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Sample records for anhydrase ii deficiency

  1. Genetics Home Reference: carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 19(3):199-229. Review. Citation on PubMed Shah GN, Rubbelke TS, Hendin J, Nguyen H, Waheed A, Shoemaker JD, Sly WS. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose ...

  2. Kinetics of Formation of Cobalt(II)- and Nickel(II) Carbonic Anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Robert S.; Reardon, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the kinetic behavior associated with the interaction of metal ions with apocarbonic anhydrase, focusing on the formation of two metallocarbonic anhydrase--the biochemically active Co(II) and the inactive Ni(II)derivatives. (GA)

  3. Factor II deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  4. Building reactive copper centers in human carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, He; Weitz, Andrew C; Hendrich, Michael P; Lewis, Edwin A; Emerson, Joseph P

    2013-08-01

    Reengineering metalloproteins to generate new biologically relevant metal centers is an effective a way to test our understanding of the structural and mechanistic features that steer chemical transformations in biological systems. Here, we report thermodynamic data characterizing the formation of two type-2 copper sites in carbonic anhydrase and experimental evidence showing one of these new, copper centers has characteristics similar to a variety of well-characterized copper centers in synthetic models and enzymatic systems. Human carbonic anhydrase II is known to bind two Cu(2+) ions; these binding events were explored using modern isothermal titration calorimetry techniques that have become a proven method to accurately measure metal-binding thermodynamic parameters. The two Cu(2+)-binding events have different affinities (K a approximately 5 × 10(12) and 1 × 10(10)), and both are enthalpically driven processes. Reconstituting these Cu(2+) sites under a range of conditions has allowed us to assign the Cu(2+)-binding event to the three-histidine, native, metal-binding site. Our initial efforts to characterize these Cu(2+) sites have yielded data that show distinctive (and noncoupled) EPR signals associated with each copper-binding site and that this reconstituted enzyme can activate hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the oxidation of 2-aminophenol.

  5. Azobenzene-based inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrase II

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    Leander Simon Runtsch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aryl sulfonamides are a widely used drug class for the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. In the context of our program of photochromic pharmacophores we were interested in the exploration of azobenzene-containing sulfonamides to block the catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII. Herein, we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a small library of nine photochromic sulfonamides towards hCAII. All molecules are azobenzene-4-sulfonamides, which are substituted by different functional groups in the 4´-position and were characterized by X-ray crystallography. We aimed to investigate the influence of electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents on the inhibitory constant Ki. With the aid of an hCAII crystal structure bound to one of the synthesized azobenzenes, we found that the electronic structure does not strongly affect inhibition. Taken together, all compounds are strong blockers of hCAII with Ki = 25–65 nM that are potentially photochromic and thus combine studies from chemical synthesis, crystallography and enzyme kinetics.

  6. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  7. Increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II in the developing Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palminiello, Sonia; Kida, Elizabeth; Kaur, Kulbir; Walus, Marius; Wisniewski, Krystyna E; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Rabe, Ausma; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2008-01-23

    By using a proteomic approach, we found increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Further immunoblot analyses showed that the levels of CA II are increased not only in the brain of adult Ts65Dn mice but also in the brain of infants and young children with DS. Cellular localization of the enzyme in human brain, predominantly in the oligodendroglia and primitive vessels in fetal brain and in the oligodendroglia and some GABAergic neurons postnatally, was similar in DS subjects and controls. Given the role of CA II in regulation of electrolyte and water balance and pH homeostasis, up-regulation of CA II may reflect a compensatory mechanism mobilized in response to structural/functional abnormalities in the developing DS brain. However, this up-regulation may also have an unfavorable effect by increasing susceptibility to seizures of children with DS.

  8. Virtual screening of combinatorial library of novel benzenesulfonamides on mycobacterial carbonic anhydrase II

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    Dikant F.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial library of novel benzenesulfonamides was docked (Schrodinger Glide into mycobacterial carbonic anhydrase (mtCA II and human (hCA II isoforms with an aim to find drug candidates with selective activity on mtCA II. The predicted selectivity was calculated based on optimized MM-GBSA free energies for ligand enzyme interactions. Selectivity, LogP (o/w and interaction energy were used to calculate the selection index which determined the subset of best scoring molecules selected for further evaluation. Structure-activity relationship was found for fragment subsets, showing us the possible way regarding how to influence lipophilicity without affecting ligand-enzyme binding properties.

  9. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with secondary sulfonamides incorporating benzothiazole scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Anthi; Geronikaki, Athina; Terzi, Emine; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. A series of benzothiazole-based sulfonamides were synthesized and tested as possible CA inhibitors. Their inhibitory activity was assessed against the cytosolic human isoforms hCA I and hCA II and the transmembrane hCA IX and hCA XII. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting hCA IX and hCA XII over the off-target ones hCA I and hCA II. Furthermore, computational procedures were used to investigate the binding mode of this class of compounds, within the active site of hCA IX.

  10. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase II by thioxolone: a mechanistic and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, Albert A; Genis, Caroli; Fisher, S Zoe; Orwenyo, Jared N; Kumara, Mudalige Thilak; Dutta, Subodh K; Phillips, Eric; Kiddle, James J; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert; Tripp, Brian C

    2008-03-11

    This paper examines the functional mechanism of thioxolone, a compound recently identified as a weak inhibitor of human carbonic anhydrase II by Iyer et al. (2006) J. Biomol. Screening 11, 782-791 . Thioxolone lacks sulfonamide, sulfamate, or hydroxamate functional groups that are typically found in therapeutic carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, such as acetazolamide. Analytical chemistry and biochemical methods were used to investigate the fate of thioxolone upon binding to CA II, including Michaelis-Menten kinetics of 4-nitrophenyl acetate esterase cleavage, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), oxygen-18 isotope exchange studies, and X-ray crystallography. Thioxolone is proposed to be a prodrug inhibitor that is cleaved via a CA II zinc-hydroxide mechanism known to catalyze the hydrolysis of esters. When thioxolone binds in the active site of CA II, it is cleaved and forms 4-mercaptobenzene-1,3-diol via the intermediate S-(2,4-thiophenyl)hydrogen thiocarbonate. The esterase cleavage product binds to the zinc active site via the thiol group and is therefore the active CA inhibitor, while the intermediate is located at the rim of the active-site cavity. The time-dependence of this inhibition reaction was investigated in detail. Because this type of prodrug inhibitor mechanism depends on cleavage of ester bonds, this class of inhibitors may have advantages over sulfonamides in determining isozyme specificity. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study with a series of structural analogues of thioxolone yielded similar estimates of inhibition constants for most compounds, although two compounds with bromine groups at the C1 carbon of thioxolone were not inhibitory, suggesting a possible steric effect.

  11. Carbonic anhydrase II increases the activity of the human electrogenic Na+/HCO3- cotransporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2007-05-04

    Several acid/base-coupled membrane transporters, such as the electrogenic sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), have been shown to bind to different carbonic anhydrase isoforms to create a "transport metabolon." We have expressed NBCe1 derived from human kidney in oocytes of Xenopus leavis and determined its transport activity by recording the membrane current in voltage clamp, and the cytosolic H(+) and Na(+) concentrations using ion-selective microelectrodes. When carbonic anhydrase isoform II (CAII) had been injected into oocytes, the membrane current and the rate of cytosolic Na(+) rise, indicative for NBCe1 activity, increased significantly with the amount of injected CAII (2-200 ng). The CAII inhibitor ethoxyzolamide reversed the effects of CAII on the NBCe1 activity. Co-expressing wild-type CAII or NH(2)-terminal mutant CAII together with NBCe1 provided similar results, whereas co-expressing the catalytically inactive CAII mutant V143Y had no effect on NBCe1 activity. Mass spectrometric analysis and the rate of cytosolic H(+) change following addition of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) confirmed the catalytic activity of injected and expressed CAII in oocytes. Our results show that the transport capacity of NBCe1 is enhanced by the catalytic activity of CAII, in line with the notion that CAII forms a transport metabolon with NBCe1.

  12. Synthesis of novel bisindolylmethanes: New carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors, docking, and 3D pharmacophore studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Syahrul; Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Fayyaz, Sharmeen; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2016-10-01

    In this study, 45 bisindolylmethanes having sulfonamide moiety had been synthesized through 3 steps. In vitro assay for inhibition of carbonic anhydrase showed that some of the compounds having sulfonamide moiety are capable of inhibiting carbonic anhydrase II. Bisindoles having halogens at fifth position showed better inhibitory activity as compared to unsubstituted bisindoles. The results obtained from in vitro inhibitory activity were subjected through 3D QSAR and docking studies to identify important features contributing to the activity and further improve the structure. Pharmacophore studies suggest that bisindolylmethane moiety is contributing significantly towards the inhibition activity. Docking studies showed that compounds having nitro substituent (5g and 5i) were found to be able interact with Zn(2+) ion, Thr199, His94, His96, and His119, which interferes with the ZnOHThr199Glu106 hydrogen bond network. Bulky nitro substituent at ortho position for compound 5g prevents the compound from interacting with other residues like Thr199 and Thr200. Methyl substituent at ortho position for Compound 5i induces less steric hindrance effect, thus allowing second oxygen atom of sulfonamide to interact with Thr199 (2.51Å). Hydrogen bonding between NH on indole ring with Glu69 might have increased stability of ligand-receptor complex.

  13. Conformational effects on the circular dichroism of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II: a multilevel computational study.

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    Tatyana G Karabencheva-Christova

    Full Text Available Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy is a powerful method for investigating conformational changes in proteins and therefore has numerous applications in structural and molecular biology. Here a computational investigation of the CD spectrum of the Human Carbonic Anhydrase II (HCAII, with main focus on the near-UV CD spectra of the wild-type enzyme and it seven tryptophan mutant forms, is presented and compared to experimental studies. Multilevel computational methods (Molecular Dynamics, Semiempirical Quantum Mechanics, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory were applied in order to gain insight into the mechanisms of interaction between the aromatic chromophores within the protein environment and understand how the conformational flexibility of the protein influences these mechanisms. The analysis suggests that combining CD semi empirical calculations, crystal structures and molecular dynamics (MD could help in achieving a better agreement between the computed and experimental protein spectra and provide some unique insight into the dynamic nature of the mechanisms of chromophore interactions.

  14. Influence of pesticide exposure on carbonic anhydrase II from sheep stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Namık; İşgör, Mehmet Mustafa; Şengül, Bülent; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2015-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a widely distributed enzyme and has a crucial role in the cells, tissues and organs of living organisms. It is found that CA-II is one of the most abundant CA isoenzymes in the gastrointestinal system. It plays an important role in the gastric acid secretion in stomach. In this study, we purified CA-II isoenzyme from sheep stomach with a 615.2 purification fold, 78% purification yield and 5562.02 specific activity. Moreover, the in vitro effects of some commonly used pesticides including chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, dichlorvos, glyphosate isopropylamine and lambda cyhalomethrin on the enzyme activity were investigated. Of these compounds, glyphosate isopropylamine and dichlorvos showed an inhibition on CA-II esterase activity. They have IC50 values of 0.155 µM and 2.690 µM and Ki values of 0.329 µM and 3.654 µM, respectively. Both glyphosate isopropylamine and dichlorvos inhibited CA-II isoenzyme in a noncompetitive manner.

  15. Alkyl sulfonic acide hydrazides: Synthesis, characterization, computational studies and anticancer, antibacterial, anticarbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O. Ozdemir, Ummuhan; İlbiz, Firdevs; Balaban Gunduzalp, Ayla; Ozbek, Neslihan; Karagoz Genç, Zuhal; Hamurcu, Fatma; Tekin, Suat

    2015-11-01

    Methane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3SO2NHNH2 (1), ethane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2SO2NHNH2 (2), propane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (3) and butane sulfonic acide hydrazide, CH3CH2CH2CH2SO2NHNH2 (4) have been synthesized as homologous series and characterized by using elemental analysis, spectrophotometric methods (1H-13C NMR, FT-IR, LC-MS). In order to gain insight into the structure of the compounds, we have performed computational studies by using 6-311G(d, p) functional in which B3LYP functional were implemented. The geometry of the sulfonic acide hydrazides were optimized at the DFT method with Gaussian 09 program package. A conformational analysis of compounds were performed by using NMR theoretical calculations with DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d, 2p) level of theory by applying the (GIAO) approach. The anticancer activities of these compounds on MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line investigated by comparing IC50 values. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against Gram positive bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Bacillus cereus NRRL-B-3711, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and Gram negative bacteria; Escherichia coli ATCC 11230, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 70063 by using the disc diffusion method. The inhibition activities of these compounds on carbonic anhydrase II enzyme (hCA II) have been investigated by comparing IC50 and Ki values. The biological activity screening shows that butane sulfonic acide hydrazide (4) has more activity than the others against tested breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, Gram negative/Gram positive bacteria and carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) isoenzyme.

  16. Antibodies reacting to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (I and II) and albumin in sera from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Toshiho; Miyazaki, Rui; Miyazaki, Takae; Ochiai, Hideharu; Orito, Kensuke

    2016-06-01

    IgGs to carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CA-I and CA-II) and albumin were identified in dog serum. IgG titers were determined in the sera of asymptomatic dogs, and in dogs with atopic dermatitis, diarrhea and/or vomiting, diabetes and/or pancreatitis, kidney disease, hepatic disease, and thyroid gland disease, using ELISA. Low titres of IgG-reactive CA-I, CA-II, BSA, and CSA were found in the sera of healthy beagles. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the titers of antibodies against CA-I in asymptomatic dogs, dogs with diabetes and/or pancreatitis, or thyroid gland disease, or hepatic disease. Compared with healthy beagles, there was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-CA-II IgG in asymptomatic dogs and in those with hepatic disease. There was a significant difference in the antibody titer of anti-BSA IgG between healthy beagles and dogs with hepatic disease.

  17. Modification of carbonic anhydrase II with acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, leads to decreased enzyme activity.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, can generate covalent modifications of proteins and cellular constituents. However, functional consequences of such modification remain poorly defined. In the present study, we examined acetaldehyde reaction with human carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozyme II, which has several features that make it a suitable target protein: It is widely expressed, its enzymatic activity can be monitored, its structural and catalytic properties are...

  18. Structural insight into activity enhancement and inhibition of H64A carbonic anhydrase II by imidazoles

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    Mayank Aggarwal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydration and dehydration of CO2 and HCO3−, respectively. The reaction follows a ping-pong mechanism, in which the rate-limiting step is the transfer of a proton from the zinc-bound solvent (OH−/H2O in/out of the active site via His64, which is widely believed to be the proton-shuttling residue. The decreased catalytic activity (∼20-fold lower with respect to the wild type of a variant of CA II in which His64 is replaced with Ala (H64A CA II can be enhanced by exogenous proton donors/acceptors, usually derivatives of imidazoles and pyridines, to almost the wild-type level. X-ray crystal structures of H64A CA II in complex with four imidazole derivatives (imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, 2-methylimidazole and 4-methylimidazole have been determined and reveal multiple binding sites. Two of these imidazole binding sites have been identified that mimic the positions of the `in' and `out' rotamers of His64 in wild-type CA II, while another directly inhibits catalysis by displacing the zinc-bound solvent. The data presented here not only corroborate the importance of the imidazole side chain of His64 in proton transfer during CA catalysis, but also provide a complete structural understanding of the mechanism by which imidazoles enhance (and inhibit when used at higher concentrations the activity of H64A CA II.

  19. A DFT-Based QSARs Study of Acetazolamide/Sulfanilamide Derivatives with Carbonic Anhydrase (CA-II Isozyme Inhibitory Activity

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    Oral Oltulu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR studyon a pool of 18 bio-active sulfonamide compounds which includes five acetazolamidederivatives, eight sulfanilamide derivatives and five clinically used sulfonamides moleculesas drugs namely acetazolamide, methazolamide, dichlorophenamide, ethoxolamide anddorzolamide. For all the compounds, initial geometry optimizations were carried out with amolecular mechanics (MM method using the MM force fields. The lowest energyconformations of the compounds obtained by the MM method were further optimized by theDensity Functional Theory (DFT method by employing Becke’s three-parameter hybridfunctional (B3LYP and 6-31G (d basis set. Molecular descriptors, dipole moment,electronegativity, total energy at 0 K, entropy at 298 K, HOMO and LUMO energiesobtained from DFT calculations provide valuable information and have a significant role inthe assessment of carbonic anhydrase (CA-II inhibitory activity of the compounds. By usingthe multiple linear regression technique several QSAR models have been drown up with thehelp these calculated descriptors and carbonic anhydrase (CA-II inhibitory data of themolecules. Among the obtained QSAR models presented in the study, statistically the mostsignificant one is a five parameters linear equation with the squared correlation coefficient R2 values of ca. 0.94 and the squared cross-validated correlation coefficient R2CV values of ca. 0.85. The results were discussed in the light of the main factors that influence theinhibitory activity of the carbonic anhydrase (CA-II isozyme.

  20. Structural elucidation of the hormonal inhibition mechanism of the bile acid cholate on human carbonic anhydrase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Christopher D. [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Tu, Chingkuang [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with cholate has been determined to 1.54 Å resolution. Elucidation of the novel inhibition mechanism of cholate will aid in the development of a nonsulfur-containing, isoform-specific therapeutic agent. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of CO{sub 2} into bicarbonate and a proton. Human isoform CA II (HCA II) is abundant in the surface epithelial cells of the gastric mucosa, where it serves an important role in cytoprotection through bicarbonate secretion. Physiological inhibition of HCA II via the bile acids contributes to mucosal injury in ulcerogenic conditions. This study details the weak biophysical interactions associated with the binding of a primary bile acid, cholate, to HCA II. The X-ray crystallographic structure determined to 1.54 Å resolution revealed that cholate does not make any direct hydrogen-bond interactions with HCA II, but instead reconfigures the well ordered water network within the active site to promote indirect binding to the enzyme. Structural knowledge of the binding interactions of this nonsulfur-containing inhibitor with HCA II could provide the template design for high-affinity, isoform-specific therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases/pathological states, including cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy and osteoporosis.

  1. High-resolution structure of human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with acetazolamide reveals insights into inhibitor drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Katherine H; Robbins, Arthur H; Domsic, John; Genis, Caroli; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) complexed with the inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) has been determined at 1.1 A resolution and refined to an R(cryst) of 11.2% and an R(free) of 14.7%. As observed in previous CA II-inhibitor complexes, AZM binds directly to the zinc and makes several key interactions with active-site residues. The high-resolution data also showed a glycerol molecule adjacent to the AZM in the active site and two additional AZMs that are adventitiously bound on the surface of the enzyme. The co-binding of AZM and glycerol in the active site demonstrate that given an appropriate ring orientation and substituents, an isozyme-specific CA inhibitor may be developed.

  2. Carbonic Anhydrase II: A Model System for Artificial Copper Center Design, Protein-guided Cycloadditions, Tethering Screenings and Fragment-based Lead Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze Wischeler, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a variety of quite different fragment-based lead discovery approaches have been applied to the target protein carbonic anhydrase II. The different projects were strongly supported and methodologically tailored towards protein crystallography; a method which is currently emerging as a routine analytical tool. This maturation mainly results from improved radiation sources and enhanced computing power. About 200-250 da...

  3. Comparative analysis of 10 small molecules binding to carbonic anhydrase II by different investigators using Biacore technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Leavitt, Stephanie; Bynum, Maggie A; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Wilton, Rosemarie; Qiu, Huawei; Steukers, Mieke; Wang, Siming; Bindu, Lakshman; Phogat, Sanjay; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ryan, Thomas E; Pudlak, Victoria A; Matusiewicz, Katarzyna; Michelson, Klaus M; Nowakowski, Agnes; Pham-Baginski, Anh; Brooks, Jonathan; Tieman, Bryan C; Bruce, Barry D; Vaughn, Michael; Baksh, Michael; Cho, Yun Hee; Wit, Mieke De; Smets, Alexandra; Vandersmissen, Johan; Michiels, Lieve; Myszka, David G

    2006-12-01

    In this benchmark study, 26 investigators were asked to characterize the kinetics and affinities of 10 sulfonamide inhibitors binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II using Biacore optical biosensors. A majority of the participants collected data that could be fit to a 1:1 interaction model, but a subset of the data sets obtained from some instruments were of poor quality. The experimental errors in the k(a), k(d), and K(D) parameters determined for each of the compounds averaged 34, 24, and 37%, respectively. As expected, the greatest variation in the reported constants was observed for compounds with exceptionally weak affinity and/or fast association rates. The binding constants determined using the biosensor correlated well with solution-based titration calorimetry measurements. The results of this study provide insight into the challenges, as well as the level of experimental variation, that one would expect to observe when using Biacore technology for small molecule analyses.

  4. Synchrotron Radiation Provides a Plausible Explanation for the Generation of a Free Radical Adduct of Thioxolone in Mutant Carbonic Anhydrase II.

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    Sippel, Katherine H; Genis, Caroli; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Kiddle, James J; Tripp, Brian C; McKenna, Robert

    2010-10-07

    Thioxolone acts as a prodrug in the presence of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), whereby the molecule is cleaved by thioester hydrolysis to the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, 4-mercaptobenzene-1,3-diol (TH0). Thioxolone was soaked into the proton transfer mutant H64A of CA II in an effort to capture a reaction intermediate via X-ray crystallography. Structure determination of the 1.2 Å resolution data revealed the TH0 had been modified to a 4,4'-disulfanediyldibenzene-1,3-diol, a product of crystallization conditions, and a zinc ligated 2,4-dihydroxybenzenesulfenic acid, most likely induced by radiation damage. Neither ligand was likely a result of an enzymatic mechanism.

  5. Mono- and di-halogenated histamine, histidine and carnosine derivatives are potent carbonic anhydrase I, II, VII, XII and XIV activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Mohamed-Chiheb; Vullo, Daniela; Montero, Jean-Louis; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and di-halogenated histamines, l-histidine methyl ester derivatives and carnosine derivatives incorporating chlorine, bromine and iodine were prepared and investigated as activators of five carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic hCA I, II and VII, and the transmembrane hCA XII and XIV. All of them were activated in a diverse manner by the investigated compounds, with a distinct activation profile.

  6. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors in two animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomotto, Jean; Pertl, Cordula; Borrel, Caroline; Walter, Maggie C; Bulst, Stefanie; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David L; Lochmüller, Hanns; Thirion, Christian; Ségalat, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is an inherited muscle degeneration disease for which there is still no efficient treatment. However, compounds active on the disease may already exist among approved drugs but are difficult to identify in the absence of cellular models. We used the Caenorhabditis elegans animal model to screen a collection of 1000 already approved compounds. Two of the most active hits obtained were methazolamide and dichlorphenamide, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors widely used in human therapy. In C. elegans, these drugs were shown to interact with CAH-4, a putative carbonic anhydrase. The therapeutic efficacy of these compounds was further validated in long-term experiments on mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Mice were treated for 120 days with food containing methazolamide or dichlorphenamide at two doses each. Musculus tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles were histologically analyzed and isometric muscle force was measured in M. extensor digitorum longus. Both substances increased the tetanic muscle force in the treated M. extensor digitorum longus muscle group, dichlorphenamide increased the force significantly by 30%, but both drugs failed to increase resistance of muscle fibres to eccentric contractions. Histological analysis revealed a reduction of centrally nucleated fibers in M. tibialis anterior and diaphragm in the treated groups. These studies further demonstrated that a C. elegans-based screen coupled with a mouse model validation strategy can lead to the identification of potential pharmacological agents for rare diseases.

  7. 1. alpha. ,25-dihydroxyvitamin D sub 3 regulates the expression of carbonic anhydrase II in nonerythroid avian bone marrow cells

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    Billecocq, A.; Emanuel, J.R.; Levenson, R.; Baron, R. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-08-01

    1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}), the active metabolite of the steroid hormone vitamin D, is a potent regulator of macrophage and osteoclast differentiation. The mature osteoclast, unlike the circulating monocyte or the tissue macrophage, expresses high levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII). This enzyme generates protons and bicarbonate from water and carbon dioxide and is involved in bone resorption and acid-base regulation. To test whether 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} could induce the differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors toward osteoclasts rather than macrophages, analyzed its effects on the expression of CAII in bone marrow cultures containing precursors common to both cell types. The expression of CAII was markedly increased by 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in a dose-and time-dependent manner. In bone marrow, this increase occurred at the mRNA and protein levels and was detectable as early as 24 hr after stimulation. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was also found to induce CAII expression in a transformed myelomonocytic avian cell line. These results suggest that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} regulates the level at which myelomonocytic precursors express CAII, an enzyme that is involved in the function of the mature osteoclast.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro inhibition of metal complexes of pyrazole based sulfonamide on human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkıdan, Nurgün; Büyükkıdan, Bülent; Bülbül, Metin; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; Mert, Samet

    2017-12-01

    Sulfonamides represent an important class of biologically active compounds. A sulfonamide possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties obtained from a pyrazole based sulfonamide, ethyl 1-(3-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-3-((5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)carbamoyl)-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (1), and its metal complexes with the Ni(II) for (2), Cu(II) for (3) and Zn(II) for (4) have been synthesized. The structures of metal complexes (2-4) were established on the basis of their elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-Vis and MS spectral data. The inhibition of two human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes I and II, with 1 and synthesized complexes (2-4) and acetazolamide (AAZ) as a control compound was investigated in vitro by using the hydratase and esterase assays. The complexes 2, 3 and 4 showed inhibition constant in the range 0.1460-0.3930 µM for hCA-I and 0.0740-0.0980 µM for hCA-II, and they had effective more inhibitory activity on hCA-I and hCA-II than corresponding free ligand 1 and than AAZ.

  9. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer pathways in human carbonic anhydrase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Roy; Srabani Taraphder

    2007-09-01

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic interactions are modelled.

  10. Crystal structure and kinetic studies of a tetrameric type II β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraroni, Marta; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a zinc enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) and a proton. CAs have been extensively investigated owing to their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Currently, CA inhibitors are widely used as antiglaucoma, anticancer and anti-obesity drugs and for the treatment of neurological disorders. Recently, the potential use of CA inhibitors to fight infections caused by protozoa, fungi and bacteria has emerged as a new research direction. In this article, the cloning and kinetic characterization of the β-CA from Vibrio cholerae (VchCAβ) are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of this new enzyme was solved at 1.9 Å resolution from a crystal that was perfectly merohedrally twinned, revealing a tetrameric type II β-CA with a closed active site in which the zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated to Cys42, Asp44, His98 and Cys101. The substrate bicarbonate was found bound in a noncatalytic binding pocket close to the zinc ion, as reported for a few other β-CAs, such as those from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. At pH 8.3, the enzyme showed a significant catalytic activity for the physiological reaction of the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: a kcat of 3.34 × 10(5) s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The new enzyme, on the other hand, was poorly inhibited by acetazolamide (Ki of 4.5 µM). As this bacterial pathogen encodes at least three CAs, an α-CA, a β-CA and a γ-CA, these enzymes probably play an important role in the life cycle and pathogenicity of Vibrio, and it cannot be excluded that interference with their activity may be exploited therapeutically to obtain antibiotics with a different mechanism of action.

  11. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  12. Functional role of a putative carbonic anhydrase II-binding domain in the electrogenic Na+ -HCO₃- cotransporter NBCe1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hideomi; Horita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masashi; Fujita, Toshiro; Seki, George

    2011-01-01

    The electrogenic Na+ -HCO₃⁻ cotransporter NBCe1 plays essential roles in the regulation of systemic and/or local pH. Homozygous inactivating mutations in NBCe1 cause proximal renal tubular acidosis associated with ocular abnormalities. We recently showed that defective membrane expression of NBCe1, caused by several mutations such as Delta65bp (S982NfsX4), is also associated with familial migraine. The Delta65bp mutant is quite unique in that it lacks a putative carbonic anhydrase (CA) II-binding domain but still shows an apparently normal transport activity in Xenopus oocytes. In this addendum, we show that the co-expression of CAII together with the wild-type NBCe1 or the Delta65bp mutant does not enhance the NBCe1 activities in oocytes. Moreover, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide fails to inhibit the wild-type or the Delta65bp activities co-expressed with CAII. These results indicate that a bicarbonate transport metabolon proposed for the interaction between CAII and NBCe1 does not work at least in Xenopus oocytes.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, computational studies, antimicrobial activities and carbonic anhydrase inhibitor effects of 2-hydroxy acetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Memmi, Burcu Koçak; Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Bahçeci, Zafer; Alyar, Hamit

    2017-01-01

    2-Hydroxyacetophenone-N-methyl p-toluenesulfonylhydrazone (afptsmh) derived from p-toluenesulfonicacid-1-methylhydrazide (ptsmh) and its Co(II), Pd(II), Pt(II) complexes were synthesized for the first time. Synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, 1Hsbnd 13C NMR, LC-MS, UV-vis), magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for crystal structure of ligand were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The vibrational band assignments were performed at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) theory level combined with scaled quantum mechanics force field (SQMFF) methodology. The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were studied against some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria by using microdilution and disc diffusion methods. In vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of the compounds were measured by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The enzyme activities against human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) were evaluated as IC50 (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) values. It was found that afptsmh and its metal complexes have inhibitory effects on hCA II isoenzyme. General esterase activities were determined using alpha and beta naphtyl acetate substrates (α- and β-NAs) of Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Activity results show that afptsmh does not strongly affect the bacteria strains and also shows poor inhibitory activity against hCAII isoenzyme whereas all complexes posses higher biological activities.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of human cytosolic isoforms I and II with (reduced) Schiff's bases incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylate and carboxymethyl moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Gihane; Cristian, Alina; Barboiu, Mihail; Vullo, Daniella; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-05-15

    A library of Schiff bases was synthesized by condensation of aromatic amines incorporating sulfonamide, carboxylic acid or carboxymethyl functionalities as Zn(2+)-binding groups, with aromatic aldehydes incorporating tert-butyl, hydroxy and/or methoxy groups. The corresponding amines were thereafter obtained by reduction of the imines. These compounds were assayed for the inhibition of two cytosolic human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoenzymes, hCA I and II. The Ki values of the Schiff bases were in the range of 7.0-21,400nM against hCA II and of 52-8600nM against hCA I, respectively. The corresponding amines showed Ki values in the range of 8.6nM-5.3μM against hCA II, and of 18.7-251nM against hCA I, respectively. Unlike the imines, the reduced Schiff bases are stable to hydrolysis and several low-nanomolar inhibitors were detected, most of them incorporating sulfonamide groups. Some carboxylates also showed interesting CA inhibitory properties. Such hydrosoluble derivatives may show pharmacologic applications.

  15. Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with methazolamide: mapping the solvent and hydrogen-bonding patterns of an effective clinical drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Aggarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1 catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−, and their inhibitors have long been used as diuretics and as a therapeutic treatment for many disorders such as glaucoma and epilepsy. Acetazolamide (AZM and methazolamide (MZM, a methyl derivative of AZM are two of the classical CA inhibitory drugs that have been used clinically for decades. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of MZM in complex with human CA isoform II (hCA II has been determined to a resolution of 2.2 Å with an Rcryst of ∼16.0%. Presented in this article, along with only the second neutron structure of a clinical drug-bound hCA, is an in-depth structural comparison and analyses of differences in hydrogen-bonding network, water-molecule orientation and solvent displacement that take place upon the binding of AZM and MZM in the active site of hCA II. Even though MZM is slightly more hydrophobic and displaces more waters than AZM, the overall binding affinity (Ki for both of the drugs against hCA II is similar (∼10 nM. The plausible reasons behind this finding have also been discussed using molecular dynamics and X-ray crystal structures of hCA II–MZM determined at cryotemperature and room temperature. This study not only allows a direct comparison of the hydrogen bonding, protonation states and solvent orientation/displacement of AZM and MZM, but also shows the significant effect that the methyl derivative has on the solvent organization in the hCA II active site.

  16. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII with novel Schiff bases: identification of selective inhibitors for the tumor-associated isoforms over the cytosolic ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Busra; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-11-01

    A series of new Schiff bases was obtained from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide and aromatic/heterocyclic aldehydes incorporating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. The obtained sulfonamides were investigated as inhibitors of four physiologically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms, the cytosolic CA I and II, as well as the transmembrane, tumor-associated CA IX and XII. Most derivatives were medium potency or weak hCA I/II inhibitors, but several of them showed nanomolar affinity for CA IX and/or XII, making them an interesting example of isoform-selective compounds. The nature of the aryl/hetaryl moiety present in the initial aldehyde was the main factor influencing potency and isoform selectivity. The best and most CA IX-selective compounds incorporated moieties such as 4-methylthiophenyl, 4-cyanophenyl-, 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl and the 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide scaffold. The best hCA XII inhibitors, also showing selectivity for this isoform, incorporated 2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl and 4-(2-pyridyl)-phenyl functionalities and were also derivatives of 4-aminoethylbenzenesulfonamide. The sulfanilamide and 3-fluorosulfanilamide derived Schiff bases were less active compared to the corresponding 4-aminoethyl-benzenesulfonamide derivatives. As hCA IX/XII selective inhibition is attractive for obtaining antitumor agents/diagnostic tools with a new mechanism of action, compounds of the type described here may be considered interesting preclinical candidates.

  17. Design and synthesis of benzothiazole-6-sulfonamides acting as highly potent inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Diaa A; Lasheen, Deena S; Zaky, Maysoun Y; Ibrahim, Amany W; Vullo, Daniela; Ceruso, Mariangela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel 2-aminobenzothiazole derivatives bearing sulfonamide at position 6 was designed, synthesized and investigated as inhibitors of four isoforms of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the cytosolic CA I and II, and the tumor-associated isozymes CA IX and XII. Docking and binding energy studies were carried out to reveal details regarding the favorable interactions between the scaffolds of these new inhibitors and the active sites of the investigated CA isoforms. Most of the novel compounds were acting as highly potent inhibitors of the tumor-associated hCA IX and hCA XII with KIs in the nanomolar range. The ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozyme hCA II was also inhibited with KIs ranging from 3.5 to 45.4 nM. The favorable interactions between some of the new compounds and the active site of different CA isoforms were delineated by using molecular docking which may be useful for designing compounds with high affinity and selectivity for some CAs with biomedical applications.

  18. The importance of carbonic anhydrase II in red blood cells during exposure of chicken embryos to CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaert, N; Willemsen, H; Hulikova, A; Brown, H; Decuypere, E; Swietach, P; Bruggeman, V

    2010-07-31

    The importance of carbonic anhydrase (CA) during exposure of chicken embryos to CO(2) during the second half of incubation was investigated. The protein abundance and activity of CAII in erythrocytes was significantly higher in CO(2)-exposed embryos compared to normal conditions. Daily injections of acetazolamide (ATZ), an inhibitor of CA, increased blood P(CO2) and decreased blood pH in both control and CO(2)-incubated embryos. ATZ increased blood bicarbonate concentration in embryos exposed to normal atmosphere and in day-12 embryos exposed to high CO(2). The tendency of an increased blood potassium concentration in ATZ-injected embryos under standard atmospheric conditions might indicate that protons were exchanged with intracellular potassium. However, there was no evidence for such an exchange in CO(2)-incubated ATZ-treated embryos. This study shows for the first time that chicken embryos adapt to CO(2) during the second half of incubation by increasing CAII protein expression and function in red blood cells. This response may serve to "buffer" elevated CO(2) levels.

  19. Gene fusions with human carbonic anhydrase II for efficient expression and rapid single-step recovery of recombinant proteins: expression of the Escherichia coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heeke, G; Shaw, R; Schnizer, R; Couton, J M; Schuster, S M; Wagner, F W

    1993-08-01

    A new expression vector was constructed which allows the overproduction in Escherichia coli of tripartite proteins consisting of human carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (hCAII), a peptide linker containing an enterokinase cleavage site, and a target protein of interest. Carbonic anhydrase is soluble and stable in E. coli and serves as a highly specific purification tag in the recovery of the fusion protein by a single affinity chromatography step. The enterokinase cleavage site was engineered into the construct to allow accurate and efficient release of the target protein. To demonstrate the practical value of this vector, the E. coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit was expressed as a fusion with hCAII. After a single purification step, biologically active recombinant E. coli F1-ATPase epsilon subunit was recovered following proteolytic removal of the hCAII moiety.

  20. Major contribution of the type II beta carbonic anhydrase CanB (Cj0237) to the capnophilic growth phenotype of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haideri, Halah; White, Michael A; Kelly, David J

    2016-02-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, the leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis, requires low environmental oxygen and high carbon dioxide for optimum growth, but the molecular basis for the carbon dioxide requirement is unclear. One factor may be inefficient conversion of gaseous CO2 to bicarbonate, the required substrate of various carboxylases. Two putative carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are encoded in the genome of C. jejuni strain NCTC 11168 (Cj0229 and Cj0237). Here, we show that the deletion of the cj0237 (canB) gene alone prevents growth in complex media at low (1% v/v) CO2 and significantly reduces the growth rate at high (5% v/v) CO2. In minimal media incubated under high CO2, the canB mutant grew on L-aspartate but not on the key C3 compounds L-serine, pyruvate and L-lactate, showing that CanB is crucial in bicarbonate provision for pyruvate carboxylase-mediated oxaloacetate synthesis. Nevertheless, purified CanB (a dimeric, anion and acetazolamide sensitive, zinc-containing type II beta-class enzyme) hydrates CO2 actively only above pH 8 and with a high Km (∼ 34 mM). At typical cytoplasmic pH values and low CO2, these kinetic properties might limit intracellular bicarbonate availability. Taken together, our data suggest CanB is a major contributor to the capnophilic growth phenotype of C. jejuni.

  1. Identification of putative unfolding intermediates of the mutant His-107-tyr of human carbonic anhydrase II in a multidimensional property space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Puspita; Taraphder, Srabani

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we develop an extensive search procedure of the multi-dimensional folding energy landscape of a protein. Our aim is to identify different classes of structures that have different aggregation propensities and catalytic activity. Following earlier studies by Daggett et al. [Jong, D. D.; Riley, R.: Alonso, D.O.: Dagett, V. J. Mol. Biol. 2002, 319, 229], a series of high temperature all-atom classical molecular simulation studies has been carried out to derive a multi-dimensional property space. Dynamical changes in these properties are then monitored by projecting them along a one-dimensional reaction coordinate, dmean . We have focused on the application of this method to partition a wide array of conformations of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) and its unstable mutant His-107-Tyr along dmean by sampling a 35-dimensional property space. The resultant partitioning not only reveals the distribution of conformations corresponding to stable structures of HCA II and its mutant, but also allows the monitoring of several partially unfolded and less stable conformations of the mutant. We have investigated the population of these conformations at different stages of unfolding and collected separate sets of structures that are widely separated in the property space. The dynamical diversity of these sets are examined in terms of the loading of their respective first principal component. The partially unfolded structures thus collected are qualitatively mapped on to the experimentally postulated light molten globule (MGL) and molten globule (MG) intermediates with distinct aggregation propensities and catalytic activities. Proteins 2016; 84:726-743. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mutation and biochemical analysis in carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Afifi, A; Clark, S

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT II) deficiency has three basic phenotypes, late-onset muscular (mild), infantile/juvenile hepatic (intermediate) and severe neonatal. We have measured fatty acid oxidation and CPT II activity and performed mutation studies in 24 symptomatic patients......, the implication being that they may significantly influence the manifestation of clinical disease and could therefore potentially be considered as a susceptibility variants. Among myopathic individuals, males comprised 88% of patients, suggesting increased susceptibility to clinical disease. A small number...

  3. The Cellular Physiology of Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breton S

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO(2 to form HCO(3(- and protons according to the following reaction: CO(2 + H(2O = H(2CO(3 = HCO(3(- + H(+. The first reaction is catalyzed by carbonic anhydrase and the second reaction occurs instantaneously. The carbonic anhydrase (CA gene family includes ten enzymatically active members, which are major players in many physiological processes, including renal and male reproductive tract acidification, bone resorption, respiration, gluconeogenesis, signal transduction, and formation of gastric acid. The newly identified CA IX (previously called MN and CA XII are related to cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Carbonic anhydrase isozymes have different kinetic properties and they are present in various tissues and in various cell compartments. CA I, II, III and VII are cytoplasmic, CA V is mitochondrial, and CA VI is present in salivary secretions. CA IV, IX, XII and XIV are membrane proteins: CA IV is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, and CA IX, XII and XIV are transmembrane proteins. The present work will focus on the roles of CA II and CA IV in transepithelial proton secretion and bicarbonate reabsorption processes. The localization of these isoforms in selected epithelia that are involved in net acid/base transport, such as kidney proximal tubules and collecting ducts, and tubules from the male reproductive tract will be reviewed.

  4. Comparison of QSAR models based on combinations of genetic algorithm, stepwise multiple linear regression, and artificial neural network methods to predict Kd of some derivatives of aromatic sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Afshin; Daraei, Hiua; Alaei, Loghman; Faraji, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Four stepwise multiple linear regressions (SMLR) and a genetic algorithm (GA) based multiple linear regressions (MLR), together with artificial neural network (ANN) models, were applied for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling of dissociation constants (Kd) of 62 arylsulfonamide (ArSA) derivatives as human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) inhibitors. The best subsets of molecular descriptors were selected by SMLR and GA-MLR methods. These selected variables were used to generate MLR and ANN models. The predictability power of models was examined by an external test set and cross validation. In addition, some tests were done to examine other aspects of the models. The results show that for certain purposes GA-MLR is better than SMLR and for others, ANN overcomes MLR models.

  5. A Case of Probable MHC Class II Deficiency with Disseminated BCGitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Abolnezhadian, Farhad; Khoshkhui, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by abnormality of MHC class II molecules surface expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections but the immunodeficiency is not as severe as SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency), as evidenced by failure to develop disseminated infection after BCG vaccination. Therefore, MHC II deficiency with BCGosis, that is disseminated BCGitis, is not reported commonly. We report an interesting case of BCGosis after vaccination that was diagnosed to have probable MHC II deficiency.

  6. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Rymen

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD. However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency.

  7. 3D QSAR studies, pharmacophore modeling, and virtual screening of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives as a template to obtain new inhibitors, using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari Heravi, Yeganeh; Sereshti, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Jahan; Amirmostofian, Marzieh; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-12-01

    A 3D-QSAR modeling was performed on a series of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives acting as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The compounds were collected from two datasets with the same scaffold, and utilized as a template for a new pharmacophore model to screen the ZINC database of commercially available derivatives. The datasets were divided into training, test, and validation sets. As the first step, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), CoMFA region focusing and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) in parallel with docking studies were applied to a set of 41 human (h) CA II inhibitors. The validity and the prediction capacity of the resulting models were evaluated by leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach. The reliability of the model for the prediction of possibly new CA inhibitors was also tested.

  8. Characterization of one Novel Flavone and four New Source Compounds from the Bark of Millettia ovalifolia and In-Vitro Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase-II by the Novel Flavonoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taj Ur Rahman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical examination of the extract of bark of Millettia ovalifolia yielded chemical constituents, which included one novel flavonoid 7-(4-methoxyphenyl-9H-furo [2, 3-f] chromen-9-one and four new source compounds characterized as 3,7-Dihydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one, (E-Ethyl-13-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacrylate, (E-Methyl-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylacrylate and N-Ethylacetamide. These compounds were characterized by using advance modern spectroscopic analytical techniques such as UV, IR, 1D, 2D NMR and mass spectrometry. The novel flavonoid (1 displayed significant inhibition of cytosolic form of bovine carbonic anhydrase-II with IC 50 value of 17.86 ± 0.07 µM. This flavonoid may be used as a new pharmacophore to treat cystic fibrosis, glaucoma, epilepsy, leaukomia and other disorders such as neurology etc.

  9. Liver and plasma levels of descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA II) in vitamin K deficiency in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harauchi, T; Takano, K; Matsuura, M; Yoshizaki, T

    1986-04-01

    Descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA II) is a precursor of prothrombin without biological activity, and it increases with vitamin K deficiency. We studied the time course changes in liver and plasma levels of PIVKA II during the progress of vitamin K deficiency in rats. Good correlation was observed between liver PIVKA II and plasma PIVKA II and between liver or plasma PIVKA II and plasma prothrombin in experiments in which rats were fed a vitamin K-deficient diet. Feeding of a vitamin K-deficient diet or fasting caused marked increases in liver and plasma PIVKA II in male rats and a weaker response in female rats. Warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, caused an abrupt increase in liver PIVKA II, but the increase in plasma PIVKA II was delayed about 3 hr. Plasma prothrombin decreased from about 30 min later. Factor VII decreased similarly to prothrombin, and changes in the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were slower than the changes in these substances. Sex differences were not seen in these warfarin actions. These observations indicate that liver and plasma PIVKA II are sensitive markers of vitamin K deficiency in rats, and assay of PIVKA II can be useful for analyzing the action mechanism of drugs which influence blood coagulation.

  10. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  11. The synthesis of novel pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxamides bearing 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide moiety with effective inhibitory activity against the isoforms of human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Samet; Alım, Zuhal; İşgör, Mehmet Mustafa; Beydemir, Şükrü; Kasımoğulları, Rahmi

    2016-10-01

    A series of 1-(3-substituted-phenyl)-5-phenyl-N(3),N(4)-bis(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3,4-dicarboxamides (4-15) were synthesized. The structures of these pyrazole-sulfonamides were confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and elemental analysis methods. Human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes (hCA I and II) were purified from erythrocyte cells by affinity chromatography. The inhibitory effects of newly synthesized derivatives (4-15) were investigated in vitro on esterase activities of these isozymes. The Ki values were determined as 0.119-3.999μM for hCA I and 0.084-0.878μM for hCA II. The results showed that the compound 6 for hCA I and the compound 11 for hCA II had the highest inhibitory effect. Beside that, the compound 8 had the lowest inhibition effect on both isozymes.

  12. Effect of ADH II Deficiency on the Intracellular Redox Homeostasis in Zymomonas mobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Galinina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant strain of the facultatively anaerobic, ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis, deficient in the Fe-containing alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme (ADH II, showed impaired homeostasis of the intracellular NAD(PH during transition from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and also in steady-state continuous cultures at various oxygen supplies. At the same time, ADH II deficiency in aerobically grown cells was accompanied by a threefold increase of catalase activity and by about 50% increase of hydrogen peroxide excretion. It is concluded that ADH II under aerobic conditions functions to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and to protect the cells from endogenous hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Effect of ADH II deficiency on the intracellular redox homeostasis in Zymomonas mobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinina, Nina; Lasa, Zane; Strazdina, Inese; Rutkis, Reinis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2012-01-01

    Mutant strain of the facultatively anaerobic, ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis, deficient in the Fe-containing alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme (ADH II), showed impaired homeostasis of the intracellular NAD(P)H during transition from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and also in steady-state continuous cultures at various oxygen supplies. At the same time, ADH II deficiency in aerobically grown cells was accompanied by a threefold increase of catalase activity and by about 50% increase of hydrogen peroxide excretion. It is concluded that ADH II under aerobic conditions functions to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and to protect the cells from endogenous hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Muscle Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency: A Review of Enzymatic Controversy and Clinical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Diana; Motlagh, Leila; Robaa, Dina; Zierz, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) II muscle deficiency is the most common form of muscle fatty acid metabolism disorders. In contrast to carnitine deficiency, it is clinically characterized by attacks of myalgia and rhabdomyolysis without persistent muscle weakness and lipid accumulation in muscle fibers. The biochemical consequences of the disease-causing mutations are still discussed controversially. CPT activity in muscles of patients with CPT II deficiency ranged from not detectable to reduced to normal. Based on the observation that in patients, total CPT is completely inhibited by malony-CoA, a deficiency of malonyl-CoA-insensitive CPT II has been suggested. In contrast, it has also been shown that in muscle CPT II deficiency, CPT II protein is present in normal concentrations with normal enzymatic activity. However, CPT II in patients is abnormally sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA, Triton X-100 and fatty acid metabolites. A recent study on human recombinant CPT II enzymes (His6-N-hCPT2 and His6-N-hCPT2/S113L) revealed that the wild-type and the S113L variants showed the same enzymatic activity. However, the mutated enzyme showed an abnormal thermal destabilization at 40 and 45 °C and an abnormal sensitivity to inhibition by malony-CoA. The thermolability of the mutant enzyme might explain why symptoms in muscle CPT II deficiency mainly occur during prolonged exercise, infections and exposure to cold. In addition, the abnormally regulated enzyme might be mostly inhibited when the fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:28054946

  15. Carbonic Anhydrases and Their Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert McKenna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbonic anhydrases (CAs are mostly zinc-containing metalloenzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of carbon dioxide/bicarbonate. The CAs have been extensively studied because of their broad physiological importance in all kingdoms of life and clinical relevance as drug targets. In particular, human CA isoform II (HCA II has a catalytic efficiency of 108 M−1 s−1, approaching the diffusion limit. The high catalytic rate, relatively simple procedure of expression and purification, relative stability and extensive biophysical studies of HCA II has made it an exciting candidate to be incorporated into various biomedical applications such as artificial lungs, biosensors and CO2 sequestration systems, among others. This review highlights the current state of these applications, lists their advantages and limitations, and discusses their future development.

  16. Intrinsic Thermodynamics and Structure Correlation of Benzenesulfonamides with a Pyrimidine Moiety Binding to Carbonic Anhydrases I, II, VII, XII, and XIII.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miglė Kišonaitė

    Full Text Available The early stage of drug discovery is often based on selecting the highest affinity lead compound. To this end the structural and energetic characterization of the binding reaction is important. The binding energetics can be resolved into enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding Gibbs free energy. Most compound binding reactions are coupled to the absorption or release of protons by the protein or the compound. A distinction between the observed and intrinsic parameters of the binding energetics requires the dissection of the protonation/deprotonation processes. Since only the intrinsic parameters can be correlated with molecular structural perturbations associated with complex formation, it is these parameters that are required for rational drug design. Carbonic anhydrase (CA isoforms are important therapeutic targets to treat a range of disorders including glaucoma, obesity, epilepsy, and cancer. For effective treatment isoform-specific inhibitors are needed. In this work we investigated the binding and protonation energetics of sixteen [(2-pyrimidinylthioacetyl]benzenesulfonamide CA inhibitors using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescent thermal shift assay. The compounds were built by combining four sulfonamide headgroups with four tailgroups yielding 16 compounds. Their intrinsic binding thermodynamics showed the limitations of the functional group energetic additivity approach used in fragment-based drug design, especially at the level of enthalpies and entropies of binding. Combined with high resolution crystal structural data correlations were drawn between the chemical functional groups on selected inhibitors and intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of CA-inhibitor complex formation.

  17. Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  18. SPAK deficiency corrects pseudohypoaldosteronism II caused by WNK4 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Chu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the OSR1 (Oxidative stress-responsive kinase-1/SPAK [STE20 (sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase]-NCC (Na(+-Cl(- cotransporter signaling cascade plays an important role in the WNK [With-No-Lysine (K] kinase 4 D561A knock-in mouse model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension and hyperkalemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the respective roles of Osr1 and Spak in the pathogenesis of PHA II in vivo. Wnk4 (D561A/+ mice were crossed with kidney tubule-specific (KSP Osr1 knockout (KSP-Osr1 (-/- and Spak knockout (Spak (-/- mice. Blood pressure, plasma and urine biochemistries, and the relevant protein expression in the kidneys were examined. Wnk4 (D561A/+, KSP-Osr1 (-/-, and Spak (-/- mice recapitulated the phenotypes of PHA II, Bartter-like syndrome, and Gitelman syndrome, respectively. Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- remained phenotypically PHA II while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice became normotensive and lacked the PHA II phenotype. Phosphorylated Spak and Ncc were similarly increased in both Wnk4 (D561A/+ and Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice while phosphorylated Ncc normalized in Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice. Furthermore, Wnk4 (D561A/+.KSP-Osr1 (-/- mice exhibited exaggerated salt excretion in response to thiazide diuretics while Wnk4 (D561A/+.Spak (-/- mice exhibited normal responses. Wnk4(D561A/+.Spak (-/-.KSP-Osr1 (-/- triple mutant mice had low blood pressure and diminished phosphorylated Ncc. Both SPAK and OSR1 are important in the maintenance of blood pressure but activation of SPAK-NCC plays the dominant role in PHA II. SPAK may be a therapeutic target for disorders with salt-sensitive hypertension related to WNK4 activation.

  19. Leukoencephalopathy due to Complex II Deficiency and Bi-Allelic SDHB Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Darin, Niklas; Miranda, Maria J

    2017-01-01

    described in heterozygous form in patients with familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and/or renal cell cancer. This is only the second example in the literature where one specific SDHx mutation is associated with both recessive mitochondrial disease in one patient and familial paraganglioma......Isolated complex II deficiency is a rare cause of mitochondrial disease and bi-allelic mutations in SDHB have been identified in only a few patients with complex II deficiency and a progressive neurological phenotype with onset in infancy. On the other hand, heterozygous SDHB mutations are a well......-known cause of familial paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma and renal cell cancer. Here, we describe two additional patients with respiratory chain deficiency due to bi-allelic SDHB mutations. The patients' clinical, neuroradiological, and biochemical phenotype is discussed according to current knowledge...

  20. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...... against challenge with a high dose of the invasive clone 13 strain of LCMV. In contrast, vaccination with adenovirus encoding unlinked LCMV glycoprotein induced weak virus control in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, and mice may die of increased immunopathology associated with incomplete protection. Acute...

  1. NLRP3 Deficiency Improves Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension But Not Fetal Growth Restriction During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasuna, Koumei; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Usui, Fumitake; Kobayashi, Motoi; Komada, Tadanori; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kawashima, Akira; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by elevated blood pressure, proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Although sterile inflammation appears to be involved, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence indicates that sterile inflammation is mediated through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes, composed of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1. Here we investigated the role of the NLRP3 inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia using Nlrp3(-/-) and Asc(-/-) (Nlrp3 and Asc deficient) pregnant mice. During pregnancy in mice, continuous infusion of high-dose angiotensin II (AngII) induced hypertension, proteinuria, and IUGR, whereas infusion of low-dose AngII caused hypertension alone. AngII-induced hypertension was prevented in Nlrp3(-/-) mice but not in Asc(-/-), indicating that NLRP3 contributes to gestational hypertension independently of ASC-mediated inflammasomes. Although NLRP3 deficiency had no effect on IUGR, it restored the IL-6 up-regulation in the placenta and kidney of AngII-infused mice. Furthermore, treatment with hydralazine prevented the development of gestational hypertension but not IUGR or IL-6 expression in the placenta and kidney. These findings demonstrate that NLRP3 contributes to the development of gestational hypertension independently of the inflammasomes and that IUGR and kidney injury can occur independent of blood pressure elevation during pregnancy.

  2. Future Perspective in Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors and its Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Petchimuthu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Through this review it is contemplated that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, were a traditional drugs of choice for the treatment of glaucoma with a myriad of side effects and inadequate topical effectiveness, may be formulated into a topically effective agent by utilizing various newer formulation approaches of ocular drug delivery. Even though the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide (ACZ has a poor solubility and penetration power (BCS Class IV, various studies mentioned in the review indicate that it is possible to successfully formulate topically effective ACZ by using:(i High concentration of the drug, (ii Surfactant gel preparations of ACZ, (iii ACZ loaded into liposomes, (iv Cyclodextrins to increase the solubility and hence bioavailability of ACZ, and Viscolyzers and other polymers either alone or in combination with cyclodextrins. With the advent of newer topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs like dorzolamide and brinzolamide, a localized effect with fewer side effects is expected.But whenever absorbed systemically, a similar range of adverse effects (attributable to sulphonamides may occur upon use. Furthermore, oral ACZ is reported to be more physiologically effective than 2% dorzolamide hydrochloridead ministered topically, even though in isolated tissues dorzolamide appears to be the most active as it shows the lowest IC50 values for CA-II and CA-IV. Hence, there exists considerable scope for the development of more/equally effective and inexpensive topically effective formulations of ACZ. The use of various formulation technologies discussed in this review can provide a fresh impetus to research in this area.

  3. Severe infantile carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency in 19-week fetal sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Karen; Fellig, Yakov; Meiner, Vardiella; Korman, Stanley H; Shaag, Avraham; Nadjari, Michel; Soffer, Dov; Ariel, Ilana

    2009-01-01

    Antenatal presentation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency due to mutations in the CPT2 gene has been rarely reported. We report an Ashkenazi Jewish family with 3 terminated pregnancies for multicystic kidneys and/or hydrocephalus. Fetal autopsy after termination of the couple's 4th pregnancy (sib 2) showed renal parenchyma replaced by cysts that appeared to increase in diameter toward the medulla. Fetopsy after termination of the 7th pregnancy (sib 3) revealed micrognathia; hypospadias; cystic renal dysplasia; hepatosteatosis; and lipid accumulation in the renal tubular epithelium, myocardium, and skeletal muscle. Microvascular proliferative changes and focal polymicrogyria were seen in the brain. A beta-oxidative enzyme deficiency was suspected. CPT2 gene analysis showed a homozygous complex haplotype for the F448L mutation associated with a c.del1238_1239AG (p.Q413fs) truncating mutation in exon 4. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis in fetuses of Ashkenazi origin with multicystic kidneys and unusual cerebral findings.

  4. Early-onset Evans syndrome, immunodeficiency, and premature immunosenescence associated with tripeptidyl-peptidase II deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepensky, Polina; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gather, Ruth; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Nabhani, Schafiq; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Fuchs, Sebastian; Zenke, Simon; Firat, Elke; Pessach, Vered Molho; Borkhardt, Arndt; Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Eibel, Hermann; Niedermann, Gabriele; Elpeleg, Orly; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-01-29

    Autoimmune cytopenia is a frequent manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies. Two siblings presented with Evans syndrome, viral infections, and progressive leukopenia. DNA available from one patient showed a homozygous frameshift mutation in tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) abolishing protein expression. TPP2 is a serine exopeptidase involved in extralysosomal peptide degradation. Its deficiency in mice activates cell death programs and premature senescence. Similar to cells from naïve, uninfected TPP2-deficient mice, patient cells showed increased major histocompatibility complex I expression and most CD8(+) T-cells had a senescent CCR7-CD127(-)CD28(-)CD57(+) phenotype with poor proliferative responses and enhanced staurosporine-induced apoptosis. T-cells showed increased expression of the effector molecules perforin and interferon-γ with high expression of the transcription factor T-bet. Age-associated B-cells with a CD21(-) CD11c(+) phenotype expressing T-bet were increased in humans and mice, combined with antinuclear antibodies. Moreover, markers of senescence were also present in human and murine TPP2-deficient fibroblasts. Telomere lengths were normal in patient fibroblasts and granulocytes, and low normal in lymphocytes, which were compatible with activation of stress-induced rather than replicative senescence programs. TPP2 deficiency is the first primary immunodeficiency linking premature immunosenescence to severe autoimmunity. Determination of senescent lymphocytes should be part of the diagnostic evaluation of children with refractory multilineage cytopenias.

  5. Complex II deficiency--a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain-Ghai, Shailly; Cameron, Jessie M; Al Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; MacKay, Nevena; Robinson, Brian; Raiman, Julian

    2013-02-01

    Complex II deficiency is a rare cause of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects with a prevalence of 2-23%. It is exclusively nuclear encoded and functions in the citric acid cycle by oxidizing succinate to fumarate and in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) by transferring electrons to ubiquinone. Of the four subunits, SDHA and SDHB are catalytic and SDHC and SDHD are anchoring. Mutations in SDHA and SDHAF1 (assembly factor) have been found in patients with CII deficiency and a mitochondrial phenotype. We present a patient with CII deficiency with a previously undescribed phenotype of dilated cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Also, a comprehensive review of 36 cases published in the literature was undertaken. The results show that CII deficiency has a variable phenotype with no correlation with residual complex activity in muscle although the phenotype and enzyme activities are comparable within a family. For some, the condition was fatal in infancy, others had multisystem involvement and some had onset in adulthood with mild symptoms and normal cognition. Neurological involvement is most commonly observed and brain imaging commonly shows leukoencephalopathy, Leigh syndrome, or cerebellar atrophy. Mutations in SDHAF1 are associated with leukoencephalopathy. Other organ systems like heart, muscle, and eyes are only involved in about 50% of the cases but cardiomyopathy is associated with high mortality and morbidity. In some patients, riboflavin has provided clinical improvement.

  6. Renal tubular acidosis type II associated with vitamin D deficiency presenting as chronic weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Yaseen; Parekh, Amila; Baig, Mirza; Ali, Taseen; Rafiq, Tazeen

    2014-08-01

    Chronic vitamin D deficiency, though common in the elderly, is often under diagnosed and when progressing to renal tubular acidosis type II (RTA 2) can cause several simultaneous electrolyte imbalances that may present with weakness and pain as chief symptoms. We present such a case that after months of evaluation and symptomatic treatment did not lead to an effective establishment of the etiology causing chronic weakness and body pain in an elderly female patient. Eventually, after a careful review of the patient's history, repeat physical examinations, laboratory data evaluation, and diagnostic testing led to the establishment of the diagnosis of proximal RTA 2 associated with vitamin D deficiency, which caused the patient to develop several remarkable secondary electrolyte imbalances such as hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, acidemia, hyperparathyroidism, with weakness and body pain.

  7. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway.

  8. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and antigen I/II deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  9. High-salt diet combined with elevated angiotensin II accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Maria E; Bernberg, Evelina; Andersson, Irene J

    2009-01-01

    to atherosclerosis. METHODS: Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice received standard or high-salt diet (8%) alone or in combination with fixed angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.5 microg/kg per min). BP was measured using telemetry, and plaque burden was assessed in the thoracic aorta and innominate artery. We...

  10. Catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction is sensitive to carbonic anhydrase I activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puscas I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship between alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists and the activity of carbonic anhydrase I and II in erythrocyte, clinical and vessel studies. Kinetic studies were performed. Adrenergic agonists increased erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase as follows: adrenaline by 75%, noradrenaline by 68%, isoprenaline by 55%, and orciprenaline by 62%. The kinetic data indicated a non-competitive mechanism of action. In clinical studies carbonic anhydrase I from erythrocytes increased by 87% after noradrenaline administration, by 71% after orciprenaline and by 82% after isoprenaline. The increase in carbonic anhydrase I paralleled the increase in blood pressure. Similar results were obtained in vessel studies on piglet vascular smooth muscle. We believe that adrenergic agonists may have a dual mechanism of action: the first one consists of a catecholamine action on its receptor with the formation of a stimulus-receptor complex. The second mechanism proposed completes the first one. By this second component of the mechanism, the same stimulus directly acts on the carbonic anhydrase I isozyme (that might be functionally coupled with adrenergic receptors, so that its activation ensures an adequate pH for stimulus-receptor coupling for signal transduction into the cell, resulting in vasoconstriction.

  11. Density functional theory study of proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lidong; XIE Daiqian

    2005-01-01

    Proton transfer in carbonic anhydrase II has been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(D) level. The active site model consists of the zinc ion, four histidine residues, two threonine residues, and three water molecules. Our calculations showed that the proton of the zinc-bound water molecule could be transferred to the nearest water molecule and an intermediate containing H3O+ is then formed. The intermediate is only 1.3 kJ·mol-1 above the reactant complex, whereas the barrier height for the proton transfer is about 8.1 kJ·mol-1.

  12. Association of Transcobalamin II (TCN2) and Transcobalamin II-Receptor (TCblR) Genetic Variations With Cobalamin Deficiency Parameters in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnat-Thoma, Emma L; Pangilinan, Faith; Matteini, Amy M; Wong, Bob; Pepper, Ginette A; Stabler, Sally P; Guralnik, Jack M; Brody, Lawrence C

    2015-07-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a subtle progressive clinical disorder, affecting nearly 1 in 5 individuals > 60 years old. This deficiency is produced by age-related decreases in nutrient absorption, medications that interfere with vitamin B12 absorption, and other comorbidities. Clinical heterogeneity confounds symptom detection for elderly adults, as deficiency sequelae range from mild fatigue and weakness to debilitating megaloblastic anemia and permanent neuropathic injury. A better understanding of genetic factors that contribute to cobalamin deficiency in the elderly would allow for targeted nursing care and preventive interventions. We tested for associations of common variants in genes involved in cobalamin transport and homeostasis with metabolic indicators of cobalamin deficiency (homocysteine and methylmalonic acid) as well as hematologic, neurologic, and functional performance features of cobalamin deficiency in 789 participants of the Women's Health and Aging Studies. Although not significant when corrected for multiple testing, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in two genes, transcobalamin II (TCN2) and the transcobalamin II-receptor (TCblR), were found to influence several clinical traits of cobalamin deficiency. The three most significant findings were the identified associations involving missense coding SNPs, namely, TCblR G220R (rs2336573) with serum cobalamin, TCN2 S348F (rs9621049) with homocysteine, and TCN2 P259R (rs1801198) with red blood cell mean corpuscular volume. These SNPs may modify the phenotype in older adults who are more likely to develop symptoms of vitamin B12 malabsorption.

  13. Calpain-2 compensation promotes angiotensin II-induced ascending and abdominal aortic aneurysms in calpain-1 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Subramanian

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that angiotensin II (AngII-infusion profoundly increased both aortic protein and activity of calpains, calcium-activated cysteine proteases, in mice. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of calpain attenuated AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AA in mice. Recent studies have shown that AngII infusion into mice leads to aneurysmal formation localized to the ascending aorta. However, the precise functional contribution of calpain isoforms (-1 or -2 in AngII-induced abdominal AA formation is not known. Similarly, a functional role of calpain in AngII-induced ascending AA remains to be defined. Using BDA-410, an inhibitor of calpains, and calpain-1 genetic deficient mice, we examined the relative contribution of calpain isoforms in AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AA development.To investigate the relative contribution of calpain-1 and -2 in development of AngII-induced AAs, male LDLr -/- mice that were either calpain-1 +/+ or -/- were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min for 4 weeks. Calpain-1 deficiency had no significant effect on body weight or blood pressure during AngII infusion. Moreover, calpain-1 deficiency showed no discernible effects on AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AAs. Interestingly, AngII infusion induced increased expression of calpain-2 protein, thus compensating for total calpain activity in aortas of calpain-1 deficient mice. Oral administration of BDA-410, a calpain inhibitor, along with AngII-infusion significantly attenuated AngII-induced ascending and abdominal AA formation in both calpain-1 +/+ and -/- mice as compared to vehicle administered mice. Furthermore, BDA-410 administration attenuated AngII-induced aortic medial hypertrophy and macrophage accumulation. Western blot and immunostaining analyses revealed BDA-410 administration attenuated AngII-induced C-terminal fragmentation of filamin A, an actin binding cytoskeletal protein in aorta

  14. Angiotensin II blockade causes acute renal failure in eNOS-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Schnermann

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared with wild-type mice, adult endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS knockout mice (eight months of age have increased blood pressure (BP (126±9 mmHg vs. 100±4 mmHg, and an increased renal vascular resistance (155±16 vs. 65±4 mmHg.min/ml. Renal vascular resistance responses to i.v. administration of noradrenaline were markedly enhanced in eNOS knockout mice. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR of anaesthetised eNOS -/- mice was 324±57 µl/min gKW, significantly lower than the GFR of 761±126 µl/min.gKW in wild-type mice. AT1-receptor blockade with i.v. candesartan (1—1.5 mg/kg reduced arterial blood pressure and renal vascular resistance, and increased renal blood flow (RBF to about the same extent in wild-type and eNOS -/- mice. Candesartan did not alter GFR in wild-type mice (761±126 vs. 720±95 µl/min.gKW, but caused a marked decrease in GFR in eNOS -/- mice (324.5±75.2 vs. 77±18 µl/min.gKW. A similar reduction in GFR of eNOS deficient mice was also caused by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Afferent arteriolar granularity, a measure of renal renin expression, was found to be reduced in eNOS -/- compared with wild-type mice. In chronically eNOS-deficient mice, angiotensin II (Ang II is critical for maintaining glomerular filtration pressure and GFR, presumably through its effect on efferent arteriolar tone.

  15. Enzymes for carbon sequestration: neutron crystallographic studies of carbonic anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, S. Z., E-mail: zfisher@lanl.gov; Kovalevsky, A. Y. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Domsic, J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Mustyakimov, M. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Silverman, D. N. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, PO Box 100267, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, PO Box 100245, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Langan, P. [Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The first neutron crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase is presented. The structure reveals interesting and unexpected features of the active site that affect catalysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a ubiquitous metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to form HCO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sup +} using a Zn–hydroxide mechanism. The first part of catalysis involves CO{sub 2} hydration, while the second part deals with removing the excess proton that is formed during the first step. Proton transfer (PT) is thought to occur through a well ordered hydrogen-bonded network of waters that stretches from the metal center of CA to an internal proton shuttle, His64. These waters are oriented and ordered through a series of hydrogen-bonding interactions to hydrophilic residues that line the active site of CA. Neutron studies were conducted on wild-type human CA isoform II (HCA II) in order to better understand the nature and the orientation of the Zn-bound solvent (ZS), the charged state and conformation of His64, the hydrogen-bonding patterns and orientations of the water molecules that mediate PT and the ionization of hydrophilic residues in the active site that interact with the water network. Several interesting and unexpected features in the active site were observed which have implications for how PT proceeds in CA.

  16. Enhanced seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration following kainic acid-induced seizures in metallothionein-I + II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Penkowa, M; Hadberg, H

    2000-01-01

    ), a potent convulsive agent, to examine the neurobiological importance of these MT isoforms. At 35 mg/kg KA, MT-I + II deficient male mice showed a higher number of convulsions and a longer convulsion time than control mice. Three days later, KA-injected mice showed gliosis and neuronal injury...

  17. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported.

  18. Degradation products of the artificial azo dye, Allura red, inhibit esterase activity of carbonic anhydrase II: A basic in vitro study on the food safety of the colorant in terms of enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Khaledian, Koestan; Adibi, Hadi; Rouhani, Shohre; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-12-15

    Allura red is a widely used food colorant, but there is debate on its potential security risk. In the present study, we found that degradation products of the dye were more potent agents with higher carbonic anhydrase inhibitory action than the parent dye. The mechanism by which the compounds inhibit the enzyme activity has been determined as competitive mode. In addition, the enzyme binding properties of the compounds were investigated employing different spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking. The analyses of fluorescence quenching data revealed the existence of the same binding site for the compounds on the enzyme molecule. The thermodynamic parameters of ligand binding were not similar, which indicates that different interactions are responsible in binding of the parent dye and degradation products to the enzyme. It appears that enzyme inhibition should be considered, more seriously, as a new opened dimension in food safety.

  19. Thermostable Carbonic Anhydrases in Biotechnological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Di Fiore

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are ubiquitous metallo-enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide in bicarbonate ions and protons. Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the utilization of these enzymes in CO2 capture and storage processes. However, since this use is greatly limited by the harsh conditions required in these processes, the employment of thermostable enzymes, both those isolated by thermophilic organisms and those obtained by protein engineering techniques, represents an interesting possibility. In this review we will provide an extensive description of the thermostable carbonic anhydrases so far reported and the main processes in which these enzymes have found an application.

  20. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Zoccola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1 a change in gene expression under OA (2 an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  1. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-06-03

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  2. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity. PMID:27271641

  3. Different patterns of {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial accumulation in patients with type I and II CD36 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Nagatomo, Takafumi [Niigata Coll. of Pharmacy (Japan); Toba, Ken; Ogawa, Yusuke; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Tanabe, Naohito; Miyajima, Seiichi; Kusano, Yoriko; Hirokawa, Yoichi

    1997-12-01

    The CD36 molecule is a multifunctional membrane type receptor glycoprotein that reacts with thrombospondin, collagen, oxidized LDL and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). LCFA are one of the major cardiac energy substrates, hence LCFA metabolism may have an important role in cardiac diseases. In this study, we analyzed CD36 expression in 200 patients with heart diseases (44 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 16 with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 26 with old myocardial infarction (OMI), 55 with angina pectoris (AP) and 59 with other miscellaneous heart diseases) using a flow cytometer. {sup 123}I-{beta}-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial accumulation was also examined in some patients. Eight patients (2 with HCM, 1 with DCM, 2 with OMI, and 3 with AP) were diagnosed as having type I CD36 deficiency (neither platelets nor monocytes expressed CD36). Sixteen patients (3 with HCM, 1 with DCM, 1 with OMI, 8 with AP, and 3 with other heart diseases) showed type II CD36 deficiency (monocytes expressed CD36 but platelets did not). In all 8 patients with type I CD36 deficiency, there was no BMIPP accumulation in the heart. However, in 13 patients with type II CD36 deficiency, focally reduced BMIPP accumulation was observed, but there were no patients without BMIPP accumulation. CD36 deficiency was observed in a higher proportion (12%) of patients with heart disease in this study than in a reported control study. Type I CD36 deficiency is associated with absence of BMIPP accumulation in the heart, hence it may have an important role in LCFA metabolic disorders and some types of cardiac hypertrophy as well as other heart diseases. (author)

  4. Impaired inflammatory response to glial cell death in genetically metallothionein-I- and -II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Moos, T

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein I+II (MT-I+II) are acute-phase proteins which are upregulated during pathological conditions in the brain. To elucidate the neuropathological importance of MT-I+II, we have examined MT-I+II-deficient mice following ip injection with 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN). 6-AN is antimetabolic...... and toxic for bone marrow cells and grey matter astrocytes. In MT+/+ mice, injection with 6-AN resulted in breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and absence of GFAP-positive astrocytes in specific grey matter areas of the brain stem. Reactive astrocytosis encircled the damaged grey matter areas, which...... and histochemically detectable zinc increased in the brain stem after 6-AN similarly in MT+/+ and MT-/- mice. Bone marrow myeloid monocytes and macrophages were increased as a reaction to 6-AN only in MT+/+ mice. The results demonstrate that the capability of MT-/- mice to mount a normal inflammatory response...

  5. Truncated recombinant human SP-D attenuates emphysema and type II cell changes in SP-D deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mühlfeld Christian

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D deficient mice develop emphysema-like pathology associated with focal accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, an excess of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolar space and both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of alveolar type II cells. These findings are associated with a chronic inflammatory state. Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with a truncated recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D has been shown to decrease the lipidosis and alveolar macrophage accumulation as well as production of proinflammatory chemokines. The aim of this study was to investigate if rfhSP-D treatment reduces the structural abnormalities in parenchymal architecture and type II cells characteristic of SP-D deficiency. Methods SP-D knock-out mice, aged 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks were treated with rfhSP-D for 9, 6 and 3 weeks, respectively. All mice were sacrificed at age 12 weeks and compared to both PBS treated SP-D deficient and wild-type groups. Lung structure was quantified by design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level. Emphasis was put on quantification of emphysema, type II cell changes and intracellular surfactant. Data were analysed with two sided non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Main Results After 3 weeks of treatment, alveolar number was higher and mean alveolar size was smaller compared to saline-treated SP-D knock-out controls. There was no significant difference concerning these indices of pulmonary emphysema within rfhSP-D treated groups. Type II cell number and size were smaller as a consequence of treatment. The total volume of lamellar bodies per type II cell and per lung was smaller after 6 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Treatment of SP-D deficient mice with rfhSP-D leads to a reduction in the degree of emphysema and a correction of type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy. This supports the concept that rfhSP-D might become a therapeutic option in diseases that are

  6. Identification of a novel mutation in an Indian patient with CAII deficiency syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprasad C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII deficiency syndrome characterized by osteopetrosis (OP, renal tubular acidosis (RTA, and cerebral calcifications is caused by mutations in the carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2 gene. Severity of this disorder varies depending on the nature of the mutation and its effect on the protein. We present here, the clinical and radiographic details along with, results of mutational analysis of the CA2 gene in an individual clinically diagnosed with renal tubular acidosis, osteopetrosis and mental retardation and his family members to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. A novel homozygous deletion mutation c.251delT was seen in the patient resulting in a frameshift and a premature stop codon at amino acid position 90 generating a truncated protein leading to a complete loss of function and a consequential deficiency of the enzyme making this a pathogenic mutation. Confirmation of clinical diagnosis by molecular methods is essential as the clinical features of the CAII deficiency syndrome are similar to other forms of OP but the treatment modalities are different. Genetic confirmation of the diagnosis at an early age leads to the timely institution of therapy improving the growth potential, reduces other complications like fractures, and aids in providing prenatal testing and genetic counseling to the parents planning a pregnancy.

  7. The narrow substrate specificity of human tyrosine aminotransferase--the enzyme deficient in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Kirsch, Jack F

    2006-05-01

    Human tyrosine aminotransferase (hTATase) is the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transamination of tyrosine to p-hydrophenylpyruvate, an important step in tyrosine metabolism. hTATase deficiency is implicated in the rare metabolic disorder, tyrosinemia type II. This enzyme is a member of the poorly characterized Igamma subfamily of the family I aminotransferases. The full length and truncated forms of recombinant hTATase were expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The pH-dependent titration of wild-type reveals a spectrum characteristic of family I aminotransferases with an aldimine pK(a) of 7.22. I249A mutant hTATase exhibits an unusual spectrum with a similar aldimine pK(a) (6.85). hTATase has very narrow substrate specificity with the highest enzymatic activity for the Tyr/alpha-ketoglutarate substrate pair, which gives a steady state k(cat) value of 83 s(-1). In contrast there is no detectable transamination of aspartate or other cosubstrates. The present findings show that hTATase is the only known aminotransferase that discriminates significantly between Tyr and Phe: the k(cat)/K(m) value for Tyr is about four orders of magnitude greater than that for Phe. A comparison of substrate specificities of representative Ialpha and Igamma aminotransferases is described along with the physiological significance of the discrimination between Tyr and Phe by hTATase as applied to the understanding of the molecular basis of phenylketonuria.

  8. Characterization of human carbonic anhydrase III from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Shiels, A; Edwards, Y; Tipler, T; Hopkinson, D A

    1979-10-01

    A third form of human carbonic anhydrase (CA III), found at high concentrations in skeletal muscle, has been purified and characterized. This isozyme shows relatively poor hydratase and esterase activities compared to the red cell isozymes, CA I and CA II, but is similar to these isozymes in subunit structure (monomer) and molecular size (28,000). CA III is liable to posttranslational modification by thiol group interaction. Monomeric secondary isozymes, sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, are found in both crude and purified material and can be generated in vitro by the addition of thiol reagents. Active dimeric isozymes, generated apparently by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bridges, also occur but account for only a small proportion of the total protein and appear only when the concentration of CA III is particularly high.

  9. Six missense mutations associated with type I and type II protein C deficiency and implications obtained from molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y Z; Sakata, T; Matsusue, T; Umeyama, H; Kato, H; Miyata, T

    1994-10-01

    The molecular basis of protein C deficiency was studied in three type I and three type II heterozygotes. Three probands showed thrombotic complications. All the exons and intron/exon junctions of the protein C gene were studied using a strategy combining by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified fragments. Six missense mutations were identified, including three novel ones. One was located in exon II, in which the initiating translation codon (ATG) encoding for Met at position -42 was replaced by ACG encoding for Thr. The other five were located in exon IX, and included TAC(Tyr399)-->CAC(His), CCG(Pro327)-->CTG(Leu), GAC(Asp359)-->AAC(Asn) in two cases, and GGG(Gly350)-->AGG(Arg). Four of the six missense mutations occurred in CG dinucleotide. Sequence analysis of the other exons excluded additional mutations. By restriction enzyme analysis, co-segregation of the mutation with protein C deficiency was observed in four families. The other two mutations at amino acid positions -42 and 350 were also considered to be associated with protein C deficiency due to the absence of these mutations in 50 normal individuals. A structural model of the protease domain of mutant activated protein C was constructed by the chimeric modelling method, and the resultant model suggested conformational changes due to each missense mutation identified in protein C deficiency. The present data also provide some evidence regarding the genetic heterogeneity of protein C deficiency.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Furosemide on Carbonic Anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jianli; ZHAO Tongjin; JIANG Yan; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a high efficiency diuretic, furosemide, on carbonic anhydrase (CA). First, comparing the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide, a low efficiency diuretic, on CA, shows that furosemide or acetazolamide can quickly make CA inactive when its concentration is close to the enzyme concentration, different from the usual inhibitory kinetics in which the concentration of the inhibitor is far higher than the enzyme concentration. Secondly, the reaction of the enzyme indicates that the inhibitory effect of furosemide or acetazolamide on carbonic anhydrase is quickly reversible. Finally, the degree of the inhibitory effect of furosemide and of acetazolamide on CA are compared. The results show that furosemide inhibits CA less than acetazolamide.

  11. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  12. Capsaicin: A Potent Inhibitor of Carbonic Anhydrase Isoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Arabaci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1 is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 and water (H2O into a proton (H+ and bicarbonate (HCO3– ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  13. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-07-10

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  14. CNS wound healing is severely depressed in metallothionein I- and II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Carrasco, J; Giralt, M

    1999-01-01

    To characterize the physiological role of metallothioneins I and II (MT-I+II) in the brain, we have examined the chronological effects of a freeze injury to the cortex in normal and MT-I+II null mice. In normal mice, microglia/macrophage activation and astrocytosis were observed in the areas surr...

  15. Carbonic Anhydrase: In the Driver's Seat for Bicarbonate Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterling D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases are a widely expressed family of enzymes that catalyze the reversible reaction: CO(2 + H(2O = HCO(3(- + H(+. These enzymes therefore both produce HCO(3(- for transport across membranes and consume HCO(3(- that has been transported across membranes. Thus these enzymes could be expected to have a key role in driving the transport of HCO(3(- across cells and epithelial layers. Plasma membrane anion exchange proteins (AE transport chloride and bicarbonate across most mammalian membranes in a one-for-one exchange reaction and act as a model for our understanding of HCO(3(- transport processes. Recently it was shown that AE1, found in erythrocytes and kidney, binds carbonic anhydrase II (CAII via the cytosolic C-terminal tail of AE1. To examine the physiological consequences of the interaction between CAII and AE1, we characterized Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange activity in transfected HEK293 cells. Treatment of AE1-transfected cells with acetazolamide, a CAII inhibitor, almost fully inhibited anion exchange activity, indicating that endogenous CAII activity is essential for transport. Further experiments to examine the role of the AE1/CAII interaction will include measurements of the transport activity of AE1 following mutation of the CAII binding site. In a second approach a functionally inactive CA mutant, V143Y, will be co-expressed with AE1 in HEK293 cells. Since over expression of V143Y CAII would displace endogenous wild-type CAII from AE1, a loss of transport activity would be observed if binding to the AE1 C-terminus is required for transport.

  16. LHC II protein phosphorylation in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in non-photochemical quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitholtz, Hanna-Leena; Srivastava, Renu; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2005-06-01

    Phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex II (LHC II) proteins is induced in light via activation of the LHC II kinase by reduction of cytochrome b(6)f complex in thylakoid membranes. We have recently shown that, besides this activation, the LHC II kinase can be regulated in vitro by a thioredoxin-like component, and H2O2 that inserts an inhibitory loop in the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation in the chloroplast. In order to disclose the complex network for LHC II protein phosphorylation in vivo, we studied phosphorylation of LHC II proteins in the leaves of npq1-2 and npq4-1 mutants of Arabidopis thaliana. In comparison to wild-type, these mutants showed reduced non-photochemical quenching and increased excitation pressure of Photosystem II (PS II) under physiological light intensities. Peculiar regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation was observed in mutant leaves under illumination. The npq4-1 mutant was able to maintain a high amount of phosphorylated LHC II proteins in thylakoid membranes at light intensities that induced inhibition of phosphorylation in wild-type leaves. Light intensity-dependent changes in the level of LHC II protein phosphorylation were smaller in the npq1-2 mutant compared to the wild-type. No significant differences in leaf thickness, dry weight, chlorophyll content, or the amount of LHC II proteins were observed between the two mutant and wild-type lines. We propose that the reduced capacity of the mutant lines to dissipate excess excitation energy induces changes in the production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which consequently affects the regulation of LHC II protein phosphorylation.

  17. The Role of Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase Deficiency Type II on Proliferation of Neuronal Progenitor Cells and Layering of the Cerebral Cortex in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heepeel Chang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase Deficiency Type II, characterized by the absence of CPT II enzyme, is one of the lethal disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. CPT II regulates the conversion of long chain fatty acids, so that its product, acyl-CoA esters, can enter the Krebs cycle and generate energy. Neonatal mutations of CPT II lead to severe disruption of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acids and result in dysmorphic features, cystic renal dysplasia, and neuronal migration defects. Examination of the brain from an approximately 15-week gestation human fetus with CPT II deficiency revealed premature formation of cerebral cortical gyri and sulci and significantly lower levels of neuronal cell proliferation in the ventricular and subventricular zones as compared to the reference cases. We used immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the effect of CPT II deficiency on progenitor cell proliferation and layering of neurons. These studies demonstrated a premature generation of layer 5 cortical neurons. In addition, both the total number and percentage of progenitor cells proliferating in the ventricular zone were markedly reduced in the CPT II case in comparison to a reference case. Our results indicate that CPT II deficiency alters the normal program of cellular proliferation and differentiation in the cortex, with early differentiation of progenitor cells associated with premature cortical maturation.

  18. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Scheie, Anne A.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  19. Pd(II)-catalyzed cascade Wacker-Heck reaction: chemoselective coupling of two electron-deficient reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Franck; Reiter, Maud; Mills-Webb, Rebecca; Sawicki, Marcin; Klär, Daniel; Bensel, Nicolas; Wagner, Alain; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2006-10-27

    A novel palladium(II)-catalyzed oxy-carbopalladation process was developed allowing for the orchestrated union of hydroxy ynones with ethyl acrylate, two electron-deficient reactants. With beta-hydroxy ynones, this cascade Wacker-Heck process gave access to highly functionalized tri- or tetrasubstituted dihydropyranones featuring an unusual dienic system. For diastereomerically pure and for enantioenriched beta-hydroxyynones, these reactions proceed without affecting the stereochemical integrity of the existing stereocenters. In addition, tetrasubstituted furanones can be prepared when alpha-hydroxyynones and ethyl acrylate are used as starting materials. The dihydropyranones and furanones obtained upon cyclization are novel compounds, but structurally related carbohydrate derivatives featuring a similar dienic system have been used as starting materials for the construction of polyannulated products, suggesting that these cascade Pd(II)-mediated oxidative heterocyclizations are of value for various synthetic applications.

  20. Saccharin: a lead compound for structure-based drug design of carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Brian P; Hendon, Alex M; Driscoll, Jenna M; Rankin, Gregory M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2015-02-15

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a key modulator of aggressive tumor behavior and a prognostic marker and target for several cancers. Saccharin (SAC) based compounds may provide an avenue to overcome CA isoform specificity, as they display both nanomolar affinity and preferential binding, for CA IX compared to CA II (>50-fold for SAC and >1000-fold when SAC is conjugated to a carbohydrate moiety). The X-ray crystal structures of SAC and a SAC-carbohydrate conjugate bound to a CA IX-mimic are presented and compared to CA II. The structures provide substantial new insight into the mechanism of SAC selective CA isoform inhibition.

  1. 4-Amino-substituted Benzenesulfonamides as Inhibitors of Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Rutkauskas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives and diazobenzenesulfonamides containing aliphatic rings were designed, synthesized, and their binding to carbonic anhydrases (CA I, II, VI, VII, XII, and XIII was studied by the fluorescent thermal shift assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. The results showed that 4-substituted diazobenzenesulfonamides were more potent CA binders than N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives. Most of the N-aryl-β-alanine derivatives showed better affinity for CA II while diazobenzenesulfonamides possessed nanomolar affinities towards CA I isozyme. X-ray crystallographic structures showed the modes of binding of both compound groups.

  2. Expression of proteins encoded by the Escherichia coli cyn operon: carbon dioxide-enhanced degradation of carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozliak, E I; Guilloton, M B; Gerami-Nejad, M; Fuchs, J A; Anderson, P M

    1994-09-01

    Cyanase catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give 2CO2. The cynS gene encoding cyanase, together with the cynT gene for carbonic anhydrase, is part of the cyn operon, the expression of which is induced in Escherichia coli by cyanate. The physiological role of carbonic anhydrase is to prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 (M.B. Guilloton, A.F. Lamblin, E. I. Kozliak, M. Gerami-Nejad, C. Tu, D. Silverman, P.M. Anderson, and J.A. Fuchs, J. Bacteriol. 175:1443-1451, 1993). A delta cynT mutant strain was extremely sensitive to inhibition of growth by cyanate and did not catalyze decomposition of cyanate (even though an active cyanase was expressed) when grown at a low pCO2 (in air) but had a Cyn+ phenotype at a high pCO2. Here the expression of these two enzymes in this unusual system for cyanate degradation was characterized in more detail. Both enzymes were found to be located in the cytosol and to be present at approximately equal levels in the presence of cyanate. A delta cynT mutant strain could be complemented with high levels of expressed human carbonic anhydrase II; however, the mutant defect was not completely abolished, perhaps because the E. coli carbonic anhydrase is significantly less susceptible to inhibition by cyanate than mammalian carbonic anhydrases. The induced E. coli carbonic anhydrase appears to be particularly adapted to its function in cyanate degradation. Active cyanase remained in cells grown in the presence of either low or high pCO2 after the inducer cyanate was depleted; in contrast, carbonic anhydrase protein was degraded very rapidly (minutes) at a high pCO2 but much more slowly (hours) at a low pCO2. A physiological significance of these observations is suggested by the observation that expression of carbonic anhydrase at a high pCO2 decreased the growth rate.

  3. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  4. A altura facial anterior inferior nas más oclusões do padrão II, deficiência mandibular The anterior lower facial height in the Class II division 1 with mandibular deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldino Capelozza Filho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Controvérsias na leitura cefalométrica da AFAi (Altura Facial Anterior inferior e no diagnóstico clínico baseado na análise facial em casos de más oclusões do padrão II por deficiência mandíbular, motivaram este artigo. Compusemos uma amostra formada por 26 pacientes portadores desta má oclusão, sem distinção de gênero e idade, tratados no curso de especialização da PROFIS do HRAC - USP, Bauru. A amostra foi caracterizada utilizando-se um conjunto de medidas cefalométricas clássicas (SNA, SNB, ANB, NAP, AFAi, SNPO, SNGoGn, CoA, CoGn e testamos uma forma alternativa para medir a AFAi, onde os pontos espinha nasal anterior (ENA e mentoniano (Me foram projetados perpendicularmente a um plano frontal que passa por násio, perpendicular ao plano de Frankfurt (Nperp A e a distância entre eles medida linearmente. Os resultados foram confrontados com os valores obtidos da medição da AFAi como preconizado por McNamara, em 1984. Encontrou-se uma relação inversa entre a AFAi convencional e a AFAi perpendicular. Esta diferença foi estatisticamente significante para toda a amostra e apresentou alta correlação. A AFAi perpendicular foi sempre menor em toda amostra e exibiu uma tendência de ser tanto menor quanto maior fosse o valor de SNGoGn. Estes achados levaram a crer que a AFAi perpendicular, medida como preconizada neste artigo, torna o triângulo de McNamara mais equilibrado. Isso confere à avaliação cefalométrica a capacidade de identificar a diminuição da AFAi, característica facial típica do portador de deficiência mandibular, além de permitir um entendimento mais claro dos efeitos do tratamento nessa dimensão.Controversies between the cephalometrics analysis of the ALFH (anterior lower facial height and the clinical diagnosis based on the facial examination on Class II with mandibular deficiency has motivated this article. A sample composed of 26 Class II division 1 with mandibular deficiency individuals

  5. Southern GEMS groups II: HI distribution, mass functions and HI deficient galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kilborn, Virginia A; Barnes, David G; Koribalski, Baerbel S; Brough, Sarah; Kern, Katie

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of sixteen groups for which we have multi-wavelength data including X-ray observations. Wide-field imaging of the groups was obtained with the 20-cm multibeam system on the 64-m Parkes telescope. We have detected ten previously uncatalogued HI sources, one of which has no visible optical counterpart. We examine the HI properties of the groups, compared to their X-ray characteristics, finding that those groups with a higher X-ray temperature and luminosity contain less HI per galaxy. The HI content of a group depends on its morphological make-up, with those groups dominated by early-type galaxies containing the least total HI. We determined the expected HI for the spiral galaxies in the groups, and found that a number of the galaxies were HI deficient. The HI deficient spirals were found both in groups with and without a hot intra-group medium. The HI deficient galaxies were not necessarily found at the centre of the groups, however, we did find that two thirds ...

  6. New natural product carbonic anhydrase inhibitors incorporating phenol moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Bilia, Anna-Rita; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. The need to find selective CA inhibitors (CAIs) triggered the investigation of natural product libraries, which proved to be a valid source of agents with such an activity, as demonstrated for the phenols, polyamines and coumarins. Herein we report an in vitro inhibition study of human (h) CA isoforms hCAs I, II, IV, VII and XII with a panel of natural polyphenols including flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavanols, isoflavones and depsides, some of which extracted from Quercus ilex and Salvia miltiorrhiza. Several of the investigated derivatives showed interesting inhibition activity and selectivities for inhibiting some important isoforms over the off-target ones hCA I and II.

  7. Circadian variation in serum free and total insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II in untreated and treated acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjaerbaek, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Kaal, Andreas;

    2000-01-01

    to the nocturnal increase in IGF binding protein-1. In this study we have investigated the circadian variation in circulating free IGF-I and IGF-II in patients with acromegaly and patients with adult onset growth hormone deficiency. PATIENTS: Seven acromegalic patients were studied with and without treatment...... no significant circadian variations in free IGF-I or free IGF-II in either of the two occasions. In contrast, there was a significant circadian variation of total IGF-I after adjustment for changes in plasma volume in both treated and untreated acromegaly and GH deficiency in all cases with a peak between 0300 h...

  8. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach...

  9. Electron deficient organoiron(II) complexes of amidinates and betha-diketiminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciarone, Timotheus

    2005-01-01

    Iron(II) 2,6-diiminopyridine (PDI) complexes, in conjunction with methyl alumoxane (MAO) cocatalyst, have emerged as highly active catalysts for the polymerisation and oligomerisation of ethene. Thus far, this combination constitutes the only iron-based system that shows high activities. Although th

  10. A novel splice site mutation in neonatal carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.J.P.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Semmekrot, B.A.; Scholte, H.R.; Wanders, R.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids requires the concerted action of three tightly integrated membrane-bound enzymes (carnitine palmitoyltransferase I and II and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase) that transport them into mitochondria. Neonatal onset of carnitine palmitoyltransf

  11. Characterization of Carbonic Anhydrase 9 in the Alimentary Canal of Aedes aegypti and Its Relationship to Homologous Mosquito Carbonic Anhydrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Daniel P; Van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J

    2017-02-21

    In the mosquito midgut, luminal pH regulation and cellular ion transport processes are important for the digestion of food and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. pH regulation in the mosquito gut is affected by the vectorial movement of the principal ions including bicarbonate/carbonate and protons. As in all metazoans, mosquitoes employ the product of aerobic metabolism carbon dioxide in its bicarbonate/carbonate form as one of the major buffers of cellular and extracellular pH. The conversion of metabolic carbon dioxide to bicarbonate/carbonate is accomplished by a family of enzymes encoded by the carbonic anhydrase gene family. This study characterizes Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrases using bioinformatic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods. Our analyses show that there are fourteen Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase genes, two of which are expressed as splice variants. The carbonic anhydrases were classified as either integral membrane, peripheral membrane, mitochondrial, secreted, or soluble cytoplasmic proteins. Using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, one of the carbonic anhydrases, Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase 9, was analyzed and found in each life stage, male/female pupae, male/female adults, and in the female posterior midgut. Next, carbonic anhydrase 9 was analyzed in larvae and adults using confocal microscopy and was detected in the midgut regions. According to our analyses, carbonic anhydrase 9 is a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme found in the alimentary canal of larvae and adults and is expressed throughout the life cycle of the mosquito. Based on previous physiological analyses of adults and larvae, it appears AeCA9 is one of the major carbonic anhydrases involved in producing bicarbonate/carbonate which is involved in pH regulation and ion transport processes in the alimentary canal. Detailed understanding of the molecular bases of ion homeostasis in mosquitoes will provide targets for novel mosquito control strategies into the

  12. Characterization of Carbonic Anhydrase 9 in the Alimentary Canal of Aedes aegypti and Its Relationship to Homologous Mosquito Carbonic Anhydrases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Daniel P.; Van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    In the mosquito midgut, luminal pH regulation and cellular ion transport processes are important for the digestion of food and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. pH regulation in the mosquito gut is affected by the vectorial movement of the principal ions including bicarbonate/carbonate and protons. As in all metazoans, mosquitoes employ the product of aerobic metabolism carbon dioxide in its bicarbonate/carbonate form as one of the major buffers of cellular and extracellular pH. The conversion of metabolic carbon dioxide to bicarbonate/carbonate is accomplished by a family of enzymes encoded by the carbonic anhydrase gene family. This study characterizes Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrases using bioinformatic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods. Our analyses show that there are fourteen Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase genes, two of which are expressed as splice variants. The carbonic anhydrases were classified as either integral membrane, peripheral membrane, mitochondrial, secreted, or soluble cytoplasmic proteins. Using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, one of the carbonic anhydrases, Aedes aegypti carbonic anhydrase 9, was analyzed and found in each life stage, male/female pupae, male/female adults, and in the female posterior midgut. Next, carbonic anhydrase 9 was analyzed in larvae and adults using confocal microscopy and was detected in the midgut regions. According to our analyses, carbonic anhydrase 9 is a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme found in the alimentary canal of larvae and adults and is expressed throughout the life cycle of the mosquito. Based on previous physiological analyses of adults and larvae, it appears AeCA9 is one of the major carbonic anhydrases involved in producing bicarbonate/carbonate which is involved in pH regulation and ion transport processes in the alimentary canal. Detailed understanding of the molecular bases of ion homeostasis in mosquitoes will provide targets for novel mosquito control strategies into the

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase and Metalloderivatives: A Bioinorganic Chemistry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses selected bioinorganic aspects of carbonic anhydrase and describes experiments that will reinforce the students' understanding of the presence and essential role that metal ions have in some biological systems. (SL)

  14. Biochemical and phenotypic abnormalities in kynurenine aminotransferase II-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Di Prospero, Nicholas A; Sapko, Michael T; Cai, Tao; Chen, Amy; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Du, Fu; Whetsell, William O; Guidetti, Paolo; Schwarcz, Robert; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-08-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) can act as an endogenous modulator of excitatory neurotransmission and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurological and psychiatric diseases. To evaluate its role in the brain, we disrupted the murine gene for kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II), the principal enzyme responsible for the synthesis of KYNA in the rat brain. mKat-2(-/-) mice showed no detectable KAT II mRNA or protein. Total brain KAT activity and KYNA levels were reduced during the first month but returned to normal levels thereafter. In contrast, liver KAT activity and KYNA levels in mKat-2(-/-) mice were decreased by >90% throughout life, though no hepatic abnormalities were observed histologically. KYNA-associated metabolites kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and quinolinic acid were unchanged in the brain and liver of knockout mice. mKat-2(-/-) mice began to manifest hyperactivity and abnormal motor coordination at 2 weeks of age but were indistinguishable from wild type after 1 month of age. Golgi staining of cortical and striatal neurons revealed enlarged dendritic spines and a significant increase in spine density in 3-week-old mKat-2(-/-) mice but not in 2-month-old animals. Our results show that gene targeting of mKat-2 in mice leads to early and transitory decreases in brain KAT activity and KYNA levels with commensurate behavioral and neuropathological changes and suggest that compensatory changes or ontogenic expression of another isoform may account for the normalization of KYNA levels in the adult mKat-2(-/-) brain.

  15. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes from Euglena gracilis and Mutants Deficient in Chlorophyll b: II. Polypeptide Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, F X; Schiff, J A

    1986-01-01

    Chlorophyll-protein complexes (CPs) obtained from thylakoids of Euglena gracilis Klebs var bacillaris Cori contain the following polypeptides (listed in parentheses in order of prominence after Coomassie R-250 staining of polyacrylamide gels): CP Ia (66, 18, 22, 22.5, 27.5, 21, 28, 24, 25.5, and 26 kilodaltons [kD]); CP I (66 kD); CPx (41 kD); LHCP(2) (an oligomer of LHCP) (26.5, 28, and 26 kD); CPy (27 and 19 kD); CPa (54 kD); and LHCP (26.5, 28, and 26 kD). Mutants of bacillaris low in chlorophyll b (Gr(1)BSL, G(1)BU, and O(4)BSL; Chl a/b [mol/mol] = 50-100) which lack CP Ia, LHCP(2), and LHCP also lack or are deficient in polypeptides associated with these complexes in wild-type cells. Mutants G(1) and O(4), which also lack CPy, lack the CPy-associated polypeptides found in wild-type and Gr(1). Using an antiserum which was elicited by and reacts strongly and selectively with the SDS-treated major polypeptide (26.5 kD) of the LHCP complexes of wild-type, this polypeptide is undetectable in the mutants (saturation, consistent with the selective loss of major antenna components but not CP I or CPa from the mutants.

  16. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC50 values around 10−8M against isozyme CA II, and 10−7 M against isozyme CAI. PMID:18472784

  17. Metal Complexes of 1,3,4-Thiadiazole-2,5-Disulfonamide are Strong Dual Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors, although the Ligand Possesses very Weak such Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    1995-01-01

    Coordination compounds of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) with 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-disulfonamide as ligand were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy, conductimetry and thermogravimetry. The parent ligand is a very weak carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, although it constituted the lead for developing important classes of diuretics. The complex derivatives behave as much stronger CA inhibitors, with IC(50) values around 10(-8)M against isozyme CA II, and 10(-7) M against isozyme CAI.

  18. Cartografia e deficiência visual: experiências no Colégio Pedro II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Medeiros de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available O processo de construção de uma escola inclusiva perpassa um conjunto de esforços cognitivos e técnicos por parte da comunidade escolar que são necessários para a adequada educação e desenvolvimento do aluno. No que diz respeito ao ensino de Geografia para alunos deficientes visuais, fazem parte deste conjunto de medidas o domínio do sistema Braille, a confecção de materiais e mapas táteis, a gravação de textos em áudio e, entre outras, a realização de trabalhos de campo. O presente relato de experiência refere-se à um projeto de dedicação exclusiva, implementado no Colégio Pedro II de 2008 a 2010, cujo objetivo foi aprimorar o ensino de Geografia para os alunos deficientes visuais. Conclui-se que a adoção dessas medidas representa o início de um longo trabalho de toda comunidade escolar que não pode ser resumido à existência de alguns materiais táteis. Deve, por outro lado, envolver um processo de construção e adequação instrumental, acompanhado da capacitação profissional e da sensibilização da comunidade escolar.

  19. Spatial memory deficits and motor coordination facilitation in cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincott, Charlotte M; Kim, Seonil; Titcombe, Roseann F; Tukey, David S; Girma, Hiwot K; Pick, Joseph E; Devito, Loren M; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    Activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA receptors to synapses regulates synaptic strength. Activation of the NMDA receptor induces several second messenger pathways that contribute to receptor trafficking-dependent plasticity, including the NO pathway, which elevates cGMP. In turn, cGMP activates the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII), which phosphorylates the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 at serine 845, a critical step facilitating synaptic delivery in the mechanism of activity-dependent synaptic potentiation. Since cGKII is expressed in the striatum, amygdala, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, it has been proposed that mice lacking cGKII may present phenotypic differences compared to their wild-type littermates in emotion-dependent tasks, learning and memory, and drug reward salience. Previous studies have shown that cGKII KO mice ingest higher amounts of ethanol as well as exhibit elevated anxiety levels compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Here, we show that cGKII KO mice are significantly deficient in spatial learning while exhibiting facilitated motor coordination, demonstrating a clear dependence of memory-based tasks on cGKII. We also show diminished GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of cGKII KO prefrontal cortex while in hippocampal PSD fractions, phosphorylation was not significantly altered. These data suggest that the role of cGKII may be more robust in particular brain regions, thereby impacting complex behaviors dependent on these regions differently.

  20. IL-6 deficiency leads to reduced metallothionein-I+II expression and increased oxidative stress in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) deficiency on brain inflammation and the accompanying bone marrow (BM) leukopoiesis and spleen immune reaction after systemic administration of a niacin antagonist, 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), which causes both astroglial degeneration/cell death...... in brain stem gray matter areas and BM toxicity. In both normal and genetically IL-6-deficient mice (IL-6 knockout (IL-6KO) mice), the extent of astroglial degeneration/cell death in the brain stem was similar as determined from disappearance of GFAP immunoreactivity. In 6-AN-injected normal mice reactive...... astrocytosis encircled gray matter areas containing astroglial degeneration/cell death, which were infiltrated by several macrophages and some T-lymphocytes. Reactive astrocytes and a few macrophages increased significantly the antioxidants metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) and moderately the MT-III isoform. In 6...

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors with dual-tail moieties to match the hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the carbonic anhydrase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpure, Rajendra P; Ren, Bin; Peat, Thomas S; Bornaghi, Laurent F; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2015-02-12

    We present a new approach to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) inhibitor design that enables close interrogation of the regions of the CA active site where there is the greatest variability in amino acid residues among the different CA isozymes. By appending dual tail groups onto the par excellence CA inhibitor acetazolamide, compounds that may interact with the distinct hydrophobic and hydrophilic halves of the CA II active site were prepared. The dual-tail combinations selected included (i) two hydrophobic moieties, (ii) two hydrophilic moieties, and (iii) one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic moiety. The CA enzyme inhibition profile as well as the protein X-ray crystal structure of compound 3, comprising one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic tail moiety, in complex with CA II is described. This novel dual-tail approach has provided an enhanced opportunity to more fully exploit interactions with the CA active site by enabling these molecules to interact with the distinct halves of the active site. In addition to the dual-tail compounds, a corresponding set of single-tail derivatives was synthesized, enabling a comparative analysis of the single-tail versus dual-tail compound CA inhibition profile.

  2. Catalase, carbonic anhydrase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Beyaztas, Serap; Gokce, Basak; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In several studies the relationship between catalase (CAT), human cytosolic carbonic anhydrases (CA; hCA-I and hCA-II) and xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme activities have been investigated in various types of cancers but carbonic anhydrase, catalase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with MF have not been previously reported. Therefore, in this preliminary study we aim to investigate CAT, CA and XO activities in patients with MF. This study enrolled 32 patients with MF and 26 healthy controls. According to the results, CA and CAT activities were significantly lower in patients with mycosis fungoides than controls (p < 0.001) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in XO activity between patient and control group (p = 0.601). Within these findings, we believe these enzyme activity levels might be a potentially important finding as an additional diagnostic biochemical tool for MF.

  3. BMP type II receptor deficiency confers resistance to growth inhibition by TGF-β in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: role of proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Rachel J; Holmes, Alan M; Deighton, John; Long, Lu; Yang, Xudong; Barker, Lucy; Walker, Christoph; Budd, David C; Upton, Paul D; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type II receptor (BMPR-II) underlie most cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and a significant proportion of sporadic cases. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) not only exhibit attenuated growth suppression by BMPs, but an abnormal mitogenic response to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this loss of the antiproliferative effects of TGF-β1 in BMPR-II-deficient PASMCs. The effect of TGF-β1 on PASMC proliferation was characterized in three different models of BMPR-II dysfunction: 1) HPAH PASMCs, 2) Bmpr2(+/-) mouse PASMCs, and 3) control human PASMCs transfected with BMPR-II small interfering RNA. BMPR-II reduction consistently conferred insensitivity to growth inhibition by TGF-β1. This was not associated with altered canonical TGF-β1/Smad signaling but was associated with a secreted factor. Microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional responses to TGF-β1 differed between control and HPAH PASMCs, particularly regarding genes associated with interleukins and inflammation. HPAH PASMCs exhibited enhanced IL-6 and IL-8 induction by TGF-β1, an effect reversed by NF-κB inhibition. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 or IL-8 restored the antiproliferative effect of TGF-β1 in HPAH PASMCs. This study establishes that BMPR-II deficiency leads to failed growth suppression by TGF-β1 in PASMCs. This effect is Smad-independent but is associated with inappropriately altered NF-κB signaling and enhanced induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression. Our study provides a rationale to test anti-interleukin therapies as an intervention to neutralize this inappropriate response and restore the antiproliferative response to TGF-β1.

  4. The origin of HI-deficiency in galaxies on the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. II. Companions and uncertainties in distances and deficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchis, T; Salvador-Solé, E; Solanes, J M

    2004-01-01

    The origin of the deficiency in neutral Hydrogen of 13 spiral galaxies lying in the outskirts of the Virgo cluster is reassessed. If these galaxies have passed through the core of the cluster, their interstellar gas should have been lost through ram pressure stripping by the hot X-ray emitting gas of the cluster. We analyze the positions of these HI-deficient and other spiral galaxies in velocity-distance plots, in which we include our compilation of velocity-distance data on 61 elliptical galaxies, and compare with simulated velocity-distance diagrams obtained from cosmological N-body simulations. We find that ~20% relative Tully-Fisher distance errors are consistent with the great majority of the spirals, except for a small number of objects, whose positions in the velocity-distance diagram suggest grossly incorrect distances, which implies that the Tully-Fisher error distribution function has non-gaussian wings. Moreover, we find that the distance errors may lead to an incorrect fitting of the Tolman-Bondi...

  5. Depletion of endothelial or smooth muscle cell-specific angiotensin II type 1a receptors does not influence aortic aneurysms or atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra L Rateri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole body genetic deletion of AT1a receptors in mice uniformly reduces hypercholesterolemia and angiotensin II-(AngII induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs. However, the role of AT1a receptor stimulation of principal cell types resident in the arterial wall remains undefined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells influences the development of atherosclerosis and AAAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: AT1a receptor floxed mice were developed in an LDL receptor -/- background. To generate endothelial or smooth muscle cell specific deficiency, AT1a receptor floxed mice were bred with mice expressing Cre under the control of either Tie2 or SM22, respectively. Groups of males and females were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 3 months to determine effects on atherosclerosis. Deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effect on the size of atherosclerotic lesions. We also determined the effect of cell-specific AT1a receptor deficiency on atherosclerosis and AAAs using male mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min. Again, deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effects on either AngII-induced atherosclerotic lesions or AAAs. CONCLUSIONS: Although previous studies have demonstrated whole body AT1a receptor deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and AAAs, depletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells did not affect either of these vascular pathologies.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of novel benzothiazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Buğday, Nesrin; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-protected amino acids were reacted with substituted benzothiazoles to give the corresponding N-protected amino acid-benzothiazole conjugates (60-89%). Their structures were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR), IR and elemental analysis. Their carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activities were determined against two cytosolic human isoforms (hCA I and hCA II), one membrane-associated (hCA IV) and one transmembrane (hCA XII) enzyme by a stopped-flow CO2 hydrase assay method. The new compounds showed rather weak, micromolar inhibitory activity against most of these enzymes.

  7. Role of the Na+/H+ exchanger 3 in angiotensin II-induced hypertension in NHE3-deficient mice with transgenic rescue of NHE3 in small intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao C; Shull, Gary E; Miguel-Qin, Elisa; Chen, Fang; Zhuo, Jia L

    2015-11-01

    The role of Na(+/)H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) in the kidney in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension remains unknown. The present study used global NHE3-deficient mice with transgenic rescue of the Nhe3 gene in small intestines (tgNhe3(-/-)) to test the hypothesis that genetic deletion of NHE3 selectively in the kidney attenuates ANG II-induced hypertension. Six groups of wild-type (tgNhe3(+/+)) and tgNhe3(-/-) mice were infused with either vehicle or ANG II (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks, or 10 nmol/min, i.v., 30 min), treated with or without losartan (20 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 2 weeks. Basal systolic blood pressure (SBP) and mean intra-arterial blood pressure (MAP) were significantly lower in tgNhe3(-/-) mice (P excretion, urinary Na(+) excretion, urinary K(+) excretion, and urinary Cl(-) excretion were significantly lower in tgNhe3(-/-) mice (P < 0.01). These responses were associated with significantly elevated plasma ANG II and aldosterone levels, and marked upregulation in aquaporin 1, the Na(+)/HCO3 cotransporter, the α1 subunit isoform of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, protein kinase Cα, MAP kinases ERK1/2, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 α/β in the renal cortex of tgNhe3(-/-) mice (P < 0.01). ANG II infusion markedly increased SBP and MAP and renal cortical transporter and signaling proteins in tgNhe3(+/+), as expected, but all of these responses to ANG II were attenuated in tgNhe3(-/-) mice (P < 0.01). These results suggest that NHE3 in the kidney is necessary for maintaining normal blood pressure and fully developing ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  8. The role of carbonic anhydrase in hepatic glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ibrahim Salihu

    2016-12-14

    Considerable efforts are being made daily to discover novel therapeutic targets to better understand the mechanism for designing drugs in treating diabetes. Inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by metformin remains the first line of oral therapy for managing type 2 diabetes. The link between rise in blood lactate level and reduction of hepatic glucose production with metformin usage remains to be determined. Carbonic anhydrase is proposed to be the link connecting blood lactate accumulation and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and thus could serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing hepatic glucose production. Understanding the link between rise in blood lactate level and the role of carbonic anhydrase in lactate uptake will be essential towards the development of a promising new antidiabetic medication.

  9. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenescu, Violeta [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Arsenescu, Razvan [Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Zhang, Xuan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Baker, Nicki [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States); Cassis, Lisa A., E-mail: lcassis@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0200 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments AngII

  10. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect.

  11. Human secreted carbonic anhydrase: cDNA cloning, nucleotide sequence, and hybridization histochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldred, P.; Fu, Ping; Barrett, G.; Penschow, J.D.; Wright, R.D.; Coghlan, J.P.; Fernley, R.T. (The Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, Parkville, Victoria (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for the human secreted carbonic anhydrase isozyme (CAVI) have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. These clones identify a 1.45-kb mRNA that is present in high levels in parotid submandibular salivary glands but absent in other tissues such as the sublingual gland, kidney, liver, and prostate gland. Hybridization histochemistry of human salivary glands shows mRNA for CA VI located in the acinar cells of these glands. The cDNA clones encode a protein of 308 amino acids that includes a 17 amino acid leader sequence typical of secreted proteins. The mature protein has 291 amino acids compared to 259 or 260 for the cytoplasmic isozymes, with most of the extra amino acids present as a carboxyl terminal extension. In comparison, sheep CA VI has a 45 amino acid extension. Overall the human CA VI protein has a sequence identity of 35 {percent} with human CA II, while residues involved in the active site of the enzymes have been conserved. The human and sheep secreted carbonic anhydrases have a sequence identity of 72 {percent}. This includes the two cysteine residues that are known to be involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond in the sheep CA VI. The enzyme is known to be glycosylated and three potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Thr/Ser) have been identified. Two of these are known to be glycosylated in sheep CA VI. Southern analysis of human DNA indicates that there is only one gene coding for CA VI.

  12. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  13. Fluoroalkyl and alkyl chains have similar hydrophobicities in binding to the "hydrophobic wall" of carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecinović, Jasmin; Snyder, Phillip W; Mirica, Katherine A; Bai, Serena; Mack, Eric T; Kwant, Richard L; Moustakas, Demetri T; Héroux, Annie; Whitesides, George M

    2011-09-07

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H(2)NSO(2)C(6)H(4)-CONHCH(2)(CX(2))(n)CX(3), n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and entropic contributions to the

  14. Skeletal and Dentoalveolar changes concurrent to use of Twin Block appliance in Class II division I cases with a deficient mandible: A cephalometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of Class II malocclusions are due to underdeveloped mandible with increased overjet and overbite. Lack of incisal contact results in the extrusion of the upper and lower anterior dentoalveolar complex, which helps to lock the mandible and prevent its normal growth and development, and this abnormality, is exaggerated by soft tissue imbalance. The purpose of present study was to cephalometrically evaluate skeletal and dentoalveolar changes following the use of Twin-Block appliance in 10 growing children of age group 9-13 years (mean 11.1 year ± SD 1.37 of Class II division 1 malocclusion with a deficient mandible. Cephalometric pre- and post-functional treatment measurements (angular and linear were done and statistically analyzed using student′s paired t-test. The results of the present study showed that maxilla (SNA was restricted sagittally (head gear effect with marked maxillary dental retraction. Significant mandible sagittal advancement (SNB with minimum dental protraction was observed with significant increase in the mandibular length. The maxillomandibular skeletal relation (ANB and WITS appraisal reduced considerably which improved the profile and facial esthetics. Pronounced correction of overjet and overbite was seen. The present study concluded that Class II correction occurs by both skeletal and dentoalveolar changes.

  15. Design of a carbonic anhydrase IX active-site mimic to screen inhibitors for possible anticancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Caroli; Sippel, Katherine H; Case, Nicolette; Cao, Wengang; Avvaru, Balendu Sankara; Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David N; Rosser, Charles J; McKenna, Robert

    2009-02-17

    Recently, a convincing body of evidence has accumulated suggesting that the overexpression of carbonic anhydrase isozyme IX (CA IX) in some cancers contributes to the acidification of the extracellular matrix, which in turn promotes the growth and metastasis of the tumor. These observations have made CA IX an attractive drug target for the selective treatment of certain cancers. Currently, there is no available X-ray crystal structure of CA IX, and this lack of availability has hampered the rational design of selective CA IX inhibitors. In light of these observations and on the basis of structural alignment homology, using the crystal structure of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and the sequence of CA IX, a double mutant of CA II with Ala65 replaced by Ser and Asn67 replaced by Gln has been constructed to resemble the active site of CA IX. This CA IX mimic has been characterized kinetically using (18)O-exchange and structurally using X-ray crystallography, alone and in complex with five CA sulfonamide-based inhibitors (acetazolamide, benzolamide, chlorzolamide, ethoxzolamide, and methazolamide), and compared to CA II. This structural information has been evaluated by both inhibition studies and in vitro cytotoxicity assays and shows a correlated structure-activity relationship. Kinetic and structural studies of CA II and CA IX mimic reveal chlorzolamide to be a more potent inhibitor of CA IX, inducing an active-site conformational change upon binding. Additionally, chlorzolamide appears to be cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells. This preliminary study demonstrates that the CA IX mimic may provide a useful model to design more isozyme-specific CA IX inhibitors, which may lead to development of new therapeutic treatments of some cancers.

  16. H-deficient blood groups of Reunion island. II. Differences between Indians (Bombay Phenotype) and whites (Reunion phenotype).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pendu, J; Gerard, G; Vitrac, D; Juszczak, G; Liberge, G; Rouger, P; Salmon, C; Lambert, F; Dalix, A M; Oriol, R

    1983-05-01

    Two variants of recessive, H-deficient nonsecretor individuals (h/h, se/se) were identified on Reunion Island: (1) H-negative individuals corresponding to the classical Bombay phenotypes (OhO, OhA, OhB, OhAB) who lack completely the H antigen on their red cells; all of them were Indian and had strong anti-H antibodies reacting with normal O and Oh red cells from whites; and (2) H-weak individuals (Oh, Ah, Bh, ABh). This phenotype represented the majority (85%) of the H-deficient phenotypes on Reunion Island, and all of them were white. They had only a weak expression of the H antigen and showed small but detectable amounts of ABH antigens on their red cells. Their anti-H antibodies reacted with normal O erythrocytes, but failed to react with Oh red cells, regardless of the ethnic origin of the donor. They were all from the same geographical area on the Island (Cilaos) and showed homogeneous titers of anti-H antibodies in sera. We propose to call this particular variant of weak H phenotype, belonging to the so-called para-Bombay series, Reunion.

  17. [Health and nutritional status of 'alternatively' fed infants and young children, facts and uncertainties. II. Specific nutritional deficiencies; discussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnelie, P C; Van Staveren, W A; Hautvast, J G

    1985-12-01

    This article, which is the second in a series of two articles, discusses available scientific information on the nutritional status of infants and preschool children on alternative diets with regard to calcium, iron, vitamin B12 and D. Some favourable aspects of alternative food habits in such children are also mentioned. Most studies report low intakes of vitamin D and in vegan and macrobiotic children also of calcium and vitamin B12, but it cannot be excluded that some alternative sources of these nutrient may have been missed. Deficiencies have been described for vitamin D and B12 but the evidence is often unconvincing. For example, exposure to sunlight has not been measured in most of the studies on rickets. From the literature available, it would appear that there is a need for longitudinal research on the growth and development of alternatively fed infants and preschool children and for information on the nutrient composition of alternative foods.

  18. Pilot absorption experiments with carbonic anhydrase enhanced MDEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; F. Lomholdt, Niels; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    -methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) solvent, with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). The absorption experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and agas phase carbon dioxide mole fraction of 0.13. During experiments liquid samples were withdrawn at each meter of column height and the solvent loading...... was determined by both a density method and the BaCl2 method. After the solvent was loaded to equilibrium it was heated up and reintroduced into the column, where CO2 was stripped off using air as stripping gas. The addition of CA increased the mass transfer significantly in all experiments. Lower absorption...

  19. Bioindication potential of carbonic anhydrase activity in anemones and corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A L; Guzmán, H M

    2001-09-01

    Activity levels of carbonic anhydrase (CA) were assessed in anemones Condylactis gigantea and Stichodactyla helianthus with laboratory exposures to copper, nickel, lead, and vanadium, and also in animals collected from polluted vs pristine field sites. CA activity was found to be decreased with increase in metal concentration and also in animals collected from the polluted field site. Preliminary assessments to adapt the CA assay for use in the widespread coral Montastraea cavernosa show decreased CA activity in specimens from the polluted field site and provide an avenue for future research aimed at more thoroughly describing coral CA activity for potential application in bioindication.

  20. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase XIII in the erythrocytes of the Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbaugh, A J; Secor, S M; Grosell, M

    2015-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is one of the most abundant proteins found in vertebrate erythrocytes with the majority of species expressing a low activity CA I and high activity CA II. However, several phylogenetic gaps remain in our understanding of the expansion of cytoplasmic CA in vertebrate erythrocytes. In particular, very little is known about isoforms from reptiles. The current study sought to characterize the erythrocyte isoforms from two squamate species, Python molurus and Nerodia rhombifer, which was combined with information from recent genome projects to address this important phylogenetic gap. Obtained sequences grouped closely with CA XIII in phylogenetic analyses. CA II mRNA transcripts were also found in erythrocytes, but found at less than half the levels of CA XIII. Structural analysis suggested similar biochemical activity as the respective mammalian isoforms, with CA XIII being a low activity isoform. Biochemical characterization verified that the majority of CA activity in the erythrocytes was due to a high activity CA II-like isoform; however, titration with copper supported the presence of two CA pools. The CA II-like pool accounted for 90 % of the total activity. To assess potential disparate roles of these isoforms a feeding stress was used to up-regulate CO2 excretion pathways. Significant up-regulation of CA II and the anion exchanger was observed; CA XIII was strongly down-regulated. While these results do not provide insight into the role of CA XIII in the erythrocytes, they do suggest that the presence of two isoforms is not simply a case of physiological redundancy.

  1. Synthesis and Evaluation of New Phthalazine Urea and Thiourea Derivatives as Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Berber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of phthalazine substituted urea and thiourea derivatives were synthesized, and their inhibitory effects on the activity of purified human carbonic anhydrases (hCAs I and II were evaluated. 2H-Indazolo[2,1-b]phthalazine-trione derivative (1 was prepared with 4-nitrobenzaldehyde, dimedone, and phthalhydrazide in the presence of TFA in DMF, and nitro group was reduced to amine derivative (2 with SnCl2·2H2O. The compound was reacted with isocyanates and isothiocyanates to get the final products (3a–p. The results showed that all the synthesized compounds inhibited the CA isoenzymes activity. 3a (IC50 = 6.40 µM for hCA I and 6.13 µM for hCA II has the most inhibitory effect. The synthesized compounds are very bulky to be able to bind near the zinc ion, and they much more probably bind as the coumarin derivatives.

  2. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of association between mandibular crowding and some of anatomical indexes in skeletal Cl II 8-12 years old patient with mandibular deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirazi Mohsen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran ( mirahashemi@tums.ac.ir   Background and Aims: Nowadays patients refer to orthodontist for issue such as dental crowding and other aesthetic problems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between some of mandibular anatomical landmarks and dental crowding in the patient with skeletal Cl II due to mandibular deficiency.   Materials and Methods: 108 cases have been randomly selected out of patients with mandibular related Cl II problem associated with lower incisor crowding, out of orthodontic patient department of Tehran university of medical sciences. ANB, SNB, mandibular discrepancy, gonial angle, Sn-Go-Gn and IMPA was evaluated out of the data. Lateral cephalograms were used for this matter. The correlation between variables was evaluated by correlation test and after reviewing the data was analyzed using Normality test, the Pearson correlation coefficient was used for normally distributed variables.   Results: Corpus-ramus length ratio had a significant relationship with dental crowding (P≤0.05 but there was no meaningful and significant relationship between other facial landmarks ( P = 0.26 .   Conclusion: there seems to be a slight relationship between facial landmarks and dental crowding in lower incisors. But further case control and clinical studies may be helpful in achieving more reliable data.

  4. A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase molecular switch occurs in the gills of metamorphic sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; McCormick, Stephen; Campos, A.; Lopes-Marques, M.; Osorio, H.; Coimbra, J.; Castro, L.F.C.; Wilson, Jonthan M

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase plays a key role in CO2 transport, acid-base and ion regulation and metabolic processes in vertebrates. While several carbonic anhydrase isoforms have been identified in numerous vertebrate species, basal lineages such as the cyclostomes have remained largely unexamined. Here we investigate the repertoire of cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrases in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), that has a complex life history marked by a dramatic metamorphosis from a benthic filter-feeding ammocoete larvae into a parasitic juvenile which migrates from freshwater to seawater. We have identified a novel carbonic anhydrase gene (ca19) beyond the single carbonic anhydrase gene (ca18) that was known previously. Phylogenetic analysis and synteny studies suggest that both carbonic anhydrase genes form one or two independent gene lineages and are most likely duplicates retained uniquely in cyclostomes. Quantitative PCR of ca19 and ca18 and protein expression in gill across metamorphosis show that the ca19 levels are highest in ammocoetes and decrease during metamorphosis while ca18 shows the opposite pattern with the highest levels in post-metamorphic juveniles. We propose that a unique molecular switch occurs during lamprey metamorphosis resulting in distinct gill carbonic anhydrases reflecting the contrasting life modes and habitats of these life-history stages.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase 5 regulates acid-base homeostasis in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Postel

    Full Text Available The regulation of the acid-base balance in cells is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. Disturbed acid-base balance directly affects cellular physiology, which often results in various pathological conditions. In every living organism, the protein family of carbonic anhydrases regulate a broad variety of homeostatic processes. Here we describe the identification, mapping and cloning of a zebrafish carbonic anhydrase 5 (ca5 mutation, collapse of fins (cof, which causes initially a collapse of the medial fins followed by necrosis and rapid degeneration of the embryo. These phenotypical characteristics can be mimicked in wild-type embryos by acetazolamide treatment, suggesting that CA5 activity in zebrafish is essential for a proper development. In addition we show that CA5 regulates acid-base balance during embryonic development, since lowering the pH can compensate for the loss of CA5 activity. Identification of selective modulators of CA5 activity could have a major impact on the development of new therapeutics involved in the treatment of a variety of disorders.

  6. Carbonic anhydrase from Apis mellifera: purification and inhibition by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Ercan; Güler, Ahmet; Bıyık, Selim; Şentürk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ekinci, Deniz

    2017-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes have been shown to play an important role in ion transport and in pH regulation in several organisms. Despite this information and the wealth of knowledge regarding the significance of CA enzymes, few studies have been reported about bee CA enzymes and the hazardous effects of chemicals. Using Apis mellifera as a model, this study aimed to determine the risk of pesticides on Apis mellifera Carbonic anhydrase enzyme (Am CA). CA was initially purified from Apis mellifera spermatheca for the first time in the literature. The enzyme was purified with an overall purification of ∼35-fold with a molecular weight of ∼32 kDa. The enzyme was then exposed to pesticides, including tebuconazole, propoxur, carbaryl, carbofuran, simazine and atrazine. The six pesticides dose-dependently inhibited in vitro AmCA activity at low micromolar concentrations. IC50 values for the pesticides were 0.0030, 0.0321, 0.0031, 0.0087, 0.0273 and 0.0165 μM, respectively. The AmCA inhibition mechanism of these compounds is unknown at this moment.

  7. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C; Scheie, Anne A; van der Mei, Henny C

    2007-04-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant IB03987 was nearly unable to adhere to laminin films under flow conditions due to a lack of specific interactions (0.8 x 10(6) and 1.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) compared with parent strain LT11 (21.8 x 10(6) and 26.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2)). The adhesion of both the parent and mutant strains was slightly greater at pH 6.8 than at pH 5.8. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the parent strain experienced less repulsion when it approached a laminin film than the mutant experienced. Upon retraction, combined specific and nonspecific adhesion forces were stronger for the parent strain (up to -5.0 and -4.9 nN at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) than for the mutant (up to -1.5 and -2.1 nN), which was able to interact only through nonspecific interactions. Enthalpy was released upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of the parent strain but not upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of IB03987. A comparison of the adhesion forces in AFM with the adhesion forces reported for specific ligand-receptor complexes resulted in the conclusion that the number of antigen I/II binding sites for laminin on S. mutans LT11 is on the order of 6 x 10(4) sites per organism and that the sites are probably arranged along exterior surface structures, as visualized here by immunoelectron microscopy.

  8. The archetype gamma-class carbonic anhydrase (Cam) contains iron when synthesized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Sheridan R; Zimmerman, Sabrina A; Apolinario, Ethel E; Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming; Ferry, James G; Sowers, Kevin R

    2009-02-10

    A recombinant protein overproduction system was developed in Methanosarcina acetivorans to facilitate biochemical characterization of oxygen-sensitive metalloenzymes from strictly anaerobic species in the Archaea domain. The system was used to overproduce the archetype of the independently evolved gamma-class carbonic anhydrase. The overproduced enzyme was oxygen sensitive and had full incorporation of iron instead of zinc observed when overproduced in Escherichia coli. This, the first report of in vivo iron incorporation for any carbonic anhydrase, supports the need to reevaluate the role of iron in all classes of carbonic anhydrases derived from anaerobic environments.

  9. Optic nerve oxygen tension in pigs and the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, E; Jensen, P K; Eysteinsson, T;

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture....

  10. A class of sulfonamides with strong inhibitory action against the α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel-Akdemir, Özlen; Akdemir, Atilla; Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane B; Parkkila, Seppo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-07-25

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes for an α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) possessing high catalytic activity (TcCA) which was recently characterized (Pan et al. J. Med. Chem. 2013, 56, 1761-1771). A new class of sulfonamides possessing low nanomolar/subnanomolar TcCA inhibitory activity is described here. Aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides incorporating halogeno/methoxyphenacetamido tails inhibited TcCA with KIs in the range of 0.5-12.5 nM, being less effective against the human off-target isoforms hCA I and II. A homology model of TcCA helped us to rationalize the excellent inhibition profile of these compounds against the protozoan enzyme, a putative new antitrypanosoma drug target. These compounds were ineffective antitrypanosomal agents in vivo due to penetrability problems of these highly polar molecules that possess sulfonamide moieties.

  11. Zic deficiency in the cortical marginal zone and meninges results in cortical lamination defects resembling those in type II lissencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Masaharu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2008-04-30

    The formation of the highly organized cortical structure depends on the production and correct placement of the appropriate number and types of neurons. The Zic family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays essential roles in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors in the medial forebrain and the cerebellum. Examination of the expression of Zic genes demonstrated that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 were expressed by the progenitor cells in the septum and cortical hem, the sites of generation of the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed that Zic proteins were abundantly expressed in the meningeal cells and that the majority of the CR cells distributed in the medial and dorsal cortex also expressed Zic proteins in the mid-late embryonic and postnatal cortical marginal zones. During embryonic cortical development, Zic1/Zic3 double-mutant and hypomorphic Zic2 mutant mice showed a reduction in the number of CR cells in the rostral cortex, whereas the cell number remained unaffected in the caudal cortex. These mutants also showed mislocalization of the CR cells and cortical lamination defects, resembling the changes noted in type II (cobblestone) lissencephaly, throughout the brain. In the Zic1/3 mutant, reduced proliferation of the meningeal cells was observed before the thinner and disrupted organization of the pial basement membrane (BM) with reduced expression of the BM components and the meningeal cell-derived secretory factor. These defects correlated with the changes in the end feet morphology of the radial glial cells. These findings indicate that the Zic genes play critical roles in cortical development through regulating the proliferation of meningeal cells and the pial BM assembly.

  12. Transmembrane carbonic anhydrase isozymes IX and XII in the female mouse reproductive organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eija

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase (CA classically catalyses the reversible hydration of dissolved CO2 to form bicarbonate ions and protons. The twelve active CA isozymes are thought to regulate a variety of cellular functions including several processes in the reproductive systems. Methods The present study was designed to investigate the expression of transmembrane CAs, CA IX and XII, in the mouse uterus, ovary and placenta. The expression of CA IX and XII was examined by immunoperoxidase staining method and western blotting. CA II and XIII served as positive controls since they are known to be present in the mouse reproductive tract. Results The data of our study indicated that CA XII is expressed in the mouse endometrium. Only very faint signal was observed in the corpus luteum of the ovary and the placenta remained mainly negative. CA IX showed weak reaction in the endometrial epithelium, while it was completely absent in the ovary and placenta. Conclusion The conservation of CA XII expression in both mouse and human endometrium suggests a role for this isozyme in reproductive physiology.

  13. Coumarin or benzoxazinone based novel carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Mert Olgun; Uslu, Harun; Sarı, Suat; Alagöz, Mehmet Abdullah; Karakurt, Arzu; Alıcı, Bülent; Bilen, Cigdem; Yavuz, Emre; Gencer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay

    2016-10-01

    Among many others, coumarin derivatives are known to show human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) inhibitory activity. Since hCA inhibition is one of the underlying mechanisms that account for the activities of some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), hCA inhibitors are expected to have anti-seizure properties. There are also several studies reporting compounds with an imidazole and/or benzimidazole moiety which exert these pharmacological properties. In this study, we prepared fifteen novel coumarin-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride, nine novel benzoxazinone-bearing imidazolium and benzimidazolium chloride derivatives and evaluated their hCA inhibitory activities and along with fourteen previously synthesized derivatives we scanned their anticonvulsant effects. As all compounds inhibited purified hCA isoforms I and II, some of them also proved protective against Maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and ScMet induced seizures in mice. Molecular docking studies with selected coumarin derivatives have revealed that these compounds bind to the active pocket of the enzyme in a similar fashion to that previously described for coumarin derivatives.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  15. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition increases retinal oxygen tension and dilates retinal vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Koch Jensen, Peter; la Cour, Morten;

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase blood flow in the brain and probably also in the optic nerve and retina. Additionally they elevate the oxygen tension in the optic nerve in the pig. We propose that they also raise the oxygen tension in the retina. We studied the oxygen tension in the...... in the pig retina and optic nerve before and after dorzolamide injection. Also the retinal vessel diameters during carbonic anhydrase inhibition were studied....

  16. Evolution of carbonic anhydrase in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Martha

    2016-06-01

    During the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the intracellular location with most carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has changed. In Flaveria, the loss of the sequence encoding a chloroplast transit peptide from an ancestral C3 CA ortholog confined the C4 isoform to the mesophyll cell cytosol. Recent studies indicate that sequence elements and histone modifications controlling the expression of C4-associated CAs were likely present in the C3 ancestral chromatin, enabling the evolution of the C4 pathway. Almost complete abolishment of maize CA activity yields no obvious phenotype at ambient CO2 levels. This contrasts with results for Flaveria CA mutants, and has opened discussion on the role of CA in the C4 carbon concentrating mechanism.

  17. Carbonic anhydrases in normal gastrointestinal tract and gastrointestinal tumours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti J. Kivel(a); Jyrki Kivel(a); Juha Saarnio; Seppo Parkkila

    2005-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) catalyse the hydration of CO2to bicarbonate at physiological pH. This chemical interconversion is crucial since HCO3- is the substrate for several biosynthetic reactions. This review is focused on the distribution and role of CA isoenzymes in both normal and pathological gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues. It has been known for many years that CAs are widely present in the GI tract and play important roles in several physiological functions such as production of saliva, gastric acid, bile, and pancreatic juice as well as in absorption of salt and water in intestine. New information suggests that these enzymes participate in several processes that were not envisioned earlier. Especially, the recent reports on plasma membranebound isoenzymes Ⅸ and Ⅻ have raised considerable interest since they were reported to participate in cancer invasion and spread. They are induced by tumour hypoxia and may also play a role in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated carcinogenesis.

  18. Natural Product Polyamines That Inhibit Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan A. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural product compound collections have proven an effective way to access chemical diversity and recent findings have identified phenolic, coumarin, and polyamine natural products as atypical chemotypes that inhibit carbonic anhydrases (CAs. CA enzymes are implicated as targets of variable drug therapeutic classes and the discovery of selective, drug-like CA inhibitors is essential. Just two natural product polyamines, spermine and spermidine, have until now been investigated as CA inhibitors. In this study, five more complex natural product polyamines 1–5, derived from either marine sponge or fungi, were considered for inhibition of six different human CA isozymes of interest in therapeutic drug development. All compounds share a simple polyamine core fragment, either spermine or spermidine, yet display substantially different structure activity relationships for CA inhibition. Notably, polyamines 1–5 were submicromolar inhibitors of the cancer drug target CA IX, this is more potent than either spermine or spermidine.

  19. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank B;

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... in the reaction induces vasodilation in aortic rings. This reaction occurs under normoxic and hypoxic conditions and in various tissues at physiological levels of CA and nitrite. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of the CO2 hydration, dorzolamide and acetazolamide, increase the CA-catalyzed production...... of vasoactive NO from nitrite. This enhancing effect may explain the known vasodilating effects of these drugs and indicates that CO2 and nitrite bind differently to the enzyme active site. Kinetic analyses show a higher reaction rate at high pH, suggesting that anionic nitrite participates more effectively...

  20. Carbonic Anhydrase: An Efficient Enzyme with Possible Global Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Boone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the global atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases continue to grow to record-setting levels, so do the demands for an efficient and inexpensive carbon sequestration system. Concurrently, the first-world dependence on crude oil and natural gas provokes concerns for long-term availability and emphasizes the need for alternative fuel sources. At the forefront of both of these research areas are a family of enzymes known as the carbonic anhydrases (CAs, which reversibly catalyze the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate. CAs are among the fastest enzymes known, which have a maximum catalytic efficiency approaching the diffusion limit of 108 M−1s−1. As such, CAs are being utilized in various industrial and research settings to help lower CO2 atmospheric emissions and promote biofuel production. This review will highlight some of the recent accomplishments in these areas along with a discussion on their current limitations.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli. A product of the cyn operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M B; Korte, J J; Lamblin, A F; Fuchs, J A; Anderson, P M

    1992-02-25

    The product of the cynT gene of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase. The cyn operon also includes the gene cynS, encoding the enzyme cyanase. Cyanase catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. The carbonic anhydrase was isolated from an Escherichia coli strain overexpressing the cynT gene and characterized. The purified enzyme was shown to contain 1 Zn2+/subunit (24 kDa) and was found to behave as an oligomer in solution; the presence of bicarbonate resulted in partial dissociation of the oligomeric enzyme. The kinetic properties of the enzyme are similar to those of carbonic anhydrases from other species, including inhibition by sulfonamides and cyanate. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of identity with the sequences of two plant carbonic anhydrases. but not with animal and algal carbonic anhydrases. Since carbon dioxide formed in the bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate diffuses out of the cell faster than it would be hydrated to bicarbonate, the apparent function of the induced carbonic anhydrase is to catalyze hydration of carbon dioxide and thus prevent depletion of cellular bicarbonate.

  2. Complexes With Biologically Active Ligands. Part 111. Synthesis and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity of Metal Complexes of 4,5-Disubstituted-3-Mercapto-1,2,4-Triazole Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Cavazza, Christine; Saramet, Ioana; Briganti, Fabrizio; Banciu, Mircea D.

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma. PMID:18475819

  3. Complexes with biologically active ligands. Part 11. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzafava, A; Cavazza, C; Supuran, C T; Saramet, I; Briganti, F; Banciu, M D

    1998-01-01

    Complexes containing five 4,5-disubstituted-3-mercapto-1,2,4-triazoles and Zn(II), Hg(II) and Cu(I) were synthesized and characterized by standard procedures (elemental analysis; IR, electronic and NMR spectroscopy, conductimetry and TG analysis). Both the thione as well as the thiolate forms of the ligands were evidenced to interact with the metal ions in the prepared complexes. The original mercaptans and their metal complexes behave as inhibitors of three carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, CA I, II and IV, but did not lower intraocular pressure in rabbits in animal models of glaucoma.

  4. Iodine Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – February 2017 VOLUME ... 2016 By ATA | Featured , Iodine Deficiency , News Releases , Potassium Iodide (KI) | No Comments IDD NEWSLETTER – November 2015 (PDF ...

  5. Size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles lead to a variant behavior in the unfolding dynamics of human carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Irem; Lundqvist, Martin; Cabaleiro-Lago, Celia

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence revealed that HCAs adsorb to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, however the dynamics of the unfolding at the nanoparticle surfaces drastically vary with the polarity. The size of the nanoparticles has opposite effects depending on the polarity of the nanoparticle surface. The apolar nanoparticles induce seconds timescale structural rearrangements whereas polar nanoparticles induce hours timescale structural rearrangements on the same charged HCA variant. Here, a simple model is proposed where the difference in the timescales of adsorption is correlated with the energy barriers for initial docking and structural rearrangements which are firmly regulated by the surface polarity. Near-UV circular dichorism (CD) further supports that both protein variants undergo structural rearrangements at the nanoparticle surfaces regardless of being ``hard'' or ``soft''. However, the conformational changes induced by the apolar surfaces differ for each HCA isoform and diverge from the previously reported effect of silica nanoparticles.The adsorption induced conformational changes of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCAi) and pseudo wild type human carbonic anhydrase II truncated at the 17th residue at the N-terminus (trHCAii) were studied in presence of nanoparticles of different sizes and polarities. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies showed that the binding to apolar surfaces is affected by the nanoparticle size in combination with the inherent protein stability. 8-Anilino

  6. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  7. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  8. Fluoroalkyl and Alkyl Chains Have Similar Hydrophobicities in Binding to the “Hydrophobic Wall” of Carbonic Anhydrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Mecinovic; P Snyder; K Mirica; S Bai; E Mack; R Kwant; D Moustakas; A Heroux; G Whitesides

    2011-12-31

    The hydrophobic effect, the free-energetically favorable association of nonpolar solutes in water, makes a dominant contribution to binding of many systems of ligands and proteins. The objective of this study was to examine the hydrophobic effect in biomolecular recognition using two chemically different but structurally similar hydrophobic groups, aliphatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic fluorocarbons, and to determine whether the hydrophobicity of the two groups could be distinguished by thermodynamic and biostructural analysis. This paper uses isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to examine the thermodynamics of binding of benzenesulfonamides substituted in the para position with alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains (H{sub 2}NSO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CONHCH{sub 2}(CX{sub 2}){sub n}CX{sub 3}, n = 0-4, X = H, F) to human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). Both alkyl and fluoroalkyl substituents contribute favorably to the enthalpy and the entropy of binding; these contributions increase as the length of chain of the hydrophobic substituent increases. Crystallography of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the benzenesulfonamide groups of all ligands examined bind with similar geometry, that the tail groups associate with the hydrophobic wall of HCA II (which is made up of the side chains of residues Phe131, Val135, Pro202, and Leu204), and that the structure of the protein is indistinguishable for all but one of the complexes (the longest member of the fluoroalkyl series). Analysis of the thermodynamics of binding as a function of structure is compatible with the hypothesis that hydrophobic binding of both alkyl and fluoroalkyl chains to hydrophobic surface of carbonic anhydrase is due primarily to the release of nonoptimally hydrogen-bonded water molecules that hydrate the binding cavity (including the hydrophobic wall) of HCA II and to the release of water molecules that surround the hydrophobic chain of the ligands. This study defines the balance of enthalpic and

  9. IgM natural autoantibodies against bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells recognise carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonusys, A M; Cox, K O; Steele, E J

    1991-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from mouse erythrocyte membranes is recognised as an autoantigen in Western blotting experiments with FUB 1, a murine IgM monoclonal antibody that binds both phosphatidylcholine and bromelain-treated mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC). Serum from mice stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS-serum) also recognises CA. From SDS-PAGE, and blotting experiments with whole mouse erythrocytes, we found two closely spaced glycoprotein bands in the 30 kD region that reacted with both FUB 1 and LPS-serum. One of the molecular weight markers, bovine carbonic anhydrase which is of a molecular weight of about 30 kD, electrophoresed in the same 30 kD region also reacted with these antibodies. Carbonic anhydrases from a range of mammalian species were found to be crossreactive with FUB 1 and LPS-serum by Western blotting, whereas human glycophorin A and human asialoglycophorin were not recognised by the antibodies. FUB 1 specifically recognises both native and denatured bovine carbonic anhydrase in ELISA assays. The serological identity of the determinants of CA and BrMRBC was confirmed by specific absorption of both FUB 1 and LPS-serum with BrMRBC and normal mouse erythrocytes. We propose that a native autoantigenic epitope on erythrocytes may be revealed by the proteolytic action of bromelain and that this determinant is associated, at least in part, with carbonic anhydrase.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, kinetic, docking and molecular dynamics analysis of novel glycine and phenylalanine sulfonamide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, İsmail; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Arslan, Mehmet; Şentürk, Murat; Durdagi, Serdar; Ekinci, Deniz; Şentürk, Esra; Coşgun, Sedat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II, with some novel glycine and phenylalanine sulfonamide derivatives were investigated. Newly synthesized compounds G1-4 and P1-4 showed effective inhibition profiles with KI values in the range of 14.66-315μM for hCA I and of 18.31-143.8μM against hCA II, respectively. In order to investigate the binding mechanisms of these inhibitors, in silico docking studies were applied. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were performed for docking poses which utilize to illustrate the inhibition mechanism of used inhibitors into active site of CAII. These sulfonamide containing compounds generally were competitive inhibitors with 4-nitrophenylacetate as substrate. Some investigated compounds here showed effective hCA II inhibitory effects, in the same range as the clinically used sulfonamide, sulfanilamide or mafenide and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors possibly targeting other CA isoforms which have not been yet assayed for their interactions with such agents.

  11. Variable involvement of the perivascular retinal tissue in carbonic anhydrase inhibitor induced relaxation of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehler, Anne Katrine; Holmgaard, Kim; Hessellund, Anders;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase in the eye is an important treatment modality for reducing the intraocular pressure in glaucoma. However, evidence suggests that carbonic anhydrase inhibition also exerts a relaxing effect on the vessels in the optic nerve, and it has been suggested...

  12. Carbonic anhydrase isozymes Ⅸ and Ⅻ in gastric tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mari Leppilampi; Juha Saarnio; Tuomo J. Karttunen; Jyrki Kivel(a); Silvia Pastorekov(a); Jaromir Pastorek; Abdul Waheed; William S. Sly; Seppo Parkkila

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To systematically study the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) isowmes Ⅸ and Ⅻ in gastric tumors.METHODS: We analyzed a representative series of specimens from non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and from various dysplastic and neoplastic gastric lesions for the expression of CA IX and XII. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using isozyme-specific antibodies and biotinstreptavidin complex method.RESULTS: CA IX was highly expressed in the normal gastric mucosa and remained positive in many gastric tumors. In adenomas, CA IX expression significantly decreased towards the high grade dysplasia. However, the expression resumed back to the normal level in well differentiated adenocarcinomas,while it again declined in carcinomas with less differentiation.In comparison, CA Ⅻ showed no or weak immunoreaction in the normal gastric mucosa and was slightly increased in tumors.CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CA Ⅸexpression is sustained in several types of gastric tumors.The variations observed in the CA Ⅸ levels support the concept that gastric adenomas and carcinomas are distinct entities and do not represent progressive steps of a single pathway.

  13. Disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, T M; Christopher, N L

    1969-02-01

    This review of the literature and current knowledge concerning a nutritional disorder of disaccharidase deficiency discusses the following topics: 1) a description of disorders of disaccharide digestion; 2) some historical perspective on the laboratory and bedside advances in the past 10 years that have helped define a group of these digestive disorders; 3) a classification of conditions causing disaccharide intolerance; and 4) a discussion of some of the specific clinical syndromes emphasizing nutritional consequences of these syndromes. The syndromes described include congenital lactase deficiency, acquired lactase deficiency in teenagers and adults, acquired generalized disaccharidase deficiency secondary to diffuse mucosal damage, acquired lactose intolerance secondary to alterations in the intestinal transit, sucrase-isomaltase deficiencies, and other disease associations connected with lactase deficiency such as colitis.

  14. Multiple sources of carbonic anhydrase activity in pea thylakoids: soluble and membrane-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Natalia N; Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Ivanov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity of pea thylakoids, thylakoid membranes enriched with photosystem I (PSI-membranes), or photosystem II (PSII-membranes) as well as both supernatant and pellet after precipitation of thylakoids treated with detergent Triton X-100 were studied. CA activity of thylakoids in the presence of varying concentrations of Triton X-100 had two maxima, at Triton/chlorophyll (triton/Chl) ratios of 0.3 and 1.0. CA activities of PSI-membranes and PSII-membranes had only one maximum each, at Triton/Chl ratio 0.3 or 1.0, respectively. Two CAs with characteristics of the membrane-bound proteins and one CA with characteristics of the soluble proteins were found in the medium after thylakoids were incubated with Triton. One of the first two CAs had mobility in PAAG after native electrophoresis the same as that of CA residing in PSI-membranes, and the other CA had mobility the same as the mobility of CA residing in PSII-membranes, but the latter was different from CA situated in PSII core-complex (Ignatova et al. 2006 Biochemistry (Moscow) 71:525-532). The properties of the "soluble" CA removed from thylakoids were different from the properties of the known soluble CAs of plant cell: apparent molecular mass was about 262 kD and it was three orders more sensitive to the specific CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, than soluble stromal CA. The data are discussed as indicating the presence of, at least, four CAs in pea thylakoids.

  15. Phosphorylation controls the localization and activation of the lumenal carbonic anhydrase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaya Blanco-Rivero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cah3 is the only carbonic anhydrase (CA isoform located in the thylakoid lumen of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Previous studies demonstrated its association with the donor side of the photosystem II (PSII where it is required for the optimal function of the water oxidizing complex. However this enzyme has also been frequently proposed to perform a critical function in inorganic carbon acquisition and CO(2 fixation and all mutants lacking Cah3 exhibit very poor growth after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: In the present work we demonstrate that after transfer to low CO(2, Cah3 is phosphorylated and that phosphorylation is correlated to changes in its localization and its increase in activity. When C. reinhardtii wild-type cells were acclimated to limiting CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 activity increased about 5-6 fold. Under these conditions, there were no detectable changes in the level of the Cah3 polypeptide. The increase in activity was specifically inhibited in the presence of Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, suggesting that the Cah3 protein was post-translationally regulated via phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro dephosphorylation experiments confirm this hypothesis. In vivo phosphorylation analysis of thylakoid polypeptides indicates that there was a 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation signal of the Cah3 polypeptide within the first two hours after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. The increase in the phosphorylation signal was correlated with changes in the intracellular localization of the Cah3 protein. Under high CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 protein was only associated with the donor side of PSII in the stroma thylakoids. In contrast, in cells grown at limiting CO(2 the protein was partly concentrated in the thylakoids crossing the pyrenoid, which did not contain PSII and were surrounded by Rubisco molecules. SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a CA being post

  16. Carbonic anhydrase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membrane and fragments enriched with PSI or PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Lyudmila K; Rudenko, Natalia N; Mudrik, Vilen A; Fedorchuk, Tat'yana P; Ivanov, Boris N

    2011-12-01

    The procedure of isolating the thylakoids and the thylakoid membrane fragments enriched with either photosystem I or photosystem II (PSI- and PSII-membranes) from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was developed. It differed from the one used with pea and spinach in durations of detergent treatment and centrifugation, and in concentrations of detergent and Mg(2+) in the media. Both the thylakoid and the fragments preserved carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities. Using nondenaturing electrophoresis followed by detection of CA activity in the gel stained with bromo thymol blue, one low molecular mass carrier of CA activity was found in the PSI-membranes, and two carriers, a low molecular mass one and a high molecular mass one, were found in the PSII-membranes. The proteins in the PSII-membranes differed in their sensitivity to acetazolamide (AA), a specific CA inhibitor. AA at 5 × 10(-7) M inhibited the CA activity of the high molecular mass protein but stimulated the activity of the low molecular mass carrier in the PSII-membranes. At the same concentration, AA moderately inhibited, by 30%, the CA activity of PSI-membranes. CA activity of the PSII-membranes was almost completely suppressed by the lipophilic CA inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide at 10(-9) M, whereas CA activity of the PSI-membranes was inhibited by this inhibitor even at 5 × 10(-7) M just the same as for AA. The observed distribution of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes from A. thaliana was close to the one found in the membranes of pea, evidencing the general pattern of CA activity in the thylakoid membranes of C3-plants.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  18. A physiological role for cyanate-induced carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Guilloton, M B; Lamblin, A F; Kozliak, E I; Gerami-Nejad, M; Tu, C.; Silverman, D.; Anderson, P. M.; Fuchs, J A

    1993-01-01

    Cyanate induces expression of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli. The cyn operon includes the gene cynS, encoding cyanase, which catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. A carbonic anhydrase activity was recently found to be encoded by the cynT gene, the first gene of the cyn operon; it was proposed that carbonic anhydrase prevents depletion of bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 by diffusion out of the cell (M. B. Guilloto...

  19. Carbonic anhydrase mimics for enhanced CO2 absorption in an amine-based capture solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Rachael A; Miller, David A; Parkin, Sean R; Liu, Kun; Remias, Joe E; Yang, Yue; Lightstone, Felice C; Liu, Kunlei; Lippert, Cameron A; Odom, Susan A

    2016-01-07

    Two new small-molecule enzyme mimics of carbonic anhydrase were prepared and characterized. These complexes contain the salen-like ligand bis(hydroxyphenyl)phenanthroline. This ligand is similar to the salen-type ligands previously incorporated into carbonic anhydrase mimics but contains no hydrolyzable imine groups and therefore serves as a promising ligand scaffold for the synthesis of a more robust CO2 hydration catalyst. These homogeneous catalysts were investigated for CO2 hydration in concentrated primary amine solutions through which a dilute CO2 (14%) fluid stream was flowed and showed exceptional activity for increased CO2 absorption rates.

  20. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected. Howeve

  1. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  2. Molecular and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrases of Paracoccidioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira Tomazett

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbonic anhydrases (CA belong to the family of zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. In the present work, we characterized the cDNAs of four Paracoccidioides CAs (CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4. In the presence of CO2, there was not a significant increase in fungal ca1, ca2 and ca4 gene expression. The ca1 transcript was induced during the mycelium-to-yeast transition, while ca2 and ca4 gene expression was much higher in yeast cells, when compared to mycelium and mycelium-to-yeast transition. The ca1 transcript was induced in yeast cells recovered directly from liver and spleen of infected mice, while transcripts for ca2 and ca4 were down-regulated. Recombinant CA1 (rCA1 and CA4 (rCA4, with 33 kDa and 32 kDa respectively, were obtained from bacteria. The enzymes rCA1 (β-class and rCA4 (α-class were characterized regarding pH, temperature, ions and amino acids addition influence. Both enzymes were stable at pHs 7.5-8.5 and temperatures of 30-35 °C. The enzymes were dramatically inhibited by Hg+2 and activated by Zn+2, while only rCA4 was stimulated by Fe2+. Among the amino acids tested (all in L configuration, arginine, lysine, tryptophan and histidine enhanced residual activity of rCA1 and rCA4.

  3. Efficient activation of human T cells of both CD4 and CD8 subsets by urease-deficient recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG that produced a heat shock protein 70-M. tuberculosis-derived major membrane protein II fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Tetsu; Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Makino, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of obtaining Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) capable of activating human naive T cells, urease-deficient BCG expressing a fusion protein composed of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived major membrane protein II (MMP-II) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) of BCG (BCG-DHTM) was produced. BCG-DHTM secreted the HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein and effectively activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) by inducing phenotypic changes and enhanced cytokine production. BCG-DHTM-infected DCs activated naive T cells of both CD4 and naive CD8 subsets, in an antigen (Ag)-dependent manner. The T cell activation induced by BCG-DHTM was inhibited by the pretreatment of DCs with chloroquine. The naive CD8(+) T cell activation was mediated by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) and the proteosome-dependent cytosolic cross-priming pathway. Memory CD8(+) T cells and perforin-producing effector CD8(+) T cells were efficiently produced from the naive T cell population by BCG-DHTM stimulation. Single primary infection with BCG-DHTM in C57BL/6 mice efficiently produced T cells responsive to in vitro secondary stimulation with HSP70, MMP-II, and M. tuberculosis-derived cytosolic protein and inhibited the multiplication of subsequently aerosol-challenged M. tuberculosis more efficiently than did vector control BCG. These results indicate that the introduction of MMP-II and HSP70 into urease-deficient BCG may be useful for improving BCG for control of tuberculosis.

  4. Synthesis and carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties of amino acid - coumarin/quinolinone conjugates incorporating glycine, alanine and phenylalanine moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükbay, F Zehra; Küçükbay, Hasan; Tanc, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    N-Protected amino acids (Gly, Ala and Phe) were reacted with amino substituted coumarin and quinolinone derivatives, leading to the corresponding N-protected amino acid-coumarin/quinolinone conjugates. The carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitory activity of the new compounds was assessed against various human (h) isoforms, such as hCA I, hCA II, hCA IV and hCA XII. The quinolinone conjugates were inactive as enzyme inhibitors, whereas the coumarins were ineffective hCA I/II inhibitors (KIs > 50 μM) but were submicromolar hCA IV and XII inhibitors, with inhibition constants ranging between 92 nM and 1.19 μM for hCA IV, and between 0.11 and 0.79 μM for hCA XII. These coumarin derivatives, as many others reported earlier, thus show an interesting selective inhibitory profile for the membrane-bound over the cytosolic CA isoforms.

  5. Gene conversion in the CYP11B2 gene encoding P450c11AS is associated with, but does not cause, the syndrome of corticosterone methyloxidase II deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardella, C.E.; Hum, D.W.; Rodriguez, H. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P450c11AS (aldosterone synthase) has 11{beta}hydroxylase, 18-hydroxylase, and 18-oxidase activities and is expressed solely in the adrenal zona glomerulosa. Corticosterone methyloxidase II (CMOII) deficiency denotes a rare disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis in which only the 18-oxidase activity of P450c11AS is disrupted, while the 11{beta}-hydroxylase and 18-hydroxylase activities persist. Such patients have elevated serum concentrations of corticosterone and 18-hydroxycorticosterone and very low or unmeasurable concentrations of aldosterone, often resulting in a clinical salt-losing crisis in infancy. We have sought mutations causing CMOII deficiency in outbred populations. In three of four unrelated P450c11AS alleles from two unrelated patients with CMOII deficiency, we found a gene conversion event in which exons 3 and 4 of the CYP11B2 gene encoding P450c11AS were changed to the sequence of the nearby CYP11B1 gene, which encodes the related enzyme P450c11{beta}. This conversion resulted in a mutant P450c11AS protein carrying three changes. We built seven vectors expressing P450c11AS carrying each mutation singly, each of the three possible pairs of mutations, and the triple mutation as found in the proband. The activities in steroidogenic MA-10 and JEG-3 cells were 10- to 20-fold higher. In these systems all of the mutants retained normal 18-oxidase activity, indicating that the detected gene conversion event is associated with but does not cause CMOII deficiency. None of the four CPY11B2 alleles in these two patients bore other identifiable mutations. These patients might have mutations in the promoters or other noncoding regions, or mutations in genes other than CYP11B2 may cause the syndrome of CMOII deficiency. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Polyclonal activation of naïve T cells by urease deficient-recombinant BCG that produced protein complex composed of heat shock protein 70, CysO and major membrane protein-II

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Mukai, Tetsu; Makino, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is known to be only partially effective in inhibiting M. tuberculosis (MTB) multiplication in human. A new recombinant (r) urease-deficient BCG (BCG-dHCM) that secretes protein composed of heat shock protein (HSP)70, MTB-derived CysO and major membrane protein (MMP)-II was produced for the efficient production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is an essential element for mycobacteriocidal action and inhibition of neutrophil accumul...

  7. Carboxysomal carbonic anhydrases: Structure and role in microbial CO2 fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Gordon C.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2010-06-23

    Cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophic bacteria are able to grow in environments with limiting CO2 concentrations by employing a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that allows them to accumulate inorganic carbon in their cytoplasm to concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than that on the outside. The final step of this process takes place in polyhedral protein microcompartments known as carboxysomes, which contain the majority of the CO2-fixing enzyme, RubisCO. The efficiency of CO2 fixation by the sequestered RubisCO is enhanced by co-localization with a specialized carbonic anhydrase that catalyzes dehydration of the cytoplasmic bicarbonate and ensures saturation of RubisCO with its substrate, CO2. There are two genetically distinct carboxysome types that differ in their protein composition and in the carbonic anhydrase(s) they employ. Here we review the existing information concerning the genomics, structure and enzymology of these uniquely adapted carbonic anhydrases, which are of fundamental importance in the global carbon cycle.

  8. Antibody inhibiting enzymatic activity of tumour-associated carbonic anhydrase isoform IX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murri-Plesko, M.T.; Hulikova, A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Scott, A.M.; Zortea, A.; Harris, A.L.; Ritter, G.; Old, L.; Bauer, S.; Swietach, P.; Renner, C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia-induced, membrane-tethered enzyme that is highly expressed in many cancers. It catalyses the hydration of CO(2) to HCO(3)(-) and H(+), and the reverse dehydration reaction. Recent studies have shown an important role for CAIX in pH regulation and it has been

  9. Iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  10. Effect of high concentration of inert cosolutes on the refolding of an enzyme: carbonic anhydrase B in sucrose and ficoll 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, Begoña; Minton, Allen P

    2007-11-16

    The kinetics of refolding of carbonic anhydrase II following transfer from a buffer containing 5 m guanidinium chloride to a buffer containing 0.5 m guanidinium chloride were studied by measuring the time-dependent recovery of enzymatic activity. Experiments were carried out in buffer containing concentrations of two "inert" cosolutes, sucrose and Ficoll 70, a sucrose polymer, at concentrations up to 150 g/liter. Data analysis indicates that both cosolutes significantly accelerate the rate of refolding to native or compact near-native conformations, but decrease the fraction of catalytically active enzyme recovered in the limit of long time. According to the simplest model that fits the data, both cosolutes accelerate a competing side reaction yielding inactive compact species. Acceleration of the side reaction by Ficoll is significantly greater than that of sucrose at equal w/v concentrations.

  11. The influence of high dietary protein, energy and mineral intake on deficient young camel (Camelus dromedarius)--II. Changes in mineral status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, B; Saint-Martin, G; Cherrier, R; Ruffa, A

    1992-06-01

    1. Mangrove Avicennia marina is poor in some trace elements such as copper, zinc and manganese. In a trial we used 32 young camels divided into four groups. 2. Groups 1 and 3 were supplemented with copper and zinc in drinking water after 1 month of mangrove feeding. 3. Groups 2 and 3 received concentrate rich in protein and energy. The supplementation was stopped after 2 months. 4. All the camels were deficient in trace elements at the beginning of mineral supplementation. 5. The plasma concentration of copper increased significantly up to normal levels (less than 70 micrograms/100 ml) in energy protein supplemented groups, but the quantity supplied (100 mg of copper sulphate/day) was not sufficient to maintain this level after the end of supplementation. 6. The original zinc deficiency was too severe to observe a significant effect of the mineral supplementation. 7. Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus levels were improved during the supplementation period in protein-energy supplemented groups. 8. A high interaction between mineral absorption and quality of the diet was observed. A well-balanced diet seems essential to avoid deficient mineral status.

  12. Inhibition studies of bacterial, fungal and protozoan β-class carbonic anhydrases with Schiff bases incorporating sulfonamide moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Alothman, Zeid; Monti, Simona Maria; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-08-01

    A series of new Schiff bases derived from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide containing either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic tail, have been investigated as inhibitors of three β-carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from three different microorganisms. Their antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoan activities have been determined against the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the bacterial pathogen Brucella suis and the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani chagasi, responsible for Leishmaniasis. The results of these inhibition studies show that all three enzymes were efficiently inhibited by the Schiff base sulfonamides with KI values in the nanomolar or submicromolar range, depending on the nature of the tail, coming from the aryl/heteroaryl moiety present in the starting aldehyde employed in the synthesis. Furthermore, the compounds hereby investigated revealed high β-CAs selectivity over the ubiquitous, physiologically relevant and off-target human isoforms (CA I and II) and to be more potent as antifungal and antibacterial than as antiprotozoan potential drugs.

  13. Cloning, characterization and sulfonamide inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the living fossil sponge Astrosclera willeyana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohradanova, Anna; Vullo, Daniela; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Jackson, Daniel J; Wörheide, Gert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-02-15

    The α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) Astrosclerin-3 previously isolated from the living fossil sponge Astrosclera willeyana (Jackson et al., Science 2007, 316, 1893), was cloned, kinetically characterized and investigated for its inhibition properties with sulfonamides and sulfamates. Astrosclerin-3 has a high catalytic activity for the CO(2) hydration reaction to bicarbonate and protons (k(cat) of 9.0×10(5) s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m) of 1.1×10(8) M(-1) × s(-1)), and is inhibited by various aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and sulfamates with inhibition constants in the range of 2.9 nM-8.85 μM. Astrosclerin, and the human isoform CA II, display similar kinetic properties and affinities for sulfonamide inhibitors, despite more than 550 million years of independent evolution. Because Astrosclerin-3 is involved in biocalcification, the inhibitors characterized here may be used to gain insights into such processes in other metazoans.

  14. Intrinsic Thermodynamics and Structures of 2,4- and 3,4-Substituted Fluorinated Benzenesulfonamides Binding to Carbonic Anhydrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrienė, Asta; Smirnov, Alexey; Dudutienė, Virginija; Timm, David D; Matulienė, Jurgita; Michailovienė, Vilma; Zakšauskas, Audrius; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas

    2017-01-20

    The goal of rational drug design is to understand structure-thermodynamics correlations in order to predict the chemical structure of a drug that would exhibit excellent affinity and selectivity for a target protein. In this study we explored the contribution of added functionalities of benzenesulfonamide inhibitors to the intrinsic binding affinity, enthalpy, and entropy for recombinant human carbonic anhydrases (CA) CA I, CA II, CA VII, CA IX, CA XII, and CA XIII. The binding enthalpies of compounds possessing similar chemical structures and affinities were found to be very different, spanning a range from -90 to +10 kJ mol(-1) , and are compensated by a similar opposing entropy contribution. The intrinsic parameters of binding were determined by subtracting the linked protonation reactions. The sulfonamide group pKa values of the compounds were measured spectrophotometrically, and the protonation enthalpies were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Herein we describe the development of meta- or ortho-substituted fluorinated benzenesulfonamides toward the highly potent compound 10 h, which exhibits an observed dissociation constant value of 43 pm and an intrinsic dissociation constant value of 1.1 pm toward CA IX, an anticancer target that is highly overexpressed in various tumors. Fluorescence thermal shift assays, ITC, and X-ray crystallography were all applied in this work.

  15. Thermodynamics of binding of a sulfonamide inhibitor to metal-mutated carbonic anhydrase as studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-01

    By affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), the thermodynamic binding constants of a sulfonamide (SA) inhibitor to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and metal mutated variants (M-CAs) were evaluated. 1-(4-Aminosulfonylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate was used as the SA in the electrophoretic buffer for ACE. The Scatchard analysis of the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of native CA on the SA concentration provided the binding constant to be Kb=(2.29±0.05)×10(6) M(-1) (at pH8.4, 25°C). On the other hand, apoCA showed far smaller value [Kb=(3.76±0.14)×10(2) M(-1)], suggesting that the coordination of SA to the Zn(II) center controlled the binding thermodynamics. The ACE of M-CAs showed the same behaviors as native CA but with different Kb values. For example, Co-CA adopting the same tetrahedral coordination geometry as native CA exhibited the largest Kb value [(2.55±0.05)×10(6) M(-1)] among the M-CAs. In contrast, Mn- and Ni-CA, which adopted the octahedral coordination geometry, had Kb values that were about two orders of magnitude lower. Because the hydrophobic cavity of CA around the active center pre-organized the orientation of SA, thereby fixing the ligating NH(-) moiety to the apex of the tetrahedron supported by three basal His3 of CA, metals such as Zn and Co at the center of M-CA gave the most stable CA-SA complex. However, pre-organization was not favored for octahedral geometry. Thus, pre-organization of SA was the key to facilitating the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Zn(II) active center of CA.

  16. Localization of putative carbonic anhydrases in two marine diatoms, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masaaki; Allen, Andrew E; Kikutani, Sae; Endo, Yuri; Bowler, Chris; Matsuda, Yusuke

    2011-09-01

    It is believed that intracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are essential components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in microalgae. In this study, putative CA-encoding genes were identified in the genome sequences of the marine diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Subsequently, the subcellular localizations of the encoded proteins were determined. Nine and thirteen CA sequences were found in the genomes of P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana, respectively. Two of the β-CA genes in P. tricornutum corresponded to ptca1 and ptca2 identified previously. Immunostaining transmission electron microscopy of a PtCA1:YFP fusion expressed in the cells of P. tricornutum clearly showed the localization of PtCA1 within the central part of the pyrenoid structure in the chloroplast. Besides these two β-CA genes, P. tricornutum likely contains five α- and two γ-CA genes, whereas T. pseudonana has three α-, five γ-, four δ-, and one ζ-CA genes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR performed on mRNA from the two diatoms grown in changing light and CO(2) conditions revealed that levels of six putative α- and γ-CA mRNAs in P. tricornutum did not change between cells grown in air-level CO(2) and 5% CO(2). However, mRNA levels of one putative α-CA gene, CA-VII in P. tricornutum, were reduced in the dark compared to that in the light. In T. pseudonana, mRNA accumulation levels of putative α-CA (CA-1), ζ-CA (CA-3) and δ-CA (CA-7) were analyzed and all levels found to be significantly reduced when cells were grown in 0.16% CO(2). Intercellular localizations of eight putative CAs were analyzed by expressing GFP fusion in P. tricornutum and T. pseudonana. In P. tricornutum, CA-I and II localized in the periplastidial compartment, CA-III, VI, VII were found in the chloroplast endoplasmic reticulum, and CA-VIII was localized in the mitochondria. On the other hand, T. pseudonana CA-1 localized in the stroma and CA-3 was found in the periplasm

  17. A physiological role for cyanate-induced carbonic anhydrase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloton, M B; Lamblin, A F; Kozliak, E I; Gerami-Nejad, M; Tu, C; Silverman, D; Anderson, P M; Fuchs, J A

    1993-03-01

    Cyanate induces expression of the cyn operon in Escherichia coli. The cyn operon includes the gene cynS, encoding cyanase, which catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to give ammonia and carbon dioxide. A carbonic anhydrase activity was recently found to be encoded by the cynT gene, the first gene of the cyn operon; it was proposed that carbonic anhydrase prevents depletion of bicarbonate during cyanate decomposition due to loss of CO2 by diffusion out of the cell (M. B. Guilloton, J. J. Korte, A. F. Lamblin, J. A. Fuchs, and P. M. Anderson, J. Biol. Chem. 267:3731-3734, 1992). The function of the product of the third gene of this operon, cynX, is unknown. In the study reported here, the physiological roles of cynT and cynX were investigated by construction of chromosomal mutants in which each of the three genes was rendered inactive. The delta cynT chromosomal mutant expressed an active cyanase but no active carbonic anhydrase. In contrast to the wild-type strain, the growth of the delta cynT strain was inhibited by cyanate, and the mutant strain was unable to degrade cyanate and therefore could not use cyanate as the sole nitrogen source when grown at a partial CO2 pressures (pCO2) of 0.03% (air). At a high pCO2 (3%), however, the delta cynT strain behaved like the wild-type strain; it was significantly less sensitive to the toxic effects of cyanate and could degrade cyanate and use cyanate as the sole nitrogen source for growth. These results are consistent with the proposed function for carbonic anhydrase. The chromosomal mutant carrying cynS::kan expressed induced carbonic anhydrase activity but no active cyanase. The cynS::kan mutant was found to be much less sensitive to cyanate than the delta cynT mutant at a low pCO2, indicating that bicarbonate depletion due to the reaction of bicarbonate with cyanate catalyzed by cyanase is more deleterious to growth than direct inhibition by cyanate. Mutants carrying a nonfunctional cynX gene (cynX::kan and

  18. M-CSF deficiency leads to reduced metallothioneins I and II expression and increased tissue damage in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Poulsen, Christian; Carrasco, Javier

    2002-01-01

    -CSF in neurodegeneration and brain cell death, we have examined the effect of 6-AN on osteopetrotic mice with genetic M-CSF deficiency (op/op mice). The 6-AN-induced degeneration of gray-matter areas was comparable in control and op/op mice, but the numbers of reactive astrocytes, macrophages, and lymphocytes...... in the damaged areas were significantly decreased in op/op mice relative to controls. The levels of oxidative stress (as determined by using immunoreactivity for inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitrotyrosine, and malondialdehyde) and apoptotic cell death (as determined by using TUNEL and immunoreactivity...

  19. Co-production of carbonic anhydrase and phycobiliproteins by Spirulina sp. and Synechococcus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ores, Joana da Costa; Amarante, Marina Campos Assumpção de; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the co-production of the carbonic anhydrase, C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin during cyanobacteria growth. Spirulina sp. LEB 18 demonstrated a high potential for simultaneously obtaining the three products, achieving a carbonic anhydrase (CA) productivity of 0.97U/L/d and the highest C-phycocyanin (PC, 5.9μg/mL/d) and allophycocyanin (APC, 4.3μg/mL/d) productivities. In the extraction study, high extraction yields were obtained from Spirulina using an ultrasonic homogenizer (CA: 25.5U/g; PC: 90mg/g; APC: 70mg/g). From the same biomass, it was possible to obtain three biomolecules that present high industrial value.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  1. Synthesis of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulphonamide derivatives and their inhibition effects on human carbonic anhydrase isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasımoğulları, Rahmi; Bülbül, Metin; Mert, Samet; Güleryüz, Hülya

    2011-04-01

    In this study, some novel inhibitors were synthesised from the further stage reactions of 4-benzoyl-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonyl chloride with 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulphonamide 1 (inhibitor 1). They were characterised by elemental and spectral (¹H NMR, ¹³C NMR, IR) analyses. Human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes (hCA-I and hCA-II) were purified from erythrocyte cells by affinity chromatography. The inhibitory effects of inhibitor 1, acetazolamide (2) and the 11 newly synthesised amides (8-18) on the hydratase and esterase activities of these isoenzymes (hCA-I and hCA-II) were studied in vitro. In relation to these activities, the inhibition equilibrium constants (K(i)) were determined. The K(i) values for the new compounds (8-18) were observed to be well below that of the parent compound inhibitor 1 and were also compared to 2 under the same experimental conditions. The comparison of the newly synthesised amides to inhibitor 1 and to 2 indicated that the new derivatives preferentially inhibited hCA-II and were more potent inhibitors of hCA-II than the parent inhibitor 1 and 2.

  2. The evolution of metazoan α-carbonic anhydrases and their roles in calcium carbonate biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roy, Nathalie; Jackson, Daniel J.; Marie, Benjamin; Ramos-Silva, Paula; Marin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) superfamily is a class of ubiquitous metallo-enzymes that catalyse the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. The ?-CA family, present in all metazoan clades, is a key enzyme involved in a wide range of physiological functions including pH regulation, respiration, photosynthesis, and biocalcification. This paper reviews the evolution of the ?-CA family, with an emphasis on metazoan ?-CA members involved in biocalcification. Phylogenetic analyses reveal...

  3. Targeting carbonic anhydrase to treat diabetic retinopathy: Emerging evidences and encouraging results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiwei, Zhang [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hu, Renming, E-mail: taylorzww@gmail.com [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, HuaShan Hospital, Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 12 Wulumuqi Road, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2009-12-18

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of vision loss among working-age populations in developed countries. Current treatment options are limited to tight glycemic, blood pressure control and destructive laser surgery. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a group of enzymes involving in the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Emerging evidences reveal CA inhibitors hold the promise for the treatment of DR. This article summarizes encouraging results from clinical and animal studies, and reviews the possible mechanisms.

  4. Correlation of electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions and fluorescence quenching with the aggregation of native LHC II and chlorophyll deficient mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Pen-Nan; Bode, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Wilk, Laura [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hafi, Nour [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Walla, Peter J., E-mail: pwalla@gwdg.de [Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Department for Biophysical Chemistry, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of Spectroscopy and Photochemical Kinetics, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-07-19

    The aggregation dependent correlation between fluorescence quenching and the electronic carotenoid-chlorophyll interactions, {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl}, as measured by comparing chlorophyll fluorescence observed after two- and one-photon excitation, has been investigated using native LHC II samples as well as mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. For native LHC II the same linear correlation between {phi}{sub Coupling}{sup Car S{sub 1}-Chl} and the fluorescence quenching was observed as previously reported for the pH and Zea-dependent quenching of LHC II . In order to elucidate which carotenoid-chlorophyll pair might dominate this correlation we also investigated the mutants lacking Chl 2 and Chl 13. However, also with these mutants the same linear correlation as for native LHC II was observed. This provides indication that these two chlorophylls play only a minor role for the observed effects. Nevertheless, we also conclude that this does not exclude that their neighboured carotenoids, lutein 1 and neoxanthin, might interact electronically with other chlorophylls close by.

  5. Phloretin promotes osteoclast apoptosis in murine macrophages and inhibits estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Lye; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Min-Kyung; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-09-15

    Bone-remodeling imbalance induced by increased osteoclast formation and bone resorption is known to cause skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis. The reduction of estrogen levels at menopause is one of the strongest risk factors developing postmenopausal osteoporosis. This study investigated osteoprotective effects of the dihydrochalcone phloretin found in apple tree leaves on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 female mice as a model for postmenopausal osteoporosis. OVX demoted bone mineral density (BMD) of mouse femurs, reduced serum 17β-estradiol level and enhanced serum receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin ratio with uterine atrophy. Oral administration of 10 mg/kg phloretin to OVX mice for 8 weeks improved such effects, compared to sham-operated mice. Phloretin attenuated TRAP activity and cellular expression of β3 integrin and carbonic anhydrase II augmented in femoral bone tissues of OVX mice. This study further examined that osteogenic activity of phloretin in RANKL-differentiated Raw 264.7 macrophages into mature osteoclasts. Phloretin at 1-20 μM stimulated Smac expression and capase-3 activation concurrently with nuclear fragmentation of multi-nucleated osteoclasts, indicating that this compound promoted osteoclast apoptosis. Consistently, phloretin enhanced bcl-2 induction but diminished bax expression. Furthermore, phloretin activated ASK-1-diverged JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in mature osteoclasts, whereas it dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK. Therefore, phloretin manipulated ASK-1-MAPK signal transduction leading to transcription of apoptotic genes. Phloretin was effective in preventing estrogen deficiency-induced osteoclastogenic resorption.

  6. Structure and Metal Exchange in the Cadmium Carbonic anhydrase of Marine Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,Y.; Feng, l.; Jeffrey, P.; Shi, Y.; Morel, F.

    2008-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase, a zinc enzyme found in organisms from all kingdoms, catalyses the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide and is used for inorganic carbon acquisition by phytoplankton. In the oceans, where zinc is nearly depleted, diatoms use cadmium as a catalytic metal atom in cadmium carbonic anhydrase (CDCA). Here we report the crystal structures of CDCA in four distinct forms: cadmium-bound, zinc-bound, metal-free and acetate-bound. Despite lack of sequence homology, CDCA is a structural mimic of a functional {beta}-carbonic anhydrase dimer, with striking similarity in the spatial organization of the active site residues. CDCA readily exchanges cadmium and zinc at its active site--an apparently unique adaptation to oceanic life that is explained by a stable opening of the metal coordinating site in the absence of metal. Given the central role of diatoms in exporting carbon to the deep sea, their use of cadmium in an enzyme critical for carbon acquisition establishes a remarkable link between the global cycles of cadmium and carbon.

  7. Screening and docking studies of natural phenolic inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Huo-Qiang; PAN Xu-Lin; JI Chang-Jiu; ZENG Guang-Zhi; JIANG Li-Hua; FU Xiang; LIU Ji-Kai; HAO Xiao-Jiang; ZHANG Ying-Jun; TAN Ning-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ (CAⅡ) is an Important enzyme complex with Zn2+, which is involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as calcification, glaucoma and tumorigenicity. In order to search for novel inhibitors of CA Ⅱ, inhibition assay of carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ was performed, by which seven natural phenolic compounds, including four phenolics (grifolln, 4-O-methyl-grifolic acid, grifolic acid, and isovanillic acid) and three flavones (eriodictyol, quercetin and puerin A), showed in-hibitory activities against CAⅡ with IC50s in the range of 6.37-71.73 μmol/L. Grifolic acid is the most active one with IC50 of 6.37 μmol/L. These seven phenolic compounds were proved to be novel natural carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ inhibitors, which were obtained in flexible docking study with GOLD 3.0 soft-ware. Results indicated that the aliphatic chain and polar groups of hydroxyl and carboxyl are impor-tant to their inhibitory activities, providing a new insight into study on CA Ⅱ potent inhibitors.

  8. Screening and docking studies of natural phenolic inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ (CAⅡ) is an important enzyme complex with Zn2+,which is involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as calcification, glaucoma and tumorigenicity. In order to search for novel inhibitors of CAⅡ, inhibition assay of carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ was performed, by which seven natural phenolic compounds, including four phenolics (grifolin, 4-O-methyl-grifolic acid, grifolic acid, and isovanillic acid) and three flavones (eriodictyol, quercetin and puerin A), showed in-hibitory activities against CAⅡ with IC50s in the range of 6.37-71.73 μmol/L. Grifolic acid is the most active one with IC50 of 6.37 μmol/L. These seven phenolic compounds were proved to be novel natural carbonic anhydrase Ⅱ inhibitors, which were obtained in flexible docking study with GOLD 3.0 soft-ware. Results indicated that the aliphatic chain and polar groups of hydroxyl and carboxyl are impor-tant to their inhibitory activities, providing a new insight into study on CA Ⅱ potent inhibitors.

  9. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Honghong

    2009-12-13

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere.

  10. Stability of interceptive/corrective orthodontic treatment for tooth ankylosis and Class II mandibular deficiency: A case report with 10 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the treatment of a 8-year-old boy with tooth ankylosis in teeth 85 and Class II division 1 malocclusion and to report a 10-year follow-up result. The patient was initially treated with a sagittal removable appliance, followed by an eruption guidance appliance and braces. The interceptive orthodontic treatment performed to recover the space lost by ankylosis of a deciduous tooth allowed a spontaneous eruption and prevented progression of the problem. The use of an eruption-guidance appliance corrected the dentoskeletal Class II, thus improving the patient's appearance. Besides the treatment producing a good occlusal relationship with the Class I molar, the correction of the overjet and overbite was stable over a ten-year period.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits deficient biofilm formation in the absence of class II and III ribonucleotide reductases due to hindered anaerobic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eCrespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments.Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II and III. Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development.In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the

  13. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  14. Folate Deficiency Triggered Apoptosis of Synoviocytes: Role of Overproduction of Reactive Oxygen Species Generated via NADPH Oxidase/Mitochondrial Complex II and Calcium Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Ming; Wu, Jin-Yi; Huang, Chin-Chin; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chuang, Yi-Wen; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Kai-Hua; Hong, Chang-Zern; Yeh, Rang-Hui; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2016-01-01

    Despite a plethora of literature has documented that osteoarthritis (OA) is veritably associated with oxidative stress-mediated chondrocyte death and matrix degradation, yet the possible involvement of synoviocyte abnormality as causative factor of OA has not been thoroughly investigated. For this reason, we conduct the current studies to insight into how synoviocytes could respond to an episode of folate-deprived (FD) condition. First, when HIG-82 synoviocytes were cultivated under FD condition, a time-dependent growth impediment was observed and the demise of these cells was demonstrated to be apoptotic in nature mediated through FD-evoked overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and drastically released of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentrations. Next, we uncovered that FD-evoked ROS overproduction could only be strongly suppressed by either mitochondrial complex II inhibitors (TTFA and carboxin) or NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitors (AEBSF and apocynin), but not by mitochondrial complex I inhibitor (rotenone) and mitochondrial complex III inhibitor (antimycin A). Interestingly, this selective inhibition of FD-evoked ROS by mitochondrial complex II and NOX inhibitors was found to correlate excellently with the suppression of cytosolic Ca2+ release and reduced the magnitude of the apoptotic TUNEL-positive cells. Taken together, we present the first evidence here that FD-triggered ROS overproduction in synoviocytes is originated from mitochondrial complex II and NOX. Both elevated ROS in tandem with cytosolic Ca2+ overload serve as final arbitrators for apoptotic lethality of synoviocytes cultivated under FD condition. Thus, folate supplementation may be beneficial to patients with OA.

  15. A sucrose-binding site provides a lead towards an isoform-specific inhibitor of the cancer-associated enzyme carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard, Melissa A; Aggarwal, Mayank; Mahon, Brian P; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) isoform IX (CA IX) is an extracellular zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), thereby playing a role in pH regulation. The majority of normal functioning cells exhibit low-level expression of CA IX. However, in cancer cells CA IX is upregulated as a consequence of a metabolic transition known as the Warburg effect. The upregulation of CA IX for cancer progression has drawn interest in it being a potential therapeutic target. CA IX is a transmembrane protein, and its purification, yield and crystallization have proven challenging to structure-based drug design, whereas the closely related cytosolic soluble isoform CA II can be expressed and crystallized with ease. Therefore, we have utilized structural alignments and site-directed mutagenesis to engineer a CA II that mimics the active site of CA IX. In this paper, the X-ray crystal structure of this CA IX mimic in complex with sucrose is presented and has been refined to a resolution of 1.5 Å, an Rcryst of 18.0% and an Rfree of 21.2%. The binding of sucrose at the entrance to the active site of the CA IX mimic, and not CA II, in a non-inhibitory mechanism provides a novel carbohydrate moiety binding site that could be further exploited to design isoform-specific inhibitors of CA IX.

  16. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition.

  17. Carbonic Anhydrase and Zinc in Plant Physiology Anhidrasa Carbónica y Zinc en Fisiología Vegetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Jacqueline Escudero-Almanza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase (CA (EC: 2.4.1.1 catalyzes the rapid conversion of carbon dioxide plus water into a proton and the bicarbonate ion (HCO3- that can be found in prokaryotes and higher organisms; it is represented by four different families. Carbonic anhydrase is a metalloenzyme that requires Zn as a cofactor and is involved in diverse biological processes including pH regulation, CO2 transfer, ionic exchange, respiration, CO2 photosynthetic fixation, and stomatal closure. Therefore, the review includes relevant aspects about CA morphology, oligomerization, and structural differences in the active site. On the other hand, we consider the general characteristics of Zn, its geometry, reactions, and physiology. We then consider the CA catalysis mechanism that is carried out by the metal ion and where Zn acts as a cofactor. Zinc deficiency can inhibit growth and protein synthesis, and there is evidence that it reduces the CA content in some plants, which is a relationship addressed in this review. In leaves, CA represents 20.1% of total soluble protein, while it is the second most abundant in the chloroplast after ribulose 1,5-disphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. This facilitates the supply of CO2 to the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C4 and CAM plants and RuBisCO in C3 plants.La anhidrasa carbónica (CA (EC: 4.2.1.1 cataliza la conversión rápida de dióxido de carbono más agua en un protón y el ion bicarbonato (HCO3-; la cual puede encontrarse en procariotas y en organismos superiores y está representada por cuatro familias distintas. La CA es una metaloenzima que requiere Zn como cofactor y está implicada en diversos procesos biológicos, incluyendo la regulación del pH, la transferencia de CO2, intercambio iónico, la respiración, la fijación fotosintética de CO2, y el cierre estomático. Por lo cual, la revisión incluye aspectos relevantes sobre la morfología de laAC, su oligomerización y diferencias estructurales en el

  18. Miopatia por deficiência de succinato-citocromo-C-redutase: possível defeito no complexo II da cadeia respiratória

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato do caso de mulher de 24 anos de idade que apresentava astenia desde a puberdade, com agravamento nos últimos anos, cuja biópsia muscular revelou grande acúmulo de mitocôndrias. As dosagens dos enzimas mitocondriais mostrou importante redução da succinato-citocromo-C-redutase, sugerindo defeito na cadeia respiratória a nível do complexo II. Medicada com altas doses de vitamina C e K, melhorou da força muscular. São feitas considerações a respeito das principais síndromes com miopatias mitocondriais, bem como a respeito dos métodos de investigação em defeitos da cadeia respiratória.

  19. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    -negative diagnoses of VLCADD in asymptomatic newborn babies. In view of the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation in this disorder, the information derived from mutational analysis can be helpful in designing the appropriate follow-up and therapeutic regime for these patients.......We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood...... samples taken at age 48-72 h were diagnostic whereas repeat samples at an older age were normal in 4/6 babies. Urine analysis was normal in 5/5. We conclude that the timing of blood sampling for newborn screening is important and that it is important to perform mutation analysis to avoid false...

  20. Carbonic anhydrase III regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitterberger, Maria C. [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kim, Geumsoo [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8012 (United States); Rostek, Ursula [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Levine, Rodney L. [Laboratory of Biochemistry, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-8012 (United States); Zwerschke, Werner, E-mail: werner.zwerschke@oeaw.ac.at [Cell Metabolism and Differentiation Research Group, Institute for Biomedical Aging Research of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII) is an isoenzyme of the CA family. Because of its low specific anhydrase activity, physiological functions in addition to hydrating CO{sub 2} have been proposed. CAIII expression is highly induced in adipogenesis and CAIII is the most abundant protein in adipose tissues. The function of CAIII in both preadipocytes and adipocytes is however unknown. In the present study we demonstrate that adipogenesis is greatly increased in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from CAIII knockout (KO) mice, as demonstrated by a greater than 10-fold increase in the induction of fatty acid-binding protein-4 (FABP4) and increased triglyceride formation in CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs compared with CAIII{sup +/+} cells. To address the underlying mechanism, we investigated the expression of the two adipogenic key regulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-{alpha}. We found a considerable (approximately 1000-fold) increase in the PPAR{gamma}2 expression in the CAIII{sup -/-} MEFs. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous CAIII in NIH 3T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in a significant increase in the induction of PPAR{gamma}2 and FABP4. When both CAIII and PPAR{gamma}2 were knocked down, FABP4 was not induced. We conclude that down-regulation of CAIII in preadipocytes enhances adipogenesis and that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenic differentiation which acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discover a novel function of Carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that CAIII is a regulator of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that CAIII acts at the level of PPAR{gamma}2 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data contribute to a better understanding of the role of CAIII in fat tissue.

  1. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. METHODS: Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. RESULTS: In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  2. Quantification of carbonic anhydrase gene expression in ventricle of hypertrophic and failing human heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Bernardo V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase enzymes (CA catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate in mammalian cells. Trans-membrane transport of CA-produced bicarbonate contributes significantly to cellular pH regulation. A body of evidence implicates pH-regulatory processes in the hypertrophic growth pathway characteristic of hearts as they fail. In particular, Na+/H+ exchange (NHE activation is pro-hypertrophic and CA activity activates NHE. Recently Cardrase (6-ethoxyzolamide, a CA inhibitor, was found to prevent and revert agonist-stimulated cardiac hypertrophy (CH in cultured cardiomyocytes. Our goal thus was to determine whether hypertrophied human hearts have altered expression of CA isoforms. Methods We measured CA expression in hypertrophied human hearts to begin to examine the role of carbonic anhydrase in progression of human heart failure. Ventricular biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery (CS, n = 14, or heart transplantation (HT, n = 13. CS patients presented mild/moderate concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and normal right ventricles, with preserved ventricular function; ejection fractions were ~60%. Conversely, HT patients with failing hearts presented CH or ventricular dilation accompanied by ventricular dysfunction and EF values of 20%. Non-hypertrophic, non-dilated ventricular samples served as controls. Results Expression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP were markers of CH. Hypertrophic ventricles presented increased expression of CAII, CAIV, ANP, and BNP, mRNA levels, which increased in failing hearts, measured by quantitative real-time PCR. CAII, CAIV, and ANP protein expression also increased approximately two-fold in hypertrophic/dilated ventricles. Conclusions These results, combined with in vitro data that CA inhibition prevents and reverts CH, suggest that increased carbonic anhydrase expression is a prognostic molecular marker of cardiac

  3. The selective expression of carbonic anhydrase genes of Aspergillus nidulans in response to changes in mineral nutrition and CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Dong, Cuiling; Liu, Fanghua

    2016-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays an important role in the formation and evolution of life. However, to our knowledge, there has been no report on CA isoenzyme function differentiation in fungi. Two different CA gene sequences in Aspergillus nidulans with clear genetic background provide us a favorable basis for studying function differentiation of CA isoenzymes. Heterologously expressed CA1 was used to test its weathering ability on silicate minerals and real-time quantitative PCR was used to detect expression of the CA1 and CA2 genes at different CO2 concentrations and in the presence of different potassium sources. The northern blot method was applied to confirm the result of CA1 gene expression. Heterologously expressed CA1 significantly promoted dissolution of biotite and wollastonite, and CA1 gene expression increased significantly in response to soluble K-deficiency. The northern blot test further showed that CA1 participated in K-feldspar weathering. In addition, the results showed that CA2 was primary involved in adapting to CO2 concentration change. Taken together, A. nidulans can choose different CA to meet their survival needs, which imply that some environmental microbes have evolved different CAs to adapt to changes in CO2 concentration and acquire mineral nutrition so that they can better adapt to environmental changes. Inversely, their adaption may impact mineral weathering and/or CO2 concentration, and even global change.

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase as Pollution Biomarker: An Ancient Enzyme with a New Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifone Schettino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of cellular and sub-cellular responses to chemical contaminants (referred to as biomarkers in living organisms represents a recent tool in environmental monitoring. The review focuses on carbonic anhydrase, a ubiquitous metalloenzyme which plays key roles in a wide variety of physiological processes involving CO2 and HCO3−. In the last decade a number of studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of this enzyme to pollutants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals in both humans and wildlife. The review analyses these studies and discusses the potentiality of this enzyme as novel biomarker in environmental monitoring and assessment.

  5. Carbonic Anhydrase Enhanced Carbon Capture: Kinetic Measurements and Pilot Plant Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: MEA (a primary amine), AMP (a sterically hindered primary amine), MDEA (a tertiary amine) and K2CO3 a carbonate salt solution were tested...... in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt%. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined in a temperature range from 298 to 328 K and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic...

  6. The Structure of Carbonic Anhydrase IX Is Adapted for Low-pH Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Brian P.; Bhatt, Avni; Socorro, Lilien; Driscoll, Jenna M.; Okoh, Cynthia; Lomelino, Carrie L.; Mboge, Mam Y.; Kurian, Justin J.; Tu, Chingkuang; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Frost, Susan C; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase IX (hCA IX) expression in many cancers is associated with hypoxic tumors and poor patient outcome. Inhibitors of hCA IX have been used as anticancer agents with some entering Phase I clinical trials. hCA IX is transmembrane protein whose catalytic domain faces the extracellular tumor milieu, which is typically associated with an acidic microenvironment. Here, we show that the catalytic domain of hCA IX (hCA IX-c) exhibits the necessary biochemical and biophysical prop...

  7. Enhanced protective efficacy against tuberculosis provided by a recombinant urease deficient BCG expressing heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II having PEST sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Mukai, Tetsu; Mitarai, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Saburo; Makino, Masahiko

    2016-12-07

    Enhancement of the T cell-stimulating ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG) is necessary to develop an effective tuberculosis vaccine. For this purpose, we introduced the PEST-HSP70-major membrane protein-II (MMPII)-PEST fusion gene into ureC-gene depleted recombinant (r) BCG to produce BCG-PEST. The PEST sequence is involved in the proteasomal processing of antigens. BCG-PEST secreted the PEST-HSP70-MMPII-PEST fusion protein and more efficiently activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in terms of phenotypic changes and cytokine productions than an empty-vector-introduced BCG or HSP70-MMPII gene-introduced ureC gene-depleted BCG (BCG-DHTM). Autologous human naïve CD8(+) T cells and naïve CD4(+) T cells were effectively activated by BCG-PEST and produced IFN-γ in an antigen-specific manner through DCs. These T cell activations were closely associated with phagosomal maturation and intraproteasomal protein degradation in antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, BCG-PEST produced long-lasting memory-type T cells in C57BL/6 mice more efficiently than control rBCGs. Moreover, a single subcutaneous injection of BCG-PEST more effectively reduced the multiplication of subsequent aerosol-challenged Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the standard H37Rv strain and clinically isolated Beijing strain in the lungs than control rBCGs. The vaccination effect of BCG-PEST lasted for at least 6months. These results indicate that BCG-PEST may be able to efficiently control the spread of tuberculosis in human.

  8. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  9. Evaluation of Condylar Position after Orthognathic Surgery for Treatment of Class II Vertical Maxillary Excess and Mandibular Deficiency by Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Tabrizi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: In orthognathic surgeries, proper condylar position is one of the most important factors in postoperative stability. Knowing the condylar movement after orthognathic surgery can help preventing postoperative instabilities. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the condylar positional changes after Le Fort I maxillary superior repositioning along with mandibular advancement by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 22 subjects who had class II skeletal malocclusion along with vertical maxillary excess. Subjects underwent maxillary superior repositioning (Le Fort I osteotomy along with mandibular advancement. The CBCT images were taken a couple of days before the surgery (T0, and one month (T1 and 9 months (T2 after the surgery. The condyles positions were determined from the most superior point of the condyle to three distances including the deepest point of the glenoid fossa, the most anterior-inferior point of the articular eminence, and the most superior point of the external auditory meatus in the sagittal plane. Results: The mean mandibular advancement was 4.33±2.1 mm and the mean maxillary superior repositioning was 4.66±0.3 mm. The condyles displaced inferiorly, anteriorly, and laterally between T0 and T1. They were repositioned approximately in the initial position in T2. No correlation was observed between the mandibular and maxillary movement and the condylar positions. Conclusion: The condyles displaced in the inferior-anterior-lateral position one month after the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for mandibular advancement in combination with the maxillary Le Fort I superior repositioning. It seems that the condyles adapted approximately in their initial position nine months after the surgeries. Keywords ● Mandible ● Condyle ● CBCT ● Sagittal Osteotomy ● Vertical Maxillary Excess

  10. Evaluation of Condylar Position after Orthognathic Surgery for Treatment of Class II Vertical Maxillary Excess and Mandibular Deficiency by Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Reza; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Bahramnejad, Emad; Arabion, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: In orthognathic surgeries, proper condylar position is one of the most important factors in postoperative stability. Knowing the condylar movement after orthognathic surgery can help preventing postoperative instabilities. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the condylar positional changes after Le Fort I maxillary superior repositioning along with mandibular advancement by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 22 subjects who had class II skeletal malocclusion along with vertical maxillary excess. Subjects underwent maxillary superior repositioning (Le Fort I osteotomy) along with mandibular advancement. The CBCT images were taken a couple of days before the surgery (T0), and one month (T1) and 9 months (T2) after the surgery. The condyles positions were determined from the most superior point of the condyle to three distances including the deepest point of the glenoid fossa, the most anterior-inferior point of the articular eminence, and the most superior point of the external auditory meatus in the sagittal plane. Results: The mean mandibular advancement was 4.33±2.1 mm and the mean maxillary superior repositioning was 4.66±0.3 mm. The condyles displaced inferiorly, anteriorly, and laterally between T0 and T1. They were repositioned approximately in the initial position in T2. No correlation was observed between the mandibular and maxillary movement and the condylar positions. Conclusion: The condyles displaced in the inferior-anterior-lateral position one month after the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for mandibular advancement in combination with the maxillary Le Fort I superior repositioning. It seems that the condyles adapted approximately in their initial position nine months after the surgeries. PMID:27942547

  11. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin deficiency anemia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vitamin deficiency anemia is a lack of healthy red ... you have lower than normal amounts of certain vitamins. Vitamins linked to vitamin deficiency anemia include folate, ...

  12. Zinc Transfer Kinetics of Metallothioneins and Their Fragmentswith Apo-carbonic Anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG, Zhong-Xian; LIU, Fang; ZHENG, Qi; YU, Wen-Hao

    2001-01-01

    Tne zinc transfer reactions from Zn7-MT-I, Zn7-MT-Ⅱ, Zn4α fragment (MT-I) and Zn4-α fragment (MT-Ⅱ) to apo-carbonic anhydrase have been studied. In each reaction, no more than one zinc ion per molecule is involved in metal transfer.Zn7-MT-I and Zn7-MT-Ⅱ donate zinc to apo-carbonic anhydrase and de novo constitute it at a comparable efficiency,while Zn7-MT-Ⅱ exhibits a little faster rate. Surprisingiy,Zinc is released from Zn4-α fragment (MT-Ⅱ) with a much faster rate than from Zn4-α fragment (MT-I), whose rate is close to that of Zn7-MT-I. The reason for the difference is still unknown. Introducing complex compounds into this system may give rise to an effect on the reaction. The transfer from Zn7-MT-Ⅱ in the presence of reduced glutathione shows little difference compare to the control, suggesting that the reduced glutathione is not involved in zinc transfer process. However,glutathione disulfide does accelerate this zinc transfer reaction remarkably, indicating that the oxidative factors contribute to zinc rlease from metallothioneins.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase in calcified endoskeleton: novel activity in biocalcification in alcyonarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a key enzyme in the chemical reaction of living organisms and has been found to be associated with calcification in a number of invertebrates including calcareous sponges, but until now no direct evidence has been advanced to show CA activity in alcyonarian corals. However, it is essential to understand the role of CA in the process of biocalcification in alcyonarian. Here we describe the novel activity of CA and its relationship to the formation of calcified hard tissues in alcyonarian coral, Lobophytum crassum. We find that two CA proteins, which were partially purified by electro-elution treatment, can control the morphology of CaCO(3) crystals and one of them is potentially involved in the process of biocalcification. Previously, we isolated CA from the total extract of alcyonarian, and further, we report here a single protein, which has both calcium-binding and CA activities and is responsible for CaCO(3) nucleation and crystal growth. This matrix protein inhibited the precipitation of CaCO(3) from a saturated solution containing CaCl(2) and NaHCO(3), indicating that it can act as a negative regulator for calcification in the sclerites of alcyonarians. The effect of an inhibitor on the enzyme activity was also examined. These findings strongly support the idea that carbonic anhydrase domain in alcyonarian is involved in the calcification process. Our observations strongly suggest that the matrix protein in alcyonarian coral is not only a structural protein but also a catalyst.

  14. Biochemistry and physiology of the β class carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R Siva Sai; Hendrick, William; Correll, Jared B; Patterson, Andrew D; Melville, Stephen B; Ferry, James G

    2013-05-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13, the only carbonic anhydrase encoded in the genome, was characterized both biochemically and physiologically. Heterologously produced and purified Cpb was shown to belong to the type I subclass of the β class, the first β class enzyme investigated from a strictly anaerobic species of the domain Bacteria. Kinetic analyses revealed a two-step, ping-pong, zinc-hydroxide mechanism of catalysis with Km and kcat/Km values of 3.1 mM CO₂ and 4.8 × 10⁶ s⁻¹ M⁻¹, respectively. Analyses of a cpb deletion mutant of C. perfringens strain HN13 showed that Cpb is strictly required for growth when cultured in semidefined medium and an atmosphere without CO₂. The growth of the mutant was the same as that of the parent wild-type strain when cultured in nutrient-rich media with or without CO₂ in the atmosphere, although elimination of glucose resulted in decreased production of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The results suggest a role for Cpb in anaplerotic CO₂ fixation reactions by supplying bicarbonate to carboxylases. Potential roles in competitive fitness are discussed.

  15. Toxicity and Physiological Actions of Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors to Aedes aegypti and Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena A. M. Francis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological role of carbonic anhydrases in pH and ion regulation is crucial to insect survival. We examined the toxic and neurophysiological effects of five carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs against Aedes aegypti. The 24 h larvicidal toxicities followed this rank order of potency: dichlorphenamide > methazolamide > acetazolamide = brinzolamide = dorzolamide. Larvicidal activity increased modestly in longer exposures, and affected larvae showed attenuated responses to probing without overt tremors, hyperexcitation, or convulsions. Acetazolamide and dichlorphenamide were toxic to adults when applied topically, but were of low potency and had an incomplete effect (<50% at 300 ng/mosquito even after injection. Dichlorphenamide was also the most toxic compound when fed to adult mosquitoes, and they displayed loss of posture and occasionally prolonged fluttering of the wings. Co-exposure with 500 ng of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO increased the toxicity of dichlorphenamide ca. two-fold in feeding assays, indicating that low toxicity was not related to oxidative metabolism. Dichlorphenamide showed mild depolarizing and nerve discharge actions on insect neuromuscular and central nervous systems, respectively. These effects were increased in low buffer salines, indicating they were apparently related to loss of pH control in these tissues. Overall, sulfonamides displayed weak insecticidal properties on Aedes aegypti and are weak lead compounds.

  16. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields affect lipid-linked carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Pepe, Isidoro Mario; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2011-06-01

    In the last years, the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on the activity of different enzymes were investigated. Only the membrane-anchored enzymes did decrease their activity, up to 50%. In this work, the effect of ELF-EMF on bovine lung membrane carbonic anhydrase (CA) were studied. Carbonic anhydrases are a family of 14 zinc-containing isozymes catalyzing the reversible reaction: CO(2)+H(2)O = HCO(3)(- )+H(+). CA differ in catalytic activity and subcellular localization. CA IV, IX, XII, XIV, and XV are membrane bound. In particular, CA IV, which is expressed in the lung, is glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol-linked to the membrane, therefore it was a candidate to inhibition by ELF-EMF. Exposure to the membranes to a field of 75 Hz frequency and different amplitudes caused CA activity to a reproducible decrease in enzymatic activity by 17% with a threshold of about 0.74 mT. The decrease in enzymatic activity was independent of the time of permanence in the field and was completely reversible. When the source of enzyme was solubilized with Triton, the field lost its effect on CA enzymatic activity, suggesting a crucial role of the membrane, as well as of the particular linkage of the enzyme to it, in determining the conditions for CA inactivation. Results are discussed in terms of the possible physiologic effects of CA inhibition in target organs.

  17. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  18. Indomethacin lowers optic nerve oxygen tension and reduces the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibition and carbon dioxide breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T; Stefánsson, E

    2004-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important in blood flow regulation. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) breathing and carbonic anhydrase inhibition increase the oxygen tension in the retina and optic nerve. To study the mechanism of this effect and the role of cyclo-oxygenase in the regulation of optic nerve oxygen tensio...

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cystic Macular Lesions in Children With X-Linked Juvenile Retinoschisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, S.K.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Blanc, L.M.P. le; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Jong, E.K.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known regarding the therapeutic effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) in the management of cystic macular lesions in children with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) despite the fact that this disease often manifests during childhood. Therefore, our goal was to determ

  20. Colocalization of carbonic anhydrase 9 expression and cell proliferation in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, I.J.; Marres, H.A.M.; Wijffels, K.I.E.M.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Peters, J.P.W.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Oosterwijk, E.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor cells undergo a variety of biological changes under sustained hypoxic conditions, allowing cells to survive and retain their clonogenic potential. The purpose of this study is to relate the expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) to the uptake of iododeoxyuridine (

  1. Update and critical appraisal of combined timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the effect on ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Adam M; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Rusia, Deepam; Williamson, Kathleen M; Shoshani, Yochai

    2010-04-26

    Topical hypotensive therapy with both timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors has been shown to be efficacious at reducing intraocular pressure. Many prospective studies have also suggested that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors augment ocular blood flow and vascular regulation independent of their hypotensive effects. Although consistent in their findings, these studies must be cautiously interpreted due to the limitations of study design and specific blood flow imaging modalities. The purpose of this review is to appraise and critically evaluate the current body of literature investigating the effects of combined treatment with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol in patients with glaucoma with respect to ocular blood flow, visual function, and optic nerve head structure.

  2. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anouk de Bruyn; Yves Jacquemyn; Kristof Kinget; François Eyskens

    2015-01-01

    We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, su...

  3. Responses of Legumes to Phosphorus Deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus deficiency is a universal problem in most world soils. Furthermore, of all nutrients, shortage of phosphorus has the biggest impact on legumes, therefore, lots of studies were carried out for identifying responses of legumes to shortage of phosphorus. They concluded that to maintain improved growth under phosphorus deficiency conditions plants develop two major mechanisms: (i) Phosphorus acquisition (root morphology, root exudation and phosphorus uptake mechanisms), (ii) Phosphorus utilization (internal mechanisms associated with better use of absorbed phosphorus at cellular level). The aim of this brief review is to elucidate root morphological changes and rhizophere acidification to phosphorus deficiency.

  4. Update and critical appraisal of combined timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and the effect on ocular blood flow in glaucoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Moss

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Adam M Moss, Alon Harris, Brent Siesky, Deepam Rusia, Kathleen M Williamson, Yochai ShoshaniDepartment of Ophthalmology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USAAbstract: Topical hypotensive therapy with both timolol and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors has been shown to be efficacious at reducing intraocular pressure. Many prospective studies have also suggested that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors augment ocular blood flow and vascular regulation independent of their hypotensive effects. Although consistent in their findings, these studies must be cautiously interpreted due to the limitations of study design and specific blood flow imaging modalities. The purpose of this review is to appraise and critically evaluate the current body of literature investigating the effects of combined treatment with topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors and timolol in patients with glaucoma with respect to ocular blood flow, visual function, and optic nerve head structure.Keywords: ocular blood flow, carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, timolol, glaucoma, visual function, optic nerve head

  5. Cloning, characterization, and sulfonamide and thiol inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Capaci Rodrigues, Giseli; Scozzafava, Andrea; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Parkkila, Seppo; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-02-28

    An α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has been identified, cloned, and characterized from the unicellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The enzyme (TcCA) has a very high catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, being similar kinetically to the human (h) isoform hCA II, although it is devoid of the His64 proton shuttle. A large number of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and some 5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazoles were investigated as TcCA inhibitors. The aromatic sulfonamides were weak inhibitors (K(I) values of 192 nM to 84 μM), whereas some heterocyclic compounds inhibited the enzyme with K(I) values in the range 61.6-93.6 nM. The thiols were the most potent in vitro inhibitors (K(I) values of 21.1-79.0 nM), and some of them also inhibited the epimastigotes growth of two T. cruzi strains in vivo.

  6. Effect of egg turning and incubation time on carbonic anhydrase gene expression in the blastoderm of the Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, P; Sugden, D; Baggott, G K

    2008-09-01

    1. The gene expression of carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme for the production of sub-embryonic fluid (SEF), was assessed in turned and unturned eggs of the Japanese quail. The plasma membrane-associated isoforms CA IV, CA IX, CA XII, CA XIV, and the cytoplasmic isoform CA II, were investigated in the extra-embryonic tissue of the blastoderm and in embryonic blood. 2. Eggs were incubated at 37.6 degrees C, c.60% RH, and turned hourly (90 degrees ) or left unturned. From 48 to 96 h of incubation mRNA was extracted from blastoderm tissue, reverse-transcribed to cDNA and quantified by real-time qPCR using gene-specific primers. Blood collected at 96 h was processed identically. 3. Blastoderm CA IV gene expression increased with the period of incubation only in turned eggs, with maxima at 84 and 96 h of incubation. Only very low levels were found in blood. 4. Blastoderm CA II gene expression was greatest at 48 and 54 h of incubation, subsequently declining to much lower levels and unaffected by turning. Blood CA II gene expression was about 25-fold greater than in the blastoderm. 5. The expression of CA IX in the blastoderm was the highest of all isoforms, yet unaffected by turning. CA XII did not amplify and CA XIV was present at unquantifiable low levels. 6. It is concluded that only gene expression for CA IV is sensitive to egg turning, and that increased CA IV gene expression could account for the additional SEF mass found at 84 to 96 h of incubation in embryos of turned eggs.

  7. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  8. Cadmium-Containing Carbonic Anhydrase CDCA1 in Marine Diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Alterio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Carbon Concentration Mechanism (CCM allows phytoplakton species to accumulate the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC necessary for an efficient photosynthesis even under carbon dioxide limitation. In this mechanism of primary importance for diatoms, a key role is played by carbonic anhydrase (CA enzymes which catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2, thus taking part in the acquisition of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis. A novel CA, named CDCA1, has been recently discovered in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. CDCA1 is a cambialistic enzyme since it naturally uses Cd2+ as catalytic metal ion, but if necessary can spontaneously exchange Cd2+ to Zn2+. Here, the biochemical and structural features of CDCA1 enzyme will be presented together with its putative biotechnological applications for the detection of metal ions in seawaters.

  9. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  10. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors modify intracellular pH transients and contractions of rat middle cerebral arteries during CO2/HCO3(-) fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jacob K; Boedtkjer, Ebbe

    2017-01-01

    The CO2/HCO3(-) buffer minimizes pH changes in response to acid-base loads, HCO3(-) provides substrate for Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO3(-)-exchangers, and H(+) and HCO3(-) modify vasomotor responses during acid-base disturbances. We show here that rat middle cerebral arteries express cytosolic, mitochondrial, extracellular, and secreted carbonic anhydrase isoforms that catalyze equilibration of the CO2/HCO3(-) buffer. Switching from CO2/HCO3(-)-free to CO2/HCO3(-)-containing extracellular solution results in initial intracellular acidification due to hydration of CO2 followed by gradual alkalinization due to cellular HCO3(-) uptake. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition decelerates the initial acidification and attenuates the associated transient vasoconstriction without affecting intracellular pH or artery tone at steady-state. Na(+),HCO3(-)-cotransport and Na(+)/H(+)-exchange activity after NH4(+)-prepulse-induced intracellular acidification are unaffected by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. Extracellular surface pH transients induced by transmembrane NH3 flux are evident under CO2/HCO3(-)-free conditions but absent when the buffer capacity and apparent H(+) mobility increase in the presence of CO2/HCO3(-) even after the inhibition of carbonic anhydrases. We conclude that (a) intracellular carbonic anhydrase activity accentuates pH transients and vasoconstriction in response to acute elevations of pCO2, (b) CO2/HCO3(-) minimizes extracellular surface pH transients without requiring carbonic anhydrase activity, and

  11. Carbonic anhydrase: a key regulatory and detoxifying enzyme for Karst plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Qiang, Li; Schröder, Heinz C; Hönig, Natalie; Yuan, Daoxian; Grebenjuk, Vlad A; Mussino, Francesca; Giovine, Marco; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Karstification is a rapid process during which calcidic stones/limestones undergo dissolution with the consequence of a desertification of karst regions. A slow-down of those dissolution processes of Ca-carbonate can be approached by a reforestation program using karst-resistant plants that can resist alkaline pH and higher bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) concentrations in the soil. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) are enzymes that mediate a rapid and reversible interconversion of CO₂ and HCO₃⁻. In the present study, the steady-state expression of a CA gene, encoding for the plant carbonic anhydrase from the parsley Petroselinum crispum, is monitored. The studies were primarily been performed during germination of the seeds up to the 12/14-day-old embryos. The CA cDNA was cloned. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis revealed that the gene expression level of the P. crispum CA is strongly and significantly affected at more alkaline pH in the growth medium (pH 8.3). This abolishing effect is counteracted both by addition of HCO₃⁻ and by addition of polyphosphate (polyP) to the culture medium. In response to polyP, the increased pH in the vacuoles of the growing plants is normalized. The effect of polyP let us to propose that this polymer acts as a buffer system that facilitates the adjustment of the pH in the cytoplasm. In addition, it is proposed that polyP has the potential to act, especially in the karst, as a fertilizer that allows the karstic plants to cope with the adverse pH and HCO₃⁻ condition in the soil.

  12. Malaria parasite carbonic anhydrase: inhibition of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides and its therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2011-06-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) is responsible for the majority of life-threatening cases of human malaria, causing 1.5-2.7 million annual deaths. The global emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites necessitates identification and characterization of novel drug targets and their potential inhibitors. We identified the carbonic anhydrase (CA) genes in P. falciparum. The pfCA gene encodes anα-carbonic anhydrase, a Zn(2+)-metalloenzme, possessing catalytic properties distinct from that of the human host CA enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the pfCA enzyme is different from the analogous protozoan and human enzymes. A library of aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing a large diversity of scaffolds were found to be very good inhibitors for the malarial enzyme at moderate-low micromolar and submicromolar inhibitions. The structure of the groups substituting the aromatic-ureido- or aromatic-azomethine fragment of the molecule and the length of the parent sulfonamide were critical parameters for the inhibitory properties of the sulfonamides. One derivative, that is, 4- (3, 4-dichlorophenylureido)thioureido-benzenesulfonamide (compound 10) was the most effective in vitro Plasmodium falciparum CA inhibitor, and was also the most effective antimalarial compound on the in vitro P. falciparum growth inhibition. The compound 10 was also effective in vivo antimalarial agent in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, an animal model of drug testing for human malaria infection. It is therefore concluded that the sulphonamide inhibitors targeting the parasite CA may have potential for the development of novel therapies against human malaria.

  13. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  14. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000574.htm Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on ... tissues. There are many types of anemia. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is a low red blood cell ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  16. Characterization of the first beta-class carbonic anhydrase from an arthropod (Drosophila melanogaster and phylogenetic analysis of beta-class carbonic anhydrases in invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niederhauser Barbara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1 enzymes have been reported in a variety of organisms, but their existence in animals has been unclear. The purpose of the present study was to perform extensive sequence analysis to show that the β-CAs are present in invertebrates and to clone and characterize a member of this enzyme family from a representative model organism of the animal kingdom, e.g., Drosophila melanogaster. Results The novel β-CA gene, here named DmBCA, was identified from FlyBase, and its orthologs were searched and reconstructed from sequence databases, confirming the presence of β-CA sequences in 55 metazoan species. The corresponding recombinant enzyme was produced in Sf9 insect cells, purified, kinetically characterized, and its inhibition was investigated with a series of simple, inorganic anions. Holoenzyme molecular mass was defined by dynamic light scattering analysis and gel filtration, and the results suggested that the holoenzyme is a dimer. Double immunostaining confirmed predictions based on sequence analysis and localized DmBCA protein to mitochondria. The enzyme showed high CO2 hydratase activity, with a kcat of 9.5 × 105 s-1 and a kcat/KM of 1.1 × 108 M-1s-1. DmBCA was appreciably inhibited by the clinically-used sulfonamide acetazolamide, with an inhibition constant of 49 nM. It was moderately inhibited by halides, pseudohalides, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite and sulfate (KI values of 0.67 - 1.36 mM and more potently by sulfamide (KI of 0.15 mM. Bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic/boronic acids were much weaker inhibitors (KIs of 26.9 - 43.7 mM. Conclusions The Drosophila β-CA represents a highly active mitochondrial enzyme that is a potential model enzyme for anti-parasitic drug development.

  17. Influence of temperature and solvent concentration on the kinetics of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase in carbon capture technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: the primary amine monoethanolamine (MEA), the sterically hindered primary amine 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), the tertiary amine N......-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) and the carbonate salt solution K2CO3 were compared in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt% in a temperature range of 298–328 K with and without enzyme. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined...... and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) dramatically increases the liquid side mass transfer coefficient for MDEA, and K2CO3; AMP has a moderate increase whereas MEA was unchanged. The results confirm that just bicarbonate forming systems...

  18. Kinetic study of a novel thermo-stable α-carbonic anhydrase for biomimetic CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Maria Elena; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Capasso, Clemente; De Luca, Viviana; Marzocchella, Antonio; Salatino, Piero; Rossi, Mosè

    2013-09-10

    Biomimetic CO2 capture includes environmentally friendly solutions based on carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that increases CO2 absorption rate in conventional acid-gas scrubbing processes. The present contribution reports the characterization of a new recombinant carbonic anhydrase, SspCA, isolated from the thermophile bacterium Sulphurhydrogenibium yellowstonense sp. YO3AOP1. The kinetics of SspCA was characterized in terms of first order CO2 hydration rate according to a procedure based on CO2 absorption tests in a stirred cell apparatus. The first order kinetic constant at 25°C was 9.16 × 10(6) L/(mols). An appropriate investigation on SspCA stability was carried out to assess its long-term resistance to high temperatures as in all capture processes based on absorption/vacuum-desorption cycles. Its half-life was 53 and 8 days at 40 °C and 70 °C, respectively.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by ...

  2. Knock-down of hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases IX and XII radiosensitizes tumor cells by increasing intracellular acidosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between acidosis within the tumor microenvironment and radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells remains unclear. Previously we reported that hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases (CA) IX and CAXII constitute a robust intracellular pH (pHi)-regulating system that confers a survival advantage on hypoxic human colon carcinoma LS174Tr cells in acidic microenvironments. Here we investigate the role of acidosis, CAIX and CAXII knock-down in combination with ionizing radiation. Fibrobla...

  3. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Gul N.; Rubbelke, Timothy S.; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D.; Sly, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium–potassium citrate-supplemented wate...

  4. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Tori A.; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W.; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI ...

  5. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  6. Allosteric reversion of Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase via a proline shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Katherine M; Million-Perez, H Rachael; Merkhofer, Richard; Nicholson, Hilary; Rowlett, Roger S

    2015-01-20

    Haemophilus influenzae β-carbonic anhydrase (HICA) has been reverse-engineered in the allosteric site region to resemble the nonallosteric Pisum sativum enzyme in order to identify critical features of allostery and intersusbunit communication. Three variants (W39V/G41A, P48S/A49P, and W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P) were identified, through a comparison with a crystal structure of nonallosteric P. sativum β-carbonic anhydrase (PSCA, PDB 1EKJ ), to potentially revert HICA to a nonallosteric enzyme. The W39V/G41A and P48S/A49P mutations decreased the apparent kcat/Km proton dependence from 4 to 2 and 1, respectively, increasing the overall maximal kcat/Km to 16 ± 2 μM(-1) s(-1) (380% of wild type) and 17 ± 3 μM(-1) s(-1) (405% of wild type). The pKa values of the metal-bound water molecule based on the pH-rate profile kinetics (8.32 ± 0.04 for W39V/G41A and 8.3 ± 0.1 for P48S/A49P) were also slightly higher than that for the wild-type enzyme (7.74 ± 0.04). The P48S/A49P variant has lost all pH-rate cooperativity. The W39V/G41A/P48S/A49P variant's kinetics were unusual and were fit with a log-linear function with a slope 0.9 ± 0.2. The crystal structure of the W39V/G41A variant revealed an active site very similar to the T-state wild-type oligomer with bicarbonate trapped in the escort site. By contrast, the X-ray crystal structure of a proline shift variant (P48S/A49P) reveals that it has adopted an active site conformation nearly identical to that of nonallosteric β-carbonic anhydrase (R-state) for one chain, including a tight association with the dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices; the second chain in the asymmetric unit is associated in a biologically relevant oligomer, but it adopts a T-state conformation that is not capped by dimer-exchanged N-terminal helices. The hybrid R/T nature of HICA P48S/A49P structurally recapitulates the interruption of pH-rate cooperativity observed for this variant. Comparison of the conformations of the R and T chains of P48S/A49P

  7. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  8. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  9. Spectroscopic and MD simulation studies on unfolding processes of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA induced by urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Prakash, Amresh; Haque, Md Anzarul; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-09-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) is primarily expressed in the mitochondria and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis and neuronal transmission. To understand the biophysical properties of CAVA, we carried out a reversible urea-induced isothermal denaturation at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Spectroscopic probes, [θ]222 (mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm), F344 (Trp-fluorescence emission intensity at 344 nm) and Δε280 (difference absorption at 280 nm) were used to monitor the effect of urea on the structure and stability of CAVA. The urea-induced reversible denaturation curves were used to estimate [Formula: see text], Gibbs free energy in the absence of urea; Cm, the mid-point of the denaturation curve, i.e. molar urea concentration ([urea]) at which ΔGD = 0; and m, the slope (=∂ΔGD/∂[urea]). Coincidence of normalized transition curves of all optical properties suggests that unfolding/refolding of CAVA is a two-state process. We further performed 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different urea concentrations. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies.

  10. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the beta class carbonic anhydrases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Michael K; Tsikou, Daniela; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2010-07-01

    The beta class of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme family has been found in plants, yeast, bacteria and algae, but not in animals. Also, little is known concerning the CAs of C. elegans. Genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed by in silico analysis of the C. elegans genome. Amino acid sequence and 3D structure analysis revealed a resemblance to both plant and cab-type beta-CAs. Temporal expression patterns of the two genes, as well as changes in expression levels under different atmospheric conditions (stress) were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Recombinant enzymes, expressed in E. coli were used for in vitro measurement of CA activity, while a yeast complementation experiment was performed in order to assess their ability to complement the function of S. crevisieae beta-CA (NCE103) in vivo. RNAi by feeding was performed on wild-type populations that were then examined for a visible phenotype under normal or various stress conditions (pH, CO(2)/O(2)). Two genes possibly encoding beta-CAs were revealed (bca-1 and y116a8c.28). Their products contain elements of both plant and cab-type CAs. Both assays showed that Y116a8c.28 is an active CA. Both genes showed significant levels of transcript accumulation during development, while they also responded to the stress conditions. No visible phenotype was scored under normal or stress conditions.

  11. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the α class carbonic anhydrases in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Michael K; Tsikou, Daniela; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Katinakis, Panagiotis

    2011-03-01

    In this study, in silico analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome revealed six genes (cah-1, cah-2, cah-3, cah-4, cah-5, and cah-6) possibly encoding α class CAs (carbonic anhydrase). Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed the temporal expression pattern of each gene, as well as changes in expression levels under different atmospheric conditions (stress). Cah-3 and cah-4 showed the highest levels of transcript accumulation, while most genes responded to the stress conditions. Yeast complementation showed that cah-3 was able to complement the function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CA (NCE103) in vivo. Recombinant CAH-3, CAH-4a and CAH-5 enzymes, expressed in Escherichia coli were used for in vitro measurement of CA activity. However, in vitro activity was only detectable for CAH-4a. RNAi by feeding was performed on wild-type C. elegans for all genes. The worms were examined for a visible phenotype under normal and stress conditions (pH, CO(2)/O(2)). Silencing cah-3 and cah-4 may reduce the life-span of the worms (at 22 °C).

  12. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes.

  13. Oxygen Regulation of a Nodule-Located Carbonic Anhydrase in Alfalfa1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Susana; Hirsch, Ann M.; Wycoff, Keith L.; Hunt, Stephen; Layzell, David B.; Kondorosi, Adam; Crespi, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Control of the permeability to oxygen is critical for the function of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legume nodules. The inner cortex (IC) seems to be a primary site for this regulation. In alfalfa (Medicago sativa) nodules, expression of the Msca1 gene encoding a carbonic anhydrase (CA) was previously found to be restricted to the IC. We have now raised antibodies against recombinant Msca1 protein and used them, together with antibodies raised against potato leaf CA, to demonstrate the presence of two forms of CA in mature nodules. Each antibody recognizes a different CA isoform in nodule tissues. Immunolocalization revealed that leaf-related CAs were localized primarily in the nitrogen-fixing zone, whereas the Msca1 protein was restricted exclusively to the IC region, in indeterminate and determinate nodules. In alfalfa nodules grown at various O2 concentrations, an inverse correlation was observed between the external oxygen pressure and Msca1 protein content in the IC, the site of the putative diffusion barrier. Thus Msca1 is a molecular target of physiological processes occurring in the IC cells involved in gas exchange in the nodule. PMID:11080283

  14. Comparison of amino and epoxy functionalized SBA-15 used for carbonic anhydrase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiaoyao; Chen, Shaoyun; Liu, Dai; Huang, Chunjie; Zhang, Yongchun

    2016-09-01

    Two functionalized SBA-15 [amine-functionalized SBA-15 (AFS) and epoxy-functionalized SBA-15 (GFS)] with different types of functional groups were synthesized by a hydrothermal process and post functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), respectively. They were used for the immobilization of carbonic anhydrase (CA). The physicochemical properties of the functionalized SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, (13)C, (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Before and after CA was immobilized on AFS and GFS, the effects of temperature and pH value on the enzyme activity, storage stability, and reusability were investigated using para-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) assay. CA/GFS showed a better performance with respect to storage stability and reusability than CA/AFS. Moreover, the amount of CaCO3 precipitated over CA/AFS was less than that precipitated over CA/GFS, which was almost equal to that precipitated over the free CA. The results indicate that the epoxy group is a more suitable functional group for covalent bonding with CA than the amino group, and GFS is a promising support for CA immobilization.

  15. How to get into bones: proton pump and carbonic anhydrase in Osedax boneworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Katz, Sigrid; Rouse, Greg W

    2013-06-22

    Osedax are gutless siboglinid worms that thrive on vertebrate bones lying on the ocean floor, mainly those of whales. The posterior body of female Osedax penetrates into the bone forming extensions known as 'roots', which host heterotrophic symbiotic bacteria in bacteriocytes beneath the epidermis. The Osedax root epithelium presumably absorbs bone collagen and/or lipids, which are metabolized by the symbiotic bacteria that in turn serve for Osedax's nutrition. Here, we show that Osedax roots express extremely high amounts of vacuolar-H(+)-ATPase (VHA), which is located in the apical membrane and in cytoplasmic vesicles of root and ovisac epithelial cells. The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyses the hydration of CO2 into H(+) and HCO3(-), is also expressed in roots and throughout Osedax body. These results suggest Osedax roots have massive acid-secreting capacity via VHA, fuelled by H(+) derived from the CA-catalysed hydration of CO2 produced by aerobic metabolism. We propose the secreted acid dissolves the bone carbonate matrix to then allow the absorption of bone-derived nutrients across the skin. In an exciting example of convergent evolution, this model for acid secretion is remarkably similar to mammalian osteoclast cells. However, while osteoclasts dissolve bone for repairing and remodelling, the Osedax root epithelium secretes acid to dissolve foreign bone to access nutrients.

  16. Inhibition of the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Manole, Gheorghe; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly inhibited by weak acids although the mechanism by which these compounds act is not completely understood. A series of substituted benzoic acids, nipecotic acid, ortho- and para-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid were investigated as inhibitors of three β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from this pathogen, mtCA 1 (Rv1284), mtCA 2 (Rv3588c) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). All three enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the submicromolar to the micromolar one, depending on the scaffold present in the carboxylic acid. mtCA 3 was the isoform mostly inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s in the range of 0.11-0.97 µM); followed by mtCA 2 (K(I)s in the range of 0.59-8.10 µM), whereas against mtCA 1, these carboxylic acids showed inhibition constants in the range of 2.25-7.13 µM. This class of relatively underexplored β-CA inhibitors warrant further in vivo studies, as they may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug or extensive multi-drug resistance.

  17. Renal carbonic anhydrases are involved in the reabsorption of endogenous nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Schwarz, Alexandra; Böhmer, Anke; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Michaelsen, Jan T; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2012-02-15

    Nitrite (ONO(-)) exerts nitric oxide (NO)-related biological actions and its concentration in the circulation may be of particular importance. Nitrite is excreted in the urine. Hence, the kidney may play an important role in nitrite/NO homeostasis in the vasculature. We investigated a possible involvement of renal carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in endogenous nitrite reabsorption in the proximal tubule. The potent CA inhibitor acetazolamide was administered orally to six healthy volunteers (5 mg/kg) and nitrite was measured in spot urine samples before and after administration. Acetazolamide increased abruptly nitrite excretion in the urine, strongly suggesting that renal CAs are involved in nitrite reabsorption in healthy humans. Additional in vitro experiments support our hypothesis that nitrite reacts with CO(2), analogous to the reaction of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) with CO(2), to form acid-labile nitrito carbonate [ONOC(O)O(-)]. We assume that this reaction is catalyzed by CAs and that nitrito carbonate represents the nitrite form that is actively transported into the kidney. The significance of nitrite reabsorption in the kidney and the underlying mechanisms, notably a direct involvement of CAs in the reaction between nitrite and CO(2), remain to be elucidated.

  18. Characterization of urease and carbonic anhydrase producing bacteria and their role in calcite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2011-03-01

    Urease and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are key enzymes in the chemical reaction of living organisms and have been found to be associated with calcification in a number of microorganisms and invertebrates. Three bacterial strains designated as AP4, AP6, and AP9 were isolated from highly alkaline soil samples using the enrichment culture technique. On the basis of various physiological tests and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these three bacteria were identified as Bacillus sp., B. megaterium, and B. simplex. Further, these Bacillus species have been characterized for the production of urease and CA in the process of biocalcification. One of the isolates, AP6 produced 553 U/ml of urease and 5.61 EU/ml CA. All the strains were able to produce significant amount of exopolymeric substances and biofilm. Further, efficacy of these strains was tested for calcite production ability and results were correlated with urease and CA. Isolate AP6 precipitated 2.26 mg calcite/cell dry mass (mg). Our observations strongly suggest that it is not only urease but CA also plays an important role in microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation process. The current work demonstrates that urease and CA producing microbes can be utilized in biocalcification as a sealing agent for filling the gaps or cracks and fissures in constructed facilities and natural formations alike.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase VI gene and dental caries susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Q; Hu, X-P; Zhou, J-Y; Xie, X-D; Zhang, J-M

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the role of 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms in the carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI gene (rs2274328, rs17032907, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186) and the possible association between these polymorphisms and dental caries susceptibility in a Northwestern Chinese population. We collected samples from 164 high caries experience and 191 very low caries experience and conducted a case-control study according to the number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and genotyped the 7 polymorphisms using a 384-well plate format with the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Individuals carrying the rs17032907 TT genotype were more likely to have an increased risk of dental caries compared with carriers of the C/C genotype in the co-dominant model, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.144 (1.096-4.195). We also found that the haplotype (ACA) (rs2274328, rs17032907 and rs11576766) was associated with a low number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.635 (0.440-0.918). However, we found no association between dental caries susceptibility and the rs2274328, rs11576766, rs2274333, rs10864376, rs3765964, and rs6680186 polymorphisms and other haplotypes. The rs17032907 genetic variant and the haplotype (ACA) of CA VI may be associated with dental caries susceptibility.

  20. Interaction of anions with a newly characterized alpha carbonic anhydrase from Halomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Furkan; Şentürk, Murat; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-12-01

    The inhibition and characterization of the α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the Halomonas sp. are reported for the first time. The enzyme was purified 91-fold with a yield of 39%, and a specific activity of 600 U/mg proteins was obtained. It has an optimum pH at 7.5, an optimum ionic strength at 20 mM and an optimum temperature at 20 °C. The following anions, SCN(-), Br(-), Cl(-), I(-), [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] showed inhibitory effects on the hydratase activity of the enzyme. Sulfate, sulfide, azide, nitrate, nitrite and iodide exhibited the strongest inhibitory activity, in the micromolar range (KI-s of 5.5-15.5 µM). SCN(-), Br(-), Cl(-), [Formula: see text] were moderate inhibitors, whereas other anions showed only weak activities. Our findings indicate that these anions inhibit the Halomonas sp. CA (HmCA) enzyme in a similar manner to other α-CAs from mammals investigated earlier, but the susceptibility to various anions differs significantly between the Halomonas sp. and other organism CAs.

  1. Carbon dioxide capture using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase in a foam bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart K; Han, Zhenlin; Su, Wei Wen; Deshusses, Marc A; Kan, Eunsung

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports CO2 capture and conversion to bicarbonate using Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase (CA) on its cell surface in a novel foam bioreactor. The very large gas-liquid interfacial area in the foam bioreactor promoted rapid CO2 absorption while the CO2 in the aqueous phase was subsequently converted to bicarbonate ions by the CA. CO2 gas removal in air was investigated at various conditions such as gas velocity, cell density and CO2 inlet concentration. Regimes for kinetic and mass transfer limitations were defined. Very high removal rates of CO2 were observed: 9570 g CO2 m(-3) bioreactor h(-1) and a CO2 removal efficiency of 93% at 4% inlet CO2 when the gas retention time was 24 s, and cell concentration was 4 gdw L(-1). These performances are superior to earlier reports of experimental bioreactors using CA for CO2 capture. Overall, this bioreactor system has significant potential as an alternative CO2 capture technology.

  2. Mutant carbonic anhydrase 4 impairs pH regulation and causes retinal photoreceptor degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenglin; Alvarez, Bernardo V; Chakarova, Christina; Jiang, Li; Karan, Goutam; Frederick, Jeanne M; Zhao, Yu; Sauvé, Yves; Li, Xi; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Hollander, Anneke I Den; Katz, Bradley; Baehr, Wolfgang; Cremers, Frans P; Casey, Joseph R; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Zhang, Kang

    2005-01-15

    Retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) belong to the metabolically most active tissues in the human body. Efficient removal of acid load from retina and RPE is a critical function mediated by the choriocapillaris. However, the mechanism by which pH homeostasis is maintained is largely unknown. Here, we show that a functional complex of carbonic anhydrase 4 (CA4) and Na+/bicarbonate co-transporter 1 (NBC1) is specifically expressed in the choriocapillaris and that missense mutations in CA4 linked to autosomal dominant rod-cone dystrophy disrupt NBC1-mediated HCO3- transport. Our results identify a novel pathogenic pathway in which a defect in a functional complex involved in maintaining pH balances, but not expressed in retina or RPE, leads to photoreceptor degeneration. The importance of a functional CA4 for survival of photoreceptors implies that CA inhibitors, which are widely used as medications, particularly in the treatment of glaucoma, may have long-term adverse effects on vision.

  3. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-02-15

    The Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea encodes for a γ-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), which was cloned, purified and characterized. The enzyme (CpsCAγ) has a moderate catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with a k(cat) 6.0×10(5) s(-1) and a k(cat)/K(m) of 4.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1). A series of sulfonamides and a sulfamate were investigated as inhibitors of the new enzyme. The best inhibitor was metanilamide (K(I) of 83.5 nM) followed by indisulam, valdecoxib, celecoxib, sulthiame and hydrochlorothiazide (K(I)s ranging between 343 and 491 nM). Acetazolamide, methazolamide as well as other aromatic/heterocyclic derivatives showed inhibition constants between 502 and 7660 nM. The present study may shed some more light regarding the role that γ-CAs play in the life cycle of psychrophilic bacteria as the Antarctic one investigated here, by allowing the identification of inhibitors which may be useful as pharmacologic tools.

  4. Engineering de novo disulfide bond in bacterial α-type carbonic anhydrase for thermostable carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung Hoon; Park, Tae Yoon; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that rapidly catalyzes carbon dioxide hydration, is an attractive biomimetic route for carbon sequestration due to its environmental compatibility and potential economic viability. However, the industrial applications of CA are strongly hampered by the unstable nature of enzymes. In this work, we introduced in silico designed, de novo disulfide bond in a bacterial α-type CA to enhance thermostability. Three variants were selected and expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional disulfide bridge. One of the variants showed great enhancement in terms of both kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities. This improvement could be attributed to the loss of conformational entropy of the unfolded state, showing increased rigidity. The variant showed an upward-shifted optimal temperature and appeared to be thermoactivated, which compensated for the lowered activity at 25 °C. Collectively, the variant constructed by the rapid and effective de novo disulfide engineering can be used as an efficient biocatalyst for carbon sequestration under high temperature conditions.

  5. Innovative molecular diagnosis of Trichinella species based on β-carbonic anhydrase genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Näreaho, Anu; Sukura, Antti; Parkkila, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    Trichinellosis is a helminthic infection where different species of Trichinella nematodes are the causative agents. Several molecular assays have been designed to aid diagnostics of trichinellosis. These assays are mostly complex and expensive. The genomes of Trichinella species contain certain parasite-specific genes, which can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. We selected β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) gene as a target, because it is present in many parasites genomes but absent in vertebrates. We developed a novel β-CA gene-based method for detection of Trichinella larvae in biological samples. We first identified a β-CA protein sequence from Trichinella spiralis by bioinformatic tools using β-CAs from Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Thereafter, 16 sets of designed primers were tested to detect β-CA genomic sequences from three species of Trichinella, including T. spiralis, Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinella nativa. Among all 16 sets of designed primers, the primer set No. 2 efficiently amplified β-CA genomic sequences from T. spiralis, T. pseudospiralis and T. nativa without any false-positive amplicons from other parasite samples including Toxoplasma gondii, Toxocara cati and Parascaris equorum. This robust and straightforward method could be useful for meat inspection in slaughterhouses, quality control by food authorities and medical laboratories.

  6. The role of carbonic anhydrase in C4 photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Anthony [Life Sciences Research Foundation, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Current pressures on the global food supply have accelerated the urgency for a second green revolution using novel and sustainable approaches to increase crop yield and efficiency. This proposal outlines experiments to address fundamental questions regarding the biology of C4 photosynthesis, the method of carbon fixation utilized by the most productive food, feed and bioenergy crops. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions including nitrogen metabolism, water use efficiency, and photosynthesis. CA catalyzes the first dedicated step in C4 photosynthesis, the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate, and is potentially rate limiting in C4 grasses. Using insertional mutagenesis, we have generated CA mutants in maize, and propose the characterization of these mutants using phenotypic, physiological, and transcriptomic profiling to assay the plant’s response to altered CA activity. In addition, florescent protein tagging experiments will be employed to study the subcellular localization of CA paralogs, providing critical data for modeling carbon fixation in C4 plants. Finally, I propose parallel experiments in Setaria viridis to explore its relevance as model C4 grass. Using a multifaceted approach, this proposal addresses important questions in basic biology, as well as the need for translation research in response to looming global food challenges.

  7. Carbonic anhydrase promotes the absorption rate of CO2 in post-combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Grace, Andrews Nirmala; Kim, Dae Hoon; Yoon, Yeoil; Nam, Sung Chan; Baek, Il Hyun; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2013-05-09

    The rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by monoethanol amine (MEA), diethanol amine (DEA), N-methyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl 1-propanol (AMP) solutions was found to be enhanced by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA), has been investigated using a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) device. The enthalpy (-ΔHabs) of CO2 absorption and the absorption capacities of aqueous amines were measured in the presence and/or absence of CA enzyme via differential reaction calorimeter (DRC). The reaction temperature (ΔT) under adiabatic conditions was determined based on the DRC analysis. Bicarbonate and carbamate species formation mechanisms were elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analysis. The overall CO2 absorption rate (flux) and rate constant (kapp) followed the order MEA > DEA > AMP > MDEA in the absence or presence of CA. Hydration of CO2 by MDEA in the presence of CA directly produced bicarbonate, whereas AMP produced unstable carbamate intermediate, then underwent hydrolytic reaction and converted to bicarbonate. The MDEA > AMP > DEA > MEA reverse ordering of the enhanced CO2 flux and kapp in the presence of CA was due to bicarbonate formation by the tertiary and sterically hindered amines. Thus, CA increased the rate of CO2 absorption by MDEA by a factor of 3 relative to the rate of absorption by MDEA alone. The thermal effects suggested that CA yielded a higher activity at 40 °C.

  8. Effect of sulfonamides as carbonic anhydrase VA and VB inhibitors on mitochondrial metabolic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechederra, Robert L; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S; Supuran, Claudiu T; Minteer, Shelley D

    2013-03-15

    Obesity is quickly becoming an increasing problem in the developed world. One of the major fundamental causes of obesity and diabetes is mitochondria dysfunction due to faulty metabolic pathways which alter the metabolic substrate flux resulting in the development of these diseases. This paper examines the role of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes in the metabolism of pyruvate, acetate, and succinate when specific isozyme inhibitors are present. Using a sensitive electrochemical approach of wired mitochondria to analytically measure metabolic energy conversion, we determine the resulting metabolic difference after addition of an inhibitory compound. We found that certain sulfonamide analogues displayed broad spectrum inhibition of metabolism, where others only had significant effect on some metabolic pathways. Pyruvate metabolism always displayed the most dramatically affected metabolism by the sulfonamides followed by fatty acid metabolism, and then finally succinate metabolism. This allows for the possibility of using designed sulfonamide analogues to target specific mitochondrial CA isozymes in order to subtly shift metabolism and glucogenesis flux to treat obesity and diabetes.

  9. SWATH-based proteomics identified carbonic anhydrase 2 as a potential diagnosis biomarker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanzhang; Mok, Tin Seak; Lin, Xiuxian; Zhang, Wanling; Cui, Yizhi; Guo, Jiahui; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a serious threat to public health, and the biomarker discovery is of urgent needs. The data-independent mode (DIA) based sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) mass spectrometry (MS) has been proved to be precise in protein quantitation and efficient for cancer biomarker researches. In this study, we performed the first SWATH-MS analysis comparing the NPC and normal tissues. Spike-in stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (super-SILAC) MS was used as a shotgun reference. We identified and quantified 1414 proteins across all SWATH-MS analyses. We found that SWATH-MS had a unique feature to preferentially detect proteins with smaller molecular weights than either super-SILAC MS or human proteome background. With SWATH-MS, 29 significant differentially express proteins (DEPs) were identified. Among them, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) was selected for further validation per novelty, MS quality and other supporting rationale. With the tissue microarray analysis, we found that CA2 had an AUC of 0.94 in differentiating NPC from normal tissue samples. In conclusion, SWATH-MS has unique features in proteome analysis, and it leads to the identification of CA2 as a potentially new diagnostic biomarker for NPC. PMID:28117408

  10. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase IV enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) is GPI-anchored to the outer membrane surface, catalyzing CO2/HCO3 (-) hydration-dehydration. We examined effects of heterologously expressed CA IV on intracellular-pH (pHi) and surface-pH (pHS) transients caused by exposing oocytes to CO2/HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50. CO2 influx causes a sustained pHi fall and a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA IV increases magnitudes of maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, and maximal pHS change (ΔpHS) and decreases time constants for pHi changes (τpHi ) and pHS relaxations (τpHS ). Decreases in time constants indicate that CA IV enhances CO2 fluxes. Extracellular acetazolamide blocks all CA IV effects, but not those of injected CA II. Injected acetazolamide partially reduces CA IV effects. Thus, extracellular CA is required for, and the equivalent of cytosol-accessible CA augments, the effects of CA IV. Increasing the concentration of the extracellular non-CO2/HCO3 (-) buffer (i.e., HEPES), in the presence of extracellular CA or at high [CO2], accelerates CO2 influx. Simultaneous measurements with two pHS electrodes, one on the oocyte meridian perpendicular to the axis of flow and one downstream from the direction of extracellular-solution flow, reveal that the downstream electrode has a larger (i.e., slower) τpHS , indicating [CO2] asymmetry over the oocyte surface. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (third paper in series) accounts for the above general features, and supports the conclusion that extracellular CA, which replenishes entering CO2 or consumes exiting CO2 at the extracellular surface, enhances the gradient driving CO2 influx across the cell membrane.

  11. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy.

  12. Label-free characterization of carbonic anhydrase-novel inhibitor interactions using surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Florent, Tiphaine; Duhamel, Laetitia; Goossens, Laurence; Six, Perrine; Drucbert, Anne-Sophie; Depreux, Patrick; Danzé, Pierre-Marie; Landy, David; Goossens, Jean-François; Foulon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the development of biophysical unbiased methods to study the interactions between new designed compounds and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) enzyme. These methods have to permit both a screening of a series of sulfonamide derivatives and the identification of a lead compound after a thorough study of the most promising molecules. Interactions data were collected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal shift assay (TSA). In the first step, experiments were performed with bovine CAII isoform and were extended to human CAII. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were also conducted to obtain thermodynamics parameters necessary for the processing of the TSA data. Results obtained with this reference methodology demonstrate the effectiveness of SPR and TSA. KD values obtained from SPR data were in perfect accordance with ITC. For TSA, despite the fact that the absolute values of KD were quite different, the same affinity scale was obtained for all compounds. The binding affinities of the analytes studied vary by more than 50 orders of magnitude; for example, the KD value determined by SPR were 6 ± 4 and 299 ± 25 nM for compounds 1 and 3, respectively. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the affinity-based methods and evaluates the protein consumption to develop methods for the screening of further new compounds. The double interest of SPR, that is, for screening and for the quick thorough study of the interactions parameters (ka , kd , and KD ), leads us to choose this methodology for the study of new potential inhibitors.

  13. [Approaches to vitamin B12 deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russcher, Henk; Heil, Sandra G; Slobbe, Lennert; Lindemans, Jan

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female vegetarian was referred to a specialist in internal medicine with persistent iron deficiency. Laboratory analysis revealed microcytic anaemia with low ferritin levels but normal total vitamin B12 levels. The red blood cell distribution width, however, showed a very wide variation in red blood cell sizes, indicating a coexisting vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed by the low concentration of active vitamin B12. Another patient, a 69-year-old woman with a history of previous gastric surgery and renal insufficiency as a complication of diabetes mellitus, was suspected to be deficient in vitamin B12, as she had low total vitamin B12 levels and an accumulation of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine in her blood. Testing the total concentration of vitamin B12 alone has insufficient diagnostic accuracy and no accepted gold standard is available for diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency. With the development of newer tests, such as measuring holotranscobalamin II (concentration of active vitamin B12), atypical and subclinical deficiency states can be recognized. A new approach to diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency is presented, based upon these 2 case descriptions.

  14. Ultrastructural changes in the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach under the influence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors AA and EA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Vodka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (АА and EA on the membrane system of isolated chloroplasts of spinach were investigated. Under the influence of AA the considerable alterations in granal structure occurred, the thickness of the granal thylakoids increased by 36% and the interspace between thylakoids by 10% comparable with the control. As a result of EA treatment, the thickness of granal thylakoids enhanced by 31% and the interspace between thylakoids increased by 8% in comparison to the control. It was shown that structure of the granal system of the chloroplast was more sensitive to AA than EA. The data obtained can indicate a decrease in the activity of the thylakoid carbonic anhydrase, inhibition of electron transport and photosynthetic process as a whole in the presence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (AA and EA.

  15. Deficiently Extremal Gorenstein Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavinder Singh

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to study the homological properties of deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras. We prove that if / is an odd deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebra with pure minimal free resolution, then the codimension of / must be odd. As an application, the structure of pure minimal free resolution of a nearly extremal Gorenstein algebra is obtained.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  17. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A;

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  18. Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Tarım

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone deficiency is the most promising entity in terms of response to therapy among the treatable causes of growth retardation. It may be due to genetic or acquired causes. It may be isolated or a part of multiple hormone deficiencies. Diagnostic criteria and therefore treatment indications are still disputed. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 36-8

  19. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by E-MAIL | ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you ...

  1. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  2. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  3. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti α-Type Carbonic Anhydrase and Its Role in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an α-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically character...

  4. Design and simulation of rate-based CO2 capture processes using carbonic anhydrase (CA) applied to biogas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gaspar, Jozsef; Jacobsen, Bjartur

    2017-01-01

    a potential to create negative emissions using bio-energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS). All sectors are still in the need for applying more sustainable carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies which result in lower energy consumption while reducing the impact on the environment. Recently several....... The advantage is a noticeably lower regeneration energy compared to primary and secondary amines. As a result the cost for stripping is significantly lower. Reactivated slow tertiary amines are applied in this study with the aim of reducing energy consumption. This is achieved byusing carbonic anhydrase (CA...

  5. A review of the pharmacology of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors for the treatment of glaucoma in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of disorders usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), leading to optic nerve damage, retinal ganglion cell death and irreversible vision loss. Therefore, medications that lower IOP are the mainstay of glaucoma therapy. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are some of the principal drugs used in the management of canine and feline glaucoma. This paper summarises current knowledge of the mechanism of action of these agents and their effect on IOP in dogs and cats. It also discusses potential harmful side effects of CAIs and presents current opinions about their role and place in the medical management of glaucoma in small animals.

  6. Structural basis of the oxidative activation of the carboxysomal [gamma]-carbonic anhydrase, CcmM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, Kerry L.; Castel, Stephane E.; de Araujo, Charlotte; Espie, George S.; Kimber, Matthew S. (Guelph); (Toronto)

    2010-04-26

    Cyanobacterial RuBisCO is sequestered in large, icosahedral, protein-bounded microcompartments called carboxysomes. Bicarbonate is pumped into the cytosol, diffuses into the carboxysome through small pores in its shell, and is then converted to CO{sub 2} by carbonic anhydrase (CA) prior to fixation. Paradoxically, many {beta}-cyanobacteria, including Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, lack the conventional carboxysomal {beta}-CA, ccaA. The N-terminal domain of the carboxysomal protein CcmM is homologous to {gamma}-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) but recombinant CcmM derived from ccaA-containing cyanobacteria show no CA activity. We demonstrate here that either full length CcmM from T. elongatus, or a construct truncated after 209 residues (CcmM209), is active as a CA - the first catalytically active bacterial {gamma}-CA reported. The 2.0 {angstrom} structure of CcmM209 reveals a trimeric, left-handed {beta}-helix structure that closely resembles Cam, except that residues 198-207 form a third {alpha}-helix stabilized by an essential Cys194-Cys200 disulfide bond. Deleting residues 194-209 (CcmM193) results in an inactive protein whose 1.1 {angstrom} structure shows disordering of the N- and C-termini, and reorganization of the trimeric interface and active site. Under reducing conditions, CcmM209 is similarly partially disordered and inactive as a CA. CcmM protein in fresh E. coli cell extracts is inactive, implying that the cellular reducing machinery can reduce and inactivate CcmM, while diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, activates the enzyme. Thus, like membrane-bound eukaryotic cellular compartments, the {beta}-carboxysome appears to be able to maintain an oxidizing interior by precluding the entry of thioredoxin and other endogenous reducing agents.

  7. Molecular targeting of carbonic anhydrase IX in mice with hypoxic HT29 colorectal tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a membrane spanning protein involved in the enzymatic regulation of tumor acid-base balance. CAIX has been shown to be elevated in a number of hypoxic tumor types. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of intact and IgG fragments of cG250 to target CAIX in vivo in a hypoxic tumor model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Conventional biodistribution studies were performed with (111In-DO3A-cG250, (111In-DO3A-F(ab'(2-cG250 and (111In-DO3A-Fab-cG250. Additional ex vivo analysis of the tumor was performed with markers for tumor hypoxia, blood perfusion and endogenous CAIX expression. All four data sets were digitally correlated to determine the optimal agent for determining hypoxia in a HT29 colon cancer xenograft. The HT29 human colorectal tumor xenografts show strong CAIX expression in hypoxic areas of poor blood perfusion. The intact IgG had an initial high focal uptake at the periphery of these hypoxic regions and penetration into the areas of highest CAIX expression over the 7-day study period. The lower molecular weight antibody fragments had a faster uptake into areas of high CAIX expression, but had a much lower absolute uptake at the optimal imaging times. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the clinical detection of hypoxia induced CAIX using cG250 antibody based agents, imaging with the intact IgG at 7 days post injection would allow for the most sensitive and accurate detection of CAIX.

  8. Expression patterns and subcellular localization of carbonic anhydrases are developmentally regulated during tooth formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes-Göran Reibring

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs play fundamental roles in several physiological events, and emerging evidence points at their involvement in an array of disorders, including cancer. The expression of CAs in the different cells of teeth is unknown, let alone their expression patterns during odontogenesis. As a first step towards understanding the role of CAs during odontogenesis, we used immunohistochemistry, histochemistry and in situ hybridization to reveal hitherto unknown dynamic distribution patterns of eight CAs in mice. The most salient findings include expression of CAII/Car2 not only in maturation-stage ameloblasts (MA but also in the papillary layer, dental papilla mesenchyme, odontoblasts and the epithelial rests of Malassez. We uncovered that the latter form lace-like networks around incisors; hitherto these have been known to occur only in molars. All CAs studied were produced by MA, however CAIV, CAIX and CARPXI proteins were distinctly enriched in the ruffled membrane of the ruffled MA but exhibited a homogeneous distribution in smooth-ended MA. While CAIV, CAVI/Car6, CAIX, CARPXI and CAXIV were produced by all odontoblasts, CAIII distribution displayed a striking asymmetry, in that it was virtually confined to odontoblasts in the root of molars and root analog of incisors. Remarkably, from initiation until near completion of odontogenesis and in several other tissues, CAXIII localized mainly in intracellular punctae/vesicles that we show to overlap with LAMP-1- and LAMP-2-positive vesicles, suggesting that CAXIII localizes within lysosomes. We showed that expression of CAs in developing teeth is not confined to cells involved in biomineralization, pointing at their participation in other biological events. Finally, we uncovered novel sites of CA expression, including the developing brain and eye, the olfactory epithelium, melanoblasts, tongue, notochord, nucleus pulposus and sebaceous glands. Our study provides important information for

  9. Expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) in malignant mesothelioma. An immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capkova, L; Koubkova, L; Kodet, R

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a membranously located metalloenzyme involved in pH homeostasis with influence on regulation of cell proliferation, oncogenesis and tumor progression. Much attention has been paid recently to carboanhydrases and their inhibitors as they offer an opportunity for both developing novel anticancer drugs, as well as diagnostic and prognostic tools. This study was designed to assess the expression of CAIX in malignant pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomas, their benign counterparts, and in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma, metastatic carcinoma or a benign disease. Tissue blocks from 51 malignant mesotheliomas of pleura (47 cases; 41 epithelioid, 2 biphasic, 4 sarcomatoid) and peritoneum (4 cases; all epithelioid), 14 cases with normal or reactive pleural tissue, and 19 cell blocks were analyzed. CAIX expression was determined using immunohistochemistry and its membranous immunoreactivity was semiquantitatively evaluated. Specimens were divided into five subgroups according to the staining pattern and intensity.Overall, 92.2% (47/51) of mesotheliomas expressed CAIX. All epithelioid mesotheliomas showed CAIX positivity, which was predominantly strong and diffuse (73.3%, 33/45). Sarcomatoid mesotheliomas and sarcomatoid areas in biphasic mesotheliomas were negative. A strong diffuse staining was observed in all cases of normal mesothelia. In pleural effusions, CAIX expression was observed in malignant cells as well as in benign mesothelial cells. In conclusion, CAIX is expressed virtually in all mesotheliomas except for sarcomatoid subtype, and in benign mesothelia. There are probably more mechanisms of CAIX overexpression than hypoxia-induced in malignant mesothelioma, with the influence of other tissue specific transcription or growth factors depending on the type of the cell lineage. CAIX immunoreactivity is not a reliable diagnostic marker for

  10. Heterologous gene expression driven by carbonic anhydrase gene promoter in Dunaliella salina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI Yurong; LU Yumin; WANG Tianyun; HOU Weihong; XUE Lexun

    2006-01-01

    Dunaliella salina, a halotolerant unicellular green alga without a rigid cell wall, can live in salinities ranging from 0.05 to 5 mol/L NaCl. These features of D. salina make it an ideal host for the production of antibodies, oral vaccine, and commercially valuable polypeptides. To produce high level of heterologous proteins from D. salina, highly efficientpromoters are required to drive expression of target genes under controlled condition. In the present study, we cloned a 5' franking region of 1.4 kb from the carbonic anhydrase (CAH) gene of D. salina by genomic walking and PCR. The fragment was ligated to the pMD18-T vector and characterized. Sequence analysis indicated that this region contained conserved motifs, including a TATA- like box and CAAT-box. Tandem (GT)n repeats that had a potential role of transcriptional control, were also found in this region. The transcription start site (TSS) of the CAH gene was determined by 5' RACE and nested PCR method. Transformation assays showed that the 1.4 kb fragment was able to drive expression of the selectable bar (bialaphos resistance) gene when the fusion was transformed into D. salina by biolistics.Northern blotting hybridizations showed that the bar transcript was most abundant in cells grown in 2 mol/L NaCl, and less abundant in 0.5 mol/L NaCl, indicating that expression of the bar gene was induced at high salinity. These results suggest the potential use of the CAH gene promoter to induce the expression of heterologous genes in D. salina under varied salt condition.

  11. The ctnG gene encodes carbonic anhydrase involved in mycotoxin citrinin biosynthesis from Monascus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yang; Huang, Zhi-Bing; He, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin, a fungal secondary metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. Citrinin is synthesised by condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Six genes involved in the citrinin biosynthesis, including pksCT, ctnA and ctnB, have been cloned in Monascus purpureus. The pksCT gene encodes a polyketide synthase; ctnA is a regulatory factor; and ctnB encodes an oxidoreductase. When the three genes were respectively disrupted, the disruption strains drastically decreased citrinin production or barely produced citrinin. Ten new genes have been discovered in Monascus aurantiacus besides the above six genes. One of these gene displayed the highest similarity to the β-carbonic anhydrase gene from Aspergillus oryzae (74% similarity) and was designated ctnG. To learn more about the citrinin biosynthetic pathway, a ctnG-replacement vector was constructed to disrupt ctnG with the hygromycin resistance gene as the selection marker, then transformed into M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 by a protoplast-PEG method. The citrinin content of three disruptants was reduced to about 50%, meanwhile pigment production decreased by 23%, respectively, over those of the wild-type strains. ctnG was deduced to be involved in the formation of malonyl-CoA as a common precursor of red pigments and citrinin. Therefore, the disruption of the ctnG gene decreased citrinin and pigment production. M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 can produce higher concentrations of citrinin than other strains such as M. purpureus and M. ruber. Establishing the function of citrinin biosynthetic genes in M. aurantiacus is helpful in understanding the citrinin synthetic pathway and adopting some strategies to control contamination.

  12. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase generates CO2 and H+ that drive spider silk formation via opposite effects on the terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Marlene; Chen, Gefei; Otikovs, Martins; Landreh, Michael; Nordling, Kerstin; Kronqvist, Nina; Westermark, Per; Jörnvall, Hans; Knight, Stefan; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Holm, Lena; Meng, Qing; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Chesler, Mitchell; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins) under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT) that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation.

  14. Carbonic anhydrase generates CO2 and H+ that drive spider silk formation via opposite effects on the terminal domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Andersson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2 in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation.

  15. Carbonic Anhydrase I Is Recognized by an SOD1 Antibody upon Biotinylation of Human Spinal Cord Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bowser

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the presence of a novel 32 kDa protein immunoreactive to a copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 antibody within the spinal cord of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. This unique protein species was generated by biotinylation of spinal cord tissue extracts to detect conformational changes of SOD1 specific to ALS patients. To further characterize this protein, we enriched the protein by column chromatography and determined its protein identity by mass spectrometry. The protein that gave rise to the 32 kDa species upon biotinylation was identified as carbonic anhydrase I (CA I. Biotinylation of CA I from ALS spinal cord resulted in the generation of a novel epitope recognized by the SOD1 antibody. This epitope could also be generated by biotinylation of extracts from cultured cells expressing human CA I. Peptide competition assays identified the amino acid sequence in carbonic anhydrase I responsible for binding the SOD1 antibody. We conclude that chemical modifications used to identify pathogenic protein conformations can lead to the identification of unanticipated proteins that may participate in disease pathogenesis.

  16. Evaluation of impacted Brazilian estuaries using the native oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae: Branchial carbonic anhydrase as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo-Linhares, Maristela; Freire, Carolina A

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the use of branchial carbonic anhydrase activity in a sessile filter feeding species, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae, as a biomarker. The oysters were collected in three human impacted Brazilian estuaries, following a crescent latitudinal gradient: in Pernambuco state (Itamaracá), in Espírito Santo state (Piraquê), and in Paraná state (Paranaguá), in August/2003 (Winter in the southern hemisphere) and February/2004 (Summer). Three sites were chosen in each estuary for oyster sampling: Reference (R), Contaminated 1 (C1, close to industrial/harbor contamination), and Contaminated 2 (C2, near to sewage discharges). Comparing to values in oysters sampled in reference sites, there was apparent inhibition in carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA) in gills of oysters from C1 of Itamaracá and from C2 of Piraquê, both cases in Summer. On the other hand, increased CAA was noted in C2 oysters of Itamaracá in winter, and of Paranaguá, in both seasons. Branchial CAA in C. rhizophorae was thus very responsive to coastal contamination. Data are consistent with its usefulness as a supporting biomarker for inexpensive and rapid analysis in the assessment of estuaries using a sessile osmoconformer species, but preferably allied to other biomarkers and with knowledge on the suite of contaminants present.

  17. The structural comparison between membrane-associated human carbonic anhydrases provides insights into drug design of selective inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterio, Vincenzo; Pan, Peiwen; Parkkila, Seppo; Buonanno, Martina; Supuran, Claudiu T; Monti, Simona M; De Simone, Giuseppina

    2014-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrase isoform XIV (CA XIV) is the last member of the human (h) CA family discovered so far, being localized in brain, kidneys, colon, small intestine, urinary bladder, liver, and spinal cord. It has recently been described as a possible drug target for treatment of epilepsy, some retinopathies as well as some skin tumors. Human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) XIV is a membrane-associated protein consisting of an N-terminal extracellular domain, a putative transmembrane region, and a small cytoplasmic tail. In this article, we report the expression, purification, and the crystallographic structure of the entire extracellular domain of this enzyme. The analysis of the structure revealed the typical α-CA fold, in which a 10-stranded β-sheet forms the core of the molecule, while the comparison with all the other membrane associated isoforms (hCAs IV, IX, and XII) allowed to identify the diverse oligomeric arrangement and the sequence and structural differences observed in the region 127-136 as the main factors to consider in the design of selective inhibitors for each one of the membrane associated α-CAs.

  18. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. E.; Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The calvaria of 5-to-6-day-old mice treated with 1 x 10 to the -8th M of 1,25(OH)2D3 in vitro for 48 hours are examined in order to study the function of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption. Calcium concentrations in the culture were measured to assess bone resorption. It is observed that 1,25(OH)2D3 effectively stimulates bone resorption in vitro and the resorption is dose-dependent. The effects of azetazolamide on 1,25(OH)2D3-induced bone resorption are investigated. The data reveal that 1,25(OH)2D3-induced calcium release is associated with an increase in the carbonic anhydrase activity of bone, and bone alkaline phosphatase activity is decreased and acid phosphatase activity is increased in response to 1,25(OH)2D3. A two-fold mechanism for 1,25(OH)2D3-induced bone resorption is proposed; the first mechanism is an indirect activation of osteoclasts and the second involves an interaction between hormone and osteoclast precursors.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest pain, and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other complications. Infants and young children and ...

  20. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fractures), muscle weakness, and the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis. Severe vitamin D deficiency can cause rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Both problems cause soft, weak bones, as well ...

  1. Factor VII deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor VII is one such coagulation factor. Factor VII deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events Spokespeople Email Alerts E-Newsletters About NHLBI Organization NHLBI Director Budget, Planning, & Legislative Advisory Committees Jobs ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related Topics ... Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digg. Share this page from the NHLBI on Facebook. Add this link to the NHLBI to my ... Deficiency Anemia article. Updated: March 26, 2014 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  5. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  6. Iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be ...

  7. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  8. Evaluation of the oxidative stress modulation in Drosophila melanogaster strains deficient in endogenous antioxidants and with chronic exposure to casiopeina Cas II-gly and gamma radiation; Evaluacion de la modulacion del estres oxidante en cepas de Drosophila melanogaster deficientes en antioxidantes endogenos y con exposicion cronica a casiopeina CII-gly y radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, E. R.

    2013-07-01

    The casiopeinas are a family of coordination compounds with copper metallic center that have shown to have antineoplastic activity. The experimental evidences suggest that its action mechanism is through the generation of free radicals. The casiopeina (Cas II-gly) is believed to causes oxidative damage in the mitochondria, leading to the cellular death. The present study has the purpose to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the tetrapyrroles: cupro-sodica chlorophyllin (CSC), protoporphyrin-Ix (Pp-Ix) and the bilirubin (Bili) against the oxidant action of the Cas II-gly. The present study will also contribute in the characterization of the biological activity of the Cas II-gly. For this purpose is quantifies the effect of these compounds in the enzymes activity, superoxide dismutase (Sod) and catalase (Cat) in wild Drosophila melanogaster strains Canton-S and in the deficient in Sod and Cat. Two protocols were used, in the first male of 1-24 h of age were pre-treated with 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 m M of Cas II-gly and later on they were treated with radiation (15 Gy), and the second 69 m M of CSC, Pp-Ix or Bili, during 8 days and later they were treated with 0.1 m M of Cas II-gly during 24 h. The enzymatic activity was measured with the detection packages of enzymes Sod and Cat of Sigma. It was found that none of the three pigments increment the Sod activity but, if they diminished that of Cat (p≤0.007). The three concentrations of Cas II-gly did not increase the Sod activity significantly, only the concentration of 0.1 m M diminishes in 5.6 U the Cat activity (p <0.03) the same as the treatment with 15 Gy of gamma rays (8 U, p <0.004). The Cas II-gly combination 0.1 m M with the pigments does not modify the Sod and Cat activity. These results suggest that the proven pigments act as antioxidants, avoiding the induction of exogenous antioxidants caused by the gamma rays or the Cas II-gly. (Author)

  9. Effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment of renal cell carcinoma on the accumulation of carbonic anhydrase IX-specific chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Kats-Ugurlu, G.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Old, L.J.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Oosterwijk, E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of three different tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) on the biodistribution of chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) cG250, which identifies carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), in nude mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) xenografts. TKIs represent the best, but

  10. Inhibition of bacterial carbonic anhydrases and zinc proteases: from orphan targets to innovative new antibiotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, C T

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-containing enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrases (CAs) and metalloproteases (MPs) play critical functions in bacteria, being involved in various steps of their life cycle, which are important for survival, colonization, acquisition of nutrients for growth and proliferation, facilitation of dissemination, invasion and pathogenicity. The development of resistance to many classes of clinically used antibiotics emphasizes the need of new antibacterial drug targets to be explored. There is a wealth of data regarding bacterial CAs and zinc MPs present in many pathogenic species, such as Neisseria spp., Helycobacter pylori Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria spp, Vibrio spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Streptomyces spp., Clostridium spp., Enterococcus spp., etc. Some of these enzymes have been cloned, purified and characterized by crystallographic techniques. However, for the moment, few potent and specific inhibitors for bacterial MPs have been reported except for Clostridium histolyticum collagenase, botulinum and tetanus neurotoxin and anthrax lethal factor, which will be reviewed in this article. Bacteria encode α-,β-, and/or γ-CA families, but up to now only the first two classes have been investigated in some detail in different species. The α-CAs from Neisseria spp. and H. pylori as well as the β-class enzymes from E. coli, H. pylori, M. tuberculosis, Brucella spp., S. pneumoniae, S. enterica and H. influenzae have been cloned and characterized. The catalytic/inhibition mechanisms of these CAs are well understood as X-ray crystal structures are available for some of them, but no adducts of these enzymes with inhibitors have been characterized so far. In vitro and in vivo studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates have been reported. Only for Neisseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S

  11. Expression of transmembrane carbonic anhydrases, CAIX and CAXII, in human development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerman Michael I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmembrane CAIX and CAXII are members of the alpha carbonic anhydrase (CA family. They play a crucial role in differentiation, proliferation, and pH regulation. Expression of CAIX and CAXII proteins in tumor tissues is primarily induced by hypoxia and this is particularly true for CAIX, which is regulated by the transcription factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. Their distributions in normal adult human tissues are restricted to highly specialized cells that are not always hypoxic. The human fetus exists in a relatively hypoxic environment. We examined expression of CAIX, CAXII and HIF-1α in the developing human fetus and postnatal tissues to determine whether expression of CAIX and CAXII is exclusively regulated by HIF-1. Results The co-localization of CAIX and HIF-1α was limited to certain cell types in embryonic and early fetal tissues. Those cells comprised the primitive mesenchyma or involved chondrogenesis and skin development. Transient CAIX expression was limited to immature tissues of mesodermal origin and the skin and ependymal cells. The only tissues that persistently expressed CAIX protein were coelomic epithelium (mesothelium and its remnants, the epithelium of the stomach and biliary tree, glands and crypt cells of duodenum and small intestine, and the cells located at those sites previously identified as harboring adult stem cells in, for example, the skin and large intestine. In many instances co-localization of CAIX and HIF-1α was not evident. CAXII expression is restricted to cells involved in secretion and water absorption such as parietal cells of the stomach, acinar cells of the salivary glands and pancreas, epithelium of the large intestine, and renal tubules. Co-localization of CAXII with CAIX or HIF-1α was not observed. Conclusion The study has showed that: 1 HIF-1α and CAIX expression co- localized in many, but not all, of the embryonic and early fetal tissues; 2 There is no evidence of

  12. Linking Carbonic Anhydrase Abundance and Diversity in Soils to Ecological Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, E.; Meredith, L. K.; Welander, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is an ancient enzyme widespread among bacteria, archaea, and eukarya that catalyzes the following reaction: CO2 + H2O ⇌ HCO3- + H+. Its functions are critical for key cellular processes such as concentrating CO2 for autotrophic growth, pH regulation, and pathogen survival in hosts. Currently, there are six known CA classes (α, β, γ, δ, η, ζ) arising from several distinct evolutionary lineages. CA are widespread in sequenced genomes, with many organisms containing multiple classes of CA or multiple CA of the same class. Soils host rich microbial communities with diverse and important ecological functions, but the diversity and abundance of CA in soils has not been explored. CA appears to play an important, but poorly understood, role in some biogeochemical cycles such as those of CO2 and its oxygen isotope composition and also carbonyl sulfide (COS), which are potential tracers in predictive carbon cycle models. Recognizing the prevalence and functional significance of CA in soils, we used a combined bioinformatics and molecular biology approach to address fundamental questions regarding the abundance, diversity, and function of CA in soils. To characterize the abundance and diversity of the different CA classes in soils, we analyzed existing soil metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data from the DOE Joint Genome Institute databases. Out of the six classes of CA, we only found the α, β, and γ classes to be present in soils, with the β class being the most abundant. We also looked at genomes of sequenced soil microorganisms to learn what combination of CA classes they contain, from which we can begin to predict the physiological role of CA. To characterize the functional roles of the different CA classes in soils, we collected soil samples from a variety of biomes with diverse chemical and physical properties and quantified the rate of two CA-mediated processes: soil uptake of COS and acceleration of the oxygen isotope exchange

  13. H,K-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase response to chronic systemic rat gastric hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulfah Lutfiah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia may induce gastric ulcer associated with excessive hidrogen chloride (HCl secretion. Synthesis of HCl involves 2 enzymes, H,K-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase (CA. This study aimed to clarify the underlying cause of gastric ulcer in chronic hypoxic condition, by investigating the H,K-ATPase and CA9 response in rats.Methods: This study was an in vivo experiment, to know the relationship between hypoxia to expression of H,K-ATPase and CA9 mRNA, and H,K-ATPase and total CA specific activity of chronic systemic rat gastric hypoxia. The result was compared to control. Data was analyzed by SPSS. If the data distribution was normal and homogeneous, ANOVA and LSD post-hoc test were used. However, if the distribution was not normal and not homogeneous, and still as such after transformation, data was treated in non-parametric using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Twenty five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: rats undergoing hypoxia for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days placed in hypoxia chamber (10% O2, 90% N2, and one control group. Following this treatment, stomach of the rats was extracted and homogenized. Expression of H,K-ATPase and CA9 mRNA was measured using real time RT-PCR. Specific activity of H,K-ATPase was measured using phosphate standard solution, and specific activity of total CA was measured using p-nitrophenol solution.Results: The expression of H,K-ATPase mRNA was higher in the first day (2.159, and drastically lowered from the third to seventh day (0.289; 0.108; 0.062. Specific activities of H,K-ATPase was slightly higher in the first day (0.765, then was lowered in the third (0.685 and fifth day (0.655, and was higher in the seventh day (0.884. The expression of CA9 mRNA was lowered progressively from the first to seventh day (0.84; 0.766; 0.736; 0.343. Specific activities of total CA was low in the first day (0.083, and was higher from the third to seventh day (0.111; 0.136; 0.144.Conclusion: In hypoxia

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  15. L-carnitine and cancer cachexia. II. Effects of lipid emulsion used in total parenteral nutrition on parameters of hemostasis and inflammatory state in L-carnitine deficiency in myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefel, Jarosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kawecki, Krzysztof; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydłowska, Wiesława

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a progressive loss of body mass, leads to malnutrition and deficiencies of essential substances including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and L-carnitine (LC). The availability of these 2 compounds determines the rate of eicosanoid synthesis, which modulates inflammatory processes and hemostasis. We compared the effects of administration of emulsions containing long chain triglycerides (LCTs) relative to a 50:50 mix of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) with LCTs on hemostasis and inflammatory reactions in patients with CC. The study was conducted on 50 patients with CC (23 women, 27 men) aged 66 ± 11 years with a mean loss in body weight of 21 ± 9% in the previous 6 months. Twenty patients received MCTs/LCTs while 30 received LCTs. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was administered using the 'all in one' method (25 kcal/kg/day, protein 1.2 g/kg/day). Selected parameters of coagulation and inflammatory state were evaluated on days 1, 5, 7 and 11 of TPN. Initial concentrations of D-dimers, fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), fibronectin, CRP and IL-6 significantly exceeded the upper limit of the reference values. After 10 days of TPN, we detected significant differences in inflammatory state and hemostasis. Immunological state and hemostasis varied depending on the type of fat emulsion administered. The most likely reasons are the 2-fold higher concentrations of PUFAs in LCTs relative to MCTs/LCTs and a deficiency of LC in skeletal muscles. Both of these factors may contribute to the observed increase in the rate of eicosanoid synthesis.

  16. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  17. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  18. Antepartum Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Nakajima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD is the most common type urea cycle enzyme deficiencies. This syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme ornithine transcarbamylase, which catalyzes the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrullin. Our case was a 28-year-old female diagnosed with OTCD following neurocognitive deficit during her first pregnancy. Although hyperammonemia was suspected as the cause of the patient's mental changes, there was no evidence of chronic liver disease. Plasma amino acid and urine organic acid analysis revealed OTCD. After combined modality treatment with arginine, sodium benzoate and hemodialysis, the patient's plasma ammonia level stabilized and her mental status returned to normal. At last she recovered without any damage left.

  19. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  20. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi for the management of Chagas disease: an underexplored therapeutic opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    An α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) was recently discovered, cloned and characterized in the genome of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a neglected but widespread tropical disease. Inhibition of this α-CAs (TcCA) with anions, sulfonamides, sulfamates, thiols and hydroxamates has been investigated in detail, with several low nanomolar in vitro inhibitors. Although the sulfonamides were the best in vitro inhibitors, they showed no ex vivo anti-T. cruzi activity, due to poor penetration. However, some thiols and hydroxamates acting as low nanomolar TcCA inhibitors also showed significant antitrypanosomal ex vivo activity, making this enzyme an attractive yet underexplored drug target for the management of Chagas disease.

  1. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  2. Carbon anhydrase IX specific immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma potentially cured by interleukin-2 based immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The majority of clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) show high and homogeneous expression levels of the tumor associated antigen (TAA) carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2) based immunotherapy can lead to cure in patients with metastatic renal cell...... of disease (NED) following treatment with IL-2 based immunotherapy, and thus potentially cured. Immune reactivity in these patients was compared with samples from patients with dramatic tumor response obtained immediately at the cessation of therapy, samples from patients that experienced progressive disease...... interest in future cancer vaccines, but more studies are needed to elucidate the immunological mechanisms of action in potentially cured patients treated with an immunotherapeutic agent....

  3. Rate-based modelling and validation of a pilot absorber using MDEA enhanced with carbonic anhydrase (CA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Gladis, Arne; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    The great paradox of the 21st century is that we must meet the increasing global demand for energy and products while simultaneously mitigating the climate change. If both these criteria are to be met, carbon capture and storage is an imperative technology for sustainable energy infrastructure...... development. Post-combustion capture is a mature capture technology, however, to make it economically attractive, design of innovative solvents and process optimization is of crucial importance. An example for promising solvent is MDEA enhanced with carbonic anhydrase (CA), due to its fast kinetics and low...... for different L/G ratios, lean CO2 loadings, gas CO2 content and packing height. We show that the developed model is suitable for CO2 capture simulation and optimization using MDEA and MDEA enhanced with CA. Furthermore, we investigate the accuracy of the General Method (GM) enhancement factor model for CO2...

  4. Effect the some heavy metals on carbonic anhydrase enzymes activities from non-tumour and tumour human stomach

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, in vitro effects of certain heavy metals on the human carbonic anhydrase enzyme were examined. Inhibitory effects of metal ions ( Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+,Cr2+, Al3+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+) were observed in tumour and non-tumour tissue. IC50 values were calculated for metals. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+ IC50 values of tumour tissue were calculated as 0.034mM, 0.426mM, 0.597mM, 0.878mM and 2.52mM respectively. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+  IC50 values of non-tu...

  5. Knock-down of hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases IX and XII radiosensitizes tumor cells by increasing intracellular acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eDoyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between acidosis within the tumor microenvironment and radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells remains unclear. Previously we reported that hypoxia-induced carbonic anhydrases CAIX and CAXII constitute a robust pHi-regulating system that confers a survival advantage on hypoxic human colon carcinoma LS174Tr cells in acidic microenvironments. Here we investigate the role of acidosis, CAIX and CAXII knock-down in combination with ionizing radiation. Fibroblasts cells (-/+ CAIX and LS174Tr cells (inducible knock-down for ca9/ca12 were analyzed for cell cycle phase distribution and survival after irradiation in extracellular pHo manipulations and hypoxia (1% O2 exposure. Radiotherapy was used to target ca9/ca12-silenced LS174Tr tumors grown in nude mice. We found that diminishing the pHi-regulating capacity of fibroblasts through inhibition of NHE-1 sensitize cells to radiation-induced cell death. Secondly, the pHi-regulating function of CAIX plays a key protective role in irradiated fibroblasts in an acidic environment as accompanied by a reduced number of cells in the radiosensitive phases of the cell cycle. Thirdly, we demonstrate that irradiation of LS174Tr spheroids, silenced for either ca9 or both ca9/ca12, showed a respective 50% and 75% increase in cell death as a result of a decrease in cell number in the radioresistant S phase and a disruption of CA-mediated pHi regulation. Finally, LS174Tr tumor progression was strongly decreased when ca9/ca12 silencing was combined with irradiation in vivo. These findings highlight the combinatory use of radiotherapy with targeting of the pHi-regulating carbonic anhydrases as an anti-cancer strategy.

  6. Identifying potential selective fluorescent probes for cancer-associated protein carbonic anhydrase IX using a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Rhiannon L; Floriano, Wely B

    2014-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a biomarker for tumor hypoxia. Fluorescent inhibitors of CAIX have been used to study hypoxic tumor cell lines. However, these inhibitor-based fluorescent probes may have a therapeutic effect that is not appropriate for monitoring treatment efficacy. In the search for novel fluorescent probes that are not based on known inhibitors, a database of 20,860 fluorescent compounds was virtually screened against CAIX using hierarchical virtual ligand screening (HierVLS). The screening database contained 14,862 compounds tagged with the ATTO680 fluorophore plus an additional 5998 intrinsically fluorescent compounds. Overall ranking of compounds to identify hit molecular probe candidates utilized a principal component analysis (PCA) approach. Four potential binding sites, including the catalytic site, were identified within the structure of the protein and targeted for virtual screening. Available sequence information for 23 carbonic anhydrase isoforms was used to prioritize the four sites based on the estimated "uniqueness" of each site in CAIX relative to the other isoforms. A database of 32 known inhibitors and 478 decoy compounds was used to validate the methodology. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis using the first principal component (PC1) as predictive score for the validation database yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. AUC is interpreted as the probability that a binder will have a better score than a non-binder. The use of first component analysis of binding energies for multiple sites is a novel approach for hit selection. The very high prediction power for this approach increases confidence in the outcome from the fluorescent library screening. Ten of the top scoring candidates for isoform-selective putative binding sites are suggested for future testing as fluorescent molecular probe candidates.

  7. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  8. Factor V deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly. Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by: A defective Factor V gene passed down through families (inherited) An antibody that interferes with normal Factor ...

  9. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficien

  10. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    biennially to exchange views and research findings. The fourth biennial meeting was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2-3 June 2005. This review covers the wide range of AAT deficiency-related topics that were addressed encompassing advances in genetic characterization, risk factor identification, clinical...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  11. Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency? Sleep deprivation (DEP-rih-VA-shun) is a condition that ... the following: You don't get enough sleep (sleep deprivation) You sleep at the wrong time of day ( ...

  12. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  13. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: II. Performance of a laboratory network running the HPLC candidate reference measurement procedure and evaluation of a candidate reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos P M; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Weykamp, Cas; Siebelder, Carla; Anton, Raymond F; Schellenberg, François; Whitfield, John B

    2010-11-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a descriptive term used for a temporary change in the transferrin glycosylation profile caused by alcohol, and used as a biomarker of chronic high alcohol consumption. The use of an array of methods for measurement of CDT in various absolute or relative amounts, and sometimes covering different transferrin glycoforms, has complicated the comparability of results and caused confusion among medical staff. This situation prompted initiation of an IFCC Working Group on CDT standardization. This second publication of the WG-CDT covers the establishment of a network of reference laboratories running a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) candidate reference measurement procedure, and evaluation of candidate secondary reference materials. The network laboratories demonstrated good and reproducible performance and thus can be used to assign target values for calibrators and controls. A candidate secondary reference material based on native human serum lyophilized with a cryo-/lyoprotectant to prevent protein denaturation was found to be commutable and stable during storage. A proposed strategy for calibration of different CDT methods is also presented. In an external quality assurance study involving 66 laboratories and covering the current routine CDT assays (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and immunoassay), recalculation of observed results based on the nominal values for the candidate calibrator reduced the overall coefficient of variation from 18.9% to 5.5%. The logistics for distribution of reference materials and review of results were found to be functional, indicating that a full reference system for CDT may soon be available.

  14. Folate deficiency and neurological disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, M I

    1976-01-01

    The restless legs syndrome could represent a folate responsive disorder in both patients with acquired-folate deficiency and those with familial symptomatology. Patients with acquired folate-deficiency could be divided into two subgroups. (i) those with minor neurological signs (restless legs syndrome, vibration sense impairment and tactile hypoesthesia in both legs with diminished ankle jerks and a prolonged or assymetrical Achilles-reflex time) and (ii) those with major neurological signs (subacute combined degeneration with or without neuropathies). In some of these patients the classical triad of the malabsorption syndrome is replaced by another triad, constipation, abnormal jejunal biopsy and abnormal d-xylose absorption. A low folic serum acid level could induce minor neuropsychiatric symptoms while an additional low CSF folate could induce major neurological symptoms in spite of the presence of a normal erythrocyte folate level and in the absence of frank anemia. Possible further studies are described.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  16. Growth Hormone Deficiency in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... c m y one in Children What is growth hormone deficiency? Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is a rare condition in which the body does not make enough growth hormone (GH). GH is made by the pituitary gland, ...

  17. [Vitamin E deficiency in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C; Polanco, I; Hernanz, A; Carrasco, S; Barea, I; Murga, M L; Arroba, M L; Codoceo, R

    1987-12-01

    Plasma vitamin E levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 42 children with cystic fibrosis and were correlated with the following parameters: sex, age, time of follow-up, clinical evolution (Schwachman score), vitamin E/cholesterol and faecal fat excretion. All children in this study received oral alfa-tocoferol (50-100 mg daily) from the diagnosis. According to the vitamin E level patients were distributed in two groups. Group I: 27 patients (64.3%) with normal concentrations. Group II: 15 patients (35.7%) with decreases plasma levels but without clinical manifestations. Steatorrhea was present in all children except 4 patients from group I and one patient from group II. On the other hand, vitamin E/cholesterol was normal in 80% of patients with vitamin E deficiency (group II). We did not find any correlation between plasma vitamin E levels and the different clinical and biological parameters studied. Further studies should be carried out to throw more light on the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of vitamin E deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  18. The changes in the chloroplast membranes of pea leaves under the influence of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (ions of copper and zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Vodka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Тhe effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, such as ions Cu2+ and Zn2+, on the membrane system of chloroplasts in pea leaves were investigated. After treatment of pea leaves with 250 mM Cu2+ or 400 mM Zn2+ we observed changes in the granal structure and compactness of the thylakoids in granae. It was shown that the thickness of granal thylakoids and the interspace between thylakoids increased comparing to control. Changes of the size and structure of thylakoids and granae in treated leaves may be associated with the enhanced accumulation of CO2 in the membrane. It is suggested that the carbonic anhydrase may also play a structural role in chloroplast granae.

  19. Research progress of carbon dioxide capture by using carbonic anhydrase%碳酸酐酶用于二氧化碳捕集的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静

    2012-01-01

    碳酸酐酶(CA)可以加速捕集化石燃料燃烧产生的二氧化碳,从而降低CO2的排放量.主要介绍了CA的来源、活性、稳定性及作用.分析了使用新型生物方法对二氧化碳进行捕集和储存的优缺点,并对下一步的工作进行了展望.%It has been demonstrated that carbonic anhydrase has the potential of accelerating of carbon dioxide capture from fossil fuel and reduce the discharge of carbon dioxide. The source, activity, stability and functions of carbonic anhydrase are mainly presented. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of using new biological for carbon dioxide capture and storage are discussed and analyzed, and the further study is prospected.

  20. Hepatoprotective effects of Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] on alcohol-damaged primary rat hepatocyte culture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenhua; Bian, Yuzhu; Wang, Zhenghui; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2017-02-01

    We have prepared a novel nanobiotherapeutic, Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase], which not only transports both oxygen and carbon dioxide but also a therapeutic antioxidant. Our previous study in a severe sustained 90 min hemorrhagic shock rat model shows that it has a hepatoprotective effect. We investigate its hepatoprotective effect further in this present report using an alcohol-damaged primary hepatocyte culture model. Results show that it significantly reduced ethanol-induced AST release, lipid peroxidation, and ROS production in rat primary hepatocytes culture. It also significantly enhanced the viability of ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Thus, the result shows that Poly-[hemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase] also has some hepatoprotective effects against alcohol-induced injury in in vitro rat primary hepatocytes cell culture. This collaborate our previous observation of its hepatoprotective effect in a severe sustained 90-min hemorrhagic shock rat model.

  1. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  2. Severe Hypocalcemia due to Vitamin D Deficiency after Extended Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    OpenAIRE

    Miñambres, I.; Chico, A.; Pérez, A.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a well-known comorbidity of obesity that can be exacerbated after bariatric surgery and can predispose the patient for hypocalcemia. Vitamin D and calcium doses to prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency after weight loss surgery are not well defined. We describe a patient who developed severe hypocalcemia due to vitamin D deficiency 5 years after an extended Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for a type II obesity. No precipitating factors were present and malabsorption induced ...

  3. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  4. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  5. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7290 - Factor deficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... defects, to monitor certain types of therapy, to detect coagulation inhibitors, and to detect a carrier state (a person carrying both a recessive gene for a coagulation factor deficiency such as hemophilia and the corresponding normal gene). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Mechanisms of cataractogenesis in the presence of magnesium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Iezhitsa, Igor N; Agarwal, Puneet; Spasov, Alexander A

    2013-01-01

    Senile cataract is the most common cause of bilateral blindness and results from the loss of transparency of the lens. Maintenance of the unique tissue architecture of the lens is vital for keeping the lens transparent. Membrane transport mechanisms utilizing several magnesium (Mg)-dependent ATPases, play an important role in maintaining lens homeostasis. Therefore, in Mg-deficiency states, ATPase dysfunctions lead to intracellular depletion of K(+) and accumulation of Na(+) and Ca(2+). High intracellular Ca(2+) causes activation of the enzyme calpain II, which leads to the denaturation of crystallin, the soluble lens protein required for maintaining the transparency of the lens. Mg deficiency also interferes with ATPase functions by causing cellular ATP depletion. Furthermore, Mg deficiency enhances lenticular oxidative stress by increased production of free radicals and depletion of antioxidant defenses. Therefore, Mg supplementation may be of therapeutic value in preventing the onset and progression of cataracts in conditions associated with Mg deficiency.

  8. Common genetic denominators for Ca++-based skeleton in Metazoa: role of osteoclast-stimulating factor and of carbonic anhydrase in a calcareous sponge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner E G Müller

    Full Text Available Calcium-based matrices serve predominantly as inorganic, hard skeletal systems in Metazoa from calcareous sponges [phylum Porifera; class Calcarea] to proto- and deuterostomian multicellular animals. The calcareous sponges form their skeletal elements, the spicules, from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC. Treatment of spicules from Sycon raphanus with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl results in the disintegration of the ACC in those skeletal elements. Until now a distinct protein/enzyme involved in ACC metabolism could not been identified in those animals. We applied the technique of phage display combinatorial libraries to identify oligopeptides that bind to NaOCl-treated spicules: those oligopeptides allowed us to detect proteins that bind to those spicules. Two molecules have been identified, the (putative enzyme carbonic anhydrase and the (putative osteoclast-stimulating factor (OSTF, that are involved in the catabolism of ACC. The complete cDNAs were isolated and the recombinant proteins were prepared to raise antibodies. In turn, immunofluorescence staining of tissue slices and qPCR analyses have been performed. The data show that sponges, cultivated under standard condition (10 mM CaCl(2 show low levels of transcripts/proteins for carbonic anhydrase or OSTF, compared to those animals that had been cultivated under Ca(2+-depletion condition (1 mM CaCl(2. Our data identify with the carbonic anhydrase and the OSTF the first two molecules which remain conserved in cells, potentially involved in Ca-based skeletal dissolution, from sponges (sclerocytes to human (osteoclast.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia A A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  11. Selenoprotein O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jidong; Fei, Yao; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2016-10-01

    Selenoprotein O (Sel O) is a selenium-containing protein, but its function is still unclear. In the present study, we observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of Sel O increased during chondrogenic induction of ATDC5 cells. The effects of Sel O on chondrocyte differentiation were then examined through shRNA-mediated gene silencing technique. The expression of Sel O was significantly suppressed at both mRNA and protein levels in a stable cell line transfected with a Sel O-specific target shRNA construct. Thereafter, we demonstrated that Sel O deficiencies suppress chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Sel O deficiencies inhibited expression of chondrogenic gene Sox9, Col II, and aggrecan. Sel O-deficient cells also accumulated a few cartilage glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and decreased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, Sel O deficiencies inhibited chondrocyte proliferation through delayed cell cycle progression by suppression of cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, Sel O deficiencies induced chondrocyte death through cell apoptosis. In summary, we describe the expression patterns and the essential roles of Sel O in chondrocyte viability, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation. Additionally, Sel O deficiency-mediated impaired chondrogenesis may illustrate the mechanisms of Se deficiency in the pathophysiological process of the endemic osteoarthropathy.

  12. How prevalent is vitamin B(12) deficiency among vegetarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman; Parrott, Scott James; Raj, Sudha; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lucus, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    Vegetarians are at risk for vitamin B(12) (B12) deficiency due to suboptimal intake. The goal of the present literature review was to assess the rate of B12 depletion and deficiency among vegetarians and vegans. Using a PubMed search to identify relevant publications, 18 articles were found that reported B12 deficiency rates from studies that identified deficiency by measuring methylmalonic acid, holo-transcobalamin II, or both. The deficiency rates reported for specific populations were as follows: 62% among pregnant women, between 25% and almost 86% among children, 21-41% among adolescents, and 11-90% among the elderly. Higher rates of deficiency were reported among vegans compared with vegetarians and among individuals who had adhered to a vegetarian diet since birth compared with those who had adopted such a diet later in life. The main finding of this review is that vegetarians develop B12 depletion or deficiency regardless of demographic characteristics, place of residency, age, or type of vegetarian diet. Vegetarians should thus take preventive measures to ensure adequate intake of this vitamin, including regular consumption of supplements containing B12.

  13. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John J; Trakadis, Yannis J; Scriver, Charles R

    2011-08-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine. It occurs in approximately 1:15,000 individuals. Deficiency of this enzyme produces a spectrum of disorders including classic phenylketonuria, mild phenylketonuria, and mild hyperphenylalaninemia. Classic phenylketonuria is caused by a complete or near-complete deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity and without dietary restriction of phenylalanine most children will develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Mild phenylketonuria and mild hyperphenylalaninemia are associated with lower risk of impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency can be diagnosed by newborn screening based on detection of the presence of hyperphenylalaninemia using the Guthrie microbial inhibition assay or other assays on a blood spot obtained from a heel prick. Since the introduction of newborn screening, the major neurologic consequences of hyperphenylalaninemia have been largely eradicated. Affected individuals can lead normal lives. However, recent data suggest that homeostasis is not fully restored with current therapy. Treated individuals have a higher incidence of neuropsychological problems. The mainstay of treatment for hyperphenylalaninemia involves a low-protein diet and use of a phenylalanine-free medical formula. This treatment must commence as soon as possible after birth and should continue for life. Regular monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is necessary. Targets of plasma phenylalanine of 120-360 μmol/L (2-6 mg/dL) in the first decade of life are essential for optimal outcome. Phenylalanine targets in adolescence and adulthood are less clear. A significant proportion of patients with phenylketonuria may benefit from adjuvant therapy with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin stereoisomer. Special consideration must be

  14. Educação inclusiva: o olhar do professor sobre a prática pedagógica para o aluno com deficiência no ensino fundamental II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cavalcante de Andrade Louzada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available objetivo do estudo foi investigar a visão do professor sobre o trabalho pedagógico com alunos público-alvo da educação especial (PAEE no ensino fundamental II. Participaram do estudo duas professoras de uma escola da rede estadual de ensino, que atuam em sala de aula comum em diferentes áreas do conhecimento. Trata-se de um Estudo de Caso de abordagem qualitativa, que adotou como instrumento de coleta de dados um roteiro de entrevista semiestruturado. Posterior à realização das entrevistas, foi feita a transcrição das gravações na íntegra a fim de obter os dados para análise. A análise desse material foi realizada a partir da Análise de Conteúdo de Bardin (2011. Os resultados revelam o conhecimento dos participantes sobre os apoios pedagógicos especializados ofertados aos alunos PAEE para cursar o ensino fundamental. Embora reconheçam a importância desse suporte, indicam a falta de qualificação profissional para orientá-los na apropriação do currículo em sala de aula comum. Somadas a esse aspecto, considerar como os professores buscam diminuir a exclusão e qualificar o rendimento escolar para esse alunado nesta etapa de ensino, constitui-se a tônica deste estudo.

  15. How does the exchange of one oxygen atom with sulfur affect the catalytic cycle of carbonic anhydrase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Stephan; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2004-06-21

    We have extended our investigations of the carbonic anhydrase (CA) cycle with the model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) and CO(2) by studying further heterocumulenes and catalysts. We investigated the hydration of COS, an atmospheric trace gas. This reaction plays an important role in the global COS cycle since biological consumption, that is, uptake by higher plants, algae, lichens, and soil, represents the dominant terrestrial sink for this gas. In this context, CA has been identified by a member of our group as the key enzyme for the consumption of COS by conversion into CO(2) and H(2)S. We investigated the hydration mechanism of COS by using density functional theory to elucidate the details of the catalytic cycle. Calculations were first performed for the uncatalyzed gas phase reaction. The rate-determining step for direct reaction of COS with H(2)O has an energy barrier of deltaG=53.2 kcal mol(-1). We then employed the CA model system [(H(3)N)(3)ZnOH](+) (1) and studied the effect on the catalytic hydration mechanism of replacing an oxygen atom with sulfur. When COS enters the carbonic anhydrase cycle, the sulfur atom is incorporated into the catalyst to yield [(H(3)N)(3)ZnSH](+) (27) and CO(2). The activation energy of the nucleophilic attack on COS, which is the rate-determining step, is somewhat higher (20.1 kcal mol(-1) in the gas phase) than that previously reported for CO(2). The sulfur-containing model 27 is also capable of catalyzing the reaction of CO(2) to produce thiocarbonic acid. A larger barrier has to be overcome for the reaction of 27 with CO(2) compared to that for the reaction of 1 with CO(2). At a well-defined stage of this cycle, a different reaction path can emerge: a water molecule helps to regenerate the original catalyst 1 from 27, a process accompanied by the formation of thiocarbonic acid. We finally demonstrate that nature selected a surprisingly elegant and efficient group of reactants, the [L(3)ZnOH](+)/CO(2)/H(2)O system, that helps

  16. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  17. Treatment of carnitine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S C

    2003-01-01

    Carnitine deficiency is a secondary complication of many inborn errors of metabolism. Pharmacological treatment with carnitine not only corrects the deficiency, it facilitates removal of accumulating toxic acyl intermediates and the generation of mitochondrial free coenzyme A (CoA). The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved the use of carnitine for the treatment of inborn errors of metabolism in 1992. This approval was based on retrospective chart analysis of 90 patients, with 18 in the untreated cohort and 72 in the treated cohort. Efficacy was evaluated on the basis of clinical and biochemical findings. Compelling data included increased excretion of disease-specific acylcarnitine derivatives in a dose-response relationship, decreased levels of metabolites in the blood, and improved clinical status with decreased hospitalization frequency, improved growth and significantly lower mortality rates as compared to historical controls. Complications of carnitine treatment were few, with gastrointestinal disturbances and odour being the most frequent. No laboratory or clinical safety issues were identified. Intravenous carnitine preparations were also approved for treatment of secondary carnitine deficiency. Since only 25% of enteral carnitine is absorbed and gastrointestinal tolerance of high doses is poor, parenteral carnitine treatment is an appealing alternative therapeutic approach. In 7 patients treated long term with high-dose weekly to daily venous boluses of parenteral carnitine through a subcutaneous venous port, benefits included decreased frequency of decompensations, improved growth, improved muscle strength and decreased reliance on medical foods with liberalization of protein intake. Port infections were the most troubling complication. Theoretical concerns continue to be voiced that carnitine might result in fatal arrhythmias in patients with long-chain fat metabolism defects. No published clinical studies substantiate these

  18. Biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes in the alpha-glucosidase II-deficient modA mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum: retention of alpha-1,3-linked glucose on N-linked oligosaccharides delays intracellular transport but does not alter sorting of alpha-mannosidase or beta-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D L; Bush, J M; Dimond, R L; Cardelli, J A

    1989-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme alpha-glucosidase II is responsible for removing the two alpha-1,3-linked glucose residues from N-linked oligosaccharides of glycoproteins. This activity is missing in the modA mutant strain, M31, of Dictyostelium discoideum. Results from both radiolabeled pulse-chase and subcellular fractionation experiments indicate that this deficiency did not prevent intracellular transport and proteolytic processing of the lysosomal enzymes, alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase. However, the rate at which the glucosylated precursors left the rough endoplasmic reticulum was several-fold slower than the rate at which the wild-type precursors left this compartment. Retention of glucose residues did not disrupt the binding of the precursor forms of the enzymes with intracellular membranes, indicating that the delay in movement of proteins from the ER did not result from lack of association with membranes. However, the mutant alpha-mannosidase precursor contained more trypsin-sensitive sites than did the wild-type precursor, suggesting that improper folding of precursor molecules might account for the slow rate of transport to the Golgi complex. Percoll density gradient fractionation of extracts prepared from M31 cells indicated that the proteolytically processed mature forms of alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase were localized to lysosomes. Finally, the mutation in M31 may have other, more dramatic, effects on the lysosomal system since two enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminidase and acid phosphatase, were secreted much less efficiently from lysosomal compartments by the mutant strain.

  19. Synthesis of 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamides and their carbonic anhydrase inhibitory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Halise Inci; Kucukoglu, Kaan; Yamali, Cem; Bilginer, Sinan; Yuca, Hafize; Ozturk, Iknur; Taslimi, Parham; Gulcin, Ilhami; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamides were synthesized by microwave irradiation and their chemical structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)CNMR, and HRMS. Ketones used were: Acetophenone (S1), 4-methylacetophenone (S2), 4-chloroacetophenone (S3), 4-fluoroacetophenone (S4), 4-bromoacetophenone (S5), 4-methoxyacetophenone (S6), 4-nitroacetophenone (S7), 2-acetylthiophene (S8), 2-acetylfuran (S9), 1-indanone (S10), 2-indanone (S11). The compounds S9, S10 and S11 were reported for the first time, while S1-S8 was synthesized by different method than literature reported using microwave irradiation method instead of conventional heating in this study. The inhibitory effects of 4-(2-substituted hydrazinyl)benzenesulfonamide derivatives (S1-S11) against hCA I and II were studied. Cytosolic hCA I and II isoenzymes were potently inhibited by new synthesized sulphonamide derivatives with Kis in the range of 1.79 ± 0.22-2.73 ± 0.08 nM against hCA I and in the range of 1.72 ± 0.58-11.64 ± 5.21 nM against hCA II, respectively.

  20. Phosphorus Deficiency in Ducklins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiHengmin; LuoLingping

    1995-01-01

    20 one-day-old Tianfu ducklings were fed on a natural diet deficient in phosphorus(Ca 0.80%,P 0.366%)for three weeks and examined for signs and lesions.Signs began to appear at the age of one week,and became serous at two weeks.13 ducklings died during the experiment.Morbidity was 100% and mortality was 65%.The affected ducklings mainly showed leg weakness,severe lamencess,deprssion,lack of appetite and stunted growth,The serum alkaline phosphatase activities increased markedly.The serum phosphorus concentration,tibial ash,ash calcium and phosphorus content decreased obviously.At necropsy,maxillae and ribe were soft,and the latter was crooked.Long ones were soft and broke easily.The hypertrophic zone of the growth-plate in the epiphysis of long ones was lengthened and osteoid tissue increased in the metaphyseal spongiosa histopathologically.The above mentioned symptoms and lesions could be prevented by adding phosphorus to the natural deficient diet(up to 0.65%),The relationship between lesions and signs,pathomorphological characterisation and pathogensis were also discussed in this paper.

  1. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  2. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  3. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  4. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blo...

  5. Inhibition of the alpha- and beta-carbonic anhydrases from the gastric pathogen Helycobacter pylori with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori encodes two carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), an α- and a β-class one, hpαCA and hpβCA, crucial for its survival in the acidic environment from the stomach. Sulfonamides, strong inhibitors of these enzymes, block the growth of the pathogen, in vitro and in vivo. Here we report the inhibition of the two H. pylori CAs with inorganic and complex anions and other molecules interacting with zinc proteins. hpαCA was inhibited in the low micromolar range by diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamide, sulfamic acid, phenylboronic acid, and in the submillimolar one by cyanide, cyanate, hydrogen sulfide, divanadate, tellurate, perruthenate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, iminodisulfonate. hpβCA generally showed a stronger inhibition with most of these anions, with several low micromolar and many submillimolar inhibitors detected. These inhibitors may be used as leads for developing anti-H. pylori agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to clinically used antibiotics.

  6. Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of a β-carbonic anhydrase from the soil bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Supuran, Claudiu T; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Osman Beldüz, Ali

    2016-12-01

    A recombinant carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the soil-dwelling bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 was cloned and purified by Co(2+) affinity chromatography. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the new enzyme (denominated here B13-CA) belongs to the β-class CAs and to possess 95% homology with the ortholog enzyme from Escherichia coli encoded by the can gene, whereas its sequence homology with the other such enzyme from E. coli (encoded by the cynT gene) was of 33%. B13-CA was characterized kinetically as a catalyst for carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons. The enzyme shows a significant catalytic activity, with the following kinetic parameters at 20 °C and pH of 8.3: kcat of 4.8 × 10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.6 × 10(7) M(-1) × s(-1). This activity was potently inhibited by acetazolamide which showed a KI of 78.9 nM. Although only this compound was investigated for the moment as B13-CA inhibitor, further studies may reveal new classes of inhibitors/activators of this enzyme which may show biomedical or environmental applications, considering the posssible role of this enzyme in CaCO3 biomineralization processes.

  7. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the newly discovered bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Beldüz, Ali Osman; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-04-01

    The genome of the newly identified bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 encodes for a β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), EspCA. This enzyme was recently cloned, and characterized kinetically by this group (J. Enzyme Inhib. Med. Chem. 2016, 31). Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and sulfamates of this enzyme. The best EspCA inhibitors were some sulfanylated sulfonamides with elongated molecules, metanilamide, 4-aminoalkyl-benzenesulfonamides, acetazolamide, and deacetylated methazolamide (KIs in the range of 58.7-96.5nM). Clinically used agents such as methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, zonisamide, sulthiame, sulpiride, topiramate and valdecoxib were slightly less effective inhibitors (KIs in the range of 103-138nM). Saccharin, celecoxib, dichlorophenamide and many simple benzenesulfonamides were even less effective as EspCA inhibitors, with KIs in the range of 384-938nM. Identification of effective inhibitors of this bacterial enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of the β-class CAs in bacterial pathogenicity/virulence.

  8. Impacts of Elevated CO2 Concentration on Biochemical Composition,Carbonic Anhydrase, and Nitrate Reductase Activity of Freshwater Green Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Rong XIA; Kun-Shan GAO

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the biochemical response of freshwater green algae to elevated CO2 concentrations,Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dang cells were cultured at different CO2concentrations within the range 3-186 μmol/L and the biochemical composition, carbonic anhydrase (CA),and nitrate reductase activities of the cells were investigated. Chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, carbonhydrate,and protein contents were enhanced to varying extents with increasing CO2 concentration from 3-186μmol/L. The CO2 enrichment significantly increased the Chl a/Chl b ratio in Chlorella pyrenoidosa, but not in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CO2 concentration had significant effects on CA and nitrate reductase activity. Elevating CO2 concentration to 186 μmol/L caused a decline in intracellular and extracellullar CA activity. Nitrate reductase activity, under either light or dark conditions, in C. reinhardtii and C. pyrenoidosa was also significantly decreased with CO2 enrichment. From this study, it can be concluded that CO2enrichment can affect biochemical composition, CA, and nitrate reductase activity, and that the biochemical response was species dependent.

  9. Identification of two carbonic anhydrases in the mantle of the European Abalone Haliotis tuberculata (Gastropoda, Haliotidae): phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LE Roy, Nathalie; Marie, Benjamin; Gaume, Béatrice; Guichard, Nathalie; Delgado, Sidney; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie; Sire, Jean-Yves; Marin, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) represent a diversified family of metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide. They are involved in a wide range of functions, among which is the formation of CaCO(3) skeletons in metazoans. In the shell-forming mantle tissues of mollusks, the location of the CA catalytic activity is elusive and gives birth to contradicting views. In the present paper, using the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata, a key model gastropod in biomineralization studies, we identified and characterized two CAs (htCA1 and htCA2) that are specific of the shell-forming mantle tissue. We analyzed them in a phylogenetic context. Combining various approaches, including proteomics, activity tests, and in silico analyses, we showed that htCA1 is secreted but is not incorporated in the organic matrix of the abalone shell and that htCA2 is transmembrane. Together with previous studies dealing with molluskan CAs, our findings suggest two possible modes of action for shell mineralization: the first mode applies to, for example, the bivalves Unio pictorum and Pinctada fucata, and involves a true CA activity in their shell matrix; the second mode corresponds to, for example, the European abalone, and does not include CA activity in the shell matrix. Our work provides new insight on the diversity of the extracellular macromolecular tools used for shell biomineralization study in mollusks.

  10. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers show carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity against α-, β-, γ- and η-class enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Vullo, Daniela; AlOthman, Zeid; Del Prete, Sonia; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-01

    Four generations of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers incorporating benzenesulfonamide moieties were investigated as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β-, γ- and η-classes which are present in pathogenic bacteria, fungi or protozoa. The following bacterial, fungal and protozoan organisms were included in the study: Vibrio cholerae, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani chagasi, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida glabrata, and Plasmodium falciparum. The eight pathozymes present in these organisms were efficiently inhibited by the four generations PAMAM-sulfonamide dendrimers, but multivalency effects were highly variable among the different enzyme classes. The Vibrio enzyme VchCA was best inhibited by the G3 dendrimer incorporating 32 sulfamoyl moieties. The Trypanosoma enzyme TcCA on the other hand was best inhibited by the first generation dendrimer G0 (with 4 sulfamoyl groups), whereas for other enzymes the optimal inhibitory power was observed for the G1 or G2 dendrimers, with 8 and 16 sulfonamide functionalities. This study thus proves that the multivalency may be highly relevant for enzyme inhibition for some but not all CAs from pathogenic organisms. On the other hand, some dendrimers investigated here showed a better inhibitory power compared to acetazolamide for enzymes from widespread pathogens, such as the η-CA from Plasmodium falciparum. Overall, the main conclusion is that this class of molecules may lead to important developments in the field of anti-infective CA inhibitors.

  11. A new class of quinazoline-sulfonamides acting as efficient inhibitors against the α-carbonic anhydrase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafeefy, Ahmed M; Ceruso, Mariangela; Al-Jaber, Nabila A; Parkkila, Seppo; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the agent responsible for trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) in humans and other animals. It has been recently reported that this pathogen encodes for an α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), denominated TcCA, which was shown to be crucial for its life cycle. Inhibition studies of a class of 4-oxoquinazoline containing a benzensulfonamide moiety and their 4-thioxo bioisosteres against the protozoan enzyme TcCA are described here. Most of 4-oxoquinazoline sulfonamides showed nanomolar TcCA inhibition activity with K(I)s in the same order of magnitude of acetazolamide (AAZ), whereas their thioxo bioisosters showed moderate anti-Trypanosoma CA potency with K(I)s in the micromolar range. The discovery of compounds incorporating a 4-oxoquinazoline ring as a low-nanomolar TcCA inhibitor is quite promising and it may be useful for developing anti-Trypanosoma agents with a novel mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs (such as benznidazole, nifurtimox) for which significant resistance and serious adverse effects due to their high-toxicity appeared.

  12. Effects of reduced carbonic anhydrase activity on CO2 assimilation rates in Setaria viridis: a transgenic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Hannah L; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Sharwood, Robert E; Covshoff, Sarah; Evans, John R; Furbank, Robert T; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    In C4 species, the major β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) localized in the mesophyll cytosol catalyses the hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-), which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase uses in the first step of C4 photosynthesis. To address the role of CA in C4 photosynthesis, we generated transgenic Setaria viridis depleted in β-CA. Independent lines were identified with as little as 13% of wild-type CA. No photosynthetic defect was observed in the transformed lines at ambient CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). At low pCO2, a strong correlation between CO2 assimilation rates and CA hydration rates was observed. C(18)O(16)O isotope discrimination was used to estimate the mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion from the intercellular air space to the mesophyll cytosol (gm) in control plants, which allowed us to calculate CA activities in the mesophyll cytosol (Cm). This revealed a strong relationship between the initial slope of the response of the CO2 assimilation rate to cytosolic pCO2 (ACm) and cytosolic CA activity. However, the relationship between the initial slope of the response of CO2 assimilation to intercellular pCO2 (ACi) and cytosolic CA activity was curvilinear. This indicated that in S. viridis, mesophyll conductance may be a contributing limiting factor alongside CA activity to CO2 assimilation rates at low pCO2.

  13. Intrinsic thermodynamics of 4-substituted-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamide binding to carbonic anhydrases by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrienė, Asta; Smirnovienė, Joana; Smirnov, Alexey; Morkūnaitė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Norvaišas, Povilas; Manakova, Elena; Gražulis, Saulius; Matulis, Daumantas

    2015-10-01

    Para substituted tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamides bind to carbonic anhydrases (CAs) extremely tightly and exhibit some of the strongest known protein-small ligand interactions, reaching an intrinsic affinity of 2 pM as determined by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The enthalpy and entropy of binding to five CA isoforms were measured by ITC in two buffers of different protonation enthalpies. The pKa values of compound sulfonamide groups were measured potentiometrically and spectrophotometrically, and enthalpies of protonation were measured by ITC in order to evaluate the proton linkage contributions to the observed binding thermodynamics. Intrinsic means the affinity of a sulfonamide anion for the Zn bound water form of CAs. Fluorination of the benzene ring significantly enhanced the observed affinities as it increased the fraction of deprotonated ligand while having little impact on intrinsic affinities. Intrinsic enthalpy contributions to the binding affinity were dominant over entropy and were more exothermic for CA I than for other CA isoforms. Thermodynamic measurements together with the X-ray crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes enabled analysis of structure-activity relationships in this enzyme ligand system.

  14. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition study of a β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; De Luca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-07-01

    The oral pathogenic bacterium involved in human dental caries formation Streptococcus mutans, encodes for two carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) one belonging to the α- and the other one to the β-class. This last enzyme (SmuCA) has been cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with a major class of CA inhibitors, the inorganic anions. Here we show that SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with kcat 4.2×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7)M(-1)×s(-1), being inhibited by cyanate, carbonate, stannate, divannadate and diethyldithiocarbamate in the submillimolar range (KIs of 0.30-0.64mM) and more efficiently by sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid (KIs of 15-46μM). The anion inhibition profile of the S. mutans enzyme is very different from other α- and β-CAs investigated earlier. Identification of effective inhibitors of this new enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action.

  15. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Tori A; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2014-01-16

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI is the lone secreted CA and exists in both saliva and the gastrointestinal mucosa. An alternative, stress-inducible isoform of CAVI (CAVI-b) has been shown to be expressed from a cryptic promoter that is activated by the CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP). The CAVI-b isoform is not secreted and is currently of unknown physiological function. Here we use neuronal models, including a model derived using Car6 and CHOP gene ablations, to delineate a role for CAVI-b in ischemic protection. Our results demonstrate that CAVI-b expression, which is increased through CHOP-signaling in response to unfolded protein stress, is also increased by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). While enforced expression of CAVI-b is not sufficient to protect against ischemia, CHOP regulation of CAVI-b is necessary for adaptive changes mediated by BDNF that reduce subsequent ischemic damage. These results suggest that CAVI-b comprises a necessary component of a larger adaptive signaling pathway downstream of CHOP.

  16. Characterization and anions inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Deniz; Ceyhun, Saltuk Buğrahan; Sentürk, Murat; Erdem, Deryanur; Küfrevioğlu, Omer İrfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-01-15

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) was purified from the gill of the teleost fish Dicentrarchus labrax (European seabass). The purification procedure consisted of a single step affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B-tyrosine-sulfanilamide. The enzyme was purified 84.9-fold with a yield of 58%, and a specific activity of 838.9 U/mg proteins. It has an optimum pH at 8.0; an optimum temperature at 10°C. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for its esterase activity, with 4-nitrophenyl acetate (NPA) as substrate. The following anions, H₂NSO₃⁻, I⁻, SCN⁻, NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻, N₃⁻, Br⁻, Cl⁻, SO₄²⁻, and F⁻ showed inhibitory effects on the enzyme. Sulfamic acid, iodide, and thiocyanate exhibited the strongest inhibitory action, in the micromolar range (K(i)s of 87-187 μM). NO₃⁻, NO₂⁻ and N₃⁻ were moderate inhibitors, whereas other anions showed only weak actions. All tested anions inhibited the enzyme in a competitive manner. Our findings indicate that these anions inhibit the fish enzyme in a similar manner to other α-CAs from mammals investigated earlier, but the susceptibility to various anions differs significantly between the fish and mammalian CAs.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the vas deferens of the cotton leafworm - Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) controlled by circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, J; Ciuk, M A; Joachimiak, E; Rowinski, S; Cymborowski, B; Bebas, P

    2006-11-01

    The male reproductive tract of Lepidoptera is an ideal model for the study of the physiological role of peripheral clocks in insects. The latter are significant in the generation and coordination of rhythmic phenomena which facilitate the initial stages of sperm capacitation. This process requires the maintenance of pH in the upper vas deferens (UVD) aided by, among others, H+-ATPase. Our aim was to determine the potential involvement of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in this process, an enzyme tasked with generating protons subsequently utilized by H+-ATPase to acidify the UVD milieu in S. littoralis, during the time when the lumen of this organ is filled with sperm. We attempted to answer the question whether CA activity can be controlled by the biological oscillator present in the male reproductive tract of the cotton leafworm. Using PAGE zymography, the presence of CA was demonstrated in the UVD wall, but not in the luminal fluid nor in the sperm. Using histochemistry, it was shown that CA is active in the UVD epithelium, and that this activity varies throughout the day and is most likely controlled by an endogenous biological clock. Conversely, the application of CA inhibitors, acetazolamide and sodium thiocyanate, in conjunction with an analysis of H+-ATPase activity in the acidification the UVD environment shows that CA most likely does not play a direct role in the regulation of the pH in this organ.

  18. Carbonic Anhydrase VI Gene Polymorphism rs2274327 Relationship Between Salivary Parameters and Dental-Oral Health Status in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Fatih; Kilic, Munevver; Gurbuz, Taskin; Tasdemir, Sener

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to research carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and its potential association with dental-oral health status (dental caries, Plaque Index (PI) and Gingival Index (GI)) and salivary parameters (salivary buffering capacity, salivary flow rate (SFR)) in children. A total of 178 children were divided into two groups: non-carious (n = 70, 34 boys and 36 girls) and carious (n = 108, 47 boys and 61 girls). The clinical evaluations were performed according to the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft/DMFT) index by a specialist. Clinical parameters including PI, GI, and simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S) were recorded. Salivary pH (SpH) was measured using pH paper. Blood samples and unstimulated whole saliva were collected, and SFR was calculated. The CA VI rs2274327 polymorphism was determined by a LightSNiP assay on the realtime PCR system. The frequencies of rs2274327 were not significant between groups (p > 0.05). There was a positive correlation between OHI-S and SpH in the carious and non-carious groups (p OHI-S, PI, GI, SFR, and SpH (p > 0.05). CA VI SNP (rs2274327) had no statistically significant association with OHI-S, PI, GI, SFR, and SpH in the children.

  19. Role of Carbonic Anhydrase as an Activator in Carbonate Rock Dissolution and Its Implication for Atmospheric CO2 Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘再华

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of CO2 into H+ and is a relatively slow reaction. Hence, its kinetics may be rate determining in carbonate rock dissolution. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), which is widespread in nature, was used to catalyze the CO2 conversion process in dissolution experiments of limestone and dolomite. It was found that the rate of dissolution increases by a factor of about 10 after the addition of CA at a high CO2 partial pressure (Pco2) for limestone and about 3 at low Pco2 for dolomite. This shows that reappraisal is necessary for the importance of chemical weathering (including carbonate rock dissolution and silicate weathering) in the atmospheric CO2 sink and the mysterious missing sink in carbon cycling. It is doubtless that previous studies of weathering underestimated weathering rates due to the ignorance of CA as an activator in weathering, thus the contribution of weathering to the atmospheric CO2 sink is also underestimated. This finding also shows the need to examine the situ distribution and activity of CA in different waters and to investigate the role of CA in weathering.``

  20. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition studies of a γ-carbonic anhydrase from the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Viviana; Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Carginale, Vincenzo; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-02-15

    We have cloned, purified and characterized the γ-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) present in the genome of the Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea, which is an obligate psychrophile. The enzyme shows a significant catalytic activity for the physiologic reaction of CO2 hydration to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: kcat of 6.0×10(5)s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.7×10(6)M(-1)×s(-1). This activity was inhibited by the sulfonamide CA inhibitor (CAI) acetazolamide, with a KI of 502nM. A range of anions was also investigated for their inhibitory action against the new enzyme CpsCA. Perchlorate, tetrafluoroborate, fluoride and bromide were not inhibitory, whereas cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, hydrogensulfide, carbonate and bicarbonate showed KIs in the range of 1.4-4.4mM. Diethyldithiocarbamate was a better inhibitor (KI of 0.58mM) whereas sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid were the most effective inhibitors detected, with KIs ranging between 8 and 38μM. The present study may shed some more light regarding the role that γ-CAs play in the life cycle of psychrophilic bacteria as the Antarctic one investigated here.

  1. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Leewattanapasuk, Worraanong; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Mastrolorenzo, Antonio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-15

    A beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), the protein encoded by the NCE103 gene of Candida glabrata which also present in Candida albicans and Saccharomycescerevisiae, was cloned, purified, characterized kinetically and investigated for its inhibition by a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate and some isosteric species. The enzyme showed significant CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 3.8 x 10(5)s(-1) and k(cat)/K(M) of 4.8 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1). The Cà glabrata CA (CgCA) was moderately inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 0.60-1.12 mM) but strongly inhibited by bicarbonate, nitrate, nitrite and phenylarsonic acid (K(I)s of 86-98 microM). The other anions investigated showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range, with the exception of bromide and iodide (K(I)s of 27-42 mM).

  2. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Semra; Kockar, Feray; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy; Innocenti, Alessio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-12-15

    The protein encoded by the Nce103 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) designated as scCA, has been cloned, purified, characterized kinetically, and investigated for its inhibition with a series simple, inorganic anions such as halogenides, pseudohalogenides, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, hydrogen sulfide, bisulfite, perchlorate, sulfate, and some of its isosteric species. The enzyme showed high CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 9.4x10(5) s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m) of 9.8x10(7) M(-1) s(-1). scCA was weakly inhibited by metal poisons (cyanide, azide, cyanate, thiocyanate, K(I)s of 16.8-55.6 mM) and strongly inhibited by bromide, iodide, and sulfamide (K(I)s of 8.7-10.8 microM). The other investigated anions showed inhibition constants in the low millimolar range.

  3. Degradation of carbonyl sulfide by Actinomycetes and detection of clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Kato, Hiromi; Higashide, Mitsuru; Nishimiya, Mami; Katayama, Yoko

    2016-09-25

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas and one of the sources of stratospheric aerosol contributing to climate change. Although one of the major sinks of COS is soil, the distribution of COS degradation ability among bacteria remains unclear. Seventeen out of 20 named bacteria belonging to Actinomycetales had COS degradation activity at mole fractions of 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) COS. Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Mycobacterium sp. THI405 had the activity comparable to a chemolithoautotroph Thiobacillus thioparus THI115 that degrade COS by COS hydrolase for energy production. Among 12 bacteria manifesting rapid degradation at 30 ppmv COS, Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Streptomyces ambofaciens NBRC 12836(T) degraded ambient COS (∼500 parts per trillion by volume). Geodermatophilus obscurus NBRC 13315(T) and Amycolatopsis orientalis NBRC 12806(T) increased COS concentrations. Moreover, six of eight COS degrading bacteria isolated from soils had partial nucleotide sequences similar to that of the gene encoding clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase, which included COS hydrolase. These results indicate the potential importance of Actinomycetes in the role of soils as sinks of atmospheric COS.

  4. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-04-24

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research.

  5. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  6. Influence of obesity and androgen deficiency on prostatic blood circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Study at 120 Diabetes Mellitus II type men the high frequency Obesity (71,7% and Androgen Deficiency (52,8—64,5% of the patients depending on a degree of the indemnification and them pathogenic authentic communications were shown. The blood level of total testosterone was represented by the critical factor of Prostatic arterial Blood Circulation. Obesity and Androgen Deficiency are seem as independent risk factors to development of ischemic prostatopathy, such as Prostatic blood circulation Disorders can develop earlier than other variants of the diabetic microangiophaty.

  7. Iodine deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delange, F

    1995-01-18

    Iodine is a trace element present in the human body in minute amounts (15-20 mg in adults, i.e. 0.0285 x 10(-3)% of body weight). The only confirmed function of iodine is to constitute an essential substrate for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, tetraiodothyronine, thyroxine or T4 and triiodothyronine, T3 (1). In thyroxine, iodine is 60% by weight. Thyroid hormones, in turn, play a decisive role in the metabolism of all cells of the organism (2) and in the process of early growth and development of most organs, especially of the brain (3). Brain development in humans occurs from fetal life up to the third postnatal year (4). Consequently, a deficit in iodine and/or in thyroid hormones occurring during this critical period of life will result not only in the slowing down of the metabolic activities of all the cells of the organism but also in irreversible alterations in the development of the brain. The clinical consequence will be mental retardation (5). When the physiological requirements of iodine are not met in a given population, a series of functional and developmental abnormalities occur (Table 1), including thyroid function abnormalities and, when iodine deficiency is severe, endemic goiter and cretinism, endemic mental retardation, decreased fertility rate, increased perinatal death, and infant mortality. These complications, which constitute an hindrance to the development of the affected population, are grouped under the general heading of Iodine Deficiency Disorders, IDD (6). Broad geographic areas exist in which the population is affected by IDD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  9. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of card

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pochinok, T. V.

    2016-01-01

    In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.Key words: children, iron deficiency anemia, treatment.

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  12. 呋塞米对碳酸酐酶的抑制效应再研究%Inhibitory effect of furosemide on carbonic anhydrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁美华; 蒋彦; 杨毅

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of a high efficient diuretic ,furosemide ,on carbonic anhydrase was investigated in this study .Compared with acetazolamide ,furosemide can quickly make BCAⅡ inactive when its concentration is close to the enzyme concentration . The results show that furosemide is a non-competitive inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase ,the vaules of its IC50 and KI are 0 .759 μM ,0 .51 μM . Acetazolamide is a competitive inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase ,the vaules of its IC5 0 and KI are 0.199μM ,0 .099 μM .%呋塞米是一种高效利尿剂,本实验主要探究其对碳酸酐酶的抑制效应.相比较乙酰唑胺而言,呋塞米在其浓度接近碳酸酐酶浓度时能使该酶基本失活.研究发现,呋塞米对碳酸酐酶的抑制效应表现为非竞争性抑制,其 IC50为0.759μM ,KI 为0.61μM ,乙酰唑胺的 IC50为0.199μM , KI 为0.099μM ,表现为竞争性抑制.

  13. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase CA VB: Differences in tissue distribution and pattern of evolution from those of CA VA suggest distinct physiological roles

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Gul N.; Hewett-Emmett, David; Grubb, Jeffrey H.; Migas, Mary C.; Fleming, Robert E.; Waheed, Abdul; Sly, William S.

    2000-01-01

    A cDNA for a second mouse mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase (CA) called CA VB was identified by homology to the previously characterized murine CA V, now called CA VA. The full-length cDNA encodes a 317-aa precursor that contains a 33-aa classical mitochondrial leader sequence. Comparison of products expressed from cDNAs for murine CA VB and CA VA in COS cells revealed that both expressed active CAs that localized in mitochondria, and showed comparable activities in crude extracts and in mitoc...

  14. Classical factor X deficiency. Report of a further case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Coser, P; Brunetti, A; Prinoth, O

    1975-01-01

    A case of classical factor X deficiency is reported. The propositus is a 28-year-old male who presented easy bruising, epistaxis, hematomas, hematuria and occasional hemartrosis since early childhood. The severely prolonged prothrombin time was corrected by normal serum but not by adsorbed normal plasma. The abnormality was not corrected by the plasma of a patient with factor X deficiency, but by the plasma of patients with factor II or VII deficiencies. Partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin consumption and the thromboplastin generation test were abnormal. The thromboelastogram showed a prolonged 'K' and 'r' together with a normal 'ma'. Factor X was very low (smaller than 1%). Platelet tests were normal. No factor X band or precipitates were seen on electroimmunoassay and on the cross-over electrophoresis. The non-consanguineous parents and several other members of the family were found to be heterozygotes.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial HDL deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial HDL deficiency familial HDL deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Familial HDL deficiency is a condition characterized by low levels ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: eosinophil peroxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions eosinophil peroxidase deficiency eosinophil peroxidase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Eosinophil peroxidase deficiency is a condition that affects certain white ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: protein C deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Thrombophilia, hereditary, due to protein C deficiency, autosomal dominant ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency PROC deficiency Related ...

  19. Biological Systems of Vitamin K: A Plasma Nutriproteomics Study of Subclinical Vitamin K Deficiency in 500 Nepalese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kerry J.; Cole, Robert N.; Wu, Lee S. F.; Yager, James D.; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K (VK) is a fat-soluble vitamin whose deficiency disrupts coagulation and may disturb bone and cardiovascular health. However, the scale and systems affected by VK deficiency in pediatric populations remains unclear. We conducted a study of the plasma proteome of 500 Nepalese children 6–8 years of age (male/female ratio = 0.99) to identify proteins associated with VK status. We measured the concentrations of plasma lipids and protein induced by VK absence-II (PIVKA-II) and correlated relative abundance of proteins quantified by mass spectrometry with PIVKA-II. VK deficiency (PIVKA-II >2 μg/L) was associated with a higher abundance of low-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (p 10% of the children, five proteins were associated with PIVKA-II and seven proteins were differentially abundant between VK deficient versus sufficient children, including coagulation factor-II, hemoglobin, and vascular endothelial cadherin, passing a false discovery rate (FDR) threshold of 10% (q PIVKA-II or VK deficiency at a less stringent FDR (q  0.7). Untargeted proteomics offers a novel systems approach to elucidating biological processes of coagulation, vascularization, and erythrocyte oxidative stress related to VK status. The results may help elucidate subclinical metabolic disturbances related to VK deficiency in populations. PMID:26913649

  20. Biological Systems of Vitamin K: A Plasma Nutriproteomics Study of Subclinical Vitamin K Deficiency in 500 Nepalese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Eun; Schulze, Kerry J; Cole, Robert N; Wu, Lee S F; Yager, James D; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin K (VK) is a fat-soluble vitamin whose deficiency disrupts coagulation and may disturb bone and cardiovascular health. However, the scale and systems affected by VK deficiency in pediatric populations remains unclear. We conducted a study of the plasma proteome of 500 Nepalese children 6-8 years of age (male/female ratio = 0.99) to identify proteins associated with VK status. We measured the concentrations of plasma lipids and protein induced by VK absence-II (PIVKA-II) and correlated relative abundance of proteins quantified by mass spectrometry with PIVKA-II. VK deficiency (PIVKA-II>2 μg/L) was associated with a higher abundance of low-density lipoproteins, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (p10% of the children, five proteins were associated with PIVKA-II and seven proteins were differentially abundant between VK deficient versus sufficient children, including coagulation factor-II, hemoglobin, and vascular endothelial cadherin, passing a false discovery rate (FDR) threshold of 10% (qPIVKA-II or VK deficiency at a less stringent FDR (q0.7). Untargeted proteomics offers a novel systems approach to elucidating biological processes of coagulation, vascularization, and erythrocyte oxidative stress related to VK status. The results may help elucidate subclinical metabolic disturbances related to VK deficiency in populations.

  1. Relationship among salivary carbonic anhydrase VI activity and flow rate, biofilm pH and caries in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasseto, F; Parisotto, T M; Peres, R C R; Marques, M R; Line, S R P; Nobre Dos Santos, M

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the activity of carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme VI (CAVI) in the saliva of preschool children with caries and to investigate the relationship between caries and salivary CAVI activity, salivary flow rate and biofilm pH before and after a 20% sucrose rinse. Thirty preschool children aged 45.3-80.3 months were divided into two groups: a caries-free group and a caries group. Clinical examinations were conducted by one examiner (κ = 0.95) according to WHO criteria (dmfs) and early caries lesions. From each subject, CAVI activity, salivary flow rate and plaque pH were determined before and after a sucrose rinse. The results were submitted to Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests (α = 0.05). The results showed that prerinse CAVI activity and its variation were higher in the saliva from caries children than from caries-free children. No difference was found between the two groups in postrinse salivary CAVI activity. After rinsing, biofilm pH differences were lower in both groups (p = 0.0012 and p = 0.0037 for the caries and caries-free groups, respectively). Also, after the sucrose rinse, salivary flow rate significantly increased in caries and caries-free groups (p = 0.0003, p = 0.0037). The variation of salivary CAVI activity was negatively correlated with caries (r = -0.501, p = 0.005). Child's age showed a positive correlation with caries (r = 0.456, p = 0.011). These results suggest that variation of salivary CAVI activity and child's age are associated with dental caries in preschool children.

  2. In vivo imaging and quantification of carbonic anhydrase IX expression as an endogenous biomarker of tumor hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagna Bao

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX is a transmembrane protein that has been shown to be greatly upregulated under conditions of hypoxia in many tumor cell lines. Tumor hypoxia is associated with impaired efficacy of cancer therapies making CA IX a valuable target for preclinical and diagnostic imaging. We have developed a quantitative in vivo optical imaging method for detection of CA IX as a marker of tumor hypoxia based on a near-infrared (NIR fluorescent derivative of the CA IX inhibitor acetazolamide (AZ. The agent (HS680 showed single digit nanomolar inhibition of CA IX as well as selectivity over other CA isoforms and demonstrated up to 25-fold upregulation of fluorescent CA IX signal in hypoxic versus normoxic cells, which could be blocked by 60%-70% with unlabeled AZ. CA IX negative cell lines (HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231, as well as a non-binding control agent on CA IX positive cells, showed low fluorescent signal under both conditions. In vivo FMT imaging showed tumor accumulation and excellent tumor definition from 6-24 hours. In vivo selectivity was confirmed by pretreatment of the mice with unlabeled AZ resulting in >65% signal inhibition. HS680 tumor signal was further upregulated >2X in tumors by maintaining tumor-bearing mice in a low oxygen (8% atmosphere. Importantly, intravenously injected HS680 signal was co-localized specifically with both CA IX antibody and pimonidazole (Pimo, and was located away from non-hypoxic regions indicated by a Hoechst stain. Thus, we have established a spatial correlation of fluorescence signal obtained by non-invasive, tomographic imaging of HS680 with regions of hypoxia and CA IX expression. These results illustrate the potential of HS680 and combined with FMT imaging to non-invasively quantify CA IX expression as a hypoxia biomarker, crucial to the study of the underlying biology of hypoxic tumors and the development and monitoring of novel anti-cancer therapies.

  3. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti α-Type Carbonic Anhydrase and Its Role in Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tsikou, Daniela; Lampiri, Vasiliki; Fotelli, Mariangela N.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Fasseas, Costas; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an α-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized, and it was proven to be an active α-CA. The biochemical and physiological roles of the CAA1 gene in free-living and symbiotic rhizobia were examined by using an M. loti R7A disruption mutant strain. Our analysis revealed that CAA1 is expressed in both nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and free-living bacteria during growth in batch cultures, where gene expression was induced by increased medium pH. L. japonicus plants inoculated with the CAA1 mutant strain showed no differences in top-plant traits and nutritional status but consistently formed a higher number of nodules exhibiting higher fresh weight, N content, nitrogenase activity, and δ13C abundance. Based on these results, we propose that although CAA1 is not essential for nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it may participate in an auxiliary mechanism that buffers the bacteroid periplasm, creating an environment favorable for NH3 protonation, thus facilitating its diffusion and transport to the plant. In addition, changes in the nodule δ13C abundance suggest the recycling of at least part of the HCO3− produced by CAA1. PMID:19218391

  4. Characterization of a Mesorhizobium loti alpha-type carbonic anhydrase and its role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Tsikou, Daniela; Lampiri, Vasiliki; Fotelli, Mariangela N; Rennenberg, Heinz; Chatzipavlidis, Iordanis; Fasseas, Costas; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) is a widespread enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that participates in many biochemical and physiological processes. Mesorhizobium loti, the microsymbiont of the model legume Lotus japonicus, possesses on the symbiosis island a gene (msi040) encoding an alpha-type CA homologue, annotated as CAA1. In the present work, the CAA1 open reading frame from M. loti strain R7A was cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized, and it was proven to be an active alpha-CA. The biochemical and physiological roles of the CAA1 gene in free-living and symbiotic rhizobia were examined by using an M. loti R7A disruption mutant strain. Our analysis revealed that CAA1 is expressed in both nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and free-living bacteria during growth in batch cultures, where gene expression was induced by increased medium pH. L. japonicus plants inoculated with the CAA1 mutant strain showed no differences in top-plant traits and nutritional status but consistently formed a higher number of nodules exhibiting higher fresh weight, N content, nitrogenase activity, and delta(13)C abundance. Based on these results, we propose that although CAA1 is not essential for nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it may participate in an auxiliary mechanism that buffers the bacteroid periplasm, creating an environment favorable for NH(3) protonation, thus facilitating its diffusion and transport to the plant. In addition, changes in the nodule delta(13)C abundance suggest the recycling of at least part of the HCO(3)(-) produced by CAA1.

  5. T tubules and surface membranes provide equally effective pathways of carbonic anhydrase-facilitated lactic acid transport in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Hallerdei

    Full Text Available We have studied lactic acid transport in the fast mouse extensor digitorum longus muscles (EDL by intracellular and cell surface pH microelectrodes. The role of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrases (CA of EDL in lactic acid transport was investigated by measuring lactate flux in muscles from wildtype, CAIV-, CAIX- and CAXIV-single ko, CAIV-CAXIV double ko and CAIV-CAIX-CAXIV-triple ko mice. This was complemented by immunocytochemical studies of the subcellular localization of CAIV, CAIX and CAXIV in mouse EDL. We find that CAXIV and CAIX single ko EDL exhibit markedly but not maximally reduced lactate fluxes, whereas triple ko and double ko EDL show maximal or near-maximal inhibition of CA-dependent lactate flux. Interpretation of the flux measurements in the light of the immunocytochemical results leads to the following conclusions. CAXIV, which is homogeneously distributed across the surface membrane of EDL fibers, facilitates lactic acid transport across this membrane. CAIX, which is associated only with T tubular membranes, facilitates lactic acid transport across the T tubule membrane. The removal of lactic acid from the lumen of T tubuli towards the interstitial space involves a CO2-HCO3- diffusional shuttle that is maintained cooperatively by CAIX within the T tubule and, besides CAXIV, by the CAIV, which is strategically located at the opening of the T tubules. The data suggest that about half the CA-dependent muscular lactate flux occurs across the surface membrane, while the other half occurs across the membranes of the T tubuli.

  6. Evidence for an early evolutionary emergence of γ-type carbonic anhydrases as components of mitochondrial respiratory complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Michael W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase has increased considerably relative to the homologous complex in bacteria. Comparative analyses of CI composition in animals, fungi and land plants/green algae suggest that novel components of mitochondrial CI include a set of 18 proteins common to all eukaryotes and a variable number of lineage-specific subunits. In plants and green algae, several purportedly plant-specific proteins homologous to γ-type carbonic anhydrases (γCA have been identified as components of CI. However, relatively little is known about CI composition in the unicellular protists, the characterizations of which are essential to our understanding of CI evolution. Results We have performed a tandem mass spectrometric characterization of CI from the amoeboid protozoon Acanthamoeba castellanii. Among the proteins identified were two γCA homologs, AcCa1 and AcCa2, demonstrating that γCA proteins are not specific to plants/green algae. In fact, through bioinformatics searches we detected γCA homologs in diverse protist lineages, and several of these homologs are predicted to possess N-terminal mitochondrial targeting peptides. Conclusions The detection of γCAs in CI of Acanthamoeba, considered to be a closer relative of animals and fungi than plants, suggests that γCA proteins may have been an ancestral feature of mitochondrial CI, rather than a novel, plant-specific addition. This assertion is supported by the presence of genes encoding γCAs in the nuclear genomes of a wide variety of eukaryotes. Together, these findings emphasize the importance of a phylogenetically broad characterization of CI for elucidating CI evolution in eukaryotes.

  7. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Gul N; Rubbelke, Timothy S; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D; Sly, William S

    2013-04-30

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium-potassium citrate-supplemented water, they produced offspring in expected numbers. Their blood ammonia concentrations were markedly elevated, but their fasting blood sugars were normal. By contrast, Car5B null mice showed normal growth and normal blood ammonia levels. They too had normal fasting blood sugars. Car5A/B double-knockout (DKO) mice showed additional abnormalities. Impaired growth was more severe than for Car5A null mice. Hyperammonemia was even greater as well. Although fertile, DKO animals were produced in less-than-predicted numbers even when supplemented with sodium-potassium citrate in their drinking water. Survival after weaning was also reduced, especially for males. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels for DKO mice were significantly lower than for controls (153 ± 33 vs. 230 ± 24 mg/dL). The enhanced hyperammonemia and lower fasting blood sugar, which are both seen in the DKO mice, indicate that both Car5A and Car5B contribute to both ammonia detoxification (ureagenesis) and regulation of fasting blood sugar (gluconeogenesis). Car5A, which is expressed mainly in liver, clearly has the predominant role in ammonia detoxification. The contribution of Car5B to ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis was evident only on a Car5A null background.

  8. Biochemical characterization of the native α-carbonic anhydrase purified from the mantle of the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, Rosa; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Sansone, Giovanni; Barone, Carmela; Rossi, Mosè; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2017-12-01

    A α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has been purified and characterized biochemically from the mollusk Mytilus galloprovincialis. As in most mollusks, this α-CA is involved in the biomineralization processes leading to the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the mussel shell. The new enzyme had a molecular weight of 50 kDa, which is roughly two times higher than that of a monomeric α-class enzyme. Thus, Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA is either a dimer, or similar to the Tridacna gigas CA described earlier, may have two different CA domains in its polypeptide chain. The Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA sequence contained the three His residues acting as zinc ligands and the gate-keeper residues present in all α-CAs (Glu106-Thr199), but had a Lys in position 64 and not a His as proton shuttling residue, being thus similar to the human isoform hCA III. This probably explains the relatively low catalytic activity of Mytilus galloprovincialis α-CA, with the following kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction: kcat = 4.1 × 10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 3.6 × 10(7) M(-1) × s(-1). The enzyme activity was poorly inhibited by the sulfonamide acetazolamide, with a KI of 380 nM. This study is one of the few describing in detail the biochemical characterization of a molluskan CA and may be useful for understanding in detail the phylogeny of these enzymes, their role in biocalcification processes and their potential use in the biomimetic capture of the CO2.

  9. Biomimetic CO2 capture using a highly thermostable bacterial α-carbonic anhydrase immobilized on a polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardini, Fortunato; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Rossi, Mosè; Corbo, Pasquale; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2014-02-01

    The biomimetic approach represents an interesting strategy for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, offering advantages over other methods, due to its specificity for CO2 and its eco-compatibility, as it allows concentration of CO2 from other gases, and its conversion to water soluble ions. This approach uses microorganisms capable of fixing CO2 through metabolic pathways or via the use of an enzyme, such as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Recently, our group cloned and purified a novel bacterial α-CA, named SspCA, from the thermophilic bacteria, Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense YO3AOP1 living in hot springs at temperatures of up to 110 °C. This enzyme showed an exceptional thermal stability, retaining its high catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction even after being heated at 70 °C for several hours. In the present paper, the SspCA was immobilized within a polyurethane (PU) foam. The immobilized enzyme was found to be catalytically active and showed a long-term stability. A bioreactor containing the "PU-immobilized enzyme" (PU-SspCA) as shredded foam was used for experimental tests aimed to verify the CO2 capture capability in conditions close to those of a power plant application. In this bioreactor, a gas phase, containing CO2, was put into contact with a liquid phase under conditions, where CO2 contained in the gas phase was absorbed and efficiently converted into bicarbonate by the extremo-α-CA.

  10. C4 photosynthesis evolution in the transitional grass Neurachne: loss of a carbonic anhydrase chloroplast transit peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Harmony; Saladié, Montserrat; Rolland, Vivien; Sharwood, Robert E; Macfarlane, Terry; Ludwig, Martha

    2017-02-02

    Neurachne is the only known grass lineage containing closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate and C4 species, making it an ideal taxon with which to study the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses. To begin dissecting the molecular changes that led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in this group, the cDNAs encoding four distinct β-carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were characterized from leaf tissue of Neurachne munroi (C4), N. minor (C3-C4), and N. alopecuroidea (C3). Two genes (CA1 and CA2) each encode two different isoforms: CA1a, CA1b, CA2a and CA2b. Transcript analyses found CA1 mRNAs were significantly more abundant than transcripts from the CA2 gene in the leaves of each species examined, comprising approximately 99% of all β-CA transcripts measured. Localization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that while CA1b is a cytosolic CA in all three species, the CA1a proteins are differentially localized. The N. alopecuroidea and N. minor CA1a isoforms were imported into chloroplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells whereas N. munroi CA1a localized to the cytosol. Sequence analysis indicated an 11 amino acid deletion in the N-terminus of N. munroi CA1a relative to the C3 and C3-C4 proteins, suggesting chloroplast targeting of CA1a is the ancestral state, and that loss of a functional chloroplast transit peptide in N. munroi CA1a is associated with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in Neurachne. Remarkably, this mechanism is homoplastic with evolution of the C4-associated CA in the dicotyledonous Flaveria, although the actual mutations in the two lineages differ.

  11. Exclusive localization of carbonic anhydrase in bacteriocytes of the deep-sea clam Calyptogena okutanii with thioautotrophic symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoshimitsu; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Toyofuku, Takashi; Hirayama, Hisako; Takai, Ken; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Maruyama, Tadashi; Yoshida, Takao

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea Calyptogena clams harbor thioautotrophic intracellular symbiotic bacteria in their gill epithelial cells. The symbiont fixes CO2 to synthesize organic compounds. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the host catalyzes the reaction CO2 + H2O ↔ HCO3(-) + H(+), and is assumed to facilitate inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake and transport to the symbiont. However, the localization of CA in gill tissue remains unknown. We therefore analyzed mRNA sequences, proteins and CA activity in Calyptogena okutanii using expression sequence tag, SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. We found that acetazolamide-sensitive soluble CA was abundantly expressed in the gill tissue of C. okutanii, and the enzyme was purified by affinity chromatography. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against the CA of C. okutanii were used in western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of the gill tissues of C. okutanii, which showed that CA was exclusively localized in the symbiont-harboring cells (bacteriocytes) in gill epithelial cells. Western blot analysis and measurement of activity showed that CA was abundantly (26-72% of total soluble protein) detected in the gill tissues of not only Calyptogena clams but also deep-sea Bathymodiolus mussels that harbor thioautotrophic or methanotrophic symbiotic bacteria, but was not detected in a non-symbiotic mussel, Mytilus sp. The present study showed that CA is abundant in the gill tissues of deep-sea symbiotic bivalves and specifically localizes in the cytoplasm of bacteriocytes of C. okutanii. This indicates that the Ci supply process to symbionts in the vacuole (symbiosome) in bacteriocytes is essential for symbiosis.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2014-01-08

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis.

  13. 寿胎II号协定方联合黄体酮辨治肾虚型胎动不安的临床研究%Clinical Study of Shoutai II Decoction combined with Progesterone on Fetal Irritability of Kidney Deficiency Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋家欣; 吴丹; 王薇

    2016-01-01

    目的::探讨寿胎II号协定方联合黄体酮辨治肾虚型胎动不安的临床效果。方法:选择2014年6月至2015年9月我院收治的肾虚型胎动不安患者110例,随机分为对照组和观察组患者各55例。对照组患者给予黄体酮肌肉注射,观察组则联合给予寿胎II号协定方内服治疗。对比2组的临床疗效,评价主要中医证候积分,监测治疗前后血清激素水平变化,随访统计患者的分娩情况。结果:观察组的有效率90.9%高于对照组患者74.5%( P<0.05);观察组患者的腰酸、腹痛、小腹下坠、阴道少量下血等症状改善优于对照组患者,证候积分显著低于对照组患者( P<0.05);观察组患者血清β-HCG、P水平显著高于对照组患者(P<0.05);观察组的分娩结局明显优于对照组患者(P<0.05)。结论:寿胎II号协定方联合黄体酮辨治肾虚型胎动不安患者疗效肯定,能显著改善临床症状,提高保胎成功率,其机制与提高血清激素水平密切相关,是中西医结合保胎效果的突出体现,值得临床推广运用。%Objective:To investigate the clinical effect of Shoutai II Decoction combined with progesterone on fetal irritability of kidney deficiency pattern. Methods:A hundred and ten patients with fetal irritability due to deficiency of the kidney admitted in the hospital from June 2014 to 2015 September randomly assigned for the control group and the observation group with 55 cases in each. Patients in the control group were treated with progesterone intramuscular injection and the observation group was additionally treated with Shoutai II Decoction. The clinical efficacy of the two groups was compared and the main TCM syndrome score was e-valuated. The changes of serum hormone level before and after treatment were monitored. Results:The effective rate of the obser-vation group was 90. 9% higher than that of the control group (74. 5%) (P<0. 05);symptoms

  14. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  15. [Four cases of aldosterone synthase deficiency in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, E; Pelissier, P; Richard, O; Gay, C; Pugeat, M; Morel, Y; Stephan, J-L

    2012-11-01

    Neonatal salt-wasting syndromes are rare but potentially serious conditions. Isolated hypoaldosteronism is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of terminal aldosterone synthesis, leading to selective aldosterone deficiency. Two different biochemical forms of this disease have been described, called aldosterone synthase deficiency or corticosterone methyl oxydase, types I and II. In type I, there is no aldosterone synthase activity and the 18 hydroxycorticosterone (18 OHB) level is low, whereas in type II, a residual activity of aldosterone synthase persists and 18 OHB is overproduced. We report on four patients with isolated hypoaldosteronism. In 2 of them, who were recently diagnosed with aldosterone synthase deficit, we discuss the symptoms and treatment. The 2 other patients are now adults. We discuss the long-term outcome, the quality of adult life, aldosterone synthase deficits, as well as the pathophysiology and molecular analysis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  17. Latent manganese deficiency in barley can be diagnosed and remediated on the basis of chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Pedas, Pai; Laursen, Kristian Holst;

    2013-01-01

    chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence as a tool for diagnosis of latent Mn deficiency. Methods: Barley plants grown under controlled greenhouse conditions or in the field were exposed to different intensities of Mn deficiency. The responses were characterised by analysis of Chl a fluorescence, photosystem II (PSII......) proteins and mineral elements. Results: Analysis of the Chl a fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) revealed distinct changes long before any visual symptoms of Mn deficiency were apparent. The changes were specific for Mn and did not occur in Mg, S, Fe or Cu deficient plants. The changes in Mn deficient......Background and aims: Manganese (Mn) deficiency represents a major plant nutritional disorder in winter cereals. The deficiency frequently occurs latently and the lack of visual symptoms prevents timely remediation and cause significant yield reductions. These problems prompted us to investigate...

  18. Helicobacterpy loriinfection and micronutrient deficiencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javed Yakoob; Wasim Jafri; Shahab Abid

    2003-01-01

    It is known that deficiencies of micronutrients due to infections increase morbidity and mortality. This phenomenon depicts itself conspicuously in developing countries.Deficiencies of iron, vitamins A, E, C, B12, etc are widely prevalent among populations living in the third world countries. Helicobacterpylori (Hpylori) infection has a high prevalence throughout the world. Deficiencies of several micronutrients due to Hpylori infection may be concomitantly present and vary from subtle sub-clinical states to severe clinical disorders. These essential trace elementsl micronutrients are involved in host defense mechanisms,maintaining epithelial cell integrity, glycoprotein synthesis,transport mechanisms, myocardial contractility, brain development, cholesterol and glucose metabolism. In this paper Hpyloriinfection in associaed with various micronutrients deficiencies is briefly reviewed.

  19. Effects of sodium bicarbonate concentration on growth, photosynthesis, and carbonic anhydrase activity of macroalgae Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, and Gracilaria chouae (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Sui, Zhenghong; Wang, Jinguo; Hu, Yiyi; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Hong, Hye Ran; Niaz, Zeeshan; Wei, Huihui; Du, Qingwei; Peng, Chong; Mi, Ping; Que, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    There is potential for bicarbonate to improve crop yields and economic efficiency of marine algae. However, few studies have focused on the effect of bicarbonate on the growth, photosynthesis, and enzyme activity associated with carbon utilization, especially in commercial macroalgae. Here, the addition of bicarbonate (up to 420 mg L(-1)) to macroalgal cultures has been evaluated for Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, and Gracilaria chouae with respect to growth rate, photosynthetic activity, carbonic anhydrase activity, and biochemical composition. The results showed that the effects of NaHCO3 on growth, chlorophyll a, phycoerythrin, photosynthetic oxygen evolution, photochemical parameters of PSI and PSII, carbonic anhydrase activity, and nitrogen content were significant (P 336 mg L(-1) for Gp. lemaneiformis and >420 mg L(-1) for the other two species). Moreover, species-specific differences induced by supplementation with bicarbonate were discovered during culture. Optimal concentrations of NaHCO3 used in this study were 252 mg L(-1) for Gp. lemaneiformis and 336 mg L(-1) for G. vermiculophylla and G. chouae. These results suggest that an adequate supplementation of sodium bicarbonate is a viable strategy for promoting growth and photosynthetic activity in some macroalgae as well as for improving biochemical composition. The study will help to accelerate the growth rate of algae and improve the quality of thalli, and will also be useful for enhancing the understanding of carbon utilization in macroalgae.

  20. A High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Psychrohalophilic α–Carbonic Anhydrase from Photobacterium profundum Reveals a Unique Dimer Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somalinga, Vijayakumar; Buhrman, Greg; Arun, Ashikha; Rose, Robert B.; Grunden, Amy M. (NCSU)

    2016-12-09

    Bacterial α–carbonic anhydrases (α-CA) are zinc containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the rapid interconversion of CO2 to bicarbonate and a proton. We report the first crystal structure of a pyschrohalophilic α–CA from a deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. Size exclusion chromatography of the purified P. profundum α–CA (PprCA) reveals that the protein is a heterogeneous mix of monomers and dimers. Furthermore, an “in-gel” carbonic anhydrase activity assay, also known as protonography, revealed two distinct bands corresponding to monomeric and dimeric forms of PprCA that are catalytically active. The crystal structure of PprCA was determined in its native form and reveals a highly conserved “knot-topology” that is characteristic of α–CA’s. Similar to other bacterial α–CA’s, PprCA also crystallized as a dimer. Furthermore, dimer interface analysis revealed the presence of a chloride ion (Cl-) in the interface which is unique to PprCA and has not been observed in any other α–CA’s characterized so far. Molecular dynamics simulation and chloride ion occupancy analysis shows 100% occupancy for the Cl- ion in the dimer interface. Zinc coordinating triple histidine residues, substrate binding hydrophobic patch residues, and the hydrophilic proton wire residues are highly conserved in PprCA and are identical to other well-studied α–CA’s.

  1. Regulation of expression and biochemical characterization of a beta-class carbonic anhydrase from the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simarjot; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Tripathi, Anil K

    2009-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA; [EC 4.2.1.1]) is a ubiquitous enzyme catalysing the reversible hydration of CO(2) to bicarbonate, a reaction that supports various biochemical and physiological functions. Genome analysis of Azospirillum brasilense, a nonphotosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing, rhizobacterium, revealed an ORF with homology to beta-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Biochemical characteristics of the beta-class CA of A. brasilense, analysed after cloning the gene (designated as bca), overexpressing in Escherichia coli and purifying the protein by affinity purification, revealed that the native recombinant enzyme is a homotetramer, inhibited by the known CA inhibitors. CA activity in A. brasilense cell extracts, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that bca was constitutively expressed under aerobic conditions. Lower beta-galactosidase activity in A. brasilense cells harbouring bca promoter: lacZ fusion during the stationary phase or during growth on 3% CO(2) enriched air or at acidic pH indicated that the transcription of bca was downregulated by the stationary phase, elevated CO(2) levels and acidic pH conditions. These observations were also supported by RT-PCR analysis. Thus, beta-CA in A. brasilense seems to be required for scavenging CO(2) from the ambient air and the requirement of CO(2) hydration seems to be higher for the cultures growing exponentially at neutral to alkaline pH.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf T Soliman; Vincenzo De Sanctis; Rania Elalaily; Said Bedair; Islam Kassem

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in adolescents is variable but considerably high in many countries, especially in Middle-east and Southeast Asia. Different factors attribute to this deficiency including lack of sunlight exposure due to cultural dress codes and veiling or due to pigmented skin, and less time spent outdoors, because of hot weather, and lower vitamin D intake. A potent adaptation process significantly modifies the clinical presentation and therefore clinical ...

  3. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency among Male Blood Donors in Sana’a City, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nood, Hafiz A.; Bazara, Fakiha A.; Al-Absi, Rashad; Habori, Molham AL

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among Yemeni people from different regions of the country living in the capital city, Sana’a, giving an indication of its overall prevalence in Yemen. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among Yemeni male blood donors attending the Department of Blood Bank at the National Centre of the Public Health Laboratories in the capital city, Sana’a, Yemen. Fluorescent spot method was used for screening, spectrophotometeric estimation of G-6-PD activity and separation by electrophoresis was done to determine the G-6-PD phenotype. Results Of the total 508 male blood donors recruited into the study, 36 were G-6-PD deficient, giving a likely G-6-PD deficiency prevalence of 7.1%. None of these deficient donors had history of anemia or jaundice. Thirty-five of these deficient cases (97.2%) showed severe G-6-PD deficiency class II (<10% of normal activity), and their phenotyping presumptively revealed a G-6-PD-Mediterranean variant. Conclusion The results showed a significant presence of G-6-PD deficiency with predominance of a severe G-6-PD deficiency type in these blood donors in Sana’a City, which could represent an important health problem through occurrence of hemolytic anemia under oxidative stress. A larger sample size is needed to determine the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency, and should be extended to include DNA analysis to identify its variants in Yemen. PMID:22359725

  5. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible carbonic anhydrase-IX enhances hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor-induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-jong YU; Hyo-suk LEE; Jung-hwan YOON; Jeong-hoon LEE; Sun-jung MYUNG; Eun-sun JANG; Min-sun KWAK; Eun-ju CHO; Ja-june JANG; Yoon-jun KIM

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The hypoxic condition within large or infiltrative hypovascular tumors produces intracellular acidification, which could activate many signaling pathways and augment cancer cell growth and invasion. Carbonic anhydrase-Ⅸ (CA-Ⅸ) is an enzyme lowering pH. This study is to examine whether hypoxia induces CA-Ⅸ in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and to evaluate its clinical implication in HCC patients.Methods: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and HepG2 cells) were used, and cell growth was assessed using MTS assay. CA-IX expression and apoptotic/kinase signaling were evaluated using immunoblotting. The cells were transfected with CA-Ⅸ-specific siRNA, or treated with its inhibitor 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonamide (CAI#1), and/or the hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). A clinic pathological analysis of 69 patients who underwent an HCC resection was performed using a tissue array.Results: Incubation of HCC cells under hypoxia (1% 02, 5% C02, 94% N2) for 36 h significantly increased CA-IX expression level. CAI#1(400 μmol/L) or CA-IX siRNA (100 μmol/L) did not influence HCC cell growth and induce apoptosis. However, CAI#1 or CA-IX siRNA at these concentrations enhanced the apoptosis induced by 3-BP (100 μmol/L). This enhancement was attributed to increased ER stress and JNK activation, as compared with 3-BP alone. Furthermore, a clinic pathological analysis of 69 HCC patients revealed that tumor CA-Ⅸ intensity was inversely related to E-cadherin intensity.Conclusion: Inhibition of hypoxia-induced CA-Ⅸ enhances hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor-induced HCC apoptosis. Furthermore, CA-IX expres sion profiles may have prognostic implications in HCC patients. Thus, the inhibition of CA-Ⅸ, in combination with a hexokinase Ⅱ inhibitor, may be therapeutically useful in patients with HCCs that are aggressively growing in a hypoxic environment.

  6. MODELLING THE INHIBITORY ACTIVITY ON CARBONIC ANHYDRASE IV OF SUBSTITUTED THIADIAZOLE - AND THIADIAZOLINE - DISULFONAMIDES: INTEGRATION OF STRUCTURE INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Daniela Bolboaca

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Purpose: To analyze the relationships between inhibitory activities on carbonic anhydrase IV and structures of substituted 1,3,4-thiadiazole and 1,3,4-thiadiazoline disulfonamide through integration of compounds complex structure information by the use of Molecular Descriptors Family.Method: A number of forty compounds were used to generate and compute the molecular descriptors family and to build structure-activity relationships models. The obtained multi-varied models (the models with two, respectively with four descriptors were validated by computing the cross-validation leave-one-out score (r2cv-loo, and analyzed through assessment of the squared correlation coefficients (r2, and the models stability (r2 - r2cv-loo. The estimation abilities of the multi-varied MDF-SAR model with four descriptors were analyzed in training and test sets.Results: Analysis of the obtained models shows that the best results was obtained by the multi-varied model with four molecular descriptors (r2 = 0.920. The prediction abilities of this model is sustained by the cross validation leave-one-out score (r2cv-loo = 0.903, the model stability (r2 - r2cv-loo = 0.017, and the results on training versus test analysis (no significant differences between correlation coefficients in training and test sets, p > 0.05. The multi-varied model which used four descriptors proved to render higher value of correlation coefficient comparing with previous reported models (p 0.05. El modelo multivariante que utilizó cuatro descriptores mostró un valor más alto del coeficiente de correlación en comparación con los modelos divulgados anteriormente (p < 0.01.Conclusión: El modelo multivariante con cuatro descriptores es sólido y fiable e indica que la actividad de la inhibición en la carboanhidrasa IV producida por las sufonamidas sustituidas del 1,3,4-tiadiazol- y de la 1,3,4-tiadiazolina- dependen de la naturaleza de la geometría y de la topología del compuesto

  7. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  8. Ethylene participates in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in Strategy I plants and in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eLucena

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is very abundant in most soils but its availability for plants is low, especially in calcareous soils. Plants have been divided into Strategy I and Strategy II species to acquire Fe from soils. Strategy I species apply a reduction-based uptake system which includes all higher plants except the Poaceae. Strategy II species apply a chelation-based uptake system which includes the Poaceae. To cope with Fe deficiency both type of species activate several Fe deficiency responses, mainly in their roots. These responses need to be tightly regulated to avoid Fe toxicity and to conserve energy. Their regulation is not totally understood but some hormones and signaling substances have been implicated. Several years ago it was suggested that ethylene could participate in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in Strategy I species. In Strategy II species, the role of hormones and signaling substances has been less studied. However, in rice, traditionally considered a Strategy II species but that possesses some characteristics of Strategy I species, it has been recently shown that ethylene can also play a role in the regulation of some of its Fe deficiency responses. Here, we will review and discuss the data supporting a role for ethylene in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in both Strategy I species and rice. In addition, we will review the data about ethylene and Fe responses related to Strategy II species. We will also discuss the results supporting the action of ethylene through different transduction pathways and its interaction with other signals, such as certain Fe-related repressive signals occurring in the phloem sap. Finally, the possible implication of ethylene in the interactions among Fe deficiency responses and the responses to other nutrient deficiencies in the plant will be addressed.

  9. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  10. Iron deficiency in blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Blood donation results in a substantial loss of iron (200 to 250 mg at each bleeding procedure (425 to 475 ml and subsequent mobilization of iron from body stores. Recent reports have shown that body iron reserves generally are small and iron depletion is more frequent in blood donors than in non-donors. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors and to establish the frequency of iron deficiency in blood donors according to sex, whether they were first-time or multi-time donors. Design: From march 20 to April 5, 2004, three hundred potential blood donors from Hemocentro del Café y Tolima Grande were studied. Diagnostic tests: Using a combination of biochemical measurements of iron status: serum ferritin (RIA, ANNAR and the hemoglobin pre and post-donation (HEMOCUE Vital technology medical . Results: The frequency of iron deficiency in potential blood donors was 5%, and blood donors accepted was 5.1%; in blood donors rejected for low hemoglobin the frequency of iron deficiency was 3.7% and accepted blood donors was 1.7% in male and 12.6% in female. The frequency of iron deficiency was higher in multi-time blood donors than in first-time blood donors, but not stadistic significative. Increase nivel accepted hemoglobina in 1 g/dl no incidence in male; in female increase of 0.5 g/dl low in 25% blood donors accepted with iron deficiency, but increased rejected innecesary in 16.6% and increased is 1 g/dl low blood donors female accepted in 58% (7/12, but increased the rejected innecesary in 35.6%. Conclusions: We conclude that blood donation not is a important factor for iron deficiency in blood donors. The high frequency of blood donors with iron deficiency found in this study suggests a need for a more accurate laboratory trial, as hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement alone is not sufficient for detecting and excluding blood donors with iron deficiency without anemia, and ajustes hacia

  11. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  12. Gene encoding γ-carbonic anhydrase is cotranscribed with argC and induced in response to stationary phase and high CO2 in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Mukti N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbonic anhydrase (CA is a ubiquitous enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate, a reaction underlying diverse biochemical and physiological processes. Gamma class carbonic anhydrases (γ-CAs are widespread in prokaryotes but their physiological roles remain elusive. At present, only γ-CA of Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam has been shown to have CA activity. Genome analysis of a rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, revealed occurrence of ORFs encoding one β-CA and two γ-CAs. Results One of the putative γ-CA encoding genes of A. brasilense was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. Electrometric assays for CA activity of the whole cell extracts overexpressing recombinant GCA1 did not show CO2 hydration activity. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that gca1 in A. brasilense is co-transcribed with its upstream gene annotated as argC, which encodes a putative N-acetyl-γ-glutamate-phosphate reductase. 5'-RACE also demonstrated that there was no transcription start site between argC and gca1, and the transcription start site located upstream of argC transcribed both the genes (argC-gca1. Using transcriptional fusions of argC-gca1 upstream region with promoterless lacZ, we further demonstrated that gca1 upstream region did not have any promoter and its transcription occurred from a promoter located in the argC upstream region. The transcription of argC-gca1 operon was upregulated in stationary phase and at elevated CO2 atmosphere. Conclusions This study shows lack of CO2 hydration activity in a recombinant protein expressed from a gene predicted to encode a γ-carbonic anhydrase in A. brasilense although it cross reacts with anti-Cam antibody raised against a well characterized γ-CA. The organization and regulation of this gene along with the putative argC gene suggests its involvement in arginine biosynthetic pathway instead of the predicted CO2 hydration.

  13. Differential diagnosis of iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A deficiência de ferro é considerada a patologia hematológica mais prevalente no homem. Assim, é fundamental a adequada identificação de suas causas, bem como a diferenciação com outras patologias distintas para adequada abordagem da deficiência de ferro. Neste artigo são brevemente descritas outras condições que podem cursar com anemia microcítica, tais como: talassemias, anemia de doença crônica, anemia sideroblástica e envenenamento por chumbo, patologias estas que devem ser afastadas dura...

  14. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  15. Primary Carnitine (OCTN2) Deficiency Without Neonatal Carnitine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Morava, E.

    2013-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a primary carnitine deficiency is usually based on a very low level of free and total carnitine (free carnitine: 1-5 muM, normal 20-55 muM) (Longo et al. 2006), we detected a patient via newborn screening with a total carnitine level 67 % of the normal value. At the age of

  16. Design and Synthesis of Novel Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors Hybrids (NSAIDs-CAIs) for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bua, Silvia; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Vullo, Daniela; Ghelardini, Carla; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carta, Fabrizio

    2017-02-09

    We report the synthesis of a series of hybrid compounds incorporating 6- and 7-substituted coumarins (carbonic anhydrase, CA inhibitors) derivatized with clinically used NSAIDs (indomethacin, sulindac, ketoprofen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, ketorolac, etc., cyclooxygenase inhibitors) as agents for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most compounds were effective in inhibiting the RA overexpressed hCA IX and XII, with KI values in the low nanomolar-subnanomolar ranges. The antihyperalgesic activity of such compounds was assessed by means of the paw-pressure and incapacitance tests using an in vivo RA model. Among all tested compounds, the 7-coumarine hybrid with ibuprofen showed potent and persistent antihyperalgesic effect up to 60 min after administration.

  17. Carborane-Based Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors: Insight into CAII/CAIX Specificity from a High-Resolution Crystal Structure, Modeling, and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Mader

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carborane-based compounds are promising lead structures for development of inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs. Here, we report structural and computational analysis applicable to structure-based design of carborane compounds with selectivity toward the cancer-specific CAIX isoenzyme. We determined the crystal structure of CAII in complex with 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane at 1.0 Å resolution and used this structure to model the 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane interactions with CAIX. A virtual glycine scan revealed the contributions of individual residues to the energy of binding of 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane to CAII and CAIX, respectively.

  18. Synthesis and in Vivo Biological Evaluation of (68)Ga-Labeled Carbonic Anhydrase IX Targeting Small Molecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Niemans, Raymon; Bauwens, Matthias; Yaromina, Ala; van Kuijk, Simon J A; Lieuwes, Natasja G; Biemans, Rianne; Pooters, Ivo; Pellegrini, Paul A; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Tonissen, Kathryn F; Supuran, Claudiu T; Lambin, Philippe; Dubois, Ludwig; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-07-14

    Tumor hypoxia contributes resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, while oxygenated tumors are sensitive to these treatments. The indirect detection of hypoxic tumors is possible by targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), an enzyme overexpressed in hypoxic tumors, with sulfonamide-based imaging agents. In this study, we present the design and synthesis of novel gallium-radiolabeled small-molecule sulfonamides targeting CA IX. The compounds display favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics and stability. We demonstrate that our lead compound, [(68)Ga]-2, discriminates CA IX-expressing tumors in vivo in a mouse xenograft model using positron emission tomography (PET). This compound shows specific tumor accumulation and low uptake in blood and clears intact to the urine. These findings were reproduced in a second study using PET/computed tomography. Small molecules investigated to date utilizing (68)Ga for preclinical CA IX imaging are scarce, and this is one of the first effective (68)Ga compounds reported for PET imaging of CA IX.

  19. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The impact of Carbonic Anhydrase on the partitioning of leaf and soil CO18O and COS gas exchange across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, L.; Wehr, R. A.; Commane, R.; Ogee, J.; Sauze, J.; Jones, S.; Launois, T.; Wohl, S.; Whelan, M.; Meredith, L. K.; Genty, B.; Gimeno, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Bosc, A.; Cuntz, M.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; Saleska, S. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis (GPP), the largest CO2 flux to the land surface, is currently estimated with considerable uncertainty at between 100-175 Pg C yr-1. More robust estimates of global GPP could be obtained from the atmospheric budgets of other valuable tracers, such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) or the oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of atmospheric CO2. However, quantifying GPP using these tracers hinges on a better understanding of how soil micro-organisms modify the atmospheric concentrations of CO18O and COS at large scales. In particular, understanding better the role and activity of the enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) in soil micro-organisms is critical. We present novel datasets and model simulations demonstrating the progress in the collection of multi-tracer field datasets and how a new generation of multi-tracer land surface models can provide valuable constraints on photosynthesis and respiration across scales.

  1. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  2. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  3. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibiti...

  4. Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Deeren, Dries

    2008-01-01

    Deferasirox in pyruvate kinase deficiency phone: +32-51-237437 (Deeren, Dries) (Deeren, Dries) Department of Haematology, Heilig-Hartziekenhuis Roeselare-Menen vzw - Wilgenstraat 2 - B-8800 - Roeselare - BELGIUM (Deeren, Dries) BELGIUM Registration: 2008-09-10 Received: 2008-09-05 Accepted: 2008-09-10 ePublished: 2008-09-23

  5. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  6. Congenital β-lipoprotein deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchem, F.S.P. van; Pol, G.; Gier, J. de; Böttcher, C.J.F.; Pries, C.

    1966-01-01

    There are several degrees of β-lipoprotein deficiency. If there is no β-lipoprotein present, or if there are only traces of it, the Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome develops. A constant feature of this syndrome is disturbed fat absorption with accumulation of fat in the epithelium of intestinal mucosa and

  7. Research and application progress of carbonic anhydrase-immobilized technology%碳酸酐酶固定化技术研究与应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘富军; 周作明

    2014-01-01

    Currently,the main drawbacks of the most available amine-based processes for post-combustion CO2 are amine degradation and parasitic power loss.A novel Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP)was proposed to reduce the energy usage by employing a potassium carbonate aqueous solution as a solvent for CO2 absorption.However,K2 CO3 -based system has a much slower CO2 absorption rate than amine-based system does.Carbonic anhydrase is the most effective known enzyme by far that catalyzes the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate and a proton.The research and applications of immobilized carbonic anhydrase were reviewed,and the application prospect of IVCAP process improvement for carbon dioxide capture by selecting magnetic carrier material was presented.%目前以有机胺为吸收剂脱除 CO2的化学吸收法多存在氨基易分解、再生能耗高等不足。新型的 IVCAP 工艺采用碳酸钾水溶液吸收 CO2,可大幅节能降耗,但吸收速率较有机胺慢。碳酸酐酶是至今发现的最有效的 CO2水合酶催化剂,将该酶添加至 IVCAP 工艺中,可显著提高 CO2吸收速率。文中综述了固定化碳酸酐酶在碳捕集与封存技术中的研究和应用进展,并对其选用磁性载体材料强化 IVCAP 工艺对 CO2的捕集应用前景进行了展望。

  8. Physiological function, diversity of carbonic anhydrase and its application%碳酸酐酶的生理功能、多样性及其在CO2捕集中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春秀; 姜笑辰; 邱勇隽; 许建和

    2013-01-01

    碳酸酐酶(carbonic anhydrase)作为一种活性中心含有锌离子的金属酶,能够可逆催化CO2生成碳酸氢盐的水合反应,该反应在生物体内承担着多样的生理学功能,具有高度的生物学意义.除广泛存在于真核生物以外,该酶在淡水、海水、嗜常温、嗜热、厌氧、好氧、致病、产酸、自养、异养等多种原核微生物中也有广泛的分布,并参与光合作用、呼吸作用和以CO2作为底物的反应,维持生理pH以及离子转运等生理过程.近年来,随着温室效应的日益加剧,生物固定CO2作为该酶的一种全新应用引起了研究者的广泛关注.回顾了碳酸酐酶作为催化剂参与CO2固定过程的历史、现状和最新发现,同时展望了未来应用的趋势.%As a metalloenzyme combining a Zn2+ at its active centers,carbonic anhydrase catalyze reaction between CO2 and H2O reversibly, the reaction can undertakes various physiological functions in organisms. Carbonic anhydrase can exist in the eukaryote, and in diversity of prokaryotes. Evidence for the presence of carbonic anhydrase is obtained for freshwater, marine, mesophilic, thermophilic, aerobic, anaerobic, pathogenic, symbiotic, acetogenic, autotrophic, heterotrophic, and photosynthetic species. In prokaryotes, carbonic anhydrases are involved in various biochemical and physiological processes, including photosynthesis, respiration, ion transport, and CO2 and bicarbonate balance. While anthropogenic CO2 emission has led to adverse impact on climate and has been implicated in global warming, this enzyme has found a new dimension in the field of biomimetic CO2 sequestration. This paper reviews the research advances on carbonic anhydrase-driven processes for CO2 sequestration research and engineering and, suggests the possible future directions in application.

  9. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  10. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND IRON-DEFICIENT ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Melnik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available 62 chronic heart failure (CHF patients with iron-deficient anemia (IDA were studied. Standard CHF therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides was accompanied with the correction of iron deficiency by intravenous injection of Venofer and subsequent Ferro-Folgamma prescription (average daily dose of iron 137,75±5mg. After treatment serum iron level increased by 95,5% and hemoglobin level – by 9,8%. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 32,2% and physical activity tolerance – by 47,6%. Before treatment 32 CHF patients with IDA (51,6% had III functional class (FC of CHF according to NYHA and 16 patients (25,8% – IV FC. After treatment I FC was observed in 18 CHF patients (29%, II FC – in 26 patients and only 18 patients demonstrated III FC of CHF.

  11. Container II

    OpenAIRE

    Baraklianou, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Container II, self-published artists book.\\ud The book was made on the occasion of the artists residency at the Banff Arts Centre, in Alberta Canada. \\ud \\ud Container II is a performative piece, it worked in conjunction with the photographic installation "Stage Set: Cool Tone" . (photographic floor installation, Reclaimed wood, frames, 130x145cm, 2016) \\ud The photographic installation was also part of the artists residency titled "New Materiality" at the Banff Arts Centre. \\ud \\ud Limited E...

  12. Identifying Causes of Job Performance Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herem, Maynard A.

    1979-01-01

    A model to guide the search for types of performance deficiencies is set forth within the general framework of systems theory. Five types of problems, singly or in combination, are discussed as causes of deficiencies. (Author)

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity? National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Active at Any Size! Educational Resources (6 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Obesity and Genetics MalaCards: congenital leptin deficiency Orphanet: Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: protein S deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my area? Other Names for This Condition hereditary thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency Related Information How are ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital protein S deficiency ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of potassium in the blood (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia, respectively). Individuals with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can also ... acid in the blood (metabolic acidosis). The hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis associated with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency ...

  16. Cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven F Werder

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven F Werder1,21Kansas University School of Medicine – Wichita, Wichita, KS, USA; 2Community Health Center of Southeast Kansas, Pittsburg, KS, USAIntroduction: Although consensus guidelines recommend checking serum B12 in patients with dementia, clinicians are often faced with various questions: (1 Which patients should be tested? (2 What test should be ordered? (3 How are inferences made from such testing? (4 In addition to serum B12, should other tests be ordered? (5 Is B12 deficiency compatible with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type? (6 What is to be expected from treatment? (7 How is B12 deficiency treated?Methods: On January 31st, 2009, a Medline search was performed revealing 1,627 citations related to cobalamin deficiency, hyperhomocysteinemia, and dementia. After limiting the search terms, all abstracts and/or articles and other references were categorized into six major groups (general, biochemistry, manifestations, associations and risks, evaluation, and treatment and then reviewed in answering the above questions.Results: The six major groups above are described in detail. Seventy-five key studies, series, and clinical trials were identified. Evidence-based suggestions for patient management were developed.Discussion: Evidence is convincing that hyperhomocysteinemia, with or without hypovitaminosis B12, is a risk factor for dementia. In the absence of hyperhomocysteinemia, evidence is less convincing that hypovitaminosis B12 is a risk factor for dementia. B12 deficiency manifestations are variable and include abnormal psychiatric, neurological, gastrointestinal, and hematological findings. Radiological images of individuals with hyperhomocysteinemia frequently demonstrate leukoaraiosis. Assessing serum B12 and treatment of B12 deficiency is crucial for those cases in which pernicious anemia is suspected and may be useful for mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia. The serum B12 level is the standard initial test

  17. Cobalamin deficiency in children: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Synne Helland

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to present cobalamin deficiency in children with a specific focus on infants. Background: Cobalamin deficiency is caused by inadequate intake, malabsorption or inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Cobalamin deficiency in infants is usually caused by deficiency in the mother. There is often a diagnostic delay among infants because the most frequent symptoms are unspecific, e.g., developmental delay, apathy, hypotonia, anorexia and failure to thrive. Chi...

  18. Hydroponics on a chip: analysis of the Fe deficient Arabidopsis thylakoid membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Gómez, Stephen M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Nishio, John N

    2009-04-13

    The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used to evaluate the thylakoid membrane proteome under Fe-deficient conditions. Plants were cultivated using a novel hydroponic system, called "hydroponics on a chip", which yields highly reproducible plant tissue samples for physiological analyses, and can be easily used for in vivo stable isotope labeling. The thylakoid membrane proteome, from intact chloroplasts isolated from Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient plants grown with hydroponics on a chip, was analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Intact masses of thylakoid membrane proteins were measured, many for the first time, and several proteins were identified with post-translational modifications that were altered by Fe deficiency; for example, the doubly phosphorylated form of the photosystem II oxygen evolving complex, PSBH, increased under Fe-deficiency. Increased levels of photosystem II protein subunit PSBS were detected in the Fe-deficient samples. Antioxidant enzymes, including ascorbate peroxidase and peroxiredoxin Q, were only detected in the Fe-deficient samples. We present the first biochemical evidence that the two major LHC IIb proteins (LHCB1 and LHCB2) may have significantly different functions in the thylakoid membrane. The study illustrates the utility of intact mass proteomics as an indispensable tool for functional genomics. "Hydroponics on a chip" provides the ability to grow A. thaliana under defined conditions that will be useful for systems biology.

  19. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  20. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  1. The enzyme-inhibitor approach to cell-selective labelling. Pt. 1; Sulphonamide inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase as carriers for red cell labelling: in vitro uptake of pIBS by human red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jaspal; Wyeth, P. (Southampton Univ. (UK))

    1991-01-01

    Red cell carbonic anhydrase is identified as an ideal target in an enzyme-inhibitor approach to radiolabel localisation. Current problems in blood pool labelling could be overcome by using selective sulphonamide inhibitors as carriers. p-Iodobenzenesulphonamide (pIBS) was selected as the choice reagent for red blood cell labelling. Rapid uptake of ({sup 125}I)-pIBS was found in vitro, consistent with passive diffusion across the cell membrane. The intracellular binding could be attributed to interaction with two specific acceptor sites, with dissociation constants of 4.9 +- 1.0 and 0.10+- 0.05 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, and maximum binding capacities of 166 +- 5 and 19.9 +- 1.0 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, respectively under the experimental conditions. These data correlate with the two major carbonic anhydrase isozymes; acceptor assignments were confirmed by gel chromatography of the red cell lysate. (author).

  2. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... sera. These data were combined with standardized serum 25(OH)D data from 4 previously standardized studies (for a total n = 55,844). Prevalence estimates of vitamin D deficiency [using various serum 25(OH)D thresholds] were generated on the basis of standardized 25(OH)D data. RESULTS: An overall pooled...

  4. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    : homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining. Ataxia telangiectasia and related disorders with defects in these pathways illustrate that such defects can lead to early childhood neurodegeneration. Aging is a risk factor for neurodegeneration and accumulation of oxidative mitochondrial DNA damage......Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...

  5. Acclimation of photosynthesis to nitrogen deficiency in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras; Mattila, Heta; Hakala-Yatkin, Marja; Tyystjärvi, Taina; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen deficiency diminishes consumption of photosynthates in anabolic metabolism. We studied adjustments of the photosynthetic machinery in nitrogen-deficient bean plants and found four phenomena. First, the number of chloroplasts per cell decreased. Chloroplasts of nitrogen starved leaves contained less pigments than those of control leaves, but the in vitro activities of light reactions did not change when measured on chlorophyll basis. Second, nitrogen deficiency induced cyclic electron transfer. The amounts of Rubisco and ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase decreased in nitrogen starved plants. Low activities of these enzymes are expected to lead to increase in reduction of oxygen by photosystem I. However, diaminobenzidine staining did not reveal hydrogen peroxide production in nitrogen starved plants. Measurements of far-red-light-induced redox changes of the primary donor of photosystem I suggested that instead of producing oxygen radicals, nitrogen starved plants develop a high activity of cyclic electron transport that competes with oxygen for electrons. Nitrogen starvation led to decrease in photochemical quenching and increase in non-photochemical quenching, indicating that cyclic electron transport reduces the plastoquinone pool and acidifies the lumen. A third effect is redistribution of excitation energy between the photosystems in favor of photosystem I. Thus, thylakoids of nitrogen starved plants appeared to be locked in state 2, which further protects photosystem II by decreasing its absorption cross-section. As a fourth response, the proportion of non-Q(B)-reducing photosystem II reaction centers increased and the redox potential of the Q(B)/Q(B)(-) pair decreased by 25 mV in a fraction of photosystem II centers of nitrogen starved plants.

  6. Molecular Genetics of Lactase Deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Mikko

    2006-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) (MIM 223000) is a rare autosomal recessive gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. The CLD locus was previously assigned by linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. In this study, the molecular background of this disorder is reported. The CLD locus was refined in 32 CLD patients in 24 families by using microsatellite and single nucleot...

  7. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    OpenAIRE

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in ad...

  8. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  9. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype...

  10. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance of studying different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy.

  11. [Iodine deficiency in cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, I; Magyari, M; Stief, L

    1998-08-30

    The thyroid hormone deficiency on cardiovascular function can be characterized with decreased myocardial contractility and increased peripheral vascular resistance as well as with the changes in lipid metabolism. 42 patients with cardiovascular disease (mean age 65 +/- 13 yr, 16 males) were investigated if iodine insufficiency can play a role as a risk factor for the cardiovascular diseases. The patients were divided in 5 subgroups on the ground of the presence of hypertension, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, coronary disfunction and arrhythmia. Urine iodine concentration (5.29 +/- 4.52 micrograms/dl) was detected with Sandell-Kolthoff colorimetric reaction. The most decreased urine iodine concentration was detected in the subgroups with arrhythmia and congestive heart failure (4.7 +/- 4.94 micrograms/dl and 4.9 +/- 4.81 micrograms/dl, respectively). An elevated TSH level was found by 3 patients (5.3 +/- 1.4 mlU/l). An elevation in lipid metabolism (cholesterol, triglyceride) associated with all subgroups without arrhythmia. In conclusion, the occurrence of iodine deficiency in cardiovascular disease is frequent. Iodine supplementation might prevent the worsing effect of iodine deficiency on cardiovascular disease.

  12. Four methods compared for measuring des-carboxy-prothrombin (PIVKA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdershoven, J; van Munster, P; De Abreu, R; Bosman, H; van Lith, T; van der Putten-van Meyel, M; Motohara, K; Matsuda, I

    1987-11-01

    PIVKA-II (Protein Induced by Vitamin K Absence) is abnormal des-carboxylated prothrombin, which is present in vitamin K deficiency or in patients using warfarin. With a sensitive method for PIVKA-II, biochemical vitamin K deficiency can be established before clinical symptoms occur. We give an overview of methods used to detect PIVKA-II, and four selected methods are inter-compared: (a) measuring total factor II including PIVKA-II by using Echis carinatus snake venom as an activator of prothrombin; (b) measuring PIVKA-II by using snake venom as an activator of factor II after adsorption of functional factor II onto barium sulfate; (c) electrophoresis-immunofixation method; and (d) enzyme immunoassay. We found d to be the most sensitive and reliable method for PIVKA-II.

  13. Impaired IL-13-mediated functions of macrophages in STAT6-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K; Kamanaka, M; Tanaka, T; Kishimoto, T; Akira, S

    1996-10-15

    IL-13 shares many biologic responses with IL-4. In contrast to well-characterized IL-4 signaling pathways, which utilize STAT6 and 4PS/IRS2, IL-13 signaling pathways are poorly understood. Recent studies performed with STAT6-deficient mice have demonstrated that STAT6 plays an essential role in IL-4 signaling. In this study, the functions of peritoneal macrophages of STAT6-deficient mice in response to IL-13 were analyzed. In STAT6-deficient mice, neither morphologic changes nor augmentation of MHC class II expression in response to IL-13 was observed. In addition, IL-13 did not decrease the nitric oxide production by activated macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that the macrophage functions in response to IL-13 were impaired in STAT6-deficient mice, indicating that IL-13 and IL-4 share the signaling pathway via STAT6.

  14. Severe Hypocalcemia due to Vitamin D Deficiency after Extended Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñambres, I; Chico, A; Pérez, A

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a well-known comorbidity of obesity that can be exacerbated after bariatric surgery and can predispose the patient for hypocalcemia. Vitamin D and calcium doses to prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency after weight loss surgery are not well defined. We describe a patient who developed severe hypocalcemia due to vitamin D deficiency 5 years after an extended Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for a type II obesity. No precipitating factors were present and malabsorption induced by the bypass was considered to be the main causative factor. High doses of vitamin D and calcium were needed to reach and maintain normal calcium and vitamin D concentrations. This case emphasises the importance of routine screening for vitamin D deficiency in obese individuals and reflects that while consensus does not exist regarding optimal dosage, vitamin D replacement should be tittered based on calcidiol levels.

  15. Severe Hypocalcemia due to Vitamin D Deficiency after Extended Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Miñambres

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is a well-known comorbidity of obesity that can be exacerbated after bariatric surgery and can predispose the patient for hypocalcemia. Vitamin D and calcium doses to prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency after weight loss surgery are not well defined. We describe a patient who developed severe hypocalcemia due to vitamin D deficiency 5 years after an extended Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for a type II obesity. No precipitating factors were present and malabsorption induced by the bypass was considered to be the main causative factor. High doses of vitamin D and calcium were needed to reach and maintain normal calcium and vitamin D concentrations. This case emphasises the importance of routine screening for vitamin D deficiency in obese individuals and reflects that while consensus does not exist regarding optimal dosage, vitamin D replacement should be tittered based on calcidiol levels.

  16. Zinc Deficiency in Humans and its Amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Yashbir Singh Shivay

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in humans has recently received considerable attention. Global mortality in children under 5 years of age in 2004 due to Zn deficiency was estimated at 4,53,207 as against 6,66,771 for vitamin A deficiency; 20,854 for iron deficiency and 3,619 for iodine deficiency. In humans 2800-3000 proteins contain Zn prosthetic group and Zn is an integral component of zinc finger prints that regulate DNA transcription. Zinc is a Type-2 nutrient, which means that its concentration in ...

  17. Hepcidin expression in the liver of rats fed a magnesium-deficient diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Natsumi; Kotani, Megumi; Funaba, Masayuki; Matsui, Tohru

    2011-10-01

    Mg deficiency accelerates Fe accumulation in the liver, which may induce various metabolic disturbances. In the present study, we examined the gene expression of Hepcidin, a peptide hormone produced in the liver to regulate intestinal Fe absorption negatively, in Mg-deficient rats. Although liver Fe concentration was significantly higher in rats fed an Mg-deficient diet for 4 weeks than in rats fed a control diet, Hepcidin expression in the liver was comparable between the dietary groups. Previous studies revealed that Fe overload up-regulated Hepcidin expression through transcriptional activation by Fe-induced bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) 6, a growth/differentiation factor belonging to the transforming growth factor-β family, in the liver. Mg deficiency up-regulated the expression of Bmp6 but did not affect the expression of inhibition of DNA binding 1, a sensitive Bmp-responsive gene. In addition, the expression of Bmp receptors such as activin receptor-like kinase 2 (Alk2), activin receptor type IIA (Actr2a), activin receptor type IIB (Actr2b) and Bmp type II receptor (Bmpr2) was lower in the liver of Mg-deficient rats than in that of control rats. The present study indicates that accumulation of hepatic Fe by Mg deficiency is a stimulant inducing Bmp6 expression but not Hepcidin expression by blunting Bmp signalling possibly resulting from down-regulation of the receptor expression. Unresponsive Hepcidin expression may have a role in Mg deficiency-induced changes related to increased liver Fe.

  18. Pregnancy and maternal iron deficiency stimulate hepatic CRBPII expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Sarah C; Gambling, Lorraine; Hayes, Helen E; Stevens, Valerie J; McArdle, Harry J

    2016-06-01

    Iron deficiency impairs vitamin A (VA) metabolism in the rat but the mechanisms involved are unknown and the effect during development has not been investigated. We investigated the effect of pregnancy and maternal iron deficiency on VA metabolism in the mother and fetus. 54 rats were fed either a control or iron deficient diet for 2weeks prior to mating and throughout pregnancy. Another 15 female rats followed the same diet and were used as non-pregnant controls. Maternal liver, placenta and fetal liver were collected at d21 for total VA, retinol and retinyl ester (RE) measurement and VA metabolic gene expression analysis. Iron deficiency increased maternal hepatic RE (PRE (P<.05), and decreased placenta total VA (P<.05). Pregnancy increased Cellular Retinol Binding Protein (CRBP)-II gene expression by 7 fold (P=.001), decreased VA levels (P=.0004) and VA metabolic gene expression (P<.0001) in the liver. Iron deficiency increased hepatic CRBPII expression by a further 2 fold (P=.044) and RBP4 by~20% (P=.005), increased RBPR2 and decreased CRBPII, LRAT, and TTR in fetal liver, while it had no effect on VA metabolic gene expression in the placenta. Hepatic CRBPII expression is increased by pregnancy and further increased by iron deficiency, which may play an important role in VA metabolism and homeostasis. Maternal iron deficiency also alters VA metabolism in the fetus, which is likely to have consequences for development.

  19. TBscore II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Frauke; Lemvik, Grethe; Abate, Ebba;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The TBscore, based on simple signs and symptoms, was introduced to predict unsuccessful outcome in tuberculosis patients on treatment. A recent inter-observer variation study showed profound variation in some variables. Further, some variables depend on a physician assessing...... them, making the score less applicable. The aim of the present study was to simplify the TBscore. Methods: Inter-observer variation assessment and exploratory factor analysis were combined to develop a simplified score, the TBscore II. To validate TBscore II we assessed the association between start...

  20. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA.