WorldWideScience

Sample records for angular momentum effects

  1. Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  2. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  3. Optical Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimondo, Ennio

    2004-01-01

    For many years the Institute of Physics has published books on hot topics based on a collection of reprints from different journals, including some remarks by the editors of each volume. The book on Optical Angular Momentum, edited by L Allen, S M Barnett and M J Padgett, is a recent addition to the series. It reproduces forty four papers originally published in different journals and in a few cases it provides direct access to works not easily accessible to a web navigator. The collection covers nearly a hundred years of progress in physics, starting from an historic 1909 paper by Poynting, and ending with a 2002 paper by Padgett, Barnett and coworkers on the measurement of the orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The field of optical angular momentum has expanded greatly, creating an interdisciplinary attraction for researchers operating in quantum optics, atomic physics, solid state physics, biophysics and quantum information theory. The development of laser optics, especially the control of single mode sources, has made possible the specific design of optical radiation modes with a high degree of control on the light angular momentum. The editors of this book are important figures in the field of angular momentum, having contributed to key progress in the area. L Allen published an historical paper in 1999, he and M J Padgett (together with M Babiker) produced few years ago a long review article which is today still the most complete basic introduction to the angular momentum of light, while S M Barnett has contributed several high quality papers to the progress of this area of physics. The editors' choice provides an excellent overview to all readers, with papers classified into eight different topics, covering the basic principles of the light and spin and orbital angular momentum, the laboratory tools for creating laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum, the optical forces and torques created by laser beams carrying angular momentum on

  4. Rotations and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyborg, P.; Froyland, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of rotational invariance and the properties of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. In particular, the problem of addition of angular momenta is treated in detail, and tables of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients are included

  5. Fission fragment angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenne, D. De

    1991-01-01

    Most of the energy released in fission is converted into translational kinetic energy of the fragments. The remaining excitation energy will be distributed among neutrons and gammas. An important parameter characterizing the scission configuration is the primary angular momentum of the nascent fragments. Neutron emission is not expected to decrease the spin of the fragments by more than one unit of angular momentum and is as such of less importance in the determination of the initial fragment spins. Gamma emission is a suitable tool in studying initial fragment spins because the emission time, number, energy, and multipolarity of the gammas strongly depend on the value of the primary angular momentum. The main conclusions of experiments on gamma emission were that the initial angular momentum of the fragments is large compared to the ground state spin and oriented perpendicular to the fission axis. Most of the recent information concerning initial fragment spin distributions comes from the measurement of isomeric ratios for isomeric pairs produced in fission. Although in nearly every mass chain isomers are known, only a small number are suitable for initial fission fragment spin studies. Yield and half-life considerations strongly limit the number of candidates. This has the advantage that the behavior of a specific isomeric pair can be investigated for a number of fissioning systems at different excitation energies of the fragments and fissioning nuclei. Because most of the recent information on primary angular momenta comes from measurements of isomeric ratios, the global deexcitation process of the fragments and the calculation of the initial fragment spin distribution from measured isomeric ratios are discussed here. The most important results on primary angular momentum determinations are reviewed and some theoretical approaches are given. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Angular momentum projected semiclassics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasse, R.W.

    1986-10-01

    By using angular momentum projected plane waves as wave functions, we derive semiclassical expressions for the single-particle propagator, the partition function, the nonlocal density matrix, the single-particle density and the one particle- one hole level density for fixed angular momentum and fixed z-component or summed over the z-components. Other quantities can be deduced from the propagator. In coordinate space (r, r') the relevant quantities depend on vertical stroker - r 3 vertical stroke instead of vertical stroker - r'vertical stroke and in Wigner space (R, P) they become proportional to the angular momentum constraints δ(vertical strokeRxPvertical stroke/ℎ - l) and δ((RxP) z /ℎ - m). As applications we calculate the single-particle and one particle- one hole level densities for harmonic oscillator and Hill-Wheeler box potentials and the imaginary part of the optical potential and its volume integral with an underlying harmonic oscillator potential and a zero range two-body interaction. (orig.)

  7. Preequilibrium GDR excitation and entrance channel angular momentum effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoli, M.; Campajola, L.; De Rosa, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; La Commara, M.; Ordine, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Roca, V.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M.; Terrasi, F.; Trotta, M.; Cardella, G.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Gillibert, A.

    1997-01-01

    The energy spectra of the γ-rays emitted in the 35 Cl+ 92 Mo reaction at incident energy E=260 MeV were measured in coincidence with the ejectiles produced in dissipative reaction events. The cumulative energy spectrum of the γ-rays coming from the decay of the ejectiles was calculated within the statistical model and its comparison to the experimental spectrum evidences an excess in the data for E γ =8 to 12 MeV. Such an excess, fitted with a Lorentz curve, is attributed to the preequilibrium GDR γ-decay of the intermediate dinuclear system. The centroid energy of the Lorentz curve corresponds to a dipole oscillation along the symmetry axis of the system and its width is found to be comparable to that of the ground state GDR low energy component of the deformed dinucleus. The small quantal dispersion Δl=(10.3±0.1)ℎ of the entrance channel angular momentum, determined by analysing the dissipative fragment angular distribution in the framework of the Strutinsky model, is suggested to limit the broadening of the preequilibrium GDR width. (orig.)

  8. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Angular Momentum in Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönnenwein, F.; Bunakov, V.; Dorvaux, O.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Hanappe, F.; Kadmensky, S.; von Kalben, J.; Khlebnikov, S.; Kinnard, V.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Petrov, G.; Prokhorova, E.; Rubchenya, V.; Sillanpää, M.; Simpson, G.; Sokolov, V.; Soldner, T.; Stuttgé, L.; Tiourine, G.; Trzaska, W.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Wagemans, C.; Wollersheim, H.-J.; Zavarukhina, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-04-01

    Three novel experiments in spontaneous and thermal neutron induced fission all with a bearing on angular momentum in fission are reviewed. In the first experiment it was observed that, in the reaction 235U(n, f) with incident polarized cold neutrons, the nucleus undergoing scission is rotating. This was inferred from the shift in angular distributions of ternary particles being dependent on the orientation of neutron spin. In the second study the properties of the angular momentum of spherical fission fragments was investigated. Current theories trace the spin of fragments to their deformations allowing for collective rotational vibrations at scission. However, in particular the spherical 132Te isotope exhibits a large spin at variance with theory. Exploiting the specific properties of cold deformed fission it could be proven that, for 132Te, single particle excitations instead of collective modes are responsible for the large spin observed. In a third project a pilot study was exploring the possibility to search for an evaporation of neutrons from fragments being anisotropic in their own cm-system. Due to fragment spin this anisotropy is claimed since decades to exist. It was so far never observed. A scheme has been devised and tested were triple coincidences between a fragment and two neutrons are evaluated in a way to bring the cm-anisotropy into the foreground while getting rid of the kinematical anisotropy in the lab-system due to evaporation from moving fragments. The test was run for spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

  10. Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the experimental data for fragments in the mass number region of 130–140. The odd–even effect observed in the fragment angular momenta in the low-energy fission of actinides has been explained quantitatively for the first time. Keywords. Fission fragment angular momentum; scission point model; fragment defor- mation ...

  11. Angular momentum partition in heavy ion induced fission and the effects of shells on gamma-ray multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, J.R.; Phillips, W.R.; Newton, J.O.; Foote, G.S.; Hinde, D.J.; Dracoulis, G.D.

    1985-06-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities have been measured following fission of nuclei with a wide range of mass and angular momentum. The average multiplicity reflects the total angular momentum of the fragments, but the observed variation of multiplicity with fragment mass asymmetry is dominated by shell effects. The highest average multiplicity arises from fission of the heaviest compound system, produced with the lowest angular momentum. This behaviour is well described by spin enhancement through statistical excitation

  12. Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy fission of actinides. B S TOMAR∗, R TRIPATHI and A GOSWAMI. Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. *Author for correspondence. E-mail: bstomar@barc.gov.in. MS received 24 March 2006; revised 31 August ...

  13. Lidar Orbital Angular Momentum Sensor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recognition in recent decades that electromagnetic fields have angular momentum (AM) in the form of not only polarization (or spin AM) but also orbital (OAM) has...

  14. Angular momentum from tidal torques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Efstathiou, G.; Cambridge Univ., England)

    1987-01-01

    The origin of the angular momentum of bound objects in large N-body simulations is studied using three sets of models. One model with white-noise initial conditions is analyzed as well as two in which the initial conditions have more power on large scales, as predicted in models with cold dark matter. The growth and distribution of angular momentum in individual objects is studied and it is found that the specific angular momentum distribution of bound clumps increases in a near linear fashion with radius while the orientation of the angular momentum in the inner high-density regions is often poorly correlated with that of the outer parts. It is also found that the dimensionless spin parameter is insensitive to the initial perturbation spectrum and has a median value of about 0.05. 61 references

  15. Plasmons with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Ali, S.; Thide, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electron plasma waves carrying orbital angular momentum are investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless plasma composed of inertial electrons and static ions. For this purpose, the usual plasmon dispersion relation is employed to derive an approximate paraxial equation. The latter is analyzed with a Gaussian beam solution. For a finite angular momentum associated with the plasmon, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) solutions are employed for solving the electrostatic potential problem which gives approximate solution and is valid for plasmon beams in the paraxial approximation. The LG potential determines the electric field components and energy flux of plasmons with finite angular momentum. Numerical illustrations show that the radial and angular mode numbers strongly modify the profiles of the LG potential.

  16. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  17. Effect of the energy spectrum and angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on the prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy by the models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheyli, Saeed; Khanlari, Marzieh Varasteh

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the various neutron emission energy spectra, as well as the influence of the angular momentum of pre-scission neutrons on theoretical predictions of fission fragment angular anisotropies for several heavy-ion induced fission systems are considered. Although theoretical calculations of angular anisotropy are very sensitive to neutron emission correction, the effects of the different values of kinetic energy of emitted neutrons derived from the various neutron emission energy spectra before reaching to the saddle point on the prediction of fission fragment angular distribution by the model are not significant and can be neglected, since these effects on angular anisotropies of fission fragments for a wide range of fissility parameters and excitation energies of compound nuclei are not more than 10%. Furthermore, the theoretical prediction of fission fragment angular anisotropy is not sensitive to the angular momentum of emitted neutrons.

  18. Angular momentum in QGP holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quark chemical potential is one of the fundamental parameters describing the quark–gluon plasma produced by sufficiently energetic heavy-ion collisions. It is not large at the extremely high temperatures probed by the LHC, but it plays a key role in discussions of the beam energy scan programmes at the RHIC and other facilities. On the other hand, collisions at such energies typically (that is, in peripheral collisions give rise to very high values of the angular momentum density. Here we explain that holographic estimates of the quark chemical potential of a rotating sample of plasma can be very considerably improved by taking the angular momentum into account.

  19. Optical angular momentum in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-06-01

    Invoking Maxwell’s classical equations in conjunction with expressions for the electromagnetic (EM) energy, momentum, force, and torque, we use a few simple examples to demonstrate the nature of the EM angular momentum. The energy and the angular momentum of an EM field will be shown to have an intimate relationship; a source radiating EM angular momentum will, of necessity, pick up an equal but opposite amount of mechanical angular momentum; and the spin and orbital angular momenta of the EM field, when absorbed by a small particle, will be seen to elicit different responses from the particle.

  20. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  1. Angular Momentum of Topologically Structured Darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperin, Samuel N; Siemens, Mark E

    2017-11-17

    We theoretically analyze and experimentally measure the extrinsic angular momentum contribution of topologically structured darkness found within fractional vortex beams, and show that this structured darkness can be explained by evanescent waves at phase discontinuities in the generating optic. We also demonstrate the first direct measurement of the intrinsic orbital angular momentum of light with both intrinsic and extrinsic angular momentum, and explain why the total orbital angular momenta of fractional vortices do not match the winding number of their generating phases.

  2. Uncertainty principle for angular position and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Eric; Leach, Jonathan; Courtial, Johannes; Padgett, Miles

    2004-01-01

    The uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on the accuracy with which we are able to measure the values of different physical quantities (Heisenberg 1949 The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (New York: Dover); Robertson 1929 Phys. Rev. 34 127). This has profound effects not only on the microscopic but also on the macroscopic level of physical systems. The most familiar form of the uncertainty principle relates the uncertainties in position and linear momentum. Other manifestations include those relating uncertainty in energy to uncertainty in time duration, phase of an electromagnetic field to photon number and angular position to angular momentum (Vaccaro and Pegg 1990 J. Mod. Opt. 37 17; Barnett and Pegg 1990 Phys. Rev. A 41 3427). In this paper, we report the first observation of the last of these uncertainty relations and derive the associated states that satisfy the equality in the uncertainty relation. We confirm the form of these states by detailed measurement of the angular momentum of a light beam after passage through an appropriate angular aperture. The angular uncertainty principle applies to all physical systems and is particularly important for systems with cylindrical symmetry

  3. The effect of scattering on single photon transmission of optical angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, D L

    2011-01-01

    Schemes for the communication and registration of optical angular momentum depend on the fidelity of transmission between optical system components. It is known that electron spin can be faithfully relayed between exciton states in quantum dots; it has also been shown by several theoretical and experimental studies that the use of beams conveying orbital angular momentum can significantly extend the density and efficiency of such information transfer. However, it remains unclear to what extent the operation of such a concept at the single photon level is practicable—especially where this involves optical propagation through a material system, in which forward scattering events can intervene. The possibility of transmitting and decoding angular momentum over nanoscale distances itself raises other important issues associated with near-field interrogation. This paper provides a framework to address these and related issues. A quantum electrodynamical representation is constructed and used to pursue the consequences of individual photons, from a Laguerre–Gaussian beam, undergoing single and multiple scattering events in the course of propagation. In this context, issues concerning orbital angular momentum conservation, and its possible compromise, are tackled by identifying the relevant components of the electromagnetic scattering and coupling tensors, using an irreducible Cartesian basis. The physical interpretation broadly supports the fidelity of quantum information transmission, but it also identifies potential limitations of principle

  4. The effect of scattering on single photon transmission of optical angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D. L.

    2011-06-01

    Schemes for the communication and registration of optical angular momentum depend on the fidelity of transmission between optical system components. It is known that electron spin can be faithfully relayed between exciton states in quantum dots; it has also been shown by several theoretical and experimental studies that the use of beams conveying orbital angular momentum can significantly extend the density and efficiency of such information transfer. However, it remains unclear to what extent the operation of such a concept at the single photon level is practicable—especially where this involves optical propagation through a material system, in which forward scattering events can intervene. The possibility of transmitting and decoding angular momentum over nanoscale distances itself raises other important issues associated with near-field interrogation. This paper provides a framework to address these and related issues. A quantum electrodynamical representation is constructed and used to pursue the consequences of individual photons, from a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, undergoing single and multiple scattering events in the course of propagation. In this context, issues concerning orbital angular momentum conservation, and its possible compromise, are tackled by identifying the relevant components of the electromagnetic scattering and coupling tensors, using an irreducible Cartesian basis. The physical interpretation broadly supports the fidelity of quantum information transmission, but it also identifies potential limitations of principle.

  5. Effect of Different Angular Momentum Transport Mechanisms on the Radial Volatile Distribution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyaan, Anusha; Desch, Steven

    2018-01-01

    How circumstellar disks evolve and transport angular momentum is a mystery even until today. Magnetorotational instability (MRI; [1]) earlier thought to be a primary driver of disk evolution, has been found to be not as strong a candidate in cold insufficiently ionized protoplanetary disks where non-ideal MHD effects take over to efficiently suppress the instability [2][3]. In the past few years, recent studies have proposed different mechanisms such as magnetically-driven disk winds [4][5], convective overstability [6], and the vertical shear instability (VSI)[7] to be likely drivers of disk evolution. In this work, we consider numerically [8] and/or parametrically derived radial α profiles of three different mechanisms of angular momentum transport (hydrodynamic instabilities such as VSI, disk winds, and MRI) to understand how the underlying disk structure changes and evolves with each mechanism. We overlay our snowline model that incorporates the advection and diffusion of volatiles as well as radial drift of solids [9] to understand how different α profiles can affect the distribution of water in the disk. References: [1] Balbus, S.A., & Hawley, J.F.,1998, Rev. of Mod. Phys., 70, 1 [2] Bai, X.-N., & Stone, J.M. 2011, ApJ, 736, 144 [3] Bai, X.-N., & Stone, J.M., 2013, ApJ, 769, 76 [4] Bai, X.-N., 2016, ApJ, 821, 80 [5] Suzuki, T.K., Ogihara, M., Morbidelli, A., Crida, A., & Guillot, T., 2016, A&A, 596, A74 [6] Klahr, H., & Hubbard, A. 2014, ApJ, 788, 21 [7] Stoll, M.H.R., & Kley, W. 2014, A&A, 572, A77 [8] Kalyaan, A., Desch, S.J., & Monga, N., 2015, ApJ, 815, 112 [9] Desch, S.J., Estrada, P.R., Kalyaan, A., & Cuzzi, J.N., 2017, ApJ, 840, 86

  6. On the reversibility of the Meissner effect and the angular momentum puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, J.E., E-mail: jhirsch@ucsd.edu

    2016-10-15

    suppress Foucault currents, charge has to flow in direction perpendicular to the phase boundary. • The charge carriers have to be holes. • This solves also the angular momentum puzzle associated with the Meissner effect.

  7. On the reversibility of the Meissner effect and the angular momentum puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    suppress Foucault currents, charge has to flow in direction perpendicular to the phase boundary. • The charge carriers have to be holes. • This solves also the angular momentum puzzle associated with the Meissner effect.

  8. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED: EFFECTS OF VARIABLE MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fall, S. Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, One Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We rederive the relation between the specific angular momentum j {sub *} and the mass M {sub *} of the stellar matter in galaxies of different morphological types. This is a revision of the j {sub *}-M {sub *} diagram presented in our recent comprehensive study of galactic angular momentum. In that work, we estimated j {sub *} from kinematic and photometric data that extended to large radii and M {sub *} from near-infrared luminosities L{sub K} with an assumed universal mass-to-light ratio M {sub *}/L{sub K} . However, recent stellar population models show large variations in M {sub *}/L{sub K} correlated with B – V color. In the present work, we use this correlation to estimate M {sub *}/L{sub K} and hence M {sub *} from the measured B – V and L{sub K} . Our revised j {sub *}-M {sub *} diagram is similar to our previous one; both disk-dominated and elliptical galaxies follow nearly parallel sequences with j{sub ⋆}∝M{sub ⋆}{sup α} and α = 0.6 ± 0.1. However, the offset between the sequences is now a factor of about 5, some 30% larger than before (and close to the offset found by Fall in 1983). Thus, our new results place even tighter constraints on the loss of specific angular momentum by galactic disks over their lifetimes.

  9. Effect of angular momentum alignment and strong magnetic fields on the formation of protostellar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William J.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2018-01-01

    Star-forming molecular clouds are observed to be both highly magnetized and turbulent. Consequently, the formation of protostellar discs is largely dependent on the complex interaction between gravity, magnetic fields, and turbulence. Studies of non-turbulent protostellar disc formation with realistic magnetic fields have shown that these fields are efficient in removing angular momentum from the forming discs, preventing their formation. However, once turbulence is included, discs can form in even highly magnetized clouds, although the precise mechanism remains uncertain. Here, we present several high-resolution simulations of turbulent, realistically magnetized, high-mass molecular clouds with both aligned and random turbulence to study the role that turbulence, misalignment, and magnetic fields have on the formation of protostellar discs. We find that when the turbulence is artificially aligned so that the angular momentum is parallel to the initial uniform field, no rotationally supported discs are formed, regardless of the initial turbulent energy. We conclude that turbulence and the associated misalignment between the angular momentum and the magnetic field are crucial in the formation of protostellar discs in the presence of realistic magnetic fields.

  10. Optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Trichili, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is mooted as a technology to address future bandwidth issues, and has been successfully demonstrated in free space using spatial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM). To further increase the data transmission...

  11. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work on the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, much attention has been devoted to the subject, with particular attention into the quantum aspects of information processing using OAM. Furthermore...

  12. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fusion reactions. The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de- excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly ...

  13. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de-excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly smaller than critical ...

  14. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 91, 043821 (2015) Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes Christian Schulze, Filippus S. Roux, Angela Dudley, Ronald Rop, Michael Duparr´e, and Andrew Forbes Abstract: We introduce a class of light field that angularly...

  15. Experimental determination of high angular momentum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, J.L.V.

    1985-01-01

    The current knowledge of the atomic nucleus structure is summarized. A short abstract of the nuclear properties at high angular momentum and a more detailed description of the experimental methods used in the study of high angular momenta is made. (L.C.) [pt

  16. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j * and mass M * (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j * reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j * in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of ∼100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j * versus M * . The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j * -M * tracks, with log-slopes of ∼0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of ∼3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and ∼7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j * -M * trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j * -M * scaling relations. This provides a

  17. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fall, S. Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j{sub *} and mass M{sub *} (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j{sub *} reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j{sub *} in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of {approx}100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j{sub *} versus M{sub *}. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j{sub *}-M{sub *} tracks, with log-slopes of {approx}0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of {approx}3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and {approx}7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j{sub *}-M{sub *} trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow

  18. Transverse angular momentum in topological photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Min; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Fu-Li; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Engineering local angular momentum of structured light fields in real space enables applications in many fields, in particular, the realization of unidirectional robust transport in topological photonic crystals with a non-trivial Berry vortex in momentum space. Here, we show transverse angular momentum modes in silicon topological photonic crystals when considering transverse electric polarization. Excited by a chiral external source with either transverse spin angular momentum or transverse phase vortex, robust light flow propagating along opposite directions is observed in several kinds of sharp-turn interfaces between two topologically-distinct silicon photonic crystals. A transverse orbital angular momentum mode with alternating phase vortex exists at the boundary of two such photonic crystals. In addition, unidirectional transport is robust to the working frequency even when the ring size or location of the pseudo-spin source varies in a certain range, leading to the superiority of the broadband photonic device. These findings enable one to make use of transverse angular momentum, a kind of degree of freedom, to achieve unidirectional robust transport in the telecom region and other potential applications in integrated photonic circuits, such as on-chip robust delay lines.

  19. Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantitative explanation for the odd–even effect on fragment angular momenta in the low-energy fission of actinides have been provided by taking into account the single particle spin of the odd proton at the fragment's scission point deformation in the case of odd- fragments along with the contribution from the population ...

  20. Dual electromagnetism: helicity, spin, momentum and angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y

    2013-01-01

    The dual symmetry between electric and magnetic fields is an important intrinsic property of Maxwell equations in free space. This symmetry underlies the conservation of optical helicity and, as we show here, is closely related to the separation of spin and orbital degrees of freedom of light (the helicity flux coincides with the spin angular momentum). However, in the standard field-theory formulation of electromagnetism, the field Lagrangian is not dual symmetric. This leads to problematic dual-asymmetric forms of the canonical energy–momentum, spin and orbital angular-momentum tensors. Moreover, we show that the components of these tensors conflict with the helicity and energy conservation laws. To resolve this discrepancy between the symmetries of the Lagrangian and Maxwell equations, we put forward a dual-symmetric Lagrangian formulation of classical electromagnetism. This dual electromagnetism preserves the form of Maxwell equations, yields meaningful canonical energy–momentum and angular-momentum tensors, and ensures a self-consistent separation of the spin and orbital degrees of freedom. This provides a rigorous derivation of the results suggested in other recent approaches. We make the Noether analysis of the dual symmetry and all the Poincaré symmetries, examine both local and integral conserved quantities and show that only the dual electromagnetism naturally produces a complete self-consistent set of conservation laws. We also discuss the observability of physical quantities distinguishing the standard and dual theories, as well as relations to quantum weak measurements and various optical experiments. (paper)

  1. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist

  2. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical ...

  3. Angular momentum gated neutron evaporation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Mukherjee, G.; Gohil, M.; Meena, J.K.; Pandey, R.; Pai, H.; Dey, A.; Biswas, M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, D.; Pal, S.; Banerjee, S.R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bandhopadhyay, T.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse level density parameter k (k = A/a, where A is the mass number of the compound nucleus)is investigated as a function of angular momentum by measuring γ-ray fold gated neutron evaporation spectrum in 4 He + 115 In fusion reaction using 35 MeV 4 He ion beam from VECC K130 cyclotron

  4. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs

  5. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Heavy-ion reactions; incomplete fusion; isomeric cross-section ratio; 12C, 16O beams; 93Nb; 89Y targets; angular momentum. ... R Tripathi1 A Goswami1. Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain 456 010, India ...

  6. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model ... Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006, India; Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110 067, India ...

  7. Quantum field theory treatment of magnetic effects on the spin and orbital angular momentum of a free electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurian, P.; Verzegnassi, C.

    2016-01-01

    We consider in a quantum field theory framework the effects of a classical magnetic field on the spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a free electron. We derive formulae for the changes in the spin and OAM due to the introduction of a general classical background field. We consider then a constant magnetic field, in which case the relevant expressions of the effects become much simpler and conversions between spin and OAM become readily apparent. An estimate of the expectation values for a realistic electron state is also given. Our findings may be of interest to researchers in spintronics and the field of quantum biology, where electron spin has been implicated on macroscopic time and energy scales. - Highlights: • We present the first field theory treatment of magnetic changes in electron spin. • Changes in spin and orbital angular momentum (OAM) are correlated and calculated. • Expectation values of spin–OAM changes for a realistic electron state are computed. • Earth's magnetic field produces non-negligible changes in spin of a few percent. • Results apply to spin–OAM conversion in electron vortex beams and quantum biology.

  8. On the angular momentum in star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horedt, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the rotation of interstellar clouds which are in a stage immediately before star formation. Cloud collisions seem to be the principal cause of the observed rotation of interstellar clouds. The rotational motion of the clouds is strongly influenced by turbulence. Theories dealing with the resolution of the angular momentum problem in star formation are classified into five major groups. The old idea that the angular momentum of an interstellar cloud passes during star formation into the angular momentum of double star systems and/or circumstellar clouds, is developed. It is suggested that a rotating gas cloud contracts into a ring-like structure which fragments into self-gravitating subcondensations. By collisions and gas accretion these subcondensations accrete into binary systems surrounded by circumstellar clouds. Using some rough approximations the authors find analytical expressions for the semi-major axis of the binary system and for the density of the circumstellar clouds as a function of the initial density and of the initial angular velocity of an interstellar cloud. The obtained values are well within the observational limits. (Auth.)

  9. Atmospheric Rotational Effects on Mars Based on the NASA Ames General Circulation Model: Angular Momentum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, James

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigation is to determine the motion of the rotational axis of Mars as a result of mass variations in the atmosphere and condensation and sublimation of CO2 ice on the polar caps. A planet experiences this type of motion if it has an atmosphere, which is changing its mass distribution with respect to the solid body of the planet and/or it is asymmetrically changing the amount of ice at the polar caps. The physical principle involved is the conservation of angular momentum, one can get a feeling for it by sitting on a well oiled swivel chair holding a rotating wheel on a horizontal direction and then changing the rotation axis of the wheel to a vertical direction. The person holding the wheel and the chair would begin to rotate in opposite direction to the rotation of the wheel. The motions of Mars atmosphere and the ice caps variations are obtained from a mathematical model developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. The model produces outputs for a time span of one Martian year, which is equivalent to 687 Earth days. The results indicate that Mars axis of rotation moves in a spiral with respect to a reference point on the surface of the planet. It can move as far away as 35.3 cm from the initial location as a result of both mass variations in the atmosphere and asymmetric ice variations at the polar caps. Furthermore the pole performs close to two revolutions around the reference point during a Martian year. This motion is a combination of two motions, one produced by the atmospheric mass variations and another due to the variations in the ice caps. The motion due to the atmospheric variations is a spiral performing about two and a half revolutions around the reference point during which the pole can move as far as 40.9 cm. The motion due to variations in the ice caps is a spiral performing almost three revolutions during which the pole can move as far as 32.8 cm.

  10. Orbital angular momentum light in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2017-02-28

    Light with a helical phase has had an impact on optical imaging, pushing the limits of resolution or sensitivity. Here, special emphasis will be given to classical light microscopy of phase samples and to Fourier filtering techniques with a helical phase profile, such as the spiral phase contrast technique in its many variants and areas of application.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Effect of angular-momentum dissipation and fluctuation on energy coherence lengths and time evolution in the dissipative collision 28Si+48Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, S.Yu.; WITS Univ., Johannesburg; Noerenberg, W.; TH Darmstadt; Papa, M.

    1992-09-01

    We analyze the energy autocorrelation functions and the energy coherence lengths in the strongly dissipative collision 28 Si(E lab = 130 MeV) + 4 8Ti for Z=11 and 12 reaction fragments. It is found that in order to obtain a good fit of both the energy averaged angular distributions and the angular dependence of the energy coherence lengths one has to take into account (i) the dissipation and fluctuation of the relative angular momentum of the dinucleus and (ii) the contribution from direct (fast) reactions in addition to the statistical (relatively slow) interaction processes. The established angular dependence is a direct consequence of the angular-momentum dissipation-fluctuation effects on the time-space evolution of the intermediate dinucleus. (orig.)

  12. Spin and orbital angular momentum distribution functions of the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, M.; Watabe, T.

    2000-09-01

    A theoretical prediction is given for the spin and orbital angular momentum distribution functions of the nucleon within the framework of an effective quark model of QCD, i.e., the chiral quark soliton model. An outstanding feature of the model is that it predicts a fairly small quark spin fraction of the nucleon ΔΣ~=0.35, which in turn dictates that the remaining 65% of the nucleon spin is carried by the orbital angular momentum of quarks and antiquarks at the model energy scale of Q2~=0.3 GeV2. This large orbital angular momentum necessarily affects the scenario of scale dependence of the nucleon spin contents in a drastic way.

  13. Energy, momentum and angular momentum conservations in de Sitter gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jia-An

    2016-01-01

    In de Sitter (dS) gravity, where gravity is a gauge field introduced to realize the local dS invariance of the matter field, two kinds of conservation laws are derived. The first kind is a differential equation for a dS-covariant current, which unites the canonical energy-momentum (EM) and angular momentum (AM) tensors. The second kind presents a dS-invariant current which is conserved in the sense that its torsion-free divergence vanishes. The dS-invariant current unites the total (matter plus gravity) EM and AM currents. It is well known that the AM current contains an inherent part, called the spin current. Here it is shown that the EM tensor also contains an inherent part, which might be observed by its contribution to the deviation of the dust particle’s world line from a geodesic. All the results are compared to the ordinary Lorentz gravity. (paper)

  14. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Corde, Sébastien; Lehe, Rémi; Le Bouteiller, Madeleine; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Davoine, Xavier; Rax, J. M.; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laserplasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  15. Projection of angular momentum via linear algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Calvin W.; O'Mara, Kevin D.

    2017-12-01

    Projection of many-body states with good angular momentum from an initial state is usually accomplished by a three-dimensional integral. We show how projection can instead be done by solving a straightforward system of linear equations. We demonstrate the method and give sample applications to 48Cr and 60Fe in the p f shell. This new projection scheme, which is competitive against the standard numerical quadrature, should also be applicable to other quantum numbers such as isospin and particle number.

  16. The angular momentum of isolated white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brassard P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a very brief report on an ongoing program aimed at mapping the internal rotation profiles of stars through asteroseismology. Three years ago, we developed and applied successfully a new technique to the pulsating GW Vir white dwarf PG 1159−035, and were able to infer that it rotates very slowly and rigidly over some 99% of its mass. We applied the same approach to the three other GW Vir pulsators with available rotational splitting data, and found similar results. We discuss the implications of these findings on the question of the angular momentum of white dwarfs resulting from single star evolution.

  17. A proposed measurement of optical orbital and spin angular momentum and its implications for photon angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Elliot

    2018-04-01

    The expression for the total angular momentum carried by a laser optical vortex beam, splits, in the paraxial approximation, into two terms which seem to represent orbital and spin angular momentum respectively. There are, however, two very different competing versions of the formula for the spin angular momentum, one based on the use of the Poynting vector, as in classical electrodynamics, the other related to the canonical expression for the angular momentum which occurs in Quantum Electrodynamics. I analyze the possibility that a sufficiently sensitive optical measurement could decide which of these corresponds to the actual physical angular momentum carried by the beam.

  18. The phenomenon of nucleon emission at high angular momentum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the drop in the separation energy is closely associated with the structural changes in the rotating nuclei, relative increase in neutron emission probability around certain values of angular momentum may be construed as evidence for the shape transition. A similar effect is predicted for 168Yb around ≈ 55ħ. We also ...

  19. Orbital angular momentum of general astigmatic modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Jorrit; Nienhuis, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    We present an operator method to obtain complete sets of astigmatic Gaussian solutions of the paraxial wave equation. In case of general astigmatism, the astigmatic intensity and phase distribution of the fundamental mode differ in orientation. As a consequence, the fundamental mode has a nonzero orbital angular momentum, which is not due to phase singularities. Analogous to the operator method for the quantum harmonic oscillator, the corresponding astigmatic higher-order modes are obtained by repeated application of raising operators on the fundamental mode. The nature of the higher-order modes is characterized by a point on a sphere, in analogy with the representation of polarization on the Poincare sphere. The north and south poles represent astigmatic Laguerre-Gaussian modes, similar to circular polarization on the Poincare sphere, while astigmatic Hermite-Gaussian modes are associated with points on the equator, analogous to linear polarization. We discuss the propagation properties of the modes and their orbital angular momentum, which depends on the degree of astigmatism and on the location of the point on the sphere

  20. Critique of the angular momentum sum rules and a new angular momentum sum rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Leader, E.; Trueman, T. L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the tensorial structure of the hadronic matrix elements of the angular momentum operators J. Well known results in the literature are shown to be incorrect, and we have taken pains to derive the correct expressions in three different ways, two involving explicit physical wave

  1. Inefficient Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers: Angular Momentum Belt in the Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-04-01

    We present unstratified 3D MHD simulations of an accretion disk with a boundary layer (BL) that have a duration ˜1000 orbital periods at the inner radius of the accretion disk. We find the surprising result that angular momentum piles up in the boundary layer, which results in a rapidly rotating belt of accreted material at the surface of the star. The angular momentum stored in this belt increases monotonically in time, which implies that angular momentum transport mechanisms in the BL are inefficient and do not couple the accretion disk to the star. This is in spite of the fact that magnetic fields are advected into the BL from the disk and supersonic shear instabilities in the BL excite acoustic waves. In our simulations, these waves only carry a small fraction (˜10%) of the angular momentum required for steady state accretion. Using analytical theory and 2D viscous simulations in the R - ϕ plane, we derive an analytical criterion for belt formation to occur in the BL in terms of the ratio of the viscosity in the accretion disk to the viscosity in the BL. Our MHD simulations have a dimensionless viscosity (α) in the BL that is at least a factor of ˜100 smaller than that in the disk. We discuss the implications of these results for BL dynamics and emission.

  2. Topological photonic orbital-angular-momentum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhang, Chuanwei; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2018-04-01

    The large number of available orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) states of photons provides a unique resource for many important applications in quantum information and optical communications. However, conventional OAM switching devices usually rely on precise parameter control and are limited by slow switching rate and low efficiency. Here we propose a robust, fast, and efficient photonic OAM switch device based on a topological process, where photons are adiabatically pumped to a target OAM state on demand. Such topological OAM pumping can be realized through manipulating photons in a few degenerate main cavities and involves only a limited number of optical elements. A large change of OAM at ˜10q can be realized with only q degenerate main cavities and at most 5 q pumping cycles. The topological photonic OAM switch may become a powerful device for broad applications in many different fields and motivate a topological design of conventional optical devices.

  3. Chiral symmetries associated with angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, M; Kleinert, M

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics courses, symmetries of a physical system are usually introduced as operators which commute with the Hamiltonian. In this paper we will consider chiral symmetries which anticommute with the Hamiltonian. Typically, introductory courses at the (under)graduate level do not discuss these simple, useful and beautiful symmetries at all. The first time a student encounters them is when the Dirac equation is discussed in a course on relativistic quantum mechanics, or when particle–hole symmetry is studied in the context of superconductivity. In this paper, we will show how chiral symmetries can be simply elucidated using the theory of angular momentum, which is taught in virtually all introductory quantum mechanics courses. (paper)

  4. Untangling Galaxy Components - The Angular Momentum Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Martha; Merrifield, Michael; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new technique to decompose Integral Field spectral data cubes into separate bulge and disk components, allowing us to study the kinematic and stellar population properties of the individual components and how they vary with position. We present here the application of this method to a sample of fast rotator early type galaxies from the MaNGA integral field survey, and demonstrate how it can be used to explore key properties of the individual components. By extracting ages, metallicities and the angular momentum parameter lambda of the bulges and disks, we show how this method can give us new insights into the underlying structure of the galaxies and discuss what this can tell us about their evolution history.

  5. Angular momentum and the electromagnetic top

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-06

    Jul 6, 2016 ... standard expression of the force on m, in order to con- serve the linear mechanical momentum of an isolated system. This problem of classical electrodynamics has particular relevance in quantum mechanics in the con- text of the nonlocality of Aharonov–Bohm [6] effects. Specifically, key to understanding ...

  6. Rotational dependence of the proton-transfer reaction HBr+ + CO2-->HOCO+ + Br. I. Energy versus angular momentum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetow, Lisa; Unger, Franziska; Beichel, Witali; Frenking, Gernot; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2010-05-07

    Cross sections for the endothermic proton-transfer reactions of rotationally state-selected HBr(+) and DBr(+) ions with CO(2) were measured in a guided ion beam apparatus in order to determine the influence of rotational excitation and collision energy in the center of mass (c.m.) system on the cross section. Ab initio calculations were performed to obtain energetic information about reactants, intermediates, and products. In the experiment HBr(+) and DBr(+) ions were prepared with the same mean rotational quantum number but different mean rotational energies as the rotational constants differ by about a factor of two. The mean rotational energy was varied from 1.4 to 66.3 meV for HBr(+) and from 0.7 to 43.0 meV for DBr(+). Collision energies (E(c.m.)) ranged from 0.32 to 1.00 eV. Under all conditions considered, an increase in the rotational excitation leads to a decrease in the cross section for both reactions. However, the effect is more pronounced for the higher collision energies. For E(c.m.)=1.00 and 0.85 eV; a comparison between the results for HBr(+) and DBr(+) indicates that the cross section is dominated by effects of rotational energy rather than angular momentum. For lower collision energies the cross sections for the deuteron transfer and the proton transfer are in best agreement if not compared for the same c.m. collision energy but for the same value of the difference between the collision energy and the reaction enthalpy.

  7. Fundamental methods to measure the orbital angular momentum of light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Gregorius Cornelis Gerardus (Joris)

    2011-01-01

    Light is a ubiquitous carrier of information. This information can be encoded in the intensity, direction, frequency and polarisation of the light and, which was described more recently, in its orbital angular momentum. Although creating light beams with orbital angular momentum is relatively easy,

  8. Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Taballione, Caterina; Bisesto, Fabrizio; Slussarenko, Sergei; Aolita, Leandro; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Walborn, Stephen P.; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However, there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission fidelity. In our experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-filtering mechanism that maps errors into losses.

  9. Optical communications beyond orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Trichili, Abderrahmen; Dudley, Angela; Ndagano, Bienvenu; Ben Salem, Amine; Zghal, Mourad; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Current optical communication technologies are predicted to face a bandwidth capacity limit in the near future. The nature of the limitation is fundamental rather than technological and is set by nonlinearities in optical fibers. One solution, suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space and fibres. However, recent studies suggest that purely OAM modes does not increase the bandwidth of optical communication systems. In fact, in all work to date, only the azimuthal component of transverse spatial modes has been used. Crucially, all transverse spatial modes require two degrees of freedom to be described; in the context of Laguerre-Gaussian (LGp`) beams these are azimuthal (l) and radial (p), the former responsible for OAM. Here, we demonstrate a technique where both degrees of freedom of LG modes are used as information carrier over free space. We transfer images encoded using 100 spatial modes in three wavelengths as our basis, and employ a spatial demultiplexing scheme that detects all 100 modes simultaneously. Our scheme is a hybrid of MIMO and SMM, and serves as a proof-of-principle demonstration. The cross-talk between the modes is small and independent of whether OAM modes are used or not.

  10. Electron with orbital angular momentum in a strong laser wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2012-12-01

    Electrons carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) have recently been discovered theoretically and obtained experimentally, which opens up possibilities for using them in high-energy physics. We consider such a twisted electron moving in the external field of a plane electromagnetic wave and study how this field influences the electron's OAM. Being motivated by the development of high-power lasers, we focus our attention on a classically strong-field regime for which -e2A2¯/(me2c4)≳1. It is shown that, along with the well-known “plane-wave” Volkov solution, the Dirac equation also has the “non-plane-wave” solutions, which possess OAM and spin-orbit coupling and generalize the free-electron's Bessel states. Motion of an electron with OAM in a circularly polarized laser wave reveals a twofold character: the wave-packet center moves along a classical helical trajectory with some quantum transverse broadening (due to OAM) existing even for a free electron. Using the twisted states, we calculate the electron's total angular momentum and predict its shift in the strong-field regime, which is analogous to the well-known shifts of the electron's momentum and mass (and to a less-known shift of its spin) in intense fields. Since the electron's effective angular momentum is conserved in a plane wave, as well as in some more general field configurations, we discuss several possibilities for accelerating nonrelativistic twisted electrons by using focused and combined electromagnetic fields.

  11. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Keplerian accretion disk yield results that are inconsistent with the generally accepted model. If correct, the ideas proposed by Hayashi &. Matsuda would radically alter our understanding of the nature of the angular momentum transport in the disk, ...

  12. Dissipation of angular momentum in light heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Dey, A.; Kundu, S.; Krishan, K.; Banerjee, S.R.; Das, P.; Basu, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    The fragment emission has been studied and is reported how angular momentum dissipation can be estimated in a model independent manner using additional information from the fusion-fission component of the fragment emission data

  13. The decay of orbital angular momentum entanglement in atmospheric turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, 8-12 July 2013 The decay of orbital angular momentum entanglement in atmospheric turbulence Roux FS CSIR, National Laser Centre, Pretoria, 0001 Corresponding email: FSroux...

  14. Pluto Moons exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum Quantization per Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Pluto satellite system of the planet plus five moons is shown to obey the quan- tum celestial mechanics (QCM angular momentum per mass quantization condition predicted for any gravitationally bound system.

  15. A Very Fast and Angular Momentum Conserving Tree Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcello, Dominic C., E-mail: dmarce504@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Computation and Technology Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    There are many methods used to compute the classical gravitational field in astrophysical simulation codes. With the exception of the typically impractical method of direct computation, none ensure conservation of angular momentum to machine precision. Under uniform time-stepping, the Cartesian fast multipole method of Dehnen (also known as the very fast tree code) conserves linear momentum to machine precision. We show that it is possible to modify this method in a way that conserves both angular and linear momenta.

  16. A Very Fast and Angular Momentum Conserving Tree Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcello, Dominic C.

    2017-01-01

    There are many methods used to compute the classical gravitational field in astrophysical simulation codes. With the exception of the typically impractical method of direct computation, none ensure conservation of angular momentum to machine precision. Under uniform time-stepping, the Cartesian fast multipole method of Dehnen (also known as the very fast tree code) conserves linear momentum to machine precision. We show that it is possible to modify this method in a way that conserves both angular and linear momenta.

  17. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2010-01-01

    Dependence of nuclear level density parameter on the angular momentum and temperature is investigated in a theoretical framework using the statistical theory of hot rotating nuclei. The structural effects are incorporated by including shell correction, shape, and deformation. The nuclei around Z≅50 with an excitation energy range of 30 to 40 MeV are considered. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimentally deduced inverse level density parameter values especially for 109 In, 113 Sb, 122 Te, 123 I, and 127 Cs nuclei.

  18. A new uncertainty relation for angular momentum and angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranold, H.U.

    1984-01-01

    An uncertainty relation of the form ΔL 2 ΔSo >=sup(h/2π)/sub(2) is derived for angular momentum and angle. The non-linear operator So measures angles and has a simple interpretation. Subject to very general conditions of rotational invariance the above relation is unique. Radial momentum is not quantized

  19. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  20. Large-uncertainty intelligent states for angular momentum and angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goette, Joerg B; Zambrini, Roberta; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M

    2005-01-01

    The equality in the uncertainty principle for linear momentum and position is obtained for states which also minimize the uncertainty product. However, in the uncertainty relation for angular momentum and angular position both sides of the inequality are state dependent and therefore the intelligent states, which satisfy the equality, do not necessarily give a minimum for the uncertainty product. In this paper, we highlight the difference between intelligent states and minimum uncertainty states by investigating a class of intelligent states which obey the equality in the angular uncertainty relation while having an arbitrarily large uncertainty product. To develop an understanding for the uncertainties of angle and angular momentum for the large-uncertainty intelligent states we compare exact solutions with analytical approximations in two limiting cases

  1. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Kathrin; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential

  2. Initial angular momentum and flow in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Chen, Guangyao; Somanathan, Sidharth

    2018-03-01

    We study the transfer of angular momentum in high energy nuclear collisions from the colliding nuclei to the region around midrapidity, using the classical approximation of the color glass condensate (CGC) picture. We find that the angular momentum shortly after the collision (up to times ˜1 /Qs , where Qs is the saturation scale) is carried by the "β -type" flow of the initial classical gluon field, introduced by some of us earlier. βi˜μ1∇iμ2-μ2∇iμ1 (i =1 ,2 ) describes the rapidity-odd transverse energy flow and emerges from Gauss's law for gluon fields. Here μ1 and μ2 are the averaged color charge fluctuation densities in the two nuclei, respectively. Interestingly, strong coupling calculations using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) techniques also find an energy flow term featuring this particular combination of nuclear densities. In classical CGC the order of magnitude of the initial angular momentum per rapidity in the reaction plane, at a time 1 /Qs , is |d L2/d η |≈ RAQs-3ɛ¯0/2 at midrapidity, where RA is the nuclear radius, and ɛ¯0 is the average initial energy density. This result emerges as a cancellation between a vortex of energy flow in the reaction plane aligned with the total angular momentum, and energy shear flow opposed to it. We discuss in detail the process of matching classical Yang-Mills results to fluid dynamics. We will argue that dissipative corrections should not be discarded to ensure that macroscopic conservation laws, e.g., for angular momentum, hold. Viscous fluid dynamics tends to dissipate the shear flow contribution that carries angular momentum in boost-invariant fluid systems. This leads to small residual angular momentum around midrapidity at late times for collisions at high energies.

  3. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Kathrin, E-mail: k.mueller@fz-juelich.de; Fedosov, Dmitry A., E-mail: d.fedosov@fz-juelich.de; Gompper, Gerhard, E-mail: g.gompper@fz-juelich.de

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  4. Orbital Angular Momentum Multiplexing over Visible Light Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Hardik Rameshchandra

    This thesis proposes and explores the possibility of using Orbital Angular Momentum multiplexing in Visible Light Communication system. Orbital Angular Momentum is mainly applied for laser and optical fiber transmissions, while Visible Light Communication is a technology using the light as a carrier for wireless communication. In this research, the study of the state of art and experiments showing some results on multiplexing based on Orbital Angular Momentum over Visible Light Communication system were done. After completion of the initial stage; research work and simulations were performed on spatial multiplexing over Li-Fi channel modeling. Simulation scenarios which allowed to evaluate the Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Received Power Distribution, Intensity and Illuminance were defined and developed.

  5. Nuclear level density variation with angular momentum induced shape transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Variation of Nuclear level density (NLD) with the excitation energy and angular momentum in particular has been a topic of interest in the recent past and there have been continuous efforts in this direction on the theoretical and experimental fronts but a conclusive trend in the variation of nuclear level density parameter with angular momentum has not been achieved so far. A comprehensive investigation of N=68 isotones around the compound nucleus 119 Sb from neutron rich 112 Ru (Z=44) to neutron deficient 127 Pr (Z= 59) nuclei is presented to understand the angular momentum induced variations in inverse level density parameter and the possible influence of deformation and structural transitions on the variations on NLd

  6. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohil M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutron evaporation spectra alongwith γ-multiplicity has been measured from the 185Re* compound nucleus at the excitation energies ~27 and 37 MeV. Statistical model analysis of the experimental data has been carried out to extract the value of the inverse level density parameter k at different angular momentum regions (J corresponding to different γ-multiplicity. It is observed that, for the present system the value of k remains almost constant for different J. The present results on the angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density (NLD parameter ã (=A/k, for nuclei with A ~180 is quite different from our earlier measurements in case of light and medium mass systems. The present analysis provides useful information to understand the angular momentum dependence of NLD at different nuclear mass regions.

  7. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  8. The role of angular momentum conservation law in statistical mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Dubrovskii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the limits of Khinchin ideas [A.Y. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundation of Statistical Mechanics. NY, Ed. Dover, 1949] the importance of momentum and angular momentum conservation laws was analyzed for two cases: for uniform magnetic field and when magnetic field is absent. The law of momentum conservation does not change the density of probability distribution in both cases, just as it is assumed in the conventional theory. It is shown that in systems where the kinetic energy depends only on particle momenta canonically conjugated with Cartesian coordinates being their diagonal quadric form,the angular momentum conservation law changes the density of distribution of the system only in case the full angular momentum of a system is not equal to zero. In the gas of charged particles in a uniform magnetic field the density of distribution also varies if the angular momentum is zero [see Dubrovskii I.M., Condensed Matter Physics, 2206, 9, 23]. Two-dimensional gas of charged particles located within a section of an endless strip filled with gas in magnetic field is considered. Under such conditions the angular momentum is not conserved. Directional particle flows take place close to the strip boundaries, and, as a consequence, the phase trajectory of the considered set of particles does not remain within the limited volume of the phase space. In order to apply a statistical thermodynamics method, it was suggested to consider near-boundary trajectories relative to a reference system that moves uniformly. It was shown that if the diameter of an orbit having average thermal energy is much smaller than a strip width, the corrections to thermodynamic functions are small depending on magnetic field. Only the average velocity of near-boundary particles that form near-boundary electric currents creating the paramagnetic moment turn out to be essential.

  9. Angular momentum non-conserving symmetries in bosonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortunato, L [ECT, Strada delle Tabarelle 286, I-38123 Villazzano (Trento) (Italy); De Graaf, W A, E-mail: fortunat@pd.infn.it [Dip. Matematica, Universita di Trento, via Sommarive 24, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2011-04-08

    The Levi-Malcev decomposition is applied to bosonic models of quantum mechanics based on unitary Lie algebras u(2), u(2)+u(2), u(3) and u(4) to clearly disentangle semisimple subalgebras. The theory of weighted Dynkin diagrams is then applied to identify conjugacy classes of relevant A{sub 1} subalgebras allowing us to introduce a complete classification of new angular momentum non conserving (AMNC) dynamical symmetries. The tensor analysis of the whole algebra based on the new 'angular momentum' operators reveals unexpected spinors to occur in purely bosonic models. The new chains of subalgebra can be invoked to set up ANMC bases for diagonalization.

  10. Angular momentum non-conserving symmetries in bosonic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, L.; de Graaf, W. A.

    2011-04-01

    The Levi-Malcev decomposition is applied to bosonic models of quantum mechanics based on unitary Lie algebras u(2), u(2)⊕u(2), u(3) and u(4) to clearly disentangle semisimple subalgebras. The theory of weighted Dynkin diagrams is then applied to identify conjugacy classes of relevant A1 subalgebras allowing us to introduce a complete classification of new angular momentum non conserving (AMNC) dynamical symmetries. The tensor analysis of the whole algebra based on the new 'angular momentum' operators reveals unexpected spinors to occur in purely bosonic models. The new chains of subalgebra can be invoked to set up ANMC bases for diagonalization.

  11. Spatial distribution of angular momentum inside the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric; Mantovani, Luca; Pasquini, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    We discuss in detail the spatial distribution of angular momentum inside the nucleon. We show that the discrepancies between different definitions originate from terms that integrate to zero. Even though these terms can safely be dropped at the integrated level, they have to be taken into account when discussing distributions. Using the scalar diquark model, we illustrate our results and, for the first time, check explicitly that the equivalence between kinetic and canonical orbital angular momentum persists at the level of distributions, as expected in a system without gauge degrees of freedom.

  12. Earth Rotation and Coupling to Changes in Atmospheric Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research supported under the contract dealt primarily with: (a) the mechanisms responsible for the exchange of angular momentum between the solid Earth and atmosphere; (b) the quality of the data sets used to estimate atmospheric angular momentum; and (c) the ability of these data and of global climate models to detect low-frequency signals in the momentum and, hence, circulation of the atmosphere. Three scientific papers reporting on the results of this research were produced during the course of the contract. These papers identified the particular torques responsible for the peak in atmospheric angular momentum and length-of-day during the 1982-93 El Nino event, and, more generally, the relative roles of torques over land and ocean in explaining the broad spectrum of variability in the length-of-day. In addition, a tendency for interannual variability in atmospheric angular momentum to increase during the last several decades of the 20th century was found in both observations and a global climate model experiment.

  13. Classical Angular Momentum of Light: A Paradox and its Resolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. Classical Angular Momentum of Light: A Paradox and its Resolution. K Vijay Kumar N Kumar. Classroom Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 69-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Holographic toolkit for optical communication beyond orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosales-Guzman, C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available , suggested over 30 years ago, comprises the use of spatial modes of light as information carriers. Along this direction, light beams endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have been demonstrated as potential information carriers in both, free space...

  15. Gravitational Field of Ultrarelativistic Objects with Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fursaev, Dmitri V

    2006-01-01

    A brief review of recently found gyraton metrics which describe the gravitational field of objects having an angular momentum and moving with the velocity of light is given. The gyraton metrics belong to a class of exact plane wave solutions of four and higher dimensional Einstein equations in vacuum or in the presence of a negative cosmological constant

  16. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although many techniques are efficient at measuring optical orbital angular momentum (OAM), they do not allow one to obtain a quantitative measurement for the OAM density across an optical field and instead only measure its global OAM. Numerous...

  17. Exact angular momentum projection based on cranked HFB solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enami, Kenichi; Tanabe, Kosai; Yosinaga, Naotaka [Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-03-01

    Exact angular momentum projection of cranked HFB solutions is carried out. It is reconfirmed from this calculation that cranked HFB solutions reproduce the intrinsic structure of deformed nucleus. The result also indicates that the energy correction from projection is important for further investigation of nuclear structure. (author)

  18. Angular momentum projection of tilted axis rotating states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, M.; Onishi, N.; Tajima, N. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Horibata, T.

    1998-03-01

    We applied an exact angular momentum projection to three dimensional cranked HFB (3d-CHFB) states. Tilted axis rotating states (TAR) and principal axis rotating states (PAR) are compared. It is shown that TAR is more adequate than PAR for description of the back bending phenomena driven by tilted rotation or wobbling motion. (author)

  19. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study delineates the vorticity and angular momentum balances of Asian summer monsoon during the evolution and established phases. It also elucidates the differences between these balances in the National Centre for Environmental Prediction/National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis ...

  20. The phenomenon of nucleon emission at high angular momentum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is contrary to the classical notion of monotonously decreasing separation energy with increasing angular momentum. We have reported in ref. [1] some results for 156Er formed in the reaction 96Zr (64Ni,xn) 155Er, which are in good agreement with the experimental results of Henss et al [2] for single neutron emission.

  1. Angular Momentum across the Hubble sequence from the CALIFA survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Lyubenova, Mariya; van de Ven, Glenn

    We investigate the stellar angular momentum of galaxies across the Hubble sequence from the CALIFA survey. The distribution of CALIFA elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the λRe - ɛe diagram is consistent with that shown by the Atlas3D survey. Our data, however, show that the location of spiral

  2. The phenomenon of nucleon emission at high angular momentum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 75–93. The phenomenon of nucleon emission at high angular momentum states of fused compound systems. T R RAJASEKARAN1 £, S SELVARAJ2 and S SANTHOSH KUMAR3. 1Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli 627 012, India. 2Department of Physics, The M.D.T. ...

  3. Continuous Variable Entanglement and Squeezing of Orbital Angular Momentum States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Leuchs, Gerd; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2009-01-01

    We report the first experimental characterization of the first-order continuous variable orbital angular momentum states. Using a spatially nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) we produce quadrature entanglement between the two first-order Laguerre-Gauss modes. The family of orbital...

  4. Implementing quantum walks using orbital angular momentum of classical light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goyal, SK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an implementation scheme for a quantum walk in the orbital angular momentum space of a laser beam. The scheme makes use of a ring interferometer, containing a quarter-wave plate and a q plate. This setup enables one to perform...

  5. Angular Momentum Transport in Turbulent Flow between Independently Rotating Cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoletti, M. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular momentum flux (torque) in Taylor-Couette flow of water between independently rotating cylinders for all regions of the (Ω 1 , Ω 2 ) parameter space at high Reynolds numbers, where Ω 1 (Ω 2 ) is the inner (outer) cylinder angular velocity. We find that the Rossby number Ro=(Ω 1 -Ω 2 )/Ω 2 fully determines the state and torque G as compared to G(Ro=∞)≡G ∞ . The ratio G/G ∞ is a linear function of Ro -1 in four sections of the parameter space. For flows with radially increasing angular momentum, our measured torques greatly exceed those of previous experiments [Ji et al., Nature (London), 444, 343 (2006)], but agree with the analysis of Richard and Zahn [Astron. Astrophys. 347, 734 (1999)].

  6. GR angular momentum in the quadratic spinor Lagrangian formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We inquire into the question of whether the quadratic spinor Lagrangian (QSL) formulation can describe the angular momentum for a general-relativistic system. The QSL Hamiltonian has previously been shown to be able to yield an energy-momentum quasilocalization which brings a proof of the positive gravitational energy when the spinor satisfies the conformal Witten equation. After inspection, we find that, under the constraint that the spinor on the asymptotic boundary is a constant, the QSL Hamiltonian is successful in giving an angular momentum quasilocalization. We also make certain the spinor in the Hamiltonian plays the role of a gauge field, a warrant of our permission to impose constraints on the spinor. Then, by some adjustment of the QSL Hamiltonian, we gain a covariant center-of-mass moment quasilocalization only under the condition that the displacement on the asymptotic boundary is a Killing boost vector. We expect the spinor expression will bring a proof of some connection between the gravitational energy and angular momentum.

  7. How much mass and angular momentum can the progenitors of carbon-enriched stars accrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrozis, E.; Abate, C.; Stancliffe, R. J.

    2017-10-01

    The chemically peculiar barium stars, CH stars, and most carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are all believed to be the products of mass transfer in binary systems from a now extinct asymptotic giant branch (AGB) primary star. The mass of the AGB star and the orbital parameters of the system are the key factors usually considered when determining how much mass is transferred onto the lower-mass main-sequence companion. What is usually neglected, however, is the angular momentum of the accreted material, which should spin up the accreting star. If the star reaches critical rotation, further accretion should cease until the excess angular momentum is somehow dealt with. If the star cannot redistribute or lose the angular momentum while the primary is on the AGB, the amount of mass accreted could be much lower than otherwise expected. Here we present calculations, based on detailed stellar evolution models, of the mass that can be accreted by putative progenitors of Ba and CEMP stars before they reach critical rotation under the assumption that no angular momentum loss occurs during the mass transfer. We consider different accretion rates and values of specific angular momentum. The most stringent limits on the accreted masses result from considering accretion from a Keplerian accretion disk, which is likely present during the formation of most extrinsically-polluted carbon-enriched stars. Our calculations indicate that in this scenario only about 0.05 M⊙ of material can be added to the accreting star before it reaches critical rotation, which is much too low to explain the chemical enrichment of many Ba and CEMP stars. Either the specific angular momentum of the accreted material has to effectively be lower by about a factor of ten than the Keplerian value, or significant angular momentum losses must occur for substantial accretion to take place.

  8. Spin and orbital angular momentum propagation in anisotropic media: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picón, Antonio; Benseny, Albert; Mompart, Jordi; Calvo, Gabriel F

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a study of the propagation of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum in optically anisotropic media. We first review some properties of homogeneous anisotropic media, and describe how the paraxial formalism is modified in order to proceed with a new approach dealing with the general setting of paraxial propagation along uniaxial inhomogeneous media. This approach is suitable for describing space-variant optical-axis phase plates

  9. Tunnelling of orbital angular momentum in parallel optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeyev, C N; Fadeyeva, T A; Yavorsky, M A; Boklag, N A

    2011-01-01

    We study the evolution of circularly polarized optical vortices (OVs) in the system of two coupled few-mode optical fibres. We demonstrate that upon propagation OVs tunnel into the adjacent fibre as a complex superposition of OVs that comprise also OVs of opposite polarization and topological charge. The initial OV may tunnel into the other fibre as the same vortex state of lesser energy. The evolution of the orbital angular momentum in coupled fibres is studied

  10. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Angel

    2011-01-01

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  11. Potential model for fusion and angular momentum localisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugi, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.

    1981-01-01

    The elastic scattering and fusion cross sections for different heavy-ion systems with (A 1 + A 2 ) 9 Be, 8 Be) reaction as a representative example for direct processes in the system 9 Be + 28 Si is well reproduced by a DWBA calculation which in turn leads to a localisation of fusion and direct processes in mutually exclusive regions of the angular momentum space. (author)

  12. Unveiling the orbital angular momentum and acceleration of electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, Roy; Tsur, Yuval; Remez, Roei; Lereah, Yossi; Malomed, Boris A; Shvedov, Vladlen; Hnatovsky, Cyril; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Arie, Ady

    2015-03-06

    New forms of electron beams have been intensively investigated recently, including vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum, as well as Airy beams propagating along a parabolic trajectory. Their traits may be harnessed for applications in materials science, electron microscopy, and interferometry, and so it is important to measure their properties with ease. Here, we show how one may immediately quantify these beams' parameters without need for additional fabrication or nonstandard microscopic tools. Our experimental results are backed by numerical simulations and analytic derivation.

  13. Angular momentum coupling in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, J.

    1986-01-01

    The coupling between the electronic angular momentum and the rotating atom-atom axis in the initial or the final phase of an atom-atom collision is discussed, making use of the concepts of radial and rotational (Coriolis) coupling between different molecular states. The description is based on a limited number of well-understood approximations, and it allows an illustrative geometric representation of the transition from the body fixed to the space fixed motion of the electrons. (orig.)

  14. Introduction to the graphical theory of angular momentum Case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Balcar, Ewald

    2009-01-01

    Application of quantum mechanics in physics and chemistry often entails manipulation and evaluation of sums and products of coupling coefficients for the theory of angular momentum. Challenges encountered in such work can be tamed by graphical techniques that provide both the insight and analytical power. The book is the first step-by-step exposition of a graphical method grounded in established work. Copious exercises recover standard results but demonstrate the power to go beyond.

  15. Superpositions of light fields carrying orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OF LIGHT FIELDS CARRYING ORBITAL ANGULAR MOMENTUM By Angela Dudley A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the academic requirements for the PhD degree of Science in the School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban... this dissertation for submission. _________________________________ Prof Andrew Forbes On this_______day of____________________________2012 iv Declaration 2 - Plagiarism I, ???????????????. declare that 1...

  16. Nuclear level density parameter 's dependence on angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear level densities represent a very important ingredient in the statistical Model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections and help to understand the microscopic features of the excited nuclei. Most of the earlier experimental nuclear level density measurements are confined to low excitation energy and low spin region. A recent experimental investigation of nuclear level densities in high excitation energy and angular momentum domain with some interesting results on inverse level density parameter's dependence on angular momentum in the region around Z=50 has motivated us to study and analyse these experimental results in a microscopic theoretical framework. In the experiment, heavy ion fusion reactions are used to populate the excited and rotating nuclei and measured the α particle evaporation spectra in coincidence with ray multiplicity. Residual nuclei are in the range of Z R 48-55 with excitation energy range 30 to 40 MeV and angular momentum in 10 to 25. The inverse level density parameter K is found to be in the range of 9.0 - 10.5 with some exceptions

  17. Cavity modes with optical orbital angular momentum in a metamaterial ring based on transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H W; Wang, F; Dong, Y Q; Shu, F Z; Zhang, K; Peng, R W; Xiong, X; Wang, Mu

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we theoretically study the cavity modes with transverse orbital angular momentum in metamaterial ring based on transformation optics. The metamaterial ring is designed to transform the straight trajectory of light into the circulating one by enlarging the azimuthal angle, effectively presenting the modes with transverse orbital angular momentum. The simulation results confirm the theoretical predictions, which state that the transverse orbital angular momentum of the mode not only depends on the frequency of the incident light, but also depends on the transformation scale of the azimuthal angle. Because energy dissipation inevitably reduces the field amplitude of the modes, the confined electromagnetic energy and the quality factor of the modes inside the ring are also studied in order to evaluate the stability of those cavity modes. The results show that the metamaterial ring can effectively confine light with a high quality factor and maintain steady modes with the orbital angular momentum, even if the dimension of the ring is much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. This technique for exploiting the modes with optical transverse orbital angular momentum may provides a unique platform for applications related to micromanipulation.

  18. Latitudinal Transport of Angular Momentum by Cellular Flows Observed with MDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Gilman, Peter A.; Beck, John G.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed Doppler velocity images from the MDI instrument on SOHO to determine the latitudinal transport of angular momentum by the cellular photospheric flows. Doppler velocity images from 60-days in May to July of 1996 were processed to remove the p-mode oscillations, the convective blue shift, the axisymmetric flows, and any instrumental artifacts. The remaining cellular flows were examined for evidence of latitudinal angular momentum transport. Small cells show no evidence of any such transport. Cells the size of supergranules (30,000 km in diameter) show strong evidence for a poleward transport of angular momentum. This would be expected if supergranules are influenced by the Coriolis force, and if the cells are elongated in an east-west direction. We find good evidence for just such an east-west elongation of the supergranules. This elongation may be the result of differential rotation shearing the cellular structures. Data simulations of this effect support the conclusion that elongated supergranules transport angular momentum from the equator toward the poles, Cells somewhat larger than supergranules do not show evidence for this poleward transport. Further analysis of the data is planned to determine if the direction of angular momentum transport reverses for even larger cellular structures. The Sun's rapidly rotating equator must be maintained by such transport somewhere within the convection zone.

  19. Is angular momentum in the horizontal plane during gait a controlled variable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielemans, V.; Meyns, P.; Bruijn, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that angular momentum in the horizontal plane during human gait is controlled (i.e., kept minimal). However, this has not been explored in conditions when angular momentum of different segments is manipulated explicitly. In order to examine the behavior of angular momentum, 12

  20. The ATLAS3D project - III. A census of the stellar angular momentum within the effective radius of early-type galaxies: unveiling the distribution of fast and slow rotators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emsellem, Eric; Cappellari, Michele; Krajnović, Davor; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; van de Ven, Glenn; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    We provide a census of the apparent stellar angular momentum within one effective radius of a volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the nearby Universe, using the integral-field spectroscopy obtained in the course of the ATLAS3D project. We exploit the λR parameter (previously

  1. The ATLAS(3D) project : III. A census of the stellar angular momentum within the effective radius of early-type galaxies: unveiling the distribution of fast and slow rotators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emsellem, Eric; Cappellari, Michele; Krajnovic, Davor; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frederic; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Khochfar, Sadegh; Kuntschner, Harald; Lablanche, Pierre-Yves; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; van de Ven, Glenn; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    We provide a census of the apparent stellar angular momentum within one effective radius of a volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the nearby Universe, using the integral-field spectroscopy obtained in the course of the ATLAS(3D) project. We exploit the lambda(R) parameter

  2. Revolution evolution: tracing angular momentum during star and planetary system formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Claire Louise

    2015-04-01

    Stars form via the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds during which time the protostellar object contracts by over seven orders of magnitude. If all the angular momentum present in the natal cloud was conserved during collapse, stars would approach rotational velocities rapid enough to tear themselves apart within just a few Myr. In contrast to this, observations of pre-main sequence rotation rates are relatively slow (∼ 1 - 15 days) indicating that significant quantities of angular momentum must be removed from the star. I use observations of fully convective pre-main sequence stars in two well-studied, nearby regions of star formation (namely the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus-Auriga) to determine the removal rate of stellar angular momentum. I find the accretion disc-hosting stars to be rotating at a slower rate and contain less specific angular momentum than the disc-less stars. I interpret this as indicating a period of accretion disc-regulated angular momentum evolution followed by near-constant rotational evolution following disc dispersal. Furthermore, assuming that the age spread inferred from the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram constructed for the star forming region is real, I find that the removal rate of angular momentum during the accretion-disc hosting phase to be more rapid than that expected from simple disc-locking theory whereby contraction occurs at a fixed rotation period. This indicates a more efficient process of angular momentum removal must operate, most likely in the form of an accretion-driven stellar wind or outflow emanating from the star-disc interaction. The initial circumstellar envelope that surrounds a protostellar object during the earliest stages of star formation is rotationally flattened into a disc as the star contracts. An effective viscosity, present within the disc, enables the disc to evolve: mass accretes inwards through the disc and onto the star while momentum migrates outwards, forcing the outer regions of the

  3. Dynamical evolution of angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions (I). Accumulation of angular momentum by nucleon transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Thomas; Randrup, Jørgen

    1985-02-01

    The dynamical accumulation of angular momentum in the course of a damped nuclear reaction is studied within the framework of the nucleon exchange transport model. The dinuclear spin distribution is described by the mean values and the covariances of the two prefragment spins and their orbital angular momentum overlineL. Using an intrinsic coordinate system aligned with the fluctuating direction of overlineL, the equations of motion for the spin distribution are derived and discussed. The ultimate transformation to an externally defined reference frame is also discussed. The evolution of other observables and their coupling to the spin variables are included and, by integrating conditional distributions over all impact parameters, results are obtained for differential cross sections corresponding to a specified loss of relative kinetic energy. The characteristic features of the evolution of the spin distribution is discussed in detail. First the stationary solution of the equations of motion is considered and its different appearance in the various relevant coordinate systems is exhibited. The dynamical evolution is discussed in terms of the time-dependent relaxation times associated with the six different intrinsic modes of rotation in the disphere. Due to the relative smallness of the window size the positive modes will dominate (for not too long times), resulting in a predominantly positive correlation between the fragment spin fluctuations. Illustrative applications to cases of experimental interest are made and a critical discussion is given of other models addressing angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions.

  4. Energy, momentum and angular momentum in the dyadosphere of a charged spacetime in teleparallel equivalent of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, G. L. Nashed

    2012-03-01

    We apply the energy momentum and angular momentum tensor to a tetrad field, with two unknown functions of radial coordinate, in the framework of a teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR). The definition of the gravitational energy is used to investigate the energy within the external event horizon of the dyadosphere region for the Reissner—Nordström black hole. We also calculate the spatial momentum and angular momentum.

  5. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, G

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  6. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation

  7. Heavy ion reactions: an experimental vista. [Review, angular momentum, compound-nucleus decay, reaction mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of recent experiments in the areas of fusion and deep-inelastic scattering are presented and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the importance of individual nucleons in the fusion process, the effects of high angular momentum, and the understanding of compound nuclear decay. Experiments on deep inelastic scattering are entering a new stage in which important parameters of the reaction mechanism are now open to investigation. Primarily through coincidence measurements, direct information on the angular momentum transferred in a collision and on the time scale of decay is being obtained.

  8. Angular momentum and torque described with the complex octonion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to adopt the complex octonion to formulate the angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields. Applying the octonionic representation enables one single definition of angular momentum (or torque, force) to combine some physics contents, which were considered to be independent of each other in the past. J. C. Maxwell used simultaneously two methods, the vector terminology and quaternion analysis, to depict the electromagnetic theory. It motivates the paper to introduce the quaternion space into the field theory, describing the physical feature of electromagnetic and gravitational fields. The spaces of electromagnetic field and of gravitational field can be chosen as the quaternion spaces, while the coordinate component of quaternion space is able to be the complex number. The quaternion space of electromagnetic field is independent of that of gravitational field. These two quaternion spaces may compose one octonion space. Contrarily, one octonion space can be separated into two subspaces, the quaternion space and S-quaternion space. In the quaternion space, it is able to infer the field potential, field strength, field source, angular momentum, torque, and force etc in the gravitational field. In the S-quaternion space, it is capable of deducing the field potential, field strength, field source, current continuity equation, and electric (or magnetic) dipolar moment etc in the electromagnetic field. The results reveal that the quaternion space is appropriate to describe the gravitational features, including the torque, force, and mass continuity equation etc. The S-quaternion space is proper to depict the electromagnetic features, including the dipolar moment and current continuity equation etc. In case the field strength is weak enough, the force and the continuity equation etc can be respectively reduced to that in the classical field theory

  9. Locking of intrinsic angular momentum in collision complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berengolts, Alexander.

    1995-04-01

    A concept of locking of the intrinsic angular momentum of a fragment of a collision complex to a body-fixed axis is widely used in the description of heavy-particle dynamics. The aim of this work is to provide a semiclassical description of the locking phenomenon which occur in diatomic and three atomic collision complexes. The first part of this work is devoted to the semiclassical study of the locking of the electronic angular momentum that occurs in slow collisions of two atoms, one in the spherically symmetric state and the other in state with j= 1. Here we calculate explicitly the complete locking matrix for different types of interatomic interactions. The elements of this matrix directly enter into the semiclassical expression for the different cross sections of polarized atoms. Limitations to the notion of the the locking radius and slipping probability are discussed in connection with the steepness of the interaction. Numerical calculations confirm analytical result: the optimal criterion for determination of the locking radius is a condition for the accumulated phase difference between two molecular states. Analytical expressions are suggested for the locking angle and the slipping probability. Implication of the locking approximation for calculation of the quasiclassical scattering matrix is discussed. The second part considers the locking of the rotational angular momentum of a diatom in the decomposition of a triatomic complexes. We discuss here cases J = 1,2,3 and 4, but restrict ourselves to calculation of the so-called dynamic orientation of the diatomic fragment. The letter represents one of the characteristics of the locking matrix which in principle can be measured experimentally. The orientation is created as a result of the interplay between the adiabatic interaction in the atom- diatom exit channel and the rotationally non adiabatic coupling in the perturbed rotor region

  10. On the Angular Momentum Loss of Tropical Cyclones: An f-Plane Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2018-02-01

    The angular momentum for ideal axisymmetric tropical cyclones on the f-plane is investigated with a focus on the total-volume integrated quantity. Budget analysis of the momentum equation at cylindrical coordinates shows that a tropical cyclone loses angular momentum during its development and mature stages due to the dynamical difference between the viscous inward-flow near the surface and the angular momentum conserving outward-flow aloft. The total relative angular momentum of a tropical cyclone, as a result, can be negative (i.e., implying anticyclonic rotation as a whole) despite intense cyclonic wind in the tropospheric layers. This anticyclonic rotation was measured in terms of the super-rotation ratio, the ratio of total relative angular momentum to the planetary angular momentum. Simulations with the numerical model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) version 3.4.1 was found to be in favor of the theoretical angular-momentum budget analysis. It was revealed in the numerical simulations that the super-rotation ratio was negative, indicating a sub-rotation, as was predicted by analysis. The sub-rotation ratio was found to be less than one percent for typical tropical cyclones. To show the angular momentum decrease even in the decaying stage, numerical simulations where the thermal forcing by sea surface temperature switched off in the mature stage were carried out. In support of the angular momentum budget analysis, the results indicated that the angular momentum also decreases for a while soon after the forcing was eliminated.

  11. On the angular momentum loss of tropical cyclones: An f-plane approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Gyu; Cheong, Hyeong-Bin; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-12-01

    The angular momentum for ideal axisymmetric tropical cyclones on the f-plane is investigated with a focus on the total-volume integrated quantity. Budget analysis of the momentum equation at cylindrical coordinates shows that a tropical cyclone loses angular momentum during its development and mature stages due to the dynamical difference between the viscous inward-flow near the surface and the angular momentum conserving outward-flow aloft. The total relative angular momentum of a tropical cyclone, as a result, can be negative (i.e., implying anticyclonic rotation as a whole) despite intense cyclonic wind in the tropospheric layers. This anticyclonic rotation was measured in terms of the super-rotation ratio, the ratio of total relative angular momentum to the planetary angular momentum. Simulations with the numerical model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) version 3.4.1 was found to be in favor of the theoretical angular-momentum budget analysis. It was revealed in the numerical simulations that the super-rotation ratio was negative, indicating a sub-rotation, as was predicted by analysis. The sub-rotation ratio was found to be less than one percent for typical tropical cyclones. To show the angular momentum decrease even in the decaying stage, numerical simulations where the thermal forcing by sea surface temperature switched off in the mature stage were carried out. In support of the angular momentum budget analysis, the results indicated that the angular momentum also decreases for a while soon after the forcing was eliminated.

  12. Statistical windows in angular momentum space: the basis of heavy-ion compound cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Toledo, A.S. de.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of statistical windows in angular momentum space is introduced and utilized to develop a practical model for the heavy-ion compound cross section. Closed expressions for the average differential cross-section are derived and compared with Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The effects of the statistical windows are isolated and discussed. (Author) [pt

  13. Propagation of orbital angular momentum carrying beams through a perturbing medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chaibi, A

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The orbital angular momentum of light has been suggested as a means of information transfer over free-space, yet the detected optical vortex is known to be sensitive to perturbation. Such effects have been studied theoretically, in particular...

  14. Vortex-MEMS filters for wavelength-selective orbital-angular-momentum beam generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Sujoy; Lyubopytov, Vladimir; Schumann, Martin F.

    2017-01-01

    and orbital angular momentum (OAM) domains at around 1550 nm, is considered as a compact, robust and cost-effective solution for simultaneous OAM- and WDM optical communications. Experimental spectra for azimuthal orders 1, 2 and 3 show OAM state purity >92% across 30 nm wavelength range. A demonstration...

  15. Longitudinal dispersion of orbital angular momentum modes in high-gain free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hemsing

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The physical effects of optical mode dispersion in the electron beam of a free-electron laser are investigated for modes that carry orbital angular momentum. The analysis is performed using a derived equivalence between two different formulations that describe the radiation fields in the linear regime.

  16. Phase transition and angular momentum dependence of correlations in the rotational spectra of Ne20 and Ne22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, L.; Schmid, K.W.; Krewald, S.; Faessler, A.

    1974-01-01

    Multi-Configuration-Hartree-Fock (MCHF) calculations with angular momentum projection before the variation of the internal degree of freedom have been performed for the nuclei Ne 20 and Ne 22 . This procedure yields different correlated intrinsic states for the different members of a rotational band. Thus, the angular momentum dependence of correlations has been studied. Experimentally, the ground state spectra of Ne 20 and Ne 22 show properties similar to the phase transitions observed in some rare earth nuclei which have been well reproduced through the present calculations. The calculated spectra show a significant improvement compared to the ones obtained by variation before the angular momentum projection is effected. (author)

  17. CONNECTING ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALACTIC DYNAMICS: THE COMPLEX INTERPLAY BETWEEN SPIN, MASS, AND MORPHOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teklu, Adelheid F.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander M.; Burkert, Andreas; Schulze, Felix; Steinborn, Lisa K.; Schmidt, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter (DM) halos have been discussed in several studies over the past decades. In particular, the idea arose that angular momentum conservation should allow us to infer the total angular momentum of the entire DM halo from measuring the angular momentum of the baryonic component, which is populating the center of the halo, especially for disk galaxies. To test this idea and to understand the connection between the angular momentum of the DM halo and its galaxy, we use a state-of-the-art, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation taken from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder simulations. Thanks to the inclusion of the relevant physical processes, the improved underlying numerical methods, and high spatial resolution, we successfully produce populations of spheroidal and disk galaxies self-consistently. Thus, we are able to study the dependence of galactic properties on their morphology. We find that (1) the specific angular momentum of stars in disk and spheroidal galaxies as a function of their stellar mass compares well with observational results; (2) the specific angular momentum of the stars in disk galaxies is slightly smaller compared to the specific angular momentum of the cold gas, in good agreement with observations; (3) simulations including the baryonic component show a dichotomy in the specific stellar angular momentum distribution when splitting the galaxies according to their morphological type (this dichotomy can also be seen in the spin parameter, where disk galaxies populate halos with slightly larger spin compared to spheroidal galaxies); (4) disk galaxies preferentially populate halos in which the angular momentum vector of the DM component in the central part shows a better alignment to the angular momentum vector of the entire halo; and (5) the specific angular momentum of the cold gas in disk galaxies is approximately 40% smaller than the specific angular momentum of the total DM halo

  18. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yin-e [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  19. Operator theory of angular momentum nad orientational auto-correlation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    The rigorous relation between the orientational auto-correlation function and the angular momentum autocorrelation function is described in two cases of interest. First when description of the complete zero THz- spectrum is required from the Mori continued fraction expansion for the angular momentum autocorrelation function and second when rotation/translation effects are important. The Mori-Evans theory of 1976, relying on the simple Shimizu relation is found to be essentially unaffected by the higher order corrections recently worked out by Ford and co-workers in the Markov limit. The mutual interaction of rotation and translation is important in determining the details of both the orientational and angular momentum auto-correlation function's (a.c.f.'s) in the presence of sample anisotropy or a symmetry breaking field. In this case it is essential to regard the angular momentum a.c.f. as non-Markovian and methods are developed to relate this to the orientational a.c.f. in the presence of rotation/translation coupling. (author)

  20. Angular correlations between recoil velocity and angular momentum vectors in molecular photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. E.; Sivakumar, N.; Chawla, D.; Houston, P. L.; Burak, I.

    1988-03-01

    A technique has been developed for determining the angular correlation between a photofragment's angular momentum vector J, its recoil velocity vector v, and the transition dipole moment of the parent molecule μp . Doppler profile spectroscopy used in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence probing by polarized light can be used to determine the correlations. The pairwise correlations between these vectors as well as their triple correlation are discussed for limiting cases using a classical approach as well as for the general case using a quantum approach based on density matrices. The current formulations differ in two ways from the recent approach of Dixon, who used a bipolar expansion of the correlated velocity and angular momentum distributions. The physical basis for the influence of the vector correlations on the Doppler profile is somewhat more transparent in the current formulations, and the direct connection between the measured correlations and the t-matrix elements occurring in the theory of Balint-Kurti and Shapiro for the photodissociation of a triatomic molecule is also demonstrated.

  1. Marine algae are `taught' the basics of angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John Taylor

    2017-11-01

    Advanced modelling studies and high-resolution observations have shown that flows related to instability of the mesoscale ( 1-10 km scale) may provide both the fertilisation mechanism for nutrient-depleted (oligotrophic) surface waters and a subduction mechanism for the rapid export of phytoplankton biomass to the deep ocean. Here, a detailed multidisciplinary analysis of the data from an example high-resolution observational campaign is presented. The data provide direct observations of the transport of phytoplankton through baroclinic instability. Furthermore, the data confirm that this transport is constrained by the requirement to conserve angular momentum, expressed in a stratified water column as the conservation of potential vorticity. This constraint is clearly seen to produce long thin filaments of phytoplankton populations strained out along isopycnal vorticity annuli associated with mesoscale frontal instabilities.

  2. Multiple orbital angular momentum generated by dielectric hybrid phase element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Hu, Dejiao; Li, Xiangping

    2017-09-01

    Vortex beam carrying multiple orbital angular momentum provides a new degree of freedom to manipulate light leading to the various exciting applications as trapping, quantum optics, information multiplexing, etc. Helical wavefront can be generated either via the geometric or the dynamic phase arising from a space-variant birefringence (q-plate) or from phase accumulation through propagation (spiral-phase-plate), respectively. Using fast direct laser writing technique we fabricate and characterize novel hybrid q-plate generating vortex beam simultaneously carrying two different high-order topological charges, which arise from the spin-orbital conversion and the azimuthal height variation of the recorded structures. We approve the versatile concept to generate multiple-OAM vortex beams combining the spin-orbital interaction and the phase accumulation in a single micro-scale device, a hybrid dielectric phase plate.

  3. Compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum sorter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhao Wan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact and high-resolution optical orbital angular momentum (OAM sorter is proposed and demonstrated. The sorter comprises a quadratic fan-out mapper and a dual-phase corrector positioned in the pupil plane and the Fourier plane, respectively. The optical system is greatly simplified compared to previous demonstrations of OAM sorting, and the performance in resolution and efficiency is maintained. A folded configuration is set up using a single reflective spatial light modulator (SLM to demonstrate the validity of the scheme. The two phase elements are implemented on the left and right halves of the SLM and connected by a right-angle prism. Experimental results demonstrate the high resolution of the compact OAM sorter, and the current limit in efficiency can be overcome by replacing with transmissive SLMs and removing the beam splitters. This novel scheme paves the way for the miniaturization and integration of high-resolution OAM sorters.

  4. Semiclassical decay of strings with maximum angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Iengo, R; Iengo, Roberto; Russo, Jorge G.

    2003-01-01

    A highly excited (closed or open) string state on the leading Regge trajectory can be represented by a rotating soliton solution. There is a semiclassical probability per unit cycle that this string can spontaneously break into two pieces. Here we find the resulting solutions for the outgoing two pieces, which describe two specific excited string states, and show that this semiclassical picture reproduces very accurately the features of the quantum calculation of decay in the large mass M limit. In particular, this picture prescribes the precise analytical relation of the masses M_1 and M_2 of the decay products, and indicates that the lifetime of these string states grows with the mass as T= const. a' M, in agreement with the quantum calculation. Thus, surprisingly, a string with maximum angular momentum becomes more stable for larger masses. We also point out some interesting features of the evolution after the splitting process.

  5. Radial and angular-momentum Regge trajectories: a systematic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arriola E.R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of Ref. [1] of the radial (n and angular-momentum (J Regge trajectories for all light-quark meson states listed in the Particle Data Tables. The parameters of the trajectories are obtained with linear regression, with weight of each resonance inversely proportional to its half-width squared, (Γ/22. The joint analysis in the (n, J, M2 Regge plane indicates, at the 4.5 standard deviation level, that the slopes in n are larger from the slopes in J. Thus no strict universality of slopes occurs in the light non-strange meson sector. We also extend our analysis to the kaon sector.

  6. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus; Kroll, Peter; Regensburg Univ.

    2013-02-01

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale μ=2 GeV to be J u v =0.230 +0.009 -0.024 and J d v =-0.004 +0.010 -0.016 .

  7. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kroll, Peter [Bergische Univ., Wuppertal (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-02-15

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale {mu}=2 GeV to be J{sup u}{sub v}=0.230{sup +0.009}{sub -0.024} and J{sup d}{sub v}=-0.004{sup +0.010}{sub -0.016}.

  8. Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabados László B.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present status of the quasi-local mass, energy-momentum and angular-momentum constructions in general relativity is reviewed. First, the general ideas, concepts, and strategies, as well as the necessary tools to construct and analyze the quasi-local quantities, are recalled. Then, the various specific constructions and their properties (both successes and deficiencies are discussed. Finally, some of the (actual and potential applications of the quasi-local concepts and specific constructions are briefly mentioned.This review is based on talks given at the Erwin Schrödinger Institute, Vienna in July 1997, at the Universität Tübingen in May 1998, and at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Hsinchu, Taiwan and at the National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan, in July 2000.

  9. Quasi-Local Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in GR: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabados László B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present status of the quasi-local mass-energy-momentum and angular momentum constructions in general relativity is reviewed. First the general ideas, concepts and strategies as well as the necessary tools to construct and analyze the quasi-local quantities are recalled. Then the various specific constructions and their properties (both successes and defects are discussed. Finally, some of the (actual and potential applications of the quasi-local concepts and specific constructions are briefly mentioned. This review is based on the talks given at the Erwin Schrödinger Institut, Vienna, in July 1997, at the Universität Tübingen, in May 1998 and at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Hsinchu and at the National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan, in July 2000.

  10. Momentum and angular momentum of laser plasma produced by irradiation of the target located in a magnetic field in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischenko, V. N.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Miroshnichenko, I. B.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments, the momentum and angular momentum of the slow magnetosonic and torsional Alfven waves produced by irradiating train of laser pulses of the target in a magnetic field in a vacuum or in a rarefied plasma with a magnetic field were investigated. At "resonance" of plasma bunches with background, a single Alfven wave and a single slow magnetosonic wave are formed. These waves transfer a momentum in a narrow tube of the magnetic field, angular momentum variation of the current, and the electric field.

  11. Momentum and angular momentum in the H-space of asymptotically flat, Einstein-Maxwell space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallidy, W.; Ludvigsen, M.

    1979-01-01

    New definitions are proposed for the momentum and angular momentum of Einstein-Maxwell fields that overcome the deficiencies of earlier definitions of these terms and are appropriate to the new H-space formulations of space-time. Definitions are made in terms of the Winicour-Tamburino linkages applied to the good cuts of Cj + . The transformations between good cuts then correspond to the translations and Lorentz transformations at points in H-space. For the special case of Robinson-Trautman type II space-times, it is shown that the definitions of momentum and angular momentum yield previously published results. (author)

  12. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Peter A. Becker. 3. 1Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O Bag 4, Ganeshkhind,. Pune 411 007, India. e-mail: psubrama@iucaa.ernet.in. 2Dept. of Physics, University of Pune, .... ity η arises out of local effects, i.e., due to momentum exchange between neighboring annuli of the accretion disk, as with ...

  13. Angular momentum-large-scale structure alignments in ΛCDM models and the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Dante J.; Stasyszyn, Federico; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2008-09-01

    We study the alignments between the angular momentum of individual objects and the large-scale structure in cosmological numerical simulations and real data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6 (SDSS-DR6). To this end, we measure anisotropies in the two point cross-correlation function around simulated haloes and observed galaxies, studying separately the one- and two-halo regimes. The alignment of the angular momentum of dark-matter haloes in Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulations is found to be dependent on scale and halo mass. At large distances (two-halo regime), the spins of high-mass haloes are preferentially oriented in the direction perpendicular to the distribution of matter; lower mass systems show a weaker trend that may even reverse to show an angular momentum in the plane of the matter distribution. In the one-halo term regime, the angular momentum is aligned in the direction perpendicular to the matter distribution; the effect is stronger than for the one-halo term and increases for higher mass systems. On the observational side, we focus our study on galaxies in the SDSS-DR6 with elongated apparent shapes, and study alignments with respect to the major semi-axis. We study five samples of edge-on galaxies; the full SDSS-DR6 edge-on sample, bright galaxies, faint galaxies, red galaxies and blue galaxies (the latter two consisting mainly of ellipticals and spirals, respectively). Using the two-halo term of the projected correlation function, we find an excess of structure in the direction of the major semi-axis for all samples; the red sample shows the highest alignment (2.7 +/- 0.8per cent) and indicates that the angular momentum of flattened spheroidals tends to be perpendicular to the large-scale structure. These results are in qualitative agreement with the numerical simulation results indicating that the angular momentum of galaxies could be built up as in the Tidal Torque scenario. The one-halo term only shows a significant alignment

  14. Angular momentum dynamics and the intrinsic drift of monopolar vortices on a rotating sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Toorn, R.; Zimmerman, J.T.F.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of the angular momentum equation for a fluid shell on a rotating planet, we analyze the intrinsic drift of a monopolar vortex in the shell. Central is the development of a general angular momentum equation for Eulerian fluid mechanics based on coordinate-free, general tensorial

  15. Spontaneous angular momentum generation of two-dimensional fluid flow in an elliptic geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keetels, G.H.; Clercx, H.J.H.; van Heijst, G.J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous spin-up, i.e., the significant increase of the total angular momentum of a flow that initially has no net angular momentum, is very characteristic for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in square domains bounded by rigid no-slip walls. In contrast, spontaneous spin-up is virtually

  16. Contribution of the support limb in control of angular momentum after tripping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; Bobbert, M.F.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    Tripping over an obstacle can result in a fall when the forward angular momentum, obtained from impact with the obstacle, is not arrested. Angular momentum can be restrained by proper placement of the recovery limb, anteriorly of the body, but possibly also by a reaction in the contralateral support

  17. Galaxy S-Stars Exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum Quantization per Unit Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost stars of our Galaxy, called S-stars, are in Keplerian orbits. Quantum celestial mechanics (QCM predicts orbital angular momentum quantization per unit mass for each of them. I determine the quantization integers for the 27 well-measured S-stars and the total angular momentum of this nearly isolated QCM system within the Galactic bulge.

  18. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-E Sun

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g., electron cooling of heavy ions, while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g., possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders. In this paper we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  19. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yin-E.; Piot, Philippe; Kim, Kwang-Je; Barov, Nikolas; Lidia, Steven; Santucci, James; Tikhoplav, Rodion; Wennerberg, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g. electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g. possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper, we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models

  20. Close binary evolution. II. Impact of tides, wind magnetic braking, and internal angular momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.; Georgy, C.; Qin, Y.; Fragos, T.; Soerensen, M.; Barblan, F.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Massive stars with solar metallicity lose important amounts of rotational angular momentum through their winds. When a magnetic field is present at the surface of a star, efficient angular momentum losses can still be achieved even when the mass-loss rate is very modest, at lower metallicities, or for lower-initial-mass stars. In a close binary system, the effect of wind magnetic braking also interacts with the influence of tides, resulting in a complex evolution of rotation. Aims: We study the interactions between the process of wind magnetic braking and tides in close binary systems. Methods: We discuss the evolution of a 10 M⊙ star in a close binary system with a 7 M⊙ companion using the Geneva stellar evolution code. The initial orbital period is 1.2 days. The 10 M⊙ star has a surface magnetic field of 1 kG. Various initial rotations are considered. We use two different approaches for the internal angular momentum transport. In one of them, angular momentum is transported by shear and meridional currents. In the other, a strong internal magnetic field imposes nearly perfect solid-body rotation. The evolution of the primary is computed until the first mass-transfer episode occurs. The cases of different values for the magnetic fields and for various orbital periods and mass ratios are briefly discussed. Results: We show that, independently of the initial rotation rate of the primary and the efficiency of the internal angular momentum transport, the surface rotation of the primary will converge, in a time that is short with respect to the main-sequence lifetime, towards a slowly evolving velocity that is different from the synchronization velocity. This "equilibrium angular velocity" is always inferior to the angular orbital velocity. In a given close binary system at this equilibrium stage, the difference between the spin and the orbital angular velocities becomes larger when the mass losses and/or the surface magnetic field increase. The

  1. ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS. I. THE MILKY WAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imara, Nia; Blitz, Leo

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis comparing the velocity fields in molecular clouds and the atomic gas that surrounds them in order to address the origin of the gradients. To that end, we present first-moment intensity-weighted velocity maps of the molecular clouds and surrounding atomic gas. The maps are made from high-resolution 13 CO observations and 21 cm observations from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Galactic H I Survey. We find that (1) the atomic gas associated with each molecular cloud has a substantial velocity gradient-ranging from 0.02 to 0.07 km s -1 pc -1 -whether or not the molecular cloud itself has a substantial linear gradient. (2) If the gradients in the molecular and atomic gas were due to rotation, this would imply that the molecular clouds have less specific angular momentum than the surrounding H I by a factor of 1-6. (3) Most importantly, the velocity gradient position angles in the molecular and atomic gas are generally widely separated-by as much as 130 deg. in the case of the Rosette molecular cloud. This result argues against the hypothesis that molecular clouds formed by simple top-down collapse from atomic gas.

  2. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum. II. Soft equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2018-03-01

    We study critical phenomena in the collapse of rotating ultrarelativistic perfect fluids, in which the pressure P is related to the total energy density ρ by P =κ ρ , where κ is a constant. We generalize earlier results for radiation fluids with κ =1 /3 to other values of κ , focusing on κ density. For κ changes the nature of the black-hole threshold completely: at sufficiently large initial rotation rates Ω and sufficient fine-tuning of the initial data to the black-hole threshold we expect to observe nontrivial universal scaling functions (familiar from critical phase transitions in thermodynamics) governing the black-hole mass and angular momentum, and, with further fine-tuning, eventually a finite black-hole mass almost everywhere on the threshold. In practice, however, the second unstable mode grows so slowly that we do not observe this breakdown of scaling at the level of fine-tuning we can achieve, nor systematic deviations from the leading-order power-law scalings of the black-hole mass. We do see systematic effects in the black-hole angular momentum, but it is not clear yet if these are due to the predicted nontrivial scaling functions, or to nonlinear effects at sufficiently large initial angular momentum (which we do not account for in our theoretical model).

  3. Constraints on radial migration in spiral galaxies - II. Angular momentum distribution and preferential migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Kathryne J.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2018-05-01

    The orbital angular momentum of individual stars in galactic discs can be permanently changed through torques from transient spiral patterns. Interactions at the corotation resonance dominate these changes and have the further property of conserving orbital circularity. We derived in an earlier paper an analytic criterion that an unperturbed stellar orbit must satisfy in order for such an interaction to occur, i.e. for it to be in a trapped orbit around corotation. We here use this criterion in an investigation of how the efficiency of induced radial migration for a population of disc stars varies with the angular momentum distribution of that population. We frame our results in terms of the velocity dispersion of the population, this being an easier observable than is the angular momentum distribution. Specifically, we investigate how the fraction of stars in trapped orbits at corotation varies with the velocity dispersion of the population, for a system with an assumed flat rotation curve. Our analytic results agree with the finding from simulations that radial migration is less effective in populations with `hotter' kinematics. We further quantify the dependence of this trapped fraction on the strength of the spiral pattern, finding a higher trapped fraction for higher amplitude perturbations.

  4. Large Quantum Probability Backflow and the Azimuthal Angle-Angular Momentum Uncertainty Relation for an Electron in a Constant Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a surprising aspect of quantum mechanics that is accessible to an undergraduate student. We discuss probability backflow for an electron in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that even for a wavepacket composed entirely of states with negative angular momentum the effective angular momentum can take on positive…

  5. Angular momentum conservation law in light-front quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Kelly Yu-Ju; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2017-03-01

    We prove the Lorentz invariance of the angular momentum conservation law and the helicity sum rule for relativistic composite systems in the light-front formulation. We explicitly show that j 3 , the z -component of the angular momentum remains unchanged under Lorentz transformations generated by the light-front kinematical boost operators. The invariance of j 3 under Lorentz transformations is a feature unique to the front form. Applying the Lorentz invariance of the angular quantum number in the front form, we obtain a selection rule for the orbital angular momentum which can be used to eliminate certain interaction vertices in QED and QCD. We also generalize the selection rule to any renormalizable theory and show that there exists an upper bound on the change of orbital angular momentum in scattering processes at any fixed order in perturbation theory.

  6. Interpreting angular momentum transfer between electromagnetic multipoles using vector spherical harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A

    2018-02-01

    The transfer of angular momentum between a quadrupole emitter and a dipole acceptor is investigated theoretically. Vector spherical harmonics are used to describe the angular part of the field of the mediating photon. Analytical results are presented for predicting angular momentum transfer between the emitter and absorber within a quantum electrodynamical framework. We interpret the allowability of such a process, which appears to violate conservation of angular momentum, in terms of the breakdown of the isotropy of space at the point of photon absorption (detection). That is, collapse of the wavefunction results in loss of all angular momentum information. This is consistent with Noether's Theorem and demystifies some common misconceptions about the nature of the photon. The results have implications for interpreting the detection of photons from multipole sources and offers insight into limits on information that can be extracted from quantum measurements in photonic systems.

  7. Poynting vector and orbital angular momentum density of superpositions of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available . Courtial, ?Measuring the orbital angular momentum of a single photon,? Phys. Rev. Lett. 88(25), 257901 (2002). 15. C. Gao, X. Qi, Y. Liu, J. Xin, and L. Wang, ?Sorting and detecting orbital angular momentum states by using a Dove prism embedded Mach.... Rev. Lett. 75(5), 826?829 (1995). 7. A. Mair, A. Vaziri, G. Weihs, and A. Zeilinger, ?Entanglement of the orbital angular momentum states of photons,? Nature 412(6844), 313?316 (2001). 8. A. Vaziri, G. Weihs, and A. Zeilinger, ?Experimental two-photon...

  8. Interannual signals in length of day and atmospheric angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abarco del Rio

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric angular momentum (AAM and length of day (LOD series are investigated for their characteristics on interannual time scales during the half-century period 1949 to 1998. During this epoch, the interannual variability in LOD can be separated naturally into three bands: a quasi-biennial, a triennial-quadrennial and one at six-seven years. The atmosphere appears to excite the first two bands, while it does not contribute to the last. Considering the quasi-biennial (QB band alone, the atmosphere appears to excite most of its signal in LOD, but it arises from separate fluctuations with stratospheric and tropospheric origin. Thus, although close in frequency, stratospheric and tropospheric processes differ in their amplitude and phase variability. The time shift can be noted especially during the strong El Niño events of 1982-83 and 1997-98 when both processes have positive phase and thus combine to help produce particularly strong peak in AAM and LOD. In addition, we have reconfirmed the downward propagation in the stratosphere and upward propagation in the troposphere of AAM observed in earlier studies for other variables. In the triennial-quadrennial (TQ band, time-variable spectral analyses reveal that LOD and AAM contain strong variability, with periods shorter than four years before 1975 and longer thereafter. This signal originates mainly within the troposphere and propagates upwards from the lower to the higher layers of the troposphere. According to a zonal analysis, an equatorial poleward mode, strongly linked to the SOI, explains more than 60% of the total variability at these ranges. In addition, this study also indicates that an equatorward mode, originating within polar latitudes, explains, on average, more than 15% of the triennial-quadrennial oscillation (TQO variability in AAM, and up to 30% at certain epochs. Finally, a six year period in LOD noted in earlier studies, as well as in lengthier series covering much of the

  9. Angular momentum transport and turbulence in laboratory models of Keplerian flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paoletti, M.S.; van Gils, Dennis Paulus Maria; Dubrulle, B.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present angular momentum transport (torque) measurements in two recent experimental studies of the turbulent flow between independently rotating cylinders. In addition to these studies, we reanalyze prior torque measurements to expand the range of control parameters for the experimental

  10. Parameter dependence of the decoherence of orbital angular momentum entanglement in atmospheric turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamadou Ibrahim, A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available he orbital angular momentum (OAM) state of light can potentially be used to implement higher dimensional entangled systems for quantum communication. Unfortunately, optical fibers in use today support only modes with zero OAM values. Free...

  11. Evolution of orbital angular momentum entangled bi-photon, propagating through a turbulent atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital angular momentum (OAM) entangled bi-photons are a resource for the higher dimensional implementation of quantum cryptography, which allows secure communication over various channels. In the case where free-space is used as communication...

  12. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions. [Lectures, mass charge, and linear and angular momentum transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references.

  13. Improving student understanding of addition of angular momentum in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangtian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with concepts related to addition of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. We also describe the development and implementation of a research-based learning tool, Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT, to reduce these difficulties. The preliminary evaluation shows that the QuILT related to the basics of the addition of angular momentum is helpful in improving students’ understanding of these concepts.

  14. Bell’s measure and implementing quantum Fourier transform with orbital angular momentum of classical light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinbing; Sun, Yifan; Li, Pengyun; Qin, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We perform Bell’s measurement for the non-separable correlation between polarization and orbital angular momentum from the same classical vortex beam. The violation of Bell’s inequality for such a non-separable classical correlation has been demonstrated experimentally. Based on the classical vortex beam and non-quantum entanglement between the polarization and the orbital angular momentum, the Hadamard gates and conditional phase gates have been designed. Furthermore, a quantum Fourier transform has been implemented experimentally. PMID:26369424

  15. Energy dependence of angular momentum transfer in post-collision interaction. Classical view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerchikov, L.; Sheinerman, S.

    2018-03-01

    A classical approach to the description of angular momentum transfer between the Auger electron and photoelectron in post-collision interaction is worked out. The results of the classical approach coincide with the quantum mechanical ones at the photoionization threshold. Besides, the approach developed provides a description of angular momentum transfer beyond the photoionization threshold. In particular, it is suitable in the energy region of comparable velocities of two emitted electrons.

  16. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information.

  17. Jerks as Guiding Influences on the Global Environment: Effects on the Solid Earth, Its Angular Momentum and Lithospheric Plate Motions, the Atmosphere, Weather, and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. M.; Leybourne, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Jerks are thought to be the result of torques applied at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) caused by either of two possible processes, working together or separately: 1) Electromagnetic Induction and 2) Mechanical Slippage. In the first case, it is thought that electromagnetic energy slowly builds-up at the CMB, reaches some critical level, and is then suddenly released, causing a geomagneticly induced torque at the CMB due to the differential electrical conductivity between the lower mantle and the surface of the outer core. The second case is driven by stress and strain increases that buildup mechanical potential energy, which is released when a critical level is reached, thereby generating a torque at the CMB. Generally, a trigger is required to start the Jerk process in motion. In the electromagnetic case, it is suggested that energy from the Sun may supply the requisite energy buildup that is subsequently released by a magnetic storm trigger, for instance. In the case of mechanical slippage, bari-center motion among the Earth, Moon, and Sun, as well as tidal forces and mass redistributions through Earth's wobbles combine to provide the accumulated stress/strain buildup and subsequent trigger. The resulting fluid flow changes at the CMB result in geomagnetic field changes and Joule heating throughout the solid Earth, its oceans, and atmosphere. It is shown that the Global Temperature Anomaly (GTA), which is measured at Earth's surface, correlates with changes in the geomagnetic non-dipole moment, and thus with core fluid motions. This links Global Warming and weather with core processes, important examples being the 1930's Dust Bowl Era and the 1947 Impulse. The CMB torque also affects Earth's angular momentum. But it appears that magnetic storms can as well. As a consequence, the Jet Stream, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the Global Oscillation System (i.e., El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decade Oscillation, etc.) are

  18. Modeling channel interference in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed laser link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effects of optical turbulence on the energy crosstalk among constituent orbital angular momentum (OAM) states in a vortex-based multi-channel laser communication link and determine channel interference in terms of turbulence strength and OAM state separation. We characterize the channel interference as a function of C2n and transmit OAM state, and propose probability models to predict the random fluctuations in the received signals for such architecture. Simulations indicate that turbulence-induced channel interference is mutually correlated across receive channels.

  19. Underwater optical communications using orbital angular momentum-based spatial division multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Alan E.; Zhao, Zhe; Ren, Yongxiong; Li, Long; Xie, Guodong; Song, Haoqian; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Runzhou; Bao, Changjing; Pang, Kai

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we review high-capacity underwater optical communications using orbital angular momentum (OAM)-based spatial division multiplexing. We discuss methods to generate and detect blue-green optical data-carrying OAM beams as well as various underwater effects, including attenuation, scattering, current, and thermal gradients on OAM beams. Attention is also given to the system performance of high-capacity underwater optical communication links using OAM-based space division multiplexing. The paper closes with a discussion of a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm to mitigate the inter-mode crosstalk caused by thermal gradients.

  20. Excited Landau levels, orbital angular momentum and axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teryaev, O.V.

    1993-01-01

    The IR cutoff via the exclusion of the high orbital momentum components for the excited Landau levels leads to the physical interpretation of the cancellation between the explicity and anomalous chiral symmetry breaking. 21 refs

  1. Demonstrating the Conservation of Angular Momentum Using Model Cars Moving along a Rotating Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an exciting non-traditional experiment for our introductory physics laboratories to help students to understand the principle of conservation of angular momentum. We used electric toy cars moving along a long rotating rod. As the cars move towards the centre of the rod, the angular velocity of this system increases.…

  2. Robust interferometer for the routing of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lavery, MPJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors have developed an interferometer requiring only minimal angular alignment for the routing of beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The Mach–Zehnder interferometer contains a Dove prism in each arm where each has a mirror plane around...

  3. Tidal evolution of the Moon from a high-obliquity, high-angular-momentum Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćuk, Matija; Hamilton, Douglas P; Lock, Simon J; Stewart, Sarah T

    2016-11-17

    In the giant-impact hypothesis for lunar origin, the Moon accreted from an equatorial circum-terrestrial disk; however, the current lunar orbital inclination of five degrees requires a subsequent dynamical process that is still unclear. In addition, the giant-impact theory has been challenged by the Moon's unexpectedly Earth-like isotopic composition. Here we show that tidal dissipation due to lunar obliquity was an important effect during the Moon's tidal evolution, and the lunar inclination in the past must have been very large, defying theoretical explanations. We present a tidal evolution model starting with the Moon in an equatorial orbit around an initially fast-spinning, high-obliquity Earth, which is a probable outcome of giant impacts. Using numerical modelling, we show that the solar perturbations on the Moon's orbit naturally induce a large lunar inclination and remove angular momentum from the Earth-Moon system. Our tidal evolution model supports recent high-angular-momentum, giant-impact scenarios to explain the Moon's isotopic composition and provides a new pathway to reach Earth's climatically favourable low obliquity.

  4. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Weakly Magnetized Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessah Martin E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity in accretion disks is based on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. This implies that the turbulent stress must be negative and thus transport angular momentum inwards, in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves in configurations that are stable to the standard MRI. Employing the shearing-sheet framework, we show that transient amplification of shearing MHD waves can generate magnetic energy without leading to a substantial generation of hydromagnetic stresses. While these results are in agreement with numerical simulations, they emphasize the need to better understand the mechanism for angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions on more solid grounds.

  5. Model for how an accretion disk drives astrophysical jets and sheds angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Clumps of ions and neutrals in the weakly ionized plasma in an accretion disk are shown to follow trajectories analogous to those of fictitious ‘metaparticles’ having a charge to mass ratio reduced from that of an ion by the ionization fraction. A certain class of meta-particles have zero-canonical angular momentum and so spiral in towards the star. Accumulation of these meta-particles establishes a radial electric field that drives the electric current that flows in bidirectional astrophysical jets lying along the disk axis and provides forces that drive the jets. The entire process converts gravitational potential energy into jet energy while absorbing angular momentum from accreting material and shedding this angular momentum at near infinite radius.

  6. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V.; Yavorsky, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  7. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  8. Half theory fractional angular momentum and the application of fractional derivatives to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, Steve

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we review the fractional derivative and apply it to various problems in quantum mechanics. Among other things, we find fractional angular momentum, with "fractional spherical harmonics" as solutions to the squared quantum mechanical angular momentum operator, but with non-integer eigenvalues. These fractional functions might be interpreted as intermediary states visited by an orbiting electron as it jumps between the more stable, integer angular momentum values in an atom. Alternatively, these fractional states may be of interest in the mechanisms of chemical bonding. The justification for these new states, which are normalizable solutions to Hermitian operators, depends of course on experiment. We remember Feynmann's statement about quantum mechanics, "Everything that is not expressly forbidden, is mandatory."

  9. Theory of generation of angular momentum of phonons by heat current and its conversion to spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Masato; Murakami, Shuichi

    Spin-rotation coupling in crystals will enable us to convert between spin current and mechanical rotations, as has been studied in surface acoustic waves, in liquid metals, and in carbon nanotubes. In this presentation we focus on angular momentum of phonons. In nonmagnetic crystals without inversion symmetry, we theoretically demonstrate that phonon modes generally have angular momenta depending on their wave vectors. In equilibrium the sum of the angular momenta is zero. On the other hand, if a heat current flows in the crystal, nonequilibrium phonon distribution leads to nonzero total angular momentum of phonons. It can be observed as a rotation of crystal itself, and as a spin current induced by these phonons via the spin-rotation coupling.

  10. Distribution of electron orbits having a definite angular momentum in a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, S.

    1996-01-01

    Electron orbits having a definite angular momentum in a static magnetic field are calculated with the aid of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rules. The quantization gives that orbits are arranged along a straight line but the distance between the centers of two neighboring orbits decreases with increase of the absolute value of the angular momentum. With the energy correction equal to the zero-point energy of the harmonic oscillator, the distribution of orbits becomes identical to that obtained recently with the aid of a mixed semiclassical and quantum mechanical theory. 16 refs., 1 fig

  11. Bar formation in disk galaxies, and the normalized angular momentum of the bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasov, A.V.

    1985-09-01

    In 1971 Polyachenko et al. suggested that the spheroidal bulge in a spiral galaxy would retain a biaxial shape unless its normalized angular momentum, defined as M = KM/sub b//sup -5/3/ (K is the ordinary angular momentum and M/sub b/ the mass of the bulge), exceeds some critical value; in that event a triaxial ellipsoid: a bar: would develop. This proposal is in fact consistent with bulge rotational velocities observed in disk-type systems. The bar presumably represents a bulge component having a high M value.

  12. Up-down symmetry of the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Peeters, Arthur G.

    2011-01-01

    Two symmetries of the local nonlinear δf gyrokinetic system of equations in tokamaks in the high flow regime are presented. The turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum changes sign under an up-down reflection of the tokamak and a sign change of both the rotation and the rotation shear. Thus, the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum must vanish for up-down symmetric tokamaks in the absence of both rotation and rotation shear. This has important implications for the modeling of spontaneous rotation.

  13. Acoustic Virtual Vortices with Tunable Orbital Angular Momentum for Trapping of Mie Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Asier; Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2018-01-01

    Acoustic vortices can transfer angular momentum and trap particles. Here, we show that particles trapped in airborne acoustic vortices orbit at high speeds, leading to dynamic instability and ejection. We demonstrate stable trapping inside acoustic vortices by generating sequences of short-pulsed vortices of equal helicity but opposite chirality. This produces a "virtual vortex" with an orbital angular momentum that can be tuned independently of the trapping force. We use this method to adjust the rotational speed of particles inside a vortex beam and, for the first time, create three-dimensional acoustics traps for particles of wavelength order (i.e., Mie particles).

  14. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation in sd-shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, P. A.; Sheikh, J. A.; Maqbool, I.; Singh, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard USD interaction and the canonical partition function constructed from the calculated eigen-solutions. It is shown that the extracted average quadrupole moments show a transitional behavior as a function of temperature and the inferred transitional temperature is shown to vary with angular-momentum. The quadrupole deformation of the individual eigen-states is also analyzed.

  15. Modelling the turbulent transport of angular momentum in tokamak plasmas - A quasi-linear gyrokinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic confinement in tokamaks is for now the most advanced way towards energy production by nuclear fusion. Both theoretical and experimental studies showed that rotation generation can increase its performance by reducing the turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas. The rotation influence on the heat and particle fluxes is studied along with the angular momentum transport with the quasi-linear gyro-kinetic eigenvalue code QuaLiKiz. For this purpose, the QuaLiKiz code is modified in order to take the plasma rotation into account and compute the angular momentum flux. It is shown that QuaLiKiz framework is able to correctly predict the angular momentum flux including the E*B shear induced residual stress as well as the influence of rotation on the heat and particle fluxes. The major approximations of QuaLiKiz formalisms are reviewed, in particular the ballooning representation at its lowest order and the eigenfunctions calculated in the hydrodynamic limit. The construction of the quasi-linear fluxes is also reviewed in details and the quasi-linear angular momentum flux is derived. The different contributions to the turbulent momentum flux are studied and successfully compared both against non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations and experimental data. (author) [fr

  16. Investigating fusion dynamics at high angular momentum via fission cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palshetkar, C. S.; Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Ramachandran, K.; Dasgupta, M.; Cook, K. J.; Wakhle, A.; Jeung, D. Y.; Rafferty, D. C.; McNeil, S. D.; Carter, I. P.; Luong, D. H.

    2017-11-01

    A quantitative understanding of fusion dynamics at high angular momentum is attempted employing experimental fission cross sections as a probe and carrying out a simultaneous description of the fusion and fission cross sections at above barrier energies. For this, experimental fission fragment angular distributions for three systems: 16O+148Sm, 28Si+136Ba and 40Ca+124Sn, all forming the same compound nucleus 164Yb at similar excitation energies, have been measured at four beam energies above their respective capture barriers. A simultaneous description of the angle integrated fission cross sections and evaporation residue/fusion cross sections available in literature for the systems is carried out using coupled-channels and statistical model calculations. Fission cross sections, which are most sensitive to the changes in angular momentum, provide very stringent constraints for model calculations thus indicating the need of precision evaporation residue as well as fission cross sections in such studies. A large diffuseness (ao>0.65 fm) of the nuclear potential gives the best reproduction of the experimental data. In addition, different coupling schemes give very different angular momentum distributions, which, in turn, give very different fission cross section predictions. Both these observations hint at the explanation that depending on energy dissipation of the interacting nuclei occurring inside or outside the fusion pocket, very different fission cross sections can result due to heavily altered angular momentum and thus justifies the sensitivity of fission cross sections used as probes in the present work.

  17. Macroscopic angular-momentum stages of Bose-Einstein condensates in toroidal traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benakli, M.; Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S.R.

    2001-03-01

    We study the stability of a rotating repulsive-atom Bose-Einstein condensate in a toroidal trap. The resulting macroscopic angular-momentum states with integer vorticity l spread radially, lowering rotational energies. These states are robust against vorticity-lowering decays, with estimated metastability barriers capable of sustaining large angular momenta (1 < or ∼ 10) for typical parameters. We identify the centrifugally squashed l-dependent density profile as a possible signature of condensate rotation and superfluidity. (author)

  18. Development of Angular Motion, Angular Momentum, and Torque Knowledge Bases for an Intelligent Physics Tutoring System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eason, Michael

    1998-01-01

    .... The knowledge base developed in this project provides the physics backbone for the rest of the tutoring system by generating the necessary equations and solution graphs to solve selected angular motion...

  19. Azimuthal angular correlations in high transverse momentum dijet events

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The azimuthal angle correlation between the two jets with the largest transverse momenta in inclusive 2-jet topologies, close to the back-to-back configuration, is measured for several regions of the leading jet transverse momentum. Measurements of the same observable requiring the presence of extra jets are also presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The results are compared to predictions using Monte Carlo event generators which combine perturbative QCD calculations up to next-to-leading-order accuracy with contributions from parton showers, hadronization, and multiparton interactions.

  20. Integral equations for four identical particles in angular momentum representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, V.F.; Shadchin, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    In integral equations of motion for a system of four identical spinless particles with central pair interactions, transition is realized from the representation of relative Jacobi momenta to the representation of their moduli and relative angular moments. As a result, the variables associated with the rotation of the system as a whole are separated in the equations. The integral equations of motion for four particles are reduced to the form of an infinite system of three-demensional integral equations. The four-particle kinematic factors contained in integral kernels are expressed in terms of three-particle type kinematic factors. In the case of separable two-particle interaction, the equations of motion for four particles have the form of an infinite system of two-dimensional integral equations

  1. Semiclassical analysis of the Wigner 12j symbol with one small angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Liang

    2011-01-01

    We derive an asymptotic formula for the Wigner 12j symbol, in the limit of one small and 11 large angular momenta. There are two kinds of asymptotic formulas for the 12j symbol with one small angular momentum. We present the first kind of formula in this paper. Our derivation relies on the techniques developed in the semiclassical analysis of the Wigner 9j symbol [L. Yu and R. G. Littlejohn, Phys. Rev. A 83, 052114 (2011)], where we used a gauge-invariant form of the multicomponent WKB wave functions to derive asymptotic formulas for the 9j symbol with small and large angular momenta. When applying the same technique to the 12j symbol in this paper, we find that the spinor is diagonalized in the direction of an intermediate angular momentum. In addition, we find that the geometry of the derived asymptotic formula for the 12j symbol is expressed in terms of the vector diagram for a 9j symbol. This illustrates a general geometric connection between asymptotic limits of the various 3nj symbols. This work contributes an asymptotic formula for the 12j symbol to the quantum theory of angular momentum, and serves as a basis for finding asymptotic formulas for the Wigner 15j symbol with two small angular momenta.

  2. Atmospheric turbulence compensation in orbital angular momentum communications: Advances and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhui; Chen, Shi; Gao, Chunqing; Willner, Alan E.; Wang, Jian

    2018-02-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying beams have recently generated considerable interest due to their potential use in communication systems to increase transmission capacity and spectral efficiency. For OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) links, a critical challenge is the atmospheric turbulence that will distort the helical wavefronts of OAM beams leading to the decrease of received power, introducing crosstalk between multiple channels, and impairing link performance. In this paper, we review recent advances in turbulence effects compensation techniques for OAM-based FSO communication links. First, basic concepts of atmospheric turbulence and theoretical model are introduced. Second, atmospheric turbulence effects on OAM beams are theoretically and experimentally investigated and discussed. Then, several typical turbulence compensation approaches, including both adaptive optics-based (optical domain) and signal processing-based (electrical domain) techniques, are presented. Finally, key challenges and perspectives of compensation of turbulence-distorted OAM links are discussed.

  3. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  4. Probing transverse momentum broadening via dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Qin, Guang-You; Wei, Shu-Yi; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Han-Zhong

    2017-10-01

    Dijet, dihadron, hadron-jet angular correlations have been reckoned as important probes of the transverse momentum broadening effects in relativistic nuclear collisions. When a pair of high-energy jets created in hard collisions traverse the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions, they become de-correlated due to the vacuum soft gluon radiation associated with the Sudakov logarithms and the medium-induced transverse momentum broadening. For the first time, we employ the systematical resummation formalism and establish a baseline calculation to describe the dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlation data in pp and peripheral AA collisions where the medium effect is negligible. We demonstrate that the medium-induced broadening 〈 p⊥2 〉 and the so-called jet quenching parameter q ˆ can be extracted from the angular de-correlations observed in AA collisions. A global χ2 analysis of dihadron and hadron-jet angular correlation data renders 〈p⊥ 2 〉 ∼13-4+5 GeV2 for a quark jet at RHIC top energy. Further experimental and theoretical efforts along the direction of this work shall significantly advance the quantitative understanding of transverse momentum broadening and help us acquire unprecedented knowledge of jet quenching parameter in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Orbital-angular-momentum based origin of Rashba-type surface band splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Ryong; Kim, Choong H; Yu, Jaejun; Han, Jung Hoon; Kim, Changyoung

    2011-10-07

    We propose that the existence of local orbital angular momentum (OAM) on the surfaces of high-Z materials plays a crucial role in the formation of Rashba-type surface band splitting. Local OAM state in a Bloch wave function produces an asymmetric charge distribution (electric dipole). The surface-normal electric field then aligns the electric dipole and results in chiral OAM states and the relevant Rashba-type splitting. Therefore, the band splitting originates from electric dipole interaction, not from the relativistic Zeeman splitting as proposed in the original Rashba picture. The characteristic spin chiral structure of Rashba states is formed through the spin-orbit coupling and thus is a secondary effect to the chiral OAM. Results from first-principles calculations on a single Bi layer under an external electric field verify the key predictions of the new model.

  6. On gravitational mass and angular momentum of two black holes in equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimatsu, Akira.

    1983-03-01

    We investigate the Komar integrals for the metric describing a nonlinear superposition of two Kerr-NUT metrics. This metric can be interpreted as a system of two black holes in equilibrium. We define the gravitational mass and angular momentum of each black hole by the surface integrals over each horizon, and observe the effect of their gravitational spin-spin interaction. Moreover, we discuss the problem whether the gravitational masses obtained here are positive or not. If the metric fails to satisfy the condition of elementary flatness on the part of the axis between the two horizons, the peculiar property of this region is studied from the viewpoint of the Komar integrals. (author)

  7. Design and verification of monopole patch antenna systems to generate orbital angular momentum waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monopole patch antenna systems, which can generate orbital angular momentum (OAM waves at 2.4GHz, are proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna systems have advantages of simple planar structure and small size of antenna element. Design, simulation, fabrication and measurement of the proposed antenna systems are presented. Two feeding networks, which constitute the proposed antenna systems with monopole patch antenna array, are designed to generate modes 1 and 2 of OAM waves. The antenna systems for both modes are shown to be effective in generating OAM waves of modes 1 and 2 from both simulation and three types of measurement: radiation pattern, phase distribution and phase gradient. Simulation and measurement results of radiation pattern and phase distribution have shown very close results. Phase gradient measurement results has verified that the generated waves from the antenna systems are indeed OAM waves.

  8. Design and verification of monopole patch antenna systems to generate orbital angular momentum waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dandan; Gui, Liangqi; Zhou, Cong; Zhang, Zixiao; Chen, Han; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Monopole patch antenna systems, which can generate orbital angular momentum (OAM) waves at 2.4GHz, are proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna systems have advantages of simple planar structure and small size of antenna element. Design, simulation, fabrication and measurement of the proposed antenna systems are presented. Two feeding networks, which constitute the proposed antenna systems with monopole patch antenna array, are designed to generate modes 1 and 2 of OAM waves. The antenna systems for both modes are shown to be effective in generating OAM waves of modes 1 and 2 from both simulation and three types of measurement: radiation pattern, phase distribution and phase gradient. Simulation and measurement results of radiation pattern and phase distribution have shown very close results. Phase gradient measurement results has verified that the generated waves from the antenna systems are indeed OAM waves.

  9. All-fiber orbital angular momentum mode generation and transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Xiaobo; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Qian, Qi; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin

    2017-11-01

    We proposed and demonstrated an all-fiber system for generating and transmitting orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode light. A specially designed multi-core fiber (MCF) was used to endow with guide modes different phase change and two tapered transition regions were used for providing low-loss interfaces between different fiber structures. By arranging the refractive index distribution among the multi-cores and controlling the length of MCF, which essentially change the phase difference between the neighboring cores, OAM modes with different topological charge l can be generated selectively. Through two tapered transition regions, the non-OAM mode light can be effectively injected into the MCF and the generated OAM mode light can be easily launched into OAM mode supporting fiber for long distance and high purity transmission. Such an all-fiber OAM mode generation and transmission system owns the merits of flexibility, compactness, portability, and would have practical application value in OAM optical fiber communication systems.

  10. Mimicking Faraday rotation to sort the orbital angular momentum of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuhong; Qi, Qianqian; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Lixiang

    2014-04-18

    The efficient separation of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) is essential to both the classical and quantum applications with twisted photons. Here we devise and demonstrate experimentally an efficient method of mimicking the Faraday rotation to sort the OAM based on the OAM-to-polarization coupling effect induced by a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our device is capable of sorting the OAM of positive and negative numbers, as well as their mixtures. Furthermore, we report the first experimental demonstration to sort optical vortices of noninteger charges. The possibility of working at the photon-count level is also shown using an electron-multiplying CCD camera. Our scheme holds promise for quantum information applications with single-photon entanglement and for high-capacity communication systems with polarization and OAM multiplexing.

  11. Investigating Students' Mental Models about the Quantization of Light, Energy, and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Nilüfer; Eryilmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Sakir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables--light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed…

  12. Angular momentum, accretion, and radial flows in chemodynamical models of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pezzulli, G.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-01-01

    Gas accretion and radial flows are key ingredients of the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. They are also tightly linked to each other (accretion drives radial flows due to angular momentum conservation) and should therefore be modeled simultaneously. We summarize an algorithm that can be used

  13. The angular momentum of cosmological coronae and the inside-out growth of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo; Binney, James

    Massive and diffuse haloes of hot gas (coronae) are important intermediaries between cosmology and galaxy evolution, storing mass and angular momentum acquired from the cosmic web until eventual accretion on to star-forming discs. We introduce a method to reconstruct the rotation of a galactic

  14. MEMS-based wavelength and orbital angular momentum demultiplexer for on-chip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubopytov, Vladimir; Porfirev, Alexey P.; Gurbatov, Stanislav O.

    2017-01-01

    Summary form only given. We demonstrate a new tunable MEMS-based WDM&OAM Fabry-Pérot filter for simultaneous wavelength (WDM) and Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) (de)multiplexing. The WDM&OAM filter is suitable for dense on-chip integration and dedicated for the next generation of optical...

  15. Variation of level density parameter with angular momentum in 119Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear level density (NLD), a basic ingredient of Statistical Model has been a subject of interest for various decades as it plays an important role in the understanding of a wide variety of Nuclear reactions. There have been various efforts towards the precise determination of NLD and study its dependence on excitation energy and angular momentum as it is crucial in the determination of cross-sections. Here we report our results of theoretical calculations in a microscopic framework to understand the experimental results on inverse level density parameter (k) extracted for different angular momentum regions for 119 Sb corresponding to different γ-ray multiplicities by comparing the experimental neutron energy spectra with statistical model predictions where an increase in the level density with the increasing angular momentum is predicted. NLD and neutron emission spectra dependence on temperature and spin has been studied in our earlier works where the influence of structural transitions due to angular momentum and temperature on level density of states and neutron emission probability was shown

  16. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to uniquely assign total angular momentum () values to high-lying even-parity energy levels of atomic samarium. Unique value assignment was done for seven energy levels in the energy region 34,800–36,200 cm-1 , recently observed and reported in ...

  17. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even-parity atomic states of samarium by spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique. A K PULHANI∗, M L SHAH, G P GUPTA and B M SURI. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,. Mumbai 400 085, India.

  18. Encoding mutually unbiased bases in orbital angular momentum for quantum key distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We encode mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) using the higher-dimensional orbital angular momentum (OAM) degree of freedom associated with optical fields. We illustrate how these states are encoded with the use of a spatial light modulator (SLM). We...

  19. Fractal geometry of angular momentum evolution in near-Keplerian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkan, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, we propose a method to study the nature of resonant relaxation in near-Keplerian systems. Our technique is based on measuring the fractal dimension of the angular momentum trails and we use it to analyse the outcome of N-body simulations. With our method, we can reliably determine

  20. Orbital angular momentum correlations with a phase-flipped Gaussian mode pump beam

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Romero, J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report orbital angular momentum (OAM) and angle correlations between signal and idler photons observed when the nonlinear crystal used in spontaneous parametric down-conversion is illuminated by a non-fundamental Gaussian pump beam. We introduce...

  1. High Angular Momentum Halo Gas: A Feedback and Code-independent Prediction of LCDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Oñorbe, Jose; Bullock, James S.; Joung, M. Ryan; Devriendt, Julien; Ceverino, Daniel; Kereš, Dušan; Hopkins, Philip F.; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-07-01

    We investigate angular momentum acquisition in Milky Way-sized galaxies by comparing five high resolution zoom-in simulations, each implementing identical cosmological initial conditions but utilizing different hydrodynamic codes: Enzo, Art, Ramses, Arepo, and Gizmo-PSPH. Each code implements a distinct set of feedback and star formation prescriptions. We find that while many galaxy and halo properties vary between the different codes (and feedback prescriptions), there is qualitative agreement on the process of angular momentum acquisition in the galaxy’s halo. In all simulations, cold filamentary gas accretion to the halo results in ˜4 times more specific angular momentum in cold halo gas (λ cold ≳ 0.1) than in the dark matter halo. At z > 1, this inflow takes the form of inspiraling cold streams that are co-directional in the halo of the galaxy and are fueled, aligned, and kinematically connected to filamentary gas infall along the cosmic web. Due to the qualitative agreement among disparate simulations, we conclude that the buildup of high angular momentum halo gas and the presence of these inspiraling cold streams are robust predictions of Lambda Cold Dark Matter galaxy formation, though the detailed morphology of these streams is significantly less certain. A growing body of observational evidence suggests that this process is borne out in the real universe.

  2. Proposal for the generation of photon pairs with nonzero orbital angular momentum in a ring fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javůrek, D.; Svozilík, J.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 19 (2014), s. 23743-23748 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon pairs * orbital-angular-momentum states * spontaneous parametric down-conversion Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  3. Measuring the orbital angular momentum density for a superposition of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure the Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) density of superposition fields two steps are needed: generation and measurement. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency domain produces a higher...

  4. Improving Student Understanding of Addition of Angular Momentum in Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2013-01-01

    We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with concepts related to addition of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. We also describe the development and implementation of a research-based learning tool, Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT), to reduce these difficulties. The preliminary evaluation…

  5. Traces of products of angular momentum operators in the spherical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.E. de; Berghe, G. Vanden

    1978-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived for the traces of products of angular momentum operators in the spherical basis. These expressions contain binomial coefficients and Stirling numbers of the second kind. In addition, some relations between Bernouilli polynomials and Stirling numbers are retrieved. (author)

  6. High Angular Momentum Halo Gas: A Feedback and Code-independent Prediction of LCDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside, CA 92504 (United States); Maller, Ariyeh H. [Department of Physics, New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Oñorbe, Jose [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bullock, James S. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Joung, M. Ryan [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Devriendt, Julien [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, The Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Rd., Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Ceverino, Daniel [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kereš, Dušan [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Hopkins, Philip F. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André [Department of Physics and Astronomy and CIERA, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We investigate angular momentum acquisition in Milky Way-sized galaxies by comparing five high resolution zoom-in simulations, each implementing identical cosmological initial conditions but utilizing different hydrodynamic codes: Enzo, Art, Ramses, Arepo, and Gizmo-PSPH. Each code implements a distinct set of feedback and star formation prescriptions. We find that while many galaxy and halo properties vary between the different codes (and feedback prescriptions), there is qualitative agreement on the process of angular momentum acquisition in the galaxy’s halo. In all simulations, cold filamentary gas accretion to the halo results in ∼4 times more specific angular momentum in cold halo gas ( λ {sub cold} ≳ 0.1) than in the dark matter halo. At z > 1, this inflow takes the form of inspiraling cold streams that are co-directional in the halo of the galaxy and are fueled, aligned, and kinematically connected to filamentary gas infall along the cosmic web. Due to the qualitative agreement among disparate simulations, we conclude that the buildup of high angular momentum halo gas and the presence of these inspiraling cold streams are robust predictions of Lambda Cold Dark Matter galaxy formation, though the detailed morphology of these streams is significantly less certain. A growing body of observational evidence suggests that this process is borne out in the real universe.

  7. 850-nm hybrid fiber/free-space optical communications using orbital angular momentum modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Tatarczak, Anna; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Light beams can carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) associated to the helicity of their phasefronts. These OAM modes can be employed to encode information onto a laser beam for transmitting not only in a fiber link but also in a free-space optical (FSO) one. Regarding this latter scenario, FSO c...

  8. Quantifying the impact of mergers on the angular momentum of simulated galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Bower, Richard G.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Padilla, Nelson D.; Obreschkow, Danail; Croton, Darren; Trayford, James W.; Welker, Charlotte; Theuns, Tom

    2018-02-01

    We use EAGLE to quantify the effect galaxy mergers have on the stellar specific angular momentum of galaxies, jstars. We split mergers into dry (gas-poor)/wet (gas-rich), major/minor and different spin alignments and orbital parameters. Wet (dry) mergers have an average neutral gas-to-stellar mass ratio of 1.1 (0.02), while major (minor) mergers are those with stellar mass ratios ≥0.3 (0.1-0.3). We correlate the positions of galaxies in the jstars-stellar mass plane at z = 0 with their merger history, and find that galaxies of low spins suffered dry mergers, while galaxies of normal/high spins suffered predominantly wet mergers, if any. The radial jstars profiles of galaxies that went through dry mergers are deficient by ≈0.3 dex at r ≲ 10 r50 (with r50 being the half-stellar mass radius), compared to galaxies that went through wet mergers. Studying the merger remnants reveals that dry mergers reduce jstars by ≈30 per cent, while wet mergers increase it by ≈10 per cent, on average. The latter is connected to the build-up of the bulge by newly formed stars of high rotational speed. Moving from minor to major mergers accentuates these effects. When the spin vectors of the galaxies prior to the dry merger are misaligned, jstars decreases by a greater magnitude, while in wet mergers corotation and high orbital angular momentum efficiently spun-up galaxies. We predict what would be the observational signatures in the jstars profiles driven by dry mergers: (i) shallow radial profiles and (ii) profiles that rise beyond ≈10 r50, both of which are significantly different from spiral galaxies.

  9. Polarization of molecular angular momentum in the chemical reactions Li + HF and F + HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Mikhail B.; Popov, Ruslan S.; Roncero, Octavio; De Fazio, Dario; Cavalli, Simonetta; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2013-06-01

    The quantum mechanical approach to vector correlation of angular momentum orientation and alignment in chemical reactions [G. Balint-Kurti and O. S. Vasyutinskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 14281 (2009)], 10.1021/jp902796v is applied to the molecular reagents and products of the Li + HF [L. Gonzalez-Sanchez, O. S. Vasyutinskii, A. Zanchet, C. Sanz-Sanz, and O. Roncero, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13656 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02452j and F + HD [D. De Fazio, J. Lucas, V. Aquilanti, and S. Cavalli, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 8571 (2011)], 10.1039/c0cp02738c reactions for which accurate scattering information has become recently available through time-dependent and time-independent approaches. Application of the theory to two important particular cases of the reactive collisions has been considered: (i) the influence of the angular momentum polarization of reactants in the entrance channel on the spatial distribution of the products in the exit channel and (ii) angular momentum polarization of the products of the reaction between unpolarized reactants. In the former case, the role of the angular momentum alignment of the reactants is shown to be large, particularly when the angular momentum is perpendicular to the reaction scattering plane. In the latter case, the orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum was found to be significant and strongly dependent on the scattering angle. The calculation also reveals significant differences between the vector correlation properties of the two reactions under study which are due to difference in the reaction mechanisms. In the case of F + HD reaction, the branching ratio between HF and DF production points out interest in the insight gained into the detailed dynamics, when information is available either from exact quantum mechanical calculations or from especially designed experiments. Also, the geometrical arrangement for the experimental determination of the product angular momentum orientation and alignment based

  10. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  11. A program to evaluate closed diagrams algebraically for angular momentum coupled product operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B.D.; Wong, S.S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The many particle trace of a product operator, expressed in terms of angular-momentum coupled spherical tensor creation and annihilation operators, can be evaluated as the sum of the different ways or diagrams to contract all the single particle operators. In the coupled representation, the process of contraction involves recouplings of angular momenta and this can be tedious. The program is constructed to perform algebraically the contractions and the associated angular momentum recouplings. The output are (algebraic) expressions which can be used either as analytical results or as input to a separate program, CONTRACTION-COMPILER, constructed to write a Fortran code to carry out the numerical calculations. The primary motivation of the project is derived from the need of scalar and configuration traces in nuclear structure problems using spectral distribution methods. (orig./HSI)

  12. Galaxy spin as a formation probe: the stellar-to-halo specific angular momentum relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posti, Lorenzo; Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo; Di Teodoro, Enrico M.

    2018-03-01

    We derive the stellar-to-halo specific angular momentum relation (SHSAMR) of galaxies at z = 0 by combining (i) the standard Λcold dark matter tidal torque theory, (ii) the observed relation between stellar mass and specific angular momentum (the Fall relation), and (iii) various determinations of the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR). We find that the ratio fj = j*/jh of the specific angular momentum of stars to that of the dark matter (i) varies with mass as a double power law, (ii) always has a peak in the mass range explored and iii) is three to five times larger for spirals than for ellipticals. The results have some dependence on the adopted SHMR and we provide fitting formulae in each case. For any choice of the SHMR, the peak of fj occurs at the same mass where the stellar-to-halo mass ratio f* = M*/Mh has a maximum. This is mostly driven by the straightness and tightness of the Fall relation, which requires fj and f* to be correlated with each other roughly as f_j∝ f_\\ast ^{2/3}, as expected if the outer and more angular momentum rich parts of a halo failed to accrete on to the central galaxy and form stars (biased collapse). We also confirm that the difference in the angular momentum of spirals and ellipticals at a given mass is too large to be ascribed only to different spins of the parent dark-matter haloes (spin bias).

  13. Optical spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in ultra-thin metasurfaces with arbitrary topological charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; De Leon, Israel; Schulz, Sebastian A.; Upham, Jeremy; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum associated with the helical phase-front of optical beams provides an unbounded “space” for both classical and quantum communications. Among the different approaches to generate and manipulate orbital angular momentum states of light, coupling between spin and orbital angular momentum allows a faster manipulation of orbital angular momentum states because it depends on manipulating the polarisation state of light, which is simpler and generally faster than manipulating conventional orbital angular momentum generators. In this work, we design and fabricate an ultra-thin spin-to-orbital angular momentum converter, based on plasmonic nano-antennas and operating in the visible wavelength range that is capable of converting spin to an arbitrary value of orbital angular momentum ℓ. The nano-antennas are arranged in an array with a well-defined geometry in the transverse plane of the beam, possessing a specific integer or half-integer topological charge q. When a circularly polarised light beam traverses this metasurface, the output beam polarisation switches handedness and the orbital angular momentum changes in value by ℓ=±2qℏ per photon. We experimentally demonstrate ℓ values ranging from ±1 to ±25 with conversion efficiencies of 8.6% ± 0.4%. Our ultra-thin devices are integratable and thus suitable for applications in quantum communications, quantum computations, and nano-scale sensing.

  14. Force, torque, linear momentum, and angular momentum in classical electr odynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-10-01

    The classical theory of electrodynamics is built upon Maxwell's equations and the concepts of electromagnetic (EM) field, force, energy, and momentum, which are intimately tied together by Poynting's theorem and by the Lorentz force law. Whereas Maxwell's equations relate the fields to their material sources, Poynting's theorem governs the flow of EM energy and its exchange between fields and material media, while the Lorentz law regulates the back-and-forth transfer of momentum between the media and the fields. An alternative force law, first proposed by Einstein and Laub, exists that is consistent with Maxwell's equations and complies with the conservation laws as well as with the requirements of special relativity. While the Lorentz law requires the introduction of hidden energy and hidden momentum in situations where an electric field acts on a magnetized medium, the Einstein-Laub (E-L) formulation of EM force and torque does not invoke hidden entities under such circumstances. Moreover, total force/torque exerted by EM fields on any given object turns out to be independent of whether the density of force/torque is evaluated using the law of Lorentz or that of Einstein and Laub. Hidden entities aside, the two formulations differ only in their predicted force and torque distributions inside matter. Such differences in distribution are occasionally measurable, and could serve as a guide in deciding which formulation, if either, corresponds to physical reality.

  15. Mechanically Reconfigurable Single-Arm Spiral Antenna Array for Generation of Broadband Circularly Polarized Orbital Angular Momentum Vortex Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Zhou, Xiaoxiao

    2018-03-23

    In this paper, a mechanically reconfigurable circular array with single-arm spiral antennas (SASAs) is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate broadband circularly polarized orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex waves in radio frequency domain. With the symmetrical and broadband properties of single-arm spiral antennas, the vortex waves with different OAM modes can be mechanically reconfigurable generated in a wide band from 3.4 GHz to 4.7 GHz. The prototype of the circular array is proposed, conducted, and fabricated to validate the theoretical analysis. The simulated and experimental results verify that different OAM modes can be effectively generated by rotating the spiral arms of single-arm spiral antennas with corresponding degrees, which greatly simplify the feeding network. The proposed method paves a reconfigurable way to generate multiple OAM vortex waves with spin angular momentum (SAM) in radio and microwave satellite communication applications.

  16. Study of the angular momentum distribution of compound nuclei obtained from fusion reactions close to the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romain, P.

    1990-03-01

    The effect of the mass asymmetry of the input channel on the compound nuclei spin distribution. The 16 O + 144 Nd and 80 Se + 80 Se reactions produce the same 160 Er compound nucleus in the 38 to 68 MeV energy range. In certain cases, the incident energies required to form the compound nucleus, at the same excitation energies, are very close to the Coulomb barrier. In the experimental device, the 'Chateau de Cristal' multidetector and additional sensors are used. The angular momentum distribution of the different evaporation products are measured by gamma spectrometry techniques. The fusion cross sections are measured by the time-of-flight technique. Theoretical predictions and experimental results concerning the distribution of the compound nucleus angular momentum are compared [fr

  17. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the transportation by the relative and planetary vorticity components exceeds the generation due to stretching. The effective balancing mechanism is provided by vorticity generation due to sub-grid scale processes. The flux convergence of omega and relative momenta over the monsoon domain is effectively balanced by ...

  18. Differences in whole-body angular momentum between below-knee amputees and non-amputees across walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, A K; Neptune, R R

    2011-02-03

    Unilateral, below-knee amputees have an increased risk of falling compared to non-amputees. The regulation of whole-body angular momentum is important for preventing falls, but little is known about how amputees regulate angular momentum during walking. This study analyzed three-dimensional, whole-body angular momentum at four walking speeds in 12 amputees and 10 non-amputees. The range of angular momentum in all planes significantly decreased with increasing walking speed for both groups. However, the range of frontal-plane angular momentum was greater in amputees compared to non-amputees at the first three walking speeds. This range was correlated with a reduced second vertical ground reaction force peak in both the intact and residual legs. In the sagittal plane, the amputee range of angular momentum in the first half of the residual leg gait cycle was significantly larger than in the non-amputees at the three highest speeds. In the second half of the gait cycle, the range of sagittal-plane angular momentum was significantly smaller in amputees compared to the non-amputees at all speeds. Correlation analyses suggested that the greater range of angular momentum in the first half of the amputee gait cycle is associated with reduced residual leg braking and that the smaller range of angular momentum in the second half of the gait cycle is associated with reduced residual leg propulsion. Thus, reducing residual leg braking appears to be a compensatory mechanism to help regulate sagittal-plane angular momentum over the gait cycle, but may lead to an increased risk of falling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Light-quarkonium spectra and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition in a Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A. [University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Institute of Physics, Graz (Austria); Gomez-Rocha, M. [ECT*, Villazzano, Trento (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    We investigate the light-quarkonium spectrum using a covariant Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach to QCD. We discuss splittings among as well as orbital angular momentum properties of various states in detail and analyze common features of mass splittings with regard to properties of the effective interaction. In particular, we predict the mass of anti ss exotic 1{sup -+} states, and identify orbital angular momentum content in the excitations of the ρ meson. Comparing our covariant model results, the ρ and its second excitation being predominantly S-wave, the first excitation being predominantly D-wave, to corresponding conflicting lattice-QCD studies, we investigate the pion-mass dependence of the orbital-angular-momentum assignment and find a crossing at a scale of m{sub π} ∝ 1.4 GeV. If this crossing turns out to be a feature of the spectrum generated by lattice-QCD studies as well, it may reconcile the different results, since they have been obtained at different values of m{sub π}. (orig.)

  20. Wigner functions for the pair angle and orbital angular momentum. Possible applications in quantum information theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastrup, H.A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2017-10-17

    The framework of Wigner functions for the canonical pair angle and orbital angular momentum, derived and analyzed in 2 recent papers [H. A. Kastrup, Phys. Rev. A 94, 062113(2016) and Phys. Rev. A 95, 052111(2017)], is applied to elementary concepts of quantum information like qubits and 2-qubits, e.g., entangled EPR/Bell states etc. Properties of the associated Wigner functions are discussed and illustrated. The results may be useful for quantum information experiments with orbital angular momenta of light beams or electron beams.

  1. Passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Chen, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    Based on the orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation, we present a novel passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) scheme with the two-mode source. Combining with the tight bounds of the yield and error rate of single-photon pairs given in our paper, we conduct performance analysis on the scheme with heralded single-photon source. The numerical simulations show that the performance of our scheme is significantly superior to the traditional MDI-QKD in the error rate, key generation rate and secure transmission distance, since the application of orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation can exclude the basis-dependent flaw and increase the information content for each single photon. Moreover, the performance is improved with the rise of the frame length. Therefore, our scheme, without intensity modulation, avoids the source side channels and enhances the key generation rate. It has greatly utility value in the MDI-QKD setups.

  2. The paradoxical role played by the angular momentum conservation in magnetization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrowe, Jean-Eric; Drouhin, Henri-Jean

    2011-10-01

    The intimate relation between the angular momentum and the magnetization - expressed through the gyromagnetic relation - is well known and is easy to evidenced at the macroscopic scale with magnetomechanical measurements. On the other hand, the conservation of the angular momentum find also a simple illustration in the behavior of a spinning top. Accordingly, the dynamics of a single domain ferromagnet should follow the same laws as a symmetrical spinning top. Paradoxically, this is not true since the equations that govern the dynamics of the magnetization do not contain inertial terms. We investigate under what conditions the inertial terms that are initially present in the conservation laws disappear, in order to lead to the well-known expressions of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation

  3. Transverse characterization of focused Bessel beams with angular momentum applied to study degree of coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xi; Wu, Fengtie; Chen, Ziyang; Pu, Jixiong; Chavez-Cerda, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    The transverse focusing properties at the ‘pseudo-focal’ plane of coherent Bessel beams with angular momentum are analyzed in detail. The transverse magnification of the central dark region of Bessel beams at this pseudo-focal plane is derived for the first time by calculating the ratio of the magnitude of the transverse components of the corresponding wave vectors before and after the focusing lens. We test our results experimentally with coherent laser Bessel beams and excellent agreement is observed. Then, an LED light source is used to generate Bessel beams. By modifying the coherence of the LED light source, we observe that by reducing coherence a smaller and shallower central dark region of Bessel beams with angular momentum is produced at the pseudo-focal plane. This technique can be used as a method to characterize the degree of coherence of vortex beams. (paper)

  4. Compensation for the orbital angular momentum of a vortex beam in turbulent atmosphere by adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chu, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Pengfei; Feng, Xiaoxing; Fan, ChengYu; Qiao, Chunhong

    2018-01-01

    A method which can be used to compensate for a distorted orbital angular momentum and wavefront of a beam in atmospheric turbulence, simultaneously, has been proposed. To confirm the validity of the method, an experimental setup for up-link propagation of a vortex beam in a turbulent atmosphere has been simulated. Simulation results show that both of the distorted orbital angular momentum and the distorted wavefront of a beam due to turbulence can be compensated by an adaptive optics system with the help of a cooperative beacon at satellite. However, when the number of the lenslet of wavefront sensor (WFS) and the actuators of the deform mirror (DM) is small, satisfactory results cannot be obtained.

  5. Role of photonic angular momentum states in nonreciprocal diffraction from magneto-optical cylinder arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Jing Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical eigenstates in a concentrically symmetric resonator are photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs with quantized optical orbital angular momentums (OAMs. Nonreciprocal optical phenomena can be obtained if we lift the degeneracy of PAMSs. In this article, we provide a comprehensive study of nonreciprocal optical diffraction of various orders from a magneto-optical cylinder array. We show that nonreciprocal diffraction can be obtained only for these nonzero orders. Role of PAMSs, the excitation of which is sensitive to the directions of incidence, applied magnetic field, and arrangement of the cylinders, are studied. Some interesting phenomena such as a dispersionless quasi-omnidirectional nonreciprocal diffraction and spikes associated with high-OAM PAMSs are present and discussed.

  6. The Gauge-Invariant Angular Momentum Sum-Rule for the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    We give a gauge-invariant treatment of the angular momentum sum-rule for the proton in terms of matrix elements of three gauge-invariant, local composite operators. These matrix elements are decomposed into three independent form factors, one of which is the flavour singlet axial charge. We further show that the axial charge cancels out of the sum-rule, so that it is unaffacted by the axial anomaly. The three form factors are then related to the four proton spin components in the parton model, namely quark and gluon intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum. The renormalisation of the three operators is determined to one loop from which the scale dependence and mixing of the spin components is derived under the constraint that the quark spin be scale-independent. We also show how the three form factors can be measured in experiments.

  7. Design and verification of monopole patch antenna systems to generate orbital angular momentum waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dandan Liu; Liangqi Gui; Cong Zhou; Zixiao Zhang; Han Chen; Tao Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Monopole patch antenna systems, which can generate orbital angular momentum (OAM) waves at 2.4GHz, are proposed in this paper. The proposed antenna systems have advantages of simple planar structure and small size of antenna element. Design, simulation, fabrication and measurement of the proposed antenna systems are presented. Two feeding networks, which constitute the proposed antenna systems with monopole patch antenna array, are designed to generate modes 1 and 2 of OAM waves. The antenna ...

  8. Comparison of length of day with oceanic and atmospheric angular momentum series

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, J.; Vondrák, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 79, 4-5 (2005), s.256-268 ISSN 0949-7714 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003205; GA MŠk LC506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Earth rotation * length of day * atmospheric angular momentum Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.205, year: 2005

  9. Continuity and Stability of families of figure eight orbits with finite angular momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for a family of three dimensional periodic orbits with three equal masses which connects the classical circular orbit of Lagrange with the figure eight orbit discovered by C. Moore [ Moore, C.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3675 - 3679 ( 1993); Chenciner, A., Montgomery, R.: Ann. Math. 152, 881 - 901 ( 2000)]. Each member of this family is an orbit with finite angular momentum that is periodic in a frame which rotates with frequency Omega aroun...

  10. The angular momentum of cosmological coronae and the inside-out growth of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Fraternali, Filippo; Binney, James

    2017-05-01

    Massive and diffuse haloes of hot gas (coronae) are important intermediaries between cosmology and galaxy evolution, storing mass and angular momentum acquired from the cosmic web until eventual accretion on to star-forming discs. We introduce a method to reconstruct the rotation of a galactic corona, based on its angular momentum distribution (AMD). This allows us to investigate in what conditions the angular momentum acquired from tidal torques can be transferred to star-forming discs and explain observed galaxy-scale processes, such as inside-out growth and the build-up of abundance gradients. We find that a simple model of an isothermal corona with a temperature slightly smaller than virial and a cosmologically motivated AMD is in good agreement with galaxy evolution requirements, supporting hot-mode accretion as a viable driver for the evolution of spiral galaxies in a cosmological context. We predict moderately sub-centrifugal rotation close to the disc and slow rotation close to the virial radius. Motivated by the observation that the Milky Way has a relatively hot corona (T ≃ 2 × 106 K), we also explore models with a temperature larger than virial. To be able to drive inside-out growth, these models must be significantly affected by feedback, either mechanical (ejection of low angular momentum material) or thermal (heating of the central regions). However, the agreement with galaxy evolution constraints becomes, in these cases, only marginal, suggesting that our first and simpler model may apply to a larger fraction of galaxy evolution history.

  11. Relating terrestrial atmospheric circulation to solar disturbances. [angular momentum transfer from ionosphere to tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, C. O.

    1974-01-01

    Presented are models of two proposed mechanisms for transferring angular momentum from ionospheric heights to the vicinity of the tropopause. The first mechanism consist of a vicious coupling of the upper atmosphere to the troposphere and the second requires changes in the reflection of planetary waves by the thermosphere. This second mechanism is very appealing because it makes use only of energy derived from the lower atmosphere itself, with solar activity directly modifying only the thermospheric reflectivity.

  12. Fast vortex oscillations in a ferrimagnetic disk near the angular momentum compensation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the oscillatory dynamics of a vortex core in a ferrimagnetic disk near its angular momentum compensation point, where the spin density vanishes but the magnetization is finite. Due to the finite magnetostatic energy, a ferrimagnetic disk of suitable geometry can support a vortex as a ground state similar to a ferromagnetic disk. In the vicinity of the angular momentum compensation point, the dynamics of the vortex resemble those of an antiferromagnetic vortex, which is described by equations of motion analogous to Newton's second law for the motion of particles. Owing to the antiferromagnetic nature of the dynamics, the vortex oscillation frequency can be an order of magnitude larger than the frequency of a ferromagnetic vortex, amounting to tens of GHz in common transition-metal based alloys. We show that the frequency can be controlled either by applying an external field or by changing the temperature. In particular, the latter property allows us to detect the angular momentum compensation temperature, at which the lowest eigenfrequency attains its maximum, by performing ferromagnetic resonance measurements on the vortex disk. Our work proposes a ferrimagnetic vortex disk as a tunable source of fast magnetic oscillations and a useful platform to study the properties of ferrimagnets.

  13. Angular Momentum Evolution of Solar-type Stars and Implications for Gyrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terndrup, Donald M.; Somers, Garrett; Tayar, Jamie; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the assembly history and rate of chemical enrichment in the Milky Way requires accurate ages for vast numbers of stars. Standard age-dating techniques have significant degeneracies and other limitations, and in any case are mostly limited to the tiny minority of stars in bound clusters.Data from the Kepler and K2 surveys, along with ground-based studies, show that stellar rotation rates could potentially be exploited to determine ages of field stars since rotation declines with age; this method is called gyrochronology. Several groups have advocated a purely empirical gyrochronology, essentially fitting simple mathematical expressions to rotation/age data, but here we argue that the power of rotation studies lies in their use for calibrating (or rejecting) proposed physical mechanisms for internal angular momentum transport and angular momentum loss through magnetized winds.We will review the available data and discuss several important selection biases, and will present the results of a detailed Bayesian modeling exercise to show how well a gyrochronology might work in the most favorable cases. We will also discuss whether evidence for saturation of wind loss or of internal angular momentum transfer is properly justified in a statistical sense.

  14. Angular momentum distribution during the collapse of primordial star-forming clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that angular momentum is distributed during the gravitational collapse of the primordial star forming cloud. However, so far there has been little understanding of the exact details of the distribution. We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulation, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. We find that, despite the lack of any initial turbulence and magnetic fields in the clouds the angular momentum profile follows the same characteristic power-law that has been reported in studies that employed fully self-consistent cosmological initial conditions. The fit of the power-law appears to be roughly constant regardless of the initial rotation of the cloud. We conclude that the specific angular momentum of the self-gravitating rotating gas in the primordial minihalos maintains a scaling relation with the gas mass as L ∝ M^{1.125}. We also discuss the plausible mechanisms for the power-law distribution.

  15. Creating an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum from a giant impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Bryant M.; Petz, Jonathan M.; Sumpter, William J.; Turner, Ty R.; Smith, Edward L.; Fain, Baylor G.; Hutyra, Taylor J.; Cook, Scott A.; Gresham, John H.; Hibbs, Michael F.; Goderya, Shaukat N.

    2018-04-01

    The giant impact hypothesis is the dominant theory explaining the formation of our Moon. However, the inability to produce an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum has cast a shadow on its validity. Computer-generated impacts have been successful in producing virtual systems that possess many of the observed physical properties. However, addressing the isotopic similarities between the Earth and Moon coupled with correct angular momentum has proven to be challenging. Equilibration and evection resonance have been proposed as means of reconciling the models. In the summer of 2013, the Royal Society called a meeting solely to discuss the formation of the Moon. In this meeting, evection resonance and equilibration were both questioned as viable means of removing the deficiencies from giant impact models. The main concerns were that models were multi-staged and too complex. We present here initial impact conditions that produce an isotopically similar Earth-Moon system with correct angular momentum. This is done in a single-staged simulation. The initial parameters are straightforward and the results evolve solely from the impact. This was accomplished by colliding two roughly half-Earth-sized impactors, rotating in approximately the same plane in a high-energy, off-centered impact, where both impactors spin into the collision.

  16. Angular momentum-induced delays in solid-state photoemission enhanced by intra-atomic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, Fabian; Neb, Sergej; Bartz, Peter; Hensen, Matthias; Strüber, Christian; Fiechter, Sebastian; Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Silkin, Vyacheslav M; Krasovskii, Eugene E; Kabachnik, Nikolay M; Fritzsche, Stephan; Muiño, Ricardo Díez; Echenique, Pedro M; Kazansky, Andrey K; Müller, Norbert; Pfeiffer, Walter; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    2017-09-22

    Attosecond time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy reveals that photoemission from solids is not yet fully understood. The relative emission delays between four photoemission channels measured for the van der Waals crystal tungsten diselenide (WSe 2 ) can only be explained by accounting for both propagation and intra-atomic delays. The intra-atomic delay depends on the angular momentum of the initial localized state and is determined by intra-atomic interactions. For the studied case of WSe 2 , the photoemission events are time ordered with rising initial-state angular momentum. Including intra-atomic electron-electron interaction and angular momentum of the initial localized state yields excellent agreement between theory and experiment. This has required a revision of existing models for solid-state photoemission, and thus, attosecond time-resolved photoemission from solids provides important benchmarks for improved future photoemission models. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  17. SELF-GRAVITY AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT IN EXTENDED GALACTIC DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, C. P.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a significant difference in the angular momentum transport properties of galactic disks between regions in which the interstellar medium is single phase or two phase. Our study is motivated by observations of H I in extended galactic disks which indicate velocity dispersions of nonthermal origin, suggesting that turbulence in the gas may be contributing significantly to the observed dispersion. To address this, we have implemented a shearing-box framework within the FLASH code. The new code was used to perform local simulations of galactic disks that incorporate differential rotation, self-gravity, vertical stratification, hydrodynamics, and cooling. These simulations explore plausible mechanisms for driving turbulent motions via the thermal and self-gravitational instabilities coupling to differential rotation. Where a two-phase medium develops, gravitational angular momentum transporting stresses are much greater, creating a possible mechanism for transferring energy from galactic rotation to turbulence. In simulations where the disk conditions do not trigger the formation of a two-phase medium, it is found that perturbations to the flow damp without leading to a sustained mechanism for driving turbulence. The differing angular momentum transport properties of the single- and two-phase regimes of the disk suggest that a significant, dynamically motivated division can be drawn between the two, even when this division occurs far outside the star formation cutoff in a galactic disk.

  18. Measurement of 240Pu Angular Momentum Dependent Fission Probabilities Using the (α ,α') Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Fisher, Scott; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-09-01

    The surrogate reaction method often lacks the theoretical framework and necessary experimental data to constrain models especially when rectifying differences between angular momentum state differences between the desired and surrogate reaction. In this work, dual arrays of silicon telescope particle identification detectors and photovoltaic (solar) cell fission fragment detectors have been used to measure the fission probability of the 240Pu(α ,α' f) reaction - a surrogate for the 239Pu(n , f) - and fission fragment angular distributions. Fission probability measurements were performed at a beam energy of 35.9(2) MeV at eleven scattering angles from 40° to 140°e in 10° intervals and at nuclear excitation energies up to 16 MeV. Fission fragment angular distributions were measured in six bins from 4.5 MeV to 8.0 MeV and fit to expected distributions dependent on the vibrational and rotational excitations at the saddle point. In this way, the contributions to the total fission probability from specific states of K angular momentum projection on the symmetry axis are extracted. A sizable data collection is presented to be considered when constraining microscopic cross section calculations.

  19. Control of Rotational Energy and Angular Momentum Orientation with an Optical Centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Hannah M.; Murray, Matthew J.; Mullin, Amy S.

    2017-04-01

    We use an optical centrifuge to trap and spin molecules to an angular frequency of 30 THz with oriented angular momenta and extremely high rotational energy and then investigate their subsequent collision dynamics with transient high resolution IR spectroscopy. The optical centrifuge is formed by combining oppositely-chirped pulses of 800 nm light, and overlapping them spatially and temporally. Polarization-sensitive Doppler-broadened line profiles characterize the anisotropic kinetic energy release of the super rotor molecules, showing that they behave like molecular gyroscopes. Studies are reported for collisions of CO2 super rotors with CO2, He and Ar. These studies reveal how mass, velocity and rotational adiabaticity impact the angular momentum relaxation and reorientation. Quantum scattering calculations provide insight into the J-specific collision cross sections that control the relaxation. NSF-CHE 105 8721.

  20. Evolution of close binaries under the assumption that they lose angular momentum by a magnetic stellar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraicheva, Z.T.; Tutukov, A.V.; Yungel'son, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is proposed for describing the evolution of semidetached close binaries whose secondary components have degenerated helium cores and lose orbital angular momentum by a magnetic stellar wind. The results of calculations are used to estimate the initial parameters of a series of low-mass (M 1 + M 2 ≤ 5M.) systems of Algol type under the two assumptions of conservative and nonconservative evolution with respect to the orbital angular momentum. Only the assumption that the systems with secondary components possessing convective shells lose angular momentum makes it possible to reproduce their initial parameters without contradiction

  1. Photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules: Production, detection, and rotational depolarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Suits, Arthur G.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We describe the product polarization in the photolysis of symmetric top molecules. ► The polarization is written in terms of the anisotropy transforming coefficients. ► We studied the role of the angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation. ► We present a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal. - Abstract: We present the fully quantum mechanical distribution of the photofragment angular momentum polarization in the photolysis of an isotropic ensemble of symmetric top molecules. The distribution is written in terms of the recently established anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K (P.S. Shternin, O.S. Vasyutinskii, Chem. Phys. 128 (2008) 194314) which contain all dynamical information on the photolysis dynamics and can be either determined from experiment, or calculated from theory. Explicit expressions for the coefficients c k d q k K for the case of photolysis of symmetric top molecules were obtained within the full quantum mechanical approach and then simplified using the quasiclassical approximation in the high-J limit. The role of the photofragment angular momentum depolarization due to molecular rotation was analyzed for three important particular cases: photolysis of diatomic molecules, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of atomic photofragments are detected, photolysis of symmetric top molecules when the angular momentum polarization of molecular photofragments are detected. The obtained rotation factors were compared with the results of previous studies. The paper also presents a compact spherical tensor expression for the 2 + 1 REMPI absorption signal which can be used for direct determination of the coefficients c k d q k K from experiment. A comparison was made between the anisotropy transforming coefficients c k d q k K and the polarization parameters A q K introduced very recently by (T.P. Rakitzis, A.J. Alexander, J. Chem. Phys

  2. The Orbital Angular Momentum Modes Supporting Fibers Based on the Photonic Crystal Fiber Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The orbital angular momentum (OAM of light can be another physical dimension that we exploit to make multiplexing in the spatial domain. The design of the OAM mode supporting fiber attracts many attentions in the field of the space division multiplexing (SDM system. This paper reviews the recent progresses in photonic crystal fiber (PCF supporting OAM modes, and summarizes why a PCF structure can be used to support stable OAM transmission modes. The emphasis is on the circular PCFs, which possess many excellent features of transmission performance, such as good-quality OAM modes, enough separation of the effective indices, low confinement loss, flat dispersion, a large effective area, and a low nonlinear coefficient. We also compare the transmission properties between the circular PCF and the ring core fiber, as well as the properties between the OAM EDFA based on circular PCF and the OAM EDFA based on the ring core fiber. At last, the challenges and prospects of OAM fibers based on the PCF structure are also discussed.

  3. Orbital Angular Momentum-based Space Division Multiplexing for High-capacity Underwater Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Li, Long; Wang, Zhe; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Ehsan; Arbabi, Amir; Zhao, Zhe; Xie, Guodong; Cao, Yinwen; Ahmed, Nisar; Yan, Yan; Liu, Cong; Willner, Asher J.; Ashrafi, Solyman; Tur, Moshe; Faraon, Andrei; Willner, Alan E.

    2016-09-01

    To increase system capacity of underwater optical communications, we employ the spatial domain to simultaneously transmit multiple orthogonal spatial beams, each carrying an independent data channel. In this paper, we show up to a 40-Gbit/s link by multiplexing and transmitting four green orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams through a single aperture. Moreover, we investigate the degrading effects of scattering/turbidity, water current, and thermal gradient-induced turbulence, and we find that thermal gradients cause the most distortions and turbidity causes the most loss. We show systems results using two different data generation techniques, one at 1064 nm for 10-Gbit/s/beam and one at 520 nm for 1-Gbit/s/beam; we use both techniques since present data-modulation technologies are faster for infrared (IR) than for green. For the 40-Gbit/s link, data is modulated in the IR, and OAM imprinting is performed in the green using a specially-designed metasurface phase mask. For the 4-Gbit/s link, a green laser diode is directly modulated. Finally, we show that inter-channel crosstalk induced by thermal gradients can be mitigated using multi-channel equalisation processing.

  4. Orbital Angular Momentum-based Space Division Multiplexing for High-capacity Underwater Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Li, Long; Wang, Zhe; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Arbabi, Ehsan; Arbabi, Amir; Zhao, Zhe; Xie, Guodong; Cao, Yinwen; Ahmed, Nisar; Yan, Yan; Liu, Cong; Willner, Asher J.; Ashrafi, Solyman; Tur, Moshe; Faraon, Andrei; Willner, Alan E.

    2016-01-01

    To increase system capacity of underwater optical communications, we employ the spatial domain to simultaneously transmit multiple orthogonal spatial beams, each carrying an independent data channel. In this paper, we show up to a 40-Gbit/s link by multiplexing and transmitting four green orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams through a single aperture. Moreover, we investigate the degrading effects of scattering/turbidity, water current, and thermal gradient-induced turbulence, and we find that thermal gradients cause the most distortions and turbidity causes the most loss. We show systems results using two different data generation techniques, one at 1064 nm for 10-Gbit/s/beam and one at 520 nm for 1-Gbit/s/beam; we use both techniques since present data-modulation technologies are faster for infrared (IR) than for green. For the 40-Gbit/s link, data is modulated in the IR, and OAM imprinting is performed in the green using a specially-designed metasurface phase mask. For the 4-Gbit/s link, a green laser diode is directly modulated. Finally, we show that inter-channel crosstalk induced by thermal gradients can be mitigated using multi-channel equalisation processing. PMID:27615808

  5. Angular Momentum Transfer and Fractional Moment of Inertia in Pulsar Glitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eya, I. O.; Urama, J. O.; Chukwude, A. E., E-mail: innocent.eya@unn.edu.ng, E-mail: innocent.eya@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State (Nigeria)

    2017-05-01

    We use the Jodrell Bank Observatory glitch database containing 472 glitches from 165 pulsars to investigate the angular momentum transfer during rotational glitches in pulsars. Our emphasis is on pulsars with at least five glitches, of which there are 26 that exhibit 261 glitches in total. This paper identifies four pulsars in which the angular momentum transfer, after many glitches, is almost linear with time. The Lilliefore test on the cumulative distribution of glitch spin-up sizes in these glitching pulsars shows that glitch sizes in 12 pulsars are normally distributed, suggesting that their glitches originate from the same momentum reservoir. In addition, the distribution of the fractional moment of inertia (i.e., the ratio of the moment of inertia of neutron star components that are involved in the glitch process) have a single mode, unlike the distribution of fractional glitch size (Δ ν / ν ), which is usually bimodal. The mean fractional moment of inertia in the glitching pulsars we sampled has a very weak correlation with the pulsar spin properties, thereby supporting a neutron star interior mechanism for the glitch phenomenon.

  6. Momentum-Space Josephson Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junpeng; Luo, Xi-Wang; Sun, Kuei; Bersano, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Mossman, Sean; Engels, Peter; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2018-03-01

    The Josephson effect is a prominent phenomenon of quantum supercurrents that has been widely studied in superconductors and superfluids. Typical Josephson junctions consist of two real-space superconductors (superfluids) coupled through a weak tunneling barrier. Here we propose a momentum-space Josephson junction in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate, where states with two different momenta are coupled through Raman-assisted tunneling. We show that Josephson currents can be induced not only by applying the equivalent of "voltages," but also by tuning tunneling phases. Such tunneling-phase-driven Josephson junctions in momentum space are characterized through both full mean field analysis and a concise two-level model, demonstrating the important role of interactions between atoms. Our scheme provides a platform for experimentally realizing momentum-space Josephson junctions and exploring their applications in quantum-mechanical circuits.

  7. Quantum numbers of the X state and orbital angular momentum in its rho(0)J/psi decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goeel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-01-01

    Angular correlations in B+ -> X(3872)K+ decays, with X(3872) -> rho(0)J/psi, rho(0) -> pi(+)pi(-) and J/psi -> pi(+)pi(-), are used to measure orbital angular momentum contributions and to determine the J(PC) value of the X(3872) meson. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1)

  8. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26 α and H30 α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30 α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26 α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30 α line. H26 α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30 α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R {sup −4}. In addition, the H30 α and H26 α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  9. Angular momentum, g-value, and magnetic flux of gyration states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1991-10-01

    Two of the world's leading (Nobel laureate) physicists disagree on the definition of the orbital angular momentum L of the Landau gyration states of a spinless charged particle in a uniform external magnetic field B = B i Z . According to Richard P. Feynman (and also Frank Wilczek) L = (rxμv) = rx(p - qA/c), while Felix Bloch (and also Kerson Huang) defines it as L = rxp. We show here that Bloch's definition is the correct one since it satisfies the necessary and sufficient condition LxL = iℎ L, while Feynman's definition does not. However, as a consequence of the quantized Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux, this canonical orbital angular momentum (surprisingly enough) takes half-odd-integral values with a zero-point gyration states of L Z = ℎ/2. Further, since the diamagnetic and the paramagnetic contributions to the magnetic moment are interdependent, the g-value of these gyration states is two and not one, again a surprising result for a spinless case. The differences between the gauge invariance in classical and quantum mechanics, Onsager's suggestion that the flux quantization might be an intrinsic property of the electromagnetic field-charged particle interaction, the possibility that the experimentally measured fundamental unit of the flux quantum need not necessarily imply the existence of ''electron pairing'' of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductivity theory, and the relationship to the Dirac's angular momentum quantization condition for the magnetic monopole-charged particle composites (i.e. Schwinger's dyons), are also briefly examined from a pedestrian viewpoint

  10. Chiral orbital-angular momentum in the surface states of Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Ryong; Han, Jinhee; Kim, Chul; Koh, Yoon Young; Kim, Changyoung; Lee, Hyungjun; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Han, Jung Hoon; Lee, Kyung Dong; Hur, Nam Jung; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2012-01-27

    We performed angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments with circularly polarized light and first-principles density functional calculation with spin-orbit coupling to study surface states of a topological insulator Bi2Se3. We observed circular dichroism (CD) as large as 30% in the ARPES data with upper and lower Dirac cones showing opposite signs in CD. The observed CD is attributed to the existence of local orbital-angular momentum (OAM). First-principles calculation shows that OAM in the surface states is significant and is locked to the electron momentum in the opposite direction to the spin, forming chiral OAM states. Our finding opens a new possibility for strong light-induced spin-polarized current in surface states. We also provide a proof for local OAM origin of the CD in ARPES.

  11. Selection rules for angular momentum transfer via impulsive stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) plays a key role in coherent control of low-energy rotational resonances. Femtosecond laser pulses are widely employed to utilize ISRS because they are broadband and can cover the needed frequencies in a single pulse. Here, we show theoretically that the ISRS process is expressed as a linear response to the instantaneous Stokes parameters (ISPs) of the laser pulse. These IPSs expressed in rotational coordinates are then shown to be responsible for the angular momentum transfer from light to matter. These relationships have led to the designs of spectral profiles and polarization states of light pulses that should selectively excite particular rotational modes.

  12. Optical vortex symmetry breakdown and decomposition of the orbital angular momentum of light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekshaev, A Ya; Soskin, M S; Vasnetsov, M V

    2003-08-01

    Two forms of the transverse energy circulation within plane-polarized paraxial light beams are specified: one inherent in wave-front singularities (optical vortices) and the other peculiar to astigmatism and asymmetry of beams with a smooth wave front. As quantitative measures of these energy flow components, the concepts of vortex and asymmetry parts of a beam's orbital angular momentum are introduced and their definitions are proposed on the basis of beam intensity moments. The properties and physical meaning of these concepts are analyzed, and their use for the study of transformations of optical vortices is demonstrated.

  13. The measurement of magnetic moments of nuclear states of high angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldring, G.

    1978-01-01

    Two problems related to the measurement of the g-factor of relevant nuclear levels and their circumvention are discussed: a) the very high magnetic fields required for the measurements, available only as a hyperfine field of electrons or other charged particles moving very close to the nucleus; b) the large angular momentum of those nuclear states. The nuclei considered are those recoiling from a nuclear reaction at high speeds in either vacuum or gas. The environment of these nuclei are the isolated ions with which they are associated. The hyperfine interaction with such ions is primarily magnetic. (B.G.)

  14. Tunable orbital angular momentum mode filter based on optical geometric transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Yan, Yan; Yue, Yang; Ahmed, Nisar; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Dolinar, Sam; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E

    2014-03-15

    We present a tunable mode filter for spatially multiplexed laser beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). The filter comprises an optical geometric transformation-based OAM mode sorter and a spatial light modulator (SLM). The programmable SLM can selectively control the passing/blocking of each input OAM beam. We experimentally demonstrate tunable filtering of one or multiple OAM modes from four multiplexed input OAM modes with vortex charge of ℓ=-9, -4, +4, and +9. The measured output power suppression ratio of the propagated modes to the blocked modes exceeds 14.5 dB.

  15. Proof of the positive energy theorem including the angular momentum contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingfei; Chee, G.Y.; Guo Yongxin

    2005-01-01

    A proof of the positive energy theorem of general relativity is given. In this proof the gravitational Lagrangian is identified with that of Lau and is equivalent to the teleparallel Lagrangian modulo, a boundary term. The approach adopted in this proof uses the two-spinor method and the extended Witten identities and then combines the Brown-York and the Nester-Witten approaches. At the same time the proof is extended to the case involving the contribution of angular momentum by choosing a special shift vector

  16. Multi-gigabit/s underwater optical communication link using orbital angular momentum multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Joshua; Miller, Keith; Morgan, Kaitlyn; Byrd, Matthew; Osler, Sean; Ragusa, Robert; Li, Wenzhe; Cochenour, Brandon M; Johnson, Eric G

    2016-05-02

    In this work we experimentally demonstrated an underwater wireless optical communications (UWOC) link over a 2.96 m distance with two 445-nm fiber-pigtailed laser diodes employing Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) to allow for spatial multiplexing. Using an on-off keying, non-return-to-zero (OOK-NRZ) modulation scheme, a data rate of 3 Gbit/s was achieved in water with an attenuation coefficient of 0.4128 m-1 at an average bit error rate (BER) of 2.073 × 10-4, well beneath the forward error correction (FEC) threshold.

  17. The (3He,α) reaction mechanism. A study of the angular momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bergholt, L.; Ingebretsen, F.; Loevhoeiden, G.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Tveter, T.S.; Helstrup, H.; Thorsteinsen, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    The γ-rays emitted after the 163 Dy( 3 He,αxn) reactions at E( 3 He) = 45 MeV have been measured. The transferred angular momentum in the reaction is deduced from the side-feeding γ-intensities of the ground bands in the residual 162-x Dy isotopes. With decreasing α-energy the average spin transfer increases from similar 5h to similar 11h. The ( 3 He,α) reaction at these energies is dominated by direct processes. Even at the highest spin transfer the contribution from the compound reaction channel is negligible. ((orig.))

  18. Orbital angular momentum modes by twisting of a hollow core antiresonant fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; Fleming, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Generation and use of orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is finding more and more interest in a wide variety of fields of photonics: communications, optical trapping, quantum optics, and many more [1]. In the investigation of such behavior, twisting of photonic crystal fibers shows interesting...... physical phenomena [2]. We previously reported the ability to create helical hollow fibers by mechanically twisting a tube lattice fiber made of polyurethane, the twist of which can be adjusted and reversed [3]. In this work we report how such deformation induces a mode transformation to an OAM mode...

  19. Fast domain wall motion in the vicinity of the angular momentum compensation temperature of ferrimagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Kim, Se Kwon; Hirata, Yuushou; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Tono, Takayuki; Kim, Duck-Ho; Okuno, Takaya; Ham, Woo Seung; Kim, Sanghoon; Go, Gyoungchoon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Tsukamoto, Arata; Moriyama, Takahiro; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2017-12-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging research field which aims to utilize antiferromagnets as core elements in spintronic devices. A central motivation towards this direction is that antiferromagnetic spin dynamics is expected to be much faster than its ferromagnetic counterpart. Recent theories indeed predicted faster dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls (DWs) than ferromagnetic DWs. However, experimental investigations of antiferromagnetic spin dynamics have remained unexplored, mainly because of the magnetic field immunity of antiferromagnets. Here we show that fast field-driven antiferromagnetic spin dynamics is realized in ferrimagnets at the angular momentum compensation point TA. Using rare earth-3d-transition metal ferrimagnetic compounds where net magnetic moment is nonzero at TA, the field-driven DW mobility is remarkably enhanced up to 20 km s-1 T-1. The collective coordinate approach generalized for ferrimagnets and atomistic spin model simulations show that this remarkable enhancement is a consequence of antiferromagnetic spin dynamics at TA. Our finding allows us to investigate the physics of antiferromagnetic spin dynamics and highlights the importance of tuning of the angular momentum compensation point of ferrimagnets, which could be a key towards ferrimagnetic spintronics.

  20. Relativistic low angular momentum accretion: long time evolution of hydrodynamical inviscid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Patryk; Piróg, Michał; Font, José A.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate relativistic low angular momentum accretion of inviscid perfect fluid onto a Schwarzschild black hole. The simulations are performed with a general-relativistic, high-resolution (second-order), shock-capturing, hydrodynamical numerical code. We use horizon-penetrating Eddington–Finkelstein coordinates to remove inaccuracies in regions of strong gravity near the black hole horizon and show the expected convergence of the code with the Michel solution and stationary Fishbone–Moncrief toroids. We recover, in the framework of relativistic hydrodynamics, the qualitative behavior known from previous Newtonian studies that used a Bondi background flow in a pseudo-relativistic gravitational potential with a latitude-dependent angular momentum at the outer boundary. Our models exhibit characteristic ‘turbulent’ behavior and the attained accretion rates are lower than those of the Bondi–Michel radial flow. For sufficiently low values of the asymptotic sound speed, geometrically thick tori form in the equatorial plane surrounding the black hole horizon while accretion takes place mainly through the poles.

  1. Nonlinear Metasurface for Simultaneous Control of Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum in Second Harmonic Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guixin; Wu, Lin; Li, King F; Chen, Shumei; Schlickriede, Christian; Xu, Zhengji; Huang, Siya; Li, Wendi; Liu, Yanjun; Pun, Edwin Y B; Zentgraf, Thomas; Cheah, Kok W; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-12-13

    The spin and orbital angular momentum (SAM and OAM) of light is providing a new gateway toward high capacity and robust optical communications. While the generation of light with angular momentum is well studied in linear optics, its further integration into nonlinear optical devices will open new avenues for increasing the capacity of optical communications through additional information channels at new frequencies. However, it has been challenging to manipulate the both SAM and OAM of nonlinear signals in harmonic generation processes with conventional nonlinear materials. Here, we report the generation of spin-controlled OAM of light in harmonic generations by using ultrathin photonic metasurfaces. The spin manipulation of OAM mode of harmonic waves is experimentally verified by using second harmonic generation (SHG) from gold meta-atom with 3-fold rotational symmetry. By introducing nonlinear phase singularity into the metasurface devices, we successfully generate and measure the topological charges of spin-controlled OAM mode of SHG through an on-chip metasurface interferometer. The nonlinear photonic metasurface proposed in this work not only opens new avenues for manipulating the OAM of nonlinear optical signals but also benefits the understanding of the nonlinear spin-orbit interaction of light in nanoscale devices.

  2. Structured caustic vector vortex optical field: manipulating optical angular momentum flux and polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chen, Zhaozhong; Chew, Khian-Hooi; Li, Pei-Gang; Yu, Zhongliang; Ding, Jianping; He, Sailing

    2015-05-29

    A caustic vector vortex optical field is experimentally generated and demonstrated by a caustic-based approach. The desired caustic with arbitrary acceleration trajectories, as well as the structured states of polarization (SoP) and vortex orders located in different positions in the field cross-section, is generated by imposing the corresponding spatial phase function in a vector vortex optical field. Our study reveals that different spin and orbital angular momentum flux distributions (including opposite directions) in different positions in the cross-section of a caustic vector vortex optical field can be dynamically managed during propagation by intentionally choosing the initial polarization and vortex topological charges, as a result of the modulation of the caustic phase. We find that the SoP in the field cross-section rotates during propagation due to the existence of the vortex. The unique structured feature of the caustic vector vortex optical field opens the possibility of multi-manipulation of optical angular momentum fluxes and SoP, leading to more complex manipulation of the optical field scenarios. Thus this approach further expands the functionality of an optical system.

  3. Exploring dissipative processes at high angular momentum in 58Ni+60Ni reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current coupled channels (CC models treat fusion as a coherent quantum-mechanical process, in which coupling between the collective states of the colliding nuclei influences the probability of fusion in near-barrier reactions. While CC models have been used to successfully describe many experimental fusion barrier distribution (BD measurements, the CC approach has failed in the notable case of 16O+208Pb. The reason for this is poorly understood; however, it has been postulated that dissipative processes may play a role. Traditional BD experiments can only probe the physics of fusion for collisions at the top of the Coulomb barrier (L = 0ħ. In this work, we will present results using a novel method of probing dissipative processes inside the Coulomb barrier. The method exploits the predicted sharp onset of fission at L ~ 60ħ for reactions forming compound nuclei with A < 160. Using the ANU’s 14UD tandem accelerator and CUBE spectrometer, reaction outcomes have been measured for the 58Ni+60Ni reaction at a range of energies, in order to explore dissipative processes at high angular momentum. In this reaction, deep inelastic processes have been found to set in before the onset fission at high angular momentum following fusion. The results will be discussed in relation to the need for a dynamical model of fusion.

  4. The total angular momentum algebra related to the S3 Dunkl Dirac equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bie, Hendrik; Oste, Roy; Van der Jeugt, Joris

    2018-02-01

    We consider the symmetry algebra generated by the total angular momentum operators, appearing as constants of motion of the S3 Dunkl Dirac equation. The latter is a deformation of the Dirac equation by means of Dunkl operators, in our case associated to the root system A2, with corresponding Weyl group S3, the symmetric group on three elements. The explicit form of the symmetry algebra in this case is a one-parameter deformation of the classical total angular momentum algebra so(3) , incorporating elements of S3. This was obtained using recent results on the symmetry algebra for a class of Dirac operators, containing in particular the Dirac-Dunkl operator for arbitrary root system. For this symmetry algebra, we classify all finite-dimensional, irreducible representations and determine the conditions for the representations to be unitarizable. The class of unitary irreducible representations admits a natural realization acting on a representation space of eigenfunctions of the Dirac Hamiltonian. Using a Cauchy-Kowalevski extension theorem we obtain explicit expressions for these eigenfunctions in terms of Jacobi polynomials.

  5. S0 galaxies are faded spirals: clues from their angular momentum content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Francesca; Fraternali, Filippo; Iorio, Giuliano

    2018-02-01

    The distribution of galaxies in the stellar specific angular momentum versus stellar mass plane (j⋆-M⋆) provides key insights into their formation mechanisms. In this paper, we determine the location in this plane of a sample of ten field/group unbarred lenticular (S0) galaxies from the CALIFA survey. We performed a bulge-disc decomposition both photometrically and kinematically to study the stellar specific angular momentum of the disc components alone and understand the evolutionary links between S0s and other Hubble types. We found that eight of our S0 discs have a distribution in the j⋆-M⋆ plane that is fully compatible with that of spiral discs, while only two have values of j⋆ lower than the spirals. These two outliers show signs of recent merging. Our results suggest that merger and interaction processes are not the dominant mechanisms in S0 formation in low-density environments. Instead, S0s appear to be the result of secular processes and the fading of spiral galaxies after the shutdown of star formation.

  6. Angular momentum transfer in primordial discs and the rotation of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Bromm, Volker

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc. Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfvén radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one. The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields. Considering a physically-motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy (≳ 0.14). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux-freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, ≃ 10-8.2 G, evaluated at a scale of nH = 1 cm-3, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values (˜10-15 G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.

  7. Restrictions placed on constitutive relations by angular momentum balance and Galilean invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, K. R.; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    In this note, we will show that for describing the response of a wide class of bodies, it is sufficient to invoke only the balance of angular momentum to obtain the restrictions on the constitutive functions that one obtains by appealing to frame indifference. While this result is known for hyperelastic materials (although it is not found in any standard text on the subject), we extend this result to classes of elasto-plastic and viscoelastic materials as well as for a class of implicit constitutive equations for viscous fluids. In particular, we show that for a class of bodies capable of instantaneous elastic response that is dictated by a stored energy function, the symmetry of the Cauchy stress alone is enough to obtain all the necessary restrictions. The result is related to Noether's theorem; if we know that there is a conserved quantity (i.e., angular momentum), we can then show that the energy function must be invariant under a group of transformations. For a class of generalized Newtonian fluids (including the Navier Stokes fluid and the Bingham fluid), the symmetry of the stress and Galilean invariance of the response functions are all that are required to obtain restrictions that are usually obtained by enforcing frame indifference.

  8. Angular momentum transfer in primordial discs and the rotation of the first stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Bromm, Volker

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the rotation velocity of the first stars by modelling the angular momentum transfer in the primordial accretion disc. Assessing the impact of magnetic braking, we consider the transition in angular momentum transport mode at the Alfvén radius, from the dynamically dominated free-fall accretion to the magnetically dominated solid-body one. The accreting protostar at the centre of the primordial star-forming cloud rotates with close to breakup speed in the case without magnetic fields. Considering a physically motivated model for small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification, we find that stellar rotation speed quickly declines if a large fraction of the initial turbulent energy is converted to magnetic energy (≳ 0.14). Alternatively, if the dynamo process were inefficient, for amplification due to flux freezing, stars would become slow rotators if the pre-galactic magnetic field strength is above a critical value, ≃10-8.2 G, evaluated at a scale of nH = 1 cm-3, which is significantly higher than plausible cosmological seed values (˜10-15 G). Because of the rapid decline of the stellar rotational speed over a narrow range in model parameters, the first stars encounter a bimodal fate: rapid rotation at almost the breakup level, or the near absence of any rotation.

  9. Quantum information with even and odd states of orbital angular momentum of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumangatt, Chithrabhanu, E-mail: chithrabhanu@prl.res.in [Physical Research laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); Lal, Nijil [Physical Research laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); IIT Gandhinagar, Palaj, Ahmedabad, 382355 (India); Anwar, Ali [Physical Research laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); Gangi Reddy, Salla [University of Electro-communications, Chofu, Tokyo, 1828585 (Japan); Singh, R.P. [Physical Research laboratory, Navarangpura, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India)

    2017-06-15

    We address the possibility of using even/odd states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons for the quantum information tasks. Single photon qubit states and two photon entangled states in even/odd basis of OAM are considered. We present a method for the tomography and general projective measurement in even/odd basis. With the general projective measurement, we show the Bell violation and quantum cryptography with Bell's inequality. We also describe hyper and hybrid entanglement of even/odd OAM states along with polarization, which can be applied in the implementation of quantum protocols like super dense coding. - Highlights: • We propose to use even and odd states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light for quantum information tasks. • We describe the OAM qubits and entangled states in even/odd basis and the corresponding projective operators. • We present a method for the tomography and the Bell's inequality violation for photons entangled in even/odd OAM states. • We also describe hyper and hybrid entanglement of even/odd OAM states along with polarization and their applications.

  10. Heat engine by exorcism of Maxwell Demon using spin angular momentum reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedkihal, Salil; Wright, Jackson; Vaccaro, Joan; Gould, Tim

    Landauer's erasure principle is a hallmark in thermodynamics and information theory. According to this principle, erasing one bit of information incurs a minimum energy cost. Recently, Vaccaro and Barnett (VB) have explored the role of multiple conserved quantities in memory erasure. They further illustrated that for the energy degenerate spin reservoirs, the cost of erasure can be solely in terms of spin angular momentum and no energy. Motivated by the VB erasure, in this work we propose a novel optical heat engine that operates under a single thermal reservoir and a spin angular momentum reservoir. The novel heat engine exploits ultrafast processes of phonon absorption to convert thermal phonon energy to coherent light. The entropy generated in this process then corresponds to a mixture of spin up and spin down populations of energy degenerate electronic ground states which acts as demon's memory. This information is then erased using a polarised spin reservoir that acts as an entropy sink. The proposed heat engines goes beyond the traditional Carnot engine.

  11. Parent-molecule rotational depolarization of photofragment angular momentum distributions: diatomic and polyatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2011-05-14

    We extend the A(q)(k) polarization-parameter model, which describes product angular momentum polarization from one photon photodissociation of polyatomic molecules in the molecular frame [J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 132, 224310], to the case of rotating parent molecules. The depolarization of the A(q)(k) is described by a set of rotational depolarization factors that depend on the angle of rotation of the molecular axis γ. We evaluate these rotational depolarization factors for the case of dissociating diatomic molecules and demonstrate that they are in complete agreement with the results of Kuznetsov and Vasyutinskii [J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 034307] obtained from a fully quantum mechanical approach of the same problem, showing the effective equivalence of the two approaches. We further evaluate the set of rotational depolarization factors for the case of dissociating polyatomic molecules that have three (near) equal moments of inertia, thus extending these calculations to polyatomic systems. This ideal case yields insights for the dissociation of polyatomic molecules of various symmetries when we compare the long lifetime limit with the results obtained for the diatomic case. In particular, in the long lifetime limit the depolarization factors of the A(0)(k) (odd k), Re(A(1)(k)) (even k) and Im(A(1)(k)) (odd k) for diatomic molecules vanish; in contrast, for polyatomic molecules the depolarization factors for the A(0)(k) (odd k) reduce to a value of 1/3, whereas for the Re(A(1)(k)) (even k) and Im(A(1)(k)) (odd k) they reduce to 1/5.

  12. Angular-momentum-assisted dissociation of CO in strong optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Amy; Ogden, Hannah; Murray, Matthew; Liu, Qingnan; Toro, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Filaments are produced in CO gas by intense, chirped laser pulses. Visible emission from C2 is observed as a result of chemical reactions of highly excited CO. At laser intensities greater than 1014 W cm-2, the C2 emission shows a strong dependence on laser polarization. Oppositely chirped pulses of light with ω0 = 800 nm are recombined spatially and temporally to generate angularly accelerating electric fields (up to 30 THz) that either have an instantaneous linear polarization or act as a dynamic polarization grating that oscillates among linear and circular polarizations. The angularly accelerating linear polarization corresponds to an optical centrifuge that concurrently drives molecules into high rotational states (with J 50) and induces strong-field dissociation. Higher order excitation is observed for the time-varying laser polarization configuration that does not induce rotational excitation. The results indicate that the presence of rotational angular momentum lowers the threshold for CO dissociation in strong optical fields by coupling nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom. Support from NSF CHE-1058721 and the University of Maryland.

  13. Accretion of the Moon after a High-Energy, High-Angular Momentum Giant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S. T.; Lock, S. J.; Petaev, M. I.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Mace, M.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Cuk, M.

    2016-12-01

    Different giant impact scenarios are being debated for lunar origin. However, the main observations being used to constrain lunar origin are geochemical and cannot be addressed by giant impact simulations alone. Understanding the chemical relationships between the Earth and Moon requires accretion models that predict the composition of the Moon. Here, we focus on understanding the accretion of a moon after a high-energy, high-angular momentum giant impact. Such impacts drive the Earth into a post-impact state that exceeds the hot spin stability limit (HSSL), which defines the maximum mantle entropy and angular momentum for a corotating body. In typical post-HSSL states, the mantle, atmosphere and disk form a dynamically and thermodynamically continuous structure. We present a new lunar accretion model based on combining numerical simulations of cooling highly-vaporized post-impact structures with geochemical calculations. We find that condensation at large radii quickly forms a lunar seed that orbits within the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) vapor structure. As the vapor structure continues to cool, condensates form and the pressure-supported structure contracts. The seed accretes condensed material, primarily derived from collapse of the low surface density regions of the structure at large radii. The lunar seed is heated by the vapor until the first major element (Si) begins to vaporize. The growing Moon equilibrates with BSE vapor at the temperature of Si vaporization and the pressure of the structure for an extended period of time. Eventually, the cooling structure recedes within the lunar orbit, truncating the main stage of lunar accretion. Our model links the pressure-temperature conditions of lunar accretion with the chemical composition of the Moon. We find that equilibration of the Moon with BSE vapor under a certain range of pressure-temperature conditions can establish the observed lunar isotopic composition and pattern of depletion in moderately volatile

  14. A parametric study of the behavior of the angular momentum vector during spin rate changes of rigid body spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuski, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    During a spin-up or spin-down maneuver of a spinning spacecraft, it is usual to have not only a constant body-fixed torque about the desired spin axis, but also small undesired constant torques about the transverse axes. This causes the orientation of the angular momentum vector to change in inertial space. Since an analytic solution is available for the angular momentum vector as a function of time, this behavior can be studied for large variations of the dynamic parameters, such as the initial spin rate, the inertial properties and the torques. As an example, the spin-up and spin-down maneuvers of the Galileo spacecraft was studied and as a result, very simple heuristic solutions were discovered which provide very good approximations to the parametric behavior of the angular momentum vector orientation.

  15. Shaken not stirred: creating exotic angular momentum states by shaking an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiely, Anthony; Ruschhaupt, Andreas; Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to create higher orbital states of ultracold atoms in the Mott regime of an optical lattice. This is done by periodically modulating the position of the trap minima (known as shaking) and controlling the interference term of the lasers creating the lattice. These methods are combined with techniques of shortcuts to adiabaticity. As an example of this, we show specifically how to create an anti-ferromagnetic type ordering of angular momentum states of atoms. The specific pulse sequences are designed using Lewis–Riesenfeld invariants and a four-level model for each well. The results are compared with numerical simulations of the full Schrödinger equation. (paper)

  16. On-chip spin-controlled orbital angular momentum directional coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Lei, Ting; Si, Guangyuan; Du, Luping; Lin, Jiao; Min, Changjun; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2018-01-01

    Optical vortex beams have many potential applications in the particle trapping, quantum encoding, optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) communications and interconnects. However, the on-chip compact OAM detection is still a big challenge. Based on a holographic configuration and a spin-dependent structure design, we propose and demonstrate an on-chip spin-controlled OAM-mode directional coupler, which can couple the OAM signal to different directions due to its topological charge. While the directional coupling function can be switched on/off by altering the spin of incident beam. Both simulation and experimental measurements verify the validity of the proposed approach. This work would benefit the on-chip OAM devices for optical communications and high dimensional quantum coding/decoding in the future.

  17. Generation of a sub-half-wavelength focal spot with purely transverse spin angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Li; Fu, Jian; Yu, Xiaochang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Peifeng

    2017-11-01

    We theoretically demonstrate that optical focus fields with purely transverse spin angular momentum (SAM) can be obtained when a kind of special incident fields is focused by a high numerical aperture (NA) aplanatic lens (AL). When the incident pupil fields are refracted by an AL, two transverse Cartesian components of the electric fields at the exit pupil plane do not have the same order of sinusoidal or cosinoidal components, resulting in zero longitudinal SAMs of the focal fields. An incident field satisfying above conditions is then proposed. Using the Richard-Wolf vectorial diffraction theory, the energy density and SAM density distributions of the tightly focused beam are calculated and the results clearly validate the proposed theory. In addition, a sub-half-wavelength focal spot with purely transverse SAM can be achieved and a flattop energy density distribution parallel to z-axis can be observed around the maximum energy density point.

  18. Optical fiber design with orbital angular momentum light purity higher than 99.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhishen; Gan, Jiulin; Heng, Xiaobo; Wu, Yuqing; Li, Qingyu; Qian, Qi; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-11-16

    The purity of the synthesized orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) light in the fiber is inversely proportional to channel crosstalk level in the OAM optical fiber communication system. Here the relationship between the fiber structure and the purity is firstly demonstrated in theory. The graded-index optical fiber is proposed and designed for the OAM light propagation with the purity higher than 99.9%. 16 fiber modes (10 OAM modes) have been supported by a specific designed graded-index optical fiber with dispersion less than 35 ps/(km∙nm). Such fiber design has suppressed the intrinsic crosstalk to be lower than -30 dB, and can be potentially used for the long distance OAM optical communication system.

  19. Quantum Key Distribution with High Order Fibonacci-like Orbital Angular Momentum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ziwen; Cai, Jiarui; Wang, Chuan

    2017-08-01

    The coding space in quantum communication could be expanded to high-dimensional space by using orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of photons, as both the capacity of the channel and security are enhanced. Here we present a novel approach to realize high-capacity quantum key distribution (QKD) by exploiting OAM states. The innovation of the proposed approach relies on a unique type of entangled-photon source which produces entangled photons with OAM randomly distributed among high order Fiboncci-like numbers and a new physical mechanism for efficiently sharing keys. This combination of entanglement with mathematical properties of high order Fibonacci sequences provides the QKD protocol immunity to photon-number-splitting attacks and allows secure generation of long keys from few photons. Unlike other protocols, reference frame alignment and active modulation of production and detection bases are unnecessary.

  20. Beam wander relieved orbital angular momentum communication in turbulent atmosphere using Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yangsheng; Lei, Ting; Li, Zhaohui; Li, Yangjin; Gao, Shecheng; Xie, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-02-10

    Optical beam wander is one of the most important issues for free-space optical (FSO) communication. We theoretically derive a beam wander model for Bessel beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere. The calculated beam wander of high order Bessel beams with different turbulence strengths are consistent with experimental measurements. Both theoretical and experimental results reveal that high order Bessel beams are less influenced by the turbulent atmosphere. We also demonstrate the Bessel beams based orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing/demultiplexing in FSO communication with atmospheric turbulence. Under the same atmospheric turbulence condition, the bit error rates of transmitted signals carried by high order Bessel beams show smaller values and fluctuations, which indicates that the high order Bessel beams have an advantage of mitigating the beam wander in OAM multiplexing FSO communication.

  1. Superposition of two optical vortices with opposite integer or non-integer orbital angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando Díaz Meza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work develops a brief proposal to achieve the superposition of two opposite vortex beams, both with integer or non-integer mean value of the orbital angular momentum. The first part is about the generation of this kind of spatial light distributions through a modified Brown and Lohmann’s hologram. The inclusion of a simple mathematical expression into the pixelated grid’s transmittance function, based in Fourier domain properties, shifts the diffraction orders counterclockwise and clockwise to the same point and allows the addition of different modes. The strategy is theoretically and experimentally validated for the case of two opposite rotation helical wavefronts.

  2. Exact computation and large angular momentum asymptotics of 3nj symbols: Semiclassical disentangling of spin networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Roger W.; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Silva Ferreira, Cristiane da

    2008-01-01

    Spin networks, namely, the 3nj symbols of quantum angular momentum theory and their generalizations to groups other than SU(2) and to quantum groups, permeate many areas of pure and applied science. The issues of their computation and characterization for large values of their entries are a challenge for diverse fields, such as spectroscopy and quantum chemistry, molecular and condensed matter physics, quantum computing, and the geometry of space time. Here we record progress both in their efficient calculation and in the study of the large j asymptotics. For the 9j symbol, a prototypical entangled network, we present and extensively check numerically formulas that illustrate the passage to the semiclassical limit, manifesting both the occurrence of disentangling and the discrete-continuum transition.

  3. Mini-conference on Angular Momentum Transport in Laboratory and Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao; Kronberg, Philipp; Prager, Stewart C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2008-05-06

    This paper provides a concise summary of the current status of the research and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Angular Momentum Transport in Laboratory and Nature. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2007 Annual Meeting (November 12{16, 2007). This Mini-conference covers a wide range of phenomena happening in fluids and plasmas, either in laboratory or in nature. The purpose of this paper is not to comprehensively review these phenomena, but to provide a starting point for interested readers to refer to related research in areas other than their own.

  4. Mini-conference on Angular Momentum Transport in Laboratory and Nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao; Kronberg, Philipp; Prager, Stewart C.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a concise summary of the current status of the research and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Angular Momentum Transport in Laboratory and Nature. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2007 Annual Meeting (November 12-16, 2007). This Mini-conference covers a wide range of phenomena happening in fluids and plasmas, either in laboratory or in nature. The purpose of this paper is not to comprehensively review these phenomena, but to provide a starting point for interested readers to refer to related research in areas other than their own

  5. Optical Orbital Angular Momentum Demultiplexing and Channel Equalization by Using Equalizing Dammann Vortex Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel equalizing Dammann vortex grating (EDVG is proposed as orbital angular momentum (OAM multiplexer to realize OAM signal demultiplexing and channel equalization. The EDVG is designed by suppressing odd diffraction orders and adjusting the grating structure. The light intensity of diffraction is subsequently distributed evenly in the diffraction orders, and the total diffraction efficiency can be improved from 53.22% to 82%. By using the EDVG, OAM demultiplexing and channel equalization can be realized. Numerical simulation shows that the bit error rate (BER of each OAM channel can decrease to 10-4 when the bit SNR is 22 dB, and the intensity is distributed over the necessary order of diffraction evenly.

  6. Control of a Biped Robot by Total Rate of Angular Momentum Using the Task Function Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Rojas-Estrada

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we address the control problem of biped robots by using the task function approach. A problem arrives when one of the feet is in contact with the ground, which presents imperfections. There is then the possibility that the biped robot undergoes a fall. It is difficult to track any trajectory due to the presence of unevenness on the ground. What we propose is to use the task function approach combined with the application of the total rate of angular momentum to obtain a control law for the ankle. By this technique, the tracking becomes more smooth and the balance is assured. The control law proposed allows the upper part of the robot to be controlled independently since only the ankle actuators are concerned. We enounce the formal problem and present some simulations with real parameters of a 21 degrees of freedom biped robot.

  7. Inclusive breakup calculations in angular momentum basis: Application to 7Li+58Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jin

    2018-03-01

    The angular momentum basis method is introduced to solve the inclusive breakup problem within the model proposed by Ichimura, Austern, and Vincent [Phys. Rev. C 32, 431 (1985), 10.1103/PhysRevC.32.431]. This method is based on the geometric transformation between different Jacobi coordinates, in which the particle spins can be included in a natural and efficient way. To test the validity of this partial wave expansion method, a benchmark calculation is done comparing with the one given by Lei and Moro [Phys. Rev. C 92, 044616 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.044616]. In addition, using the distorted-wave Born approximation version of the IAV model, applications to 7Li+58Ni reactions at energies around Coulomb barrier are presented and compared with available data.

  8. Synthetic-lattice enabled all-optical devices based on orbital angular momentum of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Xu, Jin-Shi; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Chuanwei; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2017-07-01

    All-optical photonic devices are crucial for many important photonic technologies and applications, ranging from optical communication to quantum information processing. Conventional design of all-optical devices is based on photon propagation and interference in real space, which may rely on large numbers of optical elements, and the requirement of precise control makes this approach challenging. Here we propose an unconventional route for engineering all-optical devices using the photon's internal degrees of freedom, which form photonic crystals in such synthetic dimensions for photon propagation and interference. We demonstrate this design concept by showing how important optical devices such as quantum memory and optical filters can be realized using synthetic orbital angular momentum (OAM) lattices in degenerate cavities. The design route utilizing synthetic photonic lattices may significantly reduce the requirement for numerous optical elements and their fine tuning in conventional design, paving the way for realistic all-optical photonic devices with novel functionalities.

  9. Realization of multiple orbital angular momentum modes simultaneously through four-dimensional antenna arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Yang, Shiwen; Chen, Yikai; Guo, Jixin; Qu, Shiwei

    2018-01-09

    Electromagnetic waves carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) in radio frequency range have drawn great attention owing to its potential applications in increasing communication capacity. In this paper, both single-pole single-throw (SPST) switches and single-pole double-throw (SPDT) switches are designed and implemented. Optimal time sequence allows four-dimensional (4-D) circular antenna array to generate multiple OAM-carrying waves as well as enhance the field intensity of each OAM-carrying wave. A novel experimental platform is developed to measure the phase distribution when the transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna operate at different frequencies. The good agreement between the measurement and simulation results demonstrate that 4-D circular antenna array is able to generate multiple OAM modes simultaneously. Furthermore, the superiority of the 4-D circular antenna array in receiving and demodulating multiple OAM-carrying signals is validated through the filter and bit error rate (BER) simulations.

  10. Demonstration of hybrid orbital angular momentum multiplexing and time-division multiplexing passive optical network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andong; Zhu, Long; Liu, Jun; Du, Cheng; Mo, Qi; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-16

    Mode-division multiplexing passive optical network (MDM-PON) is a promising scheme for next-generation access networks to further increase fiber transmission capacity. In this paper, we demonstrate the proof-of-concept experiment of hybrid mode-division multiplexing (MDM) and time-division multiplexing (TDM) PON architecture by exploiting orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes. Bidirectional transmissions with 2.5-Gbaud 4-level pulse amplitude modulation (PAM-4) downstream and 2-Gbaud on-off keying (OOK) upstream are demonstrated in the experiment. The observed optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalties for downstream and upstream transmissions at a bit-error rate (BER) of 2 × 10(-3) are less than 2.0 dB and 3.0 dB, respectively.

  11. Impact of convection and resistivity on angular momentum transport in dwarf novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scepi, N.; Lesur, G.; Dubus, G.; Flock, M.

    2018-01-01

    The eruptive cycles of dwarf novae are thought to be due to a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disk surrounding the white dwarf. This model has long been known to imply enhanced angular momentum transport in the accretion disk during outburst. This is measured by the stress to pressure ratio α, with α ≈ 0.1 required in outburst compared to α ≈ 0.01 in quiescence. Such an enhancement in α has recently been observed in simulations of turbulent transport driven by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) when convection is present, without requiring a net magnetic flux. We independently recover this result by carrying out PLUTO magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of vertically stratified, radiative, shearing boxes with the thermodynamics and opacities appropriate to dwarf novae. The results are robust against the choice of vertical boundary conditions. The thermal equilibrium solutions found by the simulations trace the well-known S-curve in the density-temperature plane that constitutes the core of the disk thermal-viscous instability model. We confirm that the high values of α ≈ 0.1 occur near the tip of the hot branch of the S-curve, where convection is active. However, we also present thermally stable simulations at lower temperatures that have standard values of α ≈ 0.03 despite the presence of vigorous convection. We find no simple relationship between α and the strength of the convection, as measured by the ratio of convective to radiative flux. The cold branch is only very weakly ionized so, in the second part of this work, we studied the impact of non-ideal MHD effects on transport. Ohmic dissipation is the dominant effect in the conditions of quiescent dwarf novae. We include resistivity in the simulations and find that the MRI-driven transport is quenched (α ≈ 0) below the critical density at which the magnetic Reynolds number Rm ≤ 104. This is problematic because the X-ray emission observed in quiescent systems requires

  12. A system to generate Fortran programs for calculating configuration traces of angular momentum coupled product operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B.D.; Draayer, J.P.; Wong, S.S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Three steps are usually involved in setting up a problem for numerical solution, 1) deriving algebraic expressions, 2) programming the equations, and 3) debugging the codes. We report here on a code, called 'compiler' in what follows, which accepts as input standardized output from the CONTRACTION-JT-RECOUPLING program and produces, using additional information on the permutation symmetry of the operators from the CONTRACTION-BASIC-DIAGRAM program, a FORTRAN IV code for evaluating configuration traces of a product of angular momentum coupled operator. As output from the CONTRACTION-BASIC-DIAGRAM program and the CONTRACTION-JT-RECOUPLING program provide input to the compiler, these two programs must be run first for each distinct operator product. This input to the compiler determines the number of basic diagrams and, for each basic diagram, the associated permutation structure, the number of summation variables, the appropriate phases and statistical weight factors, and the angular momentum recoupling information. The operators themselves are assumed to be of standard form, such as hamiltonian or electromagnetic excitation operators; all defining matrix elements are considered to be input variables. The program sets up the trace evaluation code by translating this information into Fortran IV programs. It does this by mimicking the detailed logic an individual would use if assigned the same task. Certain specific procedures that are common to many cases, such as inputing the defining, matrix elements, are written as library subprograms. The compiler logic is structured but not rigid; optimization is attended to so the output codes will execute efficiently. (orig./HSI)

  13. The angular momentum controversy: What’s it all about and does it matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot; Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    The general question, crucial to an understanding of the internal structure of the nucleon, of how to split the total angular momentum of a photon or gluon into spin and orbital contributions is one of the most important and interesting challenges faced by gauge theories like Quantum Electrodynamics and Quantum Chromodynamics. This is particularly challenging since all QED textbooks state that such a splitting cannot be done for a photon (and a fortiori for a gluon) in a gauge-invariant way, yet experimentalists around the world are engaged in measuring what they believe is the gluon spin! This question has been a subject of intense debate and controversy, ever since, in 2008, it was claimed that such a gauge-invariant split was, in fact, possible. We explain in what sense this claim is true and how it turns out that one of the main problems is that such a decomposition is not unique and therefore raises the question of what is the most natural or physical choice. The essential requirement of measurability does not solve the ambiguities and leads us to the conclusion that the choice of a particular decomposition is essentially a matter of taste and convenience. In this review, we provide a pedagogical introduction to the question of angular momentum decomposition in a gauge theory, present the main relevant decompositions and discuss in detail several aspects of the controversies regarding the question of gauge invariance, frame dependence, uniqueness and measurability. We stress the physical implications of the recent developments and collect into a separate section all the sum rules and relations which we think experimentally relevant. We hope that such a review will make the matter amenable to a broader community and will help to clarify the present situation

  14. Quantum storage of orbital angular momentum entanglement in cold atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bao-Sen; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Electromagnetic waves have both spin momentum and orbital angular momentum (OAM). Light carrying OAM has broad applications in micro-particle manipulation, high-precision optical metrology, and potential high-capacity optical communications. In the concept of quantum information, a photon encoded with information in its OAM degree of freedom enables quantum networks to carry much more information and increase their channel capacity greatly compared with those of current technology because of the inherent infinite dimensions for OAM. Quantum memories are indispensable to construct quantum networks. Storing OAM states has attracted considerable attention recently, and many important advances in this direction have been achieved during the past few years. Here we review recent experimental realizations of quantum memories using OAM states, including OAM qubits and qutrits at true single photon level, OAM states entangled in a two-dimensional or a high-dimensional space, hyperentanglement and hybrid entanglement consisting of OAM and other degree of freedom in a physical system. We believe that all achievements described here are very helpful to study quantum information encoded in a high-dimensional space.

  15. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, M A; Simpson, J; Paul, E S

    2016-01-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’ . High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum–excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists. (invited comment)

  16. Vector Laguerre-Gauss beams with polarization-orbital angular momentum entanglement in a graded-index medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Nikolai I

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that the vector-vortex Laguerre-Gauss modes with polarization-orbital angular momentum (OAM) entanglement are the vector solutions of the Maxwell equations in a graded-index medium. Focusing of linearly and circularly polarized vortex light beams with nonzero azimuthal and radial indices in a cylindrical graded-index waveguide is investigated. The wave shape variation with distance taking into account the spin-orbit and nonparaxial effects is analyzed. The effect of long-term periodic revival of wave packets due to mode interference in a graded-index cylindrical optical waveguide is demonstrated. High efficiency transfer of a strongly focused spot through an optical waveguide over large distances takes place with a period of revival.

  17. Intensity and average orbital angular momentum of partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam in slant atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-qing; Wang, Li-guo

    2017-11-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the cross-spectral density function (CSDF), the intensity and average orbital angular momentum (OAM) of the partially coherent flat-topped vortex beams in the slant atmospheric turbulence are presented. The effects of the order, topological charge, waist radius, and propagation distance of the beam on the intensity and average OAM are discussed. Results obtained show that the intensity of the partially coherent flat-topped vortex beam is changed due to the variations of the propagation distance, waist radius, topological charge and beam order, the average OAM is constant during the beam propagation in the atmospheric turbulence and related only to the waist radius and beam order. Results obtained by this paper may serve as theory bases for future applications in the atmospheric optical communication.

  18. Free-space optical communications using orbital-angular-momentum multiplexing combined with MIMO-based spatial multiplexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Wang, Zhe; Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Cao, Yinwen; Liu, Cong; Liao, Peicheng; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Zhao, Zhe; Willner, Asher; Ashrafi, Nima; Ashrafi, Solyman; Linquist, Roger D; Bock, Robert; Tur, Moshe; Molisch, Andreas F; Willner, Alan E

    2015-09-15

    We explore the potential of combining the advantages of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO)-based spatial multiplexing with those of orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing to increase the capacity of free-space optical (FSO) communications. We experimentally demonstrate an 80 Gbit/s FSO system with a 2×2 aperture architecture, in which each transmitter aperture contains two multiplexed data-carrying OAM modes. Inter-channel crosstalk effects are minimized by the OAM beams' inherent orthogonality and by the use of 4×4 MIMO signal processing. Our experimental results show that the bit-error rates can reach below the forward error correction limit of 3.8×10(-3) and the power penalties are less than 3.6 dB for all channels after MIMO processing. This indicates that OAM and MIMO-based spatial multiplexing could be simultaneously utilized, thereby providing the potential to enhance system performance.

  19. Influence of anisotropic turbulence on the orbital angular momentum modes of Hermite-Gaussian vortex beam in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Yu, Lin; Zhang, Yixin

    2017-05-29

    Applying the angular spectrum theory, we derive the expression of a new Hermite-Gaussian (HG) vortex beam. Based on the new Hermite-Gaussian (HG) vortex beam, we establish the model of the received probability density of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes of this beam propagating through a turbulent ocean of anisotropy. By numerical simulation, we investigate the influence of oceanic turbulence and beam parameters on the received probability density of signal OAM modes and crosstalk OAM modes of the HG vortex beam. The results show that the influence of oceanic turbulence of anisotropy on the received probability of signal OAM modes is smaller than isotropic oceanic turbulence under the same condition, and the effect of salinity fluctuation on the received probability of the signal OAM modes is larger than the effect of temperature fluctuation. In the strong dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid and the weak dissipation rate of temperature variance, we can decrease the effects of turbulence on the received probability of signal OAM modes by selecting a long wavelength and a larger transverse size of the HG vortex beam in the source's plane. In long distance propagation, the HG vortex beam is superior to the Laguerre-Gaussian beam for resisting the destruction of oceanic turbulence.

  20. The angular momentum of hot coronae around spiral galaxies and its impact on the evolution of star forming discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pezzulli, G.; Fraternali, F.; Binney, J.

    Galaxy formation theory and recent observations indicate that spiral galaxies are surrounded by massive and hot coronae, which potentially constitute a huge source of mass and angular momentum for the star forming discs embedded within them. Accretion from these reservoirs is likely a key ingredient

  1. Formation of S0 galaxies through mergers. Explaining angular momentum and concentration change from spirals to S0s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querejeta, M.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.; Tapia, T.; Borlaff, A.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Martig, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    The CALIFA team has recently found that the stellar angular momentum and concentration of late-type spiral galaxies are incompatible with those of lenticular galaxies (S0s), concluding that fading alone cannot satisfactorily explain the evolution from spirals into S0s. Here we explore whether major

  2. Emission of orbital-angular-momentum-entangled photon pairs in a nonlinear ring fiber utilizing spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javůrek, D.; Svozilík, J.; Peřina ml., Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2014), "043844-1"-"043844-12" ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photon pairs * orbital-angular-momentum-entangled * nonlinear ring fiber * spontaneous parametric down-conversion Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2014

  3. The role of cranking frequency in the generation of angular momentum in isospin formalism for nuclei around A=90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Akbar, A.; Veeraraghavan, S.; Arunachalam, N.

    1998-01-01

    The role of cranking frequency in hot rotating deformed nuclei has been studied with reference to the extraction of several nuclear parameters. In this work, the angular momentum degree of freedom is included in the isospin formalism using statistical theory of hot deformed nuclei

  4. Arbitrary Angular Momentum Electron Repulsion Integrals with Graphical Processing Units: Application to the Resolution of Identity Hartree-Fock Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Wennmohs, Frank; Neese, Frank

    2017-07-11

    A resolution of identity based implementation of the Hartree-Fock method on graphical processing units (GPUs) is presented that is capable of handling basis functions with arbitrary angular momentum. For practical reasons, only functions up to (ff|f) angular momentum are presently calculated on the GPU, thus leaving the calculation of higher angular momenta integrals on the CPU of the hybrid CPU-GPU environment. Speedups of up to a factor of 30 are demonstrated relative to state-of-the-art serial and parallel CPU implementations. Benchmark calculations with over 3500 contracted basis functions (def2-SVP or def2-TZVP basis sets) are reported. The presented implementation supports all devices with OpenCL support and is capable of utilizing multiple GPU cards over either MPI or OpenCL itself.

  5. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Stellar angular momentum of about 2300 galaxies: unveiling the bimodality of massive galaxy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark T.; Cappellari, Michele; Li, Hongyu; Mao, Shude; Bershady, Matthew; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Law, David R.; Pan, Kaike; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2018-03-01

    We measure λ _{R_e}, a proxy for galaxy specific stellar angular momentum within one effective radius, and the ellipticity, ɛ, for about 2300 galaxies of all morphological types observed with integral field spectroscopy as part of the MaNGA survey, the largest such sample to date. We use the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram to separate early-type galaxies into fast and slow rotators. We also visually classify each galaxy according to its optical morphology and two-dimensional stellar velocity field. Comparing these classifications to quantitative λ _{R_e} measurements reveals tight relationships between angular momentum and galaxy structure. In order to account for atmospheric seeing, we use realistic models of galaxy kinematics to derive a general approximate analytic correction for λ _{R_e}. Thanks to the size of the sample and the large number of massive galaxies, we unambiguously detect a clear bimodality in the (λ _{R_e}, ɛ ) diagram which may result from fundamental differences in galaxy assembly history. There is a sharp secondary density peak inside the region of the diagram with low λ _{R_e} and ɛ definition for slow rotators. Most of these galaxies are visually classified as non-regular rotators and have high velocity dispersion. The intrinsic bimodality must be stronger, as it tends to be smoothed by noise and inclination. The large sample of slow rotators allows us for the first time to unveil a secondary peak at ±90○ in their distribution of the misalignments between the photometric and kinematic position angles. We confirm that genuine slow rotators start appearing above M ≥ 2 × 1011M⊙ where a significant number of high-mass fast rotators also exist.

  6. Precise Measurements of DVCS at JLab and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisano, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Deeply-virtual Compton scattering provides the cleanest access to the 3D imaging of the nucleon structure encoded in the generalized parton distributions, that correlate the fraction of the total nucleon momentum carried by a constituent to its position in the transverse plane. Besides the information on the spatial imaging of the nucleon, GPDs provide an access, through the Ji relation, to the contribution of the angular momentum of quarks to proton spin. An accurate estimate of such a contribution will lead to a better understanding of the origin of the proton spin. Jefferson Lab has been an ideal environment for the study of exclusive processes, thanks to the combination of the high-intensity and high-polarization electron beam provided by the CEBAF, with the complementary equipments of the three experimental halls. This has allowed high-precision measurements of the DVCS observables in a wide kinematic region, with focus on those observable s that provide access to the GPDs entering the Ji relation. These studies will be further widened by the projected data from the 12-GeV era, which will improve the existing measurements both in terms of precision and phase-space coverage. The important results on the proton DVCS obtained during the 6-GeV era will be discussed, together with the upcoming experiments approved for the 12-GeV upgrade, that foresees measurements with both proton and quasi-free neutron targets and that, when combined, will lead to the extraction of the Compton Form Factors for separate quark flavors. (author)

  7. Angular momentum evolution in dark matter haloes: a study of the Bolshoi and Millennium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, S.; Padilla, N.; Lagos, C. D. P.

    2017-12-01

    We use three different cosmological dark matter simulations to study how the orientation of the angular momentum (AM) vector in dark matter haloes evolve with time. We find that haloes in this kind of simulations are constantly affected by a spurious change of mass, which translates into an artificial change in the orientation of the AM. After removing the haloes affected by artificial mass change, we found that the change in the orientation of the AM vector is correlated with time. The change in its angle and direction (i.e. the angle subtended by the AM vector in two consecutive time-steps) that affect the AM vector has a dependence on the change of mass that affects a halo, the time elapsed in which the change of mass occurs and the halo mass. We create a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the change of angle and direction of the AM vector. We reproduce the angular separation of the AM vector since a lookback time of 8.5 Gyr to today (α) with an accuracy of approximately 0.05 in cos(α). We are releasing this Monte Carlo simulation together with this publication. We also create a Monte Carlo simulation that reproduces the change of the AM modulus. We find that haloes in denser environments display the most dramatic evolution in their AM direction, as well as haloes with a lower specific AM modulus. These relations could be used to improve the way we follow the AM vector in low-resolution simulations.

  8. Recent advances in high-capacity free-space optical and radio-frequency communications using orbital angular momentum multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Yan, Yan; Li, Long; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Tur, Moshe; Molisch, Andreas F.; Ashrafi, Solyman

    2017-01-01

    There is a continuing growth in the demand for data bandwidth, and the multiplexing of multiple independent data streams has the potential to provide the needed data capacity. One technique uses the spatial domain of an electromagnetic (EM) wave, and space division multiplexing (SDM) has become increasingly important for increased transmission capacity and spectral efficiency of a communication system. A subset of SDM is mode division multiplexing (MDM), in which multiple orthogonal beams each on a different mode can be multiplexed. A potential modal basis set to achieve MDM is to use orbital angular momentum (OAM) of EM waves. In such a system, multiple OAM beams each carrying an independent data stream are multiplexed at the transmitter, propagate through a common medium and are demultiplexed at the receiver. As a result, the total capacity and spectral efficiency of the communication system can be multiplied by a factor equal to the number of transmitted OAM modes. Over the past few years, progress has been made in understanding the advantages and limitations of using multiplexed OAM beams for communication systems. In this review paper, we highlight recent advances in the use of OAM multiplexing for high-capacity free-space optical and millimetre-wave communications. We discuss different technical challenges (e.g. atmospheric turbulence and crosstalk) as well as potential techniques to mitigate such degrading effects. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069770

  9. 3D spectroscopy with VLT/GIRAFFE. IV. Angular momentum and dynamical support of intermediate redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puech, M.; Hammer, F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Flores, H.

    2007-04-01

    Context: One of the most outstanding problems related to numerical models of galaxy formation is the so-called "angular momentum catastrophe", i.e., the inability to theoretically explain the high angular momentum observed in local disk galaxies. Aims: We study the evolution of the angular momentum from z˜0.6 to z=0 to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the large angular momenta of disk galaxies observed today. This study is based on a complete sample of 32, 0.4≤ z ≤0.75 galaxies observed with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at the VLT. Their kinematics had been classified as rotating disks (11 galaxies), perturbed rotators (7 galaxies), or complex kinematics (14 galaxies). Methods: We have computed the specific angular momentum of disks (jdisk) and the dynamical support of rotating disks through the V/σ ratio. To study how angular momentum can be acquired dynamically, we compared the properties of distant and local galaxies, as a function of their kinematical class. Results: We find that distant rotating disks have essentially the same properties (jdisk and Rd) as local disks, while distant galaxies with more complex kinematics have a significantly higher scatter in the jdisk-Vmax and Rd-Vmax planes. On average, distant galaxies show lower values of V/σ than local galaxies, the lowest V/σ values being reached by distant galaxies showing perturbed rotation. This can probably be attributed to heating mechanisms at work in distant disks. Conclusions: We found observational evidence for a non-linear random-walk evolution of the angular momentum in galaxies during the past 8 Gyr. The evolution related to galaxies with complex kinematics can be attributed to mergers, but not to (smooth) gas accretion alone. If galaxies observed at intermediate redshift are related to present-day spirals, then our results match the "spiral rebuilding" scenario proposed by Hammer et al. (2005) quite closely. Based on FLAMES/GIRAFFE Paris Observatory Guaranteed Time Observations

  10. Simultaneous wavelength and orbital angular momentum demultiplexing using tunable MEMS-based Fabry-Perot filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyubopytov, Vladimir; Porfirev, Alexey P.; Gurbatov, Stanislav O.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous wavelength and orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing/demultiplexing of 10 Gbit/s data streams using a new on-chip micro-component-tunable MEMS-based Fabry-Perot filter integrated with a spiral phase plate. In the experiment, two......B at the harddecision forward-error correction (HD-FEC) bit-error-rate (BER) limit 3.8 × 10□3 when multiplexing a Gaussian beam and OAM beams of azimuthal orders 1, 2 and 3 respectively. In case of phase modulation, power penalties do not exceed 1.77, 0.54 and 0.79 dB respectively. At the 0.4 nm wavelength grid......, maximum power penalties at the HD-FEC BER threshold relative to the 0.8 nm wavelength spacing read 0.83, 0.84 and 1.15 dB when multiplexing a Gaussian beam and OAM beams of 1st, 2nd and 3rd orders respectively. The novelty and impact of the proposed filter design is in providing practical, integrable...

  11. Integrated optical modulator manipulating the polarization and rotation handedness of Orbital Angular Momentum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S Faezeh; Nouroozi, Rahman; Vallone, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2017-06-19

    Recent studies demonstrated that the optical channels encoded by Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) are capable candidates for improving the next generation of communication systems. OAM states can enhance the capacity and security of high-dimensional communication channels in both classical and quantum regimes based on optical fibre and free space. Hence, fast and precise control of the beams encoded by OAM can provide their commercial applications in the compatible communication networks. Integrated optical devices are good miniaturized options to perform this issue. This paper proposes a numerically verified integrated high-frequency electro-optical modulator for manipulation of the guided modes encoded in both OAM and polarization states. The proposed modulator is designed as an electro-optically active Lithium Niobate (LN) core photonic wire with silica as its cladding in a LN on Insulator (LNOI) configuration. It consists of two successive parts; a phase shifter to reverse the rotation handedness of the input OAM state and a polarization converter to change the horizontally polarized OAM state to the vertically polarized one. It is shown that all four possible output polarization-OAM encoded states can be achieved with only 6 V and 7 V applied voltages to the electrodes in the two parts of the modulator.

  12. High-dimensional free-space optical communications based on orbital angular momentum coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Li; Gu, Xiaofan; Wang, Le

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a high-dimensional free-space optical communication scheme using orbital angular momentum (OAM) coding. In the scheme, the transmitter encodes N-bits information by using a spatial light modulator to convert a Gaussian beam to a superposition mode of N OAM modes and a Gaussian mode; The receiver decodes the information through an OAM mode analyser which consists of a MZ interferometer with a rotating Dove prism, a photoelectric detector and a computer carrying out the fast Fourier transform. The scheme could realize a high-dimensional free-space optical communication, and decodes the information much fast and accurately. We have verified the feasibility of the scheme by exploiting 8 (4) OAM modes and a Gaussian mode to implement a 256-ary (16-ary) coding free-space optical communication to transmit a 256-gray-scale (16-gray-scale) picture. The results show that a zero bit error rate performance has been achieved.

  13. An Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) Mode Reconfigurable Antenna for Channel Capacity Improvement and Digital Data Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baiyang; Lin, Guoying; Cui, Yuehui; Li, RongLin

    2017-08-29

    For purpose of utilizing orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode diversity, multiple OAM beams should be generated preferably by a single antenna. In this paper, an OAM mode reconfigurable antenna is proposed. Different from the existed OAM antennas with multiple ports for multiple OAM modes transmitting, the proposed antenna with only a single port, but it can be used to transmit mode 1 or mode -1 OAM beams arbitrary by controlling the PIN diodes on the feeding network through a programmable microcontroller which control by a remote controller. Simulation and measurement results such as return loss, near-field and far-field radiation patterns of two operating states for mode 1 and mode -1, and OAM mode orthogonality are given. The proposed antenna can serve as a candidate for utilizing OAM diversity, namely phase diversity to increase channel capacity at 2.4 GHz. Moreover, an OAM-mode based encoding method is experimentally carried out by the proposed OAM mode reconfigurable antenna, the digital data are encoded and decoded by different OAM modes. At the transmitter, the proposed OAM mode reconfigurable antenna is used to encode the digital data, data symbol 0 and 1 are mapped to OAM mode 1 and mode -1, respectively. At the receiver, the data symbols are decoded by phase gradient method.

  14. Generalized optical angular momentum sorter and its application to high-dimensional quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Hugo; Gagnon-Bischoff, Jérémie; Mortimer, Dominic; Zhang, Yingwen; Bouchard, Frédéric; Upham, Jeremy; Grillo, Vincenzo; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-08-21

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) carried by optical beams is a useful quantity for encoding information. This form of encoding has been incorporated into various works ranging from telecommunications to quantum cryptography, most of which require methods that can rapidly process the OAM content of a beam. Among current state-of-the-art schemes that can readily acquire this information are so-called OAM sorters, which consist of devices that spatially separate the OAM components of a beam. Such devices have found numerous applications in optical communications, a field that is in constant demand for additional degrees of freedom, such as polarization and wavelength, into which information can also be encoded. Here, we report the implementation of a device capable of sorting a beam based on its OAM and polarization content, which could be of use in works employing both of these degrees of freedom as information channels. After characterizing our fabricated device, we demonstrate how it can be used for quantum communications via a quantum key distribution protocol.

  15. Controlling orbital angular momentum of an optical vortex by varying its ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2018-03-01

    An exact analytical expression is obtained for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a Gaussian optical vortex with a different degree of ellipticity. The OAM turned out to be proportional to the ratio of two Legendre polynomials of adjoining orders. It is shown that if an elliptical optical vortex is embedded into the center of the waist of a circularly symmetrical Gaussian beam, then the normalized OAM of such laser beam is fractional and it does not exceed the topological charge n. If, on the contrary, a circularly symmetrical optical vortex is embedded into the center of the waist of an elliptical Gaussian beam, then the OAM is equal to n. If the optical vortex and the Gaussian beam have the same (or matched) ellipticity degree, then the OAM of the laser beam is greater than n. Continuous varying of the OAM of a laser beam by varying its ellipticity degree can be used in optical trapping for accelerated motion of microscopic particles along an elliptical trajectory as well as in quantum informatics for detecting OAM-entangled photons.

  16. Controlled generation of different orbital angular momentum states in a hybrid optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Xiaobo; Gan, Jiulin; Zhang, Zhishen; Qian, Qi; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin

    2017-11-01

    A new kind of hybrid optical fiber for different orbital angular momentum (OAM) states generation is proposed and investigated by simulation. The hybrid fiber is composed of three main regions: the core, the cladding and the bow-tie-shaped stress-applying zones (SAZs). The SAZs are symmetrically distributed on both sides of the core and filled with piezoelectric material PZT-5H which would generate radial mechanical movement when subjected to an electric field. The strain applied by the SAZs introduces anisotropic variation of the material permittivity which affect the propagation of the guided modes along the fiber core. The OAM modes of | l | = 1 , 2 , 3 can be generated by setting the appropriate electric potential applied in the SAZs. This fiber-based structure and electric control design enable the generation and adjustment of OAM states with the merits of accuracy, compactness and practicality, which would have potential application in OAM optical fiber communication systems and other systems utilizing OAM light.

  17. Optical momentum and angular momentum in complex media: from the Abraham–Minkowski debate to unusual properties of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y.; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    We examine the momentum and angular momentum (AM) properties of monochromatic optical fields in dispersive and inhomogeneous isotropic media, using the Abraham- and Minkowski-type approaches, as well as the kinetic (Poynting-like) and canonical (with separate spin and orbital degrees of freedom) pictures. While the kinetic Abraham–Poynting momentum describes the energy flux and the group velocity of the wave, the Minkowski-type quantities, with proper dispersion corrections, describe the actual momentum and AM carried by the wave. The kinetic Minkowski-type momentum and AM densities agree with phenomenological results derived by Philbin. Using the canonical spin–orbital decomposition, previously used for free-space fields, we find the corresponding canonical momentum, spin and orbital AM of light in a dispersive inhomogeneous medium. These acquire a very natural form analogous to the Brillouin energy density and are valid for arbitrary structured fields. The general theory is applied to a non-trivial example of a surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wave at a metal-vacuum interface. We show that the integral momentum of the SPP per particle corresponds to the SPP wave vector, and hence exceeds the momentum of a photon in the vacuum. We also provide the first accurate calculation of the transverse spin and orbital AM of the SPP. While the intrinsic orbital AM vanishes, the transverse spin can change its sign depending on the SPP frequency. Importantly, we present both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, thereby proving the validity of the general phenomenological results. The microscopic theory also predicts a transverse magnetization in the metal (i.e. a magnetic moment for the SPP) as well as the corresponding direct magnetization current, which provides the difference between the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  18. Optical momentum and angular momentum in complex media: from the Abraham-Minkowski debate to unusual properties of surface plasmon-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Bliokh, Konstantin; Y Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    We examine the momentum and angular momentum (AM) properties of monochromatic optical fields in dispersive and inhomogeneous isotropic media, using the Abraham- and Minkowski-type approaches, as well as the kinetic (Poynting-like) and canonical (with separate spin and orbital degrees of freedom) pictures. While the kinetic Abraham-Poynting momentum describes the energy flux and the group velocity of the wave, the Minkowski-type quantities, with proper dispersion corrections, describe the actual momentum and AM carried by the wave. The kinetic Minkowski-type momentum and AM densities agree with phenomenological results derived by Philbin. Using the canonical spin-orbital decomposition, previously used for free-space fields, we find the corresponding canonical momentum, spin and orbital AM of light in a dispersive inhomogeneous medium. These acquire a very natural form analogous to the Brillouin energy density and are valid for arbitrary structured fields. The general theory is applied to a non-trivial example of a surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) wave at a metal-vacuum interface. We show that the integral momentum of the SPP per particle corresponds to the SPP wave vector, and hence exceeds the momentum of a photon in the vacuum. We also provide the first accurate calculation of the transverse spin and orbital AM of the SPP. While the intrinsic orbital AM vanishes, the transverse spin can change its sign depending on the SPP frequency. Importantly, we present both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, thereby proving the validity of the general phenomenological results. The microscopic theory also predicts a transverse magnetization in the metal (i.e. a magnetic moment for the SPP) as well as the corresponding direct magnetization current, which provides the difference between the Abraham and Minkowski momenta.

  19. Random wandering of laser beams with orbital angular momentum during propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Kolosov, Valeriy V; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2014-06-10

    The propagation of laser beams having orbital angular momenta (OAM) in the turbulent atmosphere is studied numerically. The variance of random wandering of these beams is investigated with the use of the Monte Carlo technique. It is found that, among various types of vortex laser beams, such as the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam, modified Bessel-Gaussian beam, and hypergeometric Gaussian beam, having identical initial effective radii and OAM, the LG beam occupying the largest effective volume in space is the most stable one.

  20. Atmospheric Angular Momentum Fluctuations During 1979-1988 Simulated by Global Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, R.; Dickey, J. O.; Marcus, S. L.; Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    Changes in major global dynamical phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere are manifested in the time series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM), as determined directly from meteorological observations and indirectly from geodetic observations of small fluctuations in the rotation of the solid Earth which are proportional to length of day. AAM fluctuations are intimately linked with energetic processes throughout the whole atmosphere and also with the stresses at the Earth's surface produced largely by turbulent momentum transport in the oceanic and continental boundary layers and by the action of normal pressure forces on orographic features. A stringent test of any numerical global circulation model (GCM) is therefore provided by a quantitative assessment of its ability to represent AAM fluctuations on all relevant timescales, ranging from months to several years. From monthly data provided by the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) of the World Climate Research Programme, we have investigated seasonal and interannual fluctuations and the decadal mean in the axial component of AAM in 23 AMIP GCMs over the period 1979-1 988. The decadal means are generally well simulated, with the model median value (1.58 x 10(exp 26) kg sq m/s) being only 3.5% larger than the observed mean and with 10 of the models being within 5% of the observed. The seasonal cycle is well reproduced, with the median amplitude of the models' seasonal standard deviations being only 2.4% larger than observed. Half the seasonal amplitudes lie within 15% of the observed, and the median correlation found between the observed and model seasonal cycles is 0.95. The dominant seasonal error is an under- estimation of AAM during northern hemisphere winter associated with errors in the position of subtropical jets. Less robust are the modeled interannual variations, although the median correlation of 0.61 between model simulations and observed AAM is statistically significant. The two El Nino

  1. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSFER AND LACK OF FRAGMENTATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING ACCRETION FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Shlosman, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    Rapid inflows associated with early galaxy formation lead to the accumulation of self-gravitating gas in the centers of proto-galaxies. Such gas accumulations are prone to nonaxisymmetric instabilities, as in the well known Maclaurin sequence of rotating ellipsoids, which are accompanied by a catastrophic loss of angular momentum (J). Self-gravitating gas is also intuitively associated with star formation. However, recent simulations of the infall process display highly turbulent continuous flows. We propose that J-transfer, which enables the inflow, also suppresses fragmentation. Inefficient J loss by the gas leads to decay of turbulence, triggering global instabilities and renewed turbulence driving. Flow regulated in this way is stable against fragmentation, while staying close to the instability threshold for bar formation-thick self-gravitating disks are prone to global instabilities before they become unstable locally. On smaller scales, the fraction of gravitationally unstable matter swept up by shocks in such a flow is a small and decreasing function of the Mach number. We conclude counterintuitively that gas able to cool down to a small fraction of its virial temperature will not fragment as it collapses. This provides a venue for supermassive black holes to form via direct infall, without the intermediary stage of forming a star cluster. Some black holes could have formed or grown in massive halos at low redshifts. Thus the fragmentation is intimately related to J redistribution within the system: it is less dependent on the molecular/metal cooling but is conditioned by the ability of the flow to develop virial, supersonic turbulence.

  2. Isoperimetric surfaces and area-angular momentum inequality in a rotating black hole in new massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceña, Andrés; López, Ericson; Llerena, Mario

    2018-03-01

    We study the existence and stability of isoperimetric surfaces in a family of rotating black holes in new massive gravity. We show that the stability of such surfaces is determined by the sign of the hair parameter. We use the isoperimetric surfaces to find a geometric inequality between the area and the angular momentum of the black hole, conjecturing geometric inequalities for more general black holes.

  3. New Two-Mode Canonical Operator Realization of Angular Momentum and Generalized Fractional Fourier Transformation Obtained via Entangled State Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Chen, Jun-hua; Low, Sen-yue

    2014-08-01

    By virtue of two mutually conjugate bipartite entangled state representations | η> and | ξ> (Fan and Klauder, Phys Rev A 49:704, 1994) we find new canonical operator realization (COR) of angular momentum. As its two applications, we point out that the COR helps to develop Schwinger bosonic realization theory, and can generalize the concept of FrFT, i.e., constructing new 2-dimensioanl fractional Fourier transformation with additivity.

  4. Comment on 'Angular momentum gated giant dipole resonance measurements in the reaction 28Si+58Ni at E(28Si)=100 and 125 MeV'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, P.; Thoennessen, M.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent paper, the giant dipole resonance width was studied as a function of angular momentum in the nucleus 86 Mo. The width of the resonance was found to be constant over a spin range of (0-40)(ℎ/2π). It was concluded that the angular momentum dependence for 86 Mo differs from that of Sn isotopes. We compared both datasets with a phenomenological formula based on the thermal fluctuation theory. The 86 Mo data are inconsistent with the formula in contrast to the previously analyzed Sn data, which seems to indicate that the angular momentum dependence of the phenomenological model is not universally applicable

  5. Spatially multiplexed orbital-angular-momentum-encoded single photon and classical channels in a free-space optical communication link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Liu, Cong; Pang, Kai; Zhao, Jiapeng; Cao, Yinwen; Xie, Guodong; Li, Long; Liao, Peicheng; Zhao, Zhe; Tur, Moshe; Boyd, Robert W; Willner, Alan E

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate spatial multiplexing of an orbital angular momentum (OAM)-encoded quantum channel and a classical Gaussian beam with a different wavelength and orthogonal polarization. Data rates as large as 100 MHz are achieved by encoding on two different OAM states by employing a combination of independently modulated laser diodes and helical phase holograms. The influence of OAM mode spacing, encoding bandwidth, and interference from the co-propagating Gaussian beam on registered photon count rates and quantum bit error rates is investigated. Our results show that the deleterious effects of intermodal crosstalk effects on system performance become less important for OAM mode spacing Δ≥2 (corresponding to a crosstalk value of less than -18.5  dB). The use of OAM domain can additionally offer at least 10.4 dB isolation besides that provided by wavelength and polarization, leading to a further suppression of interference from the classical channel.

  6. Orbital angular momentum in four channel spatial domain multiplexing system for multi-terabit per second communication architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Muralikrishnan, Hari P.; Kozaitis, Samuel P.

    2012-06-01

    Bandwidth increase has always been an important area of research in communications. A novel multiplexing technique known as Spatial Domain Multiplexing (SDM) has been developed at the Optronics Laboratory of Florida Institute of Technology to increase the bandwidth to T-bits/s range. In this technique, space inside the fiber is used effectively to transmit up to four channels of same wavelength at the same time. Experimental and theoretical analysis shows that these channels follow independent helical paths inside the fiber without interfering with each other. Multiple pigtail laser sources of exactly the same wavelength are used to launch light into a single carrier fiber in a fashion that resulting channels follow independent helical trajectories. These helically propagating light beams form optical vortices inside the fiber and carry their own Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM). The outputs of these beams appear as concentric donut shaped rings when projected on a screen. This endeavor presents the experimental outputs and simulated results for a four channel spatially multiplexed system effectively increasing the system bandwidth by a factor of four.

  7. Harmonic oscillator states with integer and non-integer orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator in two and three dimensions, with particular attention to the solutions as basis states for representing their respective symmetry groups — O(2), O(1,1), O(3), and O(2,1). The goal of this study is to establish a correspondence between Hilbert space descriptions found by solving the Schrodinger equation in polar coordinates, and Fock space descriptions constructed by expressing the symmetry operators in terms of creation/annihilation operators. We obtain wavefunctions characterized by a principal quantum number, the group Casimir eigenvalue, and one group generator whose eigenvalue is m + s, for integer m and real constant parameter s. For the three groups that contain O(2), the solutions split into two inequivalent representations, one associated with s = 0, from which we recover the familiar description of the oscillator as a product of one-dimensional solutions, and the other with s > 0 (in three dimensions, solutions are found for s = 0 and s = 1/2) whose solutions are non-separable in Cartesian coordinates, and are hence overlooked by the standard Fock space approach. The O(1,1) solutions are singlet states, restricted to zero eigenvalue of the symmetry operator, which represents the boost, not angular momentum. For O(2), a single set of creation and annihilation operators forms a ladder representation for the allowed oscillator states for any s, and the degeneracy of energy states is always finite. However, in three dimensions, the integer and half-integer eigenstates are qualitatively different: the former can be expressed as finite dimensional irreducible tensors under O(3) or O(2,1) while the latter exhibit infinite degeneracy. Creation operators that produce the allowed integer states by acting on the non-degenerate ground state are constructed as irreducible tensor products of the fundamental vector representation. However, the half-integer eigenstates are infinite-dimensional, as expected for the non

  8. Angular Momentum Transport in Protoplanetary and Black Hole Accretion Disks: The Role of Parasitic Modes in the Saturation of MHD Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias

    2010-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered a key process for driving efficient angular momentum transport in astrophysical disks. Understanding its nonlinear saturation constitutes a fundamental problem in modern accretion disk theory. The large dynamical range in physical conditions i...

  9. Triple system HD 201433 with a SPB star component seen by BRITE -Constellation ⋆ : Pulsation, differential rotation, and angular momentum transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W.,; Beck, P.,; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Tkachenko, A.; Pakhomov, Y.; Ryabchikova, T.; Lüftinger, T.; Palle, P.L.; Semenko, E.; Handler, G.; Koudelka, O.; Matthews, J.M.; Moffat, A.F.J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive OB-type stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the Universe. It is therefore important to constrain the physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution of massive OB-type stars to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar inter...

  10. Update on Pluto and Its 5 Moons Obeying the Quantization of Angular Momentum per Unit Mass Constraint of Quantum Celestial Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In July, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passing by Pluto did not discover any more moons. Therefore, we know the Pluto system total angular momentum to within 2.4%, more accurately than any other system with more than two orbiting bodies. We there- fore update our previous analysis to determine whether a definitive test of the quantum celestial mechanics (QCM angular momentum constraint can now be achieved.

  11. Galactic Angular Momentum in Cosmological Zoom-in Simulations. I. Disk and Bulge Components and the Galaxy-Halo Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Aleksandra; Capelo, Pedro R.; Fall, S. Michael; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Bonoli, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the angular momentum evolution of four disk galaxies residing in Milky-Way-sized halos formed in cosmological zoom-in simulations with various sub-grid physics and merging histories. We decompose these galaxies, kinematically and photometrically, into their disk and bulge components. The simulated galaxies and their components lie on the observed sequences in the j *-M * diagram, relating the specific angular momentum and mass of the stellar component. We find that galaxies in low-density environments follow the relation {j}* \\propto {M}* α past major mergers, with α ˜ 0.6 in the case of strong feedback, when bulge-to-disk ratios are relatively constant, and α ˜ 1.4 in the other cases, when secular processes operate on shorter timescales. We compute the retention factors (I.e., the ratio of the specific angular momenta of stars and dark matter) for both disks and bulges and show that they vary relatively slowly after averaging over numerous but brief fluctuations. For disks, the retention factors are usually close to unity, while for bulges, they are a few times smaller. Our simulations therefore indicate that galaxies and their halos grow in a quasi-homologous way.

  12. Efficient Identification of Objects Carrying Elements of High-Order Symmetry By Using Correlated Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergienko Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The potential for efficient identification of objects carrying elements of high-order symmetry using correlated orbital angular momentum (OAM states is demonstrated. The enhanced information capacity of this approach allows the recognition of specific spatial symmetry signatures present in objects with the use of fewer resources than in a conventional pixel-by-pixel imaging, representing the first demonstration of compressive sensing using OAM states. This approach demonstrates the capability to quickly evaluate multiple Fourier coefficients directly linked with the symmetry features of the object. The results suggest further application in small-scale biological contexts where symmetry and small numbers of noninvasive measurements are important.

  13. Orbital angular momentum, spin fractions, and scenarios for the proton's spin-weighted parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Qui, J.; Richards, D.; Sivers, D.

    1989-01-01

    New data from the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) on the spin-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic lepton-proton scattering suggests that the total spin carried by valence quarks in a polarized proton may be approximately canceled by a strong negative polarization of the sea of q-barq pairs. The evolution in Q/sup 2/ of the fraction of proton spin carried by gluons depends on the initial spin fractions and it is possible to avoid the introduction of large orbital angular momentum by adopting a ''hybrid'' quark-Skyrme picture of the proton suggested by the EMC results.

  14. Gaussian-beam-propagation theory for nonlinear optics involving an analytical treatment of orbital-angular-momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, R. Nicholas; Xiao, Zhihao; Zhang, Mi; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2017-07-01

    We present a general, Gaussian spatial-mode propagation formalism for describing the generation of higher-order multi-spatial-mode beams generated during nonlinear interactions. Furthermore, to implement the theory, we simulate optical angular momentum transfer interactions and show how one can optimize the interaction to reduce the undesired modes. Past theoretical treatments of this problem have often been phenomenological, at best. Here we present an exact solution for the single-pass no-cavity regime, in which the nonlinear interaction is not overly strong. We apply our theory to two experiments, with very good agreement, and give examples of several more configurations, easily tested in the laboratory.

  15. Measurement of angular correlations of jets at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV and determination of the strong coupling at high momentum transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alton, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Alverson, G. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Askew, A. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Atkins, S. [Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia); Badaud, F. [LPC, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont (France); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bandurin, D.V. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Baringer, P. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); and others

    2012-11-15

    We present a measurement of the average value of a new observable at hadron colliders that is sensitive to QCD dynamics and to the strong coupling constant, while being only weakly sensitive to parton distribution functions. The observable measures the angular correlations of jets and is defined as the number of neighboring jets above a given transverse momentum threshold which accompany a given jet within a given distance {Delta}R in the plane of rapidity and azimuthal angle. The ensemble average over all jets in an inclusive jet sample is measured and the results are presented as a function of transverse momentum of the inclusive jets, in different regions of {Delta}R and for different transverse momentum requirements for the neighboring jets. The measurement is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp{sup Macron} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. The results are well described by a perturbative QCD calculation in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant, corrected for non-perturbative effects. From these results, we extract the strong coupling and test the QCD predictions for its running over a range of momentum transfers of 50-400 GeV.

  16. Collapse and Nonlinear Instability of AdS Space with Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choptuik, Matthew W.; Dias, Óscar J. C.; Santos, Jorge E.; Way, Benson

    2017-11-01

    We present a numerical study of rotational dynamics in AdS5 with equal angular momenta in the presence of a complex doublet scalar field. We determine that the endpoint of gravitational collapse is a Myers-Perry black hole for high energies and a hairy black hole for low energies. We investigate the time scale for collapse at low energies E , keeping the angular momenta J ∝E in anti-de Sitter (AdS) length units. We find that the inclusion of angular momenta delays the collapse time, but retains a t ˜1 /E scaling. We perturb and evolve rotating boson stars, and find that boson stars near AdS space appear stable, but those sufficiently far from AdS space are unstable. We find that the dynamics of the boson star instability depend on the perturbation, resulting either in collapse to a Myers-Perry black hole, or development towards a stable oscillating solution.

  17. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Uncovering the Angular Momentum Content of Central and Satellite Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. E.; Leauthaud, A.; Emsellem, E.; Ge, J.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Greco, J.; Lin, Y.-T.; Mao, S.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; More, S.; Okabe, N.; Schneider, D. P.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D. A.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.; Yan, R.; van den Bosch, F.

    2018-01-01

    We study 379 central and 159 satellite early-type galaxies with two-dimensional kinematics from the integral-field survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) to determine how their angular momentum content depends on stellar and halo mass. Using the Yang et al. group catalog, we identify central and satellite galaxies in groups with halo masses in the range {10}12.5 {h}-1 {M}ȯ {10}11 {h}-2 {M}ȯ tend to have very little rotation, while nearly all galaxies at lower mass show some net rotation. The ∼30% of high-mass galaxies that have significant rotation do not stand out in other galaxy properties, except for a higher incidence of ionized gas emission. Our data are consistent with recent simulation results suggesting that major merging and gas accretion have more impact on the rotational support of lower-mass galaxies. When carefully matching the stellar mass distributions, we find no residual differences in angular momentum content between satellite and central galaxies at the 20% level. Similarly, at fixed mass, galaxies have consistent rotation properties across a wide range of halo mass. However, we find that errors in classification of central and satellite galaxies with group finders systematically lower differences between satellite and central galaxies at a level that is comparable to current measurement uncertainties. To improve constraints, the impact of group-finding methods will have to be forward-modeled via mock catalogs.

  18. Angular momentum transport in accretion disk boundary layers around weakly magnetized stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, M.E.; Chan, C.-K.

    2013-01-01

    ) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves...

  19. Core Angular Momentum and the IERS Sub-Centers Activity for Monitoring Global Geophysical Fluids. Part 1; Core Angular Momentum and Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xia-Dong; Chao, Benjamin (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The part of the grant was to use recordings of seismic waves travelling through the earth's core (PKP waves) to study the inner core rotation and constraints on possible density anomalies in the fluid core. The shapes and relative arrival times of such waves associated with a common source were used to reduce the uncertainties in source location and excitation and the effect of unknown mantle structure. The major effort of the project is to assemble historical seismograms with long observing base lines. We have found original paper records of SSI earthquakes at COL between 1951 and 1966 in a warehouse of the U.S. Geological Survey office in Golden, Colorado, extending the previous measurements at COL by Song and Richards [1996] further back 15 years. Also in Alaska, the University of Alaska, Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI) has been operating the Alaskan Seismic Network with over 100 stations since the late 1960s. Virtually complete archives of seismograms are still available at UAFGI. Unfortunately, most of the archives are in microchip form (develocorders), for which the use of waveforms is impossible. Paper seismograms (helicorders) are available for a limited number of stations, and digital recordings of analog signals started around 1989. Of the paper records obtained, stations at Gilmore Dome (GLM, very close to COL), Yukon (FYU), McKinley (MCK), and Sheep Creek Mountain (SCM) have the most complete continuous recordings.

  20. Fragment angular momentum and descent dynamics in {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popeko, G.S.; Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Oganessian, Y.T.; Kliman, J. [JINR, Dubna, 141980 (Russia); Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Hamilton, J.H.; Kormicki, J.; Daniel, A.V.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hwang, J.K.; Sandulescu, A.; Florescu, A.; Greiner, W. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Ter-Akopian, G.M.; Daniel, A.V.; Florescu, A.; Greiner, W. [JIHIR, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Greiner, W. [ITP, J.W. Goethe University, D-60054, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Florescu, A. [IAP, Bucharest, P.O. Box MG-6, (Russian Federation); Kliman, J.; Morhac, M. [IP SASc, Bratislava (Slovak Republic); Rasmussen, J.O. [LBNL, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stoyer, M.A. [LLNL, Livermore , California 94550 (United States); Cole, J.D. [INEL, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Fragment angular momenta as a function of neutron multiplicity were extracted for the first time for the Mo-Ba and Zr-Ce charge splits of {sup 252}Cf by studying prompt coincident {gamma}-rays. The obtained primary fragment angular momenta do not continuously rise with the increase in the number of neutrons evaporated. In frame of the scission point bending oscillation model such regularity is explained due the decrease of the bending temperature. Adiabatic bending oscillations (T=0) are obtained at large ({nu}{sub tot}{gt}5) and small ({nu}{sub tot}=0) scission point elongation. These oscillations are excited to the temperature of 2{endash}3 MeV for the most probable scission configurations indicating a weak coupling between collective and internal degrees of freedom. A strong coupling between the collective bending and dipole oscillations was found. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Identifying Orbital Angular Momentum of Vectorial Vortices with Pancharatnam Phase and Stokes Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dengke; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an explicit formula is deduced for identifying the orbital angular moment (OAM) of vectorial vortex with space-variant state of polarization (SOP). Different to scalar vortex, the OAM of vectorial vortex can be attributed to two parts: 1. the azimuthal gradient of Pancharatnam phase; 2. the product between the azimuthal gradient of orientation angle of SOP and relevant solid angle on the Poincar? sphere. With our formula, a geometrical description for OAM of light beams can be a...

  2. Experimental characterization of a 400 Gbit/s orbital angular momentum multiplexed free-space optical link over 120 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxiong; Wang, Zhe; Liao, Peicheng; Li, Long; Xie, Guodong; Huang, Hao; Zhao, Zhe; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Willner, Asher; Lavery, Martin P J; Ashrafi, Nima; Ashrafi, Solyman; Bock, Robert; Tur, Moshe; Djordjevic, Ivan B; Neifeld, Mark A; Willner, Alan E

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate and characterize the performance of a 400-Gbit/s orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexed free-space optical link over 120 m on the roof of a building. Four OAM beams, each carrying a 100-Gbit/s quadrature-phase-shift-keyed channel are multiplexed and transmitted. We investigate the influence of channel impairments on the received power, intermodal crosstalk among channels, and system power penalties. Without laser tracking and compensation systems, the measured received power and crosstalk among OAM channels fluctuate by 4.5 dB and 5 dB, respectively, over 180 s. For a beam displacement of 2 mm that corresponds to a pointing error less than 16.7 μrad, the link bit error rates are below the forward error correction threshold of 3.8×10(-3) for all channels. Both experimental and simulation results show that power penalties increase rapidly when the displacement increases.

  3. Adaptive optics compensation of orbital angular momentum beams with a modified Gerchberg-Saxton-based phase retrieval algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan; Yin, Xiao-li; Cui, Xiao-zhou; Zhang, Zhi-chao; Ma, Jian-xin; Wu, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li-jia; Xin, Xiang-jun

    2017-12-01

    Practical orbital angular momentum (OAM)-based free-space optical (FSO) communications commonly experience serious performance degradation and crosstalk due to atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, we propose a wave-front sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) system with a modified Gerchberg-Saxton (GS)-based phase retrieval algorithm to correct distorted OAM beams. We use the spatial phase perturbation (SPP) GS algorithm with a distorted probe Gaussian beam as the only input. The principle and parameter selections of the algorithm are analyzed, and the performance of the algorithm is discussed. The simulation results show that the proposed adaptive optics (AO) system can significantly compensate for distorted OAM beams in single-channel or multiplexed OAM systems, which provides new insights into adaptive correction systems using OAM beams.

  4. Right- and left-handed rules on the transverse spin angular momentum of a surface wave of photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinbing; Xia, Tongnan; Cai, Xiaoshu; Tian, Shengnan; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2017-07-01

    By investigating the surface wave of photonic crystal, we put forward two sets of rules: the right-handed screw rule, judging the transverse spin angular momentum (SAM) directions according to the propagation direction of the surface wave; and the left-handed rule, judging the excitation direction of the surface wave in accordance to the SAM direction of incident circularly polarized light and the relative position of the dipole-like scatterer with respect to the interface where the surface wave propagates. Both right- and left-handed rules apply to the interface consisting of opposite-sign-permittivity materials. With the help of these two sets of rules, it is convenient to judge the direction of the transverse SAM and the excited surface wave, which facilitate the application involving transverse SAM of the surface wave.

  5. Construction of lambda-nucleon s-wave potential through quantum inverse scattering at fixed angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoto, E. F.; Lekala, M. L.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum systems with a strangeness degree of freedom are very important as they provide an extra dimension, and hence a deeper insight into nuclear matter. Usually phenomenological potentials obtained through meson exchange theories are used in investigating these hypernuclear systems. In this paper potentials for lambda-nucleon interactions in the spin singlet and spin triplet states, constructed through fixed-angular momentum inversion based on Marchenko theory, are presented. Owing to experimental difficulties in obtaining a sufficient number of lambda-nucleon scattering events, theoretical phase shifts are used as input for the inversion. The constructed potential is energy-independent, making it more suitable for quantum-mechanical few-body calculations.

  6. Directly measuring mean and variance of infinite-spectrum observables such as the photon orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Bruno; Slussarenko, Sergei; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Santamato, Enrico

    2015-10-19

    The standard method for experimentally determining the probability distribution of an observable in quantum mechanics is the measurement of the observable spectrum. However, for infinite-dimensional degrees of freedom, this approach would require ideally infinite or, more realistically, a very large number of measurements. Here we consider an alternative method which can yield the mean and variance of an observable of an infinite-dimensional system by measuring only a two-dimensional pointer weakly coupled with the system. In our demonstrative implementation, we determine both the mean and the variance of the orbital angular momentum of a light beam without acquiring the entire spectrum, but measuring the Stokes parameters of the optical polarization (acting as pointer), after the beam has suffered a suitable spin-orbit weak interaction. This example can provide a paradigm for a new class of useful weak quantum measurements.

  7. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: correlations in molecular fluids with intrinsic angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J; Dyre, Jeppe C; Todd, B D; Bruus, Henrik

    2013-01-21

    The extended Navier-Stokes theory accounts for the coupling between the translational and rotational molecular degrees of freedom. In this paper, we generalize this theory to non-zero frequencies and wavevectors, which enables a new study of spatio-temporal correlation phenomena present in molecular fluids. To discuss these phenomena in detail, molecular dynamics simulations of molecular chlorine are performed for three different state points. In general, the theory captures the behavior for small wavevector and frequencies as expected. For example, in the hydrodynamic regime and for molecular fluids with small moment of inertia like chlorine, the theory predicts that the longitudinal and transverse intrinsic angular velocity correlation functions are almost identical, which is also seen in the molecular dynamics simulations. However, the theory fails at large wavevector and frequencies. To account for the correlations at these scales, we derive a phenomenological expression for the frequency dependent rotational viscosity and wavevector and frequency dependent longitudinal spin viscosity. From this we observe a significant coupling enhancement between the molecular angular velocity and translational velocity for large frequencies in the gas phase; this is not observed for the supercritical fluid and liquid state points.

  8. Global and Regional Axial Ocean Angular Momentum Signals and Length-of-day Variations (1985-1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Rui M.; Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    Changes in ocean angular momentum M about the polar axis are related to fluctuations in zonal currents (relative component M(sub tau) and latitudinal shifts in mass (planetary component M(sub Omega). Output from a 1 deg. ocean model is used to calculate global M(sub tau), (sub Omega), and M time series at 5 day intervals for the period January 1985 to April 1996. The annual cycle in M(sub tau), M(sub Omega), and M is larger than the semiannual cycle, and M(sub Omega) amplitudes are nearly twice those of M(sub tau). Year-to-year modulation of the seasonal cycle is present, but interannual variability is weak. The spectrum of M is red (background slope between omega(sup -1) and omega(sup -2) at sub-seasonal periods, implying a white or blue spectrum for the external torque on the ocean. Comparisons with previous studies indicate the importance of direct atmospheric forcing in inducing sub-seasonal M signals, relative to instabilities and other internal sources of rapid oceanic signals. Regional angular momentum estimates show that seasonal variability tends to be larger at low latitudes, but many local maxima exist because of the spatial structure of zonal current and mass variability. At seasonal timescales, latitudes approx. 20 deg. S - 10 deg. N contribute substantial variability to M(sub Omega), while signals in M(sub tau) can be traced to Antarctic Circumpolar Current transports and associated circulation. Variability in M is found to be small when compared with similar time series for the atmosphere and the solid Earth, but ocean signals are significantly coherent with atmosphere-solid Earth residuals, implying a measurable oceanic impact on length-of-day variations.

  9. Turbulence mitigation scheme based on multiple-user detection in an orbital-angular-momentum multiplexed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Li; Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Chen, Han-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence (AT) induced crosstalk can significantly impair the performance of a free-space optical (FSO) communication link using orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing. In this paper, we propose a multiple-user detection (MUD) turbulence mitigation scheme in an OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link. First, we present a MUD equivalent communication model for an OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link under AT. In the equivalent model, each input bit stream represents one user’s information. The deformed OAM spatial modes caused by AT, instead of the pure OAM spatial modes, are used as information carriers, and the overlapping between the deformed OAM spatial modes are computed as the correlation coefficients between the users. Then, we present a turbulence mitigation scheme based on MUD idea to enhance AT tolerance of the OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link. In the proposed scheme, the crosstalk caused by AT is used as a useful component to deduce users’ information. The numerical results show that the performance of the OAM-multiplexed communication link has greatly improved by the proposed scheme. When the turbulence strength is 1 × 10-15 m-2/3, the transmission distance is 1000 m and the channel signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 26 dB, the bit-error-rate (BER) performance of four spatial multiplexed OAM modes lm = +1,+2,+3,+4 are all close to 10-5, and there is a 2-3 fold increase in the BER performance in comparison with those results without the proposed scheme. In addition, the proposed scheme is more effective for an OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link with a larger OAM mode topological charge interval. The proposed scheme is a promising direction for compensating the interference caused by AT in the OAM-multiplexed FSO communication link. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Open Research Fund of Key Lab of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network

  10. Generation and Amplification of Coherent Radiation with Optical Orbital Angular Momentum in a Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, Erik Willard

    The object of this work is to examine how coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be generated and amplified in a single pass, high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) at the fundamental operating frequency. This concept unites two rapidly expanding, but at present largely non-overlapping fields of study: high-order OAM light modes, which interact in new ways with matter, and FELs, in which a relativistically energetic electron beam emits coherent, ultra high-brightness, highly frequency-tunable light. The ability to generate OAM light in an FEL enables new regimes of laser interaction physics to be explored at wavelengths down to hard x-rays. The theoretical portion of this dissertation attempts to provide a new predictive mathematical framework. It builds on existing work, and describes the three-dimensional electromagnetic field of the high-gain FEL as a sum of OAM modes such that the amplification properties of individual modes can be characterized. The effects of uncorrelated energy spread, longitudinal space charge, energy detuning, and transverse emittance in the electron beam are included, as is the diffraction of the laser light. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by detailed numerical Genesis 1.3 simulations. When the theory is extended to frequency harmonics, a novel interaction is uncovered that generates a helical electron beam density distribution. These predictions are also supported by numerical Tredi simulations. This type of highly correlated structure is shown to naturally emit OAM light, and forms the basis of a new high-gain, high-mode generation (HGHMG) scheme proposed in its entirety here. The experimental section examines the helical microbunching concept in a proof-of-principle experiment dubbed HELIX, performed at the UCLA Neptune laboratory. We present detailed measurement of the coherent transition radiation emitted by the 12.5 MeV electron beam that is microbunched in a second harmonic interaction with an input

  11. Single particle momentum and angular distributions in hadron-hadron collisions at ultrahigh energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, T. T.; Chen, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The forward-backward charged multiplicity distribution (P n sub F, n sub B) of events in the 540 GeV antiproton-proton collider has been extensively studied by the UA5 Collaboration. It was pointed out that the distribution with respect to n = n sub F + n sub B satisfies approximate KNO scaling and that with respect to Z = n sub F - n sub B is binomial. The geometrical model of hadron-hadron collision interprets the large multiplicity fluctuation as due to the widely different nature of collisions at different impact parameters b. For a single impact parameter b, the collision in the geometrical model should exhibit stochastic behavior. This separation of the stochastic and nonstochastic (KNO) aspects of multiparticle production processes gives conceptually a lucid and attractive picture of such collisions, leading to the concept of partition temperature T sub p and the single particle momentum spectrum to be discussed in detail.

  12. Momentum and angular correlations study in $\\pi^{-}$ nuclei jets at high energies using emulsion telescopes technique with magnetic field

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment aims at studying angular and momentum correlations between particles in high energy hadron jets, using emulsion telescopes technique. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experimental arrangement is to obtain the highest possible accuracy in angular data. The ordinary emulsion technique is known to be limited in precision by distorsion phenomena. We have developed a technique which is able to flow emulsion on both sides of glass sheets. We measure the co-ordinates of the tracks at the glass surfaces. All possible shrinkage and distorsions are eliminated. \\\\ \\\\ We use telescope units made of glass sheets, 60 $\\mu$m thick with 30 $\\mu$m emulsion on both sides; the telescopes we use contain 10 units whose position is measured before the experiment with an accuracy of about 5 $\\mu$m in the transverse direction, using an opticle rule. It is of about 1 $\\mu$m after geometrical fit on the beam tracks. In the longitudinal direction the accuracies are, respectively, 100 $\\mu$m and 10 $\\mu$m. If the target position is ...

  13. Identifying Orbital Angular Momentum of Vectorial Vortices with Pancharatnam Phase and Stokes Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengke; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-07-10

    In this work, an explicit formula is deduced for identifying the orbital angular moment (OAM) of vectorial vortex with space-variant state of polarization (SOP). Different to scalar vortex, the OAM of vectorial vortex can be attributed to two parts: 1. the azimuthal gradient of Pancharatnam phase; 2. the product between the azimuthal gradient of orientation angle of SOP and relevant solid angle on the Poincaré sphere. With our formula, a geometrical description for OAM of light beams can be achieved under the framework of the traditional Poincaré sphere. Numerical simulations for two types of vectorial vortices have been carried on to confirm our presented formula as well as demonstrate the geometrical description of OAM. Furthermore, this work would pave the way for precise characterization of OAM charge of vectorial vortices.

  14. Collapse of core toroidal angular momentum due to the coupling of rotating magnetic islands in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, B. J.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic, nonlinear evolution of tearing instabilities on DIII-D reveals a coupling of rational surfaces that can lead to phase-locking amongst multiple rotating magnetic island chains. This loss of flow shear increases disruptivity, particularly at the low level of rotation expected in ITER. Bifurcation of differential mode frequency and fluid rotation in hybrid scenario discharges has been interpreted by comparison to a recently developed theory of nonlinear mode coupling. Magnetic islands of different toroidal mode number couple to flatten the toroidal rotation profile, and the resulting phase-locked state is similar to the so-called ``slinky'' mode observed in reversed field pinch devices. Reduction of the edge safety factor increases the momentum transport, easily overwhelming the local torque density available from neutral beam injection. In discharges with q95 ~ 4.5, however, the participating modes do not remain phase-locked. In these cases, ECE-Imaging data have been used to show that the poloidal rotation of the composite, multi-helicity structure exceeds that of the measured carbon (and estimated deuterium) fluid flow. The present model of nonlinear 3-wave mode coupling does not generate the forces required to drive this rotation. Therefore, flow shear inversion represents a transition from phase-locking to a new regime of convective momentum transport in which additional mechanisms become important. These results highlight the importance of controlling multi-mode interactions in order to maintain stabilizing flow shear. Supported by US DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FG02-92-ER54141.

  15. Operador dipolo-dipolo na base de momento angular: um complemento ao estudo de ressonância magnética nuclear Dipole-dipole operator in angular momentum basis: a complementary study in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia de Oliveira Sebastião

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the magnetic dipole-dipole potential energy function and its quantum analogue is presented in this work. It is assumed the reader is familiar with the classical expression of the dipolar interaction and has basic knowledge of the quantum mechanics of angular momentum. Except for these two points only elementary steps are involved.

  16. RETRACTED — Orbital angular momentum entanglement states of Gaussian-Schell beam pumping in low-order non-Kolmogorov turbulent aberration channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongmei; Sheng, Xueli; Zhao, Fengsheng; Zhang, Yixin

    2013-04-01

    Based on the Rytov approximation, we analyze the effect of the pump beam's space-coherence of parametric down-conversion on entangled orbital angular momentum (OAM) states propagation in slant low-order turbulence aberration channels. The detection probability of signal photon of entangled OAM states is modeled. Our numerical evaluation shows that the signal photon detection probability and the crosstalk probability decay nonlinearly with the increasing of the number of space coherent speckle and the OAM quantum number of signal photon in the channels of Z-tilt aberration, astigmatism aberration, defocus aberration and coma aberration declines. The OAM entanglement states of low spatial coherence are improper to be used for the carrier wave of the encoding of OAM. The signal photon detection probability decreases as the power-law exponent of non-Kolmogorov spectrum increases from 3 to 4, in the turbulence Z-tilt, astigmatism and coma aberrations channels.

  17. Demonstration of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes emission from a silicon photonic integrated device for 20 Gbit/s QPSK carrying data transmission in few-mode fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Shimao; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate orbital angular momentum (OAM) mode emission from a high emission efficiency OAM emitter for 20 Gbit/s QPSK carrying data transmission in few-mode fiber (FMF). Two modes propagate through a 3.6km three-mode FMF with measured OSNR penalties less than 4 dB at a BER of ...

  18. Stellar Kinematics and Structural Properties of Virgo Cluster Dwarf Early-type Galaxies from the SMAKCED Project. III. Angular Momentum and Constraints on Formation Scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boselli, A.; Peletier, R. F.; Emsellem, E.; Lisker, T.; van de Ven, G.; Simon, J. D.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Adams, J. J.; Benson, A. J.; Boissier, S.; den Brok, M.; Gorgas, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Paudel, S.; Ryś, A.; Salo, H.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo Cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum λRe and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo Cluster rotate significantly faster

  19. Triple system HD 201433 with a SPB star component seen by BRITE - Constellation: Pulsation, differential rotation, and angular momentum transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinger, T.; Weiss, W. W.; Beck, P. G.; Pigulski, A.; Kuschnig, R.; Tkachenko, A.; Pakhomov, Y.; Ryabchikova, T.; Lüftinger, T.; Palle, , P. L.; Semenko, E.; Handler, G.; Koudelka, O.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Pablo, H.; Popowicz, A.; Rucinski, S.; Wade, G. A.; Zwintz, K.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive OB-type stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the Universe. It is therefore important to constrain the physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution of massive OB-type stars to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar internal rotation can be probed through asteroseismic studies of rotationally split non radial oscillations but such results are still quite rare, especially for stars more massive than the Sun. The slowly pulsating B9V star HD 201433 is known to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic triple system, with two low-mass companions orbiting with periods of about 3.3 and 154 days. Aims: Our goal is to measure the internal rotation profile of HD 201433 and investigate the tidal interaction with the close companion. Methods: We used probabilistic methods to analyse the BRITE - Constellation photometry and radial velocity measurements, to identify a representative stellar model, and to determine the internal rotation profile of the star. Results: Our results are based on photometric observations made by BRITE - Constellation and the Solar Mass Ejection Imager on board the Coriolis satellite, high-resolution spectroscopy, and more than 96 yr of radial velocity measurements. We identify a sequence of nine frequency doublets in the photometric time series, consistent with rotationally split dipole modes with a period spacing of about 5030 s. We establish that HD 201433 is in principle a solid-body rotator with a very slow rotation period of 297 ± 76 days. Tidal interaction with the inner companion has, however, significantly accelerated the spin of the surface layers by a factor of approximately one hundred. The angular momentum transfer onto the surface of HD 201433 is also reflected by the

  20. Measurement of W boson angular distributions in events with high transverse momentum jets at s=8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aaboud

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The W boson angular distribution in events with high transverse momentum jets is measured using data collected by the ATLAS experiment from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy s=8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb−1. The focus is on the contributions to W+jets processes from real W emission, which is achieved by studying events where a muon is observed close to a high transverse momentum jet. At small angular separations, these contributions are expected to be large. Various theoretical models of this process are compared to the data in terms of the absolute cross-section and the angular distributions of the muon from the leptonic W decay.

  1. Measurement of $W$ boson angular distributions in events with high transverse momentum jets at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Carney, Rebecca; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; 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Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Gui, Bin; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Zihao; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Koulouris, Aimilianos; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Loebinger, Fred; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; López, Jorge Andrés; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Maznas, Ioannis; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Meng, Xiangting; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauch, Daniel; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Roloff, Jennifer; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; 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Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spannowsky, Michael; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usui, Junya; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; 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Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Matt; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-02-10

    The $W$ boson angular distribution in events with high transverse momentum jets is measured using data collected by the ATLAS experiment from proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. The focus is on the contributions to $W$ + jets processes from real $W$ emission, which is achieved by studying events where a muon is observed close to a high transverse momentum jet. At small angular separations, these contributions are expected to be large. Various theoretical models of this process are compared to the data in terms of the absolute cross-section and the angular distributions of the muon from the leptonic $W$ decay.

  2. Spiral phase plates with radial discontinuities for the generation of multiring orbital angular momentum beams: fabrication, characterization, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Carli, Marta; Romanato, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    A design of spiral phase plates for the generation of multiring beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is presented. Besides the usual helical profile, these phase plates present radial π-discontinuities in correspondence of the zeros of the associated Laguerre polynomials. Samples were fabricated by electron beam lithography over glass substrates coated with a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer. The optical response was analyzed and the purity of the generated beams was investigated in terms of Laguerre-Gaussian modes contributions. The far-field intensity pattern was compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations, while the expected phase features were confirmed by interferometric analysis with a Mach-Zehnder setup. The high quality of the output beams confirms the applicability of these phase plates for the generation of high-order OAM beams with nonzero radial index. An application consisting of the design of computer-generated holograms encoding information for light beams carrying phase singularities is presented and described. A numerical code based on an iterative Fourier transform algorithm has been developed for the computation of phase-only diffractive optical element for illumination under OAM beams. Numerical analysis and preliminary experimental results confirm the applicability of these devices as high-security optical elements for anticounterfeiting applications.

  3. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Le; Zhao Sheng-Mei; Cheng Wei-Wen; Gong Long-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. (paper)

  4. Measurement of total angular momentum values of high-lying even ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samarium is a rare-earth element and the study of its energy levels is significant due to effects of parity non-conservation, which are expected to be of higher order ... was done using a U–Ne hollow cathode lamp and Fabry–Perot etalon fringes. For observation and optimization of two-colour LIF, single-colour LIF signal was.

  5. A Local Model for Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks Driven by the Magnetorotational Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    We develop a local model for the exponential growth and saturation of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses in turbulent flows driven by the magnetorotational instability. We first derive equations that describe the effects of the instability on the growth and pumping of the stresses. We highlight th...

  6. Toward a general theory of momentum-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2017-08-01

    The future actions, behaviors, and outcomes of objects, individuals, and processes can often be anticipated, and some of these anticipations have been hypothesized to result from momentum-like effects. Five types of momentum-like effects (representational momentum, operational momentum, attentional momentum, behavioral momentum, psychological momentum) are briefly described. Potential similarities involving properties of momentum-like effects (continuation, coherence, role of chance or guessing, role of sensory processing, imperviousness to practice or error feedback, shifts in memory for position, effects of changes in velocity, rapid occurrence, effects of retention interval, attachment to an object rather than an abstract frame of reference, nonrigid transformation) are described, and potential constraints on a future theory of momentum-like effects (dynamic representation, nature of extrapolation, sensitivity to environmental contingencies, bridging gaps between stimulus and response, increasing adaptiveness to the environment, serving as a heuristic for perception and action, insensitivity to stimulus format, importance of subjective consequences, role of knowledge and belief, automaticity of occurrence, properties of functional architecture) are discussed. The similarity and ubiquity of momentum-like effects suggests such effects might result from a single or small number of mechanisms that operate over different dimensions, modalities, and time-scales and provide a fundamental adaptation for perception and action. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Earth System Dynamics: The Determination and Interpretation of the Global Angular Momentum Budget using the Earth Observing System. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this investigation has been to examine the mass and momentum exchange between the atmosphere, oceans, solid Earth, hydrosphere, and cryosphere. The investigation has focused on changes in the Earth's gravity field, its rotation rate, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, global sea level change, ice sheet change, and global ground water circulation observed by contemporary sensors and models. The primary component of the mass exchange is water. The geodetic observables provided by these satellite sensors are used to study the transport of water mass in the hydrological cycle from one component of the Earth to another, and they are also used to evaluate the accuracy of models. As such, the investigation is concerned with the overall global water cycle. This report provides a description of scientific, educational and programmatic activities conducted during the period July 1, 1999 through June 30,2000. Research has continued into measurements of time-varying gravity and its relationship to Earth rotation. Variability of angular momentum and the related excitation of polar motion and Earth rotation have been examined for the atmosphere and oceans at time-scales of weeks to several years. To assess the performance of hydrologic models, we have compared geodetic signals derived from them with those observed by satellites. One key component is the interannual mass variability of the oceans obtained by direct observations from altimetry after removing steric signals. Further studies have been conducted on the steric model to quantify its accuracy at global and basin-scales. The results suggest a significant loss of water mass from the Oceans to the land on time-scales longer than 1-year. These signals are not reproduced in any of the models, which have poorly determined interannual fresh water fluxes. Output from a coupled atmosphere-ocean model testing long-term climate change hypotheses has been compared to simulated errors from the Gravity Recovery and

  8. Segmental contributions to sagittal-plane whole-body angular momentum when using powered compared to passive ankle-foot prostheses on ramps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickle, Nathaniel T; Silverman, Anne K; Wilken, Jason M; Fey, Nicholas P

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the effects of an assistive device on dynamic balance is crucial, particularly for robotic leg prostheses. Analyses of dynamic balance commonly evaluate the range of whole-body angular momentum (H). However, the contributions of individual body segments to overall H throughout gait may yield futher insights, specifically for people with transtibial amputation using powered prostheses. We evaluated segment contributions to H using Statistical Parametric Mapping to assess the effects of prosthesis type (powered vs passive) and ramp angle on segmental coordination. The slope main effect was significant in all segments, the prosthesis main effect was significant in the prosthetic leg (device and residuum) and trunk, and the slope by prosthesis interaction effect was significant in the prosthetic leg and trunk. The magnitude of contributions to sagittal-plane H from the prosthetic leg was larger when using the powered prosthesis. The trunk contributed more positive (backward) H after prosthetic leg toe-off when using the powered prosthesis on inclines, similar to the soleus muscle. However, trunk contributions to H on declines were similar when using a powered and passive prosthesis, suggesting that the powered prosthesis may not replicate soleus function when walking downhill. Our novel assessment method evaluated robotic leg prostheses not only based on local joint mechanics, but also considering whole-body biomechanics.

  9. A symmetry-conserving description of odd nuclei with the Gogny force. Particle number and angular-momentum projection with self-consistent blocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrajo, M.; Egido, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    We present an approach for the calculation of odd nuclei with exact self-consistent blocking and particle number and angular-momentum projection with the finite-range density-dependent Gogny force. As an application we calculate the nucleus {sup 31}Mg at the border of the N = 20 inversion island. We evaluate the ground-state properties, the excited states and the transition probabilities. In general we obtain a good description of the measured observables. (orig.)

  10. Numerical Solution of the Schr\\"odinger Equation for a Short-Range 1/r Singular Potential with any L Angular Momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Sous, Abdulla Jameel; El-Kawni, M. I.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the Asymptotic Iteration Method (AIM) was used to calculate the energy spectrum for a short rang three parameter central potential which was introduced by H. Bahlouli and A. D. Alhaidari. The S-orbital wave solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation was obtained for different parameters of the potential. In this work a non-zero angular momentum term were introduced to the problem and the energy eigenvalues were obtained for different potential parameters. Our results show very good agre...

  11. Characterizing the Velocity Profile of a Swirling Gas Experiment by Particle Imaging Velocimetry to Study Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greess, Samuel; Ji, Hantao; Merino, Enrique; Berrios, William

    2013-10-01

    The method by which angular momentum transfers between different sections of accretion disks is a matter of ongoing debate. One suggested answer is Magnetorotational instability (MRI), which would facilitate this transfer through the magnetic interactions between particles at different distances from the center of the disk. While ongoing experiments with MRI have focused on the use of liquid metals to test the effects of magnetic fields, we are developing a swirling gas experiment to study effects beyond incompressible hydrodynamics, including compressible gas dynamics and plasma effects when gas is ionized. A second-generation prototype swirling gas experiment has been built to test the principle and to establish favorable rotation profiles using a chamber of swirling fog to simulate the formation and movement of accretion disks about some gravitational center. The paths of the visible fog particles can then be analyzed with Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) techniques; these velocity measurements can then be organized by a Python program. Anticipated results include a radial profile of velocities at different times during the gas injection process, as well as further refinement of the fog chamber design to improve the accuracy in controlling the profile.

  12. Dimensional Effects on the Momentum distribution of Bosonic Trimer States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Bellotti, F.; Frederico, T.; T. Yamashita, M.

    2013-01-01

    The momentum distribution is a powerful probe of strongly-interacting systems that are expected to display universal behavior. This is contained in the contact parameters which relate few- and many-body properties. Here we consider a Bose gas in two dimensions and explicitly show that the two......-body contact parameter is universal and then demonstrate that the momentum distribution at next-to-leading order has a logarithmic dependence on momentum which is vastly different from the three-dimensional case. Based on this, we propose a scheme for measuring the effective dimensionality of a quantum many......-body system by exploiting the functional form of the momentum distribution....

  13. High-Capacity Free-Space Optical Communications Between a Ground Transmitter and a Ground Receiver via a UAV Using Multiplexing of Multiple Orbital-Angular-Momentum Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Zhang, Runzhou; Zhao, Zhe; Xie, Guodong; Liao, Peicheng; Pang, Kai; Song, Haoqian; Liu, Cong; Ren, Yongxiong; Labroille, Guillaume; Jian, Pu; Starodubov, Dmitry; Lynn, Brittany; Bock, Robert; Tur, Moshe; Willner, Alan E

    2017-12-12

    We explore the use of orbital-angular-momentum (OAM)-multiplexing to increase the capacity of free-space data transmission to moving platforms, with an added potential benefit of decreasing the probability of data intercept. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate and characterize the performance of an OAM-multiplexed, free-space optical (FSO) communications link between a ground transmitter and a ground receiver via a moving unmanned-aerial-vehicle (UAV). We achieve a total capacity of 80 Gbit/s up to 100-m-roundtrip link by multiplexing 2 OAM beams, each carrying a 40-Gbit/s quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signal. Moreover, we investigate for static, hovering, and moving conditions the effects of channel impairments, including: misalignments, propeller-induced airflows, power loss, intermodal crosstalk, and system bit error rate (BER). We find the following: (a) when the UAV hovers in the air, the power on the desired mode fluctuates by 2.1 dB, while the crosstalk to the other mode is -19 dB below the power on the desired mode; and (b) when the UAV moves in the air, the power fluctuation on the desired mode increases to 4.3 dB and the crosstalk to the other mode increases to -10 dB. Furthermore, the channel crosstalk decreases with an increase in OAM mode spacing.

  14. Transverse and longitudinal angular momenta of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y., E-mail: k.bliokh@gmail.com [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nonlinear Physics Centre, RSPhysE, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Nori, Franco [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    We review basic physics and novel types of optical angular momentum. We start with a theoretical overview of momentum and angular momentum properties of generic optical fields, and discuss methods for their experimental measurements. In particular, we describe the well-known longitudinal (i.e., aligned with the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta in polarized vortex beams. Then, we focus on the transverse (i.e., orthogonal to the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta, which were recently actively discussed in theory and observed in experiments. First, the recently-discovered transverse spin  angular momenta appear in various structured fields: evanescent waves, interference fields, and focused beams. We show that there are several kinds of transverse spin angular momentum, which differ strongly in their origins and physical properties. We describe extraordinary features of the transverse optical spins and overview recent experiments. In particular, the helicity-independent transverse spin inherent in edge evanescent waves offers robust spin–direction coupling at optical interfaces (the quantum spin Hall effect of light). Second, we overview the transverse orbital angular momenta of light, which can be both extrinsic and intrinsic. These two types of the transverse orbital angular momentum are produced by spatial shifts of the optical beams (e.g., in the spin Hall effect of light) and their Lorentz boosts, respectively. Our review is underpinned by a unified theory of the angular momentum of light based on the canonical momentum and spin densities, which avoids complications associated with the separation of spin and orbital angular momenta in the Poynting picture. It allows us to construct a comprehensive classification of all known optical angular momenta based on their key parameters and main physical properties.

  15. Absorption of mass and angular momentum by a black hole: Time-domain formalisms for gravitational perturbations, and the small-hole or slow-motion approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The first objective of this work is to obtain practical prescriptions to calculate the absorption of mass and angular momentum by a black hole when external processes produce gravitational radiation. These prescriptions are formulated in the time domain (in contrast with the frequency-domain formalism of Teukolsky and Press) within the framework of black-hole perturbation theory. Two such prescriptions are presented. The first is based on the Teukolsky equation and it applies to general (rotating) black holes. The second is based on the Regge-Wheeler and Zerilli equations and it applies to nonrotating black holes. The second objective of this work is to apply the time-domain absorption formalisms to situations in which the black hole is either small or slowly moving; the mass of the black hole is then assumed to be much smaller than the radius of curvature of the external spacetime in which the hole moves. In the context of this small-hole/slow-motion approximation, the equations of black-hole perturbation theory can be solved analytically, and explicit expressions can be obtained for the absorption of mass and angular momentum. The changes in the black-hole parameters can then be understood in terms of an interaction between the tidal gravitational fields supplied by the external universe and the hole's tidally-induced mass and current quadrupole moments. For a nonrotating black hole the quadrupole moments are proportional to the rate of change of the tidal fields on the hole's world line. For a rotating black hole they are proportional to the tidal fields themselves. When placed in identical environments, a rotating black hole absorbs more energy and angular momentum than a nonrotating black hole

  16. Angular momentum distribution for the formation of evaporation residues in fusion of 19F with 184W near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Prasad, E.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Shidling, P.D.; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K.S.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Rao, P.V. Madhusudhana; Sinha, A.K.; Pal, Santanu

    2011-01-01

    We present γ-ray multiplicity distributions for the formation of evaporation residues in the fusion reaction 19 F + 184 W → 203 83 Bi 120 at beam energies in the range of 90-110 MeV. The measurements were carried out using a 14 element BGO detector array and the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. The data have been unfolded to obtain angular momentum distributions with inputs from the statistical model calculation. Comparison with another neighboring system, viz. 19 F + 175 Lu → 194 80 Hg 114 with nearly similar entrance-channel mass asymmetry, hints at the depletion of higher angular momenta after crossing of the Z=82 shell in the compound nucleus.

  17. Neutron emission and angular momentum distribution study for the compound nucleus 165 Dy in the 4 n and 5 n exit channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benet, P.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of neutron emission in the 4n and 5n exit channels of the 156 Dy compound nucleus. Average neutron evaporation energies have been measured as well as the total energy released in the γ-cascades. Then the γ-multiplicity distributions have been determined for each case. When associated with the measured neutron energies, the multiplicity distributions determine the entry lines of the residual nuclei. The difference between the neutron energies measured directly and these energies deduced from γ-cascades poses the problem of the binding energy of the neutron in high temperature and high angular momentum nuclei [fr

  18. Ionization of oriented targets by intense circularly polarized laser pulses: Imprints of orbital angular nodes in the two-dimensional momentum distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Christian; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a few-cycle circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse that interacts with an oriented target exemplified by an argon atom, initially in a 3px or 3py state. The photoelectron momentum distributions show distinct signatures......, we show that ionization by a circularly polarized pulse completely maps out the angular nodal structure of the initial state, thus providing a potential tool for studying orbital symmetry in individual systems or during chemical reactions....

  19. Experimental characterization of a 400  Gbit/s orbital angular momentum multiplexed free-space optical link over 120 m

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Yongxiong; Wang, Zhe; Liao, Peicheng; Li, Long; Xie, Guodong; Huang, Hao; Zhao, Zhe; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Willner, Asher; Lavery, Martin P.J.; Ashrafi, Nima; Ashrafi, Solyman; Bock, Robert; Tur, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate and characterize the\\ud performance of a 400-Gbit/s orbital angular momentum\\ud (OAM) multiplexed free-space optical link over 120-\\ud meters on the roof of a building. Four OAM beams, each\\ud carrying a 100-Gbit/s QPSK channel are multiplexed and\\ud transmitted. We investigate the influence of channel\\ud impairments on the received power, inter-modal\\ud crosstalk among channels, and system power penalties.\\ud Without laser tracking and compensation systems, the\\...

  20. Angular shift in scattering the spherical analogous of the Goos-Hanchen effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari Junior, N.F.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    A generalization of the time and spatial delay concept is obtained, for the scattering of transversaly incident beam restricted by a spherically symmetric scatterer using the methods of the complex angular momentum, valid for the angular momentum and angle conjufated variable pair. The result obtained is known validity domain, within the semiclassical approximation. Applied to the scttering problem in the high frequency limit by a transparent sphere with refractive index N [pt

  1. Counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution for atoms in strong few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Christian; Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a three-cycle circularly polarized laser pulse interacting with an atom. The photoelectron momentum distributions show counterintuitive shifts, similar to those observed in a recent experiment (Eckle et al 2008 Science 322 1525...

  2. Effect of ELMs on rotation and momentum confinement in H-mode discharges in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versloot, T.W.; de Vries, P.C.; Giroud, C.

    2010-01-01

    The loss of plasma toroidal angular momentum and thermal energy by edge localized modes (ELMs) has been studied in JET. The analysis shows a consistently larger drop in momentum in comparison with the energy loss associated with the ELMs. This difference originates from the large reduction in ang...

  3. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghilani, Mohamed S; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-12-05

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here "orbital birefringence", based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create "orbital gain dichroism" allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications.

  4. High orbital angular momentum states in H2 and D2. II. The 6h--5g and 6g--5f transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, C.; Dabrowski, I.; Herzberg, G.; Kendall, D.J.W.

    1989-01-01

    A group of lines accompanying the first line of the Pfund series of the H atom has been observed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The lines are due to transitions in molecular hydrogen of a nonpenetrating Rydberg electron possessing a high-orbital angular momentum, which is coupled only loosely to the vibrations and rotations of the H + 2 core. Lines belonging to the 6h--5g and 6g--5f (v=0--3) transitions of H 2 have been identified. The identifications are based on a calculation of the spectrum from first principles by multichannel quantum defect theory. The interaction between the nonpenetrating electron and the core was evaluated in terms of the permanent and induced molecular moments of H + 2 as calculated by Bishop and collaborators. The analogous transitions in D 2 have also been observed and assigned

  5. Frequency-resolved measurement of the orbital angular momentum spectrum of femtosecond ultra-broadband optical-vortex pulses based on field reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Keisaku; Yang, Zhili; Toda, Yasunori; Morita, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    We propose a high-precision method for measuring the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum of ultra-broadband optical-vortex (OV) pulses from fork-like interferograms between OV pulses and a reference plane-wave pulse. It is based on spatial reconstruction of the electric fields of the pulses to be measured from the frequency-resolved interference pattern. Our method is demonstrated experimentally by obtaining the OAM spectra for different spectral components of the OV pulses, enabling us to characterize the frequency dispersion of the topological charge of the OAM spectrum by a simple experimental setup. Retrieval is carried out in quasi-real time, allowing us to investigate OAM spectra dynamically. Furthermore, we determine the relative phases (including the sign) of the topological-charge-resolved electric-field amplitudes, which are significant for evaluating OVs or OV pulses with arbitrarily superposed modes. (paper)

  6. Interannual variations in length of day and atmospheric angular momentum, and their seasonal associations with El Niño/Southern Oscillation-like sea surface temperature patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuefeng; Xiao, Ziniu; Shi, Wenjing; Zhong, Qi; Wang, Qiguang; Li, Huanlian

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the seasonal connections between the interannual variations in LOD (length of day)/AAMglobe (the relative atmospheric angular momentum for the whole globe) and the ENSO-like SST (El Niño/Southern Oscillation-like sea surface temperature) pattern and corresponding zonal and vertical circulations. Consistent with previous studies, the ENSO-like SST impact the following season LOD/AAMglobe, with the strongest correlations in DJF (December, January, and February), when it is likely to be the peak El Niño/La Niña period. Lag correlations between the interannual variations in LOD/AAMglobe and surface temperature, and the interannual variations in LOD and both zonal circulation and vertical airflow around the equator, consistently indicate that the LOD/AAMglobe reflect the potential impacts of variations in the Earth's rotation rate on the following season's sea surface temperatures (SST) over the tropical central and eastern Pacific (where the ENSO-like SST pattern is located). Moreover, the centers of strongest variation in the AAMcolumn (the relative atmospheric angular momentum for an air column and the unit mass over a square meter) are located over the mid-latitudinal North Pacific in DJF and MAM (March, April, and May), and over the mid-latitudinal South Pacific in JJA (June, July, and August) and SON (September, October, and November). This suggests that the AAMcolumn over the mid-latitudinal Pacific around 30°N (30°S) dominate the modulation of Earth's rotation rate, and then impact the variations in LOD during DJF and MAM (JJA and SON).

  7. Renormalization in Large Momentum Effective Theory of Parton Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong

    2018-03-01

    In the large-momentum effective field theory approach to parton physics, the matrix elements of nonlocal operators of quark and gluon fields, linked by straight Wilson lines in a spatial direction, are calculated in lattice quantum chromodynamics as a function of hadron momentum. Using the heavy-quark effective theory formalism, we show a multiplicative renormalization of these operators at all orders in perturbation theory, both in dimensional and lattice regularizations. The result provides a theoretical basis for extracting parton properties through properly renormalized observables in Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Superradiance for the study of gamma ray lasers in a system with a change of angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudenko, Y.A.; Kuz'min, E.V.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation of a system of isomer nuclei due to an electromagnetic transition with change of momentum J 2 -J 1 and directly connected to exchange of a magnetic interaction was investigated. Such an interaction may be a magnetic exchange interaction of the Ruderman-Kittel or Sull-Nakamura type as well as any other type of interaction resulting in nuclear ferromagnetism at T 2 , Rsup(z), J 2 , Jsup(z)) and the maximum value of the cooperation number. This method of initial state preparation in this range of frequencies replaces the π/2-impulse technique in optics. The superradiance intensity of the system from a waveguide is found, assuming |k|= const for angles from zero to the Bragg angle. (author)

  9. Orbital angular momentum transfer and spin desalignment mechanisms in the deep inelastic collisions Ar+Bi and Ni+Pb using the sequential fission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, J.C.

    1984-10-01

    Angular momentum transfer and spin dealignment mechanisms have been studied in the deep inelastic collisions Ar+Bi and Ni+Pb using the sequential fission method. This experimental technique consists to measure the angular distribution of the fission fragments of a heavy nucleus in coincidence with the reaction partner, and leads to a complete determination of the heavy nucleus spin distribution. High spin values are transferred to the heavy nucleus in the interaction and indicate that the dinuclear system has reached the rigid rotation limit. A theoretical model, taking into account the excitation of surface vibrations of the nuclei and the nucleon transfer between the two partners, is able to reproduce the high spin values measured in our experiments. The spin fluctuations are important, with values of the order of 15 to 20 h units. These fluctuations increase with the charge transfer from the projectile to the target and the total kinetic energy loss. The spin dealignment mechanisms act mainly in a plane approximately perpendicular to the heavy recoil direction in the laboratory system. These results are well described by a dynamical transport model based on the stochastic exchange of individual nucleons between the two nuclei during the interaction. The origin of the dealignment mechanisms in the spin transfer processes is then related to the statistical nature of the nucleon exchange. However other mechanisms can contribute to the spin dealignment as the surface vibrations, the nuclear deformations as well their relative orientations [fr

  10. Generating millimeter-wave Bessel beam with orbital angular momentum using reflective-type metasurface inherently integrated with source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yizhu; Yang, Jiawei; Meng, Hongfu; Dou, Wenbin; Hu, Sanming

    2018-04-01

    Metasurfaces, orbital angular momenta (OAM), and non-diffractive Bessel beams have been attracting worldwide research. Combining the benefits of these three promising techniques, this paper proposes a metasurface-based reflective-type approach to generate a first-order Bessel beam carrying OAM. To validate this approach, a millimeter-wave metasurface is analyzed, designed, fabricated, and measured. Experimental results agree well with simulation. Moreover, this reflective-type metasurface, generating a Bessel beam with OAM, is inherently integrated with a planar feeding source in the same single-layer printed circuit board. Therefore, the proposed design features low profile, low cost, easy integration with front-end active circuits, and no alignment error between the feeding source and the metasurface.

  11. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  12. Measurement of angular correlations in Drell-Yan lepton pairs to probe Z/gamma* boson transverse momentum at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Gunther, Jaroslav; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Juránek, Vojtěch; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Vrba, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 720, 1-3 (2013), s. 32-51 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ATLAS * CERN * vector boson * transverse momentum * quantum chromodynamics * perturbation theory * resummation * Monte Carlo * angular correlation * dilepton Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 6.019, year: 2013

  13. A study of the angular distribution of the secondary particles of anti pAg/Br reactions at 1.4 GeV/c incident momentum observed in photographic emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.; Soerensen, S.O.

    1983-04-01

    Some features of anti pAg/Br reactions at 1.4 GeV/c incident momentum are studied by means of the emulsion technique. The distributions of the number of charged particles/event are presented. The angular distributions indicate som anisotropic process in the nuclear matter, possibly shock waves, and some back-to-back emission

  14. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  15. An order of magnitude improvement in optical fiber bandwidth using spatial domain multiplexing/space division multiplexing (SDM) in conjunction with orbital angular momentum (OAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed; Alanzi, Saud; Hridoy, Arnob; Lovell, Greg; Parhar, Gurinder; Chakravarty, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Bilas

    2014-09-01

    Spatial Domain Multiplexing/Space Division Multiplexing (SDM) can increase the bandwidth of existing and futuristic optical fibers by an order of magnitude or more. In the SDM technique, we launch multiple single mode pigtail laser sources of same wavelength into a carrier fiber at different angles. The launching angles decide the output of the carrier fiber by allocating separate spatial locations for each channel. Each channel follows a helical trajectory while traversing the length of the carrier fiber, thereby allowing spatial reuse of optical frequencies. In this endeavor we launch light from five different single mode pigtail laser sources at different angles (with respect to the axis of the carrier fiber) into the carrier fiber. Owing to helical propagation we get five distinct concentric donut shaped rings with negligible crosstalk at the output end of the fiber. These SDM channels also exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM), thereby adding an extra degree of photon freedom. We present the experimental data of five spatially multiplexed channels and compare them with simulated results to show that this technique can potentially improve the data capacity of optical fibers by an order of magnitude: A factor of five using SDM and another factor of two using OAM.

  16. Combining spatial domain multiplexing and orbital angular momentum of photon-based multiplexing to increase the bandwidth of optical fiber communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed; Alanzi, Saud; Hridoy, Arnob; Lovell, Gregory L.; Parhar, Gurinder; Chakravarty, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Bilas

    2016-06-01

    Spatial domain multiplexing/space division multiplexing (SDM) can increase the bandwidth of existing and futuristic optical fibers by an order of magnitude or more. In the SDM technique, we launch multiple single-mode pigtail laser sources of the same wavelength into a carrier multimode fiber at different angles. The launching angles decide the output of the carrier fiber by allocating separate spatial locations for each channel. Each channel follows a helical trajectory while traversing the length of the carrier fiber, thereby allowing spatial reuse of optical frequencies. We launch light from five different single-mode pigtail laser sources (of same wavelength) at different angles (with respect to the axis of the carrier fiber) into the carrier fiber. Owing to helical propagation, five distinct concentric donut-shaped rings with negligible crosstalk at the output end of the fiber were obtained. These SDM channels also exhibit orbital angular momentum (OAM), thereby adding an extradegree of photon freedom. We present the experimental data of five spatially multiplexed channels and compare them with simulated results to show that this technique can potentially improve the data capacity of optical fibers by an order of magnitude: A factor of five using SDM and another factor of two using OAM.

  17. Velocity-tunable slow beams of cold O2 in a single spin-rovibronic state with full angular-momentum orientation by multistage Zeeman deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Schmutz, H.; Motsch, M.; Merkt, F.

    2012-08-01

    Cold samples of oxygen molecules in supersonic beams have been decelerated from initial velocities of 390 and 450 m s-1 to final velocities in the range between 150 and 280 m s-1 using a 90-stage Zeeman decelerator. (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced-multiphoton-ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3sσ g 3Π g (C) ? two-photon transition of O2 have been recorded to characterize the state selectivity of the deceleration process. The decelerated molecular sample was found to consist exclusively of molecules in the J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational component of the X ? ground state of O2. Measurements of the REMPI spectra using linearly polarized laser radiation with polarization vector parallel to the decelerator axis, and thus to the magnetic-field vector of the deceleration solenoids, further showed that only the ? magnetic sublevel of the N‧‧ = 1, J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational level is populated in the decelerated sample, which therefore is characterized by a fully oriented total-angular-momentum vector. By maintaining a weak quantization magnetic field beyond the decelerator, the polarization of the sample could be maintained over the 5 cm distance separating the last deceleration solenoid and the detection region.

  18. Probability density of orbital angular momentum mode of autofocusing Airy beam carrying power-exponent-phase vortex through weak anisotropic atmosphere turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Guo, Lixin; Cheng, Mingjian; Li, Jiangting; Huang, Qingqing; Sun, Ridong

    2017-06-26

    The probability densities of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes of the autofocusing Airy beam (AAB) carrying power-exponent-phase vortex (PEPV) after passing through the weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere are theoretically formulated. It is found that the AAB carrying PEPV is the result of the weighted superposition of multiple OAM modes at differing positions within the beam cross-section, and the mutual crosstalk among different OAM modes will compensate the distortion of each OAM mode and be helpful for boosting the anti-jamming performance of the communication link. Based on numerical calculations, the role of the wavelength, waist width, topological charge and power order of PEPV in the probability density distribution variations of OAM modes of the AAB carrying PEPV is explored. Analysis shows that a relatively small beam waist and longer wavelength are good for separating the detection regions between signal OAM mode and crosstalk OAM modes. The probability density distribution of the signal OAM mode does not change obviously with the topological charge variation; but it will be greatly enhanced with the increase of power order. Furthermore, it is found that the detection region center position of crosstalk OAM mode is an emergent property resulting from power order and topological charge. Therefore, the power order can be introduced as an extra steering parameter to modulate the probability density distributions of OAM modes. These results provide guidelines for the design of an optimal detector, which has potential application in optical vortex communication systems.

  19. Mode division multiplexing using an orbital angular momentum mode sorter and MIMO-DSP over a graded-index few-mode optical fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Milione, Giovanni; Lavery, Martin P J; Xie, Guodong; Ren, Yongxiong; Cao, Yinwen; Ahmed, Nisar; An Nguyen, Thien; Nolan, Daniel A; Li, Ming-Jun; Tur, Moshe; Alfano, Robert R; Willner, Alan E

    2015-10-09

    Mode division multiplexing (MDM)- using a multimode optical fiber's N spatial modes as data channels to transmit N independent data streams - has received interest as it can potentially increase optical fiber data transmission capacity N-times with respect to single mode optical fibers. Two challenges of MDM are (1) designing mode (de)multiplexers with high mode selectivity (2) designing mode (de)multiplexers without cascaded beam splitting's 1/N insertion loss. One spatial mode basis that has received interest is that of orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes. In this paper, using a device referred to as an OAM mode sorter, we show that OAM modes can be (de)multiplexed over a multimode optical fiber with higher than -15 dB mode selectivity and without cascaded beam splitting's 1/N insertion loss. As a proof of concept, the OAM modes of the LP11 mode group (OAM-1,0 and OAM+1,0), each carrying 20-Gbit/s polarization division multiplexed and quadrature phase shift keyed data streams, are transmitted 5km over a graded-index, few-mode optical fibre. Channel crosstalk is mitigated using 4 × 4 multiple-input-multiple-output digital-signal-processing with <1.5 dB power penalties at a bit-error-rate of 2 × 10(-3).

  20. The rigorous bound on the transmission probability for massless scalar field of non-negative-angular-momentum mode emitted from a Myers-Perry black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit; Visser, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Hawking radiation is the evidence for the existence of black hole. What an observer can measure through Hawking radiation is the transmission probability. In the laboratory, miniature black holes can successfully be generated. The generated black holes are, most commonly, Myers-Perry black holes. In this paper, we will derive the rigorous bounds on the transmission probabilities for massless scalar fields of non-negative-angular-momentum modes emitted from a generated Myers-Perry black hole in six, seven, and eight dimensions. The results show that for low energy, the rigorous bounds increase with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. However, for high energy, the rigorous bounds decrease with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. When the black holes spin faster, the rigorous bounds decrease. For dimension dependence, the rigorous bounds also decrease with the increase in the number of extra dimensions. Furthermore, as comparison to the approximate transmission probability, the rigorous bound is proven to be useful.

  1. The rigorous bound on the transmission probability for massless scalar field of non-negative-angular-momentum mode emitted from a Myers-Perry black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos, E-mail: tritos.ngampitipan@gmail.com [Faculty of Science, Chandrakasem Rajabhat University, Ratchadaphisek Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Particle Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Boonserm, Petarpa, E-mail: petarpa.boonserm@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Chatrabhuti, Auttakit, E-mail: dma3ac2@gmail.com [Particle Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Visser, Matt, E-mail: matt.visser@msor.vuw.ac.nz [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Operations Research, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2016-06-02

    Hawking radiation is the evidence for the existence of black hole. What an observer can measure through Hawking radiation is the transmission probability. In the laboratory, miniature black holes can successfully be generated. The generated black holes are, most commonly, Myers-Perry black holes. In this paper, we will derive the rigorous bounds on the transmission probabilities for massless scalar fields of non-negative-angular-momentum modes emitted from a generated Myers-Perry black hole in six, seven, and eight dimensions. The results show that for low energy, the rigorous bounds increase with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. However, for high energy, the rigorous bounds decrease with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. When the black holes spin faster, the rigorous bounds decrease. For dimension dependence, the rigorous bounds also decrease with the increase in the number of extra dimensions. Furthermore, as comparison to the approximate transmission probability, the rigorous bound is proven to be useful.

  2. Angular glint effects generation for false naval target verisimility requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostis, Theodoros G; Galanis, Konstantinos G; Katsikas, Sokratis K

    2009-01-01

    A stimulating problem in the generation of coherent countermeasures for high range resolution radar systems is the inclusion of angular glint effects in the preparation of the false target mask. Since angular glint is representative of extended naval targets, this inclusion increases the credibility factor of the decoy playback signal at the adversary radar-operator station. In this paper, the ability of an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) simulator to provide a proof of concept towards the clarification of this challenging task is ascertained. The solution consists of three novel vector representations of the generated data, which are proven to behave according to the laws of physics governing the glint phenomenon. The first depiction is the angular glint injection at the target which is followed by the representation of the wavefront distortion at the radar. A value-added time procession integration of the target in pure roll motion provides an expected by ISAR theory side-view image of the naval extended false target. The effectiveness of the proposed approach through verification and validation of the results by using the method of pictorial evidence is established. A final argument is raised on the usage of this software tool for actual obfuscation and deception actions for air defence at sea applications

  3. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  4. Transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and a resulting model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhenyu

    2007-02-15

    In this thesis we report on the rst results on the transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. It is shown that this asymmetry can provide one of the rare possibilities to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) E of the nucleon, and thus, through models for E, also to the total angular momentum of u and d quarks in the nucleon. The measurement was performed using the 27.6 GeV positron beam of the HERA storage ring and the transversely polarized hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY. The two leading azimuthal amplitudes of the asymmetry are extracted from the HERMES 2002-2004 data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 65.3 pb.1. By comparing the results obtained at HERMES and theoretical predictions based on a phenomenological model of GPDs, we obtain a model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  5. Transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and a resulting model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhenyu

    2007-02-01

    In this thesis we report on the rst results on the transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. It is shown that this asymmetry can provide one of the rare possibilities to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) E of the nucleon, and thus, through models for E, also to the total angular momentum of u and d quarks in the nucleon. The measurement was performed using the 27.6 GeV positron beam of the HERA storage ring and the transversely polarized hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY. The two leading azimuthal amplitudes of the asymmetry are extracted from the HERMES 2002-2004 data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 65.3 pb.1. By comparing the results obtained at HERMES and theoretical predictions based on a phenomenological model of GPDs, we obtain a model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  6. The Effects of Minimal Length, Maximal Momentum, and Minimal Momentum in Entropic Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Wen Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modified entropic force law is studied by using a new kind of generalized uncertainty principle which contains a minimal length, a minimal momentum, and a maximal momentum. Firstly, the quantum corrections to the thermodynamics of a black hole are investigated. Then, according to Verlinde’s theory, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP corrected entropic force is obtained. The result shows that the GUP corrected entropic force is related not only to the properties of the black holes but also to the Planck length and the dimensionless constants α0 and β0. Moreover, based on the GUP corrected entropic force, we also derive the modified Einstein’s field equation (EFE and the modified Friedmann equation.

  7. Time series momentum and contrarian effects in the Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huai-Long; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2017-10-01

    This paper concentrates on the time series momentum or contrarian effects in the Chinese stock market. We evaluate the performance of the time series momentum strategy applied to major stock indices in mainland China and explore the relation between the performance of time series momentum strategies and some firm-specific characteristics. Our findings indicate that there is a time series momentum effect in the short run and a contrarian effect in the long run in the Chinese stock market. The performances of the time series momentum and contrarian strategies are highly dependent on the look-back and holding periods and firm-specific characteristics.

  8. Pion momentum distributions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkardt, Matthias R. [New Mexico State U.; Hendricks, K. S. [North Carolina State U.; Ji, Cheung Ryong [North Carolina State U.; Melnitchouk, Wally [JLAB; Thomas, Anthony W. [Adelaide U.

    2013-03-01

    We compute the light-cone momentum distributions of pions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory using both pseudovector and pseudoscalar pion--nucleon couplings. For the pseudovector coupling we identify $\\delta$-function contributions associated with end-point singularities arising from the pion-nucleon rainbow diagrams, as well as from pion tadpole diagrams which are not present in the pseudoscalar model. Gauge invariance is demonstrated, to all orders in the pion mass, with the inclusion of Weinberg-Tomozawa couplings involving operator insertions at the $\\pi NN$ vertex. The results pave the way for phenomenological applications of pion cloud models that are manifestly consistent with the chiral symmetry properties of QCD.

  9. Suppression of angular forces in collisions of non-S-state transition metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krems, R.V.; Klos, J.; Rode, M.F.; Szczesniak, M.M.; Chalasinski, G.; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    Angular momentum transfer is expected to occur rapidly in collisions of atoms in states of nonzero angular momenta due to the large torque of angular forces. We show that despite the presence of internal angular momenta transition metal atoms interact in collisions with helium effectively as spherical atoms and angular momentum transfer is slow. Thus, magnetic trapping and sympathetic cooling of transition metal atoms to ultracold temperatures should be readily achievable. Our results open up new avenues of research with a broad class of ultracold atoms

  10. Separation of rotational and translational segmental momentum to assess movement coordination during walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Brecca M.M.; Christiansen, Cory L.; Murray, Amanda M.; Silverman, Anne K.; Davidson, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation presents an analysis of segmental angular momentum to describe segmental coordination during walking. Generating and arresting momentum is an intuitive concept, and also forms the foundation of Newton-Euler dynamics. Total segmental angular momentum is separated into separate components, translational angular momentum (TAM) and rotational angular momentum (RAM), which provide different but complementary perspectives of the segmental dynamics needed to achieve forward progression during walking. TAM was referenced to the stance foot, which provides insight into the mechanisms behind how forward progression is achieved through coordinated segmental motion relative to the foot. Translational and rotational segmental moments were calculated directly from TAM and RAM, via Euler’s 1st and 2nd laws in angular momentum form, respectively, and are composed of the effects of intersegmental forces and joint moments. Using data from 14 healthy participants, the effort required to generate and arrest momentum were assessed by linking the features of segmental angular momentum and the associated segmental moments to well-known spatiotemporal and kinetic features of the gait cycle. Segmental momentum provides an opportunity to explore and understand system-wide dynamics of coordination from an alternative perspective that is rooted in fundamentals of dynamics, and can be estimated using only segmental kinematic measurements. PMID:28012385

  11. Rainbows, supernumerary rainbows and interference effects in the angular scattering of chemical reactions: an investigation using Heisenberg's S matrix programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiao; Xiahou, Chengkui; Connor, J N L

    2018-01-03

    In earlier research, we have demonstrated that broad "hidden" rainbows can occur in the product differential cross sections (DCSs) of state-to-state chemical reactions. Here we ask the question: can pronounced and localized rainbows, rather than broad hidden ones, occur in reactive DCSs? Further motivation comes from recent measurements by H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2016, 120, 6712, of a "bulge" in a reactive DCS, which they conjecture is a rainbow. Our theoretical approach uses a "weak" version of Heisenberg's scattering matrix program (wHSMP) introduced by X. Shan and J. N. L. Connor, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 8392. This wHSMP uses four general physical principles for chemical reactions to suggest simple parameterized forms for the S matrix; it does not employ a potential energy surface. We use a parameterization in which the modulus of the S matrix is a smooth-step function of the total angular momentum quantum number, J, and (importantly) its phase is a cubic polynomial in J. We demonstrate for a Legendre partial wave series (PWS) the existence of pronounced rainbows, supernumerary rainbows, and other interference effects, in reactive DCSs. We find that reactive rainbows can be more complicated in their structure than the familiar rainbows of elastic scattering. We also analyse the angular scattering using Nearside-Farside (NF) PWS theory and NF PWS Local Angular Momentum (LAM) theory, including resummations of the PWS. In addition, we apply full and NF asymptotic (semiclassical) rainbow theories to the PWS - in particular, the uniform Airy and transitional Airy approximations for the farside scattering. This lets us prove that structure in the DCSs are indeed rainbows, supernumerary rainbows as well as other interference effects.

  12. Angular coefficients of Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Magnani, Alice; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Mazza, Giovanni; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; 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Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the five most significant angular coefficients, $A_{0}$ through $A_{4}$, for Z bosons produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and decaying to $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and rapidity of Z boson. The integrated luminosity of the dataset collected with the CMS detector at the LHC corresponds to 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. These measurements provide comprehensive information about Z boson production mechanisms, and are compared to QCD predictions at leading order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbation theory.

  13. THE MOMENTUM EFFECT EXEMPLIFIES THE INFLUENCE OF INVESTORS’ IRRATIONAL BEHAVIOUR ON CHANGING PRICES OF SHARES AND STOCKS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE MOMENTUM EFFECT ON THE WARSAW STOCK EXCHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Merło

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An efficient market should not show any anomalies. When new information reaches a market which is efficient, it should automatically translate into prices of assets, which ought to eliminate the possibility of gaining an advantage over other investors, thus preventing excess profits. However, studies on capital markets indicate that in reality it is possible to earn unusually high profits by taking advantage of certain anomalies which occur on a given market. Among such anomalies there is the momentum effect. This study performed on the Stock Exchange in Warsaw has shown that the momentum effect occurred throughout the entire analyzed time period. Positive returns demonstrated for investment strategies based on the momentum effect were unexplainable by the classical theory of finances. A correlation was found between the economic situation on the stock exchange and portfolio return rates, but it was too weak to attribute the effect to a single decisive factor. In addition, the returns from investments based on the momentum effect were statistically higher in January than in the other months, which was caused by the January effect, stimulating the occurrence of statistically higher returns at the beginning of a year rather than later on during the analyzed period of time. Research in this field carried out in other countries justifies the claim that there are many irrational factors which together create the momentum effect on the stock exchange. Thus, it is possible to conclude that irrational decisions may have strong impact on the pricing of stocks on the capital market. The momentum effect persisted throughout the entire analyzed period, although its power changed cyclically, which coincides with results of research carried out in other countries. The fact that the momentum effect did not disappear may suggest that the factors involved in its creation are an indispensable part of the market, and this seems to undermine the commonly accepted

  14. Effective realistic interactions for low momentum Hilbert spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials are an essential ingredient of modern microscopic many-body calculations. These potentials can be represented in two different ways: operator representation or matrix element representation. In operator representation the potential is represented by a set of quantum mechanical operators while in matrix element representation it is defined by the matrix elements in a given basis. Many modern potentials are constructed directly in matrix element representation. While the matrix element representation can be calculated from the operator representation, the determination of the operator representation from the matrix elements is more difficult. Some methods to solve the nuclear many-body problem, such as Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) or the Green's Function Monte Carlo (GFMC) method, however require explicitly the operator representation of the potential, as they do not work in a fixed many-body basis. It is therefore desirable to derive an operator representation also for the interactions given by matrix elements. In this work a method is presented which allows the derivation of an approximate operator representation starting from the momentum space partial wave matrix elements of the interaction. For that purpose an ansatz for the operator representation is chosen. The parameters in the ansatz are determined by a fit to the partial wave matrix elements. Since a perfect reproduction of the matrix elements in general cannot be achieved with a finite number of operators and the quality of the results depends on the choice of the ansatz, the obtained operator representation is tested in nuclear many-body calculations and the results are compared with those from the initial interaction matrix elements. For the calculation of the nucleon-nucleon scattering phase shifts and the deuteron properties a computer code written within this work is used. For larger nuclei the No Core Shell Model (NCSM) and FMD are applied. The described

  15. Study of the /sup 50/V nucleus with the (/sup 3/He,d), (/sup 3/He,. cap alpha. ), (/sup 3/He,p), and (/sup 3/He,p. gamma. ) reactions. [Angular distribution, 13 and 22 MeV, analog states, DWBA, J,. pi. , spectroscopic factors, angular momentum, transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W

    1971-06-01

    The nucleus /sup 50/V with a ground-state configuration (..pi..f/sub 7/2/)/sup 3/(..nu..f/sub 7/2/)/sup -1/ was studied with the /sup 49/Ti(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 50/V, /sup 51/V)/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)/sup 50/V, and /sup 48/Ti(/sup 3/He,p)/sup 50/V, and /sup 48/Ti(/sup 3/He,p..gamma..)/sup 50/V reactions induced by the /sup 3/He/sup + +/ beam from the tandem Van de Graaff at the Argonne National Laboratory. The angular distributions from (/sup 3/He,d), (/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..), and (/sup 3/He,p) reactions induced by 22-MeV /sup 3/He were studied with overall energy resolution widths of 20, 30, and 42 keV, respectively. The reactions (/sup 3/He,p) and (/sup 3/He,p..gamma..) were also studied at an incident energy of 13 MeV to obtain the ..gamma.. decay of /sup 50/V levels (including two 0/sup +/ isobaric analog states) in which the neutron-proton pair is transferred with zero angular momentum. The angular distributions of the charged-particle reactions were analyzed with the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), and spectroscopic factors have been extracted for the one-nucleon transfer reactions. The two-nucleon transfer reaction (/sup 3/He,p) was analyzed with the DWBA on the assumption that the neutron-proton pair is transferred as a deuteron. The angular momentum L/sub np/ of the transferred deuteron is established for most of the levels, and the possibility that several levels might have spin and parity 1/sup +/ is discussed.

  16. Surface Plasmon-Polaritons and Transverse Spin Angular Momentum at the Boundary of Hyperbolic Metamaterial with Arbitrary Orientation of the Optical Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Belyi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The possibility is established and the conditions are found for localization of plasmon-polaritons (PPs near the boundaries of hyperbolic metamaterials (HMs of both I and II types with arbitrary orientation of the optical axis. It is grounded that such surface PP has the transverse spin momentum which depends on the wavelength of the exciting wave, the orientation of the optical axis of the hyperbolic metamaterial, and dielectric properties of bordered media.

  17. Study of angular momentum transfer from sequential fission in deeply inelastic collisions 40Ar-209Bi at 255 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefebvres, F.; L'Haridon, M.; Osmont, A.; Patry, J.P.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Chechik, R.; Guilbault, F.

    We have measured the angular distribution of the target-like reaction product fission fragments emitted in coincidence with the light projectile like reaction product. For the first time, a sequential fission experiment in deeply inelastic collisions has observed an increase of the width of the out of plane angular distributions with the in-plane angle phi. The in-plane distribution exhibits an anisotropy centered in the recoil direction of the heavy fissionning nucleus, and shows up a dealignment mechanism of the transferred angular comparatively to the normal to the reaction plane. The de-aligned spin components have a gaussian distribution with a r.m.s width of about 10h and are lying preferentially in a plane perpendicular to the recoil direction. The mean value of the aligned component is of about 45h in agreement with the sticking limit with deformed nuclei. The dependence of the target-like reaction product fission probabilities on the total kinetic energy loss and Z of the projectile-like reaction product have been measured [fr

  18. Momentum and spin dynamics of Dirac particles at effective dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2012-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of Dirac particles moving in the curved spaces of variable dimension interpolating smoothly between 3- and 2-dimensional spaces and considered as a toy model for 2-dimensional structures in solid state physics. Performing the Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) transformation of Dirac equation and passing to the classical limit, we derive the equations of motion of momentum and spin. The spin precesses with the variable angular velocity and may "flick" appearing in the remnant 2-dimensional space twice during the period.

  19. Effect of angular intensity distribution of radiation on a conoscopic pattern of crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikoul, O. Y.; Kovalenko, L. L.

    2016-08-01

    Angular intensity distribution of radiation in incident converging beam effects on the appearance of a conoscopic pattern of optical crystal. The peculiarities of a «Maltese cross» formation in the conoscopic patterns of optical crystals are considered.

  20. On a contradiction between the classical (idealised) quantum theory of measurement and the conservation of the square of the total angular momentum in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cufaro-Petroni, Nicola; Garuccio, Augusto; Selleri, Franco; Vigier, J.-P.

    1980-01-01

    As is known the experimental verification of quantum mechanics (and not of Bell's inequalities) in experiments of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Aspect-type (involving two correlated photons emitted in the single state) implies the existence of non local faster than light, interactions between two quantum apparatus of measurement. It is shown in this work that if one assumes that real quantum measurements correspond to the usual classical (idealised) scheme (and are reproducible in time) the wave packet collapse of correlated particles by the intervention of a real physical apparatus in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox implies the non conservation of the total angular momentum of the isolated apparatus-particle system [fr

  1. Peripheral pn production and decay angular distributions in the reaction pi /sup -/p to (pn)p at 12 GeV/c incident momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghidini, B; Cantore, A; Di Corato, M; Donald, R A; Eades, John; Edwards, D N; Edwards, M E; French, Bernard R; Fry, J R; Houlden, M A; Mandelli, L; Moebes, J P; Müller, K; Navach, F; Palano, A; Palazzi-Cerrina, C; Paul, E; Picciarelli, V; Renneberg, W; Rühmer, W; Smith, I; Zito, G

    1978-01-01

    The reaction pi /sup -/p to (pn)p/sub s/, where p/sub s/ is a slow proton, was measured at 12 GeV/c incident momentum with the CERN-OMEGA spectrometer. Both antiproton and proton were identified uniquely by electronics information. 1844 events with four-momentum transfer squared in the range 0.13

  2. Effect of electron-beam momentum spread on cyclotron resonance maser operation at two resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Robb, G. R. M.

    2001-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) operation at two resonant frequencies including the effects of momentum spread in the electron beam. A linear analysis of the system equations is presented in the limit of small momentum spreads. Numerical solutions to the system equations are also given and are in agreement with the linear theory. The results predict that for realistic momentum spreads, operation of the CRM at the higher of the two resonant frequencies should be possible, extending its operating frequency range. An experiment currently under development at Strathclyde University is described and modeled numerically.

  3. Angular momentum transfer and energy loss in the sup 32 S+ sup 60,64 Ni peripheral reactions at 160. 5 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Baldo, M.; Rapisarda, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy)); Bellia, G.; Del Zoppo, A.; Migneco, E.; Russo, G.; Sapienza, P. (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionale del Sud); Liu Jingyi (Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica); Brondi, A.; Roca, V.; Spadaccini, G.; Terrasi, F. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy))

    1990-09-03

    The first two moments of the {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution have been measured as a function of the energy of projectile-like fragments (Z=14-16) for the reactions {sup 32}S+{sup 60,64}Ni at 160.5 MeV lab bombarding energy. The increase of both moments with increasing total kinetic energy loss exhibits a plateau above {approx equal} 15 MeV, which seems to be correlated with a shape evolution of the angular distribution taking place around the same energy. Anomalously large relative widths of the {gamma}-multiplicity have been observed also at large energy losses. The trends of and {sigma}{sub M} for small energy losses are well described within the time-dependent shell model for the nucleus-nucleus collision, while discrepancies are observed at large energy losses where features of direct and damped processes seem to coexist. (orig.).

  4. Angular momentum transfer and energy loss in the 32S+60,64Ni peripheral reactions at 160.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Bellia, G.; Del Zoppo, A.; Migneco, E.; Russo, G.; Sapienza, P.

    1990-01-01

    The first two moments of the γ-ray multiplicity distribution have been measured as a function of the energy of projectile-like fragments (Z=14-16) for the reactions 32 S+ 60,64 Ni at 160.5 MeV lab bombarding energy. The increase of both moments with increasing total kinetic energy loss exhibits a plateau above ≅ 15 MeV, which seems to be correlated with a shape evolution of the angular distribution taking place around the same energy. Anomalously large relative widths of the γ-multiplicity have been observed also at large energy losses. The trends of and σ M for small energy losses are well described within the time-dependent shell model for the nucleus-nucleus collision, while discrepancies are observed at large energy losses where features of direct and damped processes seem to coexist. (orig.)

  5. Impact of momentum mismatch on 2D van der Waals tunnel field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiang; Logoteta, Demetrio; Pala, Marco G.; Cresti, Alessandro

    2018-02-01

    We numerically investigate electron quantum transport in 2D van der Waals tunnel field-effect-transistors in the presence of lateral momentum mismatch induced by lattice mismatch or rotational misalignment between the two-dimensional layers. We show that a small momentum mismatch induces a threshold voltage shift without altering the subthreshold swing. On the contrary, a large momentum mismatch produces significant potential variations and ON-current reduction. Short-range scattering, such as that due to phonons or system edges, enables momentum variations, thus enhancing interlayer tunneling. The coupling of electrons with acoustic phonons is shown to increase the ON current without affecting the subthreshold swing. In the case of optical phonons, the ON-current increase is accompanied by a subthreshold swing degradation due to the inelastic nature of the scattering.

  6. Ankle torque control that shifts the center of pressure from heel to toe contributes non-zero sagittal plane angular momentum during human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruben, Kreg G; Boehm, Wendy L

    2014-04-11

    A principle objective of human walking is controlling angular motion of the body as a whole to remain upright. The force of the ground on each foot (F) reflects that control, and recent studies show that in the sagittal plane F exhibits a specific coordination between F direction and center-of-pressure (CP) that is conducive to remaining upright. Typical walking involves the CP shifting relative to the body due to two factors: posterior motion of the foot with respect to the hip (stepping) and motion of the CP relative to the foot (foot roll-over). Recent research has also shown how adjusting ankle torque alone to shift CP relative to the foot systematically alters the direction of F, and thus, could play a key role in upright posture and the F measured during walking. This study explores how the CP shifts due to stepping and foot roll-over contribute to the observed F and its role in maintaining upright posture. Experimental walking kinetics and kinematics were combined with a mechanical model of the human to show that variation in F that was not attributable to foot roll-over had systematic correlation between direction and CP that could be described by an intersection point located near the center-of-mass. The findings characterize a component of walking motor control, describe how typical foot roll-over contributes to postural control, and provide a rationale for the increased fall risk observed in individuals with atypical ankle muscle function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fake plunges are very eccentric real EMRIs in disguise. …they dominate the rates and are blissfully ignorant of angular momentum barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Brem, P.

    2012-12-01

    The capture of a compact object in a galactic nucleus by a massive black hole (MBH) is the best way to map space and time around it. Compact objects such as stellar black holes on a capture orbit with a very high eccentricity have been wrongly assumed to be lost for the system after an intense burst of radiation, which has been described as a "direct plunge". We prove that these very eccentric capture orbits spend actually a similar number of cycles in a LISA-like detector as those with lower eccentricities if the central MBH is spinning. Although the rates are higher for high-eccentricity EMRIs, the spin also enhances the rates of lower-eccentricity EMRIs. This last kind have received more attention because of the fact that high-eccentricity EMRIs were thought to be direct plunges and thus negligible. On the other hand, recent work on stellar dynamics has demonstrated that there seems to be a complot in phase space acting on these lower-eccentricity captures, since their rates decrease significantly by the presence of a blockade in the rate at which orbital angular momenta change takes place. This so-called "Schwarzschild barrier" is a result of the impact of relativistic precession on to the stellar potential torques, and thus it affects the enhancement on lower-eccentricity EMRIs that one would expect from resonant relaxation. We confirm and quantify the existence of this barrier using a statitical sample of 2,500 direct-summation N-body simulations using both a post-Newtonian but also, and for the first time, a geodesic approximation for thse relativistic orbits. The existence of the barrier prevents "traditional EMRIs" from approaching the central MBH, but if the central MBH is spinning the rate will be anyway dominated by highly-eccentric extreme-mass ratio inspirals, which insolently ignore the presence of the barrier, because they are driven by two-body relaxation.

  8. E M form factors of the nucleon in a chiral model with momentum projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drago, A.; Tambini, U.; Fiolhais, M.

    1997-01-01

    The chiral chromo dielectric model with a quadratic potential for the confining field is used to compute electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon. A variational approach based on the hedgehog Ansatz and on angular momentum-isospin and linear momentum projection formalism is applied to describe the nucleon. The form factors are computed using momentum eigenstates, therefore taking into account recoil effects. With the exception of the magnetic form factor of the proton, the others are well reproduced. (author)

  9. Product rotational angular momentum polarization of H+FCl (v=0-5; j=0, 3, 6, 9) → HF+Cl and HCl+F at Erel=0.5-20 kcal mol(-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Wu, Victor Wei-Keh

    2015-12-01

    The rotational angular momentum polarizations of product molecules of the title reactions on the ground potential energy surface 1 (2)A' of DHTSN [Deskevic et al. J Chem Phys 2006, 124, 224303] have been studied using the quasi-classical trajectory method. Reaction dynamic results of the HF product channel comparing with another channel of HCl with 100,000 trajectories can be accurately resolved. We show the value of the polar p(ϑr) in the range of 0° ≤ ϑr ≤ 180(°), azimuthal p(φr) in the range of 0° ≤ φr ≤ 360(°), and dihedral p(ϑr, φr) in the ranges of 0(°) ≤ ϑr ≤ 180(°) and 0(°) ≤ φr ≤ 360(°); the angular distributions of the product molecules HF and HCl at relative Erel = 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kcal mol(-1); and four polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs) of HF and HCl at Erel = 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 15 kcal mol(-1). p(φr) distributions at v = 0-5, and j = 0, 3, 6, 9 at every Erel are plotted cylindrically together. The stereo dynamic transformation reaction dependent upon the rovibrational states of the reactant molecule FCl and its relative translational energies around 0.5-5 kcal mol(-1) can be significantly differentiated. Translational and rovibrational enhancements of the title reactions on both early barrier potential energy surfaces have been shown in great detail and clarified. Reaction mechanisms of forward and backward scattering of the product molecules HF and HCl, respectively, have been obtained. Graphical Abstract H + FCl → either HF + Cl (left) or HCl + F (right) is moving along a trajectory on the respective PES.

  10. Filtering reaction dynamics using nearside-farside theory and local angular momentum theory: application to the angular scattering of the H + D2(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) --> HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0) + D reaction in the energy and time domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, P D D; Connor, J N L; Bouakline, F

    2009-04-23

    We investigate methods for filtering reaction mechanisms in the angular scattering of the state-to-state reaction, H + D(2)(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0, m(i) = 0) --> HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0, m(f) = 0) + D, where v(i), j(i), and m(i) and v(f), j(f), and m(f) are initial and final vibrational, rotational, and helicity quantum numbers, respectively. The input to our filtrations is a new set of accurate quantum scattering matrix elements for total energies in the range 1.52-2.50 eV (in steps of 0.01 eV) and for total angular momentum quantum numbers in the range, 0-40, in steps of unity. We filter reaction mechanisms in both the energy domain and the time domain. The time-domain calculations employ the plane wave packet formulation of time-dependent scattering. The theoretical tools used are nearside-farside (NF) analysis of partial wave series for scattering amplitudes, together with NF local angular momentum (LAM) theory. An energy-domain LAM analysis reveals the existence of an important dynamical feature in the N scattering, a "trench" which bisects the (energy, angle) plane. We use the location of this trench to approximately filter two reaction mechanisms. Transformation to the time domain demonstrates that the two reaction mechanisms correspond to direct and delayed (by about 25 fs) scattering. Further analysis, including filtration in the time domain, shows that the pronounced LAM trench arises from the interference of the energy-domain analogues of the time-direct and time-delayed scattering. Our theory and results provide the first successful demonstration of reaction mechanism filtering carried out directly in the (energy, angle) domain. The calculations and results in this paper extend and complement earlier research reported by Monks, Connor, and Althorpe (Monks, P. D. D.; Connor, J. N. L.; Althorpe, S. C. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 741; J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 10302).

  11. Effects of symmetry energy and momentum dependent interaction on low-energy reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the dipole response associated with the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR and the Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR, in connection with specific properties of the nuclear effective interaction (symmetry energy and momentum dependence, in the neutron-rich systems 68Ni, 132Sn and 208Pb. We perform our investigation within a microscopic transport model based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation.We observe that the peak energies of PDR and IVGDR are shifted to higher values when employing momentum dependent interactions, with respect to the results obtained neglecting momentum dependence. The calculated energies are close to the experimental values and similar to the results obtained in Hartree-Fock (HF with Random Phase Approximation (RPA calculations.

  12. Measurement of angular correlations in Drell-Yan lepton pairs to probe $Z/\\gamma*$ boson transverse momentum at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-03-13

    A measurement of angular correlations in Drell-Yan lepton pairs via the phistar observable is presented. This variable probes the same physics as the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum with a better experimental resolution. The $Z/\\gamma^* \\to e^+e^-$ and $Z/\\gamma^* \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays produced in proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV are used. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb$^{-1}$. Normalised differential cross sections as a function of $\\phi^*_\\eta$ are measured separately for electron and muon decay channels. These channels are then combined for improved accuracy. The cross section is also measured double differentially as a function of $\\phi^*_\\eta$ for three independent bins of the Z boson rapidity. The results are compared to QCD calculations and to predictions from different Monte Carlo event generators. The data are reasonably well described, in all measured Z boson rapidity re...

  13. Effect of Body Mass Index (BMI) On Degree of Angular Knee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aetiology of Blount\\'s disease remains unknown, but it is generally agreed that weight bearing plays a role in the pathogenesis of knee deformity in these patients. Our aim was to analyze the effect of Body Mass Index (BMI) on the degree of angular knee deformity in children with clinical and radiological features of ...

  14. New angular quadrature sets: effect on the conditioning number of the LTSN two dimensional transport matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, Eliete Biasotto; Romero, Debora Angrizano

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to utilize a new angular quadrature sets based on Legendre and Chebyshev polynomials, and to analyse their effects on the number of LTS N matrix conditioning for the problem of discrete coordinates of neutron transport with two dimension cartesian geometry with isotropic scattering, and an energy group, in non multiplicative homogenous domains

  15. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 345–360. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect. S G KAMATH. Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036,. India. E-mail: kamath@iitm.ac.in. MS received 11 July 2005; revised 10 October 2005; accepted 18 November 2005. Abstract.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect as the response of the orbital momentum to the gradient of electrochemical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Středa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 13 (2013), "134422-1"-"134422-5" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1228 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * ferromagnetic systems * orbital momentum Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  17. Nuclear quantum effects in water: A study in position and momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Joseph A.

    Water is a system of fundamental importance in the biological and physical sciences. Due to the low mass of the proton, nuclear quantum effects are non-negligible in water. These effects may be included in atomic simulation via the Feynman path integral methodology, and have been studied over the past two decades. Recently, neutron Compton scattering experiments have been performed that have uncovered the proton momentum distribution in a variety of systems, including water. This momentum distribution significantly varies from the classical (Boltzmann) result, and is sensitive to the potential energy surface. We have developed an "open" path integral molecular dynamics methodology in order to compute the proton momentum distribution in water. We have performed the simulation utilizing both empirical force fields and the Car-Parrinello methodology, which derives the interactions "on the fly" from first principles electronic structure theory. We find that the computed momentum distributions, although in fairly good agreement with experiment, are somewhat broader than the scattering results. This indicates, via the uncertainty principle, that the proton is somewhat more localized in the simulation than in experiment. We also find that the Car-Parrinello result, unlike the force field outcome, is capable of qualitatively reproducing the experimental differences between the liquid water and ice distributions. These differences arise from the red-shift in the OH stretch that occurs when transitioning from liquid to solid water. Such effects are a reflection of the entanglement of the potential energy surface with the momentum distribution that is engendered by the uncertainty relation between position and momentum. In addition, we find that nuclear quantum effects broaden the structure of liquid water as compared to Car-Parrinello results with classical nuclei. Accordingly, there is an increased fraction of broken hydrogen bonds that is found in the path integral result

  18. Role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun; Shu, Weixing; Fan, Dianyuan

    2010-01-01

    We establish a general vector field model to describe the role of transverse-momentum currents in the optical Magnus effect in free space. As an analogy of the mechanical Magnus effect, the circularly polarized wave packet in our model acts as the rotating ball, and its rotation direction depends on the polarization state. Based on this model, we demonstrate the existence of an optical polarization-dependent Magnus effect which is significantly different from the conventional optical Magnus e...

  19. The Effects of Isokinetic Strength Training on Strength at Different Angular Velocities: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Kocahan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that angular velocity is important in isokinetic training, and that training at high angular velocities provides strength increases at lower angular velocities, but would not increase strength at angular velocities above the training level. For this reason, it is thought that in the preparation of an isokinetic strength training protocol, angular velocities need to be taken into account. For any athlete, the force at the angular velocity required in her/his sports branch needs to be considered.

  20. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E. Pessah, Martin; Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    We present a scaling law that predicts the values of the stresses obtained in numerical simulations of saturated MRI-driven turbulence in non-stratified shearing boxes. It relates the turbulent stresses to the strength of the vertical magnetic field, the sound speed, the vertical size of the box......, and the numerical resolution and predicts accurately the results of 35 numerical simulations performed for a wide variety of physical conditions. We use our result to show that the saturated stresses in simulations with zero net magnetic flux depend linearly on the numerical resolution and would become negligible...

  1. Angular momentum and the electromagnetic top

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. GIANFRANCO SPAVIERI1 GEORGE T GILLIES2. Centro de Física Fundamental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida, 5101-Venezuela; Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901-4714, USA ...

  2. ANGULAR-MOMENTUM IN BINARY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERLOO, T

    In order to investigate the relative orientations of spiral galaxies in pairs, the distribution of the angle between the spin-vectors for a new sample of 40 binary spiral galaxies is determined. From this distribution it is found, contrary to an earlier result obtained by Helou (1984), that there is

  3. The Angular Momentum of the Accreting Gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraternali, F.

    Every galaxy is embedded in a multiphase and extended circumgalactic medium that comprises cold high-column density gas, warm ionised filaments and a hot rarefied atmosphere (corona). This circumgalactic medium is vital for maintaining blue star-forming galaxies as it provides new fresh gas for star

  4. Binary asteroid population. 1. Angular momentum content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, A. W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 1 (2007), s. 250-259 ISSN 0019-1035 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/05/0604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : asteroids * satellites of asteroids Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.869, year: 2007

  5. Angular momentum and the electromagnetic top

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-06

    Jul 6, 2016 ... m is the linked magnetic flux of the solenoid. Due to the action of the local field E, a torque r×qE = c−1Qr×(−∂tA) acts on the charged ring but, as con- sidered below, no counter torque acts on the dipoles m forming the solenoid. As an integral law, Faraday's has been tested in the common case where mech ...

  6. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ] and generalized recently in the context of radial self-acceleration [23]. Such beams have been experimentally investigated in great detail [24–32]. The intensity maxima of these fields gyrate around the optical axis, forming a solenoidal shape, which has been used...(z�)]2 . (13) III. EXPERIMENT In our experiment a linearly polarized, single wavelength (λ = 632.8 nm) helium-neon laser (Melles Griot) with a power of 10 mW was expanded and collimated by a telescope (fL1 = 15 mm and fL2 = 125 mm) to approximate a plane...

  7. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [11] R Rossignoli, A Plastino and H G Miller, Phys. Rev. C43, 1599 (1991). [12] J A Sheikh, P A Ganai, R P Singh, R K Bhowmik and S Frauendorf, Phys. Rev. C77, 014303 (2008). [13] J A Sheikh and R P Singh (to be published). [14] J B French, E C Halbert, J B McGrory and S S M Wong, Advances in nuclear physics.

  8. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    particle coupled state. The above notation is the same as that used in [14]. In the present work, the statistical averages have been calculated using the canon- ical ensemble approach since the exact solutions have well-defined particle number.

  9. Orbital-angular-momentum entanglement in turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamadou Ibrahim, A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available that the whole atmospheric medium can be replaced with a single phase screen. FIG. 1. (Color online) A method for measuring the phase dif- ferences between two coherent beams propagating in a turbulent atmosphere. The phase difference is measured...) to calculate the ensemble average and evaluating one of the three-dimensional Fourier integrals we arrive at Bθ (X1 − X2) = k20 ∫∫∫ ∞ −∞ �n(k1) ∫∫ �z 0 exp(−ik1 · x1) × exp(ik1 · x2) dz1 dz2 d 3k1 (2π )3 , (14) where we used the symmetry of the power spectral...

  10. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/psi Production: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Transverse Momentum Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /Heidelberg U.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2010-08-26

    Cold nuclear matter effects on J/{psi} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are evaluated taking into account the specific J/{psi}-production kinematics at the partonic level, the shadowing of the initial parton distributions and the absorption in the nuclear matter. We consider two different parton processes for the c{bar c}-pair production: one with collinear gluons and a recoiling gluon in the final state and the other with initial gluons carrying intrinsic transverse momentum. Our results are compared to RHIC observables. The smaller values of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in the forward rapidity region (with respect to the mid rapidity region) are partially explained, therefore potentially reducing the need for recombination effects.

  11. Modeling BSM effects on the Higgs transverse-momentum spectrum in an EFT approach

    CERN Document Server

    Grazzini, Massimiliano; Spira, Michael; Wiesemann, Marius

    2017-03-22

    We consider the transverse-momentum distribution of a Higgs boson produced through gluon fusion in hadron collisions. At small transverse momenta, the large logarithmic terms are resummed up to next-to-leading-logarithmic (NLL) accuracy. The resummed computation is consistently matched to the next-to-leading-order (NLO) result valid at large transverse momenta. The ensuing Standard Model prediction is supplemented by possible new-physics effects parametrised through three dimension-six operators related to the modification of the top and bottom Yukawa couplings, and to the inclusion of a point-like Higgs-gluon coupling, respectively. We present resummed transverse-momentum spectra including the effect of these operators at NLL+NLO accuracy and study their impact on the shape of the distribution. We find that such modifications, while affecting the total rate within the current uncertainties, can lead to significant distortions of the spectrum. The proper parametrization of such effects becomes increasingly im...

  12. Characterization of the angular memory effect of scattered light in biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Sam; Bertolotti, Jacopo; Léger, Jean-Francois; Bourdieu, Laurent; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-05-18

    High resolution optical microscopy is essential in neuroscience but suffers from scattering in biological tissues and therefore grants access to superficial brain layers only. Recently developed techniques use scattered photons for imaging by exploiting angular correlations in transmitted light and could potentially increase imaging depths. But those correlations ('angular memory effect') are of a very short range and should theoretically be only present behind and not inside scattering media. From measurements on neural tissues and complementary simulations, we find that strong forward scattering in biological tissues can enhance the memory effect range and thus the possible field-of-view by more than an order of magnitude compared to isotropic scattering for ∼1 mm thick tissue layers.

  13. A comparison of the angular dependence of effective dose and effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, M.A.; Gierga, D.P.; Xu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    In ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection) Publication 60, the set of critical organs and their weighing factors were changed, defining the quantity effective dose, E. This quantity replaced the effective dose equivalent, H E , as defined by ICRP 26. Most notably, the esophagus was added to the list of critical organs. The Monte Carlo neutron/photon transport code MCNP was used to determine the effective dose to sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms, developed in previous research, were modified to include the esophagus. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for monoenergetic photon beams of energies 0.08 MeV, 0.3 MeV, and 1.0 MeV for various azimuthal and polar angles. Separate organ equivalent doses were determined for male and female phantoms. The resulting organ equivalent doses were calculated from arithmetic mean averages. The angular dependence of effective dose was compared with that of effective dose equivalent reported in previous research. The differences between the two definitions and possible implications to regulatory agencies were summarized

  14. Effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution on plasma nuclear fusion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a generalized particle momentum distribution derived by Galitskii and Yakimets (GY) on nuclear reaction rates in plasma. We derive an approximate semi-analytical formula for nuclear fusion reaction rate between nuclei in a plasma (quantum plasma nuclear fusion; or QPNF). The QPNF formula is applied to calculate deuteron-deuteron fusion rate in a plasma, and the results are compared with the results calculated with the conventional Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution. As an application, we investigate the deuteron-deuteron fusion rate for mobile deuterons in a deuterated metal/alloy. The calculated deuteron-deuteron fusion rates at low energies are enormously enhanced due to the modified tail of the GY's generalized momentum distribution. Our preliminary estimates indicate also that the deuteron-lithium (D+Li) fusion rate and the proton-lithium (p+Li) fusion rate in a metal/alloy at ambient temperatures are also substantially enhanced. (author)

  15. Effects of trees on momentum exchange within and above a real urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, S.; Giometto, M. G.; Christen, A.; Egli, P. E.; Schmid, M. F.; Tooke, T. R.; Coops, N. C.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are used to gain insight into the effects of trees on momentum transfer rates characterizing the atmosphere within and above a real urban canopy. Several areas are considered that are part of a neighbourhood in the city of Vancouver, BC, Canada where a small fraction of trees are taller than buildings. In this area, eight years of continuous wind and turbulence measurements are available from a 30 m meteorological tower. Buildings and vegetation geometries are obtained from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data. In the LES algorithm, buildings are accounted through an immersed boundary method, whereas vegetation is parameterized via a location-specific leaf area density. LES are performed varying wind direction and leaf area densities. Surface roughness lengths (z0) from both LES and tower measurements are sensitive to the 0 ≤ LAI/λ lower than the 27% increase featured by LES for the most representative canopy (leaves-off LAI/λ = 0.74, leaves-on LAI/λ = 2.24). Removing vegetation from such a canopy would cause a dramatic drop of approximately 50% in z0 when compared to the reference summer value. The momentum displacement height (d) from LES also consistently increases as LAI/λ increases, due to the disproportionate amount of drag that the (few) relatively taller trees exert on the flow. Within the urban canopy, the effects of trees are twofold: on one hand, they act as a direct momentum sink for the mean flow; on the other, they reduce downward turbulent transport of high-momentum fluid, significantly reducing the wind intensity at the heights where people live and buildings consume energy.

  16. Comparison in Measuring Effectiveness of Momentum and Contrarian Trading Strategy in Indonesian Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Luxianto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This  paper  wants  to  explore  the  effectiveness  of  momentum  or  contrarian  strategy  in Indonesian  Stock  Exchange  using  different  methods  in  measuring  the  performance.  The point of momentum or contrarian strategy is selecting winner (stocks with highest gain or loser stocks (stocks with highest loss and then buy or sell it based on the research result. This research employed three methods in measuring performance to select winner and loser stocks.  The  irst  method  used  cross  section  relative  return,  while  the  second  method  used cross section relative return plus risk component (return divided by standard deviation, and the  third  method  employed  historical  relative  return  instead  of  cross  section.  The  result  is that,  all  of  those  three  methods  prove  that  momentum  strategy  is  effectively applicable  for winner stock, so in the next period winner stock will continue to make profit, while for loser stock, it is more effective to use contrarian strategy because in the next period, loser stock will rebound and make proit after suffering from high loss. ";} // -->activate javascript

  17. Effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear radii for 160 O and B stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, A.B.; Divan, L.; Prevot-Burnichon, M.L.; Doazan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The significance is explained of the effective temperatures, angular diameters, distances and linear diameters which have been found from published ultraviolet spectrophotometry, visible and near infrared intermediate-band photometry and model-atmosphere fluxes for 160 O and B stars using a method which is fully explained and evaluated in the full paper which is reproduced on Microfiche MN 189/1. An appendix to the full paper presents BCD spectrophotometry for 77 of the program stars. The angular diameters are systematically the same as those measured previously, and the flux effective temperatures of the main-sequence and giant stars reproduce well the relationship established by other authors, for main-sequence and giant O and B stars. The O8 - B9 supergiants have systematically lower temperatures than do main-sequence stars of the same subtype. The Beta Cephei stars and most Be stars have the same effective temperature as normal stars of the same spectral type. The radii of O and B stars increase from main-sequence to supergiant. The late B supergiants are about twice as large as the O9 supergiants. (author)

  18. Momentum effect in stocks’ returns between the rational and the behavioural financial theories: Proposition of the progressive rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Zoghlami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available     The puzzling momentum strategies’ payoffs defied the rational financial theory asserting the stocks returns’ unpredictability. Moreover, the momentum effect persist the main stocks returns’ anomaly escaping any risk-based explanation. The resilience of this phenomenon had favoured the development of behavioural financial field, which breaks with the investor’ full rationality hypothesis. This paper attempts to reconcile between the rational and behavioural financial theories, through the introduction of the progressive rationality concept. Especially, we argue that recognizing the temporary inappropriate investors’ reactions; can resolve the puzzling momentum anomaly. To fulfil our objective, we identify the appropriate autoregressive level that captures the significant autocorrelations involved by the investors’ over and under reactions. Then, we explore the profitability of the 6/6 momentum strategy implemented on the adjusted stocks’ returns. The adjusted momentum strategy is still profitable but no longer puzzling, since the related excess return is henceforth fully captured by a β and a size effect.Key words: Tunisian momentum effect, the rational finance theory, the behavioural finance theory, the three-factorial model and the autoregressive process.

  19. Momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    The content of the portion of the workshop concerned with momentum distributions in condensed matter is outlined and the neutron scattering approach to their measurement is briefly described. Results concerning helium systems are reviewed. Some theoretical aspects are briefly mentioned

  20. Improved MODIS Dark Target aerosol optical depth algorithm over land: angular effect correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol optical depth (AOD product retrieved from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS measurements has greatly benefited scientific research in climate change and air quality due to its high quality and large coverage over the globe. However, the current product (e.g., Collection 6 over land needs to be further improved. The is because AOD retrieval still suffers large uncertainty from the surface reflectance (e.g., anisotropic reflection although the impacts of the surface reflectance have been largely reduced using the Dark Target (DT algorithm. It has been shown that the AOD retrieval over dark surface can be improved by considering surface bidirectional distribution reflectance function (BRDF effects in previous study. However, the relationship of the surface reflectance between visible and shortwave infrared band that applied in the previous study can lead to an angular dependence of the AOD retrieval. This has at least two reasons. The relationship based on the assumption of isotropic reflection or Lambertian surface is not suitable for the surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF. However, although the relationship varies with the surface cover type by considering the vegetation index NDVISWIR, this index itself has a directional effect and affects the estimation of the surface reflection, and it can lead to some errors in the AOD retrieval. To improve this situation, we derived a new relationship for the spectral surface BRF in this study, using 3 years of data from AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN. To test the performance of the new algorithm, two case studies were used: 2 years of data from North America and 4 months of data from the global land. The results show that the angular effects of the AOD retrieval are largely reduced in most cases, including fewer occurrences of negative retrievals. Particularly, for the global land case, the AOD retrieval was improved by the new

  1. Study on the Effect of water Injection Momentum on the Cooling Effect of Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kan; Qiang, Yanhui; Zhong, Chenghang; Yu, Shaozhen

    2017-10-01

    For the study of water injection momentum factors impact on flow field of the rocket engine tail flame, the numerical computation model of gas-liquid two phase flow in the coupling of high temperature and high speed gas flow and low temperature liquid water is established. The accuracy and reliability of the numerical model are verified by experiments. Based on the numerical model, the relationship between the flow rate and the cooling effect is analyzed by changing the water injection momentum of the water spray pipes. And the effective mathematical expression is obtained. What’s more, by changing the number of the water spray and using small flow water injection, the cooling effect is analyzed to check the application range of the mathematical expressions. The results show that: the impact and erosion of the gas flow field could be reduced greatly by water injection, and there are two parts in the gas flow field, which are the slow cooling area and the fast cooling area. In the fast cooling area, the influence of the water flow momentum and nozzle quantity on the cooling effect can be expressed by mathematical functions without causing bifurcation flow for the mainstream gas. The conclusion provides a theoretical reference for the engineering application.

  2. New method to measure the angular antispring effect in a Fabry–Perot cavity with remote excitation using radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Koji, E-mail: knagano@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Enomoto, Yutaro; Nakano, Masayuki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kawamura, Seiji [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-03-06

    In experiments with Fabry–Perot cavities consisting of suspended mirrors, an angular antispring effect on the mirror of the cavity is caused by radiation pressure from resonant light in the cavity. A new method was invented to measure the effect precisely with remote excitation on the mirror using the radiation pressure. This method was found to be available for the suspended 23 mg mirror and improved the measurement accuracy by a factor of two, compared with the previous method. This result leads to stable control systems to eliminate the angular instability of the mirror caused by the effect. - Highlights: • A method to measure an angular antispring effect on a suspended mirror was proposed. • Remote excitation on the mirror with radiation pressure of resonant light is used. • This method provides better measurement accuracy compared with the previous method.

  3. Validation of effective momentum and heat flux models for stratification and mixing in a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Li; Villanueva, W.; Kudinov, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    The pressure suppression pool is the most important feature of the pressure suppression system in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) that acts primarily as a passive heat sink during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or when the reactor is isolated from the main heat sink. The steam injection into the pool through the blowdown pipes can lead to short term dynamic phenomena and long term thermal transient in the pool. The development of thermal stratification or mixing in the pool is a transient phenomenon that can influence the pool's pressure suppression capacity. Different condensation regimes depending on the pool's bulk temperature and steam flow rates determine the onset of thermal stratification or erosion of stratified layers. Previously, we have proposed to model the effect of steam injection on the mixing and stratification with the Effective Heat Source (EHS) and the Effective Momentum Source (EMS) models. The EHS model is used to provide thermal effect of steam injection on the pool, preserving heat and mass balance. The EMS model is used to simulate momentum induced by steam injection in different flow regimes. The EMS model is based on the combination of (i) synthetic jet theory, which predicts effective momentum if amplitude and frequency of flow oscillations in the pipe are given, and (ii) model proposed by Aya and Nariai for prediction of the amplitude and frequency of oscillations at a given pool temperature and steam mass flux. The complete EHS/EMS models only require the steam mass flux, initial pool bulk temperature, and design-specific parameters, to predict thermal stratification and mixing in a pressure suppression pool. In this work we use EHS/EMS models implemented in containment thermal hydraulic code GOTHIC. The PPOOLEX experiments (Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland) are utilized to (a) quantify errors due to GOTHIC's physical models and numerical schemes, (b) propose necessary improvements in GOTHIC sub-grid scale

  4. Effect of equal channel angular pressing on the strength and ductility of an AZ80 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, T. S.; Chung, C. W.; Ding, R.; Chiu, Y. L.

    2009-08-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) was applied to an extruded AZ80 Mg alloy in order to refine microstructure and enhance mechanical properties. The results show that the initial grain size of 20 μm of the as-extruded samples has been reduced by 75% after the first pass of ECAP, down to about 5 μm. Also as a result of the severe plastic deformation, the intermetallic compound Mg17Al12, which was distributed along grain boundaries and forms networks before the ECAP, has been re-arranged into a more homogeneous distribution and with a more spherical shape after the ECAP. Although no strengthening effect has been observed, the grain refinement and precipitate fragmentation caused by the ECAP has resulted in a 28% increase in the elongation to failure in tensile tests. Fractography observation and texture measurement have also been carried out.

  5. Effect of equal channel angular pressing on the strength and ductility of an AZ80 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, T S; Chung, C W; Ding, R; Chiu, Y L, E-mail: y.chiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) was applied to an extruded AZ80 Mg alloy in order to refine microstructure and enhance mechanical properties. The results show that the initial grain size of 20 {mu}m of the as-extruded samples has been reduced by 75% after the first pass of ECAP, down to about 5 {mu}m. Also as a result of the severe plastic deformation, the intermetallic compound Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}, which was distributed along grain boundaries and forms networks before the ECAP, has been re-arranged into a more homogeneous distribution and with a more spherical shape after the ECAP. Although no strengthening effect has been observed, the grain refinement and precipitate fragmentation caused by the ECAP has resulted in a 28% increase in the elongation to failure in tensile tests. Fractography observation and texture measurement have also been carried out.

  6. Comparative study of the excitation functions of nuclear reactions induced by light ions (protons and α) and heavy ions (Ne, Ca, Ar) and, after neutron evaporation, leading to platinum and polonium isotopes. Analysis by de-excitation programme allowing for the angular momentum and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarde, Brigitte.

    1979-01-01

    This work is a study on the de-excitation of heavy nuclei from the Pt - Po area obtained by the complete fusion of various projectiles (p, 3 He, 4 He, 20 Ne, 40 Ar and 40 Ca) and of various targets. The aim was to create from different couples the same compound nucleus of a mass equal to the sum of the masses of the component parts. The excitation energy of the system thus created can vary between 60 and 120 MeV. The experimental study of one or more particular de-excitation channels performed by measuring the cross sections of residual nuclei production for various bombardment energies is a very conventional approach. An in depth examination was made of the effect of the angular momentum given to the compound nucleus by the input channel to the de-excitation processes. Now the population of orbital angular momenta depends essentially on the mass of the projectile at equal velocities. Consequently, the utilization of projectiles extending from the proton to mass 40 covers a wide range. Decay by neutrons is not the only de-excitation method. Fission has a significant role particularly for the Po's and consequently this strongly diminishes the probability (P,xn). The decay of (α,xn) when going from the compound nucleus of 204 Po to 182 Pt makes it possble to evaluate the importance of the phenomenon and to have an item of experimental information that can be compared to a theoretical calculation. Theoretical calculations using the 'ALICE' code which expresses schematically the reduction in level densities by subtracting from the excitation energy a rotation energy and the 'JULIAN' code which uses a more accurate level density calculation and takes into account the gamma emission competing with the emission of neutrons show that the last programme reports the experimental results whereas the 'ALICE' code does not enable a consistent presentation to be made of all the results by light and heavy ions. Finally, it had to be agreed that the fission does not intervene as

  7. Dissociating the Effects of Angular Disparity and Image Similarity in Mental Rotation and Object Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Olivia S.; Hayward, William G.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Performance is often impaired linearly with increasing angular disparity between two objects in tasks that measure mental rotation or object recognition. But increased angular disparity is often accompanied by changes in the similarity between views of an object, confounding the impact of the two factors in these tasks. We examined separately the…

  8. Fermi-momentum dependence of relativistic effective mass below saturation from superscaling of quasielastic electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Consentino, V. L.; Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2017-12-01

    The relativistic effective mass M* and Fermi momentum kF are important ingredients in the determination of the nuclear equation of state, but they have rarely been extracted from experimental data below saturation density where translationally invariant nuclear matter becomes unstable against clusterization into the existing atomic nuclei. Using a novel kind of superscaling analysis of the quasielastic cross-section electron scattering data involving a suitable selection criterion and 12C as a reference nucleus, the global scaling properties of the resulting set of data for 21 nuclei ranging from 2H to 238U are then analyzed. We find that a subset of a third of the about 20000 data approximately scales to an universal superscaling function with a more constrained uncertainty band than just the reference 12C case and provides M* as a function of kF.

  9. Beam-beam interaction and pacman effects in the SSC with momentum oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahale, N.K.; Ohnuma, S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to find the combined effects of beam-beam interaction (head-on and long-range) and random nonlinear multipoles in dipole magnets, the transverse oscillations of ''regular'' as well as ''pacman'' particles are traced for 256 synchrotron oscillation periods (corresponding to 135K revolutions) in the proposed SSC. Results obtained in this study do not show any obvious reduction of dynamic or linear apertures for pacman particles when compared with regular particles for (Δp/p) = 0. There are some indications of possible sudden or gradual increases in the oscillation amplitude, for pacman as well as regular particles, when the amplitude of momentum oscillation is as large as 3σ. 4 refs., 7 figs

  10. Momentum losses by charge exchange with neutral particles in H-mode discharges at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Giroud, C.; Brix, M.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Lomas, P. J.; Moulton, D.; Mullane, M. O.; Nunes, I. M.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a neutral density background on the toroidal angular momentum and kinetic energy profiles has been investigated in JET. Under equivalent conditions but with increasing gas fuelling during the flat top phase, it has been observed that both the edge rotation and temperature decrease. The

  11. The effect of angular mismatch between vertebral endplate and vertebral body replacement endplate on implant subsidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Shahi, Mohammad H; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Giannitsios, Demetrios; Ouellet, Jean; Jarzem, Peter F

    2013-07-01

    Comparative biomechanical study. To determine whether an angular mismatch between the vertebral body replacement (VBR) endplate and the simulated foam vertebral endplate leads to accelerated subsidence in a cyclic compression model of the VBR-vertebra interface. One of the main complications of the VBR surgery is postoperative subsidence and collapse of the VBR implant into the adjacent vertebral bodies. Although numerous factors affecting intervertebral cage subsidence have been cited, few studies have proposed factors responsible for VBR cage subsidence. Hardwood blocks at 0-30-degree angles and polyurethane foam blocs have been used as base for this experimental setting. One end of the Synex (Synthes) expandable cage was attached to a material testing machine. The endplate of the implant was placed at a similar spot on the block in such a manner that there was an exact match between the Synex endplate and the foam block at 0 degrees, subsequent angled blocks would tilt the foam endplates by the 10-, 20-, and 30-degree increments as needed. Cyclic axial loads were applied in 9 load-unload cycles. Five samples were tested at each mismatch angle (0, 10, 20, and 30 degrees), for a total of 20 trials. Implant subsidence significantly increased for each 10-degree increase in mismatch angle. This effect, however, did not follow a uniform trend at all angles. The curve appeared exponential at 0 degree of angular mismatch, became linear at 10-20 degrees of mismatch, and then demonstrated some ability to resist load at 30 degrees, leading to a plateau at the higher loads. Increasing mismatch angles are an important factor in leading to increased cage subsidence into polyurethane blocks. Consequently, the incidence of subsidence in the clinical setting could be reduced by paying careful attention to ensuring that both the prosthetic and bony endplates are well apposed at the end of surgery.

  12. The analysis of SCS return momentum effects on the RCS water level during mid-loop operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    swang Seo, J.; Young Yang, J.; Tack Hwang, S. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    An accurate prediction of Reactor Coolant System (RCS) water levels is of importance in the determination of allowable operating range to ensure the safety during the mid-loop operations. However, complex hydraulic phenomena induced by Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) return momentum cause different water levels from those in the loop where the water level indicators are located. This was apparantly observed at the pre-core cold hydro test of the Younggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN 3) in Korea. In this study, in order to analytically understand the effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water level and its general trend, a model using one-dimensional momentum equation, hydraulic jump, Bernoulli equation, flow resistance coefficient, and total water volume conservation has been developed to predict the RCS water levels at various RCS locations during the mid-loop conditions and the simulation results were compared with the test data. The analysis shows that the hydraulic jump in the operating cold legs in conjunction with the momentum loss throughout the RCS is the main cause creating the water level differences at various RCS locations. The prediction results provide good explanations for the test data and show the significant effect of the SCS return momentum on the RCS water levels.

  13. Effect of angular velocity on soleus and medial gastrocnemius H-reflex during maximal concentric and eccentric muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclay, Julien; Robbe, Alice; Pousson, Michel; Martin, Alain

    2009-10-01

    At rest, the H-reflex is lower during lengthening than shortening actions. During passive lengthening, both soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) H-reflex amplitudes decrease with increasing angular velocity. This study was designed to investigate whether H-reflex amplitude is affected by angular velocity during concentric and eccentric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Experiments were performed on nine healthy men. At a constant angular velocity of 60 degrees /s and 20 degrees /s, maximal H-reflex and M-wave potentials were evoked at rest (i.e., H(max) and M(max), respectively) and during concentric and eccentric MVC (i.e., H(sup) and M(sup), respectively). Regardless of the muscle, H(max)/M(max) was lower during lengthening than shortening actions and the H(sup)/M(sup) ratio was higher than H(max)/M(max) during lengthening actions. Whereas no action type and angular velocity effects on the MG H(sup)/M(sup) were found, the SOL H(sup)/M(sup) was lower during eccentric than concentric MVC and this depression was increased with higher angular velocity. Our findings indicate that the depression of the H-reflex amplitude during eccentric compared to concentric MVC depends mainly on the amount of inhibition induced by lengthening action. In conclusion, H-reflex should be evoked during both passive and active dynamic trials to evaluate the plasticity of the spinal loop.

  14. Effects of Badminton Expertise on Representational Momentum: A Combination of Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Representational momentum (RM has been found to be magnified in experts (e.g., sport players with respect to both real and implied motion in expert-familiar domains. However, it remains unclear whether similar effects can be achieved in expert-unfamiliar domains, especially within the context of implied motion. To answer this question, we conducted two independent experiments using an implied motion paradigm and examined the expert effects of badminton training on RM in both adult and child players. In Experiment 1, we used a cross-sectional design and compared RM between adult professional badminton players and matched controls. The results revealed significantly enhanced RM for adult players, supporting the expert effect in expert-unfamiliar domains for implied motion. However, cross-sectional studies could not ascertain whether the observed expert effect was due to innate factors or expertise acquirement. Therefore, in Experiment 2, we used a longitudinal design and compared RM between two groups of child participants, naming child players who had enrolled professional badminton training program at a sports school and age-matched peer non-players who attended an ordinary primary school without sports training. Before training, there were no differences in RM among child players, their non-player peers, and adult non-players. However, after 4 years of badminton training, child players demonstrated significantly enhanced RM compared to themselves prior to training. The increased RM observed in both adult and child players suggests that badminton expertise modulates implied motion RM.

  15. Young-type interference effect on angular distribution of secondary electrons emitted from H2 in collisions with fast electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Shyamal; Misra, D.; Kelkar, A. H.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Stia, C. R.; Fojón, O. A.; Rivarola, R. D.

    2008-11-01

    The Young-type interference arising due to the spatial coherence has been investigated in the electron emission spectrum from fast electron impact ionization of the inversion symmetric homonuclear diatomic molecule H2 . The evidence of the interference effect in the angular distribution of the double differential spectrum of the secondary electron is found. The signature of constructive interferences has been identified in the soft-collision regions as well as in binary encounters. The observed oscillation in the forward-backward asymmetry parameter is explained in terms of the Cohen-Fano-type interference coupled with the angular dependence of oscillation frequency. A comparative study indicates a marked difference between the angular asymmetry in the case of fast heavy ion (F9+) and electron collisions with H2 at a similar velocity.

  16. Effects of spin-orbit activated interchannel coupling on dipole photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M Ya [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Baltenkov, A S [Arifov Institute of Electronics, Tashkent 70125 (Uzbekistan); Chernysheva, L V [A F Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Felfli, Z [Center for Theoretical Studies of Physics Systems, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States); Manson, S T [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Msezane, A Z [Center for Theoretical Studies of Physics Systems, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314 (United States)

    2004-02-28

    The effects of spin-orbit induced interchannel coupling on the dipole photoelectron angular asymmetry parameter {beta}{sub 3d} for Xe, Cs and Ba are explored using a modified version of the spin-polarized random phase approximation with exchange (SPRPAE) methodology. For Xe, {beta}{sub 3d{sub 5/2}} is modified somewhat by the interchannel coupling in the vicinity of the 3d{sub 3/2} {yields} {epsilon}f shape resonance, and this effect is significantly more pronounced in Cs where the resonance is larger. In Ba, however, where f-wave orbital collapse has occurred, the shape resonance has moved below threshold and the effect of interchannel coupling on {beta}{sub 3d{sub 5/2}} above the 3d{sub 3/2} threshold is negligible. But below the 3d{sub 3/2} threshold, {beta}{sub 3d{sub 5/2}} is dominated by the huge broad 3d{sub 3/2} {yields} 4f resonance.

  17. A numerical study of the wave shoaling effect on wind-wave momentum flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuanting; Shen, Lian

    2017-11-01

    Momentum transfer between wind and waves is crucial to many physical processes in air-sea interactions. For decades, there has been a number of observational evidence that the surface roughness in the nearshore region is notably higher than in the open sea. In order to explain the mechanism behind this important phenomenon, in particular the wave shoaling effect on surface roughness, we conduct a series of numerical experiments using the wind-wave module of WOW (Wave-Ocean-Wind), a high-fidelity computational framework developed in house. We use prescribed monochromatic waves with linear shoaling effect incorporated, while the wind field is simulated using wall-resolved large-eddy simulation. A comparison between a shallow water wave case and deep water wave cases shows remarkably stronger wave effects on the wind for the former. Detailed analyses show that the increased surface roughness is closely associated with the increased form drag that is mainly due to the reduced wave age in wave shoaling.

  18. Computation of aquatic primary production: Extended formalism to include effect of angular and spectral distribution of light

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Platt, T.

    and utilization by algal cells. Neglecting the effect of angular distribution on the light absorbed by phytoplankton can lead to underestimation of primary production. For the stations studied as examples, the minimum correction required is 5-l3% for daily, column-integrated...

  19. Effects of Angular Frequency During Clinorotation on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Yew, Alvin G.; Hsieh, Adam H.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Ground-based microgravity simulation can reproduce the apparent effects of weightlessness in spaceflight using clinostats that continuously reorient the gravity vector on a specimen, creating a time-averaged nullification of gravity. In this work, we investigated the effects of clinorotation speed on the morphology, cytoarchitecture, and migration behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Methods: We compared cell responses at clinorotation speeds of 0, 30, 60, and 75 rpm over 8 hours in a recently developed lab-on-chip-based clinostat system. Time lapse light microscopy was used to visualize changes in cell morphology during and after cessation of clinorotation. Cytoarchitecture was assessed by actin and vinculin staining, and chemotaxis was examined using time lapse light microscopy of cells in NGF (100 ng/ml) gradients. Results: Among clinorotated groups, cell area distributions indicated a greater inhibition of cell spreading with higher angular frequency (p is less than 0.005), though average cell area at 30 rpm after 8 hours became statistically similar to control (p = 0.794). Cells at 75rpm clinorotation remained viable and were able to re-spread after clinorotation. In chemotaxis chambers clinorotation did not alter migration patterns in elongated cells, but most clinorotated cells exhibited cell retraction, which strongly compromised motility.

  20. The function of the left angular gyrus in mental arithmetic: evidence from the associative confusion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Roland H; Ansari, Daniel; Koschutnig, Karl; Reishofer, Gernot; Ebner, Franz

    2013-05-01

    While the left angular gyrus (lAG) has been repeatedly implicated in mental arithmetic, its precise functional role has not been established. On the one hand, it has been speculated that the lAG is involved in task-specific processes. On the other hand, the observation of relative deactivation during arithmetic has led to the contention that differential lAG activation reflects task-unrelated difficulty effects associated with the default mode network (DMN). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the neural correlates of the associative confusion effect that allowed us to dissociate effects of task difficulty and task-related arithmetic processes on lAG activation. The associative confusion effect is characterized by poorer performance while verifying addition and multiplication equations whose solutions are associated with the other operation (confusion equations: e.g., "9 × 6 = 15") compared with solutions unrelated to both operations (non-confusion equations: e.g., "9 × 6 = 52"). Comparing these two conditions revealed higher activation of the anterior lAG (areas PGa, PFm, and PF) and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for the confusion problems. This effect displayed only slight anatomical overlap with the well-established reverse problem-size effect (small minus large problems) and task-related deactivation in the parietal cortex. The finding of greater lAG activity (less deactivation) in the more difficult task condition is inconsistent with the hypothesis that lAG activation during mental arithmetic reflects task difficulty related modulations of the DMN. Instead, the present findings provide further support for the symbol-referent mapping hypothesis, suggesting that the lAG mediates the automatic mapping of arithmetic problems onto solutions stored in memory. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.