures (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and gravities (log g) avoiding the degeneracy usually present in photometric continuum calibrations based solely on color indices. Results: The internal uncertainties achieved for continuum absolute flux calculations are ≈2% of the solar chromospheric flux, one order of magnitude lower than for photometric calibrations. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we gauge the impact of observational errors on the final chromospheric fluxes due to the absolute continuum flux calibration and find that Teffuncertainties are properly mitigated by the photospheric correction leaving [Fe/H] as the dominating factor in the chromospheric flux uncertainty. Conclusions: Across the FGK spectral types, the Ca II IRT lines are sensitive to chromospheric activity. The reduced internal uncertainties reported here enable us to build a new chromospheric absolute flux scale and explore the age-activity relation from the active regime down to very low activity levels and

  17. Hyperexcitability and changes in activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase in the hippocampus of rats exposed to 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Fukunaga, Kohji; Ishidao, Toru; Hori, Hajime

    2002-12-20

    Chronic inhalation of 1-bromopropane (1-BP), a substitute of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons, has been suspected of having central neurotoxicity (Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery 101 (1999) 199; Journal of Occupational Health 44 (2002) 1) for humans. In animal experiments, 1-BP inhalation (1500 ppm) caused hyperexcitability in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) [Journal of Occupational Health 42 (2000) 149, Journal of Occupational Health 44 (2002) 156]. We studied whether the hyperexcitability is associated with changes of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase C (PKC). Male Wistar rats were exposed to 1-BP for 6 hours in a day in an exposure chamber with a concentration of 700 ppm for 8 weeks. After the inhalation, paired-pulse ratios of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials and population spikes (PSs) were analyzed in the CA1 and DG of hippocampal slices. Control rats were then given fresh air in the inhalation chamber. Semiquantitative immunoblotting analyses of protein kinases using antibodies against active and conventional protein kinases were done using the whole hippocampus. A paired-pulse ratio of PS was increased at the 5 ms interpulse interval in the CA1 and at the 10-20 ms interpulse intervals in the DG. The amount of active MAPK and total amount of CaMKIIalpha and beta were significantly increased by 28, 29, and 46% compared to control, respectively, without any change in PKC activity. In contrast, the amount of active CaMKIIbeta was decreased to 78%. These results suggest that modifications of intracellular signaling cascades are associated with hyperexcitability that occurred in the hippocampal formation of rats exposed to the chronic inhalation of 1-BP.

  18. Fourier transform spectrometer observations of solar carbon monoxide. II - Simultaneous cospatial measurements of the fundamental and first-overtone bands, and Ca II K, in quiet and active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Testerman, L.; Brault, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometry has yielded simultaneous cospatial measurements of important diagnostics of thermal structure in the high solar photosphere and low chromosphere. It is noted that the anomalous behavior of the fundamental bands of CO in quiet areas near the limb is accentuated in an active region plage observed close to the limb. The difference between the core temperatures of the CO fundamental bands in a plage and a nearby quiet region at the limb is larger than the corresponding brightness temperature differences in the inner wings of the Ca II line measured in a quiet region and several plages closer to the disk center. Numerical simulations indicate that the disparate behavior of the CO bands with respect to Ca II K cannot be reconciled with existing single component thermal structure models; a two-component atmosphere is required.

  19. A new class of quinazoline-sulfonamides acting as efficient inhibitors against the α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Ceruso, Mariangela; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Parkkila, Seppo; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the agent responsible for trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) in humans and other animals. It has been recently reported that this pathogen encodes for an α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), denominated TcCA, which was shown to be crucial for its life cycle. Inhibition studies of a class of 4-oxoquinazoline containing a benzensulfonamide moiety and their 4-thioxo bioisosteres against the protozoan enzyme TcCA are described here. Most of 4-oxoquinazoline sulfonamides showed nanomolar TcCA inhibition activity with K(I)s in the same order of magnitude of acetazolamide (AAZ), whereas their thioxo bioisosters showed moderate anti-Trypanosoma CA potency with K(I)s in the micromolar range. The discovery of compounds incorporating a 4-oxoquinazoline ring as a low-nanomolar TcCA inhibitor is quite promising and it may be useful for developing anti-Trypanosoma agents with a novel mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs (such as benznidazole, nifurtimox) for which significant resistance and serious adverse effects due to their high-toxicity appeared.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the vas deferens of the cotton leafworm - Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) controlled by circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, J; Ciuk, M A; Joachimiak, E; Rowinski, S; Cymborowski, B; Bebas, P

    2006-11-01

    The male reproductive tract of Lepidoptera is an ideal model for the study of the physiological role of peripheral clocks in insects. The latter are significant in the generation and coordination of rhythmic phenomena which facilitate the initial stages of sperm capacitation. This process requires the maintenance of pH in the upper vas deferens (UVD) aided by, among others, H+-ATPase. Our aim was to determine the potential involvement of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in this process, an enzyme tasked with generating protons subsequently utilized by H+-ATPase to acidify the UVD milieu in S. littoralis, during the time when the lumen of this organ is filled with sperm. We attempted to answer the question whether CA activity can be controlled by the biological oscillator present in the male reproductive tract of the cotton leafworm. Using PAGE zymography, the presence of CA was demonstrated in the UVD wall, but not in the luminal fluid nor in the sperm. Using histochemistry, it was shown that CA is active in the UVD epithelium, and that this activity varies throughout the day and is most likely controlled by an endogenous biological clock. Conversely, the application of CA inhibitors, acetazolamide and sodium thiocyanate, in conjunction with an analysis of H+-ATPase activity in the acidification the UVD environment shows that CA most likely does not play a direct role in the regulation of the pH in this organ.

  1. Fluoroalkyl and alkyl chains have similar hydrophobicities in binding to the "hydrophobic wall" of carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecinović, Jasmin; Snyder, Phillip W; Mirica, Katherine A; Bai, Serena; Mack, Eric T; Kwant, Richard L; Moustakas, Demetri T; Héroux, Annie; Whitesides, George M

    2011-09-07

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H(2)NSO(2)C(6)H(4)-CONHCH(2)(CX(2))(n)CX(3), n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the

  2. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the α class carbonic anhydrases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Michael K; Tsikou, Daniela; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2011-03-01

    In this study, in silico analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed six genes (cah-1, cah-2, cah-3, cah-4, cah-5, and cah-6) possibly encoding α class CAs (carbonic anhydrase). Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed the temporal expression pattern of each gene, as well as changes in expression levels under different atmospheric conditions (stress). Cah-3 and cah-4 showed the highest levels of transcript accumulation, while most genes responded to the stress conditions. Yeast complementation showed that cah-3 was able to complement the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CA (NCE103) in vivo. Recombinant CAH-3, CAH-4a and CAH-5 enzymes, expressed in Escherichia coli were used for in vitro measurement of CA activity. However, in vitro activity was only detectable for CAH-4a. RNAi by feeding was performed on wild-type C. elegans for all genes. The worms were examined for a visible phenotype under normal and stress conditions (pH, CO(2)/O(2)). Silencing cah-3 and cah-4 may reduce the life-span of the worms (at 22 °C).

  3. How to get into bones: proton pump and carbonic anhydrase in Osedax boneworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Katz, Sigrid; Rouse, Greg W

    2013-06-22

    Osedax are gutless siboglinid worms that thrive on vertebrate bones lying on the ocean floor, mainly those of whales. The posterior body of female Osedax penetrates into the bone forming extensions known as 'roots', which host heterotrophic symbiotic bacteria in bacteriocytes beneath the epidermis. The Osedax root epithelium presumably absorbs bone collagen and/or lipids, which are metabolized by the symbiotic bacteria that in turn serve for Osedax's nutrition. Here, we show that Osedax roots express extremely high amounts of vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase (VHA), which is located in the apical membrane and in cytoplasmic vesicles of root and ovisac epithelial cells. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyses the hydration of CO2 into H(+) and HCO3(-), is also expressed in roots and throughout Osedax body. These results suggest Osedax roots have massive acid-secreting capacity via VHA, fuelled by H(+) derived from the CA-catalysed hydration of CO2 produced by aerobic metabolism. We propose the secreted acid dissolves the bone carbonate matrix to then allow the absorption of bone-derived nutrients across the skin. In an exciting example of convergent evolution, this model for acid secretion is remarkably similar to mammalian osteoclast cells. However, while osteoclasts dissolve bone for repairing and remodelling, the Osedax root epithelium secretes acid to dissolve foreign bone to access nutrients.

  4. Genetic polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase VI gene and dental caries susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Q; Hu, X-P; Zhou, J-Y; Xie, X-D; Zhang, J-M

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the role of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI gene (rs2274328, rs17032907, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186) and the possible association between these polymorphisms and dental caries susceptibility in a Northwestern Chinese population. We collected samples from 164 high caries experience and 191 very low caries experience and conducted a case-control study according to the number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and genotyped the 7 polymorphisms using a 384-well plate format with the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Individuals carrying the rs17032907 TT genotype were more likely to have an increased risk of dental caries compared with carriers of the C/C genotype in the co-dominant model, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.144 (1.096-4.195). We also found that the haplotype (ACA) (rs2274328, rs17032907 and rs11576766) was associated with a low number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.635 (0.440-0.918). However, we found no association between dental caries susceptibility and the rs2274328, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186 polymorphisms and other haplotypes. The rs17032907 genetic variant and the haplotype (ACA) of CA VI may be associated with dental caries susceptibility.

  5. Effect of sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase VA and VB inhibitors on mitochondrial metabolic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechederra, Robert L; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Supuran, Claudiu T; Minteer, Shelley D

    2013-03-15

    Obesity is quickly becoming an increasing problem in the developed world. One of the major fundamental causes of obesity and diabetes is mitochondria dysfunction due to faulty metabolic pathways which alter the metabolic substrate flux resulting in the development of these diseases. This paper examines the role of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetate, and succinate when specific isozyme inhibitors are present. Using a sensitive electrochemical approach of wired mitochondria to analytically measure metabolic energy conversion, we determine the resulting metabolic difference after addition of an inhibitory compound. We found that certain sulfonamide analogues displayed broad spectrum inhibition of metabolism, where others only had significant effect on some metabolic pathways. Pyruvate metabolism always displayed the most dramatically affected metabolism by the sulfonamides followed by fatty acid metabolism, and then finally succinate metabolism. This allows for the possibility of using designed sulfonamide analogues to target specific mitochondrial CA isozymes in order to subtly shift metabolism and glucogenesis flux to treat obesity and diabetes.

  6. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  7. A new synthetic library of the Near-Infrared CaII triplet indices. I.Index Definition, Calibration and Relations with stellar atmospheric parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Wei; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2011-01-01

    Adopting the SPECTRUM package, we have synthesized a set of 2,890 Near-InfraRed (NIR) synthetic spectra with a resolution and wavelength sampling similar to the SDSS and the forthcoming LAMOST spectra. During the synthesis, we have applied the `New grids of ATLAS9 Model Atmosphere' to provide a grid of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model atmospheres. This synthetic stellar library is composed of 1,350 solor scaled abundance (SSA) and 1,530 non-solar scaled abundance (NSSA) spectra, grounding on which we have defined a new set of NIR CaII triplet indices and an index CaT as the sum of the three. Then, these defined indices have been automatically measured on the synthetic spectra and calibrated with the indices computed on the observational spectra from the INDO-U.S. stellar library. In order to check the effect of alpha-element enhancement on the so-defined CaII indices, we have compared indices measured on the SSA spectra with those on the NSSA ones at the same terns of stellar parameters (Teff, log ...

  8. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Immobilization of Fusarium verticillioides fungus on nano-silica (NSi-Fus): a novel and efficient biosorbent for water treatment and solid phase extraction of Mg(II) and Ca(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Yakout, Amr A; Abdel-Aal, Hany; Osman, Maher M

    2013-04-01

    Biosorption and water treatment of Mg(II) and Ca(II) hardness was designed via surface loading of heat inactivated Fusarium verticillioides fungus (Fus) on nano-silica (NSi) for developing the (NSi-Fus) as a novel biosorbent. Surface characterization was confirmed by FT-IR and SEM analysis. The (NSi), (Fus) and (NSi-Fus) sorbents were investigated for removal of Mg(II) and Ca(II) by using the batch equilibrium technique under the influence of solution pH, contact time, sorbent dosage, initial metal concentration and interfering ion. The maximum magnesium capacity values were identified as 600.0, 933.3 and 1000.0 μmole g(-1) while, the maximum calcium values were 1066.7, 1800.0 and 1333.3 μmole g(-1) for (NSi), (Fus) and (NSi-Fus), respectively. Sorption equilibria were established in ∼20 min and the data were well described by both Langmuir and Freundlich models. The potential applications of these biosorbents for water-softening and extraction of magnesium and calcium from sea water samples were successfully accomplished.

  10. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation of the ligand vibrations of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shin; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-10-11

    During photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water performed by photosystem II (PSII) provides electrons necessary to fix CO2, in turn supporting life on Earth by liberating molecular oxygen. Recent high-resolution X-ray images of PSII show that the water-oxidizing center (WOC) is composed of an Mn4CaO5 cluster with six carboxylate, one imidazole, and four water ligands. FTIR difference spectroscopy has shown significant structural changes of the WOC during the S-state cycle of water oxidation, especially within carboxylate groups. However, the roles that these carboxylate groups play in water oxidation as well as how they should be properly assigned in spectra are unresolved. In this study, we performed a normal mode analysis of the WOC using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to simulate FTIR difference spectra on the S1 to S2 transition in the carboxylate stretching region. By evaluating WOC models with different oxidation and protonation states, we determined that models of high-oxidation states, Mn(III)2Mn(IV)2, satisfactorily reproduced experimental spectra from intact and Ca-depleted PSII compared with low-oxidation models. It is further suggested that the carboxylate groups bridging Ca and Mn ions within this center tune the reactivity of water ligands bound to Ca by shifting charge via their π conjugation.

  11. Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a β-carbonic anhydrase from the soil bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Supuran, Claudiu T; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Osman Beldüz, Ali

    2016-12-01

    A recombinant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the soil-dwelling bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 was cloned and purified by Co(2+) affinity chromatography. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the new enzyme (denominated here B13-CA) belongs to the β-class CAs and to possess 95% homology with the ortholog enzyme from Escherichia coli encoded by the can gene, whereas its sequence homology with the other such enzyme from E. coli (encoded by the cynT gene) was of 33%. B13-CA was characterized kinetically as a catalyst for carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons. The enzyme shows a significant catalytic activity, with the following kinetic parameters at 20 °C and pH of 8.3: kcat of 4.8 × 10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.6 × 10(7) M(-1) × s(-1). This activity was potently inhibited by acetazolamide which showed a KI of 78.9 nM. Although only this compound was investigated for the moment as B13-CA inhibitor, further studies may reveal new classes of inhibitors/activators of this enzyme which may show biomedical or environmental applications, considering the posssible role of this enzyme in CaCO3 biomineralization processes.

  12. Role of Carbonic Anhydrase as an Activator in Carbonate Rock Dissolution and Its Implication for Atmospheric CO2 Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘再华

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of CO2 into H+ and is a relatively slow reaction. Hence, its kinetics may be rate determining in carbonate rock dissolution. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), which is widespread in nature, was used to catalyze the CO2 conversion process in dissolution experiments of limestone and dolomite. It was found that the rate of dissolution increases by a factor of about 10 after the addition of CA at a high CO2 partial pressure (Pco2) for limestone and about 3 at low Pco2 for dolomite. This shows that reappraisal is necessary for the importance of chemical weathering (including carbonate rock dissolution and silicate weathering) in the atmospheric CO2 sink and the mysterious missing sink in carbon cycling. It is doubtless that previous studies of weathering underestimated weathering rates due to the ignorance of CA as an activator in weathering, thus the contribution of weathering to the atmospheric CO2 sink is also underestimated. This finding also shows the need to examine the situ distribution and activity of CA in different waters and to investigate the role of CA in weathering.``

  13. Biochemical characterization of the native α-carbonic anhydrase purified from the mantle of the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, Rosa; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Sansone, Giovanni; Barone, Carmela; Rossi, Mosè; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2017-12-01

    A α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has been purified and characterized biochemically from the mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis. As in most mollusks, this α-CA is involved in the biomineralization processes leading to the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the mussel shell. The new enzyme had a molecular weight of 50 kDa, which is roughly two times higher than that of a monomeric α-class enzyme. Thus, Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA is either a dimer, or similar to the Tridacna gigas CA described earlier, may have two different CA domains in its polypeptide chain. The Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA sequence contained the three His residues acting as zinc ligands and the gate-keeper residues present in all α-CAs (Glu106-Thr199), but had a Lys in position 64 and not a His as proton shuttling residue, being thus similar to the human isoform hCA III. This probably explains the relatively low catalytic activity of Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA, with the following kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction: kcat = 4.1 × 10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 3.6 × 10(7) M(-1) × s(-1). The enzyme activity was poorly inhibited by the sulfonamide acetazolamide, with a KI of 380 nM. This study is one of the few describing in detail the biochemical characterization of a molluskan CA and may be useful for understanding in detail the phylogeny of these enzymes, their role in biocalcification processes and their potential use in the biomimetic capture of the CO2.

  14. (41)Ca in Tooth Enamel. Part II: A means for retrospective biological neutron dosimetry in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, W; Wallner, A; Cullings, H; Egbert, S D; El-Faramawy, N; Faestermann, T; Kaul, D; Knie, K; Korschinek, G; Nakamura, N; Roberts, J; Rugel, G

    2010-08-01

    (41)Ca is produced mainly by absorption of low-energy neutrons on stable (40)Ca. We used accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure (41)Ca in enamel of 16 teeth from 13 atomic bomb survivors who were exposed to the bomb within 1.2 km from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. In our accompanying paper (Wallner et al., Radiat. Res. 174, 000-000, 2010), we reported that the background-corrected (41)Ca/Ca ratio decreased from 19.5 x 10(-15) to 2.8 x 10(-15) with increasing distance from the hypocenter. Here we show that the measured ratios are in good correlation with gamma-ray doses assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the same enamel samples, and agree well with calculated ratios based on either the current Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02) or more customized dose estimates where the regression slope as obtained from an errors-in-variables linear model was about 0.85. The calculated DS02 neutron dose to the survivors was about 10 to 80 mGy. The low-energy neutrons responsible for (41)Ca activation contributed variably to the total neutron dose depending on the shielding conditions. Namely, the contribution was smaller (10%) when shielding conditions were lighter (e.g., outside far away from a single house) and was larger (26%) when they were heavier (e.g., in or close to several houses) because of local moderation of neutrons by shielding materials. We conclude that AMS is useful for verifying calculated neutron doses under mixed exposure conditions with gamma rays.

  15. Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the interaction of methanol with the S2 state of the Mn4O5Ca cluster of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyala, Paul H; Stich, Troy A; Stull, Jamie A; Yu, Fangting; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Britt, R David

    2014-12-23

    The binding of the substrate analogue methanol to the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster of the water-oxidizing enzyme photosystem II is known to alter the electronic structure properties of the oxygen-evolving complex without retarding O2-evolution under steady-state illumination conditions. We report the binding mode of (13)C-labeled methanol determined using 9.4 GHz (X-band) hyperfine sublevel-correlation (HYSCORE) and 34 GHz (Q-band) electron spin-echo electron nuclear double resonance (ESE-ENDOR) spectroscopies. These results are compared to analogous experiments on a mixed-valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex (2-OH-3,5-Cl2-salpn)2Mn(III)Mn(IV) (salpn = N,N'-bis(3,5-dichlorosalicylidene)-1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane) in which methanol ligates to the Mn(III) ion ( Larson et al. (1992) J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 114 , 6263 ). In the mixed-valence Mn(III,IV) complex, the hyperfine coupling to the (13)C of the bound methanol (Aiso = 0.65 MHz, T = 1.25 MHz) is appreciably larger than that observed for (13)C methanol associated with the Mn4CaO5 cluster poised in the S2 state, where only a weak dipolar hyperfine interaction (Aiso = 0.05 MHz, T = 0.27 MHz) is observed. An evaluation of the (13)C hyperfine interaction using the X-ray structure coordinates of the Mn4CaO5 cluster indicates that methanol does not bind as a terminal ligand to any of the manganese ions in the oxygen-evolving complex. We favor methanol binding in place of a water ligand to the Ca(2+) in the Mn4CaO5 cluster or in place of one of the waters that form hydrogen bonds with the oxygen bridges of the cluster.

  16. Monoclonal antibody against brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II detects putative conformational changes induced by Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeVine, H. III; Su, J.L.; Sahyoun, N.E.

    1988-08-23

    A mouse monoclonal IgG1 antibody has been generated against the soluble form of the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II. This antibody recognizes both the soluble and cytoskeletal forms of the enzyme, requiring Ca/sup 2 +/ for the interaction. Other divalent cations such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/, and Ni/sup 2 +/ will substitute for Ca/sup 2 +/, while Mg/sup 2 +/ and Ba/sup 2 +/ will not. The antibody reacts with both the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits on Western blots in a similar Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent fashion but with a lower sensitivity. The affinity of the antibody for the kinase is 0.13 nM determined by displacement of /sup 125/I Bolton-Hunter-labeled kinase with unlabeled enzyme. Calmodulin and antibody reciprocally potentiate each other's interaction with the enzyme. This is illustrated both by direct binding studies and by a decrease of the K/sub m app/ for calmodulin and an increase in the V/sub max/ for the autophosphorylation reaction of the enzyme. The antibody thus appears to recognize and stabilize a conformation of the kinase which favors calmodulin binding although it does not itself activate the kinase in the absence of calmodulin. Since the M/sub r/ 30,000 catalytic fragment of the kinase is not immunoreactive, either the antibody combining site of the kinase must be present in the noncatalytic portion of the protein along with the calmodulin binding site or proteolysis interferes with the putative Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent conformational change. Thus, monoclonal antibodies can be useful tools in elucidating the mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin act on the kinase molecule.

  17. Aberrant calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is associated with abnormal dendritic spine morphology in the ATRX mutant mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Norifumi; Beppu, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Takaichi; Li, En; Kitajima, Isao; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-01-05

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein of the sucrose-nonfermenting 2 family, cause several mental retardation disorders, including α-thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome. We generated ATRX mutant mice lacking exon 2 (ATRX(ΔE2) mice), a mutation that mimics exon 2 mutations seen in human patients and associated with milder forms of retardation. ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited abnormal dendritic spine formation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Consistent with other mouse models of mental retardation, ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited longer and thinner dendritic spines compared with wild-type mice without changes in spine number. Interestingly, aberrant increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity was observed in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. Increased CaMKII autophosphorylation and activity were associated with increased phosphorylation of the Rac1-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) and kalirin-7, known substrates of CaMKII. We confirmed increased phosphorylation of p21-activated kinases (PAKs) in mPFC extracts. Furthermore, reduced protein expression and activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was evident in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. In cultured cortical neurons, PP1 inhibition by okadaic acid increased CaMKII-dependent Tiam1 and kalirin-7 phosphorylation. Together, our data strongly suggest that aberrant CaMKII activation likely mediates abnormal spine formation in the mPFC. Such morphological changes plus elevated Rac1-GEF/PAK signaling seen in ATRX(ΔE2) mice may contribute to mental retardation syndromes seen in human patients.

  18. Exclusive localization of carbonic anhydrase in bacteriocytes of the deep-sea clam Calyptogena okutanii with thioautotrophic symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoshimitsu; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Toyofuku, Takashi; Hirayama, Hisako; Takai, Ken; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea Calyptogena clams harbor thioautotrophic intracellular symbiotic bacteria in their gill epithelial cells. The symbiont fixes CO2 to synthesize organic compounds. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host catalyzes the reaction CO2 + H2O ↔ HCO3(-) + H(+), and is assumed to facilitate inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake and transport to the symbiont. However, the localization of CA in gill tissue remains unknown. We therefore analyzed mRNA sequences, proteins and CA activity in Calyptogena okutanii using expression sequence tag, SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. We found that acetazolamide-sensitive soluble CA was abundantly expressed in the gill tissue of C. okutanii, and the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against the CA of C. okutanii were used in western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of the gill tissues of C. okutanii, which showed that CA was exclusively localized in the symbiont-harboring cells (bacteriocytes) in gill epithelial cells. Western blot analysis and measurement of activity showed that CA was abundantly (26-72% of total soluble protein) detected in the gill tissues of not only Calyptogena clams but also deep-sea Bathymodiolus mussels that harbor thioautotrophic or methanotrophic symbiotic bacteria, but was not detected in a non-symbiotic mussel, Mytilus sp. The present study showed that CA is abundant in the gill tissues of deep-sea symbiotic bivalves and specifically localizes in the cytoplasm of bacteriocytes of C. okutanii. This indicates that the Ci supply process to symbionts in the vacuole (symbiosome) in bacteriocytes is essential for symbiosis.

  19. The archetype gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (Cam) contains iron when synthesized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Sheridan R; Zimmerman, Sabrina A; Apolinario, Ethel E; Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming; Ferry, James G; Sowers, Kevin R

    2009-02-10

    A recombinant protein overproduction system was developed in Methanosarcina acetivorans to facilitate biochemical characterization of oxygen-sensitive metalloenzymes from strictly anaerobic species in the Archaea domain. The system was used to overproduce the archetype of the independently evolved gamma-class carbonic anhydrase. The overproduced enzyme was oxygen sensitive and had full incorporation of iron instead of zinc observed when overproduced in Escherichia coli. This, the first report of in vivo iron incorporation for any carbonic anhydrase, supports the need to reevaluate the role of iron in all classes of carbonic anhydrases derived from anaerobic environments.

  20. Renal carbonic anhydrases are involved in the reabsorption of endogenous nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Schwarz, Alexandra; Böhmer, Anke; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Michaelsen, Jan T; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2012-02-15

    Nitrite (ONO(-)) exerts nitric oxide (NO)-related biological actions and its concentration in the circulation may be of particular importance. Nitrite is excreted in the urine. Hence, the kidney may play an important role in nitrite/NO homeostasis in the vasculature. We investigated a possible involvement of renal carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in endogenous nitrite reabsorption in the proximal tubule. The potent CA inhibitor acetazolamide was administered orally to six healthy volunteers (5 mg/kg) and nitrite was measured in spot urine samples before and after administration. Acetazolamide increased abruptly nitrite excretion in the urine, strongly suggesting that renal CAs are involved in nitrite reabsorption in healthy humans. Additional in vitro experiments support our hypothesis that nitrite reacts with CO(2), analogous to the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) with CO(2), to form acid-labile nitrito carbonate [ONOC(O)O(-)]. We assume that this reaction is catalyzed by CAs and that nitrito carbonate represents the nitrite form that is actively transported into the kidney. The significance of nitrite reabsorption in the kidney and the underlying mechanisms, notably a direct involvement of CAs in the reaction between nitrite and CO(2), remain to be elucidated.

  1. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-02-15

    The Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea encodes for a γ-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), which was cloned, purified and characterized. The enzyme (CpsCAγ) has a moderate catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with a k(cat) 6.0×10(5) s(-1) and a k(cat)/K(m) of 4.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1). A series of sulfonamides and a sulfamate were investigated as inhibitors of the new enzyme. The best inhibitor was metanilamide (K(I) of 83.5 nM) followed by indisulam, valdecoxib, celecoxib, sulthiame and hydrochlorothiazide (K(I)s ranging between 343 and 491 nM). Acetazolamide, methazolamide as well as other aromatic/heterocyclic derivatives showed inhibition constants between 502 and 7660 nM. The present study may shed some more light regarding the role that γ-CAs play in the life cycle of psychrophilic bacteria as the Antarctic one investigated here, by allowing the identification of inhibitors which may be useful as pharmacologic tools.

  2. X-ray Damage to the Mn4Ca Complex in Single Crystals ofPhotosystem II: A Case Study for Metalloprotein Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Latimer, Matthew; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Pushkar, Yulia; Biesiadka, Jacek; Loll,Bernhard; Sauer, Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra,Vittal K.

    2005-06-21

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the damage caused by exposure to X-rays to the Mn4Ca active site in single crystals of photosystem II, as a function of dose and energy of X-rays, temperature, and time. These studies reveal that the conditions used for structure determination by X-ray crystallography cause serious damage specifically to the metal-site structure. The X-ray absorption spectra show that the structure changes from one that is characteristic of a high-valent Mn4(III2,IV2) oxo-bridged Mn4Ca cluster, to that of Mn(II) in aqueous solution. This damage to the metal site occurs at a dose that is more than an order of magnitude lower than that resulting in loss of diffractivity, and commonly considered safe for protein crystallography. These results establish the first quantitative X-ray dose parameters applicable to redox-active metallo-proteins. This case study shows that a careful evaluation of the structural intactness of the active sites by spectroscopic techniques can validate structures derived from crystallography, and it can be a valuable complementary method before structure-function correlations of metallo-proteins can be made on the basis of high resolution X-ray crystal structures.

  3. X-ray damage to the Mn4Ca complex in single crystals of photosystem II: a case study for metalloprotein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Latimer, Matthew J; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Pushkar, Yulia; Biesiadka, Jacek; Loll, Bernhard; Sauer, Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2005-08-23

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the damage caused by exposure to x-rays to the Mn(4)Ca active site in single crystals of photosystem II as a function of dose and energy of x-rays, temperature, and time. These studies reveal that the conditions used for structure determination by x-ray crystallography cause serious damage specifically to the metal-site structure. The x-ray absorption spectra show that the structure changes from one that is characteristic of a high-valent Mn(4)(III(2),IV(2)) oxo-bridged Mn(4)Ca cluster to that of Mn(II) in aqueous solution. This damage to the metal site occurs at a dose that is more than one order of magnitude lower than the dose that results in loss of diffractivity and is commonly considered safe for protein crystallography. These results establish quantitative x-ray dose parameters that are applicable to redox-active metalloproteins. This case study shows that a careful evaluation of the structural intactness of the active site(s) by spectroscopic techniques can validate structures derived from crystallography and that it can be a valuable complementary method before structure-function correlations of metalloproteins can be made on the basis of high-resolution x-ray crystal structures.

  4. On the long-term correlation between the flux in the Ca II H & K and Halpha lines for FGK stars

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, J Gomes; Boisse, I; Dumusque, X; Lovis, C

    2013-01-01

    The re-emission in the cores of the Ca II H & K and H$\\alpha$ lines, are well known proxies of stellar activity. However, these activity indices probe different activity phenomena, the first being more sensitive to plage variation, while the other one being more sensitive to filaments. In this paper we study the long-term correlation between $\\log R'_{HK}$ and $\\log I_{H\\alpha}$, two indices based on the Ca II H & K and H$\\alpha$ lines respectively, for a sample of 271 FGK stars using measurements obtained over a $\\sim$9 year time span. Because stellar activity is one of the main obstacles to the detection of low-mass and long-period planets, understanding further this activity index correlation can give us some hints about the optimal target to focus on, and ways to correct for these activity effects. We found a great variety of long-term correlations between $\\log R'_{HK}$ and $\\log I_{H\\alpha}$. Around 20% of our sample has strong positive correlation between the indices while about 3% show strong ...

  5. Inhibition of the alpha- and beta-carbonic anhydrases from the gastric pathogen Helycobacter pylori with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori encodes two carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), an α- and a β-class one, hpαCA and hpβCA, crucial for its survival in the acidic environment from the stomach. Sulfonamides, strong inhibitors of these enzymes, block the growth of the pathogen, in vitro and in vivo. Here we report the inhibition of the two H. pylori CAs with inorganic and complex anions and other molecules interacting with zinc proteins. hpαCA was inhibited in the low micromolar range by diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamide, sulfamic acid, phenylboronic acid, and in the submillimolar one by cyanide, cyanate, hydrogen sulfide, divanadate, tellurate, perruthenate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, iminodisulfonate. hpβCA generally showed a stronger inhibition with most of these anions, with several low micromolar and many submillimolar inhibitors detected. These inhibitors may be used as leads for developing anti-H. pylori agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to clinically used antibiotics.

  6. Impacts of Elevated CO2 Concentration on Biochemical Composition,Carbonic Anhydrase, and Nitrate Reductase Activity of Freshwater Green Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Rong XIA; Kun-Shan GAO

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the biochemical response of freshwater green algae to elevated CO2 concentrations,Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dang cells were cultured at different CO2concentrations within the range 3-186 μmol/L and the biochemical composition, carbonic anhydrase (CA),and nitrate reductase activities of the cells were investigated. Chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, carbonhydrate,and protein contents were enhanced to varying extents with increasing CO2 concentration from 3-186μmol/L. The CO2 enrichment significantly increased the Chl a/Chl b ratio in Chlorella pyrenoidosa, but not in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CO2 concentration had significant effects on CA and nitrate reductase activity. Elevating CO2 concentration to 186 μmol/L caused a decline in intracellular and extracellullar CA activity. Nitrate reductase activity, under either light or dark conditions, in C. reinhardtii and C. pyrenoidosa was also significantly decreased with CO2 enrichment. From this study, it can be concluded that CO2enrichment can affect biochemical composition, CA, and nitrate reductase activity, and that the biochemical response was species dependent.

  7. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers show carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity against α-, β-, γ- and η-class enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Vullo, Daniela; AlOthman, Zeid; Del Prete, Sonia; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-01

    Four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers incorporating benzenesulfonamide moieties were investigated as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β-, γ- and η-classes which are present in pathogenic bacteria, fungi or protozoa. The following bacterial, fungal and protozoan organisms were included in the study: Vibrio cholerae, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani chagasi, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida glabrata, and Plasmodium falciparum. The eight pathozymes present in these organisms were efficiently inhibited by the four generations PAMAM-sulfonamide dendrimers, but multivalency effects were highly variable among the different enzyme classes. The Vibrio enzyme VchCA was best inhibited by the G3 dendrimer incorporating 32 sulfamoyl moieties. The Trypanosoma enzyme TcCA on the other hand was best inhibited by the first generation dendrimer G0 (with 4 sulfamoyl groups), whereas for other enzymes the optimal inhibitory power was observed for the G1 or G2 dendrimers, with 8 and 16 sulfonamide functionalities. This study thus proves that the multivalency may be highly relevant for enzyme inhibition for some but not all CAs from pathogenic organisms. On the other hand, some dendrimers investigated here showed a better inhibitory power compared to acetazolamide for enzymes from widespread pathogens, such as the η-CA from Plasmodium falciparum. Overall, the main conclusion is that this class of molecules may lead to important developments in the field of anti-infective CA inhibitors.

  8. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition study of a β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; De Luca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-07-01

    The oral pathogenic bacterium involved in human dental caries formation Streptococcus mutans, encodes for two carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) one belonging to the α- and the other one to the β-class. This last enzyme (SmuCA) has been cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with a major class of CA inhibitors, the inorganic anions. Here we show that SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with kcat 4.2×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7)M(-1)×s(-1), being inhibited by cyanate, carbonate, stannate, divannadate and diethyldithiocarbamate in the submillimolar range (KIs of 0.30-0.64mM) and more efficiently by sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid (KIs of 15-46μM). The anion inhibition profile of the S. mutans enzyme is very different from other α- and β-CAs investigated earlier. Identification of effective inhibitors of this new enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action.

  9. Gene encoding γ-carbonic anhydrase is cotranscribed with argC and induced in response to stationary phase and high CO2 in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Mukti N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase (CA is a ubiquitous enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction underlying diverse biochemical and physiological processes. Gamma class carbonic anhydrases (γ-CAs are widespread in prokaryotes but their physiological roles remain elusive. At present, only γ-CA of Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam has been shown to have CA activity. Genome analysis of a rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, revealed occurrence of ORFs encoding one β-CA and two γ-CAs. Results One of the putative γ-CA encoding genes of A. brasilense was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. Electrometric assays for CA activity of the whole cell extracts overexpressing recombinant GCA1 did not show CO2 hydration activity. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that gca1 in A. brasilense is co-transcribed with its upstream gene annotated as argC, which encodes a putative N-acetyl-γ-glutamate-phosphate reductase. 5'-RACE also demonstrated that there was no transcription start site between argC and gca1, and the transcription start site located upstream of argC transcribed both the genes (argC-gca1. Using transcriptional fusions of argC-gca1 upstream region with promoterless lacZ, we further demonstrated that gca1 upstream region did not have any promoter and its transcription occurred from a promoter located in the argC upstream region. The transcription of argC-gca1 operon was upregulated in stationary phase and at elevated CO2 atmosphere. Conclusions This study shows lack of CO2 hydration activity in a recombinant protein expressed from a gene predicted to encode a γ-carbonic anhydrase in A. brasilense although it cross reacts with anti-Cam antibody raised against a well characterized γ-CA. The organization and regulation of this gene along with the putative argC gene suggests its involvement in arginine biosynthetic pathway instead of the predicted CO2 hydration.

  10. Effect of salinity and temperature on the adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions by a Ca-montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Ruiz, C

    2009-01-01

    Use of clay minerals for removing mercury is an effective technology for the treatment of industrial wastewaters and can become an effective tool for the remediation of coastal ecosystems polluted with this metal. Calcic montmorillonite was employed for adsorbing Hg(II) ions from aqueous solutions at different conditions of salinity (0, 20 and 35 g NaCl L(-1)), temperature (15, 25 and 35 degrees C), and initial concentrations (0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.50, 5.00 and 10.00 mg Hg L(-1)). It was observed that 0.4 g dry weight of montmorillonite removed from 0.02 mg g(-1) (at 0.25 mg L(-1) of Hg(II)) to 0.68 mg g(-1) (at 10.0 mg L(-1) of Hg(II)) at 25 degrees C, salinity of 0 g NaCl L(-1) and pH of 6. The initial concentration of Hg(II) and salinity had an effect on the behaviour of the adsorption process, which was temperature independent. The data fit well the Freundlich adsorption isotherm, indicating that heterogeneous conditions prevail in this process.

  11. Evidence for an early evolutionary emergence of γ-type carbonic anhydrases as components of mitochondrial respiratory complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase has increased considerably relative to the homologous complex in bacteria. Comparative analyses of CI composition in animals, fungi and land plants/green algae suggest that novel components of mitochondrial CI include a set of 18 proteins common to all eukaryotes and a variable number of lineage-specific subunits. In plants and green algae, several purportedly plant-specific proteins homologous to γ-type carbonic anhydrasesCA have been identified as components of CI. However, relatively little is known about CI composition in the unicellular protists, the characterizations of which are essential to our understanding of CI evolution. Results We have performed a tandem mass spectrometric characterization of CI from the amoeboid protozoon Acanthamoeba castellanii. Among the proteins identified were two γCA homologs, AcCa1 and AcCa2, demonstrating that γCA proteins are not specific to plants/green algae. In fact, through bioinformatics searches we detected γCA homologs in diverse protist lineages, and several of these homologs are predicted to possess N-terminal mitochondrial targeting peptides. Conclusions The detection of γCAs in CI of Acanthamoeba, considered to be a closer relative of animals and fungi than plants, suggests that γCA proteins may have been an ancestral feature of mitochondrial CI, rather than a novel, plant-specific addition. This assertion is supported by the presence of genes encoding γCAs in the nuclear genomes of a wide variety of eukaryotes. Together, these findings emphasize the importance of a phylogenetically broad characterization of CI for elucidating CI evolution in eukaryotes.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2014-01-08

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis.

  13. Optic nerve oxygen tension in pigs and the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, E; Jensen, P K; Eysteinsson, T;

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture....

  14. La trehalosa. Parte II: su formación en diferentes variedades de caña

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Ravelo; Eduardo L. Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Se estudia la presencia de la Trehalosa en los jugos de 10 variedades de caña que son especialmente propensas a acumular mezclas de oligosacáridos en sus jugos luego de ser cortadas. Para ello se usó el soporte cromatográfico conocido como HYDROMAG, y su variante modificada superficialmente, HYDROMAGM, los que permiten el aislamiento del oligosacárido estudiado y la identificación del monosacárido que lo forma, respectivamente. Se complementan los estudios, determinando el peso molecular del ...

  15. MEDIUL ACADEMIC CA FACTOR DE ASIGURARE A CONTINUITĂŢII ŞI INTERCONEXIUNII DINTRE CICLURILE ÎNVĂŢĂMÂNTULUI SUPERIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia ŞEVCIUC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available În articol este abordată problema privind mediul academic ca factor de asigurare a continuităţii şi interconexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior. În acest sens sunt analizate diferite concepte cu referire la mediul academic, sunt deduse principiile de concepere a unui mediu academic eficient, dar şi modalităţi de realizare a continuităţii şi inter­conexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior. Sunt propuse sugestii de asigurare a continuităţii şi interconexiunii dintre ciclurile învăţământului superior.ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT AS A FACTOR IN ENSURING CONTINUITY AND INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN CYCLES OF HIGHER EDUCATIONThe article addressed academics as a factor of continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education. In this sense analyzed different concepts with reference to academia, they are deducted design principles of an academic environment effectively, but also ways of continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education, are proposed suggestions to ensure continuity and interconnection between cycles of higher education.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  17. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten;

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension in the...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  18. Carbonic Anhydrase: An Efficient Enzyme with Possible Global Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Boone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the global atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases continue to grow to record-setting levels, so do the demands for an efficient and inexpensive carbon sequestration system. Concurrently, the first-world dependence on crude oil and natural gas provokes concerns for long-term availability and emphasizes the need for alternative fuel sources. At the forefront of both of these research areas are a family of enzymes known as the carbonic anhydrases (CAs, which reversibly catalyze the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate. CAs are among the fastest enzymes known, which have a maximum catalytic efficiency approaching the diffusion limit of 108 M−1s−1. As such, CAs are being utilized in various industrial and research settings to help lower CO2 atmospheric emissions and promote biofuel production. This review will highlight some of the recent accomplishments in these areas along with a discussion on their current limitations.

  19. Carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli. A product of the cyn operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M B; Korte, J J; Lamblin, A F; Fuchs, J A; Anderson, P M

    1992-02-25

    The product of the cynT gene of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase. The cyn operon also includes the gene cynS, encoding the enzyme cyanase. Cyanase catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The carbonic anhydrase was isolated from an Escherichia coli strain overexpressing the cynT gene and characterized. The purified enzyme was shown to contain 1 Zn2+/subunit (24 kDa) and was found to behave as an oligomer in solution; the presence of bicarbonate resulted in partial dissociation of the oligomeric enzyme. The kinetic properties of the enzyme are similar to those of carbonic anhydrases from other species, including inhibition by sulfonamides and cyanate. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of identity with the sequences of two plant carbonic anhydrases. but not with animal and algal carbonic anhydrases. Since carbon dioxide formed in the bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate diffuses out of the cell faster than it would be hydrated to bicarbonate, the apparent function of the induced carbonic anhydrase is to catalyze hydration of carbon dioxide and thus prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate.

  20. Bio-sequestration of CO2 Using Carbonic Anhydrase in situ Encapsulated Inside Electrospun Hollow Fibers%静电纺丝制备中空纤维原位固定化碳酸酐酶用于二氧化碳的吸收

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔建东; 李莹; 姬晓元; 边红杰; 张羽飞; 苏志国; 马光辉; 张松平

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzed bio-sequestration of CO2 to form HCO-3 , followed by trapping as solid CaCO3 is one of the most promising technologies for CO2 capturing. The effects of reaction condition on the CO2 hydration using free carbonic anhydrase were systematically investigated. In order to improve the stability of the enzyme and facility its recycling, the carbonic anhydrase was in situ encapsulated inside hollow fibers via a novel co-axial electrospinning technology. Compared with the free enzyme, the immobilized carbonic an-hydrase showed much improved thermal stability and suffered much reduced inhibitory effects from cation ions, such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. After 11 reuses, the immobilized enzyme retained about 81. 9% of its original activity by comparing the amount of formed CaCO3 precipitation. In the presence of immobilized carbonic anhydrase, both calcite and vaterite CaCO3 solid were formed;while in the absence of enzyme or with free carbonic anhy-drase, only calcite CaCO3 was observed.%考察了游离碳酸酐酶吸收CO2水合体系反应条件,并通过同轴共纺静电纺丝技术制备出中空结构纤维,实现了碳酸酐酶在中空纤维中的原位包埋,提高了酶的稳定性并便于回收和重复利用.实验结果表明,固定化碳酸酐酶的热稳定性显著增强,受Cu2+和Fe3+等金属离子的抑制作用大幅度降低.连续使用11次后所生成的CaCO3沉淀量仍能达到首次使用的81.9%.固定化酶体系生成的CaCO3沉淀包括方解石型和球文石型2种晶形,而无酶和加入游离碳酸酐酶的反应体系则主要生成方解石型CaCO3沉淀.

  1. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the newly discovered bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Beldüz, Ali Osman; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-04-01

    The genome of the newly identified bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 encodes for a β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), EspCA. This enzyme was recently cloned, and characterized kinetically by this group (J. Enzyme Inhib. Med. Chem. 2016, 31). Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and sulfamates of this enzyme. The best EspCA inhibitors were some sulfanylated sulfonamides with elongated molecules, metanilamide, 4-aminoalkyl-benzenesulfonamides, acetazolamide, and deacetylated methazolamide (KIs in the range of 58.7-96.5nM). Clinically used agents such as methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, zonisamide, sulthiame, sulpiride, topiramate and valdecoxib were slightly less effective inhibitors (KIs in the range of 103-138nM). Saccharin, celecoxib, dichlorophenamide and many simple benzenesulfonamides were even less effective as EspCA inhibitors, with KIs in the range of 384-938nM. Identification of effective inhibitors of this bacterial enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of the β-class CAs in bacterial pathogenicity/virulence.

  2. Intrinsic thermodynamics of 4-substituted-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamide binding to carbonic anhydrases by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrienė, Asta; Smirnovienė, Joana; Smirnov, Alexey; Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Norvaišas, Povilas; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas

    2015-10-01

    Para substituted tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamides bind to carbonic anhydrases (CAs) extremely tightly and exhibit some of the strongest known protein-small ligand interactions, reaching an intrinsic affinity of 2 pM as determined by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The enthalpy and entropy of binding to five CA isoforms were measured by ITC in two buffers of different protonation enthalpies. The pKa values of compound sulfonamide groups were measured potentiometrically and spectrophotometrically, and enthalpies of protonation were measured by ITC in order to evaluate the proton linkage contributions to the observed binding thermodynamics. Intrinsic means the affinity of a sulfonamide anion for the Zn bound water form of CAs. Fluorination of the benzene ring significantly enhanced the observed affinities as it increased the fraction of deprotonated ligand while having little impact on intrinsic affinities. Intrinsic enthalpy contributions to the binding affinity were dominant over entropy and were more exothermic for CA I than for other CA isoforms. Thermodynamic measurements together with the X-ray crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes enabled analysis of structure-activity relationships in this enzyme ligand system.

  3. Carbonic Anhydrase VI Gene Polymorphism rs2274327 Relationship Between Salivary Parameters and Dental-Oral Health Status in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Fatih; Kilic, Munevver; Gurbuz, Taskin; Tasdemir, Sener

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to research carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and its potential association with dental-oral health status (dental caries, Plaque Index (PI) and Gingival Index (GI)) and salivary parameters (salivary buffering capacity, salivary flow rate (SFR)) in children. A total of 178 children were divided into two groups: non-carious (n = 70, 34 boys and 36 girls) and carious (n = 108, 47 boys and 61 girls). The clinical evaluations were performed according to the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft/DMFT) index by a specialist. Clinical parameters including PI, GI, and simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S) were recorded. Salivary pH (SpH) was measured using pH paper. Blood samples and unstimulated whole saliva were collected, and SFR was calculated. The CA VI rs2274327 polymorphism was determined by a LightSNiP assay on the realtime PCR system. The frequencies of rs2274327 were not significant between groups (p > 0.05). There was a positive correlation between OHI-S and SpH in the carious and non-carious groups (p OHI-S, PI, GI, SFR, and SpH (p > 0.05). CA VI SNP (rs2274327) had no statistically significant association with OHI-S, PI, GI, SFR, and SpH in the children.

  4. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition studies of a γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Viviana; Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-02-15

    We have cloned, purified and characterized the γ-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) present in the genome of the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea, which is an obligate psychrophile. The enzyme shows a significant catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: kcat of 6.0×10(5)s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.7×10(6)M(-1)×s(-1). This activity was inhibited by the sulfonamide CA inhibitor (CAI) acetazolamide, with a KI of 502nM. A range of anions was also investigated for their inhibitory action against the new enzyme CpsCA. Perchlorate, tetrafluoroborate, fluoride and bromide were not inhibitory, whereas cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, hydrogensulfide, carbonate and bicarbonate showed KIs in the range of 1.4-4.4mM. Diethyldithiocarbamate was a better inhibitor (KI of 0.58mM) whereas sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid were the most effective inhibitors detected, with KIs ranging between 8 and 38μM. The present study may shed some more light regarding the role that γ-CAs play in the life cycle of psychrophilic bacteria as the Antarctic one investigated here.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Mastrolorenzo, Antonio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-15

    A beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the protein encoded by the NCE103 gene of Candida glabrata which also present in Candida albicans and Saccharomycescerevisiae, was cloned, purified, characterized kinetically and investigated for its inhibition by a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate and some isosteric species. The enzyme showed significant CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 3.8 x 10(5)s(-1) and k(cat)/K(M) of 4.8 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1). The Cà glabrata CA (CgCA) was moderately inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 0.60-1.12 mM) but strongly inhibited by bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic acid (K(I)s of 86-98 microM). The other anions investigated showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range, with the exception of bromide and iodide (K(I)s of 27-42 mM).

  6. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Semra; Kockar, Feray; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy; Innocenti, Alessio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-12-15

    The protein encoded by the Nce103 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) designated as scCA, has been cloned, purified, characterized kinetically, and investigated for its inhibition with a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate, and some of its isosteric species. The enzyme showed high CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 9.4x10(5) s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m) of 9.8x10(7) M(-1) s(-1). scCA was weakly inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 16.8-55.6 mM) and strongly inhibited by bromide, iodide, and sulfamide (K(I)s of 8.7-10.8 microM). The other investigated anions showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range.

  7. Biomimetic CO2 capture using a highly thermostable bacterial α-carbonic anhydrase immobilized on a polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardini, Fortunato; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Rossi, Mosè; Corbo, Pasquale; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2014-02-01

    The biomimetic approach represents an interesting strategy for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, offering advantages over other methods, due to its specificity for CO2 and its eco-compatibility, as it allows concentration of CO2 from other gases, and its conversion to water soluble ions. This approach uses microorganisms capable of fixing CO2 through metabolic pathways or via the use of an enzyme, such as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Recently, our group cloned and purified a novel bacterial α-CA, named SspCA, from the thermophilic bacteria, Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense YO3AOP1 living in hot springs at temperatures of up to 110 °C. This enzyme showed an exceptional thermal stability, retaining its high catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction even after being heated at 70 °C for several hours. In the present paper, the SspCA was immobilized within a polyurethane (PU) foam. The immobilized enzyme was found to be catalytically active and showed a long-term stability. A bioreactor containing the "PU-immobilized enzyme" (PU-SspCA) as shredded foam was used for experimental tests aimed to verify the CO2 capture capability in conditions close to those of a power plant application. In this bioreactor, a gas phase, containing CO2, was put into contact with a liquid phase under conditions, where CO2 contained in the gas phase was absorbed and efficiently converted into bicarbonate by the extremo-α-CA.

  8. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  9. MiR-152 may silence translation of CaMK II and induce spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation has always been a hotspot in transplantation-immune research. Recent studies revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs, hepatic satellite cells and Kupffer cells play a potential role in spontaneous immune tolerance, however the precise mechanism of spontaneous immune tolerance is still undefined. By using Microarray Chips, we investigated different immune regulatory factors to decipher critical mechanisms of spontaneous tolerance after mouse liver transplantation. Allogeneic (C57BL/6-C3H and syngeneic (C3H-C3H liver transplantation were performed by 6-8 weeks old male C57BL/6 and C3H mice. Graft samples (N = 4 each group were collected from 8 weeks post-operation mice. 11 differentially expressed miRNAs in allogeneic grafts (Allografts vs. syngeneic grafts (Syngrafts were identified using Agilent Mouse miRNA Chips. It was revealed that 185 genes were modified by the 11 miRNAs, furthermore, within the 185 target genes, 11 of them were tightly correlated with immune regulation after Gene Ontology (GO, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analysis and Genbank data cross-comparison. Verified by real-time PCR and western blot, our results indicated that mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TAB2 were respectively down regulated following miR-142-3p and miR-155 augment. In addition, increased miR-152 just silenced mRNA of CaMK II and down-regulated translation of CaMK II in tolerated liver grafts, which may play a critical role in immune regulation and spontaneous tolerance induction of mouse liver transplantation.

  10. Ca(II) doped β-In2S3 hierarchical structures for photocatalytic hydrogen generation and organic dye degradation under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuang; Xu, Cheng-Yan; Zhang, Bao-You; Yang, Li; Hu, Sheng-Peng; Zhen, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Hierarchical structures assembled by two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets could inherit the characteristics of nanosheets and acquire additional advantages from the unique secondary architectures, which would have important influences on the photocatalytic properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. In this work, we successfully synthesized Ca(II) doped β-In2S3 hierarchical structures stacked by thin nanosheets by a simple solution chemical process. The effects of reaction temperature and Ca(2+) concentration on the size and morphology of the products were systematically investigated. The photocatalytic applications of the β-In2S3 hierarchical structures were evaluated for hydrogen production and degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation (λ>420nm). The β-In2S3 hierarchical structures showed promising activity towards photocatalytic hydrogen production (145.0μmolg(-1)h(-1)) and RhB solution (1×10(-5)M) was completely degraded within 100min under visible light irradiation.

  11. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible carbonic anhydrase-IX enhances hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor-induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-jong YU; Hyo-suk LEE; Jung-hwan YOON; Jeong-hoon LEE; Sun-jung MYUNG; Eun-sun JANG; Min-sun KWAK; Eun-ju CHO; Ja-june JANG; Yoon-jun KIM

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The hypoxic condition within large or infiltrative hypovascular tumors produces intracellular acidification, which could activate many signaling pathways and augment cancer cell growth and invasion. Carbonic anhydrase-Ⅸ (CA-Ⅸ) is an enzyme lowering pH. This study is to examine whether hypoxia induces CA-Ⅸ in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and to evaluate its clinical implication in HCC patients.Methods: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and HepG2 cells) were used, and cell growth was assessed using MTS assay. CA-IX expression and apoptotic/kinase signaling were evaluated using immunoblotting. The cells were transfected with CA-Ⅸ-specific siRNA, or treated with its inhibitor 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonamide (CAI#1), and/or the hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). A clinic pathological analysis of 69 patients who underwent an HCC resection was performed using a tissue array.Results: Incubation of HCC cells under hypoxia (1% 02, 5% C02, 94% N2) for 36 h significantly increased CA-IX expression level. CAI#1(400 μmol/L) or CA-IX siRNA (100 μmol/L) did not influence HCC cell growth and induce apoptosis. However, CAI#1 or CA-IX siRNA at these concentrations enhanced the apoptosis induced by 3-BP (100 μmol/L). This enhancement was attributed to increased ER stress and JNK activation, as compared with 3-BP alone. Furthermore, a clinic pathological analysis of 69 HCC patients revealed that tumor CA-Ⅸ intensity was inversely related to E-cadherin intensity.Conclusion: Inhibition of hypoxia-induced CA-Ⅸ enhances hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor-induced HCC apoptosis. Furthermore, CA-IX expres sion profiles may have prognostic implications in HCC patients. Thus, the inhibition of CA-Ⅸ, in combination with a hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor, may be therapeutically useful in patients with HCCs that are aggressively growing in a hypoxic environment.

  12. Design and Synthesis of Novel Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Hybrids (NSAIDs-CAIs) for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bua, Silvia; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Vullo, Daniela; Ghelardini, Carla; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carta, Fabrizio

    2017-02-09

    We report the synthesis of a series of hybrid compounds incorporating 6- and 7-substituted coumarins (carbonic anhydrase, CA inhibitors) derivatized with clinically used NSAIDs (indomethacin, sulindac, ketoprofen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, ketorolac, etc., cyclooxygenase inhibitors) as agents for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most compounds were effective in inhibiting the RA overexpressed hCA IX and XII, with KI values in the low nanomolar-subnanomolar ranges. The antihyperalgesic activity of such compounds was assessed by means of the paw-pressure and incapacitance tests using an in vivo RA model. Among all tested compounds, the 7-coumarine hybrid with ibuprofen showed potent and persistent antihyperalgesic effect up to 60 min after administration.

  13. Size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles lead to a variant behavior in the unfolding dynamics of human carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Irem; Lundqvist, Martin; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence revealed that HCAs adsorb to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, however the dynamics of the unfolding at the nanoparticle surfaces drastically vary with the polarity. The size of the nanoparticles has opposite effects depending on the polarity of the nanoparticle surface. The apolar nanoparticles induce seconds timescale structural rearrangements whereas polar nanoparticles induce hours timescale structural rearrangements on the same charged HCA variant. Here, a simple model is proposed where the difference in the timescales of adsorption is correlated with the energy barriers for initial docking and structural rearrangements which are firmly regulated by the surface polarity. Near-UV circular dichorism (CD) further supports that both protein variants undergo structural rearrangements at the nanoparticle surfaces regardless of being ``hard'' or ``soft''. However, the conformational changes induced by the apolar surfaces differ for each HCA isoform and diverge from the previously reported effect of silica nanoparticles.The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino

  14. Participation of glutamate-333 of the D1 polypeptide in the ligation of the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service, Rachel J; Yano, Junko; Dilbeck, Preston L; Burnap, Robert L; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard J

    2013-11-26

    In the 1.9 Å structural model of photosystem II (PDB: 3ARC), the amino acid residue Glu333 of the D1 polypeptide coordinates to the oxygen-evolving Mn₄CaO₅ cluster. This residue appears to be highly significant in that it bridges the two Mn ions (Mn(B3) and the "dangling" Mn(A4)) that are also bridged by the oxygen atom O5. This oxygen atom has been proposed to be derived from one of two substrate water molecules and to become incorporated into the product dioxygen molecule during the final step in the catalytic cycle. In addition, the backbone nitrogen of D1-Glu333 interacts directly with a nearby Cl⁻ atom. To further explore the influence of this structurally unique residue on the properties of the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster, the D1-E333Q mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was characterized with a variety of biophysical and spectroscopic methods, including polarography, EPR, X-ray absorption, and FTIR difference spectroscopy. The kinetics of oxygen release in the mutant were essentially unchanged from those in wild-type. In addition, the oxygen flash yields exhibited normal period-four oscillations having normal S state parameters, although the yields were lower, indicative of the mutant's lower steady-state dioxygen evolution rate of approximately 30% compared to that of the wild-type. The S₁ state Mn-XANES and Mn-EXAFS and S₂ state multiline EPR signals of purified D1-E333Q PSII core complexes closely resembled those of wild-type, aside from having lower amplitudes. The S(n+1)-minus-S(n) FTIR difference spectra showed only minor alterations to the carbonyl, amide, and carboxylate stretching regions. However, the mutation eliminated a negative peak at 3663 cm⁻¹ in the weakly H-bonding O-H stretching region of the S₂-minus-S₁ FTIR difference spectrum and caused an approximately 9 cm⁻¹ downshift of the negative feature in this region of the S₁-minus-S₀ FTIR difference spectrum. We conclude that fully functional Mn₄Ca

  15. Hemoglobin level predicts outcome for vulvar cancer patients independent of GLUT-1 and CA-IX expression in tumor tissue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Hullu, J.A. de; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bulten, J.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia has been associated with poor prognosis in several solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine whether the hypoxia-associated markers glucose transporter (GLUT)-1 and carbonic anhydrase (CA)-IX expression and preoperative hemoglobin (Hb) levels correlate with presence o

  16. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of carbonic anhydrases are developmentally regulated during tooth formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes-Göran Reibring

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for

  17. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  18. Evidence for the involvement of carbonic anhydrase and urease in calcium carbonate formation in the gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Harrison, J. L.; Campbell, J. W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms that could modulate the formation of otoconia, calcium carbonate granules in the inner ear of vertebrate species, we examined statoconia formation in the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica using an in vitro organ culture model. We determined the type of calcium carbonate present in the statoconia and investigated the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease in regulating statocyst pH as well as the role of protein synthesis and urease in statoconia production and homeostasis in vitro. The type of mineral present in statoconia was found to be aragonitic calcium carbonate. When the CA inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZ), was added to cultures of statocysts, the pH initially (30 min) increased and then decreased. The urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), decreased statocyst pH. Simultaneous addition of AZ and AHA caused a decrease in pH. Inhibition of urease activity also reduced total statoconia number, but had no effect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of protein synthesis reduced statoconia production and increased statoconia volume. In a previous study, inhibition of CA was shown to decrease statoconia production. Taken together, these data show that urease and CA play a role in regulating statocyst pH and the formation and maintenance of statoconia. CA produces carbonate ion for calcium carbonate formation and urease neutralizes the acid formed due to CA action, by production of ammonia.

  19. Anion inhibition studies of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Scozzafava, Andrea; Parkkila, Seppo; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-08-01

    The protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes an α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), TcCA, which was recently shown to be crucial for its life cycle. Thiols, a class of strong TcCA inhibitors, were also shown to block the growth of the pathogen in vitro. Here we report the inhibition of TcCA by inorganic and complex anions and other molecules interacting with zinc proteins, such as sulfamide, sulfamic acid, phenylboronic/arsonic acids. TcCA was inhibited in the low micromolar range by iodide, cyanate, thiocyanate, hydrogensulfide and trithiocarbonate (KIs in the range of 44-93 μM), but the best inhibitor was diethyldithiocarbamate (KI=5 μM). Sulfamide showed an inhibition constant of 120 μM, but sulfamic acid was much less effective (KI of 10.6 mM). The discovery of diethyldithiocarbamate as a low micromolar TcCA inhibitor may be useful to detect leads for developing anti-Trypanosoma agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to clinically used drugs (benznidazole, nifurtimox) for which significant resistance emerged.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase activity and photosynthetic rate in the tree species Paulownia tomentosa Steud. Effect of dimethylsulfoxide treatment and zinc accumulation in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazova, Galia N; Naidenova, Tsveta; Velinova, Katya

    2004-03-01

    The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) catalyzes the reversible conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and has been shown to be involved in photosynthesis. The enzyme has been shown in animals, plants, eubacteria and viruses, but similar reports on the evidence for CA activity in tree plants does not be appear to be available. In the preliminary analyses of the work, the CA activity in leaf extracts from the tree species Paulownia tomentosa Steud. (introduced in Bulgaria) is described. A connection between CA activity and the rate of photosynthetic CO2 fixation is shown. In the second portion of the work, the effect of 10(-4) mol/L and 10(-2) mol/L dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the zinc accumulation in leaves is demonstrated. It is suggested that CA activity is an indicator of the level of physiologically active zinc in leaves of P. tomentosa Steud. A connection between the process of zinc accumulation in leaves and the activity of the enzymes CA and glycolate oxidase (GO) (EC 1.1.3.1) is established.

  1. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and

  2. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Tori A; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2014-01-16

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI is the lone secreted CA and exists in both saliva and the gastrointestinal mucosa. An alternative, stress-inducible isoform of CAVI (CAVI-b) has been shown to be expressed from a cryptic promoter that is activated by the CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP). The CAVI-b isoform is not secreted and is currently of unknown physiological function. Here we use neuronal models, including a model derived using Car6 and CHOP gene ablations, to delineate a role for CAVI-b in ischemic protection. Our results demonstrate that CAVI-b expression, which is increased through CHOP-signaling in response to unfolded protein stress, is also increased by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). While enforced expression of CAVI-b is not sufficient to protect against ischemia, CHOP regulation of CAVI-b is necessary for adaptive changes mediated by BDNF that reduce subsequent ischemic damage. These results suggest that CAVI-b comprises a necessary component of a larger adaptive signaling pathway downstream of CHOP.

  3. Variable involvement of the perivascular retinal tissue in carbonic anhydrase inhibitor induced relaxation of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehler, Anne Katrine; Holmgaard, Kim; Hessellund, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in the eye is an important treatment modality for reducing the intraocular pressure in glaucoma. However, evidence suggests that carbonic anhydrase inhibition also exerts a relaxing effect on the vessels in the optic nerve, and it has been suggested...

  4. HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG. IV. Time resolved analysis of the Ca ii H&K and Hα chromospheric emission of low-activity early-type M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandariato, G.; Maldonado, J.; Affer, L.; Biazzo, K.; Leto, G.; Stelzer, B.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; González Álvarez, E.; González Hernández, J. I.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Messina, S.; Micela, G.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Piotto, G.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Rosich, A.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. M dwarfs are prime targets for current and future planet search programs, particularly those focused on the detection and characterization of rocky planets in the habitable zone. In this context, understanding their magnetic activity is important for two main reasons: it affects our ability to detect small planets and it plays a key role in the characterization of the stellar environment. Aims: We analyze observations of the Ca ii H&K and Hα lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity for low-activity early-type M dwarfs. Methods: We analyze the time series of spectra of 71 early-type M dwarfs collected in the framework of the HADES project for planet search purposes. The HARPS-N spectra simultaneously provide the Ca ii H&K doublet and the Hα line. We develop a reduction scheme able to correct the HARPS-N spectra for instrumental and atmospheric effects, and also to provide flux-calibrated spectra in units of flux at the stellar surface. The Ca ii H&K and Hα fluxes are then compared with each other, and their time variability is analyzed. Results: We find that the Ca ii H and K flux excesses are strongly correlated with each other, while the Hα flux excess is generally less correlated with the Ca ii H&K doublet. We also find that Hα emission does not increase monotonically with the Ca ii H&K line flux, showing some absorption before being filled in by chromospheric emission when Ca ii H&K activity increases. Analyzing the time variability of the emission fluxes, we derive a tentative estimate of the rotation period (on the order of a few tens of days) for some of the program stars, and the typical lifetime of chromospheric active regions (on the order of a few stellar rotations). Conclusions: Our results are in good agreement with similar previous studies. In particular, we find evidence that the chromospheres of early-type M dwarfs could be characterized by different filament coverage, affecting the formation mechanism of the Hα line. We also

  5. Toward models for the full oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II by ligand coordination to lower the symmetry of the Mn3CaO4 cubane: demonstration that electronic effects facilitate binding of a fifth metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanady, Jacob S; Lin, Po-Heng; Carsch, Kurtis M; Nielsen, Robert J; Takase, Michael K; Goddard, William A; Agapie, Theodor

    2014-10-15

    Synthetic model compounds have been targeted to benchmark and better understand the electronic structure, geometry, spectroscopy, and reactivity of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, a low-symmetry Mn4CaOn cluster. Herein, low-symmetry Mn(IV)3GdO4 and Mn(IV)3CaO4 cubanes are synthesized in a rational, stepwise fashion through desymmetrization by ligand substitution, causing significant cubane distortions. As a result of increased electron richness and desymmetrization, a specific μ3-oxo moiety of the Mn3CaO4 unit becomes more basic allowing for selective protonation. Coordination of a fifth metal ion, Ag(+), to the same site gives a Mn3CaAgO4 cluster that models the topology of the OEC by displaying both a cubane motif and a "dangler" transition metal. The present synthetic strategy provides a rational roadmap for accessing more accurate models of the biological catalyst.

  6. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  7. Carbonic Anhydrase and Zinc in Plant Physiology Anhidrasa Carbónica y Zinc en Fisiología Vegetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Jacqueline Escudero-Almanza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase (CA (EC: 2.4.1.1 catalyzes the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide plus water into a proton and the bicarbonate ion (HCO3- that can be found in prokaryotes and higher organisms; it is represented by four different families. Carbonic anhydrase is a metalloenzyme that requires Zn as a cofactor and is involved in diverse biological processes including pH regulation, CO2 transfer, ionic exchange, respiration, CO2 photosynthetic fixation, and stomatal closure. Therefore, the review includes relevant aspects about CA morphology, oligomerization, and structural differences in the active site. On the other hand, we consider the general characteristics of Zn, its geometry, reactions, and physiology. We then consider the CA catalysis mechanism that is carried out by the metal ion and where Zn acts as a cofactor. Zinc deficiency can inhibit growth and protein synthesis, and there is evidence that it reduces the CA content in some plants, which is a relationship addressed in this review. In leaves, CA represents 20.1% of total soluble protein, while it is the second most abundant in the chloroplast after ribulose 1,5-disphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. This facilitates the supply of CO2 to the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C4 and CAM plants and RuBisCO in C3 plants.La anhidrasa carbónica (CA (EC: 4.2.1.1 cataliza la conversión rápida de dióxido de carbono más agua en un protón y el ion bicarbonato (HCO3-; la cual puede encontrarse en procariotas y en organismos superiores y está representada por cuatro familias distintas. La CA es una metaloenzima que requiere Zn como cofactor y está implicada en diversos procesos biológicos, incluyendo la regulación del pH, la transferencia de CO2, intercambio iónico, la respiración, la fijación fotosintética de CO2, y el cierre estomático. Por lo cual, la revisión incluye aspectos relevantes sobre la morfología de laAC, su oligomerización y diferencias estructurales en el

  8. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  9. A physiological role for cyanate-induced carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Guilloton, M B; Lamblin, A F; Kozliak, E I; Gerami-Nejad, M; Tu, C.; Silverman, D.; Anderson, P. M.; Fuchs, J A

    1993-01-01

    Cyanate induces expression of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli. The cyn operon includes the gene cynS, encoding cyanase, which catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. A carbonic anhydrase activity was recently found to be encoded by the cynT gene, the first gene of the cyn operon; it was proposed that carbonic anhydrase prevents depletion of bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 by diffusion out of the cell (M. B. Guilloto...

  10. Carbonic anhydrase mimics for enhanced CO2 absorption in an amine-based capture solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Rachael A; Miller, David A; Parkin, Sean R; Liu, Kun; Remias, Joe E; Yang, Yue; Lightstone, Felice C; Liu, Kunlei; Lippert, Cameron A; Odom, Susan A

    2016-01-07

    Two new small-molecule enzyme mimics of carbonic anhydrase were prepared and characterized. These complexes contain the salen-like ligand bis(hydroxyphenyl)phenanthroline. This ligand is similar to the salen-type ligands previously incorporated into carbonic anhydrase mimics but contains no hydrolyzable imine groups and therefore serves as a promising ligand scaffold for the synthesis of a more robust CO2 hydration catalyst. These homogeneous catalysts were investigated for CO2 hydration in concentrated primary amine solutions through which a dilute CO2 (14%) fluid stream was flowed and showed exceptional activity for increased CO2 absorption rates.

  11. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo;

    2009-01-01

    bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  12. Synthetic CA II Triplet Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, M. M.; Barbuy, B.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se hicieron calculos de sintesis del espectro en el ititervalo de longitud de onda - 8700 A, ara ? oder verificar el comporta- mien to de diferentes lineas moleculares y at5micas como funci5n de los parametros esteldres de temperatura, gravedad y metalicidad. El espec- tro sintetico ha sido generado para:(a) todas las , (b) solamente de CN, (c) solamente de TiO, y (d) solamente lineas at6micas. Abstract. Spectrum synthesis calculations are carried out in the wavelength interval X 8300 - 8700 A, in order to verify the behaviour of different molecular and atomic lines as a function of the stellar para meters temperature, gravity and metallicity. Synthetic spectra were ge nerated for: (a) all lines, (b) only CN lines, (c) only TiO lines, and (d) only atomic lines Key `td6: LINE-PROFILE - ST S-AThOSPHERES

  13. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti α-Type Carbonic Anhydrase and Its Role in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tsikou, Daniela; Lampiri, Vasiliki; Fotelli, Mariangela N.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Fasseas, Costas; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an α-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized, and it was proven to be an active α-CA. The biochemical and physiological roles of the CAA1 gene in free-living and symbiotic rhizobia were examined by using an M. loti R7A disruption mutant strain. Our analysis revealed that CAA1 is expressed in both nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and free-living bacteria during growth in batch cultures, where gene expression was induced by increased medium pH. L. japonicus plants inoculated with the CAA1 mutant strain showed no differences in top-plant traits and nutritional status but consistently formed a higher number of nodules exhibiting higher fresh weight, N content, nitrogenase activity, and δ13C abundance. Based on these results, we propose that although CAA1 is not essential for nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it may participate in an auxiliary mechanism that buffers the bacteroid periplasm, creating an environment favorable for NH3 protonation, thus facilitating its diffusion and transport to the plant. In addition, changes in the nodule δ13C abundance suggest the recycling of at least part of the HCO3− produced by CAA1. PMID:19218391

  14. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti alpha-type carbonic anhydrase and its role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tsikou, Daniela; Lampiri, Vasiliki; Fotelli, Mariangela N; Rennenberg, Heinz; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Fasseas, Costas; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an alpha-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized, and it was proven to be an active alpha-CA. The biochemical and physiological roles of the CAA1 gene in free-living and symbiotic rhizobia were examined by using an M. loti R7A disruption mutant strain. Our analysis revealed that CAA1 is expressed in both nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and free-living bacteria during growth in batch cultures, where gene expression was induced by increased medium pH. L. japonicus plants inoculated with the CAA1 mutant strain showed no differences in top-plant traits and nutritional status but consistently formed a higher number of nodules exhibiting higher fresh weight, N content, nitrogenase activity, and delta(13)C abundance. Based on these results, we propose that although CAA1 is not essential for nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it may participate in an auxiliary mechanism that buffers the bacteroid periplasm, creating an environment favorable for NH(3) protonation, thus facilitating its diffusion and transport to the plant. In addition, changes in the nodule delta(13)C abundance suggest the recycling of at least part of the HCO(3)(-) produced by CAA1.

  15. T tubules and surface membranes provide equally effective pathways of carbonic anhydrase-facilitated lactic acid transport in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Hallerdei

    Full Text Available We have studied lactic acid transport in the fast mouse extensor digitorum longus muscles (EDL by intracellular and cell surface pH microelectrodes. The role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases (CA of EDL in lactic acid transport was investigated by measuring lactate flux in muscles from wildtype, CAIV-, CAIX- and CAXIV-single ko, CAIV-CAXIV double ko and CAIV-CAIX-CAXIV-triple ko mice. This was complemented by immunocytochemical studies of the subcellular localization of CAIV, CAIX and CAXIV in mouse EDL. We find that CAXIV and CAIX single ko EDL exhibit markedly but not maximally reduced lactate fluxes, whereas triple ko and double ko EDL show maximal or near-maximal inhibition of CA-dependent lactate flux. Interpretation of the flux measurements in the light of the immunocytochemical results leads to the following conclusions. CAXIV, which is homogeneously distributed across the surface membrane of EDL fibers, facilitates lactic acid transport across this membrane. CAIX, which is associated only with T tubular membranes, facilitates lactic acid transport across the T tubule membrane. The removal of lactic acid from the lumen of T tubuli towards the interstitial space involves a CO2-HCO3- diffusional shuttle that is maintained cooperatively by CAIX within the T tubule and, besides CAXIV, by the CAIV, which is strategically located at the opening of the T tubules. The data suggest that about half the CA-dependent muscular lactate flux occurs across the surface membrane, while the other half occurs across the membranes of the T tubuli.

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gul N; Rubbelke, Timothy S; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D; Sly, William S

    2013-04-30

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium-potassium citrate-supplemented water, they produced offspring in expected numbers. Their blood ammonia concentrations were markedly elevated, but their fasting blood sugars were normal. By contrast, Car5B null mice showed normal growth and normal blood ammonia levels. They too had normal fasting blood sugars. Car5A/B double-knockout (DKO) mice showed additional abnormalities. Impaired growth was more severe than for Car5A null mice. Hyperammonemia was even greater as well. Although fertile, DKO animals were produced in less-than-predicted numbers even when supplemented with sodium-potassium citrate in their drinking water. Survival after weaning was also reduced, especially for males. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels for DKO mice were significantly lower than for controls (153 ± 33 vs. 230 ± 24 mg/dL). The enhanced hyperammonemia and lower fasting blood sugar, which are both seen in the DKO mice, indicate that both Car5A and Car5B contribute to both ammonia detoxification (ureagenesis) and regulation of fasting blood sugar (gluconeogenesis). Car5A, which is expressed mainly in liver, clearly has the predominant role in ammonia detoxification. The contribution of Car5B to ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis was evident only on a Car5A null background.

  17. The impact of Carbonic Anhydrase on the partitioning of leaf and soil CO18O and COS gas exchange across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, L.; Wehr, R. A.; Commane, R.; Ogee, J.; Sauze, J.; Jones, S.; Launois, T.; Wohl, S.; Whelan, M.; Meredith, L. K.; Genty, B.; Gimeno, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Bosc, A.; Cuntz, M.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; Saleska, S. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis (GPP), the largest CO2 flux to the land surface, is currently estimated with considerable uncertainty at between 100-175 Pg C yr-1. More robust estimates of global GPP could be obtained from the atmospheric budgets of other valuable tracers, such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) or the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of atmospheric CO2. However, quantifying GPP using these tracers hinges on a better understanding of how soil micro-organisms modify the atmospheric concentrations of CO18O and COS at large scales. In particular, understanding better the role and activity of the enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) in soil micro-organisms is critical. We present novel datasets and model simulations demonstrating the progress in the collection of multi-tracer field datasets and how a new generation of multi-tracer land surface models can provide valuable constraints on photosynthesis and respiration across scales.

  18. Synthesis of 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamides and their carbonic anhydrase inhibitory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Halise Inci; Kucukoglu, Kaan; Yamali, Cem; Bilginer, Sinan; Yuca, Hafize; Ozturk, Iknur; Taslimi, Parham; Gulcin, Ilhami; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamides were synthesized by microwave irradiation and their chemical structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)CNMR, and HRMS. Ketones used were: Acetophenone (S1), 4-methylacetophenone (S2), 4-chloroacetophenone (S3), 4-fluoroacetophenone (S4), 4-bromoacetophenone (S5), 4-methoxyacetophenone (S6), 4-nitroacetophenone (S7), 2-acetylthiophene (S8), 2-acetylfuran (S9), 1-indanone (S10), 2-indanone (S11). The compounds S9, S10 and S11 were reported for the first time, while S1-S8 was synthesized by different method than literature reported using microwave irradiation method instead of conventional heating in this study. The inhibitory effects of 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamide derivatives (S1-S11) against hCA I and II were studied. Cytosolic hCA I and II isoenzymes were potently inhibited by new synthesized sulphonamide derivatives with Kis in the range of 1.79 ± 0.22-2.73 ± 0.08 nM against hCA I and in the range of 1.72 ± 0.58-11.64 ± 5.21 nM against hCA II, respectively.

  19. Carboxysomal carbonic anhydrases: Structure and role in microbial CO2 fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-06-23

    Cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophic bacteria are able to grow in environments with limiting CO2 concentrations by employing a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that allows them to accumulate inorganic carbon in their cytoplasm to concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than that on the outside. The final step of this process takes place in polyhedral protein microcompartments known as carboxysomes, which contain the majority of the CO2-fixing enzyme, RubisCO. The efficiency of CO2 fixation by the sequestered RubisCO is enhanced by co-localization with a specialized carbonic anhydrase that catalyzes dehydration of the cytoplasmic bicarbonate and ensures saturation of RubisCO with its substrate, CO2. There are two genetically distinct carboxysome types that differ in their protein composition and in the carbonic anhydrase(s) they employ. Here we review the existing information concerning the genomics, structure and enzymology of these uniquely adapted carbonic anhydrases, which are of fundamental importance in the global carbon cycle.

  20. Antibody inhibiting enzymatic activity of tumour-associated carbonic anhydrase isoform IX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murri-Plesko, M.T.; Hulikova, A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Scott, A.M.; Zortea, A.; Harris, A.L.; Ritter, G.; Old, L.; Bauer, S.; Swietach, P.; Renner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia-induced, membrane-tethered enzyme that is highly expressed in many cancers. It catalyses the hydration of CO(2) to HCO(3)(-) and H(+), and the reverse dehydration reaction. Recent studies have shown an important role for CAIX in pH regulation and it has been

  1. The CA domain of the respiratory complex I is required for normal embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Marchetti, Fernanda; Soto, Débora; Martin, María Victoria; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina; Zabaleta, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    The NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase [complex I (CI), EC 1.6.5.3] of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the principal entry point of electrons, and vital in maintaining metabolism and the redox balance. In a variety of eukaryotic organisms, except animal and fungi (Opisthokonta), it contains an extra domain composed of putative gamma carbonic anhydrases subunits, named the CA domain, which was proposed to be essential for complex I assembly. There are two kinds of carbonic anhydrase subunits: CAs (of which there are three) and carbonic anhydrase-like proteins (CALs) (of which there are two). In plants, the CA domain has been linked to photorespiration. In this work, we report that Arabidopsis mutant plants affected in two specific CA subunits show a lethal phenotype. Double homozygous knockouts ca1ca2 embryos show a significant developmental delay compared to the non-homozygous embryos, which show a wild-type (WT) phenotype in the same silique. Mutant embryos show impaired mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The characteristic embryo greening does not take place and fewer but larger oil bodies are present. Although seeds look dark brown and wrinkled, they are able to germinate 12 d later than WT seeds. However, they die immediately, most likely due to oxidative stress.Since the CA domain is required for complex I biogenesis, it is predicted that in ca1ca2 mutants no complex I could be formed, triggering the lethal phenotype. The in vivo composition of a functional CA domain is proposed.

  2. Characterization and anions inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Deniz; Ceyhun, Saltuk Buğrahan; Sentürk, Murat; Erdem, Deryanur; Küfrevioğlu, Omer İrfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-01-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) was purified from the gill of the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax (European seabass). The purification procedure consisted of a single step affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B-tyrosine-sulfanilamide. The enzyme was purified 84.9-fold with a yield of 58%, and a specific activity of 838.9 U/mg proteins. It has an optimum pH at 8.0; an optimum temperature at 10°C. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for its esterase activity, with 4-nitrophenyl acetate (NPA) as substrate. The following anions, H₂NSO₃⁻, I⁻, SCN⁻, NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻, N₃⁻, Br⁻, Cl⁻, SO₄²⁻, and F⁻ showed inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Sulfamic acid, iodide, and thiocyanate exhibited the strongest inhibitory action, in the micromolar range (K(i)s of 87-187 μM). NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻ and N₃⁻ were moderate inhibitors, whereas other anions showed only weak actions. All tested anions inhibited the enzyme in a competitive manner. Our findings indicate that these anions inhibit the fish enzyme in a similar manner to other α-CAs from mammals investigated earlier, but the susceptibility to various anions differs significantly between the fish and mammalian CAs.

  3. Effects of La(III) and Ca(II) on isolated Carassius auratus liver mitochondria: heat production and mitochondrial permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man; Gao, Jia-Ling; Sun, Mei-Xiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The effects of lanthanum and calcium on heat production of mitochondria isolated from Carassius auratus liver were investigated by microcalorimetry, and their effects on mitochondrial swelling and membrane potential (Δψ) were determined by spectroscopic methods. La(3+) showed only inhibitory action on mitochondrial energy turnover with inhibition concentration of 50 % (IC50) being 71.2 μmol L(-1). Similarly, Ca(2+) restrained the heat production of mitochondria, and the IC50 of Ca(2+) was much higher than that of La(3+). In the spectroscopic experiments, La(3+) and Ca(2+) induced fish liver mitochondrial swelling and decreased membrane potential (Δψ), and the induction ability of La(3+) was stronger than that of Ca(2+). It is concluded that the effects of La(3+) and Ca(2+) on fish liver mitochondria differ, and La represents toxic action rather than Ca analogy.

  4. Inhibition of bacterial carbonic anhydrases and zinc proteases: from orphan targets to innovative new antibiotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-containing enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs) and metalloproteases (MPs) play critical functions in bacteria, being involved in various steps of their life cycle, which are important for survival, colonization, acquisition of nutrients for growth and proliferation, facilitation of dissemination, invasion and pathogenicity. The development of resistance to many classes of clinically used antibiotics emphasizes the need of new antibacterial drug targets to be explored. There is a wealth of data regarding bacterial CAs and zinc MPs present in many pathogenic species, such as Neisseria spp., Helycobacter pylori Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria spp, Vibrio spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Streptomyces spp., Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., etc. Some of these enzymes have been cloned, purified and characterized by crystallographic techniques. However, for the moment, few potent and specific inhibitors for bacterial MPs have been reported except for Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxin and anthrax lethal factor, which will be reviewed in this article. Bacteria encode α-,β-, and/or γ-CA families, but up to now only the first two classes have been investigated in some detail in different species. The α-CAs from Neisseria spp. and H. pylori as well as the β-class enzymes from E. coli, H. pylori, M. tuberculosis, Brucella spp., S. pneumoniae, S. enterica and H. influenzae have been cloned and characterized. The catalytic/inhibition mechanisms of these CAs are well understood as X-ray crystal structures are available for some of them, but no adducts of these enzymes with inhibitors have been characterized so far. In vitro and in vivo studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates have been reported. Only for Neisseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S

  5. Expression of transmembrane carbonic anhydrases, CAIX and CAXII, in human development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerman Michael I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane CAIX and CAXII are members of the alpha carbonic anhydrase (CA family. They play a crucial role in differentiation, proliferation, and pH regulation. Expression of CAIX and CAXII proteins in tumor tissues is primarily induced by hypoxia and this is particularly true for CAIX, which is regulated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. Their distributions in normal adult human tissues are restricted to highly specialized cells that are not always hypoxic. The human fetus exists in a relatively hypoxic environment. We examined expression of CAIX, CAXII and HIF-1α in the developing human fetus and postnatal tissues to determine whether expression of CAIX and CAXII is exclusively regulated by HIF-1. Results The co-localization of CAIX and HIF-1α was limited to certain cell types in embryonic and early fetal tissues. Those cells comprised the primitive mesenchyma or involved chondrogenesis and skin development. Transient CAIX expression was limited to immature tissues of mesodermal origin and the skin and ependymal cells. The only tissues that persistently expressed CAIX protein were coelomic epithelium (mesothelium and its remnants, the epithelium of the stomach and biliary tree, glands and crypt cells of duodenum and small intestine, and the cells located at those sites previously identified as harboring adult stem cells in, for example, the skin and large intestine. In many instances co-localization of CAIX and HIF-1α was not evident. CAXII expression is restricted to cells involved in secretion and water absorption such as parietal cells of the stomach, acinar cells of the salivary glands and pancreas, epithelium of the large intestine, and renal tubules. Co-localization of CAXII with CAIX or HIF-1α was not observed. Conclusion The study has showed that: 1 HIF-1α and CAIX expression co- localized in many, but not all, of the embryonic and early fetal tissues; 2 There is no evidence of

  6. Effect of high concentration of inert cosolutes on the refolding of an enzyme: carbonic anhydrase B in sucrose and ficoll 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, Begoña; Minton, Allen P

    2007-11-16

    The kinetics of refolding of carbonic anhydrase II following transfer from a buffer containing 5 m guanidinium chloride to a buffer containing 0.5 m guanidinium chloride were studied by measuring the time-dependent recovery of enzymatic activity. Experiments were carried out in buffer containing concentrations of two "inert" cosolutes, sucrose and Ficoll 70, a sucrose polymer, at concentrations up to 150 g/liter. Data analysis indicates that both cosolutes significantly accelerate the rate of refolding to native or compact near-native conformations, but decrease the fraction of catalytically active enzyme recovered in the limit of long time. According to the simplest model that fits the data, both cosolutes accelerate a competing side reaction yielding inactive compact species. Acceleration of the side reaction by Ficoll is significantly greater than that of sucrose at equal w/v concentrations.

  7. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  8. A physiological role for cyanate-induced carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M B; Lamblin, A F; Kozliak, E I; Gerami-Nejad, M; Tu, C; Silverman, D; Anderson, P M; Fuchs, J A

    1993-03-01

    Cyanate induces expression of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli. The cyn operon includes the gene cynS, encoding cyanase, which catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. A carbonic anhydrase activity was recently found to be encoded by the cynT gene, the first gene of the cyn operon; it was proposed that carbonic anhydrase prevents depletion of bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 by diffusion out of the cell (M. B. Guilloton, J. J. Korte, A. F. Lamblin, J. A. Fuchs, and P. M. Anderson, J. Biol. Chem. 267:3731-3734, 1992). The function of the product of the third gene of this operon, cynX, is unknown. In the study reported here, the physiological roles of cynT and cynX were investigated by construction of chromosomal mutants in which each of the three genes was rendered inactive. The delta cynT chromosomal mutant expressed an active cyanase but no active carbonic anhydrase. In contrast to the wild-type strain, the growth of the delta cynT strain was inhibited by cyanate, and the mutant strain was unable to degrade cyanate and therefore could not use cyanate as the sole nitrogen source when grown at a partial CO2 pressures (pCO2) of 0.03% (air). At a high pCO2 (3%), however, the delta cynT strain behaved like the wild-type strain; it was significantly less sensitive to the toxic effects of cyanate and could degrade cyanate and use cyanate as the sole nitrogen source for growth. These results are consistent with the proposed function for carbonic anhydrase. The chromosomal mutant carrying cynS::kan expressed induced carbonic anhydrase activity but no active cyanase. The cynS::kan mutant was found to be much less sensitive to cyanate than the delta cynT mutant at a low pCO2, indicating that bicarbonate depletion due to the reaction of bicarbonate with cyanate catalyzed by cyanase is more deleterious to growth than direct inhibition by cyanate. Mutants carrying a nonfunctional cynX gene (cynX::kan and

  9. Structure and Metal Exchange in the Cadmium Carbonic anhydrase of Marine Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,Y.; Feng, l.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.; Morel, F.

    2008-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase, a zinc enzyme found in organisms from all kingdoms, catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide and is used for inorganic carbon acquisition by phytoplankton. In the oceans, where zinc is nearly depleted, diatoms use cadmium as a catalytic metal atom in cadmium carbonic anhydrase (CDCA). Here we report the crystal structures of CDCA in four distinct forms: cadmium-bound, zinc-bound, metal-free and acetate-bound. Despite lack of sequence homology, CDCA is a structural mimic of a functional {beta}-carbonic anhydrase dimer, with striking similarity in the spatial organization of the active site residues. CDCA readily exchanges cadmium and zinc at its active site--an apparently unique adaptation to oceanic life that is explained by a stable opening of the metal coordinating site in the absence of metal. Given the central role of diatoms in exporting carbon to the deep sea, their use of cadmium in an enzyme critical for carbon acquisition establishes a remarkable link between the global cycles of cadmium and carbon.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase 2-like and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase α gene expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes) under carbonate alkalinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zongli; Lai, Qifang; Hao, Zhuoran; Chen, Ling; Lin, Tingting; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    High carbonate alkalinity is one of the major stress factors for living organisms in saline-alkaline water areas. Acute and chronic effects of carbonate alkalinity on expression of two genes, carbonic anhydrase 2-like (CA2-like) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α subunit (NKA-α) mRNA in medaka (Oryzias latipes) were evaluated to better understand the responses important for coping with a carbonate alkalinity stress. In the acute exposure experiment, the expression of CA2-like and NKA-α mRNA in the gill and kidney of medaka were examined from 0 h to 7 days exposed to 30.4 mM carbonate alkalinity water. Exposure to high carbonate alkalinity resulted in a transitory alkalosis, followed by a transient increase in gill and kidney CA2-like and NKA-α mRNA expression. In the chronic exposure experiment, the expression of these two genes was examined in the gill and kidney at 50 days post-exposure to six different carbonate alkalinity concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 30.4 mM. Gill and kidney CA2-like mRNA levels in 30.4 mM were approximately 10 and 30 times higher than that of the control (1.5 mM), respectively. Less differences were found in NKA-α expression in the 50-days exposure. The results indicate that when transferred to high carbonate alkalinity water, a transitory alkalosis may occur in medaka, followed by compensatory acid-base and ion regulatory responses. Thus, CA2-like and NKA-α are at least two of the important factors that contribute to the regulation of alkalinity stress.

  11. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram improves cognitive deficits via CaM kinase II and protein kinase C activation in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Tagashira, Hideaki; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) shows degeneration of the cholinergic system in the medial septum, thereby eliciting down-regulation of the olfactory function in patients. We have previously reported that olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice show hippocampus-dependent memory impairment as assessed by memory-related behavioral tasks and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In the present study, we focused whether novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug sunifiram improves both memory impairment and depression observed in OBX mice. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-12 days with sunifiram (0.01-1.0mg/kg p.o.) from 10 days after operation with or without gavestinel (10mg/kg i.p.), which is glycine-binding site inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The spatial reference memory assessed by Y-maze and short-term memory assessed by novel object recognition task were significantly improved by sunifiram treatment in OBX mice. Sunifiram also restored hippocampal LTP injured in OBX mice without treatment with gavestinel. By contrast, sunifiram treatment did not ameliorate the depressive behaviors assessed by tail suspension task in OBX mice. Notably, sunifiram treatment restored CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation in the hippocampal CA1 region from OBX mice to the levels of control mice. Likewise, sunifiram treatment improved PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) phosphorylation to the control levels. Stimulation of CaMKII and PKC autophosphorylation by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with gavestinel. However, sunifiram treatment did not affect the phosphorylation of CaMKIV (Thr-196) and ERK. Taken together, sunifiram ameliorates OBX-induced deficits of memory-related behaviors and impaired LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region via stimulation of glycine-binding site of NMDAR.

  12. A cold metal poor cloud traced by a weak MgII absorption at z~0.45. First detection of SiI, CaI and FeI in a QSO absorber

    CERN Document Server

    D'Odorico, Valentina

    2007-01-01

    We present the observations of a weak MgII absorption system detected at z~0.452 in the UVES high resolution spectrum of the QSO HE0001-2340. The weakest of the two MgII components forming the system shows associated absorptions due to SiI, CaI and FeI observed for the first time in a QSO spectrum. We investigate the nature of this absorber by comparing its properties with those of different classes of absorbers (weak MgII, Damped Ly-alpha systems and local interstellar clouds) and reproducing its ionization conditions with photoionization models. The observed absorber belongs to the class of weak MgII systems on the basis of its equivalent width, however the relative strength of commonly observed transitions deviates significantly from those of the above mentioned absorbers. A rough estimate of the probability to cross such a system with a QSO line of sight is P~0.03. The presence of rare neutral transitions suggests that the cloud is shielded by a large amount of neutral Hydrogen. A detailed comparison of t...

  13. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes.

  14. V-H+ -ATPase translocation during blood alkalosis in dogfish gills: interaction with carbonic anhydrase and involvement in the postfeeding alkaline tide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Wood, Chris M; Goss, Greg G

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the involvement of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in mediating V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in gills of alkalotic Squalus acanthias. Immunolabeling revealed that CA is localized in the same cells as V-H(+)-ATPase. Blood plasma from dogfish injected with acetazolamide [30 mg/kg at time (t) = 0 and 6 h] and infused with NaHCO(3) for 12 h (1,000 microeq.kg(-1).h(-1)) had significantly higher plasma HCO(3)(-) concentration than fish that were infused with NaHCO(3) alone (28.72 +/- 0.41 vs. 6.57 +/- 2.47 mmol/l, n = 3), whereas blood pH was similar in both treatments (8.03 +/- 0.11 vs. 8.04 +/- 0.11 pH units at t = 12 h). CA inhibition impaired V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane, as estimated from immunolabeled gill sections and Western blotting on gill cell membranes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.00 +/- 0.28 arbitrary units, n = 3; P < 0.05). We investigated V-H(+)-ATPase translocation during a postfeeding alkalosis ("alkaline tide"). Gill samples were taken 24-26 h after dogfish were fed to satiety in a natural-like feeding regime. Immunolabeled gill sections revealed that V-H(+)-ATPase translocated to the basolateral membrane in the postfed fish. Confirming this result, V-H(+)-ATPase abundance was twofold higher in gill cell membranes of the postfed fish than in fasted fish (n = 4-5; P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) intracellular H(+) or HCO(3)(-) produced by CA (and not blood pH or HCO(3)(-)) is likely the stimulus that triggers the V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in alkalotic fish and 2) V-H(+)-ATPase translocation is important for enhanced HCO(3)(-) secretion during a naturally occurring postfeeding alkalosis.

  15. Effect of phosphate, silicate, and Ca on the morphology, structure and elemental composition of Fe(III)-precipitates formed in aerated Fe(II) and As(III) containing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Voegelin, Andreas; Folini, Doris; Hug, Stephan J.

    2010-10-01

    We investigated Fe(III)-precipitates formed from Fe(II) oxidation in water at pH 7 as a function of dissolved Fe(II), As(III), phosphate, and silicate in the absence and presence of Ca. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to characterize the morphology, structure and elemental composition of the precipitates. Results from our companion X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) study suggested that the oxidation of Fe(II) leads to the sequential formation of distinct polymeric units in the following order: Fe(III)-phosphate oligomers in the presence of phosphate, silicate-rich hydrous ferric oxide (HFO-Si) at high Si/Fe (>0.5) or 2-line ferrihydrite (2L-Fh) at lower Si/Fe (˜0.1-0.5), and lepidocrocite (Lp) in the absence of phosphate at low Si/Fe (arrangement of the different polymeric units within Fe(III)-precipitates. The resulting structural and compositional heterogeneity of short-range-ordered Fe(III)-precipitates likely affects their colloidal stability and their chemical reactivity and needs to be considered when addressing the fate of co-transformed trace elements such as arsenic.

  16. ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient thermodynamic equilibrium model for K+─Ca²+─Mg²+─NH4+─Na+─SO4²-─NO3-─Cl-─H2O aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents ISORROPIA II, a thermodynamic equilibrium model for the K+–Ca2+–Mg2+–NH4+–Na+–SO42−–NO3−–Cl−–H2O aerosol system. A comprehensive evaluation of its performance is conducted against water uptake measurements for laboratory aerosol and predictions of the SCAPE2 thermodynamic module over a wide range of atmospherically relevant conditions. The two models agree well, to within 13% for aerosol water content and total PM mass, 16% for aerosol nitrate and 6% for aerosol chloride and ammonium. Largest discrepancies were found under conditions of low RH, primarily from differences in the treatment of water uptake and solid state composition. In terms of computational speed, ISORROPIA II was more than an order of magnitude faster than SCAPE2, with robust and rapid convergence under all conditions. The addition of crustal species does not slow down the thermodynamic calculations (compared to the older ISORROPIA code because of optimizations in the activity coefficient calculation algorithm. Based on its computational rigor and performance, ISORROPIA II appears to be a highly attractive alternative for use in large scale air quality and atmospheric transport models.

  17. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  18. Tolerância de genótipos de cafeeiro ao alumínio em solução nutritiva. II. Teores de P, Ca e Al e eficiência ao P e Ca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. L. Braccini

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Foi instalado um experimento, em janeiro de 1994, em casa de vegetação do Departamento de Fitotecnia da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Estado de Minas Gerais. Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do alumínio nos teores de P, Ca e Al e na eficiência ao fósforo e cálcio de nove genótipos de café, as plantas foram crescidas em solução nutritiva com 0 e 0,296 mmol L-1 de alumínio, com pH 4,0, por um período de 115 dias. Após esse período, as plantas foram divididas em folhas superiores, folhas inferiores, primeiro par de folhas totalmente expandido, caule e raízes, para a determinação da matéria seca e de concentrações de fósforo, cálcio e alumínio. A tolerância ao alumínio foi associada ao menor acúmulo de fósforo nas raízes, à menor redução na translocação desse nutriente para a parte aérea, à menor redução na absorção de cálcio e à maior eficiência no uso do fósforo e do cálcio. Foi observado grande acúmulo de alumínio nas raízes, bem como um transporte restrito do elemento para a parte aérea, para todos os genótipos de café.

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase as Pollution Biomarker: An Ancient Enzyme with a New Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifone Schettino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of cellular and sub-cellular responses to chemical contaminants (referred to as biomarkers in living organisms represents a recent tool in environmental monitoring. The review focuses on carbonic anhydrase, a ubiquitous metalloenzyme which plays key roles in a wide variety of physiological processes involving CO2 and HCO3−. In the last decade a number of studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of this enzyme to pollutants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals in both humans and wildlife. The review analyses these studies and discusses the potentiality of this enzyme as novel biomarker in environmental monitoring and assessment.

  20. Carbonic Anhydrase Enhanced Carbon Capture: Kinetic Measurements and Pilot Plant Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: MEA (a primary amine), AMP (a sterically hindered primary amine), MDEA (a tertiary amine) and K2CO3 a carbonate salt solution were tested...... in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt%. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined in a temperature range from 298 to 328 K and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic...

  1. Filling the gap. Human cranial remains from Gombore II (Melka Kunture, Ethiopia; ca. 850 ka) and the origin of Homo heidelbergensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profico, Antonio; Di Vincenzo, Fabio; Gagliardi, Lorenza; Piperno, Marcello; Manzi, Giorgio

    2016-06-20

    African archaic humans dated to around 1,0 Ma share morphological affinities with Homo ergaster and appear distinct in cranio-dental morphology from those of the Middle Pleistocene that are referred to Homo heidelbergensis. This observation suggests a taxonomic and phylogenetic discontinuity in Africa that ranges across the Matuyama/Brunhes reversal (780 ka). Yet, the fossil record between roughly 900 and 600 ka is notoriously poor. In this context, the Early Stone Age site of Gombore II, in the Melka Kunture formation (Upper Awash, Ethiopia), provides a privileged case-study. In the Acheulean layer of Gombore II, somewhat more recent than 875 ±10 ka, two large cranial fragments were discovered in 1973 and 1975 respectively: a partial left parietal (Melka Kunture 1) and a right portion of the frontal bone (Melka Kunture 2), which probably belonged to the same cranium. We present here the first detailed description and computer-assisted reconstruction of the morphology of the cranial vault pertaining to these fossil fragments. Our analysis suggest that the human fossil specimen from Gombore II fills a phenetic gap between Homo ergaster and Homo heidelbergensis. This appears in agreement with the chronology of such a partial cranial vault, which therefore represents at present one of the best available candidates (if any) for the origin of Homo heidelbergensis in Africa.

  2. Modelling the impact of soil Carbonic Anhydrase on the net ecosystem exchange of OCS at Harvard forest using the MuSICA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launois, Thomas; Ogée, Jérôme; Commane, Roisin; Wehr, Rchard; Meredith, Laura; Munger, Bill; Nelson, David; Saleska, Scott; Wofsy, Steve; Zahniser, Mark; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The exchange of CO2 between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is driven by photosynthetic uptake and respiratory loss, two fluxes currently estimated with considerable uncertainty at large scales. Model predictions indicate that these biosphere fluxes will be modified in the future as CO2 concentrations and temperatures increase; however, it still unclear to what extent. To address this challenge there is a need for better constraints on land surface model parameterisations. Additional atmospheric tracers of large-scale CO2 fluxes have been identified as potential candidates for this task. In particular carbonyl sulphide (OCS) has been proposed as a complementary tracer of gross photosynthesis over land, since OCS uptake by plants is dominated by carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, an enzyme abundant in leaves that catalyses CO2 hydration during photosynthesis. However, although the mass budget at the ecosystem is dominated by the flux of OCS into leaves, some OCS is also exchanged between the atmosphere and the soil and this component of the budget requires constraining. In this study, we adapted the process-based isotope-enabled model MuSICA (Multi-layer Simulator of the Interactions between a vegetation Canopy and the Atmosphere) to include the transport, reaction, diffusion and production of OCS within a forested ecosystem. This model was combined with 3 years (2011-2013) of in situ measurements of OCS atmospheric concentration profiles and fluxes at the Harvard Forest (Massachussets, USA) to test hypotheses on the mechanisms responsible for CA-driven uptake by leaves and soils as well as possible OCS emissions during litter decomposition. Model simulations over the three years captured well the impact of diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions on the net ecosystem OCS flux. A sensitivity analysis on soil CA activity and soil OCS emission rates was also performed to quantify their impact on the vertical profiles of OCS inside the

  3. Zinc Transfer Kinetics of Metallothioneins and Their Fragmentswith Apo-carbonic Anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG, Zhong-Xian; LIU, Fang; ZHENG, Qi; YU, Wen-Hao

    2001-01-01

    Tne zinc transfer reactions from Zn7-MT-I, Zn7-MT-Ⅱ, Zn4α fragment (MT-I) and Zn4-α fragment (MT-Ⅱ) to apo-carbonic anhydrase have been studied. In each reaction, no more than one zinc ion per molecule is involved in metal transfer.Zn7-MT-I and Zn7-MT-Ⅱ donate zinc to apo-carbonic anhydrase and de novo constitute it at a comparable efficiency,while Zn7-MT-Ⅱ exhibits a little faster rate. Surprisingiy,Zinc is released from Zn4-α fragment (MT-Ⅱ) with a much faster rate than from Zn4-α fragment (MT-I), whose rate is close to that of Zn7-MT-I. The reason for the difference is still unknown. Introducing complex compounds into this system may give rise to an effect on the reaction. The transfer from Zn7-MT-Ⅱ in the presence of reduced glutathione shows little difference compare to the control, suggesting that the reduced glutathione is not involved in zinc transfer process. However,glutathione disulfide does accelerate this zinc transfer reaction remarkably, indicating that the oxidative factors contribute to zinc rlease from metallothioneins.

  4. Biochemistry and physiology of the β class carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R Siva Sai; Hendrick, William; Correll, Jared B; Patterson, Andrew D; Melville, Stephen B; Ferry, James G

    2013-05-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13, the only carbonic anhydrase encoded in the genome, was characterized both biochemically and physiologically. Heterologously produced and purified Cpb was shown to belong to the type I subclass of the β class, the first β class enzyme investigated from a strictly anaerobic species of the domain Bacteria. Kinetic analyses revealed a two-step, ping-pong, zinc-hydroxide mechanism of catalysis with Km and kcat/Km values of 3.1 mM CO₂ and 4.8 × 10⁶ s⁻¹ M⁻¹, respectively. Analyses of a cpb deletion mutant of C. perfringens strain HN13 showed that Cpb is strictly required for growth when cultured in semidefined medium and an atmosphere without CO₂. The growth of the mutant was the same as that of the parent wild-type strain when cultured in nutrient-rich media with or without CO₂ in the atmosphere, although elimination of glucose resulted in decreased production of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The results suggest a role for Cpb in anaplerotic CO₂ fixation reactions by supplying bicarbonate to carboxylases. Potential roles in competitive fitness are discussed.

  5. Glutamate-354 of the CP43 polypeptide interacts with the oxygen-evolving Mn4Ca cluster of photosystem II: a preliminary characterization of the Glu354Gln mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Melodie A; Hwang, Hong Jin; Burnap, Robert L; Yano, Junko; Walker, Lee M; Service, Rachel J; Britt, R David; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard J

    2008-03-27

    In the recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of photosystem II, Glu354 of the CP43 polypeptide is assigned as a ligand of the O2-evolving Mn4Ca cluster. In this communication, a preliminary characterization of the CP43-Glu354Gln mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is presented. The steady-state rate of O2 evolution in the mutant cells is only approximately 20% compared with the wild-type, but the kinetics of O2 release are essentially unchanged and the O2-flash yields show normal period-four oscillations, albeit with lower overall intensity. Purified PSII particles exhibit an essentially normal S2 state multiline electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal, but exhibit a substantially altered S2-minus-S1 Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectrum. The intensities of the mutant EPR and FTIR difference spectra (above 75% compared with wild-type) are much greater than the O2 signals and suggest that CP43-Glu354Gln PSII reaction centres are heterogeneous, with a minority fraction able to evolve O2 with normal O2 release kinetics and a majority fraction unable to advance beyond the S2 or S3 states. The S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum of CP43-Glu354Gln PSII particles is altered in both the symmetric and asymmetric carboxylate stretching regions, implying either that CP43-Glu354 is exquisitely sensitive to the increased charge that develops on the Mn4Ca cluster during the S1-->S2 transition or that the CP43-Glu354Gln mutation changes the distribution of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxidation states within the Mn4Ca cluster in the S1 and/or S2 states.

  6. Indomethacin lowers optic nerve oxygen tension and reduces the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibition and carbon dioxide breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T; Stefánsson, E

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important in blood flow regulation. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition increase the oxygen tension in the retina and optic nerve. To study the mechanism of this effect and the role of cyclo-oxygenase in the regulation of optic nerve oxygen tensio...

  7. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cystic Macular Lesions in Children With X-Linked Juvenile Retinoschisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, S.K.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Blanc, L.M.P. le; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Jong, E.K.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known regarding the therapeutic effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) in the management of cystic macular lesions in children with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) despite the fact that this disease often manifests during childhood. Therefore, our goal was to determ

  8. Update and critical appraisal of combined timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the effect on ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adam M; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Rusia, Deepam; Williamson, Kathleen M; Shoshani, Yochai

    2010-04-26

    Topical hypotensive therapy with both timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors has been shown to be efficacious at reducing intraocular pressure. Many prospective studies have also suggested that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors augment ocular blood flow and vascular regulation independent of their hypotensive effects. Although consistent in their findings, these studies must be cautiously interpreted due to the limitations of study design and specific blood flow imaging modalities. The purpose of this review is to appraise and critically evaluate the current body of literature investigating the effects of combined treatment with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol in patients with glaucoma with respect to ocular blood flow, visual function, and optic nerve head structure.

  9. Effect of pH and light on population growth and activity of extracellular carbonic anhydrase in two species of dinoflagellates%pH及光照对两种赤潮甲藻种群生长和胞外碳酸酐酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴芳芳; 周成旭; 严小军

    2011-01-01

    研究了pH和光照强度对两种赤潮甲藻(Prorocentrum donghaiense和Karlodinium micrum)的种群生长及其胞外碳酸酐酶(CA)活性的影响.结果表明,pH7.5、光照强度30 μmol/(m2.s)是两种微藻的最适种群生长条件,在种群生长的最适pH和光照强度下,胞外CA活性最大.最适培养条件下,两种甲藻胞外碳酸酐酶活性随着种群生长周期而变化,指数生长期至平台期CA酶活增加,平台期至衰退期CA酶活降低,平台期胞外CA活性最大.%The effects of pH and light intensity on population growth and extracellular carbonic anhydrase ( CA) activity in two species of dinoflagellates (Prorocenlnim donghaieme and Karlodinium micrum) were studied. The results show that pH 7. 5 and 30μmol/( m2 · s) irradiance which triggered the optimum population growth, were the conditions that favored the highest activity of extracellular CA in the two dinoflagellates. Under the optimum cultivation conditions,the extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in the two dinoflagellates varies with the population growth phases. CA activities were increased from exponential phase to the stationary phase and decreased form stationary phase to the decline phase. The highest extracellular CA activity occurred at the stationary phase. The significance of the population growth related CA activity in population dynamics of the two dinoflagellates was also discussed.

  10. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  11. Update and critical appraisal of combined timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the effect on ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Moss

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adam M Moss, Alon Harris, Brent Siesky, Deepam Rusia, Kathleen M Williamson, Yochai ShoshaniDepartment of Ophthalmology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAAbstract: Topical hypotensive therapy with both timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors has been shown to be efficacious at reducing intraocular pressure. Many prospective studies have also suggested that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors augment ocular blood flow and vascular regulation independent of their hypotensive effects. Although consistent in their findings, these studies must be cautiously interpreted due to the limitations of study design and specific blood flow imaging modalities. The purpose of this review is to appraise and critically evaluate the current body of literature investigating the effects of combined treatment with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol in patients with glaucoma with respect to ocular blood flow, visual function, and optic nerve head structure.Keywords: ocular blood flow, carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, timolol, glaucoma, visual function, optic nerve head

  12. Intracellular pH homeostasis and serotonin-induced pH changes in Calliphora salivary glands: the contribution of V-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, Bettina; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Walz, Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Blowfly salivary gland cells have a vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in their apical membrane that energizes secretion of a KCl-rich saliva upon stimulation with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). We have used BCECF to study microfluometrically whether V-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are involved in intracellular pH (pH(i)) regulation, and we have localized CA activity by histochemistry. We show: (1) mean pH(i) in salivary gland cells is 7.5+/-0.3 pH units (N=96), higher than that expected from passive H(+) distribution; (2) low 5-HT concentrations (0.3-3 nmol l(-1)) induce a dose-dependent acidification of up to 0.2 pH units, with 5-HT concentrations >10 nmol l(-1), causing monophasic or multiphasic pH changes; (3) the acidifying effect of 5-HT is mimicked by bath application of cAMP, forskolin or IBMX; (4) salivary gland cells exhibit CA activity; (5) CA inhibition with acetazolamide and V-ATPase inhibition with concanamycin A lead to a slow acidification of steady-state pH(i); (6) 5-HT stimuli in the presence of acetazolamide induce an alkalinization that can be decreased by simultaneous application of the V-ATPase inhibitor concanamycin A; (7) concanamycin A removes alkali-going components from multiphasic 5-HT-induced pH changes; (8) NHE activity and a Cl(-)-dependent process are involved in generating 5-HT-induced pH changes; (9) the salivary glands probably contain a Na(+)-driven amino acid transporter. We conclude that V-ATPase and CA contribute to steady-state pH(i) regulation and 5-HT-induced outward H(+) pumping does not cause an alkalinization of pH(i) because of cytosolic H(+) accumulation attributable to stimulated cellular respiration and AE activity, masking the alkalizing effect of V-ATPase-mediated acid extrusion.

  13. El sitio Bajo del Coypar II: Las evidencias más tempranas (CA. 1000 AP del proceso agropastoril en la Puna Meridional Argentina (Antofagasta de la Sierra, Catamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Vigliani

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El sitio Bajo del Coypar II (BC II es un conjunto de estructuras de pequeñas dimensiones ubicado sobre una saliente de la ladera de los cerros del Coypar, frente y alrededor del cual se distribuye una gran superficie de campos de cultivo prehispánicos, (Bajo del Coypar I de aproximadamente 1000 ha. En un trabajo anterior se postuló que este amplio sistema de producción agrícola se originó hacia el final del proceso regional tardío (ca. 1300 AP en asociación con el crecimiento del principal centro habitacional de la región, La Alumbrera (Olivera et.al, 1994 y que luego fue apropiado y ampliado por el Incario. En el presente trabajo se plantean tres objetivos generales: conocer el tipo de actividades que se realizaban en el conjunto de estructuras de BC II, establecer la asociación que había entre este conjunto de estructuras y el sistema de producción agrícola e identificar posibles cambios en el uso del espacio a lo largo del tiempo. En un principio se pensó que Bajo del Coypar II formaba parte de la ampliación del espacio productivo implementada por el Imperio Incaico. Las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en el mismo permitieron determinar que efectivamente hacia las etapas más tardías y en asociación con el Incario había una estrecha relación con el sector agrícola, evidenciado en una alta frecuencia de vasijas para el almacenaje y/o el procesamiento de sustancias secas. Sin embargo, también revelaron ocupaciones más tempranas vinculadas a grupos o unidades domésticas con un desarrollo creciente de las prácticas agrícolas. De este modo, la actividad agro-pastoril fue, en este sector de la Puna meridional, mucho más temprana de lo que pensábamos.

  14. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors modify intracellular pH transients and contractions of rat middle cerebral arteries during CO2/HCO3(-) fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob K; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2017-01-01

    The CO2/HCO3(-) buffer minimizes pH changes in response to acid-base loads, HCO3(-) provides substrate for Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO3(-)-exchangers, and H(+) and HCO3(-) modify vasomotor responses during acid-base disturbances. We show here that rat middle cerebral arteries express cytosolic, mitochondrial, extracellular, and secreted carbonic anhydrase isoforms that catalyze equilibration of the CO2/HCO3(-) buffer. Switching from CO2/HCO3(-)-free to CO2/HCO3(-)-containing extracellular solution results in initial intracellular acidification due to hydration of CO2 followed by gradual alkalinization due to cellular HCO3(-) uptake. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition decelerates the initial acidification and attenuates the associated transient vasoconstriction without affecting intracellular pH or artery tone at steady-state. Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransport and Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity after NH4(+)-prepulse-induced intracellular acidification are unaffected by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. Extracellular surface pH transients induced by transmembrane NH3 flux are evident under CO2/HCO3(-)-free conditions but absent when the buffer capacity and apparent H(+) mobility increase in the presence of CO2/HCO3(-) even after the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. We conclude that (a) intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity accentuates pH transients and vasoconstriction in response to acute elevations of pCO2, (b) CO2/HCO3(-) minimizes extracellular surface pH transients without requiring carbonic anhydrase activity, and

  16. Generalized approximate spin projection calculations of effective exchange integrals of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H; Shoji, M; Yamanaka, S; Mino, H; Umena, Y; Kawakami, K; Kamiya, N; Shen, J-R; Yamaguchi, K

    2014-06-28

    Full geometry optimizations followed by the vibrational analysis were performed for eight spin configurations of the CaMn4O4X(H2O)3Y (X = O, OH; Y = H2O, OH) cluster in the S1 and S3 states of the oxygen evolution complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). The energy gaps among these configurations obtained by vertical, adiabatic and adiabatic plus zero-point-energy (ZPE) correction procedures have been used for computation of the effective exchange integrals (J) in the spin Hamiltonian model. The J values are calculated by the (1) analytical method and the (2) generalized approximate spin projection (AP) method that eliminates the spin contamination errors of UB3LYP solutions. Using J values derived from these methods, exact diagonalization of the spin Hamiltonian matrix was carried out, yielding excitation energies and spin densities of the ground and lower-excited states of the cluster. The obtained results for the right (R)- and left (L)-opened structures in the S1 and S3 states are found to be consistent with available optical and magnetic experimental results. Implications of the computational results are discussed in relation to (a) the necessity of the exact diagonalization for computations of reliable energy levels, (b) magneto-structural correlations in the CaMn4O5 cluster of the OEC of PSII, (c) structural symmetry breaking in the S1 and S3 states, and (d) the right- and left-handed scenarios for the O-O bond formation for water oxidation.

  17. Electron transfer pathways from the S2-states to the S3-states either after a Ca2+/Sr2+ or a Cl-/I- exchange in Photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussac, Alain; Rutherford, A William; Sugiura, Miwa

    2015-01-01

    The site for water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) goes through five sequential oxidation states (S0 to S4) before O2 is evolved. It consists of a Mn4CaO5-cluster close to a redox-active tyrosine residue (YZ). Cl- is also required for enzyme activity. By using EPR spectroscopy it has been shown that both Ca2+/Sr2+ exchange and Cl-/I- exchange perturb the proportions of centers showing high (S=5/2) and low spin (S=1/2) forms of the S2-state. The S3-state was also found to be heterogeneous with: i) a S=3 form that is detectable by EPR and not sensitive to near-infrared light; and ii) a form that is not EPR visible but in which Mn photochemistry occurs resulting in the formation of a (S2YZ)' split EPR signal upon near-infrared illumination. In Sr/Cl-PSII, the high spin (S=5/2) form of S2 shows a marked heterogeneity with a g=4.3 form generated at low temperature that converts to a relaxed form at g=4.9 at higher temperatures. The high spin g=4.9 form can then progress to the EPR detectable form of S3 at temperatures as low as 180K whereas the low spin (S=1/2) S2-state can only advance to the S3 state at temperatures≥235 K. Both of the two S2 configurations and the two S3 configurations are each shown to be in equilibrium at ≥235 K but not at 198 K. Since both S2 configurations are formed at 198 K, they likely arise from two specific populations of S1. The existence of heterogeneous populations in S1, S2 and S3 states may be related to the structural flexibility associated with the positioning of the oxygen O5 within the cluster highlighted in computational approaches and which has been linked to substrate exchange. These data are discussed in the context of recent in silico studies of the electron transfer pathways between the S2-state(s) and the S3-state(s).

  18. Changes of Carbonic Anhydrase Activities in Tomato Leaves under Drought Stress%干旱胁迫下番茄叶片碳酸酐酶活性的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙卫红; 吴秋霞; 温新宇; 何华纲; 吴沿友; 丁佳俊; 封丽娜

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2, and it is an important photosyn-thetic enzyme which take part in the CO2 conduction and get into the carboxylation site. The CA activity has a great effect on photosynthesis and water use efifciency. In order to study the effect of expression of CA gene on the plant photosynthesis and plant water potential in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), the expression of cytoso-lic CA gene in tomato leaves under drought stress were determined by Northern blotting. And the CA enzyme ac-tivity, photosynthetic rate and water potential in tomato leaves under drought stress were also determined. The re-sults showed that the expression of cytosolic CA gene in tomato leaves was induced by drought stress. With the time of drought stress, the CA activity increased and then fell, and the changes were basically similar to that of CA gene expression. Net photosynthetic rate and water potential of tomato leaves decreased with the degree of drought and the treatment time. However, the CA activity, net photosynthetic rate and water potential changed slightly with the soil relative water content of 75%. The results indicated that there was a certain corresponding relationship be-tween the changes of water potential and photosynthetic rate in tomato leaves and the change of CA activity.%碳酸酐酶(carbonic anhydrase, CA)催化CO2的可逆水合反应,是参与CO2传导而进入羧化位点的重要光合酶,其活性高低对植物水分利用及光合作用有较大影响。为了研究干旱胁迫下番茄CA表达活性变化对植株光合作用及水分利用的影响,本文利用Northern杂交检测番茄叶片的胞质CA基因在干旱胁迫下的表达;测定干旱胁迫下番茄叶片CA活性、光合速率和叶片水势变化。结果表明,番茄叶片胞质CA基因受干旱胁迫诱导;CA活性随着干旱胁迫时间延长而发生由低至高再回落的变化,且变化规律基本与CA基因相似。番

  19. Putting the pieces into place: Properties of intact zinc metallothionein 1A determined from interaction of its isolated domains with carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Tyler B J; Stillman, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs) bind up to seven Zn(2+) using a large number of cysteine residues relative to their small size and can act as zinc-chaperones. In metal-saturated Zn7-MTs, the seven zinc ions are co-ordinated tetrahedrally into two distinct clusters separated by a linker; the N-terminal β-domain [(Zn3Cys9)(3-)] and C-terminal α-domain [(Zn4Cys11)(3-)]. We report on the competitive zinc metalation of apo-carbonic anhydrase [CA; metal-free CA (apo-CA)] in the presence of apo-metallothionein 1A domain fragments to identify domain specific determinants of zinc binding and zinc donation in the intact two-domain Znn-βαMT1A (human metallothionein 1A isoform; n=0-7). The apo-CA is shown to compete effectively only with Zn2-3-βMT and Zn4-αMT. Detailed modelling of the ESI mass spectral data have revealed the zinc-binding affinities of each of the zinc-binding sites in the two isolated fragments. The three calculated equilibrium zinc affinities [log(KF)] of the isolated β-domain were: 12.2, 11.7 and 11.4 and the four isolated α-domain affinities were: 13.5, 13.2, 12.7 and 12.6. These data provide guidance in identification of the location of the strongest-bound and weakest-bound zinc in the intact two-domain Zn7βαMT. The β-domain has the weakest zinc-binding site and this is where zinc ions are donated from in the Zn7-βαMT. The α-domain with the highest affinity binds the first zinc, which we propose leads to an unscrambling of the cysteine ligands from the apo-peptide bundle. We propose that stabilization of the intact Zn6-MT and Zn7-MT, relative to that of the sum of the separated fragments, is due to the availability of additional cysteine ligand orientations (through interdomain interactions) to support the clustered structures.

  20. CaMKII inhibition targeted to the sarcoplasmic reticulum inhibits frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation and Ca2+ current facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Picht, Eckard; DeSantiago, Jaime; Huke, Sabine; Kaetzel, Marcia A.; Dedman, John R.; Bers, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in heart has been implicated in Ca2+ current (ICa) facilitation, enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release and frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation (FDAR) via enhanced SR Ca2+ uptake. However, questions remain about how CaMKII may work in these three processes. Here we tested the role of CaM-KII in these processes using transgenic mice (SR-AIP) that express four concatenated repeats of the CaMKII inhibitory peptide...

  1. The HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N@TNG IV. Time resolved analysis of the Ca ii H&K and H{\\alpha} chromospheric emission of low-activity early-type M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Scandariato, G; Biazzo, K; Leto, G; Stelzer, B; Sanchez, R Zanmar; Claudi, R; Cosentino, R; Damasso, M; Desidera, S; Álvarez, E González; Hernández, J I González; Gratton, R; Lanza, A F; Maggio, A; Messina, S; Micela, G; Pagano, I; Perger, M; Piotto, G; Rebolo, R; Ribas, I; Rosich, A; Sozzetti, A; Mascareño, A Suárez

    2016-01-01

    M dwarfs are prime targets for planet search programs, particularly of those focused on the detection and characterization of rocky planets in the habitable zone. Understanding their magnetic activity is important because it affects our ability to detect small planets, and it plays a key role in the characterization of the stellar environment. We analyze observations of the Ca II H&K and H{\\alpha} lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity for low-activity early-type M dwarfs. We analyze the time series of spectra of 71 early-type M dwarfs collected for the HADES project for planet search purposes. The HARPS-N spectra provide simultaneously the H&K doublet and the H{\\alpha} line. We develop a reduction scheme able to correct the HARPS-N spectra for instrumental and atmospheric effects, and to provide flux-calibrated spectra in units of flux at the stellar surface. The H&K and H{\\alpha} fluxes are compared with each other, and their variability is analyzed. We find that the H and K flux excesse...

  2. Allosteric reversion of Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase via a proline shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Katherine M; Million-Perez, H Rachael; Merkhofer, Richard; Nicholson, Hilary; Rowlett, Roger S

    2015-01-20

    Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase (HICA) has been reverse-engineered in the allosteric site region to resemble the nonallosteric Pisum sativum enzyme in order to identify critical features of allostery and intersusbunit communication. Three variants (W39V/G41A, P48S/A49P, and W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P) were identified, through a comparison with a crystal structure of nonallosteric P. sativum β-carbonic anhydrase (PSCA, PDB 1EKJ ), to potentially revert HICA to a nonallosteric enzyme. The W39V/G41A and P48S/A49P mutations decreased the apparent kcat/Km proton dependence from 4 to 2 and 1, respectively, increasing the overall maximal kcat/Km to 16 ± 2 μM(-1) s(-1) (380% of wild type) and 17 ± 3 μM(-1) s(-1) (405% of wild type). The pKa values of the metal-bound water molecule based on the pH-rate profile kinetics (8.32 ± 0.04 for W39V/G41A and 8.3 ± 0.1 for P48S/A49P) were also slightly higher than that for the wild-type enzyme (7.74 ± 0.04). The P48S/A49P variant has lost all pH-rate cooperativity. The W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P variant's kinetics were unusual and were fit with a log-linear function with a slope 0.9 ± 0.2. The crystal structure of the W39V/G41A variant revealed an active site very similar to the T-state wild-type oligomer with bicarbonate trapped in the escort site. By contrast, the X-ray crystal structure of a proline shift variant (P48S/A49P) reveals that it has adopted an active site conformation nearly identical to that of nonallosteric β-carbonic anhydrase (R-state) for one chain, including a tight association with the dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices; the second chain in the asymmetric unit is associated in a biologically relevant oligomer, but it adopts a T-state conformation that is not capped by dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices. The hybrid R/T nature of HICA P48S/A49P structurally recapitulates the interruption of pH-rate cooperativity observed for this variant. Comparison of the conformations of the R and T chains of P48S/A49P

  3. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J; Kulbe, Jacqueline R; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca(2+)-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that "autonomous" CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca(2+)/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca(2+)/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.

  4. 激变变星及相关天体的与近红外电离钙三重线的光谱分析%Spectroscopy around and Ca II Triplet of Cataclysmic Variables and Related Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘学富; 陈阳; 黄河

    2000-01-01

    给出了1997年4月15日至17日在北京天文台用2.16 m望远镜卡焦光谱仪观测获得的6颗激变变星 (AB Boo, UX UMa, T CrB, AH Her, Z Cam 和 V426 Oph) 及3颗相关天体(UMa3, EG UMa 和 Leo3)的CCD光谱, 并同时拍摄了5颗晚型星(3 Dra, Vir, Leo, 34 Boo 和36Com) 的CCD 光谱, 作为晚型星参考谱. 测量了观测样本星的和近红外Ca II的三重线(8498, 8542和 8662)的等值宽度(EW),谱线半极大全宽(FWHM)和视向速度(Vr), 并分析了这些星的活动性.%In this paper, some CCD spectra of 6 cataclysmic variables: AB Boo, T CrB, UX UMa, AH Her, Z Cam, V426 Oph and 3 related objects: Leo3, UMa3 and EG UMa are presented. We also observed 5 late-type stars: 3 Dra, Vir, Leo, 34 Boo, and 36 Com in order to provide comparison with the late-type component of the program systems. The observations were made using the 2.16 m telescope of Bejing Observatory with a Cassergrain spectrograph on 1997—04—15/17 at the Xinglong Station. The CCD spectra were obtained with a low resolution and a dispersion of 1.2/pixel. The spectral region covered is from 5920 to 7072, and from 7950 to 9180 for all the program stars and only 3390—8380 for AH Her. Representative spectra are given for each object. The equivalent width (EW) and FWHM of and CaII triplet lines were determined. The radial velocities for 9 program stars were also determined. Implications of our results are discussed.

  5. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  6. A Carbonic Anhydrase Serves as an Important Acid-Base Regulator in Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Exposed to Elevated CO2: Implication for Physiological Responses of Mollusk to Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Anguo; Song, Linsheng

    2017-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have been demonstrated to play an important role in acid-base regulation in vertebrates. However, the classification and modulatory function of CAs in marine invertebrates, especially their responses to ocean acidification remain largely unknown. Here, a cytosolic α-CA (designated as CgCAII-1) was characterized from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its molecular activities against CO2 exposure were investigated. CgCAII-1 possessed a conserved CA catalytic domain, with high similarity to invertebrate cytoplasmic or mitochondrial α-CAs. Recombinant CgCAII-1 could convert CO2 to HCO3(-) with calculated activity as 0.54 × 10(3) U/mg, which could be inhibited by acetazolamide (AZ). The mRNA transcripts of CgCAII-1 in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, and hemocytes increased significantly after exposure to elevated CO2. CgCAII-1 could interact with the hemocyte membrane proteins and the distribution of CgCAII-1 protein became more concentrated and dense in gill and mantle under CO2 exposure. The intracellular pH (pHi) of hemocytes under CO2 exposure increased significantly (p CO2 exposure. The impact of CO2 exposure on CA activity coupled with the mRNA expression level and protein translocation of CgCAII-1 provided evidences that CgCAII-1 could respond to ocean acidification and participate in acid-base regulation. Such cytoplasmic CA-based physiological regulation mechanism might explain other physiological responses of marine organisms to OA.

  7. Impacts of CA9 gene polymorphisms on urothelial cell carcinoma susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Shiang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC and the clinicopathological status. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05 than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638 had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204-18.746 increased risk of invasive cancer. CONCLUSION: The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan.

  8. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy.

  9. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors.

  10. Ultrastructural changes in the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach under the influence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors AA and EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Vodka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (АА and EA on the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach were investigated. Under the influence of AA the considerable alterations in granal structure occurred, the thickness of the granal thylakoids increased by 36% and the interspace between thylakoids by 10% comparable with the control. As a result of EA treatment, the thickness of granal thylakoids enhanced by 31% and the interspace between thylakoids increased by 8% in comparison to the control. It was shown that structure of the granal system of the chloroplast was more sensitive to AA than EA. The data obtained can indicate a decrease in the activity of the thylakoid carbonic anhydrase, inhibition of electron transport and photosynthetic process as a whole in the presence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (AA and EA.

  11. Pressure-induced structural transformation of CaC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Xiaoli; Li, Da; Huang, Yanping; Bao, Kuo; Li, Fangfei; Wu, Gang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2016-05-01

    The high pressure structural changes of calcium carbide CaC2 have been investigated with Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. At ambient conditions, two forms of CaC2 co-exist. Above 4.9 GPa, monoclinic CaC2-ii diminished indicating the structural phase transition from CaC2-ii to CaC2-i. At about 7.0 GPa, both XRD patterns and Raman spectra confirmed that CaC2-i transforms into a metallic Cmcm structure which contains polymeric carbon chains. Along with the phase transition, the isolated C2 dumbbells are polymerized into zigzag chains resulting in a large volume collapse with 22.4%. Above 30.0 GPa, the XRD patterns of CaC2 become featureless and remain featureless upon decompression, suggesting an irreversible amorphization of CaC2.

  12. A review of the pharmacology of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors for the treatment of glaucoma in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of disorders usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), leading to optic nerve damage, retinal ganglion cell death and irreversible vision loss. Therefore, medications that lower IOP are the mainstay of glaucoma therapy. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are some of the principal drugs used in the management of canine and feline glaucoma. This paper summarises current knowledge of the mechanism of action of these agents and their effect on IOP in dogs and cats. It also discusses potential harmful side effects of CAIs and presents current opinions about their role and place in the medical management of glaucoma in small animals.

  13. Molecular targeting of carbonic anhydrase IX in mice with hypoxic HT29 colorectal tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a membrane spanning protein involved in the enzymatic regulation of tumor acid-base balance. CAIX has been shown to be elevated in a number of hypoxic tumor types. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of intact and IgG fragments of cG250 to target CAIX in vivo in a hypoxic tumor model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conventional biodistribution studies were performed with (111In-DO3A-cG250, (111In-DO3A-F(ab'(2-cG250 and (111In-DO3A-Fab-cG250. Additional ex vivo analysis of the tumor was performed with markers for tumor hypoxia, blood perfusion and endogenous CAIX expression. All four data sets were digitally correlated to determine the optimal agent for determining hypoxia in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft. The HT29 human colorectal tumor xenografts show strong CAIX expression in hypoxic areas of poor blood perfusion. The intact IgG had an initial high focal uptake at the periphery of these hypoxic regions and penetration into the areas of highest CAIX expression over the 7-day study period. The lower molecular weight antibody fragments had a faster uptake into areas of high CAIX expression, but had a much lower absolute uptake at the optimal imaging times. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the clinical detection of hypoxia induced CAIX using cG250 antibody based agents, imaging with the intact IgG at 7 days post injection would allow for the most sensitive and accurate detection of CAIX.

  14. Expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) in malignant mesothelioma. An immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capkova, L; Koubkova, L; Kodet, R

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a membranously located metalloenzyme involved in pH homeostasis with influence on regulation of cell proliferation, oncogenesis and tumor progression. Much attention has been paid recently to carboanhydrases and their inhibitors as they offer an opportunity for both developing novel anticancer drugs, as well as diagnostic and prognostic tools. This study was designed to assess the expression of CAIX in malignant pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomas, their benign counterparts, and in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma, metastatic carcinoma or a benign disease. Tissue blocks from 51 malignant mesotheliomas of pleura (47 cases; 41 epithelioid, 2 biphasic, 4 sarcomatoid) and peritoneum (4 cases; all epithelioid), 14 cases with normal or reactive pleural tissue, and 19 cell blocks were analyzed. CAIX expression was determined using immunohistochemistry and its membranous immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively evaluated. Specimens were divided into five subgroups according to the staining pattern and intensity.Overall, 92.2% (47/51) of mesotheliomas expressed CAIX. All epithelioid mesotheliomas showed CAIX positivity, which was predominantly strong and diffuse (73.3%, 33/45). Sarcomatoid mesotheliomas and sarcomatoid areas in biphasic mesotheliomas were negative. A strong diffuse staining was observed in all cases of normal mesothelia. In pleural effusions, CAIX expression was observed in malignant cells as well as in benign mesothelial cells. In conclusion, CAIX is expressed virtually in all mesotheliomas except for sarcomatoid subtype, and in benign mesothelia. There are probably more mechanisms of CAIX overexpression than hypoxia-induced in malignant mesothelioma, with the influence of other tissue specific transcription or growth factors depending on the type of the cell lineage. CAIX immunoreactivity is not a reliable diagnostic marker for

  15. Heterologous gene expression driven by carbonic anhydrase gene promoter in Dunaliella salina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Yurong; LU Yumin; WANG Tianyun; HOU Weihong; XUE Lexun

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella salina, a halotolerant unicellular green alga without a rigid cell wall, can live in salinities ranging from 0.05 to 5 mol/L NaCl. These features of D. salina make it an ideal host for the production of antibodies, oral vaccine, and commercially valuable polypeptides. To produce high level of heterologous proteins from D. salina, highly efficientpromoters are required to drive expression of target genes under controlled condition. In the present study, we cloned a 5' franking region of 1.4 kb from the carbonic anhydrase (CAH) gene of D. salina by genomic walking and PCR. The fragment was ligated to the pMD18-T vector and characterized. Sequence analysis indicated that this region contained conserved motifs, including a TATA- like box and CAAT-box. Tandem (GT)n repeats that had a potential role of transcriptional control, were also found in this region. The transcription start site (TSS) of the CAH gene was determined by 5' RACE and nested PCR method. Transformation assays showed that the 1.4 kb fragment was able to drive expression of the selectable bar (bialaphos resistance) gene when the fusion was transformed into D. salina by biolistics.Northern blotting hybridizations showed that the bar transcript was most abundant in cells grown in 2 mol/L NaCl, and less abundant in 0.5 mol/L NaCl, indicating that expression of the bar gene was induced at high salinity. These results suggest the potential use of the CAH gene promoter to induce the expression of heterologous genes in D. salina under varied salt condition.

  16. The ctnG gene encodes carbonic anhydrase involved in mycotoxin citrinin biosynthesis from Monascus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yang; Huang, Zhi-Bing; He, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin, a fungal secondary metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. Citrinin is synthesised by condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Six genes involved in the citrinin biosynthesis, including pksCT, ctnA and ctnB, have been cloned in Monascus purpureus. The pksCT gene encodes a polyketide synthase; ctnA is a regulatory factor; and ctnB encodes an oxidoreductase. When the three genes were respectively disrupted, the disruption strains drastically decreased citrinin production or barely produced citrinin. Ten new genes have been discovered in Monascus aurantiacus besides the above six genes. One of these gene displayed the highest similarity to the β-carbonic anhydrase gene from Aspergillus oryzae (74% similarity) and was designated ctnG. To learn more about the citrinin biosynthetic pathway, a ctnG-replacement vector was constructed to disrupt ctnG with the hygromycin resistance gene as the selection marker, then transformed into M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 by a protoplast-PEG method. The citrinin content of three disruptants was reduced to about 50%, meanwhile pigment production decreased by 23%, respectively, over those of the wild-type strains. ctnG was deduced to be involved in the formation of malonyl-CoA as a common precursor of red pigments and citrinin. Therefore, the disruption of the ctnG gene decreased citrinin and pigment production. M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 can produce higher concentrations of citrinin than other strains such as M. purpureus and M. ruber. Establishing the function of citrinin biosynthetic genes in M. aurantiacus is helpful in understanding the citrinin synthetic pathway and adopting some strategies to control contamination.

  17. The use of CA-IX as a diagnostic method for oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayáns, M; Suárez-Peñaranda, J M; Torres-López, M; Supuran, C T; Gándara-Vila, P; Gayoso-Diz, P; Barros-Angueira, F; Gallas-Torreira, M; García-García, A

    2015-02-01

    The presence and degree of dysplasia are important diagnostic and prognostic criteria for oral leukoplakia, but evaluation of dysplasia is difficult and subjective. Carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) is expressed primarily in tumor cells and is considered a specific hypoxia marker. We investigated the role of CA-IX in oral leukoplakia. We investigated 30 specimens of oral leukoplakia and 35 dysplasia specimens adjacent to the tumor margin. We analyzed clinical variables including age, sex, degree of dysplasia, and smoking, clinical appearance of leukoplakia, number of lesions, location, size, clinical monitoring, malignant transformation and recurrence. For the immunohistochemical study, we used a noncommercial monoclonal antibody against human CA-IX MAb M75. We found greater CA-IX positivity in nonsmokers, erythroplakia and mottled leukoplakia, those located on the tongue, patients with multiple lesions, 2-4 cm leukoplakias and in recurrent cases, although differences were not statistically significant. All lesions in all samples without dysplasia were negative for CA-IX; however, for all other categories of dysplasia, the percentages of positivity and negativity varied. Regarding the diagnostic index values, we found a sensitivity of 32%, specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 13%. Leukoplakias appear mainly in females and potentially are malignant; more than 90% have some degree of dysplasia, and therefore require close clinical and histopathological monitoring. The CA-IX immunohistochemical marker may be useful for screening samples without dysplasia owing to its high specificity.

  18. Expression pattern and polymorphism of three microsatellite markers in the porcine CA3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Rong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbonic anhydrase III (CA3 is an abundant muscle protein characteristic of adult type-1, slow-twitch, muscle fibres. In order to further understand the functions of the porcine CA3 protein in muscle, the temporal and spatial distributions of its gene product were analysed and the association between the presence of specific polymorphisms and carcass traits in the pig was also examined. Real-time PCR revealed that the CA3 mRNA expression showed no differences with age in skeletal muscles from Yorkshire pigs at postnatal day-1, month-2, and month-4. We provide the first evidence that CA3 is differentially expressed in the skeletal muscle of Yorkshire and Meishan pig breeds. In addition, the whole pig genomic DNA sequence of CA3 was investigated and shown to contain seven exons and six introns. Comparative sequencing of the gene from three pig breeds revealed the existence of microsatellite SJ160 in intron 5 and microsatellite SJ158 and a novel microsatellite marker that includes a tandem repeat of (TCn in intron 4. We also determined the allele number and frequencies of the three loci in seven pig breeds and found that they are low polymorphic microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that the CA3 microsatellite polymorphism was associated with dressing percentage, internal fat rate, carcass length, rib number and backfat thickness in the pig.

  19. Carbonic anhydrase-9 expression levels and prognosis in human breast cancer: association with treatment outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Span, P.N.; Bussink, J.; Manders, P.; Beex, L.V.A.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Here, we set out to assess CA9 expression levels by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in breast cancer tissue samples obtained from 253 patients, and correlated those with relapse-free (RFS) survival. The median follow-up time was 75 months (range 2-168 months). CA9 expression was mainly found in high-g

  20. Structure and properties of the slags of continuous converting of copper nickel-containing mattes and concentrates: II. Effect of the SiO2/CaO ratio on the structure and liquidus temperature of the slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigarev, S. P.; Tsymbulov, L. B.; Selivanov, E. N.; Chumarev, V. M.

    2012-03-01

    The structure and liquidus temperature of the SiO2-CaO-Al2O3-FeO x -Cu2O-NiO slags that form during continuous converting of copper mattes and concentrates into blister copper are analyzed. The slag melt compositions are varied over a wide SiO2/CaO range. The slags are studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron-probe microanalysis. The liquidus temperature of the slags is determined by differential thermal analysis. It is found that, depending on the SiO2/CaO ratio, the structure and liquidus temperature of the slags change and the forms of copper in a slag also change. The SiO2/CaO range in a slag is recommended for the process of continuous converting of a copper nickel-containing sulfide raw materials.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase generates CO2 and H+ that drive spider silk formation via opposite effects on the terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Marlene; Chen, Gefei; Otikovs, Martins; Landreh, Michael; Nordling, Kerstin; Kronqvist, Nina; Westermark, Per; Jörnvall, Hans; Knight, Stefan; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Holm, Lena; Meng, Qing; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Chesler, Mitchell; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins) under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT) that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase generates CO2 and H+ that drive spider silk formation via opposite effects on the terminal domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Andersson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2 in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation.

  3. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present.

  4. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in two animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomotto, Jean; Pertl, Cordula; Borrel, Caroline; Walter, Maggie C; Bulst, Stefanie; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David L; Lochmüller, Hanns; Thirion, Christian; Ségalat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is an inherited muscle degeneration disease for which there is still no efficient treatment. However, compounds active on the disease may already exist among approved drugs but are difficult to identify in the absence of cellular models. We used the Caenorhabditis elegans animal model to screen a collection of 1000 already approved compounds. Two of the most active hits obtained were methazolamide and dichlorphenamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors widely used in human therapy. In C. elegans, these drugs were shown to interact with CAH-4, a putative carbonic anhydrase. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further validated in long-term experiments on mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Mice were treated for 120 days with food containing methazolamide or dichlorphenamide at two doses each. Musculus tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles were histologically analyzed and isometric muscle force was measured in M. extensor digitorum longus. Both substances increased the tetanic muscle force in the treated M. extensor digitorum longus muscle group, dichlorphenamide increased the force significantly by 30%, but both drugs failed to increase resistance of muscle fibres to eccentric contractions. Histological analysis revealed a reduction of centrally nucleated fibers in M. tibialis anterior and diaphragm in the treated groups. These studies further demonstrated that a C. elegans-based screen coupled with a mouse model validation strategy can lead to the identification of potential pharmacological agents for rare diseases.

  5. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. E.; Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The calvaria of 5-to-6-day-old mice treated with 1 x 10 to the -8th M of 1,25(OH)2D3 in vitro for 48 hours are examined in order to study the function of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption. Calcium concentrations in the culture were measured to assess bone resorption. It is observed that 1,25(OH)2D3 effectively stimulates bone resorption in vitro and the resorption is dose-dependent. The effects of azetazolamide on 1,25(OH)2D3-induced bone resorption are investigated. The data reveal that 1,25(OH)2D3-induced calcium release is associated with an increase in the carbonic anhydrase activity of bone, and bone alkaline phosphatase activity is decreased and acid phosphatase activity is increased in response to 1,25(OH)2D3. A two-fold mechanism for 1,25(OH)2D3-induced bone resorption is proposed; the first mechanism is an indirect activation of osteoclasts and the second involves an interaction between hormone and osteoclast precursors.

  6. Effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment of renal cell carcinoma on the accumulation of carbonic anhydrase IX-specific chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Kats-Ugurlu, G.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Old, L.J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of three different tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) on the biodistribution of chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) cG250, which identifies carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), in nude mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts. TKIs represent the best, but

  7. Defect chemistry and oxygen transport of (La0.6Sr0.4 − xMx)0.99Co0.2Fe0.8O3 − δ, M = Ca (x = 0.05, 0.1), Ba (x = 0.1, 0.2), Sr: Part II: Oxygen transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2009-01-01

    radius). The size difference induces different strains into the crystal structure in each composition. The possibility of simple relationships between various crystal strain parameters and the transport properties were analyzed. Oxygen pump controlled permeation experiments and a surface sensitive......, the findings on the defect chemistry were reported, while the oxygen transport properties are reported here in part II. In the investigated material series, the amount of divalent dopant has been kept constant, while Sr ions have been substituted with Ca ions (smaller ionic radius) or Ba ions (larger ionic...

  8. (Meta)stable CaC{sub 2}; (Meta)stabiles CaC{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, J.; Dill, S.; Marzini, M.; Mayer, H.A.; Meyer, H.J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2001-05-01

    One out of four modifications of CaC{sub 2} is the so-called metastable calcium carbide, CaC{sub 2}-III, which was synthesized as pure material. It forms by heating monoclinic CaC{sub 2}-II (C2/c) above 150 C and remains stable after cooling down to room temperature. The structure was refined from X-ray powder patterns (C2/m, Z = 4, a = 722.6(1) pm, b = 385.26(7) pm, c = 737.6(1) pm, {beta} = 107.345(2) ). After grinding CaC{sub 2}-III transforms back into CaC{sub 2}-II. Heating CaC{sub 2}-III induces a reversible phase transition into the cubic modification (CaC{sub 2}-IV) at 460 C. Differences between the three different structures of CaC{sub 2} I-III, being stable at ambient conditions are also shown by {sup 13}C-MAS-NMR measurements, especially the presence of two distinct types of carbon atoms in the structure of the title compound. (orig.)

  9. Generation and behavior characterization of CaMKIIβ knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is abundant in the brain, where it makes important contributions to synaptic organization and homeostasis, including playing an essential role in synaptic plasticity and memory. Four genes encode isoforms of CaMKII (α, β, δ, γ, with CaMKIIα and CaMKIIβ highly expressed in the brain. Decades of molecular and cellular research, as well as the use of a large number of CaMKIIα mutant mouse lines, have provided insight into the pivotal roles of CaMKIIα in brain plasticity and cognition. However, less is known about the CaMKIIβ isoform. We report the development and extensive behavioral and phenotypic characterization of a CaMKIIβ knockout (KO mouse. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse was found to be smaller at weaning, with an altered body mass composition. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse showed ataxia, impaired forelimb grip strength, and deficits in the rotorod, balance beam and running wheel tasks. Interestingly, the CaMKIIβ KO mouse exhibited reduced anxiety in the elevated plus maze and open field tests. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse also showed cognitive impairment in the novel object recognition task. Our results provide a comprehensive behavioral characterization of mice deficient in the β isoform of CaMKII. The neurologic phenotypes and the construction of the genotype suggest the utility of this KO mouse strain for future studies of CaMKIIβ in brain structure, function and development.

  10. The emerging role of CaMKII in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yang; Zhao, Ren; Zhe, Hong

    2015-05-20

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinases best known for its critical role in learning and memory. Recent studies suggested that high levels of CaMKII also expressed in variety of malignant diseases. In this review, we focus on the structure and biology properties of CaMKII, including the role of CaMKII in the regulation of cancer progression and therapy response. We also describe the role of CaMKII in the diagnosis of different kinds of cancer and recent progress in the development of CaMKII inhibitors. These data establishes CaMKII as a novel target whose modulation presents new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  11. A significant but rather mild contribution of T286 autophosphorylation to Ca2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Coultrap

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autophosphorylation of the Ca(2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII at T286 generates partially Ca(2+/CaM-independent "autonomous" activity, which is thought to be required for long-term potentiation (LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie learning and memory. A requirement for T286 autophosphorylation also for efficient Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity has been described, but remains controversial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to determine the contribution of T286 autophosphorylation to Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity, the activity of CaMKII wild type and its phosphorylation-incompetent T286A mutant was compared. As the absolute activity can vary between individual kinase preparations, the activity was measured in six different extracts for each kinase (expressed in HEK-293 cells. Consistent with measurements on purified kinase (from a baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system, CaMKII T286A showed a mildly but significantly reduced rate of Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated phosphorylation for two different peptide substrates (to ~75-84% of wild type. Additional slower CaMKII autophosphorylation at T305/306 inhibits stimulation by Ca(2+/CaM, but occurs only minimally for CaMKII wild type during CaM-stimulated activity assays. Thus, we tested if the T286A mutant may show more extensive inhibitory autophosphorylation, which could explain its reduced stimulated activity. By contrast, inhibitory autophosphorylation was instead found to be even further reduced for the T286A mutant under our assay conditions. On a side note, the phospho-T305 antibody showed some basal background immuno-reactivity also with non-phosphorylated CaMKII, as indicated by T305/306A mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity is mildly (~1.2-1.3fold further increased by additional T286 autophosphorylation, but that this autophosphorylation is not required for the major

  12. Carbon anhydrase IX specific immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma potentially cured by interleukin-2 based immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The majority of clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) show high and homogeneous expression levels of the tumor associated antigen (TAA) carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2) based immunotherapy can lead to cure in patients with metastatic renal cell...... of disease (NED) following treatment with IL-2 based immunotherapy, and thus potentially cured. Immune reactivity in these patients was compared with samples from patients with dramatic tumor response obtained immediately at the cessation of therapy, samples from patients that experienced progressive disease...... interest in future cancer vaccines, but more studies are needed to elucidate the immunological mechanisms of action in potentially cured patients treated with an immunotherapeutic agent....

  13. Effect the some heavy metals on carbonic anhydrase enzymes activities from non-tumour and tumour human stomach

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, in vitro effects of certain heavy metals on the human carbonic anhydrase enzyme were examined. Inhibitory effects of metal ions ( Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+,Cr2+, Al3+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+) were observed in tumour and non-tumour tissue. IC50 values were calculated for metals. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+ IC50 values of tumour tissue were calculated as 0.034mM, 0.426mM, 0.597mM, 0.878mM and 2.52mM respectively. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+  IC50 values of non-tu...

  14. Identifying potential selective fluorescent probes for cancer-associated protein carbonic anhydrase IX using a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Rhiannon L; Floriano, Wely B

    2014-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a biomarker for tumor hypoxia. Fluorescent inhibitors of CAIX have been used to study hypoxic tumor cell lines. However, these inhibitor-based fluorescent probes may have a therapeutic effect that is not appropriate for monitoring treatment efficacy. In the search for novel fluorescent probes that are not based on known inhibitors, a database of 20,860 fluorescent compounds was virtually screened against CAIX using hierarchical virtual ligand screening (HierVLS). The screening database contained 14,862 compounds tagged with the ATTO680 fluorophore plus an additional 5998 intrinsically fluorescent compounds. Overall ranking of compounds to identify hit molecular probe candidates utilized a principal component analysis (PCA) approach. Four potential binding sites, including the catalytic site, were identified within the structure of the protein and targeted for virtual screening. Available sequence information for 23 carbonic anhydrase isoforms was used to prioritize the four sites based on the estimated "uniqueness" of each site in CAIX relative to the other isoforms. A database of 32 known inhibitors and 478 decoy compounds was used to validate the methodology. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using the first principal component (PC1) as predictive score for the validation database yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. AUC is interpreted as the probability that a binder will have a better score than a non-binder. The use of first component analysis of binding energies for multiple sites is a novel approach for hit selection. The very high prediction power for this approach increases confidence in the outcome from the fluorescent library screening. Ten of the top scoring candidates for isoform-selective putative binding sites are suggested for future testing as fluorescent molecular probe candidates.

  15. Topiramate Protects Pericytes from Glucotoxicity: Role for Mitochondrial CA VA in Cerebromicrovascular Disease in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Ping; Price, Tulin O; Diogo, Ana L; Sheibani, Nader; Banks, William A; Shah, Gul N

    Hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus causes oxidative stress and pericyte depletion from the microvasculature of the brain thus leading to the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) disruption. The compromised BBB exposes the brain to circulating substances, resulting in neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death. The decline in pericyte numbers in diabetic mouse brain and pericyte apoptosis in high glucose cultures are caused by excess superoxide produced during enhanced respiration (mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of glucose). Superoxide is precursor to all Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which, in turn, cause oxidative stress. The rate of respiration and thus the ROS production is regulated by mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases (mCA) VA and VB, the two isoforms expressed in the mitochondria. Inhibition of both mCA: decreases the oxidative stress and restores the pericyte numbers in diabetic brain; and reduces high glucose-induced respiration, ROS, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in cultured brain pericytes. However, the individual role of the two isoforms has not been established. To investigate the contribution of mCA VA in ROS production and apoptosis, a mCA VA overexpressing brain pericyte cell line was engineered. These cells were exposed to high glucose and analyzed for the changes in ROS and apoptosis. Overexpression of mCA VA significantly increased pericyte ROS and apoptosis. Inhibition of mCA VA with topiramate prevented increases both in glucose-induced ROS and pericyte death. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that mCA VA regulates the rate of pericyte respiration. These findings identify mCA VA as a novel and specific therapeutic target to protect the cerebromicrovascular bed in diabetes.

  16. Role of Ca++ in Shoot Gravitropism. [avena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A cornerstone in the argument that Ca(2+) levels may regulate growth is the finding the EGTA promotes straight growth. The usual explanation for these results is that Ca(2+) chelation from cell walls results in wall loosening and thus accelerated straight growth. The ability of frozen-thawed Avena coleoptile tissue (subjected to 15g tension) to extend in response to EGTA and Quin II was examined. The EGTA when applied in weakly buffered (i.e., 0.1mM) neutral solutions initiates rapid extension. When the buffer strength is increased, similar concentrations of EGTA produce no growth response. This implies when EGTA liberated protons are released upon Ca(2+) chelation they can either initiate acid growth (low buffer conditions) or if consumed (high buffer conditions) have no effect. Thus Ca(2+) chelation in itself apparently does not result in straight growth.

  17. CaMKII in sinoatrial node physiology and dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejin eWu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium and calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is present in sinoatrial node (SAN pacemaker cells and is required for physiological fight or flight SAN beating rate responses. Inhibition of CaMKII in SAN does not affect baseline heart rate, but reduces heart rate increases in response to physiological stress. CaMKII senses intracellular calcium (Ca2+ changes, oxidation status and hyperglycemia to phosphorylate substrates that regulate Ca2+-sensitive proteins, such as L-type Ca2+ channels, phospholamban (PLN, and cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2. All of these substrates are involved in the SAN pacemaking mechanism. Excessive CaMKII activity, as occurs under pathological conditions such as heart failure, ischemia and diabetes, can promote intracellular Ca2+ overload and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Oxidation of CaMKII (ox-CaMKII locks CaMKII into a constitutively active configuration that contributes to SAN cell apoptosis and fibrosis. This ox-CaMKII-mediated loss of functional SAN cells contributes to sinoatrial node dysfunction (SND and sudden death. Thus, CaMKII has emerged as a central regulator of physiological SAN responses and a key determinant of SND.

  18. The L-arginine/NO pathway, homoarginine, and nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase activity in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmann, Christina; Lilienthal, Eggert; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona; Hörster, Irina; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Lücke, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    High circulating levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and low circulating levels of homoarginine (hArg) are known cardiovascular risk factors in adults. While in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) circulating ADMA is significantly elevated, in children and adolescents the reported ADMA data are contradictory. In 102 children with T1DM and 95 healthy controls (HC) serving as controls, we investigated the L-arginine (Arg)/nitric oxide (NO) pathway. Children with T1DM were divided into two groups, i.e., in children with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus [T1DM-ND; n = 10; age, 8.8 (4.4-11.2) years; HbA1c, 13 (8.9-13.9) %] and in those with long-term treatment [T1DM-T; n = 92; age, 12.5 (10.5-15.4) years; HbA1c, 8.0 (7.2-8.6) %]. The age of the HC was 11.3 (8-13.3) years. Amino acids and NO metabolites of the Arg/NO pathway, creatinine and the oxidative stress biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by GC-MS or GC-MS/MS. Plasma hArg, ADMA and the hArg/ADMA molar ratio did not differ between the T1DM and HC groups. There was a significant difference between T1DM-T and HC with regard to plasma nitrite [0.53 (0.48-0.61) vs 2.05 (0.86-2.36) µM, P 86-2.36) µM, P < 0.0001]. Plasma MDA did not differ between the groups. The urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOXR), a measure of nitrite-dependent renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity, was higher in T1DM-T [1173 (738-1481), P < 0.0001] and T1DM-ND [1341 (1117-1615), P = 0.0007] compared to HC [540 (324-962)], but did not differ between T1DM-T and T1DM-ND (P = 0.272). The lower nitrite excretion in the children with T1DM may indicate enhanced renal CA-dependent nitrite reabsorption compared with healthy children. Yet, lower plasma nitrite concentration in the T1DM patients may have also contributed to the higher UNOXR. Patients' age correlated positively with plasma hArg and hArg/ADMA and urinary DMA/ADMA. Plasma ADMA and urinary ADMA, DMA, nitrite and nitrate correlated negatively with age of the

  19. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian us