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Sample records for angstrom resolution insights

  1. B. subtilis ykuD Protein at 2.0 Angstrom Resolution: Insights into the Structure and Function of a Novel, Ubiquitous Family of Bacterial Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielnicki,J.; Devedjiev, Y.; Derewenda, U.; Dauter, Z.; Joachimiak, A.; Derewenda, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of the product of the Bacillus subtilis ykuD gene was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method and refined using data to 2.0 Angstroms resolution. The ykuD protein is a representative of a distinctly prokaryotic and ubiquitous family found among both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals the presence of an N-terminal LysM domain, which occurs among enzymes involved in cell wall metabolism, and a novel, putative catalytic domain with a highly conserved His/Cys-containing motif of hitherto unknown structure. As the wild-type protein did not crystallize, a double mutant was designed (Lys117Ala/Gln118Ala) to reduce excess surface conformational entropy. As expected, the structure of the LysM domain is similar to the NMR structure reported for an analogous domain from Escherichia coli murein transglycosylase MltD. The molecular model also shows that the 112-residue-long C-terminal domain has a novel tertiary fold consisting of a {beta}-sandwich with two mixed sheets, one containing five strands and the other, six strands. The two {beta}-sheets form a cradle capped by an {alpha}-helix. This domain contains a putative catalytic site with a tetrad of invariant His123, Gly124, Cys139, and Arg141. The stereochemistry of this active site shows similarities to peptidotransferases and sortases, and suggests that the enzymes of the ykuD family may play an important role in cell wall biology.

  2. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  3. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  4. Reaching sub-Angstrom resolution with a mid-voltage TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Nelson, E. Chris

    2004-04-12

    Phase-contrast imaging in the high-resolution electron microscope produces images with peaks at atom positions by extracting the spatial distribution of the relative phase from the electron wave. Usually, the electron wave is imaged by direct interference of diffracted beams at optimum focus. Instead, the One-Angstrom Microscope uses focal-series reconstruction software to derive the relative electron phase from a series of images taken over a range of focus, with peaks that correspond to the atom positions at a resolution that extends to the microscope information limit. Tests using a silicon specimen tilted into [112] orientation show that the O Angstrom M has achieved a world-record resolution of 0.78 Angstrom.

  5. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  6. Structural basis of transcription: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, P; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    2001-06-08

    Structures of a 10-subunit yeast RNA polymerase II have been derived from two crystal forms at 2.8 and 3.1 angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals a division of the polymerase into four mobile modules, including a clamp, shown previously to swing over the active center. In the 2.8 angstrom structure, the clamp is in an open state, allowing entry of straight promoter DNA for the initiation of transcription. Three loops extending from the clamp may play roles in RNA unwinding and DNA rewinding during transcription. A 2.8 angstrom difference Fourier map reveals two metal ions at the active site, one persistently bound and the other possibly exchangeable during RNA synthesis. The results also provide evidence for RNA exit in the vicinity of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain, coupling synthesis to RNA processing by enzymes bound to this domain.

  7. Crystal Structure of Bovine Mitochondrial Factor B at 0.96-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.K.; Belogrudov, G.I.; Stroud, R.M.

    2009-05-20

    Coupling factor B (FB) is a mitochondrial inner membrane polypeptide that facilitates the energy-driven catalysis of ATP synthesis in animal mitochondria by blocking a proton leak across the membrane. Here, we report the crystal structure of the bovine mitochondrial FB mutant with Gly-3-Glu substitution determined at a resolution of 0.96 {angstrom} and that of the WT polypeptide at a resolution of 2.9 {angstrom}. The structure reveals an oblong, oval-shaped molecule with a unique globular N-terminal domain that is proposed to be the membrane anchor domain and the capping region to the C-terminal leucine-rich repeats domain. A short N-terminal {alpha}-helix, which extends away from the molecule's body, is suggestive of functioning as an anchor for FB to the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Identification of a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion reveals that FB is a metalloprotein. We also report the cocrystal structures of FB bound with phenylarsine oxide and Cd{sup 2+}, two known inhibitors of the FB coupling activity.

  8. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  9. Molecular structure of an apolipoprotein determined at 2. 5- angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breiter, D.R.; Benning, M.M.; Wesenberg, G.; Holden, H.M.; Rayment, I. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Kanost, M.R.; Law, J.H.; Wells, M.A. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1991-01-22

    The three-dimensional structure of an apolipoprotein isolated from the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria has been determined by X-ray analysis to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom}. The overall molecular architecture of this protein consists of five long {alpha}-helices connected by short loops. As predicted from amino acid sequence analyses, these helices are distinctly amphiphilic with the hydrophobic residues pointing in toward the interior of the protein and the hydrophilic side chains facing outward. The molecule falls into the general category of up-and-down {alpha}-helical bundles as previously observed, for example, in cytochrome c{prime}. Although the structure shows the presence of five long amphiphilic {alpha}-helices, the {alpha}-helical moment and hydrophobicity of the entire molecule fall into the range found for normal globular proteins. Thus, in order for the amphiphilic helices to play a role in the binding of the protein to a lipid surface, there must be a structural reorganization of the protein which exposes the hydrophobic interior to the lipid surface. The three dimensional motif of this apolipoprotein is compatible with a model in which the molecule binds to the lipid surface via a relatively nonpolar end and then spreads on the surface in such a way as to cause the hydrophobic side chains of the helices to come in contact with the lipid surface, the charged and polar residues to remain in contact with water, and the overall helical motif of the protein to be maintained.

  10. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  11. A DSP-based controller for a linear actuator system with sub-angstrom resolution and 15-millimeter travel range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyanitskiy, A.; Shu, D.; Wong, T.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); IIT

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new digital signal processor (DSP)-based closed-loop feedback controller for a linear actuator system with sub-angstrom resolution and 15-mm travel range. The linear actuator system consists of a laser Doppler encoder with multiple-reflection optics [1], a high-stiffness weak-link mechanism with high driving sensitivity and stability [2], and a Texas Instruments TMS320C40 DSP-based controller for high-performance closed-loop feedback control. In this paper, we discuss the DSP-based controller design, as well as recent test results yielding step sizes below 50 picometers obtained with the atomic force microprobe setup.

  12. Crystal structure of a divalent metal ion transporter CorA at 2.9 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Said; Niegowski, Damian; Kohl, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Lesley, Scott A; Nordlund, Pär

    2006-07-21

    CorA family members are ubiquitously distributed transporters of divalent metal cations and are considered to be the primary Mg2+ transporter of Bacteria and Archaea. We have determined a 2.9 angstrom resolution structure of CorA from Thermotoga maritima that reveals a pentameric cone-shaped protein. Two potential regulatory metal binding sites are found in the N-terminal domain that bind both Mg2+ and Co2+. The structure of CorA supports an efflux system involving dehydration and rehydration of divalent metal ions potentially mediated by a ring of conserved aspartate residues at the cytoplasmic entrance and a carbonyl funnel at the periplasmic side of the pore.

  13. Crystal structure of intercalated four-stranded d(C3T) at 1.4 angstroms resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, C. H.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of d(C3T), solved at 1.4 angstroms resolution, reveals that the molecule forms a four-stranded intercalated complex. It consists of two parallel-stranded duplexes, each of which is held together by cytosine-protonated cytosine base pairs. The two duplexes are intercalated with each other and have opposite strand orientation. The molecule has a flat, lath-like appearance, and the covalently bonded cytosines have a slow right-handed twist of 17.1 degrees. However, there is considerable asymmetry. On one of the flat sides, the phosphate groups are rotated away from the center of the molecule. They are held in this orientation by bridging water molecules that bind the NH of cytosine and a phosphate group of an opposite chain. There is also considerable microheterogeneity in the structure. The cytosine hemiprotonation occurs even at pH 7 where stable crystals form.

  14. Imaging columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen with sub angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisielowski, C.; Hetherington, C.J.D.; Wang, Y.C.; Kilaas, R.; O' Keefe, M.A.; Thust, A.

    2000-01-02

    It is reported that lattice imaging with a 300 kV field emission microscope in combination with numerical reconstruction procedures can be used to reach an interpretable resolution of about 80 pm for the first time. A retrieval of the electron exit wave from focal series allows for the resolution of single atomic columns of the light elements carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen at a projected nearest neighbor spacing down to 85 pm. Lens aberrations are corrected on-line during the experiment and by hardware such that resulting image distortions are below 80 pm. Consequently, the imaging can be aberration-free to this extent. The resolution enhancement results from increased electrical and mechanical stability's of the instrument coupled with a low spherical aberration coefficient of 0.595 + 0.005 mm.

  15. Vibronic motion with joint angstrom-femtosecond resolution observed through Fano progressions recorded within one molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonhee; Perdue, Shawn M; Rodriguez Perez, Alejandro; Apkarian, Vartkess Ara

    2014-01-28

    Electroluminescence (EL) in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which enables spectroscopy with submolecular spatial resolution, is shown to be due to radiative ionization with vibronic shape resonances that carry Fano line profiles. Since Fano progressions retain phase information, the spectra can be transformed to the time domain to reconstruct the vibronic motion. In effect, measurements within a molecule are accessible with joint space-time resolution at the Å-fs limit. We demonstrate this through EL-STM on the Jahn-Teller-active Zn-etioporphyrin radical anion and visualize the orbiting motion of scattered electrons upon sudden reduction and oxidation. We discuss the elements that enable spectroscopy with submolecular spatial resolution through EL-STM and the closely related STM-Raman process.

  16. The 3.2 Angstrom Resolution Structure of the Polymorphic Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Ribonucleoprotein Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Jeffrey Alan

    Structural studies of the polymorphic cowpea chlorotic mottle virus have resulted in high resolution structures for two distinct icosahedral ribonucleoprotein particle conformations dependent upon whether acidic or basic pH conditions prevail. CCMV is stable below pH 6.5, however metal-free particles maintain a 10% increase in hydrodynamic volume at pH >=q 7.5. Identification of this swollen' form of CCMV, which can easily be disrupted with 1M NaCl, led to the first reassembly of an icosahedral virus in vitro from purified viral protein and RNA to form infectious particles, and its assembly has been the subject of biochemical and biophysical investigations for over twenty-five years. Under well defined conditions of pH, ionic strength and divalent metal ion concentration, CCMV capsid protein or capsid protein and RNA will reassemble to form icosahedral particles of various sizes, sheets, tubes, rosettes, and a variety of laminar structures which resemble virion structures from non-related virus families. Analysis of native particles at 3.2A resolution and swollen particles at 28A resolution has suggested that the chemical basis for the formation of polymorphic icosahedral and anisometric structures is: (i) hexamers formed of beta-barrel subunits stabilized by an unusual hexameric parallel beta structure made up of their N-termini, (ii) the location of protein-RNA interactions, (iii) divalent metal cation binding sites that regulate quasi-symmetrical subunit associations, (iv) charge repulsion across the same interfaces when lacking divalent metal ions at basic pH, which induces the formation of sixty 20A diameter portals for RNA release, and (v) a novel, C-terminal-based, subunit dimer assembly unit. The use of C- and N-terminal arms in CCMV has not been observed in other icosahedral RNA virus structures determined at near atomic resolution, however, their detailed interactions and roles in stabilizing the quaternary organization of CCMV are related to that found

  17. The Beginning of Kinesin's Force-Generating Cycle Visualized at 9Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, Charles V.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2007-06-20

    We have used cryo-electron microscopy of kinesin-decorated microtubules to resolve the structure of the motor protein kinesin's crucial nucleotide response elements, switch I and the switch II helix, in kinesin's poorly understood nucleotide-free state. Both of the switch elements undergo conformational change relative to the microtubule-free state. The changes in switch I suggest a role for it in ''ejecting'' adenosine diphosphate when kinesin initially binds to the microtubule. The switch II helix has an N-terminal extension, apparently stabilized by conserved microtubule contacts, implying a microtubule activation mechanism that could convey the state of the bound nucleotide to kinesin's putative force-delivering element (the ''neck linker''). In deriving this structure, we have adapted an image-processing technique, single-particle reconstruction, for analyzing decorated microtubules. The resulting reconstruction visualizes the asymmetric seam present in native, 13-protofilament microtubules, and this method will provide an avenue to higher-resolution characterization of a variety of microtubule- binding proteins, as well as the microtubule itself.

  18. CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE OF DEOXYGENATED LIMULUS-POLYPHEMUS SUBUNIT-II HEMOCYANIN AT 2.18-ANGSTROM RESOLUTION - CLUES FOR A MECHANISM FOR ALLOSTERIC REGULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAZES, B; MAGNUS, KA; BONAVENTURA, C; BONAVENTURA, J; DAUTER, Z; KALK, KH; HOL, WGJ

    The crystal structure of Limulus polyphemus subunit type II hemocyanin in the deoxygenated state has been determined to a resolution of 2.18 angstrom. Phase information for this first structure of a cheliceratan hemocyanin was obtained by molecular replacement using the crustacean hemocyanin

  19. X-ray structure of antistasin at 1.9 angstrom resolution and its modelled complex with blood coagulation factor Xa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapatto, R; Krengel, U; Schreuder, HA; Arkema, A; deBoer, B; Kalk, KH; Hol, WGJ; Grootenhuis, PDJ; Mulders, JWM; Dijkema, R; Theunissen, HJM; Dijkstra, BW

    1997-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of antistasin, a potent inhibitor of blood coagulation factor Xa, from the Mexican leech Haementeria officinalis was determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution by X-ray crystallography, The structure reveals a novel protein fold composed of two homologous domains, each res

  20. CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE OF DEOXYGENATED LIMULUS-POLYPHEMUS SUBUNIT-II HEMOCYANIN AT 2.18-ANGSTROM RESOLUTION - CLUES FOR A MECHANISM FOR ALLOSTERIC REGULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAZES, B; MAGNUS, KA; BONAVENTURA, C; BONAVENTURA, J; DAUTER, Z; KALK, KH; HOL, WGJ

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of Limulus polyphemus subunit type II hemocyanin in the deoxygenated state has been determined to a resolution of 2.18 angstrom. Phase information for this first structure of a cheliceratan hemocyanin was obtained by molecular replacement using the crustacean hemocyanin structu

  1. CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN TRIOSEPHOSPHATE ISOMERASE AT 2.8 ANGSTROM RESOLUTION - TRIOSEPHOSPHATE ISOMERASE-RELATED HUMAN GENETIC-DISORDERS AND COMPARISON WITH THE TRYPANOSOMAL ENZYME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANDE, SC; MAINFROID, [No Value; KALK, KH; GORAJ, K; MARTIAL, JA; HOL, WGJ

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of recombinant human triosephosphate isomerase (hTIM) has been determined complexed with the transition-state analogue 2-phosphoglycolate at a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom. After refinement, the R-factor is 16.7% with good geometry. The asymmetric unit contains 1 complete dimer o

  2. X-ray crystal structure of the Fe-only hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum to 1.8 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J W; Lanzilotta, W N; Lemon, B J; Seefeldt, L C

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional structure for the monomeric iron-containing hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum was determined to 1.8 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallography using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing. CpI, an enzyme that catalyzes the two-electron reduction of two protons to yield dihydrogen, was found to contain 20 gram atoms of iron per mole of protein, arranged into five distinct [Fe-S] clusters. The probable active-site cluster, previously termed the H-cluster, was found to be an unexpected arrangement of six iron atoms existing as a [4Fe-4S] cubane subcluster covalently bridged by a cysteinate thiol to a [2Fe] subcluster. The iron atoms of the [2Fe] subcluster both exist with an octahedral coordination geometry and are bridged to each other by three non-protein atoms, assigned as two sulfide atoms and one carbonyl or cyanide molecule. This structure provides insights into the mechanism of biological hydrogen activation and has broader implications for [Fe-S] cluster structure and function in biological systems.

  3. Structure of Acostatin, a Dimeric Disintegrin From Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon Contortrix Contortrix), at 1.7 Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseeva, N.; Bau, R.; Swenson, S.D.; Marklund, F.S.; Jr.; Choe, J.-Y.; Liu, Z.-J.; Allaire, M.

    2009-05-26

    Disintegrins are a family of small (4-14 kDa) proteins that bind to another class of proteins, integrins. Therefore, as integrin inhibitors, they can be exploited as anticancer and antiplatelet agents. Acostatin, an {alpha}{beta} heterodimeric disintegrin, has been isolated from the venom of Southern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix). The three-dimensional structure of acostatin has been determined by macromolecular crystallography using the molecular-replacement method. The asymmetric unit of the acostatin crystals consists of two heterodimers. The structure has been refined to an R{sub work} and R{sub free} of 18.6% and 21.5%, respectively, using all data in the 20-1.7 {angstrom} resolution range. The structure of all subunits is similar and is well ordered into N-terminal and C-terminal clusters with four intramolecular disulfide bonds. The overall fold consists of short {beta}-sheets, each of which is formed by a pair of antiparallel {beta}-strands connected by {beta}-turns and flexible loops of different lengths. Conformational flexibility is found in the RGD loops and in the C-terminal segment. The interaction of two N-terminal clusters via two intermolecular disulfide bridges anchors the {alpha}{beta}chains of the acostatin dimers. The C-terminal clusters of the heterodimer project in opposite directions and form a larger angle between them in comparison with other dimeric disintegrins. Extensive interactions are observed between two heterodimers, revealing an {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin tetramer. Further experiments are required to identify whether the {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} acostatin complex plays a functional role in vivo.

  4. Crystal structures at 2.5 Angstrom resolution of seryl-tRNA synthetase complexed with two analogs of seryl adenylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belrhali, H.; Yaremchuk, A.; Tukalo, M.;

    1994-01-01

    Crystal structures of seryl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus complexed with two different analogs of seryl adenylate have been determined at 2.5 Angstrom resolution. The first complex is between the enzyme and seryl-hydroxamate-AMP (adenosine monophosphate), produced enzymatically...... in a deep hydrophilic cleft formed by the antiparallel beta sheet and surrounding loops of the synthetase catalytic domain. Four regions in the primary sequence are involved in the interactions, including the motif 2 and 3 regions of class 2 synthetases. Apart from the specific recognition of the serine...

  5. Aspirin induces its anti-inflammatory effects through its specific binding to phospholipase A2: crystal structure of the complex formed between phospholipase A2 and aspirin at 1.9 angstroms resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajendra Kumar; Ethayathulla, A S; Jabeen, Talat; Sharma, Sujata; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P

    2005-02-01

    Phospholipase A2 is potentially an important target for structure-based rational drug design. In order to determine the involvement of phospholipase A2 in the action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the crystal structure of the complex formed between phospholipase A2 and aspirin has been determined at 1.9 angstroms resolution. The structure contains 915 protein atoms, 1 calcium ion, 13 atoms of aspirin and 105 water molecules. The observed electron density of the aspirin molecule in the structure was of very high quality thus allowing the precise determination of its atomic coordinates leading to the clear description of its interactions with the enzyme. The structure of the complex clearly shows that aspirin is literally embedded in the hydrophobic environment of PLA2. It is so placed in the substrate binding channel that it forms several important attractive interactions with calcium ion, His 48 and Asp 49. Thus, the structure of the complex clearly shows that aspirin occupies a favourable place in the specific binding site of PLA2. The binding studies have shown that acetyl salicylate (aspirin) binds to PLA2 enzyme specifically with a dissociation constant of 6.4 x 10(-6) M. The structural details and binding data suggest that the inhibition of PLA2 by aspirin is of pharmacological

  6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as potent inhibitors of phospholipase A2: structure of the complex of phospholipase A2 with niflumic acid at 2.5 Angstroms resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Talat; Singh, Nagendra; Singh, Rajendra K; Sharma, Sujata; Somvanshi, Rishi K; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Tej P

    2005-12-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2); EC 3.1.3.4) catalyzes the first step of the production of proinflammatory compounds collectively known as eicosanoids. The binding of phospholipid substrates to PLA(2) occurs through a well formed hydrophobic channel. Surface plasmon resonance studies have shown that niflumic acid binds to Naja naja sagittifera PLA(2) with an affinity that corresponds to a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 4.3 x 10(-5) M. Binding studies of PLA(2) with niflumic acid were also carried out using a standard PLA(2) kit that gave an approximate binding constant, K(i), of 1.26 +/- 0.05 x 10(-6) M. Therefore, in order to establish the viability of PLA(2) as a potential target molecule for drug design against inflammation, arthritis and rheumatism, the three-dimensional structure of the complex of PLA(2) with the known anti-inflammatory agent niflumic acid [2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)anilino]nicotinic acid] has been determined at 2.5 Angstroms resolution. The structure of the complex has been refined to an R factor of 0.187. The structure determination reveals the presence of one niflumic acid molecule at the substrate-binding site of PLA(2). It shows that niflumic acid interacts with the important active-site residues His48 and Asp49 through two water molecules. It is observed that the niflumic acid molecule is completely buried in the substrate-binding hydrophobic channel. The conformations of the binding site in PLA(2) as well as that of niflumic acid are not altered upon binding. However, the orientation of the side chain of Trp19, which is located at the entry of the substrate-binding site, has changed from that found in the native PLA(2), indicating its familiar role.

  7. Sub-Angstrom electron microscopy for sub-Angstrom nano-metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2004-01-18

    The revolution in nanoscale science and technology requires instrumentation for observation and metrology - we must be able to see and measure what we build. Because nano-devices operate on the level of a few molecules, or even a few atoms, accurate atomic-scale imaging is called for. High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopes (both TEM and STEM) can provide valuable measurements at the sub-Angstrom level. Over the next decade, extension of TEM and STEM resolutions to half-Angstrom levels by next-generation aberration-corrected electron microscopes will advance the capabilities of these essential tools for atomic-scale structural characterization. Because improvements in resolution allow for separation of atom columns in many more projection directions, these microscopes will provide much improved three-dimensional characterization of the shape and internal structure of nanodevices and catalyst nanoparticles (perhaps even true 3-D imaging), and hence provide essential feedback in the nano-theory/construction/measurement loop.

  8. New insights in high-resolution spectroscopy a wide theoretical library of R=500000 stellar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E; Rodríguez-Merino, L H; Chavez, M

    2002-01-01

    We present an extended theoretical library of over 800 synthetic stellar spectra, covering energy distribution in the optical range (lambda = 3500-7000 angstrom), at inverse resolution R=500000. The library, based on the ATLAS9 model atmospheres, has been computed with the SYNTHE code developed by R.L. Kurucz. The grid spans a large volume in the fundamental parameter space (i.e. effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), and can be profitably applied to different research fields dealing both with the study of single stars and stellar aggregates, through population synthesis models. A complementary project, in progress, will extend the wavelength range to the ultraviolet, down to 850 angstrom, at an inverse resolution of R=50000.

  9. New Insights in High-Resolution Spectroscopy: a Wide Theoretical Library of R=500000 Stellar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.; Chávez, M.

    We present an extended theoretical library of over 800 synthetic stellar spectra, covering energy distribution in the optical range (lambda = 3500-7000 angstrom), at inverse resolution R=500000. The library, based on the ATLAS9 model atmospheres, has been computed with the SYNTHE code developed by R.L. Kurucz. The grid spans a large volume in the fundamental parameter space (i.e. effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity), and can be profitably applied to different research fields dealing both with the study of single stars and stellar aggregates, through population synthesis models. A complementary project, in progress, will extend the wavelength range to the ultraviolet, down to 850 angstrom, at an inverse resolution of R=50000.

  10. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  11. Sub- Angstrom microscopy through incoherent imaging and image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.; Chisholm, M.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Ferridge, A.G.; Seddon, M.J. (Wellcome Research Lab., Beckenham (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a high-angle annular detector breaks the coherence of the imaging process, and provides an incoherent image of a crystal projection. Even in the presence of strong dynamical diffraction, the image can be accurately described as a convolution between an object function, sharply peaked at the projected atomic sites, and the probe intensity profile. Such an image can be inverted intuitively without the need for model structures, and therefore provides the important capability to reveal unanticipated interfacial arrangements. It represents a direct image of the crystal projection, revealing the location of the atomic columns and their relative high-angle scattering power. Since no phase is associated with a peak in the object function or the contrast transfer function, extension to higher resolution is also straightforward. Image restoration techniques such as maximum entropy, in conjunction with the 1.3 {Angstrom} probe anticipated for a 300 kV STEM, appear to provide a simple and robust route to the achievement of sub-{Angstrom} resolution electron microscopy.

  12. Sub-{Angstrom} microscopy through incoherent imaging and image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.; Chisholm, M.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ferridge, A.G.; Seddon, M.J. [Wellcome Research Lab., Beckenham (United Kingdom)

    1992-03-01

    Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a high-angle annular detector breaks the coherence of the imaging process, and provides an incoherent image of a crystal projection. Even in the presence of strong dynamical diffraction, the image can be accurately described as a convolution between an object function, sharply peaked at the projected atomic sites, and the probe intensity profile. Such an image can be inverted intuitively without the need for model structures, and therefore provides the important capability to reveal unanticipated interfacial arrangements. It represents a direct image of the crystal projection, revealing the location of the atomic columns and their relative high-angle scattering power. Since no phase is associated with a peak in the object function or the contrast transfer function, extension to higher resolution is also straightforward. Image restoration techniques such as maximum entropy, in conjunction with the 1.3 {Angstrom} probe anticipated for a 300 kV STEM, appear to provide a simple and robust route to the achievement of sub-{Angstrom} resolution electron microscopy.

  13. Sub-angstrom surface metrology with a virtual reference interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freischlad, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Non-contact, 3D optical interferometric profilers provide detailed topography measurements of super-smooth surfaces such as hard disk substrates and super-polished optics. However, the contribution of the interferometer system to the measurement can be significant for surfaces with an RMS roughness of one Angstrom and below. Special care must be taken to minimize random noise as well as to remove the systematic instrument error from the measured data. While the random noise can be addressed by low-noise design and averaging of measurements, the systematic instrument error is more difficult to eliminate. In this paper an interferometer configuration is presented that eliminates the mid to higher spatial frequencies from the reference beam. This configuration is called a virtual-reference interferometer, since there is no physical surface in focus conjugate to the test surface. This provides very smooth systematic instrument errors with essentially no contribution in the mid to high spatial frequencies of surface waviness and roughness. The virtual-reference interferometer has a midsize measurement area of 20x20 mm, is fully compensated for white light, extended source illumination, and enables data acquisition for both phase shifting and coherence scanning modes. Current performance data show a residual systematic tool waviness error of < 0.2 Angstrom RMS, with potential for improvement. Efficient stitching of subaperture measurements accommodates high resolution roughness and waviness maps of test surfaces up to 150 mm x100 mm.

  14. The cryo-electron microscopy structure of feline calicivirus bound to junctional adhesion molecule A at 9-angstrom resolution reveals receptor-induced flexibility and two distinct conformational changes in the capsid protein VP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhella, David; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2011-11-01

    Caliciviridae are small icosahedral positive-sense RNA-containing viruses and include the human noroviruses, a leading cause of infectious acute gastroenteritis and feline calicivirus (FCV), which causes respiratory illness and stomatitis in cats. FCV attachment and entry is mediated by feline junctional adhesion molecule A (fJAM-A), which binds to the outer face of the capsomere, inducing a conformational change in the capsid that may be important for viral uncoating. Here we present the results of our structural investigation of the virus-receptor interaction and ensuing conformational changes. Cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction were used to solve the structure of the virus decorated with a soluble fragment of the receptor at subnanometer resolution. In initial reconstructions, the P domains of the capsid protein VP1 and fJAM-A were poorly resolved. Sorting experiments led to improved reconstructions of the FCV-fJAM-A complex both before and after the induced conformational change, as well as in three transition states. These data showed that the P domain becomes flexible following fJAM-A binding, leading to a loss of icosahedral symmetry. Furthermore, two distinct conformational changes were seen; an anticlockwise rotation of up to 15° of the P domain was observed in the AB dimers, while tilting of the P domain away from the icosahedral 2-fold axis was seen in the CC dimers. A list of putative contact residues was calculated by fitting high-resolution coordinates for fJAM-A and VP1 to the reconstructed density maps, highlighting regions in both virus and receptor important for virus attachment and entry.

  15. High Resolution Structure of Deinococcus Bacteriophytochrome Yields New Insights into Phytochrome Architecture and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Forest, Katrina T. (NWU); (UW)

    2010-03-08

    Phytochromes are red/far red light photochromic photoreceptors that direct many photosensory behaviors in the bacterial, fungal, and plant kingdoms. They consist of an N-terminal domain that covalently binds a bilin chromophore and a C-terminal region that transmits the light signal, often through a histidine kinase relay. Using x-ray crystallography, we recently solved the first three-dimensional structure of a phytochrome, using the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome assembled with its chromophore, biliverdin IX{alpha}. Now, by engineering the crystallization interface, we have achieved a significantly higher resolution model. This 1.45 {angstrom} resolution structure helps identify an extensive buried surface between crystal symmetry mates that may promote dimerization in vivo. It also reveals that upon ligation of the C3{sup 2} carbon of biliverdin to Cys{sup 24}, the chromophore A-ring assumes a chiral center at C2, thus becoming 2(R),3(E)-phytochromobilin, a chemistry more similar to that proposed for the attached chromophores of cyanobacterial and plant phytochromes than previously appreciated. The evolution of bacterial phytochromes to those found in cyanobacteria and higher plants must have involved greater fitness using more reduced bilins, such as phycocyanobilin, combined with a switch of the attachment site from a cysteine near the N terminus to one conserved within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. From analysis of site-directed mutants in the D. radiodurans phytochrome, we show that this bilin preference was partially driven by the change in binding site, which ultimately may have helped photosynthetic organisms optimize shade detection. Collectively, these three-dimensional structural results better clarify bilin/protein interactions and help explain how higher plant phytochromes evolved from prokaryotic progenitors.

  16. New insights into morphology of high performance BHJ photovoltaics revealed by high resolution AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Feng; Yagihashi, Noritoshi; Nakaya, Masafumi; Ferdous, Sunzida; Liang, Xiaobin; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakajima, Ken; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-10-08

    Direct imaging of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin film morphology in polymer-based solar cells is essential to understand device function and optimize efficiency. The morphology of the BHJ active layer consists of bicontinuous domains of the donor and acceptor materials, having characteristic length scales of several tens of nanometers, that reduces charge recombination, enhances charge separation, and enables electron and hole transport to their respective electrodes. Direct imaging of the morphology from the molecular to macroscopic level, though, is lacking. Though transmission electron tomography provides a 3D, real-space image of the morphology, quantifying the structure is not possible. Here we used high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping and nanomechanical modes to investigate the BHJ active layer morphology that, when combined with Ar(+) etching, provided unique insights with unparalleled spatial resolution. PCBM was seen to form a network that interpenetrated into the fibrillar network of the hole-conducting polymer, both being imbedded in a mixture of the two components. The free surface was found to be enriched with polymer crystals having a "face-on" orientation and the morphology at the anode interface was markedly different.

  17. Crystallization and Preliminary Structural Analysis of the Giant Haemoglobin from Glossoscolex paulistus at 3.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Bachega; l Bleicher; E Horjales; p Santiago; R Garratt; M Tabak

    2011-12-31

    Glossoscolex paulistus is a free-living earthworm encountered in south-east Brazil. Its oxygen transport requirements are undertaken by a giant extracellular haemoglobin, or erythrocruorin (HbGp), which has an approximate molecular mass of 3.6 MDa and, by analogy with its homologue from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt), is believed to be composed of a total of 180 polypeptide chains. In the present work the full 3.6 MDa particle in its cyanomet state was purified and crystallized using sodium citrate or PEG8000 as precipitant. The crystals contain one-quarter of the full particle in the asymmetric unit of the I222 cell and have parameters of a = 270.8 {angstrom}, b = 320.3 {angstrom} and c = 332.4 {angstrom}. Diffraction data were collected to 3.15 {angstrom} using synchrotron radiation on beamline X29A at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and represent the highest resolution data described to date for similar erythrocruorins. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using a search model corresponding to one-twelfth of its homologue from HbLt. This revealed that HbGp belongs to the type I class of erythrocruorins and provided an interpretable initial electron density map in which many features including the haem groups and disulfide bonds could be identified.

  18. What Limits an Altimeter's Resolution of Along-Track Geoid Slope? Insights from Saral and Cryosat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimeter data collected along densely spaced ground tracks can map the marine gravity field, revealing the tectonic fabric of the sea floor. This application requires high accuracy of the along-track derivative of sea surface height over distances shorter than 80 km, and so is very sensitive to the instrument's range precision and any factors that produce short-scale along-track correlation of range measurement errors. To date the altimeters that have collected data over a dense network of ground tracks all acquired their largest data sets in Ku band and employing conventional (incoherent) processing. Two new altimeters go beyond conventional Ku instruments. SARAL AltiKa operates as an incoherent altimeter at Ka-band, and CryoSat collects some Ku-band data in a SAR mode to permit coherent processing for aperture synthesis and delay-Doppler calculations. The along-track range noise correlation characteristics of each of these new measurements are different from what has been seen in previous altimeters. SARAL AltiKa has a lower noise floor than pre-Cryosat Ku-band instruments and its noise spectrum shows decorrelation at different wavelengths, in partial agreement with theoretical work on speckle noise decorrelation over homogeneous surfaces. This improved noise performance results in demonstrable improvement in the resolution of geoid anomalies over small seamounts. Retracking of Cryosat's SAR mode multi-looked waveform yields a decorrelation of range errors unlike that found in conventional instruments, such that it doesn't require two-pass retracking to get the best geoid slope resolution. This is due mainly to the waveform's shape, which yields partial derivatives with respect to geophysical parameter estimates that are more nearly orthogonal than in conventional Ku-band Brown model waveforms. Further understanding of the limits on range precision in these instruments will require understanding of the heterogeneities in reflecting surfaces that are

  19. Radius variation of optical fibers with angstrom accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumetsky, M; Dulashko, Y

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a robust method for the unprecedentedly accurate angstrom-scale detection of local variations of the fiber radius based on the idea suggested by Birks et al. [IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 12, 182 (2000)]. The method uses an optical microfiber (MF) translated at a small distance along the tested fiber and periodically touching it at measurement points. At these points, the MF transmission spectrum exhibits whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonances shifting with the tested fiber radius. A simple and comprehensive optimization scheme, which determines the radius variation without visual recognition of resonances and treats their shifts simultaneously, is developed. The optics of WGM propagation is discussed, and the condition for the validity of the developed method is established.

  20. Changes in Moisture Flux over the Tibetan Plateau during 1979-2011: Insights from a High Resolution Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhang, Yongxin; Cuo, Lan

    2015-05-15

    Net precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration, P-E) changes between 1979 and 2011 from a high resolution regional climate simulation and its reanalysis forcing are analyzed over the Tibet Plateau (TP) and compared to the global land data assimilation system (GLDAS) product. The high resolution simulation better resolves precipitation changes than its coarse resolution forcing, which contributes dominantly to the improved P-E change in the regional simulation compared to the global reanalysis. Hence, the former may provide better insights about the drivers of P-E changes. The mechanism behind the P-E changes is explored by decomposing the column integrated moisture flux convergence into thermodynamic, dynamic, and transient eddy components. High-resolution climate simulation improves the spatial pattern of P-E changes over the best available global reanalysis. High-resolution climate simulation also facilitates new and substantial findings regarding the role of thermodynamics and transient eddies in P-E changes reflected in observed changes in major river basins fed by runoff from the TP. The analysis revealed the contrasting convergence/divergence changes between the northwestern and southeastern TP and feedback through latent heat release as an important mechanism leading to the mean P-E changes in the TP.

  1. Dispersal patterns in the North Sea, insights from a high resolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga Adame, Claudia Gabriela; Polton, Jeff; Holt, Jason; Graham, Jennifer; Henry, Lea-Anne

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are useful to elucidate the fate of materials transported by ocean currents ( i.e. larvae, pollutants, debris, drifters), and can therefore be useful to study important process in coastal seas. Dispersal patterns should be improved by the new generation of high horizontal resolution (ocean circulation models which provide an improved, more dynamic representation of the coastal ocean. We used the new high resolution Northwest European Shelf NEMO ocean circulation model and LTRANS, a particle tracking code, to study the effects of the increased resolution on the dispersion of Lagrangian particles in the North Sea. Particles were released at the locations of offshore oil and gas platforms in the North Sea and tracked for periods similar to the larval duration of benthic organisms that have colonized the subsea platforms. Dispersal patterns and spatio-temporal scales are identified for the summer (stratified) and winter (mixed) oceanographic regimes. The high resolution of the new NEMO model allows for fine scale detail of flow speed and variability. The small scale features (i.e. eddies and fronts) now represented in the model trap particles, decreasing their dispersal and increasing retention times in comparison to simulations done on a previous coarser resolution NEMO version (7 km AMM7). We isolated the effects of resolution from those due to different representations of the circulation in the different versions of the ocean circulation model by averaging the high resolution model velocity fields to the coarser (7 km) grid, and comparing the results of identical particle tracking experiments using these two flow fields. Our results provide a measure of the importance of high resolution flow fields when estimating transport of materials in an enclosed sea and provide a more realistic characterisation of dispersion in the North Sea.

  2. Sub Angstrom imaging of dislocation core structures: How well areexperiments comparable with theory?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisielowski, C.; Freitag, B.; Xu, X.; Beckman, S.P.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2005-12-16

    During the past 50 years Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has evolved from an imaging tool to a quantitative method that approaches the ultimate goal of understanding the atomic structure of materials atom by atom in three dimensions both experimentally and theoretically. Today's TEM abilities are tested in the special case of a Ga terminated 30 degree partial dislocation in GaAs:Be where it is shown that a combination of high-resolution phase contrast imaging, Scanning TEM, and local Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy allows for a complete analysis of dislocation cores and associated stacking faults. We find that it is already possible to locate atom column positions with picometer precision in directly interpretable images of the projected crystal structure and that chemically different elements can already be identified together with their local electronic structure. In terms of theory, the experimental results can be quantitatively compared with ab initio electronic structure total energy calculations. By combining elasticity theory methods with atomic theory an equivalent crystal volume can be addressed. Therefore, it is already feasible to merge experiments and theory on a picometer length scale. While current experiments require the utilization of different, specialized instruments it is foreseeable that the rapid improvement of electron optical elements will soon generate a next generation of microscopes with the ability to image and analyze single atoms in one instrument with deep sub Angstrom spatial resolution and an energy resolution better than 100 meV.

  3. Angstrom-resolved real-time dissection of electrochemically active noble metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Buddha R; Baimpos, Theodoros; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2014-06-24

    Electrochemical solid|liquid interfaces are critically important for technological applications and materials for energy storage, harvesting, and conversion. Yet, a real-time Angstrom-resolved visualization of dynamic processes at electrified solid|liquid interfaces has not been feasible. Here we report a unique real-time atomistic view into dynamic processes at electrochemically active metal interfaces using white light interferometry in an electrochemical surface forces apparatus. This method allows simultaneous deciphering of both sides of an electrochemical interface-the solution and the metal side-with microsecond resolution under dynamically evolving reactive conditions that are inherent to technological systems in operando. Quantitative in situ analysis of the potentiodynamic electrochemical oxidation/reduction of noble metal surfaces shows that Angstrom thick oxides formed on Au and Pt are high-ik materials; that is, they are metallic or highly defect-rich semiconductors, while Pd forms a low-ik oxide. In contrast, under potentiostatic growth conditions, all noble metal oxides exhibit a low-ik behavior. On the solution side, we reveal hitherto unknown strong electrochemical reaction forces, which are due to temporary charge imbalance in the electric double layer caused by depletion/generation of charged species. The real-time capability of our approach reveals significant time lags between electron transfer, oxide reduction/oxidation, and solution side reaction during a progressing electrode process. Comparing the kinetics of solution and metal side responses provides evidence that noble metal oxide reduction proceeds via a hydrogen adsorption and subsequent dissolution/redeposition mechanism. The presented approach may have important implications for designing emerging materials utilizing electrified interfaces and may apply to bioelectrochemical processes and signal transmission.

  4. Studies on inclusion resolution : gaining insight into chemical and physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Simona

    2003-01-01

    Inclusion is a process where two or more compounds crystallise together in a mixed, but regular, crystal lattice. Inclusion resolution is a relatively new way for separating enantiomers from a racemic mixture which employs inclusion with enantiopure compounds as hosts. An enantiopure host compound

  5. Studies on inclusion resolution : gaining insight into chemical and physical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Simona

    2003-01-01

    Inclusion is a process where two or more compounds crystallise together in a mixed, but regular, crystal lattice. Inclusion resolution is a relatively new way for separating enantiomers from a racemic mixture which employs inclusion with enantiopure compounds as hosts. An enantiopure host compound c

  6. Insights on the Subduction Process from High-Resolution 3D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, Margarete

    2015-04-01

    This is an exciting time in geodynamics as the use of unprecedented high-resolution 3D modeling allows us to ask new questions that were previously unattainable. It is now relatively straightforward to run 3D numerical simulations, with local mesh refinement to ~1 km, input data mapped onto over 100 million finite element nodes, and using tens of thousands of compute hours per model, e.g. Jadamec et al. [2012]. With the additional computational resources, comes a new approach to modeling the tectonic problem. For example, mapping tectonic plates onto a high-resolution 3D geodynamic model grid forces the modeler to ask questions much as a field geologist would ask when constructing a geologic map. In this process of moving from textbook models of subduction to using models based on observation, the modeler is forced to explain the more complicated geometries and features in the Earth, allowing for the new computational approaches to be powerful tools for scientific discovery. Subduction modeling of this kind has expanded the classical view of two-dimensional corner flow, e.g. McKenzie [1969], to a slab driven flow that can be quite complex with predictions for upper mantle flow rates that can be over ten times surface plate motions, e.g. Jadamec et al. [2010] and others. In this talk, I will investigate the role of the third-dimension and non-linearity in plate boundary deformation. I will present high-resolution 3D numerical models that examine the effect of observationally based slab geometry, multiple subducting plates, non-linear rheology, and variations in overriding plate thickness on the subduction related deformation of plate margins. Specific examples include the Alaska and Central America subduction systems. In addition, I will highlight future directions in subduction modeling, and how these can be advanced by the increased incorporation of observational data, high-performance computing, focused numerical algorithms, and 3D interactive data visualization.

  7. Higher resolution and higher momentum transfer; New insight into nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, J. H.

    1987-10-01

    The measurements of high momentum transfer data allows extraction of properties of very specific orbits due to the characteristic momentum transfer dependence of their respective form factors. To fully use this sensitivity, form factors need to be mapped out up to >3.5 /fm. The bulk of the new results comes from weaker levels where resolution is essential not only to separate the levels from neighboring states but also to enhance the peak to background ratio. Progress in both of these criteria have produced experimental results that force us to go beyond the mean-field HF-approach. (AIP)

  8. Insights into Tornadoes and Hurricanes from High-Resolution Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, G. H.; Cione, J.; Dahl, N.; Kalina, E.; Lundquist, J. K.; Nolan, D. S.; Rotunno, R.; Stern, D. P.; Worsnop, R.

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive measurements of wind speed in tornadoes and hurricanes are rare because these phenomena are infrequent, turbulent, and (of course) very hazardous. However, detailed knowledge of the distribution of winds would be useful for a variety of applications such as structural engineering, societal awareness, and weather forecasting. To help fill in gaps in this knowledge, numerical model simulations can play a crucial role. The NCAR Yellowstone supercomputer has been used to conduct idealized simulations of tornadoes and hurricanes with grid spacing as small as 1 m. The simulations provide insight into the maximum wind speeds that may be possible in nature and provide guidance for interpreting present-day and future observational platforms. To this end, we have built code into a numerical model to produce "mock" observational datasets from hypothetical airplanes, dropsondes, and instrumented towers. Results are currently being used to help design offshore wind turbines, evaluate tornado intercept strategies, and develop flight paths for unmanned aerial systems.

  9. Improved Insight into Transport Phenomena in Porous Materials at Submicrometer Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gooya, Reza

    injection into aquifers.A range of parameters, namely, viscosity, density and interfacial tension, at di‚fferent temperatures for water and CO2 were calculated and applied to extract the two phaseƒflow parameters for the system. Pressure of both phases, saturation rate and dynamicproperties were......) the heterogeneity of the sampleby applying the method on di‚fferent subvolumes and sizes of subvolumes and 3) theeff‚ect of resolution of the X-ray tomography images. Stokes and Navier-Stokes equationsprovided the same results for Re... velocity. In fact it is notconstant. Simulations using di‚fferent formulations of the contact angle were performedas a function of ƒflow velocity and the results were compared with experimental resultsobtained by flƒow of two phases in a micrometer sized channel. ŒThe best correspondencewith...

  10. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  11. Insights from new high-resolution data from the Traenadjupet Slide on the Norwegian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzato, Alessandro; Tappin, David; Talling, Peter; Cartigny, Matthieu; Long, David; Hunt, James; Watts, Camilla; Pope, Ed; Allin, Joshua; Stanford, Jennifer; Dowdeswell, Julian

    2015-04-01

    Submarine landslides are among the largest mass flows on Earth and can be far larger than landslides on land. They can generate tsunami and therefore represent a significant geohazard. A series of large submarine landslides have been studied previously in unusual detail along the Norwegian continental margin, including the Storegga and Traenadjupet Slides. The most closely studied is the Storegga slide(1,2) which occurred 8.2k BP and moved >3,000 km3 of sediment(2). A tsunami with run up heights sometimes reaching 20m high has been identified from deposits mapped along the Norwegian, Shetland and mainland Scottish coasts (1). The Traenadjupet Slide is the second largest slide on the Norwegian margin with a volume of about 900km3. It has been dated to ~4k BP(3,4). The volume is comparable to that of the Storegga Slide. However, no major tsunami deposit at 4ka has yet been mapped that links to the Traenadjupet Slide (Stein Bondevik, pers. comm.). The purpose of this study is to obtain new insights into how the Traenadjupet Slide was emplaced. In particular, why did movement of 900km3 of sediment during the Traenadjupet Slide fail to produce a major tsunami at 4ka? We present a new field dataset for the Traendajupet Slide including MBES bathymetry, sub-bottom profiles, and piston cores acquired during the 64PE391 research expedition in July 2014, together with data acquired previously during the JCR51 cruise. These datasets cover a large part of Traenadjupet slide and give new insights into the mechanism of the slide failure. The Traenadjupet Slide morphology is very different to that of the Storegga Slide. The Storegga Slide disintegrated generating debris flows and turbidity currents that propagated for hundreds of kilometres. The Traenadjupet Slide, on the other hand, appears not to have disintegrated in a similar manner, but rather left thick mounded deposits at the foot of the slope(5). Several distinct lobes covered with 500m-scale sediment blocks are visible

  12. Miscibility of Itraconazole-Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Blends: Insights with High Resolution Analytical Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-12-07

    Drug-polymer miscibility is considered to be a prerequisite to achieve an optimally performing amorphous solid dispersion (ASD). Unfortunately, it can be challenging to evaluate drug-polymer miscibility experimentally. The aim of this study was to investigate the miscibility of ASDs of itraconazole (ITZ) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using a variety of analytical approaches. The phase behavior of ITZ-HPMC films prepared by solvent evaporation was studied before and after heating. Conventional methodology for miscibility determination, that is, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was used in conjunction with emerging analytical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and atomic force microscopy coupled with nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and nanothermal analysis (AFM-nanoIR-nanoTA). DSC results showed a single glass transition event for systems with 10% to 50% drug loading, suggesting that the ASDs were miscible, whereas phase separation was observed for all of the films based on the other techniques. The AFM-coupled techniques indicated that the phase separation occurred at the submicron scale. When the films were heated, it was observed that the ASD components underwent mixing. The results provide new insights into the phase behavior of itraconazole-HPMC dispersions and suggest that the emerging analytical techniques discussed herein are promising for the characterization of miscibility and microstructure in drug-polymer systems. The observed differences in the phase behavior in films prepared by solvent evaporation before and after heating also have implications for processing routes and suggest that spray drying/solvent evaporation and hot melt extrusion/melt mixing can result in ASDs with varying extent of miscibility between the drug and the polymer.

  13. New insights from high resolution bathymetric surveys in the Panarea volcanic complex (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzidei, M.; Esposito, A.

    2003-04-01

    During November 2002 the portion of the Panarea volcanic complex (Aeolian Islands, Italy), which includes the islets of Dattilo, Panarelli, Lisca Bianca, Bottaro and Lisca Nera, experienced an intense submarine gaseous exhalation that produced a spectacular submarine fumarolic field. The submarine volcanic activity of the Aeolian area was already known during historical times by Tito Livio, Strabone and Plinio (SGA, 1996), that reported exhalation episodes and submarine eruptions. During the last decade geological, structural, geochemical and volcanological studies performed on the Panarea volcanic complex, evidenced a positive gravimetric anomaly, tectonic discontinuities and several centres of geothermal fluid emission (Barberi et al., 1974; Lanzafame and Rossi, 1984; Bellia et al., 1986; Gabianelli et al., 1990; Italiano and Nuccio, 1991; Calanchi et al., 1995,1999). With the aim to estimate the crustal deformation of the submarine area of the archipelago, connected with the exhalation activity, we produced a detailed Marine Digital Terrain Model (MDTM) of the seafloor by means of a high resolution bathymetric survey. We used the multi beam technique coupled with GPS positioning in RTK mode. We obtained a MDTM with an average pixel of 0.5 m. Our MDTM allowed to estimate the location, deep, shape and size of the exhalation centres and seafloor morphological-structural features, opening new questions for the evaluation of the volcanic hazard of Panarea area which date is still debated.

  14. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). School of Medicine; Westbrook, E.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  15. Carbonado revisited: Insights from neutron diffraction, high resolution orientation mapping and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazolo, Sandra; Kaminsky, Felix V.; Trimby, Patrick; Evans, Lynn; Luzin, V.

    2016-11-01

    One of the most controversial diamond types is carbonado, as its origin and geological history are still under debate. Here, we investigate selected carbonado samples using neutron diffraction and high resolution orientation mapping in combination with numerical simulations. Neutron diffraction analyses show that fine grained carbonado samples exhibit a distinct lack of crystallographic preferred orientation. Quantitative crystallographic orientation analyses performed on transmission electron microscope (TEM) sections reveal that the 2-10 μm grains exhibit locally significant internal deformation. Such features are consistent with crystal plastic deformation of a grain aggregate that initially formed by rapid nucleation, characterized by a high number of nucleation sites and no crystallographic preferred orientation. Crystal plastic deformation resulted in high stress heterogeneities close to grain boundaries, even at low bulk strains, inducing a high degree of lattice distortion without significant grain size reduction and the development of a crystallographic preferred orientation. Observed differences in the character of the grain boundary network and internal deformation structures can be explained by significant post-deformation annealing occurring to variable degrees in the carbonado samples. Differences in intensity of crystal bending and subgrain boundary sharpness can be explained by dislocation annihilation and rearrangement, respectively. During annealing grain energy is reduced resulting in distinct changes to the grain boundary geometry. Grain scale numerical modelling shows that anisotropic grain growth, where grain boundary energy is determined by the orientation of a boundary segment relative to the crystallographic orientation of adjacent grains results in straight boundary segments with abrupt changes in orientation even if the boundary is occurring between two triple junctions forming a "zigzag" pattern. In addition, in diamond anisotropic

  16. Absorption spectroscopy with sub-angstrom beams: ELS in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C. H.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) performed using a modern transmission scanning electron microscope (STEM) now offers sub-nanometre spatial resolution and an energy resolution down to 200 meV or less, in favourable cases. The absorption spectra, which probe empty states, cover the soft x-ray region and may be obtained under conditions of well-defined momentum transfer (angle-resolved), providing a double projection onto crystallographic site and symmetry within the density of states. By combining the very high brightness of field-emission electron sources (brighter than a synchrotron) with the high cross-section of electron scattering, together with parallel detection (not possible with scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy), a form of spectroscopy ideally suited to the study of nanostructures, interfacial states and defects in materials is obtained with uniquely high spatial resolution. We review the basic theory, the relationship of EELS to optical properties and the dielectric response function, the removal of multiple scattering artefacts and channelling effects. We consider applications in the light of recent developments in aberration corrector and electron monochromator design. Examples are cited of inner-shell spectra obtained from individual atoms within thin crystals, of the detection of interfacial electronic states in semiconductors, of inner-shell near edge structure mapped with sub-nanometre spatial resolution in glasses and of spectra obtained from individual carbon nanotubes, amongst many others.

  17. The Seismogenic Zone in Southern Chile: Insights from high resolution receiver function analysis and seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbrock, A.; Haberland, C.; Lange, D.; Bataille, K.

    2007-12-01

    Subduction zones, the expression of convergent plate boundaries, generate the world's largest and most destructive earthquakes. The Southern Chilean subduction zone is an ideal natural laboratory to study the processes involved in generating these devastat- ing earthquakes and is one of the main aims of the international and interdisciplinary research initiative TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to megaThrust EarthQuake pro- cesses). High resolution images, using different techniques as well as different physi- cal parameters, form the base for identifying the processes involved. Here we present new data from teleseismic receiver function analysis and 3D seismic tomography to study in detail the down-dip end of the seismogenic zone in the nucleation area of the 1960 magnitude Mw=9.5 Valdivia, Chile, earthquake. Within the project TIPTEQ two dense amphibious passive seismic networks have been installed between Nov. 2004 and Oct. 2005, both covering the entire forearc from the trench to the active volcanic front. The Northern array was located between 37° and 39° South including the epicentre of the 1960 Chile earthquake. It consisted out of 120 continuously recording, three component stations on land and 10 continuously recording Ocean Bottom Seismometers/Hydrophones (OBS/H) at sea. The Southern array was located between 41.5° and 43.5° South roughly in the middle of the rupture zone of the Valdivia earthquake. It consisted out of 20 continuously recording three component stations on land and 20 continuously recording Ocean Bottom Seismometers/Hydrophones (OBS/H) at sea. Several hundreds of micro earthquakes could be located using manual picked P- and S-wave arrivals. Joint 2D/3D inversions for earthquake location, P-wave velocity and vp/vs-ratio were carried out and give a detailed image of the structure as well as a snapshot of the seismicity distribution in both study regions. The subducting Nazca plate can be clearly identified in both regions dipping at a

  18. 2.0 Angstrom Structure of Prostaglandin H2 Synthase-1 Reconstituted with a Manganese Porphyrin Cofactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta,K.; Selinsky, B.; Loll, P.

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase (EC 1.14.99.1) is a clinically important drug target that catalyzes two key steps in the biosynthesis of the eicosanoid hormones. The enzyme contains spatially distinct cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites, both of which require a heme cofactor. Substitution of ferric heme by Mn{sup III} protoporphyrin IX greatly diminishes the peroxidase activity, but has little effect on the cyclooxygenase activity. Here, the 2.0 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of the Mn{sup III} form of ovine prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase-1 is described (R = 21.8%, R{sub free} = 23.7%). Substitution of Mn{sup III} for Fe{sup III} causes no structural perturbations in the protein. However, the out-of-plane displacement of the manganese ion with respect to the porphyrin is greater than that of the iron by approximately 0.2 Angstroms. This perturbation may help to explain the altered catalytic properties of the manganese enzyme.

  19. Structural basis of transcription: backtracked RNA polymerase II at 3.4 angstrom resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Bushnell, David A; Huang, Xuhui; Westover, Kenneth D; Levitt, Michael; Kornberg, Roger D

    2009-05-29

    Transcribing RNA polymerases oscillate between three stable states, two of which, pre- and posttranslocated, were previously subjected to x-ray crystal structure determination. We report here the crystal structure of RNA polymerase II in the third state, the reverse translocated, or "backtracked" state. The defining feature of the backtracked structure is a binding site for the first backtracked nucleotide. This binding site is occupied in case of nucleotide misincorporation in the RNA or damage to the DNA, and is termed the "P" site because it supports proofreading. The predominant mechanism of proofreading is the excision of a dinucleotide in the presence of the elongation factor SII (TFIIS). Structure determination of a cocrystal with TFIIS reveals a rearrangement whereby cleavage of the RNA may take place.

  20. Structure of recombinant Ves v 2 at 2.0 Angstrom resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Lars K; Seppälä, Ulla; Coen, Jeremy J F;

    2006-01-01

    cavity near the active site is involved in binding of the substrate. Surface epitopes and putative glycosylation sites have been compared with those of two other major group 2 allergens from Apis mellifera (honeybee) and Dolichovespula maculata (white-faced hornet). The analysis suggests...... that the harboured allergic IgE-mediated cross-reactivity between Ves v 2 and the allergen from D. maculata is much higher than that between Ves v 2 and the allergen from A. mellifera....

  1. Conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes: new insights from single base-resolution DNA methylomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhixi; Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2011-02-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most important heritable epigenetic modifications of the genome and is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes. Aberrant DNA methylation has been frequently reported to influence gene expression and subsequently cause various human diseases, including cancer. Recent rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigators to profile genome methylation patterns at single-base resolution. Remarkably, more than 20 eukaryotic methylomes have been generated thus far, with a majority published since November 2009. Analysis of this vast amount of data has dramatically enriched our knowledge of biological function, conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. Even so, many specific functions of DNA methylation and their underlying regulatory systems still remain unknown to us. Here, we briefly introduce current approaches for DNA methylation profiling and then systematically review the features of whole genome DNA methylation patterns in eight animals, six plants and five fungi. Our systematic comparison provides new insights into the conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes and their regulation of gene expression. This work aims to summarize the current state of available methylome data and features informatively.

  2. Langmuir-Blodgett films - From micron to angstrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Silberzan, P.; Chatenay, D.

    1991-10-01

    Combining optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy, a complete characterization of Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers made of arachidic acid has been performed. At macroscopic scales, both techniques can be used to control the homogeneity of the transferred films. By atomic force microscopy, roughness and thickness of the bilayers could be determined. These are compatible with a normal orientation of the fully extended aliphatic chains with respect to the substrate. Molecular-resolution images give the first direct experimental evidence for the presence of pairs of dislocations in those systems.

  3. Genotyping-by-Sequencing in a Species Complex of Australian Hummock Grasses (Triodia): Methodological Insights and Phylogenetic Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Kevin R.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Barrett, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is becoming increasingly accessible to researchers asking biosystematic questions, but current best practice in both choosing a specific approach and effectively analysing the resulting data set is still being explored. We present a case study for the use of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to resolve relationships in a species complex of Australian arid and semi-arid grasses (Triodia R.Br.), highlighting our solutions to methodological challenges in the use of GBS data. We merged overlapping paired-end reads then optimised locus assembly in the program PyRAD to generate GBS data sets for phylogenetic and distance-based analyses. In addition to traditional concatenation analyses in RAxML, we also demonstrate the novel use of summary species tree analyses (taking gene trees as input) with GBS loci. We found that while species tree analyses were relatively robust to variation in PyRAD assembly parameters, our RAxML analyses resulted in well-supported but conflicting topologies under different assembly settings. Despite this conflict, multiple clades in the complex were consistently supported as distinct across analyses. Our GBS data assembly and analyses improve the resolution of taxa and phylogenetic relationships in the Triodia basedowii complex compared to our previous study based on Sanger sequencing of nuclear (ITS/ETS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) markers. The genomic results also partly support previous evidence for hybridization between species in the complex. Our methodological insights for analysing GBS data will assist researchers using similar data to resolve phylogenetic relationships within species complexes. PMID:28135342

  4. Genotyping-by-Sequencing in a Species Complex of Australian Hummock Grasses (Triodia): Methodological Insights and Phylogenetic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin M; Thiele, Kevin R; Krauss, Siegfried L; Barrett, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is becoming increasingly accessible to researchers asking biosystematic questions, but current best practice in both choosing a specific approach and effectively analysing the resulting data set is still being explored. We present a case study for the use of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) to resolve relationships in a species complex of Australian arid and semi-arid grasses (Triodia R.Br.), highlighting our solutions to methodological challenges in the use of GBS data. We merged overlapping paired-end reads then optimised locus assembly in the program PyRAD to generate GBS data sets for phylogenetic and distance-based analyses. In addition to traditional concatenation analyses in RAxML, we also demonstrate the novel use of summary species tree analyses (taking gene trees as input) with GBS loci. We found that while species tree analyses were relatively robust to variation in PyRAD assembly parameters, our RAxML analyses resulted in well-supported but conflicting topologies under different assembly settings. Despite this conflict, multiple clades in the complex were consistently supported as distinct across analyses. Our GBS data assembly and analyses improve the resolution of taxa and phylogenetic relationships in the Triodia basedowii complex compared to our previous study based on Sanger sequencing of nuclear (ITS/ETS) and chloroplast (rps16-trnK spacer) markers. The genomic results also partly support previous evidence for hybridization between species in the complex. Our methodological insights for analysing GBS data will assist researchers using similar data to resolve phylogenetic relationships within species complexes.

  5. Structure of GES-1 at Atomic Resolution: Insights Into the Evolution of Carbapenamase Activity in the Class a Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.A.; /SLAC, SSRL; Caccamo, M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kantardjieff, K.A.; /Cal State, Fullerton; Vakulenko, S.; /Notre Dame U.

    2007-10-08

    The structure of the class A extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase GES-1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae has been determined to 1.1 Angstrom resolution. GES-1 has the characteristic active-site disulfide bond of the carbapenemase family of {beta}-lactamases and has a structure that is very similar to those of other known carbapenemases, including NMC-A, SME-1 and KPC-2. Most residues implicated in the catalytic mechanism of this class of enzyme are present in the GES-1 active site, including Ser70, which forms a covalent bond with the carbonyl C atom of the {beta}-lactam ring of the substrate during the formation of an acyl-enzyme intermediate, Glu166, which is implicated as both the acylation and deacylation base, and Lys73, which is also implicated as the acylation base. A water molecule crucial to catalysis is observed in an identical location as in other class A {beta}-lactamases, interacting with the side chains of Ser70 and Glu166. One important residue, Asn170, also normally a ligand for the hydrolytic water, is missing from the GES-1 active site. This residue is a glycine in GES-1 and the enzyme is unable to hydrolyze imipenem. This points to this residue as being critically important in the hydrolysis of this class of {beta}-lactam substrate. This is further supported by flexible-docking studies of imipenem with in silico-generated Gly170Asn and Gly170Ser mutant GES-1 enzymes designed to mimic the active sites of imipenem-hydrolyzing point mutants GES-2 and GES-5.

  6. High-resolution structure of the nitrile reductase QueF combined with molecular simulations provide insight into enzyme mechanism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.; Zhou, M.; Moy, S.; Morales, J.; Cunningham, M.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Texas-Pan American

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report the 1.53-{angstrom} crystal structure of the enzyme 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine reductase (QueF) from Vibrio cholerae, which is responsible for the complete reduction of a nitrile (C {triple_bond} N) bond to a primary amine (H{sub 2}C-NH{sub 2}). At present, this is the only example of a biological pathway that includes reduction of a nitrile bond, establishing QueF as particularly noteworthy. The structure of the QueF monomer resembles two connected ferrodoxin-like domains that assemble into dimers. Ligands identified in the crystal structure suggest the likely binding conformation of the native substrates NADPH and 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine. We also report on a series of numerical simulations that have shed light on the mechanism by which this enzyme affects the transfer of four protons (and electrons) to the 7-cyano-7-deazaguanine substrate. In particular, the simulations suggest that the initial step of the catalytic process is the formation of a covalent adduct with the residue Cys194, in agreement with previous studies. The crystal structure also suggests that two conserved residues (His233 and Asp102) play an important role in the delivery of a fourth proton to the substrate.

  7. Couples Counseling Directive Technique: A (Mis)communication Model to Promote Insight, Catharsis, Disclosure, and Problem Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    A psychoeducational model for improving couple communication is proposed. An important goal in couples counseling is to assist couples in resolving communication conflicts. The proposed communication model helps to establish a therapeutic environment that encourages insight, therapeutic alliance formation, catharsis, self-disclosure, symptom…

  8. The Angstrom Project Alert System: real-time detection of extragalactic microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Darnley, M J; Newsam, A; Duke, J P; Gould, A; Han, C; Ibrahimov, M A; Im, M; Jeon, Y B; Karimov, R G; Lee, C U; Park, B G

    2006-01-01

    The Angstrom Project is undertaking an optical survey of stellar microlensing events across the bulge region of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) using a distributed network of two-meter class telescopes. The Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) has been developed to identify in real time candidate microlensing and transient events using data from the Liverpool and Faulkes North robotic telescopes. This is the first time that real-time microlensing discovery has been attempted outside of the Milky Way and its satellite galaxies. The APAS is designed to enable follow-up studies of M31 microlensing systems, including searches for gas giant planets in M31. Here we describe the APAS and we present a few example light curves obtained during its commissioning phase which clearly demonstrate its real-time capability to identify microlensing candidates as well as other transient sources.

  9. Impact of polymer formulations on neointimal proliferation after zotarolimus-eluting stent with different polymers: insights from the RESOLUTE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseda, Katsuhisa; Ako, Junya; Yamasaki, Masao; Koizumi, Tomomi; Sakurai, Ryota; Hongo, Yoichiro; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Ormiston, John; Worthley, Stephen G; Whitbourn, Robert J; Walters, Darren L; Meredith, Ian T; Fitzgerald, Peter J; Honda, Yasuhiro

    2011-06-01

    Polymer formulation may affect the efficacy of drug-eluting stents. Resolute, Endeavor, and ZoMaxx are zotarolimus-eluting stents with different stent platforms and different polymer coatings and have been tested in clinical trials. The aim of this analysis was to compare the efficacy of zotarolimus-eluting stents with different polymers. Data were obtained from the first-in man trial or first randomized trials of each stent, The Clinical RESpOnse EvaLUation of the MedTronic Endeavor CR ABT-578 Eluting Coronary Stent System in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (RESOLUTE), Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE ABT-578 Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions (ENDEAVOR II), and ZoMaxx I trials. Follow-up intravascular ultrasound analyses (8 to 9 months of follow-up) were possible in 353 patients (Resolute: 88, Endeavor: 98, ZoMaxx: 82, Driver: 85). Volume index (volume/stent length) was obtained for vessel, stent, lumen, peristent plaque, and neointima. Cross-sectional narrowing was defined as neointimal area divided by stent area (%). Neointima-free frame ratio was calculated as the number of frames without intravascular ultrasound-detectable neointima divided by the total number of frames within the stent. At baseline, vessel, lumen, and peristent plaque volume index were not significantly different among the 4 stent groups. At follow-up, percent neointimal obstruction was significantly lower in Resolute compared with Endeavor, ZoMaxx, and Driver (Resolute: 3.7±4.0, Endeavor: 17.5±10.1, ZoMaxx: 14.6±8.1, Driver: 29.4±17.2%; Ppolymer used in Resolute independently correlated with neointimal suppression among 3 zotarolimus-eluting stents. The different polymer formulations significantly affect the relative amount of neointima for zotarolimus-eluting stents. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00248079.

  10. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  11. A study of mid-latitude 5577[angstrom] OI dayglow emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, E.E. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The green line (5577[angstrom]) is a bright, persistent component of the visible airglow produced by an electric quadrupole transition from the meta-stable second excited state ([sup 1]S[sub 0]) to the first excited state ([sup 1]D[sub 2]) of atomic oxygen. In this thesis, production and loss mechanisms important to the F-region dayglow 5577[angstrom] emission are investigated. Four major source reactions need to be incorporated in the modeling of the emission profile, photoelectron impact on atomic oxygen, dissociative recombination of O[sup +][sub 2], quenching of N[sub 2](A[sup 3][Sigma][sub u][sup +]) by atomic oxygen, and photo-dissociation of O[sub 2]. For some of the reactions, the properties of the rate coefficients, branching ratios, and cross sections are not well known. Models are used to determine the rate coefficients, branching ratios, and cross sections for these reactions. The impact of photoelectrons on atomic oxygen is the primary source of 5577[angstrom] dayglow emission in the thermosphere. The quenching of N[sub 2](A) by atomic oxygen is an important source of the 5577[angstrom] emission at the peak in the layer. The total quenching rate was determined using a vibrational model and a band model for N[sub 2] to study emissions at 3371[angstrom] from the Atmosphere Explorer satellite. The value of the rate coefficient deduced here agrees well with experimental values by Piper and Caledonia (1981) and Thomas and Kaufman (1985). The effective branching ratio determined by this study tends to support the results from Piper (1982) and De Souza et al. (1985). The effect of the distribution of the vibrational population of the N[sub 2](A[sup 3][Sigma][sub u][sup +]) state on the branching ratio is also discussed. The extension of the dayglow photochemistry into the twilight is also investigated. The model developed for the dayglow can reasonably reproduce the rapidly changing twilight emissions.

  12. Medium-resolution Isaac Newton Telescope library of empirical spectra - II. The stellar atmospheric parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cenarro, A. J.; Peletier, R. F.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Selam, S. O.; Toloba, E.; Cardiel, N.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Gorgas, J.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Vazdekis, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a homogeneous set of stellar atmospheric parameters (T-eff, log g, [Fe/H]) for MILES, a new spectral stellar library covering the range lambda lambda 3525-7500 angstrom at 2.3 angstrom (FWHM) spectral resolution. The library consists of 985 stars spanning a large range in atmospheric para

  13. High-resolution structure of human carbonic anhydrase II complexed with acetazolamide reveals insights into inhibitor drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Katherine H; Robbins, Arthur H; Domsic, John; Genis, Caroli; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McKenna, Robert

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of human carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) complexed with the inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) has been determined at 1.1 A resolution and refined to an R(cryst) of 11.2% and an R(free) of 14.7%. As observed in previous CA II-inhibitor complexes, AZM binds directly to the zinc and makes several key interactions with active-site residues. The high-resolution data also showed a glycerol molecule adjacent to the AZM in the active site and two additional AZMs that are adventitiously bound on the surface of the enzyme. The co-binding of AZM and glycerol in the active site demonstrate that given an appropriate ring orientation and substituents, an isozyme-specific CA inhibitor may be developed.

  14. Changes in Moisture Flux Over the Tibetan Plateau During 1979-2011: Insights from a High Resolution Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhang, Yongxin; Cuo, Lan

    2015-05-01

    Net precipitation (precipitation minus evapotranspiration, P-E) changes from a high resolution regional climate simulation and its reanalysis forcing are analyzed over the Tibet Plateau (TP) and compared to the global land data assimilation system (GLDAS) product. The mechanism behind the P-E changes is explored by decomposing the column integrated moisture flux convergence into thermodynamic, dynamic, and transient eddy components. High-resolution climate simulation improves the spatial pattern of P-E changes over the best available global reanalysis. Improvement in simulating precipitation changes at high elevations contributes dominantly to the improved P-E changes. High-resolution climate simulation also facilitates new and substantial findings regarding the role of thermodynamics and transient eddies in P-E changes reflected in observed changes in major river basins fed by runoff from the TP. The analysis revealed the contrasting convergence/divergence changes between the northwestern and southeastern TP and feedback through latent heat release as an important mechanism leading to the mean P-E changes in the TP.

  15. The Pursuit Behind the Escape——The Analysis of Harry Angstrom in Rabbit,Run

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾娜

    2008-01-01

    <正>The author John Updike illustrates the various contradictions between Middle-class American couples,the old and the young,the father and the son,the urban and the suburb,the rich and the poor,the soul and the body,peace and war,the God and the secular in his works.In 1960, Updike earned his fame through the publishing of Rabbit,Run and introduced one of his most unforgettable characters,the small town basketball star,Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom.This paper aims to explore Harry Angstrom’s pursuit behind his four "runs".

  16. Assessing subaqueous mudslide hazard on the Mississippi River delta front, Part 2: Insights revealed through high-resolution geophysical surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obelcz, J.; Xu, K.; Bentley, S. J.; Georgiou, I. Y.; Maloney, J. M.; Miner, M. D.; Hanegan, K.; Keller, G.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico, including the subaqueous Mississippi River delta front (MRDF), has been productive for oil and gas development since the early 1900s. In 1969 cyclic seafloor wave loading associated with the passage of Hurricane Camille triggered subaqueous mudflows across the MRDF, destroying several offshore oil platforms. This incident spurred geophysical and geotechnical studies of the MRDF, which found that the delta front is prone to mass failures on gentle gradients (survey area can be classified into four primary sedimentary facies: mudflow gullies, mudflow lobes, undisturbed prodelta, and undisturbed delta front. Subbottom profiles reveal extensive biogenic gas from 20 to about 80 m water depths on the delta front; sidescan data show a variety of bottleneck slides, mudflow gullies and mudflow noses. Previous studies have attempted to constrain the periodicity and magnitude of subaqueous mudslides on the MRDF. However, large age gaps and varied resolution between datasets result in ambiguity regarding the cause and magnitude of observed bathymetric changes. We present high-temporal resolution MRDF bathymetric variations from 2005 (post Hurricane Katrina), 2009 (relatively quiescent storm period), and 2014 (post 2011 Mississippi River flood). These data yield better magnitude and timing estimates of mass movements. This exercise represents a first step towards (1) assembling a comprehensive geologic dataset upon which future MRDF geohazard assessments can be founded, and (2) understanding the dynamics of a massive passive margin deltaic lobe entering a phase of decline.

  17. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  18. The role of inflammation resolution speed in airway smooth muscle mass accumulation in asthma: insight from a theoretical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor L Chernyavsky

    Full Text Available Despite a large amount of in vitro data, the dynamics of airway smooth muscle (ASM mass increase in the airways of patients with asthma is not well understood. Here, we present a novel mathematical model that describes qualitatively the growth dynamics of ASM cells over short and long terms in the normal and inflammatory environments typically observed in asthma. The degree of ASM accumulation can be explained by an increase in the rate at which ASM cells switch between non-proliferative and proliferative states, driven by episodic inflammatory events. Our model explores the idea that remodelling due to ASM hyperplasia increases with the frequency and magnitude of these inflammatory events, relative to certain sensitivity thresholds. It highlights the importance of inflammation resolution speed by showing that when resolution is slow, even a series of small exacerbation events can result in significant remodelling, which persists after the inflammatory episodes. In addition, we demonstrate how the uncertainty in long-term outcome may be quantified and used to design an optimal low-risk individual anti-proliferative treatment strategy. The model shows that the rate of clearance of ASM proliferation and recruitment factors after an acute inflammatory event is a potentially important, and hitherto unrecognised, target for anti-remodelling therapy in asthma. It also suggests new ways of quantifying inflammation severity that could improve prediction of the extent of ASM accumulation. This ASM growth model should prove useful for designing new experiments or as a building block of more detailed multi-cellular tissue-level models.

  19. High resolution cyclostratigraphy of the early Eocene – new insights into the origin of the Cenozoic cooling trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Westerhold

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF core scanning data from a new record retrieved from the tropical western Atlantic (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207, Site 1258. The Eocene sediments from ODP Site 1258 cover magnetochrons C20 to C24 and show well developed cycles. This record includes the missing interval for reevaluating the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS, also providing key aspects for reconstructing high-resolution climate variability during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO. Detailed spectral analysis demonstrates that early Eocene sedimentary cycles are characterized by precession frequencies modulated by short (100 kyr and long (405 kyr eccentricity with a generally minor obliquity component. Counting of both the precession and eccentricity cycles results in revised estimates for the duration of magnetochrons C21r through C24n. Our cyclostratigraphic framework also corroborates that the geochronology of the Eocene Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA is still questionable mainly due to the uncertain correlation of the "Sixth Tuff" to the GPTS.

    Right at the onset of the long-term Cenozoic cooling trend the dominant eccentricity-modulated precession cycles of ODP Site 1258 are interrupted by strong obliquity cycles for a period of ~800 kyr in the middle of magnetochron C22r. These distinct obliquity cycles at this low latitude site point to (1 a high-latitude driving mechanism on global climate variability from 50.1 to 49.4 Ma, and (2 seem to coincide with a significant drop in atmospheric CO2 concentration below a critical threshold between 2- and 3-times the pre-industrial level (PAL. The here newly identified orbital configuration of low eccentricity in combination with high obliquity amplitudes during this ~800-kyr period and the crossing of a critical pCO2 threshold may have led to the formation of the first ephemeral

  20. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  1. Clustering, methodology, and mechanistic insights into acetate chemical ionization using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Patrick; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-08-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of cluster control and transmission through the Tofwerk atmospheric pressure interface installed on various chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometers using authentic standards. This characterization of the atmospheric pressure interface allows for a detailed investigation of the acetate chemical ionization mechanisms and the impact of controlling these mechanisms on sensitivity, selectivity, and mass spectral ambiguity with the aim of non-targeted analysis. Chemical ionization with acetate reagent ions is controlled by a distribution of reagent ion-neutral clusters that vary with relative humidity and the concentration of the acetic anhydride precursor. Deprotonated carboxylic acids are primarily detected only if sufficient declustering is employed inside the atmospheric pressure interface. The configuration of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) using an acetate chemical ionization source for non-targeted analysis is discussed. Recent approaches and studies characterizing acetate chemical ionization as it applies to the HR-TOF-CIMS are evaluated in light of the work presented herein.

  2. High molecular weight SOA formation during limonene ozonolysis: insights from ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, S.; Fisseha, R.; Putman, A. L.; Rahn, T. A.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2012-06-01

    The detailed molecular composition of laboratory generated limonene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was studied using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Approximately 1200 molecular formulas were identified in the SOA over the mass range of 140 to 850 Da. Four characteristic groups of high relative abundance species were observed; they indicate an array of accretion products that retain a large fraction of the limonene skeleton. The identified molecular formulas of each of the groups are related to one another by CH2, O and CH2O homologous series. The CH2 and O homologous series of the low molecular weight (MW) SOA (m/z z > 300) were found to constitute a significant number fraction of the identified SOA components. The formation of high MW compounds was evaluated by molecular formula trends, fragmentation analysis of select high MW compounds and a comprehensive reaction matrix including the identified low MW SOA, hydroperoxides and Criegee radicals as building blocks. Although the formation of high MW SOA may occur via a variety of radical and non-radical reaction channels, the combined approach indicates a greater importance of the non-condensation reactions over aldol and ester condensation reaction channels. Among these hemi-acetal reactions appear to be most dominant followed by hydroperoxide and Criegee reaction channels.

  3. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1 in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July–7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1 measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m−3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m−3, with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA emission sources (traffic and food cooking and two secondary OA (SOA types – a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA. Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00–11:00 (BJT: UTC +8 corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00–15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00–13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity

  4. Tectonic evolution of the Resolution Ridge System, New Zealand: insights gained through UNCLOS surveying for natural prolongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R.; Barker, D.

    2005-12-01

    For coastal States, demonstration of submerged natural prolongation of the land mass is a key element in delimiting the extent of the continental margin under the terms of UNCLOS article 76. Straddling an active plate boundary and with continental margins encompassing most major tectonic settings, the New Zealand (NZ) continent presents numerous, varied examples of natural prolongation of the land mass. The mostly submerged NZ continent covers over 5,000,000 km2. The continent grew by the accretion of basement terranes and the Hikurangi Plateau, a large igneous province, along the eastern margin of Gondwana during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Fragmentation of Gondwana initially involved thinning and extension of the continental rocks of New Zealand, and ultimately resulted in the separation of the New Zealand continent from Australia and Antarctica. Renewed tectonic activity in the Cenozoic resulted in the formation of the Resolution Ridge System (RRS) southwest of NZ and several volcanic arcs north of NZ. These volcanic arcs extend onto NZ and are a submerged natural prolongation of the land mass. Geological and geophysical surveys undertaken for the NZ Continental Shelf Project established that most of the RRS was not a prolongation of the NZ land mass, and advanced understanding of NZ's tectonic evolution. The RRS is a series of bathymetric highs extending southwest of Fiordland, NZ, from Resolution Ridge itself, adjacent to the northern limit of the Puysegur Trench, to the southeast termination of the fossil spreading centre in the Tasman Sea (TS; 158°40'E, 48°10'S). A 40° bend at 162°E, 46°30'S divides the ridge system into a northeastern segment, comprising large, en echelon, northeast-southwest-trending basement ridges and basins, and a southwest segment composed of longer, more continuous ridges trending northeast-southwest. The ridge system was formed by rapid reorientation of seafloor spreading directions (through c. 90°) in the TS at ~50 Ma. The

  5. Architectures of the Moroccan continental shelf of the Alboran Sea: insights from high-resolution bathymetry and seismic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, Manfred; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Pascal; d'Acremont, Elia; Rabineau, Marina; Ercilla, Gemma; Alonso, Belén; Ammar, Abdellah

    2016-04-01

    The MARLBORO and the SARAS oceanographic surveys have explored the continental shelf in the vicinity of the transtensive Nekor basin (South Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean) and over three submarine highs located at several tens of kilometers from the shelf. Those surveys have produced high-resolution (≤29m²/pixel) bathymetry maps. Simultaneously, seismic SPARKER and TOPAS profiles were recorded. To quantify and understand Quaternary vertical motions of this tectonically active area, we searched for morphological and sedimentary paleobathymetric or paleo-elevations markers. Shelf-edge wedges associated marine terraces and paleo-shorelines have been identified on the bathymetry and on seismic cross-sections. These features reflect the trends of long term accommodation variations. Along the Moroccan continental shelf the lateral changes of shelf-edges geometries and the spatial distribution of marine landforms (sedimentary marine terraces, sediment wave fields, marine incisions) reflect the interaction between sea level changes and spatial variations of subsidence rates. Positions of paleo-shorelines identified in the studied area have been correlated with the relative sea-level curve (Rohling et al., 2014). Several still stands or slow stands periods have been recognized between -130-125m, -100-110m and -85-80m. The astronomical forcing controls the architecture of Mediterranean continental shelves. Marine landforms distribution also reveals the way sea level changed since the LGM. The comparison with observations on other western Mediterranean margins (e.g. the Gulf of Lion, the Ionian-Calabrian shelf) allowed a first order access to vertical motion rates.

  6. New insights into an old reaction. High-resolution x-ray powder diffraction of Wiberg's aminoalane intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnebier, Robert; Müller, Jens

    2003-02-24

    In accordance with the procedure described by E. Wiberg, Me(3)Al-NH(3) was heated as a bulk material in inert atmosphere to give a colorless liquid which slowly loses methane. Close to the end of this elimination reaction, the melt crystallized to give a microcrystalline powder of (Me(2)AlNH(2))(x)(). The structure of this intermediate has been solved by the method of high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c with the cell parameters of a = 15.0047(6) A, b = 8.7500(2) A, c = 24.4702(8) A, and beta = 107.290(2) degrees, with eight trimers (Me(2)AlNH(2))(3) per unit cell. These trimers crystallize in a boat conformation in contrast to the known trimers of the same composition where a twist-boat conformation had been found by single crystal determination. Different conformers of (Me(2)AlNH(2))(3) have been investigated by theoretical methods (HF/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), MP2(fc)/6-31G(d), and MP2(fc)/6-311G(d,p)). The twist-boat and the chair conformer correspond to minima at the potential energy surface, whereas the boat conformer corresponds to a first-order transition state (relative energies of 0.45-2.56 kJ/mol (boat) and 6.66-11.91 kJ/mol (chair)). Relaxed scans of the potential energy surface at the HF/6-31G(d) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) levels have shown that the boat conformer (C(s)() symmetry) connects two enantiomers of the twist-boat form (C(2) symmetry).

  7. Control of primary production in the Arctic by nutrients and light: insights from a high resolution ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Popova

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the Arctic Basin was generally considered to be a low productivity area and was afforded little attention in global- or even basin-scale ecosystem modelling studies. Due to anthropogenic climate change however, the sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is undergoing an unexpectedly fast retreat, exposing increasingly large areas of the basin to sunlight. As indicated by existing Arctic phenomena such as ice-edge blooms, this decline in sea-ice is liable to encourage pronounced growth of phytoplankton in summer and poses pressing questions concerning the future of Arctic ecosystems. It thus provides a strong impetus to modelling of this region.

    The Arctic Ocean is an area where plankton productivity is heavily influenced by physical factors. As these factors are strongly responding to climate change, we analyse here the results from simulations of the 1/4° resolution global ocean NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean model coupled with the MEDUSA (Model for Ecosystem Dynamics, carbon Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification biogeochemical model, with a particular focus on the Arctic Basin. Simulated productivity is consistent with the limited observations for the Arctic, with significant production occurring both under the sea-ice and at the thermocline, locations that are difficult to sample in the field.

    Results also indicate that a substantial fraction of the variability in Arctic primary production can be explained by two key physical factors: (i the maximum penetration of winter mixing, which determines the amount of nutrients available for summer primary production, and (ii short-wave radiation at the ocean surface, which controls the magnitude of phytoplankton blooms. A strong empirical correlation was found in the model output between primary production these two factors, highlighting the importance of physical processes in the Arctic Ocean.

  8. In situ structural characterization of ageing kinetics in aluminum alloy 2024 across angstrom-to-micrometer length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan; Levine, Lyle E.; Allen, Andrew J.; Campbell, Carelyn E.; Creuziger, Adam A.; Kazantseva, Nataliya; Ilavsky, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The precipitate structure and precipitation kinetics in an Al-Cu-Mg alloy (AA2024) aged at 190 °C, 208 °C, and 226 °C have been studied using ex situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and in situ synchrotron-based, combined ultra-small angle X-ray scattering, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) across a length scale from sub-Angstrom to several micrometers. TEM brings information concerning the nature, morphology, and size of the precipitates while SAXS and WAXS provide qualitative and quantitative information concerning the time-dependent size and volume fraction evolution of the precipitates at different stages of the precipitation sequence. Within the experimental time resolution, precipitation at these ageing temperatures involves dissolution of nanometer-sized small clusters and formation of the planar S phase precipitates. Using a three-parameter scattering model constructed on the basis of TEM results, we established the temperature-dependent kinetics for the cluster-dissolution and S-phase formation processes simultaneously. These two processes are shown to have different kinetic rates, with the cluster-dissolution rate approximately double the S-phase formation rate. We identified a dissolution activation energy at (149.5 ± 14.6) kJ mol-1, which translates to (1.55 ± 0.15) eV/atom, as well as an activation energy for the formation of S precipitates at (129.2 ± 5.4) kJ mol-1, i.e. (1.33 ± 0.06) eV/atom. Importantly, the SAXS/WAXS results show the absence of an intermediate Guinier-Preston Bagaryatsky 2 (GPB2)/S" phase in the samples under the experimental ageing conditions. These results are further validated by precipitation simulations that are based on Langer-Schwartz theory and a Kampmann-Wagner numerical method.

  9. El Nino-Southern Oscillation Correlated Aerosol Angstrom Exponent Anomaly Over the Tropical Pacific Discovered in Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    El Nino.Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of interannual variability in the tropical atmosphere. ENSO could potentially impact local and global aerosol properties through atmospheric circulation anomalies and teleconnections. By analyzing aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE; often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and the Sea ]viewing Wide Field ]of ]view Sensor for the period 2000.2011, we find a strong correlation between the AE data and the multivariate ENSO index (MEI) over the tropical Pacific. Over the western tropical Pacific (WTP), AE increases during El Nino events and decreases during La Nina events, while the opposite is true over the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP). The difference between AE anomalies in the WTP and ETP has a higher correlation coefficient (>0.7) with the MEI than the individual time series and could be considered another type of ENSO index. As no significant ENSO correlation is found in AOD over the same region, the change in AE (and hence aerosol size) is likely to be associated with aerosol composition changes due to anomalous meteorological conditions induced by the ENSO. Several physical parameters or mechanisms that might be responsible for the correlation are discussed. Preliminary analysis indicates surface wind anomaly might be the major contributor, as it reduces sea ]salt production and aerosol transport during El Nino events. Precipitation and cloud fraction are also found to be correlated with tropical Pacific AE. Possible mechanisms, including wet removal and cloud shielding effects, are considered. Variations in relative humidity, tropospheric ozone concentration, and ocean color during El Nino have been ruled out. Further investigation is needed to fully understand this AE ]ENSO covariability and the underlying physical processes responsible for

  10. High molecular weight SOA formation during limonene ozonolysis: insights from ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kundu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The detailed molecular composition of laboratory generated limonene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA was studied using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR mass spectrometry. Approximately 1200 molecular formulas were identified in the SOA over the mass range of 140 to 850 Da. Four characteristic groups of high relative abundance species were observed; they indicate an array of accretion products that retain a large fraction of the limonene skeleton. The identified molecular formulas of each of the groups are related to one another by CH2, O and CH2O homologous series. The CH2 and O homologous series of the low molecular weight (MW SOA (m/z < 300 are explained with a combination of functionalization and fragmentation of radical intermediates and reactive uptake of gas-phase carbonyls. They include isomerization and elimination reactions of Criegee radicals, reactions between alkyl peroxy radicals, and scission of alkoxy radicals resulting from the Criegee radicals. The presence of compounds with 10–15 carbon atoms in the first group (e.g. C11H18O6 provides evidence for SOA formation by the reactive uptake of gas-phase carbonyls during limonene ozonolysis. The high MW compounds (m/z > 300 were found to constitute a significant number fraction of the identified SOA components. The formation of high MW compounds was evaluated by molecular formula trends, fragmentation analysis of select high MW compounds and a comprehensive reaction matrix including the identified low MW SOA, hydroperoxides and Criegee radicals as building blocks. Although the formation of high MW SOA may occur via a variety of radical and non-radical reaction channels, the combined approach indicates a greater importance of the non-condensation reactions over aldol and ester condensation reaction channels. Among these hemi-acetal reactions appear to be most

  11. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy of the intergranular structure of a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-silicon nitride ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, A.; Kisielowski, C.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) employing focus-variation phase-reconstruction methods is used to image the atomic structure of grain boundaries in a silicon nitride ceramic at a resolution of 0.8 Angstrom

  12. Quartz Microbalance Study of 400-angstrom Thick Films near the lambda Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moses H. W.

    2003-01-01

    In a recent measurement we observed the thinning of an adsorbed helium film induced by the confinement of critical fluctuations a few millikelvin below the lambda point. A capacitor set-up was used to measure this Casimir effect. In this poster we will present our measurement of an adsorbed helium film of 400 angstroms near the lambda point with a quartz microbalance. For films this thick, we must take into account the non-linear dynamics of the shear waves in the fluid. In spite of the added complications, we were able to confirm the thinning of the film due to the Casimir effect and the onset of the superfluid transition. In addition, we observe a sharp anomaly at the bulk lambda point, most likely related to critical dissipation of the first sound. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Stephen Jordon and John Lazzaretti. This work is funded by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research under grant.

  13. Cesium Diffusion through Angstrom-Scale Open Spaces in Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Koichiro; Sato, Kiminori; Nakata, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    Saponite clay minerals possess the local molecular structures, where one and two nanosheets are inserted into interlayer spaces forming open spaces with their sizes of ˜3 and ˜9 Å, respectively. Here, Cs diffusion via the above-mentioned open spaces is highlighted based on the results of open space analysis using positronium (Ps) lifetime spectroscopy coupled with a conventional diffusion experiment. A population of Cs is found to significantly migrate in the saponite clay yielding a diffusion coefficient of ˜2.0 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 with an application of Fick's second law, which arises from overall diffusion contributed from open spaces with a variety of sizes. On the other hand, the diffusion coefficient solely attributable to the angstrom-scale open space is ˜2.5 × 10-8 cm2 s-1, which amounts to more than ˜10% than that of overall diffusion.

  14. Insights into rapid climate change: A high resolution, compound-specific n-alkane δD study of the 8.2 ka event (Tenaghi Philippon, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemmel, F.; Niedermeyer, E.; Schwab, V.; Pross, J.; Mulch, A.

    2013-12-01

    Despite being characterized as remarkably stable, the Holocene climate has experienced a number of abrupt, relatively short-term climate changes. Arguably the most prominent climate perturbation, the 8.2 ka event, was caused by the catastrophic drainage of the ice-dammed Laurentide ice-lake into the North Atlantic, leading to a severe weakening of thermohaline circulation, causing a decline in temperature and significant changes in atmospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere, especially in the North Atlantic realm and Europe. Being located between the climate systems of the higher and lower latitudes, the Mediterranean region is particularly susceptible to rapid climate change. Available proxy data and climate models provide first-order insight into the impact of the 8.2 ka event in this area but often lack the temporal resolution to supply information about changes in seasonality, hence severely hindering the understanding of rapid climate changes and revealing the need for high resolution terrestrial archives. Here, we present a multi-proxy, high resolution stable isotope study across the 8.2 ka event on a peat core from the classical site of Tenaghi Philippon (NE Greece). We aim to characterize the effects of changing temperature and rainfall patterns by using compound-specific δD values of the long-chain n-alkanes as a proxy for terrestrial (summer) precipitation. We compare changes in hydrogen isotopic composition to the concentration of the long-chain n-alkanes as well as to δ13Cbulk measurements of the organic material and high-resolution palynomorphic data from the same core. Analysis of 35 samples of telmatic peat shows significant decreases in concentration of the long-chain n-alkanes along with strong positive shifts in δD (over 40 ‰ in δDC29) during the 8.2 ka event. The general trend of δD of the n-Alkanes n-C27, n-C29 and n-C31 coincides with changes in δ13Cbulk, and to some degree reflects changes in moisture availability. We attribute

  15. Absorption Angstrom Exponent in AERONET and related data as an indicator of aerosol composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Russell

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from diverse air, ground, and laboratory studies using both radiometric and in situ techniques show that the fractions of black carbon, organic matter, and mineral dust in atmospheric aerosols determine the wavelength dependence of absorption (expressed as Absorption Angstrom Exponent, or AAE. Taken together, these results hold promise of improving information on aerosol composition from remote measurements. The purpose of this paper is to show that AAE values for Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET retrievals from Sun-sky measurements describing the full aerosol vertical column are also strongly correlated with aerosol composition or type. In particular, we find AAE values near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon for AERONET-measured aerosol columns dominated by urban-industrial aerosol, larger AAE values for biomass burning aerosols, and the largest AAE values for Sahara dust aerosols. Ambiguities in aerosol composition or mixtures thereof, resulting from intermediate AAE values, can be reduced via cluster analyses that supplement AAE with other variables, for example Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE, which is an indicator of particle size. Together with previous results, these results strengthen prospects for determining aerosol composition from space, for example using the Glory Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS, which promises retrievals of multiwavelength single-scattering albedo (SSA and aerosol optical depth (and therefore aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD and AAE, as well as shape and other aerosol properties. Cluster analyses promise additional information content, for example by using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI to add AAOD in the near ultraviolet and CALIPSO aerosol layer heights to reduce height-absorption ambiguity.

  16. Absorption Angstrom Exponent in AERONET and related data as an indicator of aerosol composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Russell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from diverse air, ground, and laboratory studies using both radiometric and in situ techniques show that the fractions of black carbon, organic matter, and mineral dust in atmospheric aerosols determine the wavelength dependence of absorption (often expressed as Absorption Angstrom Exponent, or AAE. Taken together, these results hold promise of improving information on aerosol composition from remote measurements. The main purpose of this paper is to show that AAE values for an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET set of retrievals from Sun-sky measurements describing full aerosol vertical columns are also strongly correlated with aerosol composition or type. In particular, we find AAE values near 1 (the theoretical value for black carbon for AERONET-measured aerosol columns dominated by urban-industrial aerosol, larger AAE values for biomass burning aerosols, and the largest AAE values for Sahara dust aerosols. These AERONET results are consistent with results from other, very different, techniques, including solar flux-aerosol optical depth (AOD analyses and airborne in situ analyses examined in this paper, as well as many other previous results. Ambiguities in aerosol composition or mixtures thereof, resulting from intermediate AAE values, can be reduced via cluster analyses that supplement AAE with other variables, for example Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE, which is an indicator of particle size. Together with previous results, these results strengthen prospects for determining aerosol composition from space, for example using the Glory Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS, which seeks to provide retrievals of multiwavelength single-scattering albedo (SSA and aerosol optical depth (and therefore aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD and AAE, as well as shape and other aerosol properties. Multidimensional cluster analyses promise additional information content, for example by using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI to add AAOD

  17. Crystal Structures of Human and Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase and Molecular Insights into the Carboxyltransfer Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang,S.; Tong, L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the biotin-dependent production of oxaloacetate and has important roles in gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, insulin secretion and other cellular processes. PC contains the biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin-carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) domains. We report here the crystal structures at 2.8-Angstroms resolution of full-length PC from Staphylococcus aureus and the C-terminal region (missing only the BC domain) of human PC. A conserved tetrameric association is observed for both enzymes, and our structural and mutagenesis studies reveal a previously uncharacterized domain, the PC tetramerization (PT) domain, which is important for oligomerization. A BCCP domain is located in the active site of the CT domain, providing the first molecular insights into how biotin participates in the carboxyltransfer reaction. There are dramatic differences in domain positions in the monomer and the organization of the tetramer between these enzymes and the PC from Rhizobium etli.

  18. STRUCTURE OF PARTIALLY-ACTIVATED ESCHERICHIA-COLI HEAT-LABILE ENTEROTOXIN (LT) AT 2.6-ANGSTROM RESOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERRITT, EA; PRONK, SE; SIXMA, TK; KALK, KH; VANZANTEN, BAM; HOL, WGJ

    1994-01-01

    Biological toxicity of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and the closely related cholera toxin requires that the assembled toxin be activated by proteolytic cleavage of the A subunit and reduction of a disulfide bond internal to the A subunit. The structural role served by this reduction and cleavage

  19. STRUCTURE OF PARTIALLY-ACTIVATED ESCHERICHIA-COLI HEAT-LABILE ENTEROTOXIN (LT) AT 2.6-ANGSTROM RESOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MERRITT, EA; PRONK, SE; SIXMA, TK; KALK, KH; VANZANTEN, BAM; HOL, WGJ

    1994-01-01

    Biological toxicity of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and the closely related cholera toxin requires that the assembled toxin be activated by proteolytic cleavage of the A subunit and reduction of a disulfide bond internal to the A subunit. The structural role served by this reduction and cleavage

  20. Structure of shock compressed model basaltic glass: Insights from O K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution 27Al NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo-Im; Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (UNLV); (SNU); (CIT); (CIW)

    2012-05-29

    The detailed atomic structures of shock compressed basaltic glasses are not well understood. Here, we explore the structures of shock compressed silicate glass with a diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di{sub 64}An{sub 36}), a common Fe-free model basaltic composition, using oxygen K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR spectroscopy and report previously unknown details of shock-induced changes in the atomic configurations. A topologically driven densification of the Di{sub 64}An{sub 36} glass is indicated by the increase in oxygen K-edge energy for the glass upon shock compression. The first experimental evidence of the increase in the fraction of highly coordinated Al in shock compressed glass is found in the {sup 27}Al NMR spectra. This unambiguous evidence of shock-induced changes in Al coordination environments provides atomistic insights into shock compression in basaltic glasses and allows us to microscopically constrain the magnitude of impact events or relevant processes involving natural basalts on Earth and planetary surfaces.

  1. Atomic resolution crystal structures, EXAFS, and quantum chemical studies of rusticyanin and its two mutants provide insight into its unusual properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Mark L; Harvey, Ian; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Surendran, Rajeev; Hall, John F; Ellis, Mark J; Hough, Michael A; Strange, Richard W; Hillier, Ian H; Hasnain, S Samar

    2006-03-07

    Rusticyanin from the extremophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans is a blue copper protein with unusually high redox potential and acid stability. We present the crystal structures of native rusticyanin and of its Cu site mutant His143Met at 1.27 and 1.10 A, respectively. The very high resolution of these structures allows a direct comparison with EXAFS data and with quantum chemical models of the oxidized and reduced forms of the proteins, based upon both isolated and embedded clusters and density functional theory (DFT) methods. We further predict the structure of the Cu(II) form of the His143Met mutant which has been experimentally inaccessible due to its very high redox potential. We also present metrical EXAFS data and quantum chemical calculations for the oxidized and reduced states of the Met148Gln mutant, this protein having the lowest redox potential of all currently characterized mutants of rusticyanin. These data offer new insights into the structural factors which affect the redox potential in this important class of proteins. Calculations successfully predict the structure and the order of redox potentials for the three proteins. The calculated redox potential of H143M ( approximately 400 mV greater than native rusticyanin) is consistent with the failure of readily available chemical oxidants to restore a Cu(II) species of this mutant. The structural and energetic effects of mutating the equatorial cysteine to serine, yet to be studied experimentally, are predicted to be considerable by our calculations.

  2. ATOMIC DATA FOR ABSORPTION-LINES FROM THE GROUND-LEVEL AT WAVELENGTHS GREATER-THAN-228-ANGSTROM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERNER, DA; BARTHEL, PD; TYTLER, D

    1994-01-01

    We list wavelengths, statistical weigths and oscillator strengths for 2249 spectral lines arising from the ground states of atoms and ions. The compilation covers all wavelengths longward of the HeII Lyman limit at 227.838 Angstrom and all the ion states of all elements from hydrogen to bismuth (Z =

  3. Floodplain development in engineered and natural settings determined with novel, high resolution 210-Pb geochronology: Insights from sedimentation studies along the lower Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R.; Singer, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation summarizes results from studies of floodplain sedimentation along the middle and lower Sacramento River that investigate processes using a new, high resolution methodology for 210Pb geochronology of 1-5 m floodplain cores. This approach accounts both for grain-size effects and radon ventilation and can resolve both deposition and erosional events. Therefore, it was possible to assess sedimentation over the past century within a wide array of sedimentary environments throughout the Sacramento Valley, where other techniques are limited. In particular, the Sacramento Valley has naturally low 210Pb activity due to its proximity to the Pacific Ocean, high rates of radon ventilation due to dry, porous floodplain sediment, and deposition of widely varying grain sizes - challenges that we have addressed with our enhanced methodology. The analytical approach affords a new ability to assess and directly compare dates and rates of sedimentation and erosion in disparate sedimentary environments throughout this complex fluvial dispersal system. We compare and contrast sediment deposition in engineered floodplains called bypasses, levied ancestral floodplains which serve as floodways during high flow, with sedimentation occurring in some remaining natural floodplains adjacent to the Sacramento River. We find that bypasses tend to accumulate sand and silt at their entrances, but that rates and textures decline rapidly with distance away from the channel. Essentially, a quasi-natural physical process of levee construction by advective overbank transport and deposition of sediment is operating (Singer and Aalto, ESPL, in press). These engineered floodways tend to siphon sediment out of the active channel, such that relatively low sedimentation rates prevail in floodplains and oxbow lakes within the active meander corridor that is bypassed. However, we document significant accumulation of fine-grained material in sedimentary sinks throughout floodplains upstream

  4. Estimation of monthly Angstrom-Prescott equation coefficients from measured daily data in Toledo, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almorox, J.; Hontoria, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. De Edafologia; Benito, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. De Silvopasicultura

    2005-05-01

    In this study, daily global radiation for Toledo (39{sup o}53'05''N, 4{sup o}02'58''W, Spain) were utilized to determine monthly-specific equations for estimating global solar radiation from sunshine hours and to obtain improved fits to monthly Angstrom-Prescott's coefficients. Models were compared using the root mean square error (RMSE), the mean bias error (MBE) and the t-statistic. According to our results, all the models fitted the data adequately and can be used to estimate the specific monthly global solar radiation. Average RMSE and MBE for comparison between observed and estimated global radiation were 1.260 and -0.002 MJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, respectively. The t-statistic was used as the best indicator, this indicator depends on both, and is more effective for determining the model performance. The agreement between the estimated and the measured data were remarkable and the method was recommended for use in Toledo (Spain). (author)

  5. High-resolution modeling of overland flow and sediment transport following wildfire: Insights into initiation mechanisms and sediment sources for runoff-generated debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, L.; Kean, J. W.; Staley, D. M.; Rengers, F. K.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment transport in steep landscapes may be facilitated by both water-dominated flows and debris-flow processes. Given the differences in erosion potential and mobility possessed by runoff and debris flows, knowledge of the conditions that determine the runoff-to-debris-flow transition has important implications for hazard assessment as well as our understanding of the long-term evolution of steep bedrock channels. Debris flows in alpine areas and burned steeplands are frequently triggered by runoff following high-intensity rainfall, but the mechanics by which runoff generates a debris flow are not well understood. To examine the connections between runoff and debris flow initiation, we developed a numerical model that couples overland flow with sediment transport and debris-flow processes. We applied the model to study erosion and debris-flow initiation that occurred during a rainfall event that produced numerous debris flows within a burned drainage basin in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA, USA. Input data for the numerical model was constrained by rain gauges, stage measurements at the basin outlet, soil-moisture sensors, and high-resolution topographic data obtained using a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Numerical model predictions, which compare well with TLS-derived measurements of topographic change, indicate that hillslope erosion at our study site was primarily the result of raindrop-induced sediment transport. Further, results indicate that the majority of sediment eroded from the hillslopes was deposited within the channel system during the storm with only minor amounts being transported out of the basin in suspension. Based on model results, we hypothesize that numerous debris flows were generated from the mass failure of sediment dams that built up within the channel system throughout the storm. This study adds to our understanding of sediment transport in steep landscapes and provides insight into the topographic and hydrologic factors that

  6. Structure of human dual-specificity phosphatase 27 at 2.38 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S. (NCI)

    2012-03-26

    There are over 100 genes in the human genome that encode protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and approximately 60 of these are classified as dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs). Although many dual-specificity phosphatases are still not well characterized, novel functions have been discovered for some of them that have led to new insights into a variety of biological processes and the molecular basis for certain diseases. Indeed, as the functions of DUSPs continue to be elucidated, a growing number of them are emerging as potential therapeutic targets for diseases such as cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders. Here, the overexpression, purification and structure determination of DUSP27 at 2.38 {angstrom} resolution are presented.

  7. Advances Toward Inner-Shell Photo-Ionization X-Ray Lasing at 45 (Angstrom)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S J; Weber, F A; Celliers, P M; Eder, D C

    2002-07-18

    The inner-shell photo-ionization (ISPI) scheme requires photon energies at least high enough to photo-ionize the K-shell. {approx}286 eV, in the case of carbon. As a consequence of the higher cross-section, the inner-shell are selectively knocked out, leaving a hole state 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} in the singly charged carbon ion. This generates a population inversion to the radiatively connected state 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p in C+, leading to gain on the 1s-2p transition at 45 {angstrom}. The resonant character of the lasing transition in the single ionization state intrinsically allows much higher quantum efficiency compared to other schemes. Competing processes that deplete the population inversion include auto-ionization, Auger decay, and in particular collisional ionization of the outer-shell electrons by electrons generated during photo-ionization. These competing processes rapidly quench the gain. Consequently, the pump method must be capable of populating the inversion at a rate faster than the competing processes. This can be achieved by an ultra-fast, high intensity laser that is able to generate an ultra-fast, bright x-ray source. With current advances in the development of high-power, ultra-short pulse lasers it is possible to realize fast x-ray sources based that can deliver powerful pulses of light in the multiple hundred terawatt regime and beyond. They will discuss in greater detail concept, target design and a series of x-ray spectroscopy investigations they have conducted in order to optimize the absorber/x-ray converter--filter package.

  8. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario (JHU); (Florida)

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  9. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  10. A Tale of Two Mysteries in Interstellar Astrophysics: The 2175 Angstrom Extinction Bump and Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, F Y; Zhong, J X

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are ubiquitous absorption spectral features arising from the tenuous material in the space between stars -- the interstellar medium (ISM). Since their first detection nearly nine decades ago, over 400 DIBs have been observed in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range in both the Milky Way and external galaxies, both nearby and distant. However, the identity of the species responsible for these bands remains as one of the most enigmatic mysteries in astrophysics. An equally mysterious interstellar spectral signature is the 2175 Angstrom extinction bump, the strongest absorption feature observed in the ISM. Its carrier also remains unclear since its first detection 46 years ago. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have long been proposed as a candidate for DIBs as their electronic transitions occur in the wavelength range where DIBs are often found. In recent years, the 2175 Angstrom extinction bump is also often attributed to the \\pi--\\pi* transition in ...

  11. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Joke; Goderis, Steven; Smit, Jan; Vanhaecke, Frank; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we have conducted spatially resolved trace element analysis on fresh, unaltered microtektite glasses linked to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary Chicxulub crater and on their surrounding alteration phases. This unique approach offers the opportunity to study in situ and at high spatial resolution both the mixing of different target lithologies and the variation of the major and trace element budget during the alteration process. In addition, two-dimensional element distribution maps reveal important geochemical information beyond the capabilities of single spot laser drilling. Glasses from two localities in opposite quadrants from the source crater were studied. At the Beloc locality (Haiti), the glass population is dominated by the presence of yellow high-Ca glass and black andesitic glass formed by admixture of carbonate/dolomite/anhydrite platform lithologies with crystalline basement. These glasses alter according to the well-established hydration-palagonitization model postulated for mafic volcanic glasses. REEs become progressively leached from the glass to below the detection limit for the applied spot size, while immobile Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta passively accumulate in the process exhibiting both inter-element ratios and absolute concentrations similar to those for the original glass. In contrast, The Arroyo El Mimbral locality (NE Mexico) is characterized by abundant green glass fragments high in Si, Al and alkalis, and low in Mg, Ca, Fe. Low Si black glass is less abundant though similar in composition to the black glass variety at Beloc. The alteration pattern of high-Si, Al green glass at the Mimbral locality is more complex, including numerous competing reaction processes (ion-exchange, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral precipitation) generally controlled by the pH and composition of the surrounding fluid. All green, high-Si, Al glasses are hydrated and

  12. A new high-resolution pollen sequence at Lake Van, Turkey: insights into penultimate interglacial-glacial climate change on vegetation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickarski, Nadine; Litt, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    -157 ka) with higher oscillations in tree percentages and a later stage (ca. 157-131 ka) with lower tree percentages and subdued oscillations. This subdivision of the penultimate glacial is also seen in other pollen records from southern Europe (e.g., MD01-2444 and I-284; Margari et al., 2010; Roucoux et al., 2011). The occurring vegetation pattern is analogous to the division of MIS 3 and MIS 2 during the last glacial in the same sediment sequence. Furthermore, we are able to identify the MIS 6e event (ca. 179-159 ka) as described in marine pollen records, which reveals clear climate variability due to rapid alternation in the vegetation cover.In comparison with long European pollen archives, speleothem isotope records from the Near East, and global climate parameters (e.g., insolation, atmospheric CO2 content), the new high-resolution Lake Van record presents an improved insight into regional vegetation dynamics and climate variability in the eastern Mediterranean region.

  13. Sources and atmospheric processing of winter aerosols in Seoul, Korea: insights from real-time measurements using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwajin; Zhang, Qi; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Kim, Jin Young; Bok Lee, Seung

    2017-02-01

    Highly time-resolved chemical characterization of nonrefractory submicrometer particulate matter (NR-PM1) was conducted in Seoul, the capital and largest metropolis of Korea, using an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The measurements were performed during winter, when elevated particulate matter (PM) pollution events are often observed. This is the first time that detailed real-time aerosol measurement results have been reported from Seoul, Korea, and they reveal valuable insights into the sources and atmospheric processes that contribute to PM pollution in this region. The average concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1 = NR-PM1+ black carbon (BC)) was 27.5 µg m-3, and the total mass was dominated by organics (44 %), followed by nitrate (24 %) and sulfate (10 %). The average atomic ratios of oxygen to carbon (O / C), hydrogen to carbon (H / C), and nitrogen to carbon (N / C) of organic aerosols (OA) were 0.37, 1.79, and 0.018, respectively, which result in an average organic mass-to-carbon (OM / OC) ratio of 1.67. The concentrations (2.6-90.7 µg m-3) and composition of PM1 varied dynamically during the measurement period due to the influences of different meteorological conditions, emission sources, and air mass origins. Five distinct sources of OA were identified via positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the HR-ToF-AMS data: vehicle emissions represented by a hydrocarbon-like OA factor (HOA, O / C = 0.06), cooking activities represented by a cooking OA factor (COA, O / C = 0.14), wood combustion represented by a biomass burning OA factor (BBOA, O / C = 0.34), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) represented by a semivolatile oxygenated OA factor (SV-OOA, O / C = 0.56) and a low-volatility oxygenated OA factor (LV-OOA, O / C = 0.68). On average, primary OA (POA = HOA + COA + BBOA) accounted for 59 % the OA mass, whereas SV-OOA and LV-OOA contributed 15 and 26 %, respectively. Our results indicate that air

  14. Quantifying uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for large braided rivers: insights from high-resolution, high-frequency digital elevation model differencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasington, J.; Hicks, M.; Wheaton, J. M.; Williams, R. D.; Vericat, D.

    2013-12-01

    Repeat surveys of channel morphology provide a means to quantify fluvial sediment storage and enable inferences about changes in long-term sediment supply, watershed delivery and bed level adjustment; information vital to support effective river and land management. Over shorter time-scales, direct differencing of fluvial terrain models may also offer a route to predict reach-averaged sediment transport rates and quantify the patterns of channel morphodynamics and the processes that force them. Recent and rapid advances in geomatics have facilitated these goals by enabling the acquisition of topographic data at spatial resolutions and precisions suitable for characterising river morphology at the scale of individual grains over multi-kilometre reaches. Despite improvements in topographic surveying, inverting the terms of the sediment budget to derive estimates of sediment transport and link these to morphodynamic processes is, nonetheless, often confounded by limited knowledge of either the sediment supply or efflux across a boundary of the control volume, or unobserved cut-and-fill taking place between surveys. This latter problem is particularly poorly constrained, as field logistics frequently preclude surveys at a temporal frequency sufficient to capture changes in sediment storage associated with each competent event, let alone changes during individual floods. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the principal sources of uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for the large, labile, gravel-bed braided Rees River which drains the Southern Alps of NZ. During the austral summer of 2009-10, a unique timeseries of 10 high quality DEMs was derived for a 3 x 0.7 km reach of the Rees, using a combination of mobile terrestrial laser scanning, aDcp soundings and aerial image analysis. Complementary measurements of the forcing flood discharges and estimates of event-based particle step lengths were also acquired during the field campaign

  15. Study of Modis satellite derived aerosol angstrom exponent and in-situ measured values using Sun photometer in part of the west coast of Indian Peninsula

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SunilKumar R.K.; Suresh, T.; Govindaraju; SureshKumar, B.V.

    The aerosol angstrom exponent (AAE) is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size. It is important to understand and quantify the microphysical impact of aerosols which are derived from natural and anthropogenic activities...

  16. Research and development toward a 4.5-1.5{angstrom} linac coherent light source (LCLS) at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, R.; Arthur, J.; Baltay, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In recent years significant studies have been initiated on the theoretical and technical feasibility of utilizing a portion of the 3km S-band accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to drive a short wavelength (4.5-1.5 {Angstrom}) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime. Electron beam requirements for single-pass saturation include: (1) a peak current in the 3-7 kA range, (2) a relative energy spread of <0.05%, ad (3) a transverse emittance, {epsilon}{le}{lambda}/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength. Requirements on the insertion device include field error levels of 0.1-0.2% for keeping the electron bunch centered on and in phase with the amplified photons, and a focusing beta of 4-8 m for inhibiting the dilution of its transverse density. Although much progress techniques necessary for LCLS operation down to {approximately}20 {angstrom}, a substantial amount of research and development is still required in a number of theoretical and experimental areas leading to the construction and operation of a 4.5-1.5 {angstrom} LCLS. In this paper we report on a research and development program underway and in planning at SLAC for addressing critical questions in these areas. These include the construction and operation of a linac test stand for developing laser-driven photocathode rf guns with normalized emittances approaching 1 mm-mr; development of advanced beam compression, stability, an emittance control techniques at multi-GeV energies; the construction and operation of a FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE) for theoretical and experimental studies of SASE at IR wavelengths; an undulator development program to investigate superconducting, hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM), and pulsed-Cu technologies; theoretical and computational studies of high-gain FEL physics and LCLS component designs.

  17. X-ray study of the structure of polyethylene at the scale of 100-200 Angstrom; Etude par rayons X dela structure du polyethylene a l'echelle de 100-200 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belbeoch nee Goldsztein, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-06-15

    Information on the structure of polyethylene is deduced from a comparison of the results obtained by central diffusion and by other X-ray methods. The structure depends on the thermal and mechanical treatment to which the samples are subjected, as well as on the observation temperature. The central diffusion due to the heterogeneity of the material at the scale of 100-200 Angstrom is bound up with the presence of both the amorphous and crystalline phases. Stretched polythene shows a more or less regular succession of orderly and disorderly regions. When released it has a structure of recrystallisation preceded by 'amorphization'. (author) [French] Les informations sur la structure du polyethylene sont deduites de la confrontation des resultats obtenus par la diffusion centrale et par d'autres methodes de rayons X. La structure depend des traitements thermiques et mecaniques subis par les echantillons ainsi que la temperature d'observation. La diffusion centrale due a l'existence d'heterogeneites de la matiere a l'echelle 100-200 Angstrom est lie a la presence des deux phases amorphe et cristallisee. Le polyethylene etire comporte une succession plus ou moins reguliere de domaines ordonnes et desordonnes. Le polyethylene relaxe a une structure de recristallisation precedee d'une 'amorphisation'. (auteur)

  18. Near-field measurement of modal interference in optical nanofibers for sub-Angstrom radius sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Fatemi, Fredrik K; Solano, Pablo; Fenton, Eliot F; Beadie, Guy; Rolston, Steven L; Orozco, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Optical nanofibers (ONF) of subwavelength dimensions confine light in modes with a strong evanescent field that can trap, probe, and manipulate nearby quantum systems. To measure the evanescent field and propagating modes, and to optimize ONF performance, a surface probe is desirable during fabrication. We demonstrate a nondestructive measurement of light propagation in ONFs by sampling the local evanescent field with a microfiber. This approach reveals the behavior of all propagating modes, and because the modal beat lengths in cylindrical waveguides depend strongly on radius, simultaneously provides exquisite sensitivity to the ONF radius. We show that our measured spatial frequencies provide a map of the average ONF radius (over a 600 micrometer window) along the 10 mm ONF waist with 40 picometer resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. The measurements agree with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to within SEM instrument resolution. This fast method is immune to polarization, intrinsic birefringence, m...

  19. Sub-angstrom single-molecule measurements of motor proteins using a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Ian M; Craig, Jonathan M; Stava, Eric; Laszlo, Andrew H; Ross, Brian C; Brinkerhoff, Henry; Nova, Ian C; Doering, Kenji; Tickman, Benjamin I; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Mandell, Jeffrey G; Gunderson, Kevin L; Gundlach, Jens H

    2016-01-01

    Present techniques for measuring the motion of single motor proteins, such as FRET and optical tweezers, are limited to a resolution of ~300 pm. We use ion current modulation through the protein nanopore MspA to observe translocation of helicase Hel308 on DNA with up to ~40 picometer sensitivity. This approach should be applicable to any protein that translocates on DNA or RNA, including helicases, polymerases, recombinases and DNA repair enzymes. PMID:26414351

  20. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Robinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer.

  1. Variations of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom parameters at a suburban location in Iran During 2009–2010

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Khoshsima; A A Bidokhti; F Ahmadi-Giv

    2014-02-01

    Solar irradiance is attenuated spectrally when passing through the earth’s atmosphere and it is strongly dependent on sky conditions, cleanliness of the atmosphere, composition of aerosols and gaseous constituents. In this paper, aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent () and Angstrom turbidity coefficient () have been investigated during December 2009 to October 2010, in a suburban area of Zanjan (36°N, 43°E, 1700 m), in the north–west of Iran, using meteorological and sun photometric data. Results show that turbidity varies on all time scales, from the seasonal to hourly, because of changes in the atmospheric meteorological parameters. The values of range from near zero to 1.67. The diurnal variation of AOD in Zanjan is about 15%. The diurnal variability of AOD, showed a similar variation pattern in spring (including March, April, May) and winter (December, January, February) and had a different variation pattern in summer (June, July, August) and autumn (September and October). During February, spring and early summer winds transport continental aerosols mostly from the Iraq (dust events) and cause the increase of beta and turbidity of atmosphere of Zanjan.

  2. Impact of model resolution on sea-level variability characteristics at various space and time scales: insights from four DRAKKAR global simulations and the AVISO altimeter data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Penduff

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Four global ocean/sea-ice simulations driven by the same realistic 46-year daily atmospheric forcing were performed within the DRAKKAR project at 2°, 1°, ½° and ¼° resolutions. Model sea-level anomalies are collocated over the period 1993–2004 onto the AVISO SLA dataset. These five collocated SLA datasets are then filtered and quantitatively compared over various time and space scales regarding three characteristics: SLA standard deviations, spatial correlations between SLA variability maps, and temporal correlations between observed and simulated band-passed filtered local SLA timeseries. Beyond the 2°–1° transition whose benefits are quite moderate, further increases in resolution and associated changes in subgrid scale parameterizations simultaneously induce (i strong increases in SLA standard deviations, (ii strong improvements in the spatial distribution of SLA variability, and (iii slight decreases in temporal correlations between observed and simulation SLA timeseries. These 3 effects are not only clear on mesoscale (14–180 days and quasi-annual (5–18 months fluctuations, but also on the slower (interannual, large-scale variability ultimately involved in ocean-atmosphere coupled processes. Most SLA characteristics are monotonically affected by successive resolution increases, but irregularly and with a strong dependance on frequency and latitude. Benefits of enhanced resolution are maximum in the ½°–¼° transition, in the 14–180 day range, and within eddy-active mid- and high-latitude regions. They are particularly clear in the Southern Ocean where mesoscale eddies probably sustain a substantial intrinsic interannual variability.

  3. New insights on multiple seismic uplift on the Main Frontal Thrust near the Ratu river, Eastern Nepal using high-resolution topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Cagil; Tapponnier, Paul; Nath Sapkota, Soma; Coudurier Curveur, Aurelie; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon; Gao, Mingxing; Bollinger, Laurent; Klinger, Yann

    2016-04-01

    The number of localities along the Main Frontal Thrust, between 85°49' to 86°27' E, where new data corroborates the surface emergence of the great M ≈ 8.4, 1934 Bihar-Nepal and 1255 AD earthquakes has increased over the past years. Here we show new high-resolution, quantitative evidences of surface rupture and co-seismic uplift near the Ratu river area. We present a refined map of uplifted terrace surfaces and abandoned paleo-channels truncated by the MFT, obtained by the combination of newly acquired high resolution Digital Elevation Models from Total station, Terrestrial Lidar Scanner (TLS), Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and kinematic GPS surveys. In the Ratu valley, using these new high-resolution topographic datasets, we identify six and possibly seven distinct terrace levels uplifted parallel to the riverbed, lying unconformably on top of folded Siwaliks. Several sets of measurements may be taken to imply broadly characteristic increments of throw during sequences of at least six to seven events of riverbed abandonment related to co-seismic uplifts. Newly collected detrital charcoals from several pits and from a rejuvenated paleoseismological wall will help assess more precisely uplift and shortening rates over the length of segments of the MFT east and west of Bardibas. A regional comparison of comparable long-term paleoseismological data at other sites along the 1934 rupture length is in progress.

  4. 1D goes 2D: A Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in superconducting arrays of 4-Angstrom carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhe

    2010-10-01

    We report superconducting resistive transition characteristics for array(s) of coupled 4-Angstrom single wall carbon nanotubes embedded in aluminophosphate-five zeolite. The transition was observed to initiate at 15 K with a slow resistance decrease switching to a sharp, order of magnitude drop between 7.5 and 6.0 K with strong (anisotropic) magnetic field dependence. Both the sharp resistance drop and its attendant nonlinear IV characteristics are consistent with the manifestations of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition that establishes quasi long range order in the plane transverse to the c-axis of the nanotubes, leading to an inhomogeneous system comprising 3D superconducting regions connected by weak links. Global coherence is established at below 5 K with the appearance of a well-defined supercurrent gap/low resistance region at 2 K. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Generation of GW-Level, Sub-Angstrom Radiation in the LCLS Using a Second-Harmonic Radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z

    2004-09-14

    Electron beams are strongly microbunched near the high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) saturation with a rich harmonic content in the beam current. While the coherent harmonic emission is possible in a planar undulator, the third-harmonic radiation typically dominates with about 1% of the fundamental power at saturation. In this paper, we discuss the second-harmonic radiation in the Linac Coherent Light Source. We show that by a suitable design of an second-stage undulator with its fundamental frequency tuned to the second harmonic of the first undulator, coherent second-harmonic radiation much more intense than the third-harmonic is emitted. Numerical simulations predict that GW-level, sub-Angstrom x-ray pulses can be generated in a relatively short second-harmonic radiator.

  6. Outcome After Myocardial Infarction Treated With Resolute Integrity and Promus Element Stents: Insights From the DUTCH PEERS (TWENTE II) Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, K Gert; Lam, Ming Kai; Löwik, Marije M; Danse, Peter W; Tjon Joe Gin, R Melvyn; Jessurun, Gillian A; Anthonio, Rutger L; Sen, Hanim; Linssen, Gerard C M; IJzerman, Maarten J; Doggen, Carine J M; von Birgelen, Clemens

    2016-12-01

    In acute myocardial infarction (MI), novel highly deliverable drug-eluting stents (DES) may be particularly valuable as their flexible stent designs might reduce device-induced traumas to culprit lesions. The aim of the study was to assess the safety and efficacy of percutaneous coronary interventions with 2 novel durable polymer-coated DES in patients with acute MI. The prospective, randomized DUTCH PEERS (TWENTE II) multicenter trial compares Resolute Integrity and Promus Element stents in 1811 all-comer patients, of whom 817 (45.1%) were treated for ST-segment elevation MI or non-ST-segment elevation MI and the 2-year outcome is available in 99.9%. The primary clinical endpoint is target vessel failure (TVF), a composite of cardiac death, target vessel related MI, or target vessel revascularization. Of all 817 patients treated for acute MI, 421 (51.5%) were treated with Resolute Integrity and 396 (48.5%) with Promus Element stents. At the 2-year follow-up, the rates of TVF (7.4% vs 6.1%; P = .45), target lesion revascularization (3.1% vs 2.8%; P = .79), and definite stent thrombosis (1.0% vs 0.5%; P = .69) were low for both stent groups. Consistent with these findings in all patients with acute MI, outcomes for the 2 DES were favorable and similar in both, with 370 patients with ST-segment elevation MI (TVF, 5.1% vs 4.9%; P = .81) and 447 patients with non-ST-segment elevation MI (TVF, 9.0% vs 7.5%; P = .56). Resolute Integrity and Promus Element stents were both safe and efficacious in treating patients with acute MI. The present 2-year follow-up data underline the safety of using these devices in this particular clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Carborane-Based Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors: Insight into CAII/CAIX Specificity from a High-Resolution Crystal Structure, Modeling, and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Mader

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carborane-based compounds are promising lead structures for development of inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CAs. Here, we report structural and computational analysis applicable to structure-based design of carborane compounds with selectivity toward the cancer-specific CAIX isoenzyme. We determined the crystal structure of CAII in complex with 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane at 1.0 Å resolution and used this structure to model the 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane interactions with CAIX. A virtual glycine scan revealed the contributions of individual residues to the energy of binding of 1-methylenesulfamide-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane to CAII and CAIX, respectively.

  8. Insights into the evolution of the Yenkahe resurgent dome (Siwi caldera, Tanna Island, Vanuatu) inferred from aerial high-resolution photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Normier, A.; Bacri, C.; Peltier, A.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Merle, O.; Finizola, A.; Garaebiti, E.

    2016-08-01

    The Yenkahe dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu) is one of the most spectacular examples of presently active post-caldera resurgence, exhibiting a very high uplift rate over the past 1000 years (156 mm/year on average). Although numerous inhabited areas are scattered around the dome, the dynamics of this structure and associated hazards remain poorly studied because of its remote location and dense vegetation cover. A high-resolution photogrammetric campaign was carried out in November 2011 over the dome. Georeferenced photographs were treated by "Structure from Motion" and "Multiple-view Stereophotogrammetry" methods to produce a 3D-digital surface model (DSM) of the area and its associated orthophotograph. This DSM is much more accurate than previously available SRTM and Aster digital elevation models (DEMs), particularly at minimal (coastline) and maximal altitudes (Yasur culmination point, 390 m). While previous mapping relied mostly on low resolution DEMs and satellite images, the high precision of the DSM allows for a detailed structural analysis of the Yenkahe dome, notably based on the quantification of fault displacements. The new structural map, inferred from the 3D reconstruction and morphological analysis of the dome, reveals a complex pattern of faults and destabilization scars reflecting a succession of constructive and destructive events. Numerous landslide scars directed toward the sea highlight the probable occurrence of a tsunami event affecting the south-eastern coast of Tanna. Simulations of landslide-triggered tsunamis show the short time propagation of such a wave (1-2 min), which could affect coastal localities even following relatively small destabilized volumes (a few million cubic meters).

  9. New insight into the dynamic properties and the active site architecture of H-Ras p21 revealed by X-ray crystallography at very high resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klink Björn U

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In kinetic crystallography, the usually static method of X-ray diffraction is expanded to allow time-resolved analysis of conformational rearrangements in protein structures. To achieve this, reactions have to be triggered within the protein crystals of interest, and optical spectroscopy can be used to monitor the reaction state. For this approach, a modified form of H-Ras p21 was designed which allows reaction initiation and fluorescence readout of the initiated GTPase reaction within the crystalline state. Rearrangements within the crystallized protein due to the progressing reaction and associated heterogeneity in the protein conformations have to be considered in the subsequent refinement processes. Results X-ray diffraction experiments on H-Ras p21 in different states along the reaction pathway provide detailed information about the kinetics and mechanism of the GTPase reaction. In addition, a very high data quality of up to 1.0 Å resolution allowed distinguishing two discrete subconformations of H-Ras p21, expanding the knowledge about the intrinsic flexibility of Ras-like proteins, which is important for their function. In a complex of H-Ras•GppNHp (guanosine-5'-(β,γ-imido-triphosphate, a second Mg2+ ion was found to be coordinated to the γ-phosphate group of GppNHp, which positions the hydrolytically active water molecule very close to the attacked γ-phosphorous atom. Conclusion For the structural analysis of very high-resolution data we have used a new 'two-chain-isotropic-refinement' strategy. This refinement provides an alternative and easy to interpret strategy to reflect the conformational variability within crystal structures of biological macromolecules. The presented fluorescent form of H-Ras p21 will be advantageous for fluorescence studies on H-Ras p21 in which the use of fluorescent nucleotides is not feasible.

  10. Insight into the molecular composition of laboratory organic residues produced from interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogues using very high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danger, G.; Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; de Marcellus, P.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Duvernay, F.; Vuitton, V.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, L.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental simulations in the laboratory may provide important information about the chemical evolution occurring in various astrophysical objects such as extraterrestrial ices. Interstellar or (pre)cometary ice analogues made of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 at 77 K, when subjected to an energetic process (VUV photons, electrons or ions) and then warmed-up to room temperature, lead, in the laboratory, to the formation of an organic residue. In this paper we expand our previous analysis of the residues in order to obtain a better insight into their molecular content. Data analyses show that three different chemical groups are present in the residue in the negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mode: CHN, CHO and CHNOsbnd whereas only two groups are detected in the positive ESI mode: CHN and CHNO. In both cases, the CHNO group is the most abundant. The application of specific data treatment shows that residue mainly contains aliphatic linear molecules or cyclic structures connected to unsaturated chemical functions such as esters, carboxylic acids, amides or aldehydes. In lower abundances, some molecules do present aromatic structures. The comparison of our residue with organic compounds detected in the Murchison meteorite gives an interesting match, which suggests that laboratory simulation of interstellar ice chemistry is relevant to understand astrophysical organic matter evolution.

  11. High resolution ion microprobe investigation of the δ18O of carbonate cements (Jurassic, Paris Basin, France): New insights and pending questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Benoit; Brigaud, Benjamin; Emmanuel, Laurent; Loreau, Jean-Paul

    2017-04-01

    The scope of this work is to investigate, at a high resolution, the oxygen isotope composition (δ18Ocarb) of diagenetic products (synsedimentary and burial calcite cements) in shallow-marine carbonates. SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) microprobe analyses were performed on thin sections from Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian Formations of the eastern Paris Basin and compared to data obtained on the same diagenetic products by conventional mass spectrometry (acid digestion). Hereby obtained, δ18O are similar, but the SIMS dataset displays a larger range of values. The isotopic zonation obtained by SIMS transects through sequences of cements filling pores, reveals an (expected) isotopic depletion from older stage synsedimentary calcites to younger stage blocky calcites and that follows the CL (cathodoluminescence) zonation. SIMS analyses however show that synsedimentary cements precipitated in intra-skeletal pores, have heavier δ18O than their inter-particle counterparts, with an offset of + 4‰V-PDB, despite similar petrographical characteristics. This difference is maintained in the δ18O of the first stages of blocky calcite cements, intra-skeletal blocky calcites showing heavier δ18O than the time equivalent and petrographically identical inter-particle calcites, with an offset of + 5‰V-PDB. These offsets are tentatively explained by the precipitation of cements under non-equilibrium conditions in intra-skeletal pores, where organic matter decay may have played a key role, acting notably on the pH. The occurrence of isolated micro-diagenetic environments, co-existing at the thin section scale, is tentatively proposed as an explanation to these small scale and high amplitude δ18O heterogeneities. These results may question the sampling strategy for future works. Microdrilling may miss the observed range of variation, but averaging the values may not necessarily lead to real misinterpretations if a critical selection of samples is performed, targeting

  12. 2D and 3D high resolution seismic imaging of shallow Solfatara crater in Campi Flegrei (Italy): new insights on deep hydrothermal fluid circulation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Landro, Grazia; Gammaldi, Sergio; Serlenga, Vincenzo; Amoroso, Ortensia; Russo, Guido; Festa, Gaetano; D'Auria, Luca; Bruno, Pier Paolo; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Seismic tomography can be used to image the spatial variation of rock properties within complex geological media such as volcanoes. Solfatara is a volcano located within the Campi Flegrei still active caldera, characterized by periodic episodes of extended, low-rate ground subsidence and uplift called bradyseism accompanied by intense seismic and geochemical activities. In particular, Solfatara is characterized by an impressive magnitude diffuse degassing, which underlines the relevance of fluid and heat transport at the crater and prompted further research to improve the understanding of the hydrothermal system feeding the surface phenomenon. In this line, an active seismic experiment, Repeated Induced Earthquake and Noise (RICEN) (EU Project MEDSUV), was carried out between September 2013 and November 2014 to provide time-varying high-resolution images of the structure of Solfatara. In this study we used the datasets provided by two different acquisition geometries: a) A 2D array cover an area of 90 x 115 m ^ 2 sampled by a regular grid of 240 vertical sensors deployed at the crater surface; b) two 1D orthogonal seismic arrays deployed along NE-SW and NW-SE directions crossing the 400 m crater surface. The arrays are sampled with a regular line of 240 receiver and 116 shots. We present 2D and 3D tomographic high-resolution P-wave velocity images obtained using two different tomographic methods adopting a multiscale strategy. The 3D image of the shallow (30-35 m) central part of Solfatara crater is performed through the iterative, linearized, tomographic inversion of the P-wave first arrival times. 2D P-wave velocity sections (60-70 m) are obtained using a non-linear travel-time tomography method based on the evaluation of a posteriori probability density with a Bayesian approach. The 3D retrieved images integrated with resistivity section and temperature and CO2 flux measurements , define the following characteristics: 1. A depth dependent P-wave velocity layer

  13. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in northwest China: insights from high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of submicron particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 11 July-7 August 2012. The average (PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory (PM1 (NR-(PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105 μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. Organic aerosol (OA) on average consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution organic mass spectra identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns, both with peak at ~ 07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8), corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking-emission related OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ~ 07:00 and 15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak between ~ 08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon maximum in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by downward mixing of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during nighttime. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA was

  14. High-resolution analysis of four efficient yeast replication origins reveals new insights into the ORC and putative MCM binding elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fujung; May, Caitlin D; Hoggard, Timothy; Miller, Jeremy; Fox, Catherine A; Weinreich, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In budding yeast, the eukaryotic initiator protein ORC (origin recognition complex) binds to a bipartite sequence consisting of an 11 bp ACS element and an adjacent B1 element. However, the genome contains many more matches to this consensus than actually bind ORC or function as origins in vivo. Although ORC-dependent loading of the replicative MCM helicase at origins is enhanced by a distal B2 element, less is known about this element. Here, we analyzed four highly active origins (ARS309, ARS319, ARS606 and ARS607) by linker scanning mutagenesis and found that sequences adjacent to the ACS contributed substantially to origin activity and ORC binding. Using the sequences of four additional B2 elements we generated a B2 multiple sequence alignment and identified a shared, degenerate 8 bp sequence that was enriched within 228 known origins. In addition, our high-resolution analysis revealed that not all origins exist within nucleosome free regions: a class of Sir2-regulated origins has a stably positioned nucleosome overlapping or near B2. This study illustrates the conserved yet flexible nature of yeast origin architecture to promote ORC binding and origin activity, and helps explain why a strong match to the ORC binding site is insufficient to identify origins within the genome.

  15. THE 300 km s{sup -1} STELLAR STREAM NEAR SEGUE 1: INSIGHTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF ITS BRIGHTEST STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frebel, Anna; Casey, Andrew R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lunnan, Ragnhild [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Norris, John E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyse, Rosemary F. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 300 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilmore, Gerard [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of 300S-1, the brightest likely member star of the 300 km s{sup -1} stream near the faint satellite galaxy Segue 1. From a high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectrum, we determine a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.46 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.23 (random and systematic uncertainties) for star 300S-1, and find an abundance pattern similar to typical halo stars at this metallicity. Comparing our stellar parameters to theoretical isochrones, we estimate a distance of 18 {+-} 7 kpc. Both the metallicity and distance estimates are in good agreement with what can be inferred from comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data of the stream stars to globular cluster sequences. While several other structures overlap with the stream in this part of the sky, the combination of kinematic, chemical, and distance information makes it unlikely that these stars are associated with either the Segue 1 galaxy, the Sagittarius Stream, or the Orphan Stream. Streams with halo-like abundance signatures, such as the 300 km s{sup -1} stream, present another observational piece for understanding the accretion history of the Galactic halo.

  16. Reaction-induced porosity and onset of low-temperature carbonation in abyssal peridotites: Insights from 3D high-resolution microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Niels; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Bach, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In a drillcore sample of serpentinized harzburgite from the uppermost oceanic crust (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, ODP Leg 209, Site 1270), we demonstrate using high-resolution 3D-microtomography that micron-sized open cavities are present. The development of porosity is interpreted to result from dissolution of brucite and/or olivine. Petrographic observations indicate that voids are integrated in a network of carbonate veins, the formation of which is linked to changing alkalinity in conjunction with dissolution reactions. Partial carbonate filling of pore spaces indicates that under static conditions low-temperature carbonation leads to clogging of fluid pathways and thus to a reduction in permeability. Electron microprobe analyses show that the inner walls of open voids are lined with Fe-rich precipitates. We propose that the iron in those phases was released by brucite or olivine dissolution and was subsequently oxidized and precipitated as ferric hydroxide. Thermodynamic computations show that this process may be a potential source of catabolic energy for microorganisms inhabiting serpentinites. The proposed carbonation mechanism implies that carbonate precipitation may start soon after exposure of the abyssal peridotites, when dissolution of brucite and weathering of olivine begin, and continue until the phases become inaccessible to seawater. Predicting carbonation rates of abyssal peridotites will hence require understanding of permeability reactions.

  17. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  18. The active Moresby Seamount Detachment Fault, Woodlark Basin: insights into structure and mechanics from high-resolution submarine mapping and sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrmann, Jan H.; Speckbacher, Romed; Nagel, Thorsten; Klaucke, Ingo; Devey, Colin W.

    2010-05-01

    Moresby Seamount Detachment, located east of Papua New Guinea in the Woodlark Basin, is arguably the best-exposed active extensional detachment fault in the world. It forms the northern slopes of Moresby Seamount, a 3000 meter high east-west trending tectonic horst separating two extensional basins. Fault zone dip is about 30°, and total horizontal stretch accumulated in the past 3.5 Ma is about 8 km. The detachment surface is exposed on the sea floor over an area of about 30 square kilometers. Denudation is almost absent, and sedimentation is apparently suppressed by strong bottom water currents, providing a unique opportunity to analyze the tectonic geomorphology and structure of the fault zone, and sample the fault rocks. R/V SONNE Expedition 203 first mapped the area with about 20 m spatial resolution by ship-based multibeam bathymetry operating at 12 kHz. Most of the detachment surface was subsequently surveyed by AUV fitted with a 200 kHz multibeam echosounder, a CTD and a water column turbidity sensor. Map resolution is about 2 m. Samples were dredged from the detachment, and in basement and sediment sites in the footwall block. In the uppermost part the detachment zone cuts through an approximately 500 m thick sequence of Pliocene clastic sediments. Topography there is rugged, with erosional gullies, and areas of slope failure. Below, an upper smooth zone of the detachment is made up by a slope-parallel belt of cataclasites, generated from metamorphic basement rocks of Paleogene or older age, mainly gabbro, metadiabase and psammo-pelitic schists. Structurally and topographically below the cataclasites is a lower rugged zone mainly exposing cataclasites and mylonites. Topography is due to localized slope failure and a major sinistral strike slip fault scarp transecting the detachment with a 320° azimuth. Below the rugged zone is a lower smooth zone of cataclasites and mylonites. The most spectacular feature here are several north-south trending, extremely

  19. Insights into carbohydrate recognition by Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin: the crystal structure at 2 A resolution in complex with alpha1-3 mannobiose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerborn, M K; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Grossmann, J G; Rizkallah, P J

    1999-07-01

    Carbohydrate recognition by monocot mannose-binding lectins was studied via the crystal structure determination of daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) lectin. The lectin was extracted from daffodil bulbs, and crystallised in the presence of alpha-1,3 mannobiose. Molecular replacement methods were used to solve the structure using the partially refined model of Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin as a search model. The structure was refined at 2.0 A resolution to a final R -factor of 18.7 %, and Rfreeof 26.7 %. The main feature of the daffodil lectin structure is the presence of three fully occupied binding pockets per monomer, arranged around the faces of a triangular beta-prism motif. The pockets have identical topology, and can bind mono-, di- or oligosaccharides. Strand exchange forms tightly bound dimers, and higher aggregation states are achieved through hydrophobic patches on the surface, completing a tetramer with internal 222-symmetry. There are therefore 12 fully occupied binding pockets per tetrameric cluster. The tetramer persists in solution, as shown with small-angle X-ray solution scattering. Extensive sideways and out-of-plane interactions between tetramers, some mediated via the ligand, make up the bulk of the lattice contacts.A fourth binding site was also observed. This is unique and has not been observed in similar structures. The site is only partially occupied by a ligand molecule due to the much lower binding affinity. A comparison with the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin/mannopentaose complex suggests an involvement of this site in the recognition mechanism for naturally occurring glycans.

  20. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Weill-Med)

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  1. New insights on the anatomy of abrupt climate changes based on high-resolution ice core records from NorthGRIP (Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capron, E.; Rasmussen, S.; Popp, T. J.; Vaughn, B. H.; Gkinis, V.; Erhardt, T.; Fischer, H.; Blunier, T.; Landais, A.; Pedro, J. B.; Steffensen, J. P.; Svensson, A.; Vinther, B.

    2016-12-01

    The millennial-scale succession of Greenland Stadials (GS) and Greenland Interstadials (GI) illustrates the Greenland expression of the well-known sequence of Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events, within which we observe additional climate variations of decadal to centennial-scale duration. Various paradigms, mostly based on interactions between the cryosphere and the ocean, have been proposed to explain the existence and evolution of DO events. Annual to decadal scale records of environmental and climatic regional changes over the rapid transitions are needed to assess whether climate model outputs based on a particular mechanism are consistent with the observed spatial pattern and temporal phasing. Here we present new multiannual resolution stable water isotope measurements (ice δ18O and δD) and annually resolved ion chemistry records from the NorthGRIP ice core. Because these tracers imprint the signatures of different parts of the Northern Hemisphere climate system, we can map the anatomy - the spatial and temporal signature of climate and environmental changes - associated with abrupt transitions (from GS to GI and vice-versa) occurring during Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 4. We determine via a statistical approach the timing and duration of the transitions, along with the amplitude of the local and regional changes associated with each Greenland warming and cooling phase. We quantify similarities and differences in the sequences of events through a comparison with results obtained for MIS 3 abrupt transitions and results from the NEEM ice core for selected transitions. The anatomy of abrupt climate changes appears to be different from one event to the next, suggesting that the mechanisms at play are not identical for all of them. We discuss the possible influence of (1) the Heinrich Stadials (i.e. GS during which a Heinrich Event occurred) and of (2) the long term evolution of the climate system on the different decadal to centennial-scale sequences of events

  2. A high resolution δ13C record in a modern Porites lobata coral: Insights into controls on skeletal δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Nicola; Finch, Adrian A.; EIMF

    2012-05-01

    δ13C was determined at a high spatial resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) across a 1 year section of a modern Porites lobata coral skeleton from Hawaii. Skeletal δ13C is dominated by large oscillations of 5-7‰ that typically cover skeletal distances equivalent to periods of ˜14-40 days. These variations do not reflect seawater temperature and it is unlikely that they reflect variations in the δ13C of local seawater. We observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and the pH of the calcification fluid (estimated from previous measurements of skeletal δ11B). We conclude that either the proportion of skeletal carbon derived from metabolic CO2 is not reflected by estimated ECF pH (as the [CO2] in the overlying coral tissue varies) and/or the δ13C composition of the metabolic CO2 is highly variable. We also observe no correlation between skeletal δ13C and previous δ18O SIMS measurements. Variations in skeletal δ13C and δ18O do not have a common timing, providing no evidence that skeletal δ13C and δ18O vary in response to a single factor. This suggests that skeletal δ13C is principally driven by variations in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 rather than by the abundance of metabolic CO2, which would also affect skeletal δ18O. The δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 reflects the processes of photosynthesis, heterotrophic feeding and respiration in the overlying coral tissue. Corals catabolise stored lipid reserves to meet energetic demands when photosynthesis conditions are sub-optimal. Variations in the amounts and types of reserves utilised could induce changes in the δ13C composition of metabolic CO2 and the resultant skeleton which are temporally offset from skeletal δ18O records.

  3. New constraints on the origin of the Skaergaard intrusion Cu-Pd-Au mineralization: Insights from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godel, Bélinda; Rudashevsky, Nikolay S.; Nielsen, Troels F. D.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Rudashevsky, Vladimir N.

    2014-03-01

    This contribution presents the first detailed three-dimensional (3D) in situ analysis of samples from the Platinova Reef using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) and 3D image processing and quantification coupled with microscopic and mineralogical investigations. Our HRXCT analyses reveal the complex textural relationships between Cu-rich sulfides (bulk composition close to bornite), skaergaardite (PdCu), Au-rich phases, silicates and Fe-Ti oxides and provide unequivocal textural evidences, not observed previously. The association in 3D between Cu-rich sulfide globules, PdCu alloy and ilmenite is inconsistent with a hydrothermal origin of the Cu-Pd mineralization. In contrast, our results combined with phase diagrams strongly support a primary magmatic origin for the Cu-Pd mineralization where Cu and Pd-rich, Fe-poor sulfide liquid represents a cumulus phase that forms by in-situ nucleation. These sulfide droplets and attached skaergaardite grains were trapped during the formation and crystallization of the Fe-Ti oxides. Subsequent, post-cumulus processes led to the partial to total dissolution of the sulfide not entirely enclosed by the Fe-Ti oxides (i.e., not protected from reaction) leading to the observed variability in Cu and Pd composition at the aggregate (sulfide + PdCu) scale and to the occurrence of free PdCu alloys. In contrast to the PdCu alloy, gold-bearing minerals are never observed entirely enclosed within the Fe-Ti oxide. Two hypotheses can be envisaged for the formation of the gold enriched layer in the upper part of the section. Gold may have either precipitated from high-temperature late magmatic Cl-rich fluids. Alternatively, gold may have been enriched during fractional crystallization after sulfide had been suppressed from the liquidus after the Pd layer crystallized and then deposited along redox barriers.

  4. Insights into atomic-level interaction between mefenamic acid and eudragit EPO in a supersaturated solution by high-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Mroue, Kamal H; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-06

    The intermolecular interaction between mefenamic acid (MFA), a poorly water-soluble nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and Eudragit EPO (EPO), a water-soluble polymer, is investigated in their supersaturated solution using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stable supersaturated solution with a high MFA concentration of 3.0 mg/mL is prepared by dispersing the amorphous solid dispersion into a d-acetate buffer at pH 5.5 and 37 °C. By virtue of MAS at 2.7 kHz, the extremely broad and unresolved (1)H resonances of MFA in one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum of the supersaturated solution are well-resolved, thus enabling the complete assignment of MFA (1)H resonances in the aqueous solution. Two-dimensional (2D) (1)H/(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) and radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) under MAS conditions reveal the interaction of MFA with EPO in the supersaturated solution at an atomic level. The strong cross-correlations observed in the 2D (1)H/(1)H NMR spectra indicate a hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic group of MFA and the backbone of EPO. Furthermore, the aminoalkyl group in the side chain of EPO forms a hydrophilic interaction, which can be either electrostatic or hydrogen bonding, with the carboxyl group of MFA. We believe these hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between MFA and EPO molecules play a key role in the formation of this extremely stable supersaturated solution. In addition, 2D (1)H/(1)H RFDR demonstrates that the molecular MFA-EPO interaction is quite flexible and dynamic.

  5. Connections and consequences in complex systems: insights from a case study of the emergence and local impact of crisis resolution and home treatment services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, Ben

    2013-09-01

    In this article the broad contours of a complexity perspective are outlined. Complexity ideas are then drawn on to frame an empirical examination of the connections running between different levels of organisation in health and social care, and to underpin investigation into the intended and unintended local system consequences of service development. Data are used from a study conducted in the UK's mental health field. Here, macro-level policy has led to the supplementing of longstanding community mental health teams by newer, more specialised, services. An example includes teams providing crisis resolution and home treatment (CRHT) care as an alternative to hospital admission. Using an embedded case study design, where 'the case' examined was a new CRHT team set in its surrounding organisational environment, ethnographic data (with interviews predominating) were generated in a single site in Wales over 18 months from the middle of 2007. In a large-scale context favourable to local decision-making, and against a background of a partial and disputed evidence base, the move to establish the new standalone service was contested. Whilst users valued the work of the team, and local practitioners recognised the quality of its contribution, powerful effects were also triggered across the locality's horizontal interfaces. Participants described parts of the interconnected system being closed to release resources, staff gravitating to new crisis services leaving holes elsewhere, and the most needy service users being cared for by the least experienced workers. Some community mental health team staff described unexpected increases in workload, and disputes over eligibility for crisis care with implications for system-wide working relations. Detailed data extracts are used to illustrate these connections and consequences. Concluding lessons are drawn on the use of evidence to inform policy, on the significance of local contexts and system interfaces, and on anticipating the

  6. Kinetic, thermodynamic and X-ray structural insights into the interaction of melatonin and analogues with quinone reductase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calamini, Barbara; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (UIC)

    2008-09-12

    Melatonin exerts its biological effects through at least two transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, and a lower-affinity cytosolic binding site, designated MT3. MT3 has recently been identified as QR2 (quinone reductase 2) (EC 1.10.99.2) which is of significance since it links the antioxidant effects of melatonin to a mechanism of action. Initially, QR2 was believed to function analogously to QR1 in protecting cells from highly reactive quinones. However, recent studies indicate that QR2 may actually transform certain quinone substrates into more highly reactive compounds capable of causing cellular damage. Therefore it is hypothesized that inhibition of QR2 in certain cases may lead to protection of cells against these highly reactive species. Since melatonin is known to inhibit QR2 activity, but its binding site and mode of inhibition are not known, we determined the mechanism of inhibition of QR2 by melatonin and a series of melatonin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) analogues, and we determined the X-ray structures of melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin in complex with QR2 to between 1.5 and 1.8 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) resolution. Finally, the thermodynamic binding constants for melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin were determined by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry). The kinetic results indicate that melatonin is a competitive inhibitor against N-methyldihydronicotinamide (K{sub i} = 7.2 {mu}M) and uncompetitive against menadione (K{sub i} = 92 {mu}M), and the X-ray structures shows that melatonin binds in multiple orientations within the active sites of the QR2 dimer as opposed to an allosteric site. These results provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of melatonin and analogues to QR2.

  7. High-resolution sedimentary effects of post-Little Ice Age glacial recession in Hornsund (Svalbard) - insights from chirp and core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiczak, Aleksander; Szczuciński, Witold; Moskalik, Mateusz; Forwick, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    As a result of global warming from the end of the Little Ice Age a fast withdrawal and loss of mass of many glaciers have been observed. The retreat has been particularly rapid in case of tidewater glaciers of Spitsbergen, where in an effect a new bays were formed and serve as glaciomarine sediment accumulation areas. The new depocenters in emerging bays are characterized by high sediment accumulation rates. Analysis and quantitative assessment of the processes occurring in these bays can enhance a better understanding of the dynamics of glaciers recession and bio-geochemical processes occurring in the fjords. This is particularly important because the subpolar fjords may be important storage for organic carbon on a global scale (Smith at al. 2015). In order to obtain a detailed high-resolution record of sedimentation history in the post Little Ice Age bays, 30 gravity cores and 18 box cores were collected along with detail seism acoustic surveys (Chirp) during three cruises on board of R/V Helmar Hansen in 2007, 2014 and 2015. The sediment cores revealed two major types of sediments: subglacial till and overlying laminated glacimarine mud with abundant ice rafted debris. The sediment accumulation rate of the latter is estimated to be on average in order of 1 to 5 cm per year. The periods of increase ice rafting are likely related to surge events. The dense Chirp survey grid spatial changeability in the post-Little Ice Age sediment cover. The amount and lithology of sediments in different parts of the bays also helped to link glacier dynamics with sedimentary effect. Our results confirms that despite similarities in lithology there are significant differences in sediment accumulation rates, probably driven by changes in accommodation spaces and sediment delivery. The record is also affected by effects of glacier surges. However, analyses of historical data enhanced the interpretation of sedimentary record and provide hints to identify the specific processes and

  8. Effect of angstrom-scale surface roughness on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Shreya; Ganesan, Ramakrishnan; Gaur, Nikita; Saifullah, Mohammad S. M.; Hussain, Hazrat; Yang, Hyunsoo; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly of block copolymers has been identified as a potential candidate for high density fabrication of nanostructures. However, the factors affecting its reliability and reproducibility as a patterning technique on various kinds of surfaces are not well-established. Studies pertaining to block copolymer self-assembly have been confined to ultra-flat substrates without taking into consideration the effect of surface roughness. Here, we show that a slight change in the angstrom-scale roughness arising from the surface of a material creates a profound effect on the self-assembly of polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane block copolymer. Its self-assembly was found to be dependent on both the root mean square roughness (Rrms) of the surface and the type of solvent annealing system used. It was observed that surface with Rrms< 5.0 Å showed self-assembly. Above this value, the kinetic hindrance posed by the surface roughness on the block copolymer leads to its conforming to the surface without observable phase separation. PMID:22943003

  9. MODERN WAR AND THE UTILITY OF FORCE: CHALLENGES, METHODS AND STRATEGY/Jan Angstrom and Isabelle Duyvesteyn (Eds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Louw

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The utility of military force in general, and that of military forces in particular, has been the subject of much debate since the end of the Cold War in 1989.  At the same time, as the threat and incidence of state-on-state war receded, along with its associated conventional force strategies, structures and doctrine, governments were increasingly calling upon their armed forces to carry out missions that they were not trained and equipped for.  These tasks included peace support, state-building, humanitarian aid, counter-insurgency and counter-terrorism, all of which engendered a plethora of arguments pointing to a new paradigm of war.  The Utility of Force, produced by General Sir Rupert Smith in 2005, is still one of the seminal works in this regard – and the ideas contained therein stand central to the arguments contained in Angstrom and Duyvesteyn’s book.  Since the latter is concurrently a critique, an elaboration and a validation of Smith’s tome, one should preferably have read The Utility of Force before tackling Modern War.  This is not essential, though: Modern War is perfectly able to stand on its own, especially since it targets those academics that would be conversant with its main themes anyway.

  10. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  11. Insight Into the Radical Mechanism of Phycocyanobilin-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase (Pcya) Revealed By X-Ray Crystallography And Biochemical Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, S.-L.; Rockwell, N.; Lagarias, J.C.; Fisher, A.J.; /Inst. Plant Microb. Biol., Taipei /UC, Davis

    2007-07-13

    The X-ray crystal structure of the substrate-free form of phycocyanobilin (PCB)-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA; EC 1.3.7.5) from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 has been solved at 2.5 angstrom resolution. A comparative analysis of this structure with those recently reported for substrate-bound and substrate-free forms of PcyA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Hagiwara et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 27-32; Hagiwara et al. (2006) FEBS Lett. 580, 3823-3828) provides a compelling picture of substrate-induced changes in the PcyA enzyme and the chemical basis of PcyA's catalytic activity. On the basis of these structures and the biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants of Nostoc PcyA, including mutants reported in recent studies (Tu et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3127-3136) as well as mutants described in this study, a revised mechanism for the PcyA-mediated four-electron reduction of biliverdin IX{alpha} to 3E/3Z-phycocyanobilin via enzyme-bound bilin radical intermediates is proposed. The mechanistic insight of these studies, along with homology modeling, have provided new insight into the catalytic mechanisms of other members of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family that are widespread in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  12. X-ray structure of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at atomic resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, RA; Rozeboom, HJ; Kalk, KH; Murshudov, GN; Wilson, KS; Dijkstra, BW

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation and a CCD camera, X-ray data have been collected from wild-type bovine pancreatic phospholipase A(2) at 100 K to 0.97 Angstrom resolution allowing full anisotropic refinement. The final model has a conventional R factor of 9.44% for all reflections, with a mean standard u

  13. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution withinteratomic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2007-11-09

    A study of the accurate electron density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution, better than {approx} 1.0 {angstrom}, requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8-1.0 {angstrom}, the number of experimental data is insufficient for the full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark datasets gave results comparable in quality with results of multipolar refinement and superior of those for conventional models. Applications to several datasets of both small- and macro-molecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  14. Structural basis of transcription: RNA polymerase II at 2.8 Ångstrom resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, P; Bushnell, D; Kornberg, R

    2001-01-01

    Structures of a 10-subunit yeast RNA polymerase II have been derived from two crystal forms at 2.8 and 3.1 angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals a division of the polymerase into four mobile modules, including a clamp, shown previously to swing over the active center. In the 2.8 angstrom structure, the clamp is in an open state, allowing entry of straight promoter DNA for the initiation of transcription. Three loops extending from the clamp may play roles in RNA unwinding ...

  15. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  16. Crystal structure of Manduca sexta prophenoloxidase provides insights into the mechanism of type 3 copper enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo; Deng, Junpeng; (OKLU)

    2010-02-22

    Arthropod phenoloxidase (PO) generates quinones and other toxic compounds to sequester and kill pathogens during innate immune responses. It is also involved in wound healing and other physiological processes. Insect PO is activated from its inactive precursor, prophenoloxidase (PPO), by specific proteolysis via a serine protease cascade. Here, we report the crystal structure of PPO from a lepidopteran insect at a resolution of 1.97 {angstrom}, which is the initial structure for a PPO from the type 3 copper protein family. Manduca sexta PPO is a heterodimer consisting of 2 homologous polypeptide chains, PPO1 and PPO2. The active site of each subunit contains a canonical type 3 di-nuclear copper center, with each copper ion coordinated with 3 structurally conserved histidines. The acidic residue Glu-395 located at the active site of PPO2 may serve as a general base for deprotonation of monophenolic substrates, which is key to the ortho-hydroxylase activity of PO. The structure provides unique insights into the mechanism by which type 3 copper proteins differ in their enzymatic activities, albeit sharing a common active center. A drastic change in electrostatic surface induced on cleavage at Arg-51 allows us to propose a model for localized PPO activation in insects.

  17. Insights into the physical chemistry of materials from advances in HAADF-STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Timothy J; Zhou, Wu; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2015-02-14

    The observation that, "New tools lead to new science"[P. S. Weiss, ACS Nano., 2012, 6(3), 1877-1879], is perhaps nowhere more evident than in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Advances in STEM have endowed this technique with several powerful and complimentary capabilities. For example, the application of high-angle annular dark-field imaging has made possible real-space imaging at sub-angstrom resolution with Z-contrast (Z = atomic number). Further advances have wrought: simultaneous real-space imaging and elemental identification by using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); 3-dimensional (3D) mapping by depth sectioning; monitoring of surface diffusion by time-sequencing of images; reduced electron energy imaging for probing graphenes; etc. In this paper we review how these advances, often coupled with first-principles theory, have led to interesting and important new insights into the physical chemistry of materials. We then review in detail a few specific applications that highlight some of these STEM capabilities.

  18. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  19. Atomic resolution 3D electron diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; O' Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-03-01

    Electron lens aberration is the major barrier limiting the resolution of electron microscopy. Here we describe a novel form of electron microscopy to overcome electron lens aberration. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a 2 x 2 x 2 unit cell nano-crystal (framework of LTA [Al12Si12O48]8) can be ab initio determined at the resolution of 1 Angstrom from a series of simulated noisy diffraction pattern projections with rotation angles ranging from -70 degrees to +70 degrees in 5 degrees increments along a single rotation axis. This form of microscopy (which we call 3D electron diffraction microscopy) does not require any reference waves, and can image the 3D structure of nanocrystals, as well as non-crystalline biological and materials science samples, with the resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction.

  20. The 1.25 Å resolution structure of phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javid-Majd, Farah; Yang, Dong; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

    2008-06-23

    Phosphoribosyl-ATP pyrophosphohydrolase is the second enzyme in the histidine-biosynthetic pathway, irreversibly hydrolyzing phosphoribosyl-ATP to phosphoribosyl-AMP and pyrophosphate. It is encoded by the hisE gene, which is present as a separate gene in many bacteria and archaea but is fused to hisI in other bacteria, fungi and plants. Because of its essentiality for growth in vitro, HisE is a potential drug target for tuberculosis. The crystal structures of two native (uncomplexed) forms of HisE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been determined to resolutions of 1.25 and 1.79 {angstrom}. The structure of the apoenzyme reveals that the protein is composed of five -helices with connecting loops and is a member of the {alpha}-helical nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily. The biological unit of the protein is a homodimer, with an active site on each subunit composed of residues exclusively from that subunit. A comparison with the Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase active site allowed the identification of putative metal- and substrate-binding sites in HisE, including four conserved glutamate and glutamine residues in the sequence that are consistent with a motif for pyrophosphohydrolase activity. However, significant differences between family members are observed in the loop region between {alpha}-helices H1 and H3. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis HisE provides insights into possible mechanisms of substrate binding and the diversity of the nucleoside-triphosphate pyrophosphatase superfamily.

  1. Performance of the Angstrom-Prescott Model (A-P) and SVM and ANN techniques to estimate daily global solar irradiation in Botucatu/SP/Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maurício Bruno Prado; Francisco Escobedo, João; Juliana Rossi, Taiza; dos Santos, Cícero Manoel; da Silva, Sílvia Helena Modenese Gorla

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the comparative study of different methods for estimating daily global solar irradiation (H): Angstrom-Prescott (A-P) model and two Machine Learning techniques (ML) - Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The H database was measured from 1996 to 2011 in Botucatu/SP/Brazil. Different combinations of input variables were adopted. MBE, RMSE, d Willmott, r and r2 statistical indicators obtained in the validation of A-P and SVM and ANN models showed that: SVM technique has better performance in estimating H than A-P and ANN models. A-P model has better performance in estimating H than ANN.

  2. Structure of the CED-4-CED-9 Complex Provides Insights into Programmed Cell Death in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan,N.; Chai, J.; Lee, E.; Gu, L.; Liu, Q.; He, J.; Wu, J.; Kokel, D.; Li, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Interplay among four genes-egl-1, ced-9, ced-4 and ced-3-controls the onset of programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Activation of the cell-killing protease CED-3 requires CED-4. However, CED-4 is constitutively inhibited by CED-9 until its release by EGL-1. Here we report the crystal structure of the CED-4-CED-9 complex at 2.6 Angstrom resolution, and a complete reconstitution of the CED-3 activation pathway using homogeneous proteins of CED-4, CED-9 and EGL-1. One molecule of CED-9 binds to an asymmetric dimer of CED-4, but specifically recognizes only one of the two CED-4 molecules. This specific interaction prevents CED-4 from activating CED-3. EGL-1 binding induces pronounced conformational changes in CED-9 that result in the dissociation of the CED-4 dimer from CED-9. The released CED-4 dimer further dimerizes to form a tetramer, which facilitates the autoactivation of CED-3. Together, our studies provide important insights into the regulation of cell death activation in C. elegans.

  3. Angstrom resolved imaging of charge percolation through the interface between phosphorous doped crystalline silicon and silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambal, Kapildep; Rahe, Philipp; Williams, Clayton C.; Boehme, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Using a high resolution (~100fm/√{ Hz} spectral noise density) scanning probe at T ~4K, we measure currents through the interface between phosphorus doped ([P] ~ 1017-10qualitatively distinct I-V responses, each of which is identified with charge percolation from P donors to the cantilever either with or without different kinds of silicon dangling bond involvement. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation, Major Research Instrumentation Program #0959328.

  4. The shallow structure of the 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake fault-system (Italy): new insights from integrated high-resolution refraction tomography and detailed geologic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Fabio; Improta, Luigi; Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The 6 April 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy) was caused by the Paganica Fault, which belongs to a ~20 km long network of normal faults (Paganica-San Demetrio Fault System, PSDFS). The hangingwall of the PSDFS hosts a wide Quaternary continental basin (Middle Aterno valley) with complex geometry, structural setting and sedimentary evolution. Before the 2009 earthquake, the shallow crustal structure in the epicentral area was poorly known. Here, we report results of a 2-D high-resolution seismic investigation carried out in 2010 in the NE portion of the basin, across the Paganica Fault, in a challenging urban environment. The survey consisted of 5 dense wide-aperture seismic profiles that run NE-SW for a total length of 8 km. Around 80,000 hand-picked first-arrival traveltimes were input to a non-linear multi-scale tomographic inversion. The merged profiles allow depicting a reliable cross-section of the Middle Aterno basin down to ~300 m depth. In addition, we show for the first time P-wave velocity images across the causative fault of the 6 April 2009 earthquake. Interpretation of the Vp tomograms is constrained by a few drillings and by results of a detailed geologic survey. We interpret low-Vp regions (1500-2000 m/s) as lacustrine sediments and higher Vp bodies (Vp up to 3000 m/s) as coarse fluvial and alluvial fan deposits sited above a Meso-Cenozoic carbonate substratum (Vp >3500-4000 m/s) that shows a very irregular morphology. The improved knowledge of the Middle Aterno valley geological setting together with new tomographic Vp images yield new insights on the buried structure and long-term evolution of two small basins (Bazzano and Paganica basins) crossed by the seismic lines. In particular, the Paganica basin developed since Early-Middle Pleistocene due to the Paganica SW-dipping master fault and its splays. Seismic imaging revealed that the basin infill consists almost exclusively of coarse alluvial fan deposits. We were able to detect 2

  5. Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is accredited by the South African National Department of Higher ... Relevance of traditional methods of conflict resolution in the justice systems in Africa ... in South Africa and China: Evidence from the application of governance theory ...

  6. Consumer Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JANKOT

    2004-01-01

    Fang Jun, the head of consumer and market insights of Unilever Shanghai, has summarized his early life as a market in two sentences: rush about to study market changes;act all day to observe consumer behavior. And now?"Tell stories, conduct interviews and piece together different data; calculate numbers,build models and write reports."

  7. Limitation of the Use of the Absorption Angstrom Exponent for Source Apportionment of Equivalent Black Carbon: a Case Study from the North West Indo-Gangetic Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Saryu; Chandra, Boggarapu Praphulla; Sinha, Vinayak; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Gros, Valerie; Sinha, Baerbel

    2016-01-19

    Angstrom exponent measurements of equivalent black carbon (BCeq) have recently been introduced as a novel tool to apportion the contribution of biomass burning sources to the BCeq mass. The BCeq is the mass of ideal BC with defined optical properties that, upon deposition on the aethalometer filter tape, would cause equal optical attenuation of light to the actual PM2.5 aerosol deposited. The BCeq mass hence is identical to the mass of the total light-absorbing carbon deposited on the filter tape. Here, we use simultaneously collected data from a seven-wavelength aethalometer and a high-sensitivity proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer installed at a suburban site in Mohali (Punjab), India, to identify a number of biomass combustion plumes. The identified types of biomass combustion include paddy- and wheat-residue burning, leaf litter, and garbage burning. Traffic plumes were selected for comparison. We find that the combustion efficiency, rather than the fuel used, determines αabs, and consequently, the αabs can be ∼1 for flaming biomass combustion and >1 for older vehicles that operate with poorly optimized engines. Thus, the absorption angstrom exponent is not representative of the fuel used and, therefore, cannot be used as a generic tracer to constrain source contributions.

  8. A strong emission line near 24.8 angstrom in the X-ray binary system MAXI J0556--332: gravitational redshift or unusual donor?

    CERN Document Server

    Maitra, Dipankar; Raymond, John C; Reynolds, Mark T

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of a strong emission line near 24.8 angstrom (0.5 keV) in the newly discovered X-ray binary system MAXI J0556-332 with the reflection grating spectrometer onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. The X-ray light curve morphology during these observations is complex and shows occasional dipping behavior. Here we present time- and rate-selected spectra from the RGS and show that this strong emission line is unambiguously present in all the XMM observations. The measured line center is consistent with the Ly-alpha transition of N VII in the rest frame. While the spectra contain imprints of absorption lines and edges, there appear to be no other significantly prominent narrow line due to the source itself, thus making the identification of the 24.8 angstrom line uncertain. We discuss possible physical scenarios, including a gravitationally redshifted O VIII Ly-alpha line originating at the surface of a neutron star or an unusual donor with an extremely high N/O abundance (>57) relative to solar...

  9. Self-referenced coherent diffraction x-ray movie of Angstrom- and femtosecond-scale atomic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Hartsock, R; Kozina, M; Minitti, M P; Nelson, S; Robinson, J; Sato, T; van Driel, T; Welch, G; Weninger, C; Zhi, D; Bucksbaum, P H

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from laser-excited molecular iodine are used to create a movie of intramolecular motion with time and space resolution of $30~$fs and $0.3$ \\AA . The high spatial fidelity is due to interference between the moving excitation and the static initial charge distribution. This x-ray interference has not been employed to image internal motion in molecules before. The initial state is used as the local oscillator for heterodyne amplification of the excited charge distribution to retrieve real-space movies of atomic motion on \\AA ngstrom and femtosecond scales. Coherent vibrational motion and dispersion, dissociation, and rotational dephasing are all clearly visible in the data, thereby demonstrating the stunning sensitivity of heterodyne methods.

  10. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  11. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol mixtures—whether dominated by dust, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, sea salt, or mixtures of them—complicate the retrieval of remotely sensed aerosol properties from satellites and possibly increase the uncertainty of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Major aerosol source regions in South Asia include the Thar Desert as well as agricultural lands, Himalayan foothills, and large urban centers in and near the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Over India and Pakistan, seasonal changes in meteorology, including the monsoon (June-September), significantly affect the transport, lifetime, and type of aerosols. Strong monsoonal winds can promote long range transport of dust resulting in mixtures of dust and carbonaceous aerosols, while more stagnant synoptic conditions (e.g., November-January) can prolong the occurrence of urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, or mixtures of them over the IGP. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer data are analyzed to show the aerosol optical depth (AOD) seasonality and aerosol dominant mixing states. The Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) relationship has been shown to provide sound clustering of dominant aerosol types using long term AERONET site data near known source regions [Giles et al., 2012]. In this study, aerosol type partitioning using the SSA (440 nm) and EAE (440-870 nm) relationship is further developed to quantify the occurrence of Dust, Mixed (e.g., dust and carbonaceous aerosols), Urban/Industrial (U/I) pollution, and Biomass Burning (BB) smoke. Based on EAE thresholds derived from the cluster analysis (for AOD440nm>0.4), preliminary results (2001-2010) for Kanpur, India, show the overall contributions of each dominant particle type (rounded to the nearest 10%): 10% for Dust (EAE≤0.25), 60% for Mixed (0.251.25). In the IGP, BB aerosols may have varying sizes (e.g., corresponding to 1.2

  12. On the Lack of Correlation Between Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom and Lyman alpha Emission in Lensed Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Jane Rebecca; Bayliss, M. B.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Wuyts, E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the Mg II 2796, 2803 Angstrom, Lyman alpha, and nebular line emission in five bright star-forming galaxies at 1.66 less than z less than 1.91 that have been gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxy clusters. All five galaxies show prominent Mg II emission and absorption in a P Cygni profile. We find no correlation between the equivalent widths of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission. The Mg II emission has a broader range of velocities than do the nebular emission line profiles; the Mg II emission is redshifted with respect to systemic by 100 to 200 km s(exp-1). When present, Lyman alpha is even more redshifted. The reddest components of Mg II and Lyman alpha emission have tails to 500-600 km s(exp-1), implying a strong outflow. The lack of correlation in the Mg II and Lyman alpha equivalent widths, the differing velocity profiles, and the high ratios of Mg II to nebular line fluxes together suggest that the bulk of Mg II emission does not ultimately arise as nebular line emission, but may instead be reprocessed stellar continuum emission.

  13. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  14. Coordinated Observations of X-ray and High-Resolution EUV Active Region Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The recently-launched High-resolution Coronal imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket provided the highest resolution images of coronal loops and other small-scale structures in the 193 Angstrom passband to date. With just 5 minutes of observations, the instrument recorded a variety of dynamic coronal events -- including even a small B-class flare. We will present our results comparing these extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations with X-ray imaging from Hinode/XRT as well as EUV AIA data to identify sources of hot plasma rooted in the photosphere and track their affect on the overall topology and dynamics of the active region.

  15. Resolution propositions; Proposition de resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    To put a resolution to the meeting in relation with the use of weapons made of depleted uranium is the purpose of this text. The situation of the use of depleted uranium by France during the Gulf war and other recent conflicts will be established. This resolution will give the most strict recommendations face to the eventual sanitary and environmental risks in the use of these kind of weapons. (N.C.)

  16. Seismic attribute detection of faults and fluid pathways within an active strike-slip shear zone: New insights from high-resolution 3D P-Cable™ seismic data along the Hosgri Fault, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluesner, Jared; Brothers, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Poststack data conditioning and neural-network seismic attribute workflows are used to detect and visualize faulting and fluid migration pathways within a 13.7 km2 13.7 km2 3D P-Cable™ seismic volume located along the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California. The high-resolution 3D volume used in this study was collected in 2012 as part of Pacific Gas and Electric’s Central California Seismic Imaging Project. Three-dimensional seismic reflection data were acquired using a triple-plate boomer source (1.75 kJ) and a short-offset, 14-streamer, P-Cable system. The high-resolution seismic data were processed into a prestack time-migrated 3D volume and publically released in 2014. Postprocessing, we employed dip-steering (dip and azimuth) and structural filtering to enhance laterally continuous events and remove random noise and acquisition artifacts. In addition, the structural filtering was used to enhance laterally continuous edges, such as faults. Following data conditioning, neural-network based meta-attribute workflows were used to detect and visualize faults and probable fluid-migration pathways within the 3D seismic volume. The workflow used in this study clearly illustrates the utility of advanced attribute analysis applied to high-resolution 3D P-Cable data. For example, results from the fault attribute workflow reveal a network of splayed and convergent fault strands within an approximately 1.3 km wide shear zone that is characterized by distinctive sections of transpressional and transtensional dominance. Neural-network chimney attribute calculations indicate that fluids are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones. These results provide high-resolution, 3D constraints on the relationships between strike-slip fault mechanics, substrate deformation, and fluid migration along an active

  17. Towards an Accurate Orbital Calibration of Late Miocene Climate Events: Insights From a High-Resolution Chemo- and Magnetostratigraphy (8-6 Ma) from Equatorial Pacific IODP Sites U1337 and U1338

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, A. J.; Westerhold, T.; Frederichs, T.; Wilkens, R.; Channell, J. E. T.; Evans, H. F.; Hodell, D. A.; John, C. M.; Lyle, M. W.; Roehl, U.; Tian, J.

    2015-12-01

    In the 8-6 Ma interval, the late Miocene is characterised by a long-term -0.3 ‰ reduction in benthic foraminiferal δ18O and distinctive short-term δ18O cycles, possibly related to dynamic Antarctic ice sheet variability. In addition, the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (LMCIS) marks a permanent long-term -1 ‰ shift in oceanic δ13CDIC, which is the largest, long-term perturbation in the global marine carbon cycle since the mid Miocene Monterey excursion. Accurate age control is crucial to investigate the origin of the δ18O cyclicity and determine the precise onset of the LMCIS. The current Geological Time Scale in the 8-6 Ma interval is constructed using astronomical tuning of sedimentary cycles in Mediterranean outcrops. However, outside of the Mediterranean, a comparable high-resolution chemo-, magneto-, and cyclostratigraphy at a single DSDP/ODP/IODP site does not exist. Generating an accurate astronomically-calibrated chemo- and magneto-stratigraphy in the 8-6 Ma interval became possible with retrieval of equatorial Pacific IODP Sites U1337 and U1338, as both sites have sedimentation rates ~2 cm/kyr, high biogenic carbonate content, and magnetic polarity stratigraphies. Here we present high-resolution correlation of Sites U1337 and U1338 using Milankovitch-related cycles in core images and X-ray fluorescence core scanning data. By combining inclination and declination data from ~400 new discrete samples with shipboard measurements, we are able to identify 14 polarity reversals at Site U1337 from the young end of Chron C3An.1n (~6.03 Ma) to the onset of Chron C4n.2n (~8.11 Ma). New high-resolution (<1.5 kyr) stable isotope records from Site U1337 correlate highly with Site U1338 records, enabling construction of a high-resolution stack. Initial orbital tuning of the U1337-U1338 records show that the δ18O cyclicity is obliquity driven, indicating high-latitude climate forcing. The LMCIS starts ~7.55 Ma and is anchored in Chron C4n.1n, which is

  18. Insights into the relationship between the haem-binding pocket and the redox potential of c6 cytochromes: four atomic resolution structures of c6 and c6-like proteins from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, Wojciech; Krzywda, Szymon; Zatwarnicki, Pawel; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Kolesinski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    The structure of cytochrome c6C from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 has been determined at 1.03 Å resolution. This is the first structural report on the recently discovered cyanobacterial cytochrome c6-like proteins found in marine and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Despite high similarity in the overall three-dimensional fold between cytochromes c6 and c6C, the latter shows saliently different electrostatic properties in terms of surface charge distribution and dipole moments. Its midpoint redox potential is less than half of the value for typical c6 cytochromes and results mainly from the substitution of one residue in the haem pocket. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of mutants of both cytochromes c6 and c6C are presented, and the impact of the mutation of specific residues in the haem-binding pocket on the redox potential is discussed. These findings contribute to the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of c6-like cytochromes.

  19. Hardness measures and resolution lower bounds

    OpenAIRE

    Beyersdorff, Olaf; Kullmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Various "hardness" measures have been studied for resolution, providing theoretical insight into the proof complexity of resolution and its fragments, as well as explanations for the hardness of instances in SAT solving. In this report we aim at a unified view of a number of hardness measures, including different measures of width, space and size of resolution proofs. We also extend these measures to all clause-sets (possibly satisfiable).

  20. Unified characterisations of resolution hardness measures

    OpenAIRE

    Beyersdorff, O; Kullmann, O.

    2014-01-01

    Various "hardness" measures have been studied for resolution, providing theoretical insight into the proof complexity of resolution and its fragments, as well as explanations for the hardness of instances in SAT solving. In this paper we aim at a unified view of a number of hardness measures, including different measures of width, space and size of resolution proofs. Our main contribution is a unified game-theoretic characterisation of these measures. As consequences we obtain new relations b...

  1. Conflict Resolution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and shift the focus more to the social impact of growth ana away from growth .... Perspectives on, and approaches towards, conflict and conflict resolution .... transformation, and changes in values and ethical approaches (such as nepotism ... education, life expectancy, employment, childbirth survival and similar indica-.

  2. Atomic resolution crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 from Vibrio cholerae O395: Insights into a novel mode of dimerization in the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Seema; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya, E-mail: udayaditya.sen@saha.ac.in

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • VcLMWPTP-1 forms dimer in solution. • The dimer is catalytically active unlike other reported dimeric LMWPTPs. • The formation of extended dimeric surface excludes the active site pocket. • The surface bears closer resemblance to eukaryotic LMWPTPs. - Abstract: Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) is a group of phosphotyrosine phosphatase ubiquitously found in a wide range of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Dimerization in the LMWPTP family has been reported earlier which follows a common mechanism involving active site residues leading to an enzymatically inactive species. Here we report a novel form of dimerization in a LMWPTP from Vibrio cholera 0395 (VcLMWPTP-1). Studies in solution reveal the existence of the dimer in solution while kinetic study depicts the active form of the enzyme. This indicates that the mode of dimerization in VcLMWPTP-1 is different from others where active site residues are not involved in the process. A high resolution (1.45 Å) crystal structure of VcLMWPTP-1 confirms a different mode of dimerization where the active site is catalytically accessible as evident by a tightly bound substrate mimicking ligand, MOPS at the active site pocket. Although being a member of a prokaryotic protein family, VcLMWPTP-1 structure resembles very closely to LMWPTP from a eukaryote, Entamoeba histolytica. It also delineates the diverse surface properties around the active site of the enzyme.

  3. High Resolution LC-MSn Fragmentation Pattern of Palytoxin as Template to Gain New Insights into Ovatoxin-a Structure. The Key Role of Calcium in MS Behavior of Palytoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciminiello, Patrizia; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Dello Iacovo, Emma; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Forino, Martino; Grauso, Laura; Tartaglione, Luciana

    2012-05-01

    Palytoxin is a potent marine toxin and one of the most complex natural compounds ever described. A number of compounds identified as palytoxin congeners (e.g., ovatoxins, mascarenotoxins, ostreocins, etc.) have not been yet structurally elucidated due to lack of pure material in quantities sufficient to an NMR-based structural investigation. In this study, the complex fragmentation pattern of palytoxin in its positive high resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectra (HR LC-MSn) was interpreted. Under the used conditions, the molecule underwent fragmentation at many sites of its backbone, and a large number of diagnostic fragment ions were identified. The natural product itself was used with no need for derivatization. Interestingly, most of the fragments contained calcium in their elemental formula. Evidence for palytoxin tendency to form adduct ions with calcium and other divalent cations in its mass spectra was obtained. Fragmentation pattern of palytoxin was used as template to gain detailed structural information on ovatoxin-a, the main toxin produced by Ostreopsis ovata, (observe correct font) a benthic dinoflagellate that currently represents the major harmful algal bloom threat in the Mediterranean area. Either the regions or the specific sites where ovatoxin-a and palytoxin structurally differ have been identified.

  4. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  5. The role of meltwater variability in modulating diurnal to inter-annual ice-sheet flow: New insights from a ~decade of high-temporal resolution GPS observations on the western Greenland margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L. A.; Behn, M. D.; Das, S. B.; Joughin, I.; van den Broeke, M.; Herring, T.; McGuire, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Meltwater-driven processes across the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet are controlled by seasonal fluxes as well as shorter-term variability in surface melt. Few high-temporal resolution GPS observations of ice-sheet flow extend for longer than a couple years, limiting multiyear analyses of seasonal variability in ice-sheet flow. Using a small GPS network installed at ~1000-m above sea level (m a.s.l.) operating from 2006-2014, and supplemented with a larger array of 20 GPS stations installed from 2011­-2014, we observe nine years of ice-sheet surface motion on the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The GPS array spans a horizontal distance of 30 km across an elevation range of 700-1250 m a.s.l., and captures the ice-sheet's velocity response to the seasonal melt cycle. By combining the GPS array measurements with temperature, precipitation, and runoff estimates from the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO), we examine the relationship between ice-sheet flow and surface melt variability both at the seasonal scale (i.e., during melt onset, summer melt season and melt cessation) as well as during transient high melt periods such as precipitation events, anomalously high melt episodes, and supraglacial lake drainages. We observe varying surface motion following early versus late summer extended melt events, with early-season extended melt events inducing longer sustained speed-up than late summer events. We also examine differences in the timing of melt onset and magnitude, comparing the anomalously high runoff observed across the ice sheet in 2010 and 2012 against the average to low runoff observed in the years comprising the remainder of the record. This nearly decadal record improves our understanding of the role of meltwater variability in modulating ice-sheet flow on diurnal to inter-annual timescales.

  6. Pathways of geomorphic evolution of sandstone escarpments in the Góry Stołowe tableland (SW Poland) - Insights from LiDAR-based high-resolution DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migoń, Piotr; Kasprzak, Marek

    2016-05-01

    The tableland of the Stołowe Mountains (SW Poland), with its prominent mesas and sandstone-capped escarpments, belongs to the most spectacular geomorphic landscapes of Central Europe. While the gross morphological features of the area have long been recognized, the evolutionary pathways of densely forested and poorly accessible escarpment slopes remained poorly understood. In this paper we use LiDAR data to shed a new light on landform inventories within the escarpments, their spatial patterns and, using process-from-form reasoning, on the longer-term evolution of the escarpments. Four sites, two on each major escarpment, have been subject to detailed analysis which involved examination of shaded relief, slope, plan and profile curvature and topographic wetness index. In each case, the 1 × 1 m model was used, while for the most complex site at Mt. Szczeliniec Wielki the results were compared with the 5 × 5 m model to check the impact of model resolution on geomorphic interpretation. Despite some loss of information involved in model re-interpolation to the coarser scale, the main features of escarpment morphology could still be recognized. On the other hand, automatic landform classification based on the calculation of Topographic Position Index from the 10 × 10 m model and performed for the entire tableland failed to reveal differences between various sections of the escarpments, detectable on finer models. The analysis of spatial patterns of minor landforms within the escarpments, identified on LiDAR-derived models shows that no single pathway of escarpment evolution exists. Both the upper slopes (in sandstone caprock) and the mid-slopes (in weaker rocks) show signs of instability and these are not necessarily coupled. Large-scale caprock failures do occur but seem rare and localized. Sandstone free faces are rather subject to continuous slow retreat by detachment of individual joint-bound blocks. Another zone of instability occurs well below the caprock and

  7. Unary resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, Clément; Bagnol, Marc; Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of the cut-elimination procedure of linear logic known as the geometry of interaction . This framework is restricted to terms (logic programs, rewriting rules) using only unary symbols, and this restriction is shown to be complete for polynomial time computation by encoding pushdown automata. Soundness w......We give a characterization of deterministic polynomial time computation based on an algebraic structure called the resolution semiring, whose elements can be understood as logic programs or sets of rewriting rules over first-order terms. This construction stems from an interactive interpretation...

  8. Kohler's Insight Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholtz, George

    1985-01-01

    Psychology textbooks frequently present Wolfgang Kohler's two-stick experiment with chimpanzees as having demonstrated insight in learning. Studies that replicated Kohler's work support his findings but not his interpretation in terms of insightful solution. The uncritical inclusion of Kohler's insight interpretation in texts is not warranted in…

  9. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A;

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  10. Gap Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-25

    Gap Resolution is a software package that was developed to improve Newbler genome assemblies by automating the closure of sequence gaps caused by repetitive regions in the DNA. This is done by performing the follow steps:1) Identify and distribute the data for each gap in sub-projects. 2) Assemble the data associated with each sub-project using a secondary assembler, such as Newbler or PGA. 3) Determine if any gaps are closed after reassembly, and either design fakes (consensus of closed gap) for those that closed or lab experiments for those that require additional data. The software requires as input a genome assembly produce by the Newbler assembler provided by Roche and 454 data containing paired-end reads.

  11. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  12. High Resolution Structure of the ba3 Cytochrome c Oxidase from Thermus thermophilus in a Lipidic Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiefenbrunn, Theresa; Liu, Wei; Chen, Ying; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stout, C. David; Fee, James A.; Cherezov, Vadim (Scripps); (UCSD)

    2012-06-27

    The fundamental chemistry underpinning aerobic life on Earth involves reduction of dioxygen to water with concomitant proton translocation. This process is catalyzed by members of the heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily. Despite the availability of crystal structures for all types of HCO, the mode of action for this enzyme is not understood at the atomic level, namely how vectorial H{sup +} and e{sup -} transport are coupled. Toward addressing this problem, we report wild type and A120F mutant structures of the ba{sub 3}-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The enzyme has been crystallized from the lipidic cubic phase, which mimics the biological membrane environment. The structures reveal 20 ordered lipid molecules that occupy binding sites on the protein surface or mediate crystal packing interfaces. The interior of the protein encloses 53 water molecules, including 3 trapped in the designated K-path of proton transfer and 8 in a cluster seen also in A-type enzymes that likely functions in egress of product water and proton translocation. The hydrophobic O{sub 2}-uptake channel, connecting the active site to the lipid bilayer, contains a single water molecule nearest the Cu{sub B} atom but otherwise exhibits no residual electron density. The active site contains strong electron density for a pair of bonded atoms bridging the heme Fe{sub a3} and Cu{sub B} atoms that is best modeled as peroxide. The structure of ba{sub 3}-oxidase reveals new information about the positioning of the enzyme within the membrane and the nature of its interactions with lipid molecules. The atomic resolution details provide insight into the mechanisms of electron transfer, oxygen diffusion into the active site, reduction of oxygen to water, and pumping of protons across the membrane. The development of a robust system for production of ba{sub 3}-oxidase crystals diffracting to high resolution, together with an established expression system

  13. Direct determination of the lamellar structure of peripheral nerve myelin at low resolution (17 A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, T J; Worthington, C R

    1974-05-01

    New X-ray diffraction data from normal nerve and nerve swollen in glycerol solutions have been recorded. Direct methods of structure analysis have been used in the interpretation of the X-ray data, and the phases of the first five orders of diffraction of peripheral nerve myelin have been uniquely determined. The direct methods include deconvolution of the autocorrelation function, sampling theorem reconstructions, and Fourier synthesis comparisons. Electron density profiles of normal and swollen nerve myelin at a resolution of 17 A together with an electron density scale in electrons per cubic angstrom are presented.

  14. Generalized Resolution and NC—Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘叙华; 孙吉贵

    1994-01-01

    The relation between generalized resolution and NC-resolution is discussed.The proof of the completeness of NC linear resolution is then given.The incompleteness of NC lock resolution is also presented,thus the conclusion in [3] of “a simple completeness-preserving restriction” is shown to be wrong.

  15. Structural Insights into the Assembly and Function of the SAGA Deubiquitinating Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samara, Nadine L.; Datta, Ajit B.; Berndsen, Christopher E.; Zhang, Xiangbin; Yao, Tingting; Cohen, Robert E.; Wolberger, Cynthia (CSU); (JHU-MED)

    2010-08-18

    SAGA is a transcriptional coactivator complex that is conserved across eukaryotes and performs multiple functions during transcriptional activation and elongation. One role is deubiquitination of histone H2B, and this activity resides in a distinct subcomplex called the deubiquitinating module (DUBm), which contains the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp8, bound to Sgf11, Sus1, and Sgf73. The deubiquitinating activity depends on the presence of all four DUBm proteins. We report here the 1.90 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the DUBm bound to ubiquitin aldehyde, as well as the 2.45 angstrom resolution structure of the uncomplexed DUBm. The structure reveals an arrangement of protein domains that gives rise to a highly interconnected complex, which is stabilized by eight structural zinc atoms that are critical for enzymatic activity. The structure suggests a model for how interactions with the other DUBm proteins activate Ubp8 and allows us to speculate about how the DUBm binds to monoubiquitinated histone H2B in nucleosomes.

  16. A versatile high resolution scanning tunneling potentiometry implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druga, T; Wenderoth, M; Homoth, J; Schneider, M A; Ulbrich, R G

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a new scanning tunneling potentiometry technique which can-with only minor changes of the electronic setup-be easily added to any standard scanning tunneling microscope (STM). This extension can be combined with common STM techniques such as constant current imaging or scanning tunneling spectroscopy. It is capable of performing measurements of the electrochemical potential with microvolt resolution. Two examples demonstrate the versatile application. First of all, we have determined local variations of the electrochemical potential due to charge transport of biased samples down to angstrom length scales. Second, with tip and sample at different temperatures we investigated the locally varying thermovoltage occurring at the tunneling junction. Aside from its use in determining the chemical identity of substances at the sample surface our method provides a controlled way to eliminate the influence of laterally varying thermovoltages on low-bias constant current topographies.

  17. Resolution of Primary Lymphedema: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Jeremy A.; Maclellan, Reid A.; Beijnen, Usha E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Primary lymphedema is a rare, progressive disease that typically affects the lower extremity. The condition is not curable, and the limb enlarges over time because of subcutaneous fibroadipose deposition. We present a patient with clinical and radiographical evidence of resolution of primary lymphedema. This observation may provide greater insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:28280665

  18. Apo-Nitrophorin 4 at Atomic Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoia,A.; Montfort, W.

    2007-01-01

    The nitrophorins from Rhodnius prolixus, the kissing bug, are heme-containing proteins used for the transport of nitric oxide to aide the insect in obtaining a blood meal. The Rhodnius nitrophorins display an eight-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel motif, typical of lipocalins, with a histidine-linked heme in the open end of the barrel. Heme is stabilized in the ferric state and highly distorted, displaying a ruffled conformation that may be of importance in the setting of the reduction potential. To help in understanding the means by which the protein matrix, an inherently soft material, is able to distort the heme from its low-energy planar conformation, we have determined the crystal structure of apo-nitrophorin 4-1.1 Angstroms resolution. Removal of the heme from nitrophorin 4 has very little effect on its structure: The heme binding cavity remains open and the loops near the cavity entrance respond to lower pH in the same manner as the intact protein. We conclude that the general stability of the lipocalin fold and apparent rigidity of the beta-barrel provide the means for distorting the heme cofactor.

  19. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar.

  20. He of Angstroms·Mondrian’s Art and Its Impact%彼埃·蒙德里安的艺术影响探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车秀月

    2013-01-01

    蒙德里安是几何抽象画派的先驱,与德士堡等组织“风格派”,提倡自己的艺术“新造型主义”。认为艺术应根本脱离自然的外在形式,以表现抽象精神为目的,追求人与神统一的绝对境界,亦即今日我们熟知的“纯粹抽象”。蒙德里安早年画过写实的人物和风景,后来逐渐把树木的形态简化成水平与垂直线的纯粹抽象构成,从内省的深刻观感与洞察里,创造普遍的现象秩序与均衡之美。他崇拜直线美,主张透过直角可以静观万物内部的安宁。%The Mondrian is the pioneer of geometric abstract art school, and Texaco Fort organizations such as the “de Stijl”, to promote the art of “new shape”. That art should be out of the external form of the natural fundamental to the performance of the abstract spirit, the pursuit of the absolute realm of man and God unified that is, today we know the “purely abstract”. Mondrian early years of painting realistic figures and landscapes, then gradually the shape of the trees to simplify the purely abstract composition of horizontal and vertical line, where the from introspective profound perception and insight, to create a common phenomenon in order and balanced. He worship a straight line, advocated through at right angles to the contemplation of all things internal tranquility.

  1. Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Quantitatively Detects Angstrom Level Changes in the Average Radius of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules Decorated with the Microtubule-Associated-Protein Tau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myung Chul; Raviv, Uri; Needleman, Daniel J; Safinya, Cyrus R [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Li, Youli [Materials Research Laboratory, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Miller, Herbert P; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C [Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Departments, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Kim, Mahn Won, E-mail: myungchul.choi@gmail.com, E-mail: safinya@mrl.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, S. Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-01

    With the emerging proteomics era the scientific community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of self-assembling proteins. Here, our study was concerned with the effect of the microtubule-associated-protein (MAP) tau on the assembled structure of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Significantly, the synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique is able to quantitatively detect angstrom level changes in the average diameter of the microtubules modeled as a simple hollow nanotube with a fixed wall thickness. We show that the electrostatic binding of MAP tau isoforms to taxol-stabilized MTs leads to a controlled increase in the average radius of microtubules with increasing coverage of tau on the MT surface. The increase in the average diameter results from an increase in the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs upon binding of MAP tau.

  2. HRSC: High resolution stereo camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, G.; Jaumann, R.; Basilevsky, A.T.; Dumke, A.; Van Gasselt, S.; Giese, B.; Hauber, E.; Head, J. W.; Heipke, C.; Hoekzema, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Greeley, R.; Gwinner, K.; Kirk, R.; Markiewicz, W.; McCord, T.B.; Michael, G.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Murray, J.B.; Oberst, J.; Pinet, P.; Pischel, R.; Roatsch, T.; Scholten, F.; Willner, K.

    2009-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express has delivered a wealth of image data, amounting to over 2.5 TB from the start of the mapping phase in January 2004 to September 2008. In that time, more than a third of Mars was covered at a resolution of 10-20 m/pixel in stereo and colour. After five years in orbit, HRSC is still in excellent shape, and it could continue to operate for many more years. HRSC has proven its ability to close the gap between the low-resolution Viking image data and the high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images, leading to a global picture of the geological evolution of Mars that is now much clearer than ever before. Derived highest-resolution terrain model data have closed major gaps and provided an unprecedented insight into the shape of the surface, which is paramount not only for surface analysis and geological interpretation, but also for combination with and analysis of data from other instruments, as well as in planning for future missions. This chapter presents the scientific output from data analysis and highlevel data processing, complemented by a summary of how the experiment is conducted by the HRSC team members working in geoscience, atmospheric science, photogrammetry and spectrophotometry. Many of these contributions have been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals and special issues. They form a cross-section of the scientific output, either by summarising the new geoscientific picture of Mars provided by HRSC or by detailing some of the topics of data analysis concerning photogrammetry, cartography and spectral data analysis.

  3. Structural insight into the transglycosylation step of bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovering, Andrew L; de Castro, Liza H; Lim, Daniel; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2007-03-09

    Peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the polymerization step of cell-wall biosynthesis, are membrane-bound, and are highly conserved across all bacteria. Long considered the "holy grail" of antibiotic research, they represent an essential and easily accessible drug target for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We have determined the 2.8 angstrom structure of a bifunctional cell-wall cross-linking enzyme, including its transpeptidase and GT domains, both unliganded and complexed with the substrate analog moenomycin. The peptidoglycan GTs adopt a fold distinct from those of other GT classes. The structures give insight into critical features of the catalytic mechanism and key interactions required for enzyme inhibition.

  4. High range resolution micro-Doppler analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammenga, Zachary A.; Smith, Graeme E.; Baker, Christopher J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses use of the micro-Doppler effect and the use of high range-resolution profiles to observe complex targets in complex target scenes. The combination of micro-Doppler and high range-resolution provides the ability to separate the motion of complex targets from one another. This ability leads to the differentiation of targets based on their micro-Doppler signatures. Without the high-range resolution, this would not be possible because the individual signatures would not be separable. This paper also addresses the use of the micro-Doppler information and high range-resolution profiles to generate an approximation of the scattering properties of a complex target. This approximation gives insight into the structure of the complex target and, critically, is created without using a pre-determined target model.

  5. The High-Resolution Lightweight Telescope for the EUV (HiLiTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Galarce, D S; Boerner, P; Soufli, R; De Pontieu, B; Katz, N; Title, A; Gullikson, E M; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L

    2008-06-02

    The High-resolution Lightweight Telescope for the EUV (HiLiTE) is a Cassegrain telescope that will be made entirely of Silicon Carbide (SiC), optical substrates and metering structure alike. Using multilayer coatings, this instrument will be tuned to operate at the 465 {angstrom} Ne VII emission line, formed in solar transition region plasma at {approx}500,000 K. HiLiTE will have an aperture of 30 cm, angular resolution of {approx}0.2 arc seconds and operate at a cadence of {approx}5 seconds or less, having a mass that is about 1/4 that of one of the 20 cm aperture telescopes on the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This new instrument technology thus serves as a path finder to a post-AIA, Explorer-class missions.

  6. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  7. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  8. Inside PixInsight

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    In this book, Warren Keller reveals the secrets of astro-image processing software PixInsight in a practical and easy to follow manner, allowing the reader to produce stunning astrophotographs from even mediocre data. As the first comprehensive post-processing platform to be created by astro-imagers for astro-imagers, it has for many, replaced the generic graphics editors as the software of choice. With clear instructions from Keller, astrophotographers can get the most from its tools to create amazing images. Capable of complex post-processing routines, PixInsight is also an advanced pre-processing software, through which astrophotographers calibrate and stack their exposures into completed master files.This is the most comprehensive resource on PixInsight to date. With screenshots to help illustrate the process, it is a vital guide.

  9. Dreaming and insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Edwards

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years. Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996 therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams. The need to distinguish ‘aha’ experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from ‘aha’ experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared.

  10. Dreaming and insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher L; Ruby, Perrine M; Malinowski, Josie E; Bennett, Paul D; Blagrove, Mark T

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish "aha" experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from "aha" experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared.

  11. Dreaming and insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher L.; Ruby, Perrine M.; Malinowski, Josie E.; Bennett, Paul D.; Blagrove, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses claims that dreams can be a source of personal insight. Whereas there has been anecdotal backing for such claims, there is now tangential support from findings of the facilitative effect of sleep on cognitive insight, and of REM sleep in particular on emotional memory consolidation. Furthermore, the presence in dreams of metaphorical representations of waking life indicates the possibility of novel insight as an emergent feature of such metaphorical mappings. In order to assess whether personal insight can occur as a result of the consideration of dream content, 11 dream group discussion sessions were conducted which followed the Ullman Dream Appreciation technique, one session for each of 11 participants (10 females, 1 male; mean age = 19.2 years). Self-ratings of deepened self-perception and personal gains from participation in the group sessions showed that the Ullman technique is an effective procedure for establishing connections between dream content and recent waking life experiences, although wake life sources were found for only 14% of dream report text. The mean Exploration-Insight score on the Gains from Dream Interpretation questionnaire was very high and comparable to outcomes from the well-established Hill (1996) therapist-led dream interpretation method. This score was associated between-subjects with pre-group positive Attitude Toward Dreams (ATD). The need to distinguish “aha” experiences as a result of discovering a waking life source for part of a dream, from “aha” experiences of personal insight as a result of considering dream content, is discussed. Difficulties are described in designing a control condition to which the dream report condition can be compared. PMID:24550849

  12. Atomic-Resolution Structures of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase with NAD[superscript +] and Fluoroalcohols Define Strained Michaelis Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Ramaswamy, S. (inSTEM); (Iowa)

    2013-01-16

    Structures of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase complexed with NAD{sup +} and unreactive substrate analogues, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol, were determined at 100 K at 1.12 or 1.14 {angstrom} resolution, providing estimates of atomic positions with overall errors of 0.02 {angstrom}, the geometry of ligand binding, descriptions of alternative conformations of amino acid residues and waters, and evidence of a strained nicotinamide ring. The four independent subunits from the two homodimeric structures differ only slightly in the peptide backbone conformation. Alternative conformations for amino acid side chains were identified for 50 of the 748 residues in each complex, and Leu-57 and Leu-116 adopt different conformations to accommodate the different alcohols at the active site. Each fluoroalcohol occupies one position, and the fluorines of the alcohols are well-resolved. These structures closely resemble the expected Michaelis complexes with the pro-R hydrogens of the methylene carbons of the alcohols directed toward the re face of C4N of the nicotinamide rings with a C-C distance of 3.40 {angstrom}. The oxygens of the alcohols are ligated to the catalytic zinc at a distance expected for a zinc alkoxide (1.96 {angstrom}) and participate in a low-barrier hydrogen bond (2.52 {angstrom}) with the hydroxyl group of Ser-48 in a proton relay system. As determined by X-ray refinement with no restraints on bond distances and planarity, the nicotinamide rings in the two complexes are slightly puckered (quasi-boat conformation, with torsion angles of 5.9{sup o} for C4N and 4.8{sup o} for N1N relative to the plane of the other atoms) and have bond distances that are somewhat different compared to those found for NAD(P){sup +}. It appears that the nicotinamide ring is strained toward the transition state on the path to alcohol oxidation.

  13. OpenGL Insights

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Get Real-World Insight from Experienced Professionals in the OpenGL Community With OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL, real-time rendering is becoming available everywhere, from AAA games to mobile phones to web pages. Assembling contributions from experienced developers, vendors, researchers, and educators, OpenGL Insights presents real-world techniques for intermediate and advanced OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL developers. Go Beyond the Basics The book thoroughly covers a range of topics, including OpenGL 4.2 and recent extensions. It explains how to optimize for mobile devices, explores the design

  14. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  15. Outsourcing/Offshoring Insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tate, Wendy; Bals, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    Findings: Both the geographical and governance dimensions are part of the rightshoring decision which is an important conceptual foundation for this special issue, as it invited insightful pieces on all of these phenomena (e.g. outsourcing, insourcing, offshoring, reshoring), acknowledging that t...

  16. Index Conditions of Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chun Cheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the following results are proved: (1) Using both deletion strategy and lock strategy, resolution is complete for a clause set where literals with the same predicate or proposition symbol have the same index. (2) Using deletion strategy, both positive unit lock resolution and input lock resolution are complete for a Horn set where the indexes of positive literals are greater than those of negative literals. (3) Using deletion strategy, input half-lock resolution is complete for a Horn set.

  17. Airborne Multiwavelength High-Spectral-Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) Observations During TCAP 2012: Vertical Proles of Optical and Microphysical Properties of a Smoke/Urban Haze Plume Over the Northeastern Coast of the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Chemyakin, Eduard; Kolgotin, A.; Hair, John; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David; Rogers, R. R.; Hare, Rich; Cleckner, Craig; Obland, Michael; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Berg, Larry K.; Schmid, Beat

    2014-10-10

    We present rst measurements with the rst airborne multiwavelength High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2), developed by NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument was operated during the Department of Energy (DOE) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012. We observed out ow of urban haze and fresh biomass burning smoke from the East Coast of the US out over the West Atlantic Ocean. Lidar ratios at 355 and 532 nm were ... sr indicating moderately absorbing aerosols. Extinctionrelated Angstrom exponents were 1.5{2 pointing at comparably small particles. Our novel automated, unsupervised data inversion algorithm retrieves particle e*ective radii of approximately 0.2 *m, which is in agreement with the large Angstrom exponents. We nd reasonable agreement to particle size parameters obtained from situ measurements carried out with the DOE G-1 aircraft that ew during the lidar observations.

  18. High-resolution infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Charles M.

    2010-08-01

    The hands and mind of an artist are intimately involved in the creative process of image formation, intrinsically making paintings significantly more complex than photographs to analyze. In spite of this difficulty, several years ago the artist David Hockney and I identified optical evidence within a number of paintings that demonstrated artists began using optical projections as early as c1425 - nearly 175 years before Galileo - as aids for producing portions of their images. In the course of our work, Hockney and I developed insights that I have been applying to a new approach to computerized image analysis. Recently I developed and characterized a portable high resolution infrared for capturing additional information from paintings. Because many pigments are semi-transparent in the IR, in a number of cases IR photographs ("reflectograms") have revealed marks made by the artists that had been hidden under paint ever since they were made. I have used this IR camera to capture photographs ("reflectograms") of hundreds of paintings in over a dozen museums on three continents and, in some cases, these reflectograms have provided new insights into decisions the artists made in creating the final images that we see in the visible.

  19. Death: 'nothing' gives insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    According to a widely accepted belief, we cannot know our own death--death means 'nothing' to us. At first sight, the meaning of 'nothing' just implies the negation or absence of 'something'. Death then simply refers to the negation or absence of life. As a consequence, however, death has no meaning of itself. This leads to an ontological paradox in which death is both acknowledged and denied: death is … nothing. In this article, I investigate whether insight into the ontological paradox of the nothingness of death can contribute to a good end-of-life. By analysing Aquinas', Heidegger's and Derrida's understanding of death as nothingness, I explore how giving meaning to death on different ontological levels connects to, and at the same time provides resistance against, the harsh reality of death. By doing so, I intend to demonstrate that insight into the nothingness of death can count as a framework for a meaningful dealing with death.

  20. World energy insight 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    The World Energy Insight 2011 is the official publication of the World Energy Council. It includes interviews, articles and case studies from a distinguished panel of World Energy Council Officers, CEOs, government ministers, academics and opinion formers from all areas of the energy sector and provides perspectives from around the globe. Government, industry and NGO's offer both policy and technology perspectives. The insights within this publication add to the work that WEC is doing to provide the forum for energy leaders, along with the on-going WEC studies and programmes on Energy Policies, 2050 Energy Scenarios, Energy Resources & Technologies, Energy for Urban Innovation, Rules Of Energy Trade and Global Energy Access.

  1. High resolution electron diffraction analysis of structural changes associated with the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B. -G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Biophysics

    1994-04-01

    Changes in protein structure that occur during the formation of the M photointermediate of bacteriorhodopsin can be directly visualized by electron diffraction techniques. Samples containing a high percentage of the M intermediate were trapped by rapidly cooling the crystals with liquid nitrogen following illumination with filtered green light at 240K and 260K respectively. Difference Fourier projection maps for M minus bR at two temperatures and for M{sub 260K} minus M{sub 240K} are presented. While it is likely that a unique M-substate is trapped when illuminated at 260K produces a mixture of the M{sub 240K} substate and a second M-substate which may have a protein structure similar to the N-intermediate. The diffraction data clearly show that statistically significant structural changes occur upon formation of the M{sub 240K} specimen and then further upon formation of the second substate which is present in the mixture that is produced at 260K. A preliminary 3-D difference map, based on data collected with samples tilted up to 30{degree}, has been constructed at a resolution of 3.5{angstrom} parallel to the membrane plane and a resolution of 8.5{angstrom} perpendicular to the membrane. The data have been analyzed by a number of different criteria to ensure that the differences seen reflect real conformation changes at a level which is significantly above the noise in the map. Furthermore, a comparison of the positions of specific backbone and side-chain groups relative to significant difference peaks suggests that it will be necessary to further refine the atomic resolution model before it will be possible to interpret the changes in chemical structure that occur in the protein at this stage of the photocycle.

  2. Equivariant cohomology and resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The `Folk Theorem' that a smooth action by a compact Lie group can be (canonically) resolved, by iterated blow up, to have unique isotropy type is proved in the context of manifolds with corners. This procedure is shown to capture the simultaneous resolution of all isotropy types in a `resolution tower' which projects to a resolution, with iterated boundary fibration, of the quotient. Equivariant K-theory and the Cartan model for equivariant cohomology are tracked under the resolution procedure as is the delocalized equivariant cohomology of Baum, Brylinski and MacPherson. This leads to resolved models for each of these cohomology theories, in terms of relative objects over the resolution tower and hence to reduced models as flat-twisted relative objects over the resolution of the quotient. As a result an explicit equivariant Chern character is constructed, essentially as in the non-equivariant case, over the resolution of the quotient.

  3. Elastic scattering of 59.54-keV {gamma}-rays in elements with 22 {<=} Z {<=} 92 at momentum transfer 0.4 {<=} x {<=} 4.7 Angstrom{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.; Sharma, V.; Shahi, J.S.; Mehta, D.; Singha, N. [Panjab Univ., Dept. of Physics (India)

    2009-10-15

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the 59.54 keV {gamma}-rays in elements with 22 {<=} Z {<=} 92 have been measured over the angular range 10-160 degrees corresponding to the momentum transfer 0.4 {<=} x {<=} 4.7 Angstrom{sup -1}. The measurements at forward and backward angles were performed using the {sup 241}Am radioactive point-source, target and the Ge detectors in the transmission and reflection arrangements, respectively. The measured differential scattering cross sections are compared with those based on the form-factor (FF) formalism and state-of-the-art S-matrix calculations to differentiate between their relative efficacies and to check angular-dependence of the anomalous scattering factors (ASF) incorporated as correction to the modified form-factor (MF). The S-matrix values exhibit agreement with the measured data at backward angles and differences about 10% at forward angles. The scattering cross sections based on the MF including ASF's are in general lower at various angles by up to 20% for medium- and high-Z elements. The observed deviations being higher at the forward angles infer possibility of angular-dependence of ASF's. (authors)

  4. The politics of insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Carola; Cristofori, Irene; Grafman, Jordan; Beeman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that liberals and conservatives differ in cognitive style. Liberals are more flexible, and tolerant of complexity and novelty, whereas conservatives are more rigid, are more resistant to change, and prefer clear answers. We administered a set of compound remote associate problems, a task extensively used to differentiate problem-solving styles (via insight or analysis). Using this task, several researches have proven that self-reports, which differentiate between insight and analytic problem-solving, are reliable and are associated with two different neural circuits. In our research we found that participants self-identifying with distinct political orientations demonstrated differences in problem-solving strategy. Liberals solved significantly more problems via insight instead of in a step-by-step analytic fashion. Our findings extend previous observations that self-identified political orientations reflect differences in cognitive styles. More specifically, we show that type of political orientation is associated with problem-solving strategy. The data converge with previous neurobehavioural and cognitive studies indicating a link between cognitive style and the psychological mechanisms that mediate political beliefs.

  5. Helium 10830 angstrom irradiance: 1975-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.

    1984-05-01

    A fairly complete time series from late 1974 to mid-1983 is available of values of the equivalent width of the He I 10830A chromospheric spectrum line averaged over the visible solar disk. Variation from about 25 mA in 1975 to about 80 mA in late 1981 is the major component of the signal. The 10830 variation reaches minimum about a year before the sunspot minimum and reaches maximum about a year after sunspot maximum. Superposed on the solar cycle variation is a modulation of up to + or - 13 mAdu to the passage of active regions across the disk. Power spectral analysis of the time series shows a major peak at a synodic rotation period of 27.42 days and smaller peaks at 1/2, 1/4 and 1/6 of this period. The spectrum is well modeled by a basic fluctuating component with an exponentially decaying autocovariance function of scale time of 43 days. Analysis of the data indicates that the rotational modulation occurs in episodes that last from 4 to 10 rotations. These episodes arise when active regions tend to occur in a limited longitude range. The analysis also shows that the apparent rotation period increased from 1977 to 1981. The apparent rotation period since 1981 is markedly shorter.

  6. Fast Parallel Particle Methods: Angstroms to Gigaparsecs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Fast multipole methods have become an ubiquitous tool for the simulation of physical systems with long-range interactions. Since their introduction they have been applied to a vast range of problems. Our own parallel hashed oct-tree code (HOT) has been applied to a number of physical systems with long-range interactions, including gravitational and smoothed particle hydrodynamic interactions in astrophysical systems, fluid flows with vortex-particle methods, electromagnetic scattering and aerodynamics. Several these simulations were recognized with Gordon Bell prizes for significant achievement in parallel processing. We will discuss some recent work which used a series of 1-billion particle dark matter simulations to accurately determine the mass function of galaxy halos. These simulations required over 4x10^18 floating point operations (4 exaflops). Another focus of our current research is extending the HOT framework to biological systems, with the goal of simulating systems using over ten times as many atoms as the current state-of-the-art. This requires addressing several issues with current multipole algorithms, such as spatially-correlated errors and the ability to handle disparate time scales efficiently.

  7. Structure of a Bacillus halmapalus family 13 ά-amylase, BHA, in complex with an acarbose-derived nonasaccharide at 2.1 A resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies,G.; Brzozowski, A.; Dauter, Z.; Rasmussen, M.; Borchert, T.; Wilson, K.

    2005-01-01

    The enzymatic digestion of starch by {alpha}-amylases is one of the key biotechnological reactions of recent times. In the search for industrial biocatalysts, the family GH13 {alpha}-amylase BHA from Bacillus halmapalus has been cloned and expressed. The three-dimensional structure at 2.1 Angstrom resolution has been determined in complex with the (pseudo)tetrasaccharide inhibitor acarbose. Acarbose is found bound as a nonasaccharide transglycosylation product spanning the -6 to +3 subsites. Careful inspection of electron density suggests that the bound ligand could not have been formed through successive transglycosylations of acarbose and must also have featured maltose or maltooligosaccharides as an acceptor.

  8. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  9. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  10. Modeling for Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen Matthern

    2007-04-01

    System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

  11. The crystal structure of a sodium galactose transporter reveals mechanistic insights into Na[superscript +]/sugar symport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faham, S.; Watanabe, A.; Besserer, G.M.; Cascio, D.; Specht, A.; Hirayama, B.A.; Wright, E.M.; Abramson, J. (CNRS-UMR); (UCLA)

    2009-08-27

    Membrane transporters that use energy stored in sodium gradients to drive nutrients into cells constitute a major class of proteins. We report the crystal structure of a member of the solute sodium symporters (SSS), the Vibrio parahaemolyticus sodium/galactose symporter (vSGLT). The -3.0 angstrom structure contains 14 transmembrane (TM) helices in an inward-facing conformation with a core structure of inverted repeats of 5 TM helices (TM2 to TM6 and TM7 to TM11). Galactose is bound in the center of the core, occluded from the outside solutions by hydrophobic residues. Surprisingly, the architecture of the core is similar to that of the leucine transporter (LeuT) from a different gene family. Modeling the outward-facing conformation based on the LeuT structure, in conjunction with biophysical data, provides insight into structural rearrangements for active transport.

  12. The structure of the eukaryotic ribosome at 3.0 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Melnikov, Sergey; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2011-12-16

    Ribosomes translate genetic information encoded by messenger RNA into proteins. Many aspects of translation and its regulation are specific to eukaryotes, whose ribosomes are much larger and intricate than their bacterial counterparts. We report the crystal structure of the 80S ribosome from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae--including nearly all ribosomal RNA bases and protein side chains as well as an additional protein, Stm1--at a resolution of 3.0 angstroms. This atomic model reveals the architecture of eukaryote-specific elements and their interaction with the universally conserved core, and describes all eukaryote-specific bridges between the two ribosomal subunits. It forms the structural framework for the design and analysis of experiments that explore the eukaryotic translation apparatus and the evolutionary forces that shaped it.

  13. Structure of Human Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Synthetase at 2.3 Å Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj, N.; Strauss, E.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    The structure of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) synthetase was determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. PPC synthetase is a dimer with identical monomers. Some features of the monomer fold resemble a group of NAD-dependent enzymes, while other features resemble the ribokinase fold. The ATP, phosphopantothenate, and cysteine binding sites were deduced from modeling studies. Highly conserved ATP binding residues include Gly43, Ser61, Gly63, Gly66, Phe230, and Asn258. Highly conserved phosphopantothenate binding residues include Asn59, Ala179, Ala180, and Asp183 from one monomer and Arg55 from the adjacent monomer. The structure predicts a ping pong mechanism with initial formation of an acyladenylate intermediate, followed by release of pyrophosphate and attack by cysteine to form the final products PPC and AMP.

  14. Super-resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    and aerial imaging to medical image processing, to facial image analysis, text image analysis, sign and number plates reading, and biometrics recognition, to name a few. This has resulted in many research papers, each developing a new super-resolution algorithm for a specific purpose. The current......Super-resolution, the process of obtaining one or more high-resolution images from one or more low-resolution observations, has been a very attractive research topic over the last two decades. It has found practical applications in many real world problems in different fields, from satellite...... the contributions of different authors to the basic concepts of each group. Furthermore, common issues in super-resolution algorithms, such as imaging models and registration algorithms, optimization of the cost functions employed, dealing with color information, improvement factors, assessment of super...

  15. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  16. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  17. High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of Rosetta Target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Using Keck HIRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita L.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Gulkis, Samuel; Snodgrass, Colin; Borro, Miguel de Val; Kelley, Michael S.; Feaga, Lori M.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high spectral resolution optical spectroscopy of Rosetta target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained on UT Dec 26 and 27, 2015 using the HIRES instrument on Keck I when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of approximately 2 AU post-perihelion. The spectra cover a spectral range of 3500-10000 Angstroms at a spectral resolution of 67,000. These observations aim to provide high spectral resolution, large projected field of view context for the high spatial resolution and small projected field of view observations obtained from the Rosetta instrument suite. We report detections of CN, NH2, and [OI] emission. From the [OI]6300 emission we derive a water production rate of approximately 2 x 1027 mol/s. Production rates (or upper limits) for other species will be presented and placed in context with recent results from Rosetta. We will also present results pertaining to the [OI]5577 line, which combined with the [OI]6300 emission can be used as a proxy for CO2. We will compare our results to observations obtained by Rosetta as well as NEOWISE and Spitzer.

  18. Insights into business student's book

    CERN Document Server

    Lannon, Michael; Trappe, Tonya

    1993-01-01

    With Challenging reading and listening texts from a range of authentic business sources, New Insights into Business will really engage your students. The thorough language and vocabulary syllabus together with the strong focus on business skills development gives students everything they need to function effectively in the workplace. New Insights into Business is a self-contained course and is also an ideal follow-on to First Insights into Business.

  19. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Gordon, Jeffery; Ringe, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Bank resolution is a key pillar of the European Banking Union. This column argues that the current structure of large EU banks is not conducive to an effective and unbiased resolution procedure. The authors would require systemically important banks to reorganise into a ‘holding company’ structure......, where the parent company holds unsecured term debt sufficient to cover losses at its operating financial subsidiaries. This would facilitate a ‘single point of entry’ resolution procedure, minimising the risk of creditor runs and destructive ring-fencing by national regulators....

  20. High resolution IVEM tomography of biological specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful tool for elucidating the three-dimensional architecture of large biological complexes and subcellular organelles. The introduction of intermediate voltage electron microscopes further extended the technique by providing the means to examine very large and non-symmetrical subcellular organelles, at resolutions beyond what would be possible using light microscopy. Recent studies using electron tomography on a variety of cellular organelles and assemblies such as centrosomes, kinetochores, and chromatin have clearly demonstrated the power of this technique for obtaining 3D structural information on non-symmetric cell components. When combined with biochemical and molecular observations, these 3D reconstructions have provided significant new insights into biological function.

  1. Resolution of inflammation: a new therapeutic frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, James N; Gilroy, Derek W

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulated inflammation is a central pathological process in diverse disease states. Traditionally, therapeutic approaches have sought to modulate the pro- or anti-inflammatory limbs of inflammation, with mixed success. However, insight into the pathways by which inflammation is resolved has highlighted novel opportunities to pharmacologically manipulate these processes - a strategy that might represent a complementary (and perhaps even superior) therapeutic approach. This Review discusses the state of the art in the biology of resolution of inflammation, highlighting the opportunities and challenges for translational research in this field.

  2. LHCb VELO Tracking Resolutions

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The excellent tracking performance of the Vertex Locator (VELO) at LHCb is presented. The resolutions it achieves on single hits, impact parameters, and primary vertex positions are shown, with particular attention paid to measurement of impact parameters.

  3. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  4. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  5. Ultra high resolution tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  6. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  7. Insight with hands and things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallée-Tourangeau, Frédéric; Steffensen, S. V.; Vallée-Tourangeau, Gaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether different task ecologies influenced insight problem solving. The 17 animals problem was employed, a pure insight problem. Its initial formulation encourages the application of a direct arithmetic solution, but its solution requires the spatial arrangement of sets...

  8. Cognitive insight: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Camp, L S C; Sabbe, B G C; Oldenburg, J F E

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive insight is the ability to re-evaluate thoughts and beliefs in order to make thoughtful conclusions. It differs from clinical insight, as it focuses on more general metacognitive processes. Therefore, it could be relevant to diverse disorders and non-clinical subjects. There is a growing body of research on cognitive insight in individuals with and without psychosis. This review has summarised the current state of the art regarding this topic. We conclude that while cognitive insight in its current form seems valid for use in individuals with psychosis, it is less so for individuals without psychosis. Additionally, higher cognitive insight not always leads to better psychological functioning. For instance, higher levels of self-reflection are often associated with depressive mood. We therefore recommend the sub-components of cognitive insight to be studied separately. Also, it is unclear what position cognitive insight takes within the spectrum of metacognitive processes and how it relates to other self-related concepts that have been defined previously in literature. Combining future and past research on cognitive insight and its analogue concepts will help in the formation of a uniform definition that fits all subjects discussed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Systemic sclerosis: Recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Kahan, André; Allanore, Yannick

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an orphan connective tissue disease characterized by alterations of the microvasculature, disturbances of the immune system and massive deposition of collagen and other matrix substances in the skin and internal organs. A major achievement of the recent years has been the validation of new classification criteria, allowing earlier diagnosis and earlier treatment of systemic sclerosis, before irreversible fibrosis and organ damage appeared ("window of opportunity"). Raynaud's phenomenon is usually the first sign of the disease and is considered as the main sentinel sign for the identification of very early systemic sclerosis. Systemic sclerosis is clinically heterogeneous and disease course remains unpredictable. Its prognosis depends on cardiopulmonary involvement and recent studies aim to identify serum or genetic biomarkers predictive of severe organ involvement. Moreover, the prospective follow-up of large cohorts has provided and will offer critical material to identify strong prognostic factors. Whereas the outcomes of vascular manifestations of the disease has been recently improved due to targeted therapy, recent data have highlighted that mortality has not changed over the past 40 years. This reflects the absence of efficacy of current available drugs to counteract the fibrotic process. Nevertheless, several targeted immunity therapies, commonly with proven efficacy in other immune diseases, are about to be investigated in systemic sclerosis. Indeed, promising results in small and open studies have been reported. This article deals with recent insights into classification criteria, pathogenesis, organ involvements, outcome and current and possible future therapeutic options in systemic sclerosis.

  10. O insight em psiquiatria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida P. Cardoso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O sinal de que algo está a acontecer contribui para que o paciente reconheça que alguma coisa de estranho se está a passar consigo. Este reconhecimento faz com que o sujeito possa desempenhar uma função activa e seja um elemento colaborante do seu processo de recuperação. Cada doença apresenta, contudo, diferentes sintomas, uma vez que cada doença psiquiátrica consiste em diferentes perturbações com diversos efeitos sobre o funcionamento mental. Desta maneira, o fenómeno do insight que é registado em cada doença é diferente e expressa-se sob diferentes formas, não somente devido às manifestações clínicas da doença mas também devido às características individuais do sujeito.

  11. Insights Into Finding a Mismatch Through the Structure of a Mispaired DNA Bound By a Rhodium Intercalator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, V.C.; Kaiser, J.T.; Barton, J.K.; /Caltech

    2007-07-12

    We report the 1.1-angstrom resolution crystal structure of a bulky rhodium complex bound to two different DNA sites, mismatched and matched in the oligonucleotide 5'-(dCGGAAATTCCCG){sub 2}-3'. At the AC mismatch site, the structure reveals ligand insertion from the minor groove with ejection of both mismatched bases and elucidates how destabilized mispairs in DNA may be recognized. This unique binding mode contrasts with major groove intercalation, observed at a matched site, where doubling of the base pair rise accommodates stacking of the intercalator. Mass spectral analysis reveals different photocleavage products associated with the two binding modes in the crystal, with only products characteristic of mismatch binding in solution. This structure, illustrating two clearly distinct binding modes for a molecule with DNA, provides a rationale for the interrogation and detection of mismatches.

  12. Intravital microscopy: new insights into cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavins, Felicity N E

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation is the body's way of combating invading pathogens or noxious stimuli. Under normal conditions, the complex host response of rubor, dolor, calor, tumor, and functio laesa is essential for survival and the return to homeostasis. However, unregulated inflammation is all too often observed in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, stroke, and cancer. The host inflammatory response is governed by a number of tightly regulated processes that enable cellular trafficking to occur at the sites of damage to ultimately ensure the resolution of inflammation. Intravital microscopy (IVM) provides quantitative, qualitative, and dynamic insights into cell biology and these cellular interactions. This review highlights the pros and cons of this specialized technique and how it has evolved to help understand the physiology and pathophysiology of inflammatory events in a number of different disease states, leading to a number of potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Insights into software development in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Lorraine M.

    1992-01-01

    The interdependence of the U.S.-Japanese economies makes it imperative that we in the United States understand how business and technology developments take place in Japan. We can gain insight into these developments in software engineering by studying the context in which Japanese software is developed, the practices that are used, the problems encountered, the setting surrounding these problems, and the resolution of these problems. Context includes the technological and sociological characteristics of the software development environment, the software processes applied, personnel involved in the development process, and the corporate and social culture surrounding the development. Presented in this paper is a summary of results of a study that addresses these issues. Data for this study was collected during a three month visit to Japan where the author interviewed 20 software managers representing nine companies involved in developing software in Japan. These data are compared to similar data from the United States in which 12 managers from five companies were interviewed.

  14. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  15. Risk Insights Gained from Fire Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarians, Mardy; Nowlen, Steven P.

    1999-06-10

    There now exist close to 20 years of history in the application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for the analysis of fire risk at nuclear power plants. The current methods are based on various assumptions regarding fire phenomena, the impact of fire on equipment and operator response, and the overall progression of a fire event from initiation through final resolution. Over this same time period, a number of significant fire incidents have occurred at nuclear power plants around the world. Insights gained from US experience have been used in US studies as the statistical basis for establishing fire initiation frequencies both as a function of the plant area and the initiating fire source.To a lesser extent, the fire experience has also been used to assess the general severity and duration of fires. However, aside from these statistical analyses, the incidents have rarely been scrutinized in detail to verify the underlying assumptions of fire PRAs. This paper discusses an effort, under which a set of fire incidents are being reviewed in order to gain insights directly relevant to the methods, data, and assumptions that form the basis for current fire PRAs. The paper focuses on the objectives of the effort, the specific fire events being reviews methodology, and anticipated follow-on activities.

  16. Recent Neurobiological Insights into the Concept of Insight in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y

    2016-01-01

    The concept of insight in psychosis has been an interesting area in clinical psychiatry for well over a century with a surge in research interest over the past 25 years. Moreover, the past 5 years have been particularly fruitful in deciphering its neurobiological underpinnings. This article presents the development of the concept of insight in psychosis and reviews the current neurobiological research findings in this area.

  17. Recent Neurobiological Insights into the Concept of Insight in Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Sanjay, Y

    2016-01-01

    The concept of insight in psychosis has been an interesting area in clinical psychiatry for well over a century with a surge in research interest over the past 25 years. Moreover, the past 5 years have been particularly fruitful in deciphering its neurobiological underpinnings. This article presents the development of the concept of insight in psychosis and reviews the current neurobiological research findings in this area. PMID:27335512

  18. Position Resolution in DROIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2008-04-01

    Since the very beginning, Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs) were proposed to achieve both good position and energy resolutions. In DROIDs, the absorption of primary particle energy occurs in a long superconductive strip. Quasiparticles produced in the absorber diffuse along the strip and counted by the superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the two ends of the strip. In this paper the formula for estimation DROID’s position resolution from experimental data was derived. This formula takes into account correlation between fluctuations of signals of DROID’s detectors.

  19. Latest insights on adenovirus structure and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Carmen

    2012-05-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å) and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25), but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber) had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  20. Latest Insights on Adenovirus Structure and Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen San Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV capsid organization is considerably complex, not only because of its large size (~950 Å and triangulation number (pseudo T = 25, but also because it contains four types of minor proteins in specialized locations modulating the quasi-equivalent icosahedral interactions. Up until 2009, only its major components (hexon, penton, and fiber had separately been described in atomic detail. Their relationships within the virion, and the location of minor coat proteins, were inferred from combining the known crystal structures with increasingly more detailed cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM maps. There was no structural information on assembly intermediates. Later on that year, two reports described the structural differences between the mature and immature adenoviral particle, starting to shed light on the different stages of viral assembly, and giving further insights into the roles of core and minor coat proteins during morphogenesis [1,2]. Finally, in 2010, two papers describing the atomic resolution structure of the complete virion appeared [3,4]. These reports represent a veritable tour de force for two structural biology techniques: X-ray crystallography and cryoEM, as this is the largest macromolecular complex solved at high resolution by either of them. In particular, the cryoEM analysis provided an unprecedented clear picture of the complex protein networks shaping the icosahedral shell. Here I review these latest developments in the field of AdV structural studies.

  1. Coreference Resolution With Reconcile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Procedure (RAP). JavaRap resolves only pronouns and, thus, it is not directly comparable to Reconcile. GuiTaR (Poesio and Kabadjov, 2004) and BART...Versley et al., 2008) (which can be considered a succes- sor of GuiTaR ) are both modular systems that tar- get the full coreference resolution task. As such

  2. Alternate dispute resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Paul F.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to save taxpayer dollars and ease an overburdened administrative and judicial court system, this report presents evidence to encourage the use of alternate dispute resolution (ADR) in construction contracting within the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. Information is presented detailing the primary factors that contribute to this expensive and overburdened system, including: costs associated with litigation, contractual document formation, experience level ...

  3. Conflict Resolution Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busselle, Tish

    This 7-day unit, intended for use with secondary students, contains a statement of rationale and objectives, lesson plans, class assignments, teacher and student bibliographies, and suggestions for instructional materials on conflict resolution between individuals, groups, and nations. Among the six objectives listed for the unit are: 1) explain…

  4. High-resolution headlamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gut, Carsten; Cristea, Iulia; Neumann, Cornelius

    2016-04-01

    The following article shall describe how human vision by night can be influenced. At first, front lighting systems that are already available on the market will be described, followed by their analysis with respect to the positive effects on traffic safety. Furthermore, how traffic safety by night can be increased since the introduction of high resolution headlamps shall be discussed.

  5. Super-resolution imaging in glycoscience: New developments and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates on cell surfaces play a crucial role in a wide variety of biological processes, including cell adhesion, recognition and signaling, viral and bacterial infection, inflammation and metastasis. However, owing to the large diversity and complexity of carbohydrate structure and nongenetically synthesis, glycoscience is the least understood field compared with genomics and proteomics. Although the structures and functions of carbohydrates have been investigated by various conventional analysis methods, the distribution and role of carbohydrates in cell membranes remain elusive. This review focuses on the developments and challenges of super-resolution imaging in glycoscience through introduction of imaging principle and the available fluorescent probes for super-resolution imaging, the labeling strategies of carbohydrates, and the recent applications of super-resolution imaging in glycoscience, which will promote the super-resolution imaging technology as a promising tool to provide new insights into the study of glycoscience.

  6. Structural Basis of Silencing: Sir3 BAH Domain in Complex with a Nucleosome at 3.0 Å Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armache, Karim-Jean; Garlick, Joseph D.; Canzio, Daniele; Narlikar, Geeta J.; Kingston, Robert E. (UCSF); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-11-30

    Gene silencing is essential for regulating cell fate in eukaryotes. Altered chromatin architectures contribute to maintaining the silenced state in a variety of species. The silent information regulator (Sir) proteins regulate mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of these proteins, Sir3, interacts directly with the nucleosome to help generate silenced domains. We determined the crystal structure of a complex of the yeast Sir3 BAH (bromo-associated homology) domain and the nucleosome core particle at 3.0 angstrom resolution. We see multiple molecular interactions between the protein surfaces of the nucleosome and the BAH domain that explain numerous genetic mutations. These interactions are accompanied by structural rearrangements in both the nucleosome and the BAH domain. The structure explains how covalent modifications on H4K16 and H3K79 regulate formation of a silencing complex that contains the nucleosome as a central component.

  7. CROSS CULTURAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION STYLES: DATA REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray ALAGÖZLÜ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The way conflicts are solved is thought to be culturally learned (Hammer, 2005; therefore, this is reflected through language use. Conflicts, as inevitable parts of communication, naturally mirror cultural differences. Intercultural conflict styles have been studied so far by various researchers. How conflicts are initiated, maintained and escalated or terminated are all culture bound (Leung, 2002 and all the related stages vary from one culture to another. In the related literature, there have been attempts to describe different conflict handling classifications. Using Hammer’s (2005 categorization that was found to be more refined and summative, conflict resolution styles of Turkish and American College students were explored using Discourse Completion Tests (DCT with eight conflict situations where the respondents were required to write verbal solutions to overcome the conflicts described in the test. Those utterances were categorized according to Directness/Indirectness Scale modified from Hammer’s (2005 “International Conflict Style Inventory (ICSI” that classifies intercultural conflict resolution styles as high/low level of directness and high/low level of emotional expressiveness. It is believed that the study provides insight into intercultural communication as there are culturally generalizable (etic and learned patterns of conflict resolution styles pertinent to different cultures (Hammer, 2009, p. 223; Ting-Toomey, 1994.

  8. Particle detector spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  9. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Gordon, Jeffery; Ringe, Georg

    2015-01-01

    This chapter argues that the work of the European Banking Union remains incomplete in one important respect, the structural re-organization of large European financial firms that would make “resolution” of a systemically important financial firm a credible alternative to bail-out or some other sort...... of taxpayer assistance. A holding company structure in which the public parent holds unsecured term debt sufficient to cover losses at an operating financial subsidiary would facilitate a “Single Point of Entry” resolution procedure that would minimize knock-on effects from the failure of a systemically...... important financial institution. Resolution through such a structure would minimize run risk from short term creditors and minimize destructive ring-fencing by national regulators. Although structural reform in the EU could be achieved by supervisory implementation of the “living wills” requirement...

  10. Bank Resolution in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Jeffrey N.; Ringe, Georg

    This chapter argues that the work of the European Banking Union remains incomplete in one important respect, the structural re-organization of large European financial firms that would make “resolution” of a systemically important financial firm a credible alternative to bail-out or some other sort...... of taxpayer assistance. A holding company structure in which the public parent holds unsecured term debt sufficient to cover losses at an operating financial subsidiary would facilitate a “Single Point of Entry” resolution procedure that would minimize knock-on effects from the failure of a systemically...... important financial institution. Resolution through such a structure would minimize run risk from short term creditors and minimize destructive ring-fencing by national regulators. Although structural reform in the EU could be achieved by supervisory implementation of the “living wills” requirement...

  11. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  12. High resolution differential thermometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotra Z. Yu.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Main schematic solutions of differential thermometers with measurement resolution about 0.001°C are considered. Differential temperature primary transducer realized on a transistor differential circuit in microampere mode. Analytic calculation and schematic mathematic simulation of primary transducer are fulfilled. Signal transducer is realized on a high precision Zero-Drift Single-Supply Rail-to-Rail operation amplifier AD8552 and 24-Bit S-D microconverter ADuC834.

  13. Understanding Insight in the Context of Q

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, David

    2012-01-01

    In Revans' learning formula, L = P + Q, Q represents "questioning insight", by which Revans means that insight comes out of the process of questioning programmed knowledge (P) in the light of experience. We typically focus on the content of an insight rather than on the act of insight. Drawing primarily on the work of Bernard Lonergan this paper…

  14. Approaching the Distinction between Intuition and Insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonglu; Lei, Yi; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Intuition and insight share similar cognitive and neural basis. Though, there are still some essential differences between the two. Here in this short review, we discriminated between intuition, and insight in two aspects. First, intuition, and insight are toward different aspects of information processing. Whereas intuition involves judgment about "yes or no," insight is related to "what" is the solution. Second, tacit knowledge play different roles in between intuition and insight. On the one hand, tacit knowledge is conducive to intuitive judgment. On the other hand, tacit knowledge may first impede but later facilitate insight occurrence. Furthermore, we share theoretical, and methodological views on how to access the distinction between intuition and insight.

  15. Breaking the Crowther limit: Combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovden, Robert, E-mail: rmh244@cornell.edu [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Ercius, Peter [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jiang, Yi [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Elser, Veit [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Muller, David A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. - Highlights: • Develop tomography technique for high-resolution and large field of view. • We combine depth sectioning with traditional tilt tomography. • Through-focal tomography reduces tilts and improves resolution. • Through-focal tomography overcomes the fundamental Crowther limit. • Aberration-corrected becomes a benefit and not a hindrance for tomography.

  16. Insights into Strand Exchange in BTB Domain Dimers from the Crystal Structures of FAZF and Miz1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Chen, Lu; Pomroy, Neil C.; Privé, Gilbert G. (Toronto); (OCI)

    2010-09-22

    The BTB domain is a widely distributed protein-protein interaction motif that is often found at the N-terminus of zinc finger transcription factors. Previous crystal structures of BTB domains have revealed tightly interwound homodimers, with the N-terminus from one chain forming a two-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet with a strand from the other chain. We have solved the crystal structures of the BTB domains from Fanconi anemia zinc finger (FAZF) and Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) to resolutions of 2.0 {angstrom} and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. Unlike previous examples of BTB domain structures, the FAZF BTB domain is a nonswapped dimer, with each N-terminal {beta}-strand associated with its own chain. As a result, the dimerization interface in the FAZF BTB domain is about half as large as in the domain-swapped dimers. The Miz1 BTB domain resembles a typical swapped BTB dimer, although it has a shorter N-terminus that is not able to form the interchain sheet. Using cysteine cross-linking, we confirmed that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) BTB dimer is strand exchanged in solution, while the FAZF BTB dimer is not. A phylogenic tree of the BTB fold based on both sequence and structural features shows that the common ancestor of the BTB domain in BTB-ZF (bric a brac, tramtrack, broad-complex zinc finger) proteins was a domain-swapped dimer. The differences in the N-termini seen in the FAZF and Miz1 BTB domains appear to be more recent developments in the structural evolution of the domain.

  17. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2017-02-01

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. We briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed to describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.

  18. New observation techniques lead to new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, H. H. G.

    2009-04-01

    Most scientific discoveries are the result of new observations. A researcher who observes something that at first sight seems odd is triggered to think beyond the obvious. The obvious often corresponds with an established theory. The interesting moment arises when an observation challenges established theory. Some researchers may then be inclined to get rid of the unexpected observation, so as not to harm the well-established theory, while others see it as an opportunity to improve the theory. New observations, from a different or unexpected angle, may offer a new perspective on a physical phenomenon, and hence are important triggers for innovation. Established theory has not been able to provide adequate answers to the high predictive uncertainty of most hydrological models. Several hydrologists have indicated that our fixture on catchment runoff as the main state variable for calibration is partly to blame for that. What we indeed need is 'orthogonal' information that provides a perspective into the inner functioning of a catchment, preferably as an integrated signal at the scale of our model. Some observation techniques offer themselves to hydrology as an opportunity (since they were developed for other purposes). Good examples of such opportunities are: the GRACE mission, which offers insights into stock variations at the river basin scale; new satellites providing insight into the state of vegetation and the processes determining evaporation; LIDAR, providing detailed DEMs, and the cellular telephone network, which allows high resolution estimates of rainfall reaching the surface. Also there are new instruments that can be readily used for hydrological research, such as the DTS (distributed temperature sensing) fiber optic cable, or the Liquid-Water Isotope Analyser. But there are also instruments that can be developed specifically to get a better grip on a particular process or its spatial distribution. Recently instruments have been developed to continuously

  19. Resolution Enhancement of Multilook Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, Amy E. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2004-07-01

    This dissertation studies the feasibility of enhancing the spatial resolution of multi-look remotely-sensed imagery using an iterative resolution enhancement algorithm known as Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS). A multi-angle satellite image modeling tool is implemented, and simulated multi-look imagery is formed to test the resolution enhancement algorithm. Experiments are done to determine the optimal con guration and number of multi-angle low-resolution images needed for a quantitative improvement in the spatial resolution of the high-resolution estimate. The important topic of aliasing is examined in the context of the POCS resolution enhancement algorithm performance. In addition, the extension of the method to multispectral sensor images is discussed and an example is shown using multispectral confocal fluorescence imaging microscope data. Finally, the remote sensing issues of atmospheric path radiance and directional reflectance variations are explored to determine their effect on the resolution enhancement performance.

  20. Near-cloud aerosol properties from the 1 km resolution MODIS ocean product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várnai, Tamás.; Marshak, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    This study examines aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds by analyzing high-resolution atmospheric correction parameters provided in the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) ocean color product. The study analyzes data from a 2 week long period of September in 10 years, covering a large area in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that on the one hand, the Quality Assessment (QA) flags of the ocean color product successfully eliminate cloud-related uncertainties in ocean parameters such as chlorophyll content, but on the other hand, using the flags introduces a sampling bias in atmospheric products such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Angstrom exponent. Therefore, researchers need to select QA flags by balancing the risks of increased retrieval uncertainties and sampling biases. Using an optimal set of QA flags, the results reveal substantial increases in optical thickness near clouds—on average the increase is 50% for the roughly half of pixels within 5 km from clouds and is accompanied by a roughly matching increase in particle size. Theoretical simulations show that the 50% increase in 550 nm AOT changes instantaneous direct aerosol radiative forcing by up to 8 W/m2 and that the radiative impact is significantly larger if observed near-cloud changes are attributed to aerosol particles as opposed to undetected cloud particles. These results underline that accounting for near-cloud areas and understanding the causes of near-cloud particle changes are critical for accurate calculations of direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  1. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O

    2016-05-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications.

  2. Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties from the 1 Km Resolution MODIS Ocean Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study examines aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds by analyzing high-resolution atmospheric correction parameters provided in the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) ocean color product. The study analyzes data from a 2 week long period of September in 10 years, covering a large area in the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that on the one hand, the Quality Assessment (QA) flags of the ocean color product successfully eliminate cloud-related uncertainties in ocean parameters such as chlorophyll content, but on the other hand, using the flags introduces a sampling bias in atmospheric products such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Angstrom exponent. Therefore, researchers need to select QA flags by balancing the risks of increased retrieval uncertainties and sampling biases. Using an optimal set of QA flags, the results reveal substantial increases in optical thickness near clouds-on average the increase is 50% for the roughly half of pixels within 5 km from clouds and is accompanied by a roughly matching increase in particle size. Theoretical simulations show that the 50% increase in 550nm AOT changes instantaneous direct aerosol radiative forcing by up to 8W/m2 and that the radiative impact is significantly larger if observed near-cloud changes are attributed to aerosol particles as opposed to undetected cloud particles. These results underline that accounting for near-cloud areas and understanding the causes of near-cloud particle changes are critical for accurate calculations of direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  3. Radiation damage free two-color X-ray ghost diffraction with atomic resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Chapman, Henry; Shih, Yanhua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) can enable diffractive structural determination of protein crystals or single molecules that are too small and radiation-sensitive for conventional X-ray analysis. However the electronic form factor could have been modified during the ultrashort X-ray pulse due to photoionization and electron cascade caused by the intense X-ray pulse. For general X-ray imaging techniques, to minimize radiation damage effect is of major concern to ensure faithful reconstruction of the structure. Here we show that a radiation damage free diffraction can be achieved with an atomic spatial resolution, by using X-ray parametric down-conversion (PDC), and two-color biphoton ghost imaging. We illustrate that formation of the diffractive patterns satisfies a condition analogous to the Bragg equation, with a resolution that could be as fine as the lattice length scale of several Angstrom. Because the samples are illuminated by the optical photons of low energy, they can be free of radiation damage...

  4. Structure of a prokaryotic virtual proton pump at 3.2 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yiling; Jayaram, Hariharan; Shane, Tania; Kolmakova-Partensky, Ludmila; Wu, Fang; Williams, Carole; Xiong, Yong; Miller, Christopher; (Yale); (Brandeis)

    2009-09-15

    To reach the mammalian gut, enteric bacteria must pass through the stomach. Many such organisms survive exposure to the harsh gastric environment (pH 1.5-4) by mounting extreme acid-resistance responses, one of which, the arginine-dependent system of Escherichia coli, has been studied at levels of cellular physiology, molecular genetics and protein biochemistry. This multiprotein system keeps the cytoplasm above pH 5 during acid challenge by continually pumping protons out of the cell using the free energy of arginine decarboxylation. At the heart of the process is a 'virtual proton pump' in the inner membrane, called AdiC, that imports L-arginine from the gastric juice and exports its decarboxylation product agmatine. AdiC belongs to the APC superfamily of membrane proteins, which transports amino acids, polyamines and organic cations in a multitude of biological roles, including delivery of arginine for nitric oxide synthesis, facilitation of insulin release from pancreatic {beta}-cells, and, when inappropriately overexpressed, provisioning of certain fast-growing neoplastic cells with amino acids. High-resolution structures and detailed transport mechanisms of APC transporters are currently unknown. Here we describe a crystal structure of AdiC at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution. The protein is captured in an outward-open, substrate-free conformation with transmembrane architecture remarkably similar to that seen in four other families of apparently unrelated transport proteins.

  5. Natural resolution of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marcelo O; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation is a protective response essential for maintaining human health and for fighting disease. As an active innate immune reaction to challenge, inflammation gives rise to clinical cardinal signs: rubor, calor, dolor, tumor and functio laesa. Termination of acute inflammation was previously recognized as a passive process; a natural decay of pro-inflammatory signals. We now understand that the natural resolution of inflammation involves well-integrated, active, biochemical programs that return tissues to homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of endogenous lipid mediators that modulate cellular fate and inflammation. Biosynthesis of eicosanoids and other lipids in exudates coincides with changes in the types of inflammatory cells. Resolution of inflammation is initiated by an active class switch in lipid mediators, such as classic prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to the production of proresolution mediators. Endogenous pro-resolving lipid mediators, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins, aspirin-triggered lipoxins, ω3-eicosapentaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the E-series, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvins of the D-series, protectins and maresins, are biosynthesized during the resolution phase of acute inflammation. Depending on the type of injury and the type of tissue, the initial cells that respond are polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes/macrophages, epithelial cells or endothelial cells. The selective interaction of specific lipid mediators with G protein-coupled receptors expressed on innate immune cells (e.g. G protein-coupled receptor 32, lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor2, chemokine-like receptor 1, leukotriene B4 receptor type 1 and cabannoid receptor 2) induces cessation of leukocyte infiltration; vascular permeability/edema returns to normal with polymorphonuclear neutrophil death (mostly via apoptosis), the nonphlogistic infiltration of monocyte/macrophages and the removal

  6. Saturn's rings - high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained this high-resolution picture of Saturn's rings Aug. 22, when the spacecraft was 4 million kilometers (2.5 million miles) away. Evident here are the numerous 'spoke' features, in the B-ring; their very sharp, narrow appearance suggests short formation times. Scientists think electromagnetic forces are responsible in some way for these features, but no detailed theory has been worked out. Pictures such as this and analyses of Voyager 2's spoke movies may reveal more clues about the origins of these complex structures. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  7. Achieving atomic resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Spence

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the nanotube in 19915 by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM, following closely on the discovery of fullerenes, has initiated a new field of science known as nanoscience. (In fact the fullerene buckyball itself was first observed in 1980, by HREM1. While nanoscience now spans many disciplines, from molecular biology to quantum computing, for all of them, the HREM technique has become the indispensable tool for analyzing the atomic structure of individual bulk nanostructural elements. However this method has long been the technique of choice whenever questions of microstructural characterization arise in materials science.

  8. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  9. Insights from a Math Phobic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Anne Wescott

    1992-01-01

    The author's personal experiences in overcoming mathematics anxiety provide insights into how teachers can create a classroom environment to help students develop self-confidence by assessing students' feelings, using cooperative-learning techniques, showing more patience, and having students write about their experiences. (MDH)

  10. Global China Insights December 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Rien T.; Havinga, Marieke; Fischer, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Journal in which the Groningen Confucius Institute (GCI) shares different perspectives on China and provides insights into China from as many different aspects as possible. GCI aims to provide a full view of real China to the readers as well as featuring international and comprehensive perspectives,

  11. New Insights into Behavioral Finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Baltussen (Guido)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis applies insights from psychology and other behavioral sciences to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional finance approach (which assumes that agents and markets are rational) and improves our understanding of financial markets and its participants. More specific, this t

  12. Investigating Insight as Sudden Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Ivan K.; Jee, Benjamin D.; Wiley, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt psychologists proposed two distinct learning mechanisms. Associative learning occurs gradually through the repeated co-occurrence of external stimuli or memories. Insight learning occurs suddenly when people discover new relationships within their prior knowledge as a result of reasoning or problem solving processes that re-organize or…

  13. Global China Insights June 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingrid Fischer; Rien T. Segers

    2013-01-01

    Journal in which the Groningen Confucius Institute (GCI) shares different perspectives on China and provides insights into China from as many different aspects as possible. GCI aims to provide a full view of real China to the readers as well as featuring international and comprehensive perspectives,

  14. Interferon-Inducible Protein 16: Insight into the Interaction with Tumor Suppressor p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Jack C.C.; Lam, Robert; Brazda, Vaclav; Duan, Shili; Ravichandran, Mani; Ma, Justin; Xiao, Ting; Tempel, Wolfram; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. (Toronto); (NCI)

    2011-08-24

    IFI16 is a member of the interferon-inducible HIN-200 family of nuclear proteins. It has been implicated in transcriptional regulation by modulating protein-protein interactions with p53 tumor suppressor protein and other transcription factors. However, the mechanisms of interaction remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of both HIN-A and HIN-B domains of IFI16 determined at 2.0 and 2.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Each HIN domain comprises a pair of tightly packed OB-fold subdomains that appear to act as a single unit. We show that both HIN domains of IFI16 are capable of enhancing p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation via distinctive means. HIN-A domain binds to the basic C terminus of p53, whereas the HIN-B domain binds to the core DNA-binding region of p53. Both interactions are compatible with the DNA-bound state of p53 and together contribute to the effect of full-length IFI16 on p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation.

  15. Decision insight into stakeholder conflict for ERN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siirola, John; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Benz, Zachary O.; Stansbury, Melanie; Richards, Elizabeth H.; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Galisteo Consulting); Warrender, Christina E.; Morrow, James Dan

    2012-02-01

    Participatory modeling has become an important tool in facilitating resource decision making and dispute resolution. Approaches to modeling that are commonly used in this context often do not adequately account for important human factors. Current techniques provide insights into how certain human activities and variables affect resource outcomes; however, they do not directly simulate the complex variables that shape how, why, and under what conditions different human agents behave in ways that affect resources and human interactions related to them. Current approaches also do not adequately reveal how the effects of individual decisions scale up to have systemic level effects in complex resource systems. This lack of integration prevents the development of more robust models to support decision making and dispute resolution processes. Development of integrated tools is further hampered by the fact that collection of primary data for decision-making modeling is costly and time consuming. This project seeks to develop a new approach to resource modeling that incorporates both technical and behavioral modeling techniques into a single decision-making architecture. The modeling platform is enhanced by use of traditional and advanced processes and tools for expedited data capture. Specific objectives of the project are: (1) Develop a proof of concept for a new technical approach to resource modeling that combines the computational techniques of system dynamics and agent based modeling, (2) Develop an iterative, participatory modeling process supported with traditional and advance data capture techniques that may be utilized to facilitate decision making, dispute resolution, and collaborative learning processes, and (3) Examine potential applications of this technology and process. The development of this decision support architecture included both the engineering of the technology and the development of a participatory method to build and apply the technology

  16. Monoamine transporters: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eGrouleff

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human monoamine transporters facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the monoamine transporters is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The monoamine transporters are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the monoamine transporters, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors.

  17. Insights from genomics into bacterial pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. By providing insights into bacterial evolution and disease etiology, these approaches pave the way for novel interventions and therapeutic targets. Sequencing populations of bacteria across the whole genome provides unprecedented resolution to investigate (i within-host evolution, (ii transmission history, and (iii population structure. Moreover, advances in rapid benchtop sequencing herald a new era of real-time genomics in which sequencing and analysis can be deployed within hours in response to rapidly changing public health emergencies. The purpose of this review is to highlight the transformative effect of population genomics on bacteriology, and to consider the prospects for answering abiding questions such as why bacteria cause disease.

  18. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  19. Structural insights into calicivirus attachment and uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhella, David; Gatherer, Derek; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Pink, Rebecca; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2008-08-01

    The Caliciviridae family comprises positive-sense RNA viruses of medical and veterinary significance. In humans, caliciviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, while in animals respiratory illness, conjunctivitis, stomatitis, and hemorrhagic disease are documented. Investigation of virus-host interactions is limited by a lack of culture systems for many viruses in this family. Feline calicivirus (FCV), a member of the Vesivirus genus, provides a tractable model, since it may be propagated in cell culture. Feline junctional adhesion molecule 1 (fJAM-1) was recently identified as a functional receptor for FCV. We have analyzed the structure of this virus-receptor complex by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction, combined with fitting of homology modeled high-resolution coordinates. We show that domain 1 of fJAM-1 binds to the outer face of the P2 domain of the FCV capsid protein VP1, inducing conformational changes in the viral capsid. This study provides the first structural view of a native calicivirus-protein receptor complex and insights into the mechanisms of virus attachment and uncoating.

  20. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  1. High Time Resolution Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Phelan, Don; Shearer, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    High Time Resolution Astrophysics (HTRA) is an important new window to the universe and a vital tool in understanding a range of phenomena from diverse objects and radiative processes. This importance is demonstrated in this volume with the description of a number of topics in astrophysics, including quantum optics, cataclysmic variables, pulsars, X-ray binaries and stellar pulsations to name a few. Underlining this science foundation, technological developments in both instrumentation and detectors are described. These instruments and detectors combined cover a wide range of timescales and can measure fluxes, spectra and polarisation. These advances make it possible for HTRA to make a big contribution to our understanding of the Universe in the next decade.

  2. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brünken, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limita...

  3. Civil Engineering Dispute Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, J

    2001-01-01

    Construction work on the civil engineering contract started at Point 5 in August 1998. The new surface buildings and underground structures are necessary to accommodate the CMS detector for the LHC Project. The principal underground works consist of two new shafts, two parallel caverns separated by a supporting pillar, and a number of small connection tunnels and service galleries. A dispute resolution procedure has been included in the contract, whereby a Panel of Adjudicators may be called upon to make a decision in the case of a difference or dispute between the parties. The aim of this paper is to present CERN's first experience of civil engineering Adjudication arising from problems encountered with the ground freezing technique employed to allow construction of two new shafts.

  4. Lexical ambiguity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, S.; Cottrell, G.; Tanenhaus, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book collects much of the best research currently available on the problem of lexical ambiguity resolution in the processing of human language. When taken out of context, sentences are usually ambiguous. When actually uttered in a dialogue or written in text, these same sentences often have unique interpretations. The inherent ambiguity of isolated sentences, becomes obvious in the attempt to write a computer program to understand them. Different views have emerged on the nature of context and the mechanisms by which it directs unambiguous understanding of words and sentences. These perspectives are represented and discussed. Eighteen original papers from a valuable source book for cognitive scientists in AI, psycholinguistics, neuropsychology, or theoretical linguistics.

  5. Atomic resolution structure of cucurmosin, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xiaomin; Meehan, Edward J.; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing (UAH); (Fujian); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-10-27

    A novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) designated cucurmosin was isolated from the sarcocarp of Cucurbita moschata (pumpkin). Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, cucurmosin exhibits strong cytotoxicities to three cancer cell lines of both human and murine origins, but low toxicity to normal cells. Plant genomic DNA extracted from the tender leaves was amplified by PCR between primers based on the N-terminal sequence and X-ray sequence of the C-terminal. The complete mature protein sequence was obtained from N-terminal protein sequencing and partial DNA sequencing, confirmed by high resolution crystal structure analysis. The crystal structure of cucurmosin has been determined at 1.04 {angstrom}, a resolution that has never been achieved before for any RIP. The structure contains two domains: a large N-terminal domain composed of seven {alpha}-helices and eight {beta}-strands, and a smaller C-terminal domain consisting of three {alpha}-helices and two {beta}-strands. The high resolution structure established a glycosylation pattern of GlcNAc{sub 2}Man3Xyl. Asn225 was identified as a glycosylation site. Residues Tyr70, Tyr109, Glu158 and Arg161 define the active site of cucurmosin as an RNA N-glycosidase. The structural basis of cytotoxicity difference between cucurmosin and trichosanthin is discussed.

  6. Analysis of X-ray Spectra of High-Z Elements obtained on Nike with high spectral and spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Yefim; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The spectra of multi-charged ions of Hf, Ta, W, Pt, Au and Bi have been studied on Nike krypton-fluoride laser facility with the help of two kinds of X-ray spectrometers. First, survey instrument covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms which allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of above mentioned elements with high spectral resolution. Second, an imaging spectrometer with interchangeable spherically bent Quartz crystals that added higher efficiency, higher spectral resolution and high spatial resolution to the qualities of the former one. Multiple spectral lines with X-ray energies as high as 4 keV that belong to the isoelectronic sequences of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were identified with the help of NOMAD package developed by Dr. Yu. Ralchenko and colleagues. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, this campaign covered a wide range of plasma conditions that result in production of relatively energetic X-rays. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  7. SCIENCE CHINA In-Sight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE ShiGang

    2010-01-01

    @@ 2010 celebrates the 60th anniversary of this journal.From this issue, the journal features a brand new section: 'In-Sight'.Equivalent to the Cutting Edge of the Cell, News and Views of the Nature and Perspective of the Science, 'In-Sight' provides a forum for discussions about science and science policies in China, the history and future development of this journal and the highlights of scientific progresses published in the current issue.

  8. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  9. Super-resolution image transfer by a vortex-like metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Hui Yuan; Fung, Kin Hung; Cui, Tie Jun

    2013-01-01

    We propose a vortex-like metamaterial device that is capable of transferring image along a spiral route without losing subwavelength information of the image. The super-resolution image can be guided and magnified at the same time with one single design. Our design may provide insights in manipulating super-resolution image in a more flexible manner. Examples are given and illustrated with numerical simulations.

  10. Ultrahigh Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Chen, Yu; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Považay, Boris; Unterhuber, Angelika; Fujimoto, James G.

    Since its invention in the late 1980s [1-4] and early 1990s [5-7], the original idea of OCT was to enable noninvasive optical biopsy, i.e., the in situ imaging of tissue microstructure with a resolution approaching that of histology, but without the need for tissue excision and post-processing. An important advance toward this goal was the introduction of ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT). By improving axial OCT resolution by one order of magnitude from the 10 to 15 μm to the sub-μm region [8-11], UHR OCT enables superior visualization of tissue microstructure, including all major intraretinal layers in ophthalmic applications as well as cellular resolution OCT imaging in nontransparent tissue. This chapter reviews state-of-the-art technology that enables ultrahigh-resolution OCT covering the entire wavelength region from 500 to 1,600 nm and discusses fundamental limitations of OCT image resolution.

  11. Delocalized equivariant cohomology and resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    A refined form of the `Folk Theorem' that a smooth action by a compact Lie group can be (canonically) resolved, by iterated blow up, to have unique isotropy type was established by the authors in the context of manifolds with corners; the canonical construction induces fibrations on the boundary faces of the resolution resulting in an `equivariant resolution structure'. Here, equivariant K-theory and the Cartan model for equivariant cohomology are tracked under the resolution procedure as is the delocalized equivariant cohomology of Baum, Brylinski and MacPherson. This leads to resolved models for each of these cohomology theories, in terms of relative objects over the resolution structure and hence to reduced models as flat-twisted relative objects over the resolution of the quotient. An explicit equivariant Chern character is then constructed, essentially as in the non-equivariant case, over the resolution of the quotient.

  12. Quantifying the Qualitative: Measuring the Insight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    No scales currently exist that measure variability in the insight experience. Two scales were created to measure two factors hypothesized to be key drivers of the insight experience: insight radicality (i.e., perceived deviation between previous and new problem representations) and restructuring experience (i.e., the subjective experience of the…

  13. Meter-Scale Slopes of Candidate InSight Landing Sites from Point Photoclinometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ross A.

    2016-09-01

    Photoclinometry was used to analyze the small-scale roughness of areas within the proposed Mars InSight landing ellipse. The landing ellipse presented in this study is in Elysium Planitia. This study was able to constrain surface slopes on length scales comparable to the HiRISE image resolution (0.25 meters/pixel and coarser). The InSight mission has various engineering constraints that each candidate landing ellipse must satisfy. These constraints indicate that the statistical value of the slopes at one, two, and five meter baselines are an important criterion. This technique estimates surface slopes across large swaths of each image, and builds up slope statistics for the images in the landing ellipse. The slopes I derived for the InSight landing site ellipse in this study are within the small-scale roughness constraints put forth by the InSight project. These results have provided input into the landing hazard assessment process.

  14. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  15. Equalization equations in reactant resolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jacek Korchowiec

    2005-09-01

    The chemical system can be analyzed in different resolutions. The assumed resolution imposes a given partitioning of the system in physical or functional space. The most frequently explored are global, reactant, atoms-in-molecule, orbital, and local resolutions. In this paper we have considered reactant resolution, i.e., the mutually polarized reactants before the charge-transfer among them. We have demonstrated that a certain type of generalized sensitivity, the system responses to the population variables, is equalized throughout the space up to the infinite order in the perturbation expansion.

  16. Building a Successful School Conflict Resolution Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, Judith

    1994-01-01

    Looks at components of conflict resolution programs in Toronto elementary schools. Describes how curriculum, peer resolution, and management work interdependently to support conflict resolution. Discusses establishing a program and lists key components of successful conflict resolution programs. (SR)

  17. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  18. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  19. The INSIGHT SEIS VBB Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillier, S.; De Raucourt, S.; Lognonne, P. H.; Banerdt, B.; Mimoun, D.; Giardini, D.; Christensen, U. R.; Pike, W. T.; Zweifel, P.; Mance, D.; Bierwirth, M.; Laudet, P.; Perez, R.; Kerjean, L.; Hurst, K. J.; Mocquet, A.; Garcia, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The SEIS experiment is the primary payload of the Interior Structure investigation using Seismology and Heat Transport (INSIGHT) Mission Proposal, submitted to NASA in the frame of the 2010 Discovery program, and selected for a competitive phase A study, together with two other projects. The objective of the INSIGHT SEIS experiment is the determination of the deep internal structure of Mars. In particular, geophysical parameters of first importance, such as the state (liquid/solid) and size of the core, structure of the mantle, shape of discontinuities, thickness of the crust will be determined by the experiment. It will measure seismic activity in a very broad band of signal, from the tidal frequencies (0.05 mHz) up to the short period frequencies (50 Hz), to address the widest range of scientific questions, from the state of the core to the meteoritic impact and quake rates. The instrument integrates a Very Broad Band (VBB) 3 axis seismometer, completed by another trihedron of MEMS short period seismometers, environmental sensors for pressure, wind and temperature, The sensors will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The sensor assembly, which contains all seismic sensors, the leveling system, as well as house-keeping and temperature measurements, will be deployed on the soil in order to allow the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The wind and thermal shield, the sensors' specific containers (vacuum sphere for VBBs) and a passive thermal compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the VBB against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a deection threshold below 10-9 ms-2 Hz-1/2 in the VBB bandwidth. A dedicated electronics will manage the overall experiment and ultra-low noise, space qualified 24 bits A/D converters will perform the acquisition

  20. Tele-AAC Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Anderson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1.3% of all people, or about 4 million Americans, cannot rely on their natural speech to meet their daily communication needs. Telepractice offers a potentially cost-effective service delivery mechanism to provide clinical AAC services at a distance to the benefit of underserved populations in the United States and worldwide.  Tele-AAC is a unique cross-disciplinary clinical service delivery model that requires expertise in both telepractice and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC systems.  The Tele-AAC Working Group of the 2012 ISAAC Research Symposium therefore drafted a resolution underscoring the importance of identifying and characterizing the unique opportunities and constraints of Tele-AAC in all aspects of service delivery. These include, but are not limited to: needs assessments; implementation planning; device/system procurement, set-up and training; quality assurance, client progress monitoring, and follow-up service delivery. Tele-AAC, like other telepractice applications, requires adherence to the ASHA Code of Ethics and other policy documents, and state, federal, and international laws, as well as a competent technological infrastructure. The Working Group recommends that institutions of higher education and professional organizations provide training in Tele-AAC service provision. In addition, research and development are needed to create validity measures across Tele-AAC practices (i.e., assessment, implementation, and consultation; determine the communication competence levels achieved  by Tele-AAC users; discern stakeholders’  perceptions of Tele-AAC services (e.g., acceptability and viability; maximize Tele-AAC’s capacity to engage multiple team members in AAC assessment and ongoing service; identify the limitations and barriers of Tele-AAC provision; and develop potential solutions. 

  1. Takotsubo Syndrome: Insights from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ishihara, Masaharu

    2016-10-01

    We report the history and new insights of takotsubo syndrome based on the achievements that Japanese researchers have contributed and summarize the evidence originally presented from Japan. Takotsubo syndrome is a newly described heart failure characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction. We should be aware of this entity as a syndrome, not actual cardiomyopathy. Japanese researchers focus on the experimental approaches for clinical diagnosis and treatment of takotsubo syndrome. As representatives from a country originally naming this syndrome takotsubo, a global registry for takotsubo syndrome including Japan should be established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structures of Human Cyctochrome P450 2E1: Insights Into the Binding of Inhibitors And Both Small Molecular Weight And Fatty Acid Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porubsky, P.R.; Meneely, K.M.; Scott, E.E.

    2009-05-21

    Human microsomal cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1) monooxygenates >70 low molecular weight xenobiotic compounds, as well as much larger endogenous fatty acid signaling molecules such as arachidonic acid. In the process, CYP2E1 can generate toxic or carcinogenic compounds, as occurs with acetaminophen overdose, nitrosamines in cigarette smoke, and reactive oxygen species from uncoupled catalysis. Thus, the diverse roles that CYP2E1 has in normal physiology, toxicity, and drug metabolism are related to its ability to metabolize diverse classes of ligands, but the structural basis for this was previously unknown. Structures of human CYP2E1 have been solved to 2.2 {angstrom} for an indazole complex and 2.6 {angstrom} for a 4-methylpyrazole complex. Both inhibitors bind to the heme iron and hydrogen bond to Thr{sup 303} within the active site. Complementing its small molecular weight substrates, the hydrophobic CYP2E1 active site is the smallest yet observed for a human cytochrome P-450. The CYP2E1 active site also has two adjacent voids: one enclosed above the I helix and the other forming a channel to the protein surface. Minor repositioning of the Phe{sup 478} aromatic ring that separates the active site and access channel would allow the carboxylate of fatty acid substrates to interact with conserved {sup 216}QXXNN{sup 220} residues in the access channel while positioning the hydrocarbon terminus in the active site, consistent with experimentally observed {omega}-1 hydroxylation of saturated fatty acids. Thus, these structures provide insights into the ability of CYP2E1 to effectively bind and metabolize both small molecule substrates and fatty acids.

  3. Super-resolution Phase Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Depeursinge, Christian

    2013-04-21

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) yields reconstructed complex wavefields. It allows synthesizing the aperture of a virtual microscope up to 2π, offering super-resolution phase images. Live images of micro-organisms and neurons with resolution less than 100 nm are presented.

  4. Quantitative super-resolution microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkes, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Super-Resolution Microscopy is an optical fluorescence technique. In this thesis we focus on single molecule super-resolution, where the position of single molecules is determined. Typically these molecules can be localized with a 10 to 30nm precision. This technique is applied in four different s

  5. Turn the Resolutions into Reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Can you remember each New Year's resolutions you made at the beginning of a year? Did you make good on them or did you forget about them by June? Here are 6 tips that will help you turn those resolutions into reality.

  6. Ethnic Identity: Crisis and Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Aureliano Sandoval

    1990-01-01

    Presents Chicano/Latino ethnic identity development model that fosters understanding of ethnic identity conflicts particular to Chicano and Latino clients. Presents five stages (causal, cognitive, consequence, working through, and successful resolution) in relationship to ethnic identity conflicts, interventions, and resolution. Combines several…

  7. "Planar" Tautologies Hard for Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantchev, Stefan; Riis, Søren

    2001-01-01

    We prove exponential lower bounds on the resolution proofs of some tautologies, based on rectangular grid graphs. More specifically, we show a 2Ω(n) lower bound for any resolution proof of the mutilated chessboard problem on a 2n×2n chessboard as well as for the Tseitin tautology (G. Tseitin, 196...

  8. "Planar" Tautologies Hard for Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantchev, Stefan; Riis, Søren

    2001-01-01

    We prove exponential lower bounds on the resolution proofs of some tautologies, based on rectangular grid graphs. More specifically, we show a 2Ω(n) lower bound for any resolution proof of the mutilated chessboard problem on a 2n×2n chessboard as well as for the Tseitin tautology (G. Tseitin, 196...

  9. Resolution of smooth group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    A refined form of the `Folk Theorem' that a smooth action by a compact Lie group can be (canonically) resolved, by iterated blow up, to have unique isotropy type is proved in the context of manifolds with corners. This procedure is shown to capture the simultaneous resolution of all isotropy types in a `resolution structure' consisting of equivariant iterated fibrations of the boundary faces. This structure projects to give a similar resolution structure for the quotient. In particular these results apply to give a canonical resolution of the radial compactification, to a ball, of any finite dimensional representation of a compact Lie group; such resolutions of the normal action of the isotropy groups appear in the boundary fibers in the general case.

  10. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  11. Resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Christoph; Masters, Barry R.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the history of resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy and their impact on current research in biomedicine. Often these techniques are labeled superresolution, or enhanced resolution microscopy, or light-optical nanoscopy. First, we introduce the development of diffraction theory in its relation to enhanced resolution; then we explore the foundations of resolution as expounded by the astronomers and the physicists and describe the conditions for which they apply. Then we elucidate Ernst Abbe's theory of optical formation in the microscope, and its experimental verification and dissemination to the world wide microscope communities. Second, we describe and compare the early techniques that can enhance the resolution of the microscope. Third, we present the historical development of various techniques that substantially enhance the optical resolution of the light microscope. These enhanced resolution techniques in their modern form constitute an active area of research with seminal applications in biology and medicine. Our historical survey of the field of resolution enhancement uncovers many examples of reinvention, rediscovery, and independent invention and development of similar proposals, concepts, techniques, and instruments. Attribution of credit is therefore confounded by the fact that for understandable reasons authors stress the achievements from their own research groups and sometimes obfuscate their contributions and the prior art of others. In some cases, attribution of credit is also made more complex by the fact that long term developments are difficult to allocate to a specific individual because of the many mutual connections often existing between sometimes fiercely competing, sometimes strongly collaborating groups. Since applications in biology and medicine have been a major driving force in the development of resolution enhancing approaches, we focus on the contribution of enhanced resolution to these fields.

  12. Theory of mind correlates with clinical insight but not cognitive insight in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Xu; Parker, Giverny J; Hong, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Yi; Lui, Simon S Y; Neumann, David L; Cheung, Eric F C; Shum, David H K; Chan, Raymond C K

    2016-03-30

    Research on the relationship between insight and social cognition, in particular Theory of Mind (ToM), in schizophrenia has yielded mixed findings to date. Very few studies, however, have assessed both clinical insight and cognitive insight when examining their relationships with ToM in schizophrenia. The current study thus investigated the relationship between clinical insight, cognitive insight, and ToM in a sample of 56 patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls. Twenty-seven patients were classified as low in clinical insight according to their scores on the 'insight' item (G12) of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Moreover, cognitive insight and ToM were assessed with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) and the Yoni task, respectively. The results indicated that patients with poor clinical insight performed worse on tasks of second-order cognitive and affective ToM, while the ToM performance of patients with high clinical insight was equivalent to that of healthy controls. Furthermore, while clinical insight was correlated with ToM and clinical symptoms, cognitive insight did not correlate with clinical insight, ToM, or clinical symptoms. Clinical insight thus appears to be an important factor related to ToM in schizophrenia.

  13. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  14. Insight with hands and things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée-Tourangeau, Frédéric; Steffensen, Sune Vork; Vallée-Tourangeau, Gaëlle; Sirota, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments examined whether different task ecologies influenced insight problem solving. The 17 animals problem was employed, a pure insight problem. Its initial formulation encourages the application of a direct arithmetic solution, but its solution requires the spatial arrangement of sets involving some degree of overlap. Participants were randomly allocated to either a tablet condition where they could use a stylus and an electronic tablet to sketch a solution or a model building condition where participants were given material with which to build enclosures and figurines. In both experiments, participants were much more likely to develop a working solution in the model building condition. The difference in performance elicited by different task ecologies was unrelated to individual differences in working memory, actively open-minded thinking, or need for cognition (Experiment 1), although individual differences in creativity were correlated with problem solving success in Experiment 2. The discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for the prevailing metatheoretical commitment to methodological individualism that places the individual as the ontological locus of cognition.

  15. GOES-R: Satellite Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Leon, Nancy J.; Novati, Alexander; Lincoln, Laura K.; Fisher, Diane K.

    2012-01-01

    GOES-R: Satellite Insight seeks to bring awareness of the GOES-R (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite -- R Series) satellite currently in development to an audience of all ages on the emerging medium of mobile games. The iPhone app (Satellite Insight) was created for the GOES-R Program. The app describes in simple terms the types of data products that can be produced from GOES-R measurements. The game is easy to learn, yet challenging for all audiences. It includes educational content and a path to further information about GOESR, its technology, and the benefits of the data it collects. The game features action-puzzle game play in which the player must prevent an overflow of data by matching falling blocks that represent different types of GOES-R data. The game adds more different types of data blocks over time, as long as the player can prevent a data overflow condition. Points are awarded for matches, and players can compete with themselves to beat their highest score.

  16. Analysis of Regolith Properties Using Seismic Signals Generated by InSight's HP3 Penetrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Sharon; Andrade, Jose; Banerdt, Bruce; Delage, Pierre; Golombek, Matt; Grott, Matthias; Hudson, Troy; Kiely, Aaron; Knapmeyer, Martin; Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte; Krause, Christian; Kawamura, Taichi; Lognonne, Philippe; Pike, Tom; Ruan, Youyi; Spohn, Tilman; Teanby, Nick; Tromp, Jeroen; Wookey, James

    2017-07-01

    InSight's Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS) provides a unique and unprecedented opportunity to conduct the first geotechnical survey of the Martian soil by taking advantage of the repeated seismic signals that will be generated by the mole of the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3). Knowledge of the elastic properties of the Martian regolith have implications to material strength and can constrain models of water content, and provide context to geological processes and history that have acted on the landing site in western Elysium Planitia. Moreover, it will help to reduce travel-time errors introduced into the analysis of seismic data due to poor knowledge of the shallow subsurface. The challenge faced by the InSight team is to overcome the limited temporal resolution of the sharp hammer signals, which have significantly higher frequency content than the SEIS 100 Hz sampling rate. Fortunately, since the mole propagates at a rate of ˜1 mm per stroke down to 5 m depth, we anticipate thousands of seismic signals, which will vary very gradually as the mole travels. Using a combination of field measurements and modeling we simulate a seismic data set that mimics the InSight HP3-SEIS scenario, and the resolution of the InSight seismometer data. We demonstrate that the direct signal, and more importantly an anticipated reflected signal from the interface between the bottom of the regolith layer and an underlying lava flow, are likely to be observed both by Insight's Very Broad Band (VBB) seismometer and Short Period (SP) seismometer. We have outlined several strategies to increase the signal temporal resolution using the multitude of hammer stroke and internal timing information to stack and interpolate multiple signals, and demonstrated that in spite of the low resolution, the key parameters—seismic velocities and regolith depth—can be retrieved with a high degree of confidence.

  17. Medium-resolution isaac newton telescope library of empirical spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Peletier, R. F.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Cardiel, N.; Cenarro, A. J.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Gorgas, J.; Selam, S.; Vazdekis, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new stellar library developed for stellar population synthesis modelling is presented. The library consists of 985 stars spanning a large range in atmospheric parameters. The spectra were obtained at the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope and cover the range lambda lambda 3525-7500 angstrom at 2.3 angst

  18. Destruction of Tissue, Cells and Organelles in Type 1 Diabetic Rats Presented at Macromolecular Resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Avramut, M. Cristina; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Pronk, Joachim W.; Dijk, Freark; Koster, Abraham J.; Visser, Jeroen T. J.; Faas, Frank G. A.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Finding alternatives for insulin therapy and making advances in etiology of type 1 diabetes benefits from a full structural and functional insight into Islets of Langerhans. Electron microscopy (EM) can visualize Islet morphology at the highest possible resolution, however, conventional EM only

  19. Active site of bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst by atomic resolution aberration-corrected STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Chien-Nan, E-mail: 0209347@narlabs.org.tw; Lin, Chun-Ting

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Up to fifth order aberration coefficients of STEM had been compensated. • The core-shell structural catalyst was identified by Z-contrast image. • Atomic twinning in nanoparticle was revealed by aberration-corrected STEM. - Abstract: The localized defect of Au–Pd bimetallic heterogeneous nanoparticles catalyst was investigated using HRTEM and aberration-corrected HRSTEM. The phase plates were calculated from the aberration coefficients of the measured probe tableau for various outer tilt angle of the optical axis and the accuracy required for the compensation of the various residual aberration coefficients in order to achieve sub-angstrom resolution with the electron optics system was evaluated up to the fifth order aberrations. It is found that the interplanar spacing of the Au–Pd nanoparticle (1 1 1) planes observed along the [1 1 0] zone axis was approximately 0.24 nm measured by HRTEM. In addition, the HRSTEM HAADF image demonstrated that the twin boundaries on the surfaces of heterogeneous nanoparticles catalysts at atomic scale. These defects might be introduced during the growth to alleviate the internal stress caused by the 4.6% lattice mismatch of Au–Pd bimetallic system. Current research could be applied to the study of active sites in nanocatalysts.

  20. State of the art in atomic resolution off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linck, Martin, E-mail: mlinck@lbl.gov [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Zum Triebenberg 50, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Freitag, Bert; Kujawa, Stephan [FEI Company, Eindhoven, Building AAE, Achtseweg Noord 5, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lehmann, Michael; Niermann, Tore [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    As proposed by Hannes Lichte, to resolve structure-property relations not only the question 'Which atom is where?' but also the question 'Which fields are around?' has to be answered. High-resolution off-axis electron holography opens up an access to these key questions in that it allows accessing the complete exit-wave of the object provided within the information limit of the microscope, i.e. amplitude and phase including atomic details such as position and species, and moreover, information about large area electric potentials and magnetic fields, which a conventional transmission electron microscope is blind for-also when using a Cs-corrector. For an excellent object exit-wave reconstruction, special care has to be taken on the hologram quality, i.e. interference fringe contrast and electron dose. Severe restrictions are given to signal resolution by the limited brightness of the electron source. Utilizing a new high-brightness Schottky field electron emitter in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope operated at 300 kV, the phase signal resolution at atomic resolution can significantly be enhanced. An improvement by at least a factor of 2.88 compared to the most recently reported single hologram at atomic resolution is found. To proof the applicability of this setup to real materials science problems, a grain boundary of gold has been investigated holographically. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impact of the brightness on the reconstructed signal in electron holography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Factor 2.8 gain in signal quality by setup with a high brightness electron gun. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of a grain boundary in gold with a state-of-the-art holography setup. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-posteriori aberration fine-tuning for true one Angstrom resolution in the object wave. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mistilt analysis on the atomic scale by numerical wave optics.

  1. Thematic and spatial resolutions affect model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liang

    Full Text Available Subjective decisions of thematic and spatial resolutions in characterizing environmental heterogeneity may affect the characterizations of spatial pattern and the simulation of occurrence and rate of ecological processes, and in turn, model-based tree species distribution. Thus, this study quantified the importance of thematic and spatial resolutions, and their interaction in predictions of tree species distribution (quantified by species abundance. We investigated how model-predicted species abundances changed and whether tree species with different ecological traits (e.g., seed dispersal distance, competitive capacity had different responses to varying thematic and spatial resolutions. We used the LANDIS forest landscape model to predict tree species distribution at the landscape scale and designed a series of scenarios with different thematic (different numbers of land types and spatial resolutions combinations, and then statistically examined the differences of species abundance among these scenarios. Results showed that both thematic and spatial resolutions affected model-based predictions of species distribution, but thematic resolution had a greater effect. Species ecological traits affected the predictions. For species with moderate dispersal distance and relatively abundant seed sources, predicted abundance increased as thematic resolution increased. However, for species with long seeding distance or high shade tolerance, thematic resolution had an inverse effect on predicted abundance. When seed sources and dispersal distance were not limiting, the predicted species abundance increased with spatial resolution and vice versa. Results from this study may provide insights into the choice of thematic and spatial resolutions for model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

  2. Thematic and spatial resolutions affect model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; He, Hong S; Fraser, Jacob S; Wu, ZhiWei

    2013-01-01

    Subjective decisions of thematic and spatial resolutions in characterizing environmental heterogeneity may affect the characterizations of spatial pattern and the simulation of occurrence and rate of ecological processes, and in turn, model-based tree species distribution. Thus, this study quantified the importance of thematic and spatial resolutions, and their interaction in predictions of tree species distribution (quantified by species abundance). We investigated how model-predicted species abundances changed and whether tree species with different ecological traits (e.g., seed dispersal distance, competitive capacity) had different responses to varying thematic and spatial resolutions. We used the LANDIS forest landscape model to predict tree species distribution at the landscape scale and designed a series of scenarios with different thematic (different numbers of land types) and spatial resolutions combinations, and then statistically examined the differences of species abundance among these scenarios. Results showed that both thematic and spatial resolutions affected model-based predictions of species distribution, but thematic resolution had a greater effect. Species ecological traits affected the predictions. For species with moderate dispersal distance and relatively abundant seed sources, predicted abundance increased as thematic resolution increased. However, for species with long seeding distance or high shade tolerance, thematic resolution had an inverse effect on predicted abundance. When seed sources and dispersal distance were not limiting, the predicted species abundance increased with spatial resolution and vice versa. Results from this study may provide insights into the choice of thematic and spatial resolutions for model-based predictions of tree species distribution.

  3. High resolution emission tomography; Tomographie d`emission haute resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Mastrippolito, R.; Pinot, L.; Ploux, L.; Valda Ochoa, A.; Valentin, L. [Groupe I.P.B., Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    We have developed an original high resolution tomograph for in-vivo small animal imaging. A first prototype is under evaluation. Initial results of its characterisation are presented. (authors) 3 figs.

  4. Improved Insight into Transport Phenomena in Porous Materials at Submicrometer Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gooya, Reza

    Traditionally it has been challenging to investigate ƒflow properties of porous media becauseof their complex and oft‰en heterogeneous pore geometry. However, these materialsare important for oil and gas, catalysts, fuel cells, groundwater quality, CO2 storageand in medical applications. In this ......Traditionally it has been challenging to investigate ƒflow properties of porous media becauseof their complex and oft‰en heterogeneous pore geometry. However, these materialsare important for oil and gas, catalysts, fuel cells, groundwater quality, CO2 storageand in medical applications....... In this thesis, transport phenomena- including single phaseƒow, two phase ƒow and reactive transport, were investigated at the pore scale. Œe motivationwas to €nd cheaper, easier and faster alternatives to macroscale investigations.In the fi€rst part, single phase ƒuid flƒow models were tested on experimentally...... materials at the pore scale. ThŒe coupled program wastested for two cases of chloride transport in a 2D channel and for a 2D ion exchanger.In this thesis, pore scale modeling was presented for several transport phenomenain porous media. ThŒeir agreement with the macroscale properties and the ability...

  5. Stuttering Risk: Neurophysiological and Genetic Findings Versus Psychosocial Insights. A Proposalfor a Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurg Kollbrunner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the search for the causes of developmental stuttering the findings have constantly proved contradictory. Despite the huge body of knowledge about stuttering its cause is still considered to be unknown; the psychological background is recognized as important, but stuttering is currently regarded as a pure neurological problem. It is generally agreed that therapy should be multidimensional but in fact there is a widespread opinion that the dysfunction has genetic roots. This surprising lack of agreement is blocking the advance of research and the development of therapeutic approaches. In addition, there are serious shortcomings in the currently favored methodology of stuttering research: evidence-based medicine and practice have reduced the amount of high-grade evidence research data to such an extent that much useful information has been lost; the relevance of functional magnetic resonance imaging is controversial, and the hope that one day genetic engineering will correct stuttering-related mutations without severe side effects is unrealistic. A change of approach to research and therapy is required. If this cannot be found on the basis of a generally accepted notion of the cause of stuttering, it must emerge from the search for the best existing therapeutic approach. Conclusion:The present paper offers an evaluation of the basic finding of modern outcome research that the factor of a specific therapeutic approach has less impact on outcome than the common factors, especially the clinician-client relationship. In Speech Language Pathology, and notably in stuttering research and clinical practice, it would be wise to implement this understanding in the form of chempathy-based therapies. The requirements for developing the skills for this approach are discussed.

  6. New insights into the formation and resolution of ultra-fine anaphase bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kok Lung; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    that are important for preventing Fanconi anemia (FA) in man. As part of an analysis of the roles of these proteins in mitosis, we identified a novel class of anaphase bridge structure, called an ultra-fine anaphase bridge (UFB). These UFBs are also defined by the presence of a SNF2 family protein called PICH...

  7. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context...

  8. How wet are gullies on Mars? Insights from high resolution topography

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, S. J.; Balme, M. R.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    We have found that debris flows are the main process in forming two gullied crater slopes on Mars. We used 1 m/pix elevation models to derive three topographic indices: slope-area, CAD and DI-25. These indices allow the active slope processes to be identified by comparison to data from Earth analogues. We present data from Meteor Crater together with analogues previsouly presented by Conway et al. [1]. We also compare the signals from the martian gullied slopes with a non-gullied martian exam...

  9. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis from high resolution surface enhanced Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Tia E.; Leane, Deirdre; Forster, Robert J.; Moran, Niamh; Kenny, Dermot

    2005-06-01

    Occlusion of a blood vessel due to thrombosis can reduce or completely stop blood supply to different tissues or organs with the clinical consequences of myocardial infarction or stroke. Platelets are the cellular component which initiate thrombus formation, they activate in response to a variety of signals, such as interactions with a damaged blood vessel. αIIbβ3 is a membrane bound integrin protein responsible for regulating adhesion of the activated platelet to damaged blood vessels. It exists in both activated and non-activated states displaying high and low affinity respectively for ligands such as fibrinogen. αIIbβ3 determines the "stickiness" of the blood platelet and is therefore, a logical target for therapeutic measures to control thrombus formation. During the past decade considerable progress has been made to identify the role of the αIIbβ3 complex in platelet-mediated thrombus formation and the structure of αIIbβ3 has been extrapolated from the crystal structure of related integrins. However, despite these advances, the bimolecular mechanisms underlying the activation of αIIbβ3 remain poorly understood. In this contribution, we describe methodologies of deriving surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of αIIbβ3 on nanostructured metal surfaces, fabricated by a number of methods. We compare activation of αIIbβ3 by SERS using a range of known activation conditions including Mn(II), EDTA and dithiotheritol (DTT). By studying the behaviour of the disulfide and CS marker vibrations in the spectral region 400 to 800 cm-1 using SERS we confirm that activation results in significant conformational change in the protein, and most interestingly, that the response is not the same for every agonist. This mechanistic difference has implications for the biochemical study of this protein (and indeed for understanding the role of this integrin in response to different agonists).

  10. A high-resolution structure that provides insight into coiled-coil thiodepsipeptide dynamic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadon, Zehavit; Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Shahar, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-09-16

    Stable and reactive: A crystal structure at 1.35 Å of a thioester coiled-coil protein reveals high similarity to all-peptide-bond proteins. In these assemblies, the thioester bonds are kept reactive towards thiol molecules in the mixture. This enables efficient domain exchange between proteins in response to changes in folding conditions or introduction of external templates.

  11. Energy resolution of scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moszyński, M., E-mail: M.Moszynski@ncbj.gov.pl; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska, J.; Sibczyński, P.; Szczęśniak, T.

    2016-01-01

    According to current knowledge, the non-proportionality of the light yield of scintillators appears to be a fundamental limitation of energy resolution. A good energy resolution is of great importance for most applications of scintillation detectors. Thus, its limitations are discussed below; which arise from the non-proportional response of scintillators to gamma rays and electrons, being of crucial importance to the intrinsic energy resolution of crystals. The important influence of Landau fluctuations and the scattering of secondary electrons (δ-rays) on intrinsic resolution is pointed out here. The study on undoped NaI and CsI at liquid nitrogen temperature with a light readout by avalanche photodiodes strongly suggests that the non-proportionality of many crystals is not their intrinsic property and may be improved by selective co-doping. Finally, several observations that have been collected in the last 15 years on the influence of the slow components of light pulses on energy resolution suggest that more complex processes are taking place in the scintillators. This was observed with CsI(Tl), CsI(Na), ZnSe(Te), and undoped NaI at liquid nitrogen temperature and, finally, for NaI(Tl) at temperatures reduced below 0 °C. A common conclusion of these observations is that the highest energy resolution, and particularly intrinsic resolution measured with the scintillators, characterized by two or more components of the light pulse decay, is obtainable when the spectrometry equipment integrates the whole light of the components. In contrast, the slow components observed in many other crystals degrade the intrinsic resolution. In the limiting case, afterglow could also be considered as a very slow component that spoils the energy resolution. The aim of this work is to summarize all of the above observations by looking for their origin.

  12. Managing complexity insights, concepts, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Each chapter in Managing Complexity focuses on analyzing real-world complex systems and transferring knowledge from the complex-systems sciences to applications in business, industry and society. The interdisciplinary contributions range from markets and production through logistics, traffic control, and critical infrastructures, up to network design, information systems, social conflicts and building consensus. They serve to raise readers' awareness concerning the often counter-intuitive behavior of complex systems and to help them integrate insights gained in complexity research into everyday planning, decision making, strategic optimization, and policy. Intended for a broad readership, the contributions have been kept largely non-technical and address a general, scientifically literate audience involved in corporate, academic, and public institutions.

  13. Illness Insight and Recovery: How Important is Illness Insight in Peoples’ Recovery Process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbek, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Topic: This account reflects on the topic of illness insight and recovery. Purpose: The purpose of the account is to clarify our understanding about the importance of illness insight in peoples’ recovery process, especially when relating the question of illness insight to the question of identity....... Sources Used:The writing is based on research literature related to illness insight and on personal recovery experiences.Conclusions and Implications for Practice: It is helpful to consider the integration of the issue of illness insight when addressing the questions and consequences of diagnosis...... in relation to the importance of illness insight in the recovery process....

  14. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  15. Absolute intensity, high resolution spectrum of the Vortek arc lamp and its spectral match to Nd:YAG bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, L.E.; Pertica, A.J.

    1989-12-28

    A high resolution (1{angstrom}), absolute intensity spectrum from 300 to 900 nm was obtained for a high average power (100 kWe) argon arc-lamp. The high average power is obtained due to innovative technology that cools the inside surface of the lamp envelope by means of a spiraling water jet. The optical output between 200 and 2000 nm was measured by using a calibrated pyroelectric detector and glass color filters, and accounted for 54% of the electrical input. The argon arc-lamp radiated 35% of the electrical power input in the 400 to 900 nm spectral region when a cerium doped quartz envelope was used; furthermore, 37% of this optical power was emitted as line output between 730 and 830 nm, a region well tuned to Nd{sup 3+}:YAG absorption bands. Lower resolution spectra and fluorescence/transmission measurements of YAG samples were obtained for mixtures of Ar/Kr and Ar/Xe with up to 14% by volume of the heavier species. When the Ar/14%-Kr mixture was used, increased absorption (115%) and net fluorescence (120%) were measured relative to the pure argon arc-lamp. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSICAL) for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is providing unprecedented insights into biology by resolving details much below the diffraction limit. State-of-the-art Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) techniques for super-resolution are restricted by long acquisition and computational times, or the need of special fluorophores or chemical environments. Here, we propose a novel statistical super-resolution technique of wide-field fluorescence microscopy called MUltiple SIgnal Classification ALgorithm (MUSICAL) which has several advantages over SMLM techniques. MUSICAL provides resolution down to at least 50 nm, has low requirements on number of frames and excitation power and works even at high fluorophore concentrations. Further, it works with any fluorophore that exhibits blinking on the time scale of the recording. We compare imaging results of MUSICAL with SMLM and four contemporary statistical super-resolution methods for experiments of in-vitro actin filaments and datasets provided by independent research gro...

  17. Insights into the substrate specificity of plant peptide deformylase, an essential enzyme with potential for the development of novel biotechnology applicatons in agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Schmidt, Jack J.; Cai, Yiying; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Hanger, Katherine M.; Nayak, Nihar R.; Williams, Mark A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Houtz, Robert L.; Rodgers, David W. (Kentucky)

    2008-07-28

    The crystal structure of AtPDF1B [Arabidopsis thaliana PDF (peptide deformylase) 1B; EC 3.5.1.88], a plant specific deformylase, has been determined at a resolution of 2.4 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom}=0.1 nm). The overall fold of AtPDF1B is similar to other peptide deformylases that have been reported. Evidence from the crystal structure and gel filtration chromatography indicates that AtPDF1B exists as a symmetric dimer. PDF1B is essential in plants and has a preferred substrate specificity towards the PS II (photosystem II) D1 polypeptide. Comparative analysis of AtPDF1B, AtPDF1A, and the type 1B deformylase from Escherichia coli, identifies a number of differences in substrate binding subsites that might account for variations in sequence preference. A model of the N-terminal five amino acids from the D1 polypeptide bound in the active site of AtPDF1B suggests an influence of Tyr{sup 178} as a structural determinant for polypeptide substrate specificity through hydrogen bonding with Thr{sup 2} in the D1 sequence. Kinetic analyses using a polypeptide mimic of the D1 N-terminus was performed on AtPDF1B mutated at Tyr{sup 178} to alanine, phenylalanine or arginine (equivalent residue in AtPDF1A). The results suggest that, whereas Tyr{sup 178} can influence catalytic activity, other residues contribute to the overall preference for the D1 polypeptide.

  18. House passes resolution on occupation

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Venemaalt Baltimaade okupeerimise tunnistamist nõudva resolutsiooni vastuvõtmisest USA Kongressi Esindajate Kojas Leedu päritolu kongressmani John Shimkuse eestvedamisel. Vt. ka resolutsiooni teksti "House Concurrent Resolution 128" lk. 14

  19. Fragmentation and Dijet Mass Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D

    2004-01-01

    At the LHC the overlap of minimum bias events and the jet energy deposits in a calorimeter causes a degradation in the dijet mass resolution. Guided by QCD, a judicious set of cuts can be developed to mitigate this degradation.

  20. House passes resolution on occupation

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Venemaalt Baltimaade okupeerimise tunnistamist nõudva resolutsiooni vastuvõtmisest USA Kongressi Esindajate Kojas Leedu päritolu kongressmani John Shimkuse eestvedamisel. Vt. ka resolutsiooni teksti "House Concurrent Resolution 128" lk. 14

  1. Towards generic resolution of strong singularities in loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2010-10-01

    Singularities are the boundaries of classical spacetime in General Relativity. It has been always hoped that quantum gravitational effects may resolve these singularities. In recent years, progress in loop quantum cosmology has provided insights on the resolution of big bang, big crunch and other spacelike singularities. In this talk we will give an update on the recent status of the generic resolution of strong spacelike singularities in loop quantum cosmology. We will show that for flat and curved Roberston-Walker backgrounds and also for Bianchi-I models, loop quantum gravity effects resolve all strong curvature singularities. However, weak curvature singularities, that is those beyond which geodesics can be continued, may not be resolved.

  2. Super-resolution optical microscopy of lipid plasma membrane dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane dynamics are an important ruler of cellular activity, particularly through the interaction and diffusion dynamics of membrane-embedded proteins and lipids. FCS (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy) on an optical (confocal) microscope is a popular tool for investigating such dynamics. Unfortunately, its full applicability is constrained by the limited spatial resolution of a conventional optical microscope. The present chapter depicts the combination of optical super-resolution STED (stimulated emission depletion) microscopy with FCS, and why it is an important tool for investigating molecular membrane dynamics in living cells. Compared with conventional FCS, the STED-FCS approach demonstrates an improved possibility to distinguish free from anomalous molecular diffusion, and thus to give new insights into lipid-protein interactions and the traditional lipid 'raft' theory.

  3. High-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Gligorijevic, Bojana; Entenberg, David; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of the individual steps in metastasis is crucial if insights at the molecular level are to be linked to the cell biology of cancer. A technical hurdle to achieving the analysis of the individual steps of metastasis is the fact that, at the gross level, tumors are heterogeneous in both animal models and patients. Human primary tumors show extensive variation in all properties ranging from growth and morphology of the tumor through tumor-cell density in the blood and formation and growth of metastases. Methods capable of the direct visualization and analysis of tumor-cell behavior at single-cell resolution in vivo have become crucial in advancing the understanding of mechanisms of metastasis, the definition of microenvironment, and the markers related to both. This article discusses the use of high-resolution multiphoton imaging of tumors (specifically breast tumors in mice) in vivo.

  4. High-resolution neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikerov, V.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitnik, I.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat`ev, A.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Isakov, A.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krutov, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzin, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Oparin, S.N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pertsov, A.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podolyak, E.R. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sobel`man, I.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tindo, I.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tukarev, B.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A neutron tomography technique with a coordinate resolution of several tens of micrometers has been developed. Our results indicate that the technique resolves details with dimensions less than 100 {mu}m and measures a linear attenuation of less than {approx} 0.1 cm{sup -1}. Tomograms can be reconstructed using incomplete data. Limits on the resolution of the restored pattern are analyzed, and ways to improve the sensitivity of the technique are discussed. (orig.).

  5. Resolution enhancement in tilted coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Keith Morley, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution is applied to remove source wavelet effects from seismograms. The results are resolution enhancement that enables detection of thin layers. Following enhancement of resolution, low frequency and high angle reflectors, particularly at great depth, appear as low amplitude and semi-invisible reflectors that are difficult to track and pick. A new approach to enhance resolution is introduced that estimates a derivative using continuous wavelet transform in tilted coordinates. The results are compared with sparse spike deconvolution, curvelet deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain. The positive consequence of the new method is to increase sampling of high dip features by changing the coordinate system from Cartesian to tilted. To compare those methods a complex data set was chosen that includes high angle faults and chaotic mass transport complex. Image enhancement using curvelet deconvolution shows a chaotic system as a non-chaotic one. The results show that sparse spike deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain are able to enhance resolution more than curvelet deconvolution especially at great depth but it is impossible to follow steep dip reflectors after resolution enhancement using these methods, especially when their apparent dips are more than 45°. By estimating derivatives in a continuous wavelet transform from tilted data sets similar resolution enhancement as the other deconvolution methods is achieved but additionally steep dipping reflectors are imaged much better than others. Subtracted results of the enhanced resolution data set using new method and the other introduced methods show that steeply dipping reflectors are highlighted as a particular ability of the new method. The results show that high frequency recovery in Cartesian co-ordinate is accompanied by inability to image steeply dipping reflectors especially at great depths. Conversely recovery of high frequency data and imaging of the data

  6. Resolution analysis of bistatic SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Guillermo; Qiao, Zhijun

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the resolution of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR) imaging for stationary objects. In particular, we analyze the resolution of images reconstructed by the method of a filtered backprojection inversion, an inversion method which is derived from a scalar wave equation model. In this context we are able to account for the effects of antenna beam patterns and arbitrary flight trajectories. The analysis is done by examining the data collection manifold for different experiment geometries and system parameters.

  7. AFM's path to atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We review progress in improving the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) under vacuum. After an introduction to the basic imaging principle and a conceptual comparison to scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we outline the main challenges of AFM as well as the solutions that have evolved in the first 20 years of its existence. Some crucial steps along AFM's path toward higher resolution are discussed, followed by an outlook on current and future applications.

  8. Single Image Super Resolution via Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, M.C.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van; Dijk, J.; Schutte, K.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution sensors are required for recognition purposes. Low resolution sensors, however, are still widely used. Software can be used to increase the resolution of such sensors. One way of increasing the resolution of the images produced is using multi-frame super resolution algorithms. Limita

  9. Dynamic thermodynamic resolution: advantage by separation of equilibration and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Koo; Park, Yong Sun; Beak, Peter

    2009-02-17

    In the investigation of a chemical reaction, researchers typically survey variables such as time, temperature, and stoichiometry to optimize yields. This Account demonstrates how control of these variables, often in nontraditional ways, can provide significant improvements in enantiomeric ratios for asymmetric reactions. Dynamic thermodynamic resolution (DTR) offers a convenient method for the resolution of enantiomeric products in the course of a reaction. This process depends on an essential requirement: the equilibration of the penultimate diastereomers must be subject to external control. As a general case, the reaction of A(R), A(S) with B under the influence of the chiral species, L*, gives resolved products C(R) and C(S). In the first step of dynamic resolution under thermodynamic control, the enantiomeric reactants A(R) and A(S) and L* form the diastereomers A(R)/L* and A(S)/L*. The equilibrium between A(R) and A(S) can be rapid, slow, or not operative, and L* can represent a ligand, an auxiliary, or a crystallization process that provides a chiral environment. Second, the populations of the diastereomers are controlled, usually by thermal equilibration. Finally, the reaction of the diastereomers with a reagent B provides the enantiomeric products C(R) and C(S). The control of the diastereomeric equilibrium distinguishes DTR from other resolution techniques. By contrast, physical resolutions separate thermodynamically stable, nonequilibrating diastereomers, and dynamic kinetic resolutions utilize kinetic control for reactions of rapidly equilibrating diastereomers. The dynamic thermodynamic resolutions discussed in this Account illustrate cases of significantly improved enantioselectivities using this technique. Although many of the well-recognized cases come from organolithium chemistry, the principles are general, and we also present cases facilitated by other chemistries. This approach has been used to control enantioselectivities in a number of

  10. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  11. Anonymous-address-resolution model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-jia SONG; Zhen-zhou JI

    2016-01-01

    Address-resolution protocol (ARP) is an important protocol of data link layers that aims to obtain the corresponding relationship between Internet Protocol (IP) and Media Access Control (MAC) addresses. Traditional ARPs (address-resolution and neighbor-discovery protocols) do not consider the existence of malicious nodes, which reveals destination addresses in the resolution process. Thus, these traditional protocols allow malicious nodes to easily carry out attacks, such as man-in-the-middle attack and denial-of-service attack. To overcome these weaknesses, we propose an anonymous-address-resolution (AS-AR) protocol. AS-AR does not publicize the destination address in the address-resolution process and hides the IP and MAC addresses of the source node. The malicious node cannot obtain the addresses of the destination and the node which initiates the address resolution; thus, it cannot attack. Analyses and experiments show that AS-AR has a higher security level than existing security methods, such as secure-neighbor discovery.

  12. Quantitative and high spatial resolution d{sub 33} measurement of piezoelectric bulk and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Smitha, E-mail: sus44@psu.edu; Yang, Jung In; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Stitt, Joe [Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    A single beam laser interferometer based on a modified Mirau detection scheme with a vertical resolution of ∼5 pm was developed for localized d{sub 33} measurements on patterned piezoelectric films. The tool provides high spatial resolution (∼2 μm), essential for understanding scaling and processing effects in piezoelectric materials. This approach enables quantitative information on d{sub 33}, currently difficult in local measurement techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy. The interferometer is built in a custom microscope and employs a phase lock-in technique in order to detect sub-Angstrom displacements. d{sub 33} measurements on single crystal 0.67PbMg{sub 0.33}Nb{sub 0.67}O{sub 3}-0.33PbTiO{sub 3} and bulk PbZrTiO{sub 3}-5A ceramics demonstrated agreement within <3% with measurements using a double beam laser interferometer. Substrate bending contributions to out-of-plane strain, observed in thin continuous PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films grown on Si substrates is reduced for electrode diameters smaller than 100 μm. Direct scanning across room temperature and 150 °C poled 5 μm and 10 μm features etched in 0.5 μm thick PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} films doped with 1% Nb confirmed minimal substrate contributions to the effective d{sub 33,f}. Furthermore, enhanced d{sub 33,f} values were observed along the feature edges due to partial declamping from the substrate, thus validating the application of single beam interferometry on finely patterned electrodes.

  13. First insights into disassembled "evapotranspiration"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chormański, Jarosław; Kleniewska, Małgorzata; Berezowski, Tomasz; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Okruszko, Tomasz; Szatyłowicz, Jan; Batelaan, Okke

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present an initial data analysis obtained from a complex tool for measuring water fluxes in wetland ecosystems. The tool was designed to quantify processes related to interception storage on plants leafs. The measurements are conducted by combining readings from various instruments, including: eddy covariance tower (EC), field spectrometer, SapFlow system, rain gauges above and under canopy, soil moisture probes and other. The idea of this set-up is to provide continuous measurement of overall water flux from the ecosystem (EC tower), intercepted water volume and timing (field spectrometers), through-fall (rain gauges above and under canopy), transpiration (SapFlow), evaporation and soil moisture (soil moisture probes). Disassembling the water flux to the above components allows giving more insight to the interception related processes and differentiates them fromthe total evapotranspiration. The measurements are conducted in the Upper Biebrza Basin (NE Poland). The study area is part of the valley and is covered by peat soils (mainly peat moss with the exception of areas near the river) and receives no inundations waters of the Biebrza. The plant community of Agrostietum-Carici caninae has a dominant share here creating an up to 0.6 km wide belt along the river. The area is covered also by Caricion lasiocarpae as well as meadows and pastures Molinio-Arrhenatheretea, Phragmitetum communis. Sedges form a hummock pattern characteristic for the sedge communities in natural river valleys with wetland vegetation. The main result of the measurement set-up will be the analyzed characteristics and dynamics of interception storage for sedge ecosystems and a developed methodology for interception monitoring by use spectral reflectance technique. This will give a new insight to processes of evapotranspiration in wetlands and its component transpiration, evaporation from interception and evaporation from soil. Moreover, other important results of this project

  14. Psychotherapy - insights from bhagavad gita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M S

    2012-01-01

    Spoken and written commentary on Bhagavad Gita, the distilled spiritual essence of Vedas and Upanishads, is aplenty. Mahatma Gandhi was quoted as saying that whenever he had a problem Bhagavad Gita offered an answer and the solution. For a student of psychology Bhagavad Gita offers a valuable case study for lessons in psychotherapy - resolution of conflict and successful resumption of action from a state of acute anxiety and guilt laden depression that precipitated inaction. This presentation makes a humble attempt to discuss the therapy process involved in Bhagavad Gita in which Lord Krishna helped the grief-stricken Arjuna through dialogue and discussion. The focus would be on the conflict and diagnosis of patient, the background setting of the situation, personality of patient, technique of therapy, underlying psychological concepts/ principles/theories, the Guru - Sishya concept, etc.

  15. Working wonders? investigating insight with magic tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danek, Amory H; Fraps, Thomas; von Müller, Albrecht; Grothe, Benedikt; Ollinger, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new approach to differentiate between insight and noninsight problem solving, by introducing magic tricks as problem solving domain. We argue that magic tricks are ideally suited to investigate representational change, the key mechanism that yields sudden insight into the solution of a problem, because in order to gain insight into the magicians' secret method, observers must overcome implicit constraints and thus change their problem representation. In Experiment 1, 50 participants were exposed to 34 different magic tricks, asking them to find out how the trick was accomplished. Upon solving a trick, participants indicated if they had reached the solution either with or without insight. Insight was reported in 41.1% of solutions. The new task domain revealed differences in solution accuracy, time course and solution confidence with insight solutions being more likely to be true, reached earlier, and obtaining higher confidence ratings. In Experiment 2, we explored which role self-imposed constraints actually play in magic tricks. 62 participants were presented with 12 magic tricks. One group received verbal cues, providing solution relevant information without giving the solution away. The control group received no informative cue. Experiment 2 showed that participants' constraints were suggestible to verbal cues, resulting in higher solution rates. Thus, magic tricks provide more detailed information about the differences between insightful and noninsightful problem solving, and the underlying mechanisms that are necessary to have an insight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mining Login Data for Actionable Student Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Lalitha; Aghababyan, Ani; Mojarad, Shirin; Riedesel, Mark; Essa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Student login data is a key resource for gaining insight into their learning experience. However, the scale and the complexity of this data necessitate a thorough exploration to identify potential actionable insights, thus rendering it less valuable compared to student achievement data. To compensate for the underestimation of login data…

  17. Course of insight in manic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insight is an important factor associated with non compliance and poor outcome. Poor level of insight has been described as a characteristic in patients with acute bipolar disorder with more unawareness in social consequences with increasing severity in manic episode. Aim: Main aim of study was to see the baseline and longitudinal relationship between dimensions of insight with improvement in psychopathology. Setting and Design: Forty four patients diagnosed with mania, were selected from an inpatient setting at Institute of Mental Health and Hospital, Agra with mean age of 31.07(±9.00 years. They were assessed at base line and were followed up weekly or psychopathology and insight. Materials and Methods: The Young′s mania rating scale for psychopathology and insight was assessed on three dimensions of SUMD. Results: Twenty five patients eventually completed the study. There was a positive correlation with global insight and with psychopathology consistent in longitudinal follow-up (P<0.05, but not correlating for awareness for achieved effect of medication and social consequences. Linear regression showed a positive relationship at the first and second week of assessment of SUMD and YMRS scores (P=0.001; 0.019. Conclusion: Improvement in insight is graded in a manic episode as compared to psychopathology. There is slower improvement in awareness of social consequences of mental disorder. It means that improvement in psychopathology may not necessarily indicate remission and need further supervision to improve insight and hence monitoring.

  18. Towards Responsible Steel: Preliminary Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Benn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the structures and processes underpinning the attempt of the Australian steel industry to establish a certification scheme for Responsible Steel. We take it as a case example of how collective action and collaboration along a supply chain has the potential to be a win-win situation for the environment and for the competitiveness of an industry sector. The paper identifies the drivers that have prompted key stakeholders from all major sectors of the Australian steel product life cycle from mining through steel manufacturing, processing, product fabrication, use and re-use, and recycling to collaborate in the establishment of the Steel Stewardship Forum (SSF, the structure established to lead the development of the certification scheme. The development of this initiative is indicative of the wider shift to sustainability-related certification schemes as a means of garnering legitimacy and market advantage and provides detailed insights into both the drivers for and the challenges associated with such initiatives. Findings from the paper contribute to our understanding of the shift to sustainable supply chains as it is interpreted through institutional and institutional entrepreneurship theory.

  19. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  20. Catalytic Features of the Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain Revealed by High Resolution Structure of an Inhibitory Peptide Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaggi,N.; Wilson, D.; Tzipori, S.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) is a Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotease that blocks the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAP-25, one of the SNARE proteins required for exocytosis. Because of the potential for use of the toxin in bioterrorism and the increasingly widespread application of the toxin in the medical field, there is significant interest in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the metalloprotease. Efforts to design such inhibitors have not benefited from knowledge of how peptides bind to the active site since the enzyme-peptide structures available previously either were not occupied in the vicinity of the catalytic Zn(II) ion or did not represent the product of SNAP-25 substrate cleavage. Herein we report the 1.4 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between the BoNT/A-LC and the inhibitory peptide N-Ac-CRATKML, the first structure of the light chain with an inhibitory peptide bound at the catalytic Zn(II) ion. The peptide is bound with the Cys S? atom coordinating the metal ion. Surprisingly, the cysteine sulfur is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form. Given the unstable nature of this species in solution, is it likely that oxidation occurs on the enzyme. In addition to the peptide-bound structure, we report two structures of the unliganded light chain with and without the Zn(II) cofactor bound at 1.25 and 1.20 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The two structures are nearly identical, confirming that the Zn(II) ion plays a purely catalytic role. Additionally, the structure of the Zn(II)-bound uncomplexed enzyme allows identification of the catalytic water molecule and a second water molecule that occupies the same position as the peptidic oxygen in the tetrahedral intermediate. This observation suggests that the enzyme active site is prearranged to stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate of the protease reaction.

  1. Structural Insights into the Activation and Inhibition of Histo-Aspartic Protease from Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaumik, Prasenjit; Xiao, Huogen; Hidaka, Koushi; Gustchina, Alla; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Yada, Rickey Y.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Guelph); (Kyoto); (NCI)

    2012-09-17

    Histo-aspartic protease (HAP) from Plasmodium falciparum is a promising target for the development of novel antimalarial drugs. The sequence of HAP is highly similar to those of pepsin-like aspartic proteases, but one of the two catalytic aspartates, Asp32, is replaced with histidine. Crystal structures of the truncated zymogen of HAP and of the complex of the mature enzyme with inhibitor KNI-10395 have been determined at 2.1 and 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. As in other proplasmepsins, the propeptide of the zymogen interacts with the C-terminal domain of the enzyme, forcing the N- and C-terminal domains apart, thereby separating His32 and Asp215 and preventing formation of the mature active site. In the inhibitor complex, the enzyme forms a tight domain-swapped dimer, not previously seen in any aspartic proteases. The inhibitor is found in an unprecedented conformation resembling the letter U, stabilized by two intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Surprisingly, the location and conformation of the inhibitor are similar to those of the fragment of helix 2 comprising residues 34p-38p in the prosegments of the zymogens of gastric aspartic proteases; a corresponding helix assumes a vastly different orientation in proplasmepsins. Each inhibitor molecule is in contact with two molecules of HAP, interacting with the carboxylate group of the catalytic Asp215 of one HAP protomer through a water molecule, while also making a direct hydrogen bond to Glu278A' of the other protomer. A comparison of the shifts in the positions of the catalytic residues in the inhibitor complex presented here with those published previously gives further hints regarding the enzymatic mechanism of HAP.

  2. Insights into Diterpene Cyclization from Structure of Bifunctional Abietadiene Synthase from Abies grandis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ke; Gao, Yang; Hoy, Julie A.; Mann, Francis M.; Honzatko, Richard B.; Peters, Reuben J. (Iowa State)

    2013-09-24

    Abietadiene synthase from Abies grandis (AgAS) is a model system for diterpene synthase activity, catalyzing class I (ionization-initiated) and class II (protonation-initiated) cyclization reactions. Reported here is the crystal structure of AgAS at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and molecular dynamics simulations of that structure with and without active site ligands. AgAS has three domains ({alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma}). The class I active site is within the C-terminal {alpha} domain, and the class II active site is between the N-terminal {gamma} and {beta} domains. The domain organization resembles that of monofunctional diterpene synthases and is consistent with proposed evolutionary origins of terpene synthases. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to determine the effect of substrate binding on enzymatic structure. Although such studies of the class I active site do lead to an enclosed substrate-Mg{sup 2+} complex similar to that observed in crystal structures of related plant enzymes, it does not enforce a single substrate conformation consistent with the known product stereochemistry. Simulations of the class II active site were more informative, with observation of a well ordered external loop migration. This 'loop-in' conformation not only limits solvent access but also greatly increases the number of conformational states accessible to the substrate while destabilizing the nonproductive substrate conformation present in the 'loop-out' conformation. Moreover, these conformational changes at the class II active site drive the substrate toward the proposed transition state. Docked substrate complexes were further assessed with regard to the effects of site-directed mutations on class I and II activities.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Senescence Marker Protein 30: Insights Linking Structural, Enzymatic, and Physiological Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborti, Subhendu; Bahnson, Brian J. (Delaware)

    2010-05-25

    Human senescence marker protein 30 (SMP30), which functions enzymatically as a lactonase, hydrolyzes various carbohydrate lactones. The penultimate step in vitamin-C biosynthesis is catalyzed by this enzyme in nonprimate mammals. It has also been implicated as an organophosphate hydrolase, with the ability to hydrolyze diisopropyl phosphofluoridate and other nerve agents. SMP30 was originally identified as an aging marker protein, whose expression decreased androgen independently in aging cells. SMP30 is also referred to as regucalcin and has been suggested to have functions in calcium homeostasis. The crystal structure of the human enzyme has been solved from X-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.4 {angstrom}. The protein has a 6-bladed {beta}-propeller fold, and it contains a single metal ion. Crystal structures have been solved with the metal site bound with either a Ca{sup 2+} or a Zn{sup 2+} atom. The catalytic role of the metal ion has been confirmed by mutagenesis of the metal coordinating residues. Kinetic studies using the substrate gluconolactone showed a k{sub cat} preference of divalent cations in the order Zn{sup 2+} > Mn{sup 2+} > Ca{sup 2+} > Mg{sup 2+}. Notably, the Ca{sup 2+} had a significantly higher value of K{sub d} compared to those of the other metal ions tested (566, 82, 7, and 0.6 {micro}m for Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+}, respectively), suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+}-bound form may be physiologically relevant for stressed cells with an elevated free calcium level.

  4. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52 angstrom resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over alpha-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria.

  5. INSIGHT: RFID and Bluetooth enabled automated space for the blind and visually impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Aura; Gandhi, Siddhesh Rajan; Wilson, Carole; Mullett, Gary

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce INSIGHT, an indoor location tracking and navigation system to help the blind and visually impaired to easily navigate to their chosen destination in a public building. INSIGHT makes use of RFID and Bluetooth technology deployed within the building to locate and track the users. The PDA based user device interacts with INSIGHT server and provides the user navigation instructions in an audio form. The proposed system provides multi-resolution localization of the users, facilitating the provision of accurate navigation instructions when the user is in the vicinity of the RFID tags as well as accommodating a PANIC button which provides navigation instructions when the user is anywhere in the building. Moreover, the system will continuously monitor the zone in which the user walks. This will enable the system to identify if the user is located in the wrong zone of the building which may not lead to the desired destination.

  6. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney.

  7. Schizophrenia - Insight, Depression: A Correlation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth Ampalam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is one of the severe forms of mental illness which demands enormous personal and economical costs. Recent years have attracted considerable interest in the dual problem of depression in schizophrenia and its relation to insight. Most clinicians believe that poor insight in patients with schizophrenia, though problematic for treatment adherence, may be protective with respect to suicide. The assumption is that patients who do not believe that they are ill are less likely to be suicidal. Alternatively, those patients with schizophrenia who recognize and acknowledge the illness will be more of a suicidal nature. Aim of the Study: The aim of the study is to find out the correlation between insight and depression in schizophrenic population. Materials and Methods: This study is a cross-sectional, single-centred, correlation study done in a total of 60 subjects. Inclusion Criteria - Subjects between 20-60 years, who were diagnosed to have schizophrenia as per International clasification of diseases-10 and who have given written consent to participate in the study. Exclusion Criteria - Subjects who have other diagnosis such as mood disorder, schizoaffective disorder, mental retardation, epilepsy or detectable organic disease and co morbid substance abuse are excluded from the study. Schizophrenics who have acute exacerbation are also excluded. Instruments - For insight assessment, schedule for assessment of insight, a three item rating scale, is used. For depressive symptoms assessment a nine item rating scale, Calgary depression rating scale, is administrated. Results: Insight and depression are strongly correlated in schizophrenic population with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.758. The correlation between insight and depression is high in subjects with less duration of illness. Conclusion: Better insight was significantly correlated with lower mood. In addition, it suggests that poor insight may protect against

  8. Resolution in forensic microbial genotyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velsko, S P

    2005-08-30

    Resolution is a key parameter for differentiating among the large number of strain typing methods that could be applied to pathogens involved in bioterror events or biocrimes. In this report we develop a first-principles analysis of strain typing resolution using a simple mathematical model to provide a basis for the rational design of microbial typing systems for forensic applications. We derive two figures of merit that describe the resolving power and phylogenetic depth of a strain typing system. Rough estimates of these figures-of-merit for MLVA, MLST, IS element, AFLP, hybridization microarrays, and other bacterial typing methods are derived from mutation rate data reported in the literature. We also discuss the general problem of how to construct a ''universal'' practical typing system that has the highest possible resolution short of whole-genome sequencing, and that is applicable with minimal modification to a wide range of pathogens.

  9. Energy resolution studies for NEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C A B; Ferreira, A L; Veloso, J F C A [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sorel, M; Martin-Albo, J; Gomez-Cadenas, J J, E-mail: carlos.oliveira@ua.pt [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universidad de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Investigacion, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    This work aims to present the current state of simulations of electroluminescence (EL) produced in gas-based detectors with special interest for NEXT - Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC. NEXT is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, thus needs outstanding energy resolution which can be achieved by using electroluminescence. The process of light production is reviewed and properties such as EL yield and associated fluctuations, excitation and electroluminescence efficiencies, and energy resolution, are calculated. An EL production region with a 5 mm width gap between two infinite parallel planes is considered, where a uniform electric field is produced. The pressure and temperature considered are 10 bar and 293 K, respectively. The results show that, even for low values of VUV photon detection efficiency, good energy resolution can be achieved: below 0.4 % (FWHM) at Q{sub {beta}{beta}} = 2.458 MeV.

  10. Energy Resolution studies for NEXT

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C A B; Martin-Albo, J; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Ferreira, A L; Veloso, J F C A

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to present the current state of simulations of electroluminescence (EL) produced in gas-based detectors with special interest for NEXT --- Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC. NEXT is a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, thus needs outstanding energy resolution which can be achieved by using electroluminescence. The process of light production is reviewed and properties such as EL yield and associated fluctuations, excitation and electroluminescence efficiencies, and energy resolution, are calculated. An EL production region with a 5 mm width gap between two infinite parallel planes is considered, where a uniform electric field is produced. The pressure and temperature considered are 10 bar and 293 K, respectively. The results show that, even for low values of VUV photon detection efficiency, good energy resolution can be achieved: below 0.4 % (FWHM) at $Q_{\\beta\\beta}=$2.458 MeV.

  11. INTELLIGENT RESOLUTION OF COOPERATIVE CONFLICT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    First, the concept of cooperative conflict is presented, and the characteristic of cooperative air combat is researched. Then, four methods of conflict resolution are designed by way of the first order predicate logic, I.e., link-up, coordination, accommodation and integration, and corresponding examples are given. A 2 vs 2 air combat simulation was carried out; after conflict resolution, the loss ratio is dropped to 0.54 from the original 1.32, so the enhancement of effectiveness is notable. The present research findings are that the wide conflicts discover the essence of multi-fighter cooperation, I.e., to as fully as possible enhance the effectiveness of each fighter to attain global optimization, and that the possibility of conflict resolution shows the application prospect. The proposed method in this paper is a helpful try to the application of the Fifth Generation Computer in the new generation of C3I system.

  12. APPROACH TO TEAM CONFLICT RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enes Huseinagić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work includes research of team conflict resolution styles in sports by basketball coaches. This research was conducted at the European Junior Basketball Championship B Division held from July 23 to August 2, 2009 in Sarajevo. Research tasks were created with the goal to establish styles for resolving team conflict by coaches in basketball, to determine dominating styles and with the help of a questionnaire to analyze opinion about correlation of the offered styles and their effectiveness. The questionnaire created by Kreitner and Kinicki (1998, has given answers on these hypotheses. Sample was comprised of 14 coaches from 24 basketball teams which took part in competition. The research was conducted through the questionnaire which covered five different conflict resolution styles: bonding, reconciling, imposing, avoiding and compromise. Coaches of tested teams who have dominating styles for resolving team conflicts caused by certain reasons, have shown that hypothesis relating to coach’s different adaptational styles of conflict resolution is completely confirmed.

  13. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  14. Generating toric noncommutative crepant resolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Bocklandt, Raf

    2011-01-01

    We present an algorithm that finds all toric noncommutative crepant resolutions of a given toric 3-dimensional Gorenstein singularity. The algorithm embeds the quivers of these algebras inside a real 3-dimensional torus such that the relations are homotopy relations. One can project these embedded quivers down to a 2-dimensional torus to obtain the corresponding dimer models. We discuss some examples and use the algorithm to show that all toric noncommutative crepant resolutions of a finite quotient of the conifold singularity can be obtained by mutating one basic dimer model. We also discuss how this algorithm might be extended to higher dimensional singularities.

  15. Newer insights in teledermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garehatty Rudrappa Kanthraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study and practice of dermatology care using interactive audio, visual, and data communications from a distance is called teledermatology. A teledermatology practice (TP provides teleconsultation as well tele-education. Initially, dermatologists used videoconference. Convenience, cost-effectiveness and easy application of the practice made "store and forward" to emerge as a basic teledermatology tool. The advent of newer technologies like third generation (3G and fourth generation (4G mobile teledermatology (MT and dermatologists′ interest to adopt tertiary TP to pool expert (second opinion to address difficult-to-manage cases (DMCs has resulted in a rapid change in TP. Online discussion groups (ODGs, author-based second opinion teledermatology (AST, or a combination of both are the types of tertiary TP. This article analyzes the feasibility studies and provides latest insight into TP with a revised classification to plan and allocate budget and apply appropriate technology. Using the acronym CAP-HAT, which represents five important factors like case, approach, purpose, health care professionals, and technology, one can frame a TP. Store-and-forward teledermatology (SAFT is used to address routine cases (spotters. Chronic cases need frequent follow-up care. Leg ulcer and localized vitiligo need MT while psoriasis and leprosy require SAFT. Pigmented skin lesions require MT for triage and combination of teledermoscopy, telepathology, and teledermatology for diagnosis. A self-practising dermatologist and national health care system dermatologist use SAFT for routine cases and a combination of ASTwith an ODG to address a DMC. A TP alone or in combination with face-to-face consultation delivers quality care.

  16. Structural and functional insights into asymmetric enzymatic dehydration of alkenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestl, Bettina M; Geinitz, Christopher; Popa, Stephanie; Rizek, Sari; Haselbeck, Robert J; Stephen, Rosary; Noble, Michael A; Fischer, Max-Philipp; Ralph, Erik C; Hau, Hoi Ting; Man, Henry; Omar, Muhiadin; Turkenburg, Johan P; van Dien, Stephen; Culler, Stephanie J; Grogan, Gideon; Hauer, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    The asymmetric dehydration of alcohols is an important process for the direct synthesis of alkenes. We report the structure and substrate specificity of the bifunctional linalool dehydratase isomerase (LinD) from the bacterium Castellaniella defragrans that catalyzes in nature the hydration of β-myrcene to linalool and the subsequent isomerization to geraniol. Enzymatic kinetic resolutions of truncated and elongated aromatic and aliphatic tertiary alcohols (C5-C15) that contain a specific signature motif demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LinD. The three-dimensional structure of LinD from Castellaniella defragrans revealed a pentamer with active sites at the protomer interfaces. Furthermore, the structure of LinD in complex with the product geraniol provides initial mechanistic insights into this bifunctional enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed active site amino acid residues essential for its dehydration and isomerization activity. These structural and mechanistic insights facilitate the development of hydrating catalysts, enriching the toolbox for novel bond-forming biocatalysis.

  17. RESOLUTION

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    Research without a budget = Europe without a future !   Noting that the CERN Management has submitted to the Member States for the Finance Committee meeting on 25th August 2010 a budget for 2011 and a medium-term plan (MTP) for the period 2012-2015; Deploring the fact that, on the Member States’ request, this plan proposes a reduction of resources of 478 million Swiss francs over the period 2011–2015, compared to the initial proposal by the Management, which corresponded even then to the minimum needed to exploit the machines and experiments; Recalling that, following a decision by Council in 1996, CERN has suffered an annual budget cut of 100 million Swiss francs; Considering that this approach equates to an abandonment by the Member States of the European Union of a policy agreed upon in Barcelona in 2003 to invest 3% of their GDP in R&D by 2010, and today they can barely manage 1.85%; Considering that these budget cuts imposed on CERN compromise not on...

  18. Resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Council, in its ordinary session on 6 March 2007, Recalling its profound desire and that of all staff to see Europe occupy a key role in the domain of basic research, through the safeguarding and development of European centres of scientific and technological excellence, models of collaboration between countries, such as CERN;

  19. Generating Schemata of Resolution Proofs

    CERN Document Server

    Aravantinos, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct algorithms are presented to extract (schemata of) resolution proofs from closed tableaux for propositional schemata. The first one handles the most efficient version of the tableau calculus but generates very complex derivations (denoted by rather elaborate rewrite systems). The second one has the advantage that much simpler systems can be obtained, however the considered proof procedure is less efficient.

  20. Spontaneous resolution of subfoveal perfluorocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oellers P

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Oellers,1 Leon D Charkoudian,2 Paul Hahn11Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Cape Fear Retinal Associates, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: Perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCL have transformed the surgical approach to complex retinal detachments, but their use can be complicated by subretinal retention. Migration of peripherally located subretinal PFCL towards the fovea is well established, but spontaneous resolution of subfoveal PFCL without surgical evacuation or displacement has rarely been described. We present a case of a large single retained subfoveal PFCL droplet following vitrectomy with membrane peeling, inferior relaxing retinectomy, and silicone oil tamponade that demonstrated spontaneous resolution 3 weeks postoperatively, with subsequent anatomic and visual improvement. No residual subretinal PFCL was noted, and we hypothesize that the PFCL droplet spontaneously extruded through a transient hole created in the thinned retina overlying the droplet, which subsequently closed spontaneously. Further understanding of the mechanisms of PFCL migration and resolution may facilitate improved treatments for this complication.Keywords: perfluorocarbon, subretinal, retained, resolution

  1. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  2. Entity resolution for uncertain data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayat, N.; Akbarinia, R.; Afsarmanesh, H.; Valduriez, P.

    2012-01-01

    Entity resolution (ER), also known as duplicate detection or record matching, is the problem of identifying the tuples that represent the same real world entity. In this paper, we address the problem of ER for uncertain data, which we call ERUD. We propose two different approaches for the ERUD probl

  3. Ambiguity Resolution in Lateralized Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayadre, Manar; Kurzon, Dennis; Peleg, Orna; Zohar, Eviatar

    2015-01-01

    We examined ambiguity resolution in reading in Arabic. Arabic is an abjad orthography and is morphologically similar to Hebrew. However, Arabic literacy occurs in a diglossic context, and its orthography is more visually complex than Hebrew. We therefore tested to see whether hemispheric differences will be similar or different from previous…

  4. Graph Representation of Projective Resolutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Bo SHI

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the concept - dimension tree and the related results for monomial algebras to a more general case - relations algebras Λ by bringing Gr(o)bner basis into play. More precisely,graph to be called the minimal resolution graph for M. Algorithms for computing such diagraphs and applications as well will be presented.

  5. High Resolution Orientation Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    carbon distribution as it relates to the presence of Bainite phase (with small tetragonality) interspersed among the cubic ferrite. An example of the...preferentially segregate. The view offered by these high resolution methods differs from what has been considered before: grains thought to be Bainite

  6. Toric Resolutions of Heterotic Orbifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Nibbelink, Stefan Groot; Trapletti, Michele

    2007-01-01

    We investigate resolutions of heterotic orbifolds using toric geometry. Our starting point is provided by the recently constructed heterotic models on explicit blowup of C^n/Z_n singularities. We show that the values of the relevant integrals, computed there, can be obtained as integrals of divisors (complex codimension one hypersurfaces) interpreted as (1,1)-forms in toric geometry. Motivated by this we give a self contained introduction to toric geometry for non-experts, focusing on those issues relevant for the construction of heterotic models on toric orbifold resolutions. We illustrate the methods by building heterotic models on the resolutions of C^2/Z_3, C^3/Z_4 and C^3/\\Intr_2xZ_2'. We are able to obtain a direct identification between them and the known orbifold models. In the C^3/Z_2xZ_2' case we observe that, in spite of the existence of two inequivalent resolutions, fully consistent blowup models of heterotic orbifolds can only be constructed on one of th

  7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    30 September 1986 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Los Angeles, Calif. 90009-2960 36 74. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(If...TREE PLMUT ",-20 -CUTLIASS DumpER SED AN... TREE TRUNK, -0 - MERC BUMPER f - 40 H!-I -50 iI Fig. 7. High-Resolution Instrumentation Radar View of

  8. Blindness and Insight in King Lear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳元玉

    2008-01-01

    This paper intends to explore how William Shakespeare illustrates the theme of blindness and insight in his great tragedy "King Lear".Four characters’ deeds and their fate are used as a case study to examine what blindness is,what insight is,and the relationship between the two.The writer finds that by depicting the characters’ deeds and their fate in a double plot,Shakespeare renders the folly of blindness,the transition from blindness to insight,and the use of reason and thought to understand the truth.

  9. 36 CFR 1150.113 - Amicable resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amicable resolution. 1150.113 Section 1150.113 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE... resolution. (a) Amicable resolution is encouraged at any stage of proceedings where such resolution...

  10. 43 CFR 10.17 - Dispute resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dispute resolution. 10.17 Section 10.17... REPATRIATION REGULATIONS General § 10.17 Dispute resolution. (a) Formal and informal resolutions. Any person... a fair resolution of the matter. The Review Committee may aid in this regard as described below....

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. Selection of the InSight Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, I. J.; Fergason, R.; Kirk, R. L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, S.; Putzig, N. E.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M.; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.; Lognonné, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation ( {≤}{-}2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S-5°N and later 3°N-5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ˜600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  14. Insights into structural variations and genome rearrangements in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) are genomic rearrangements that affect fairly large fragments of DNA. Most of the SVs such as inversions, deletions and translocations have been largely studied in context of genetic diseases in eukaryotes. However, recent studies demonstrate that genome rearrangements can also have profound impact on prokaryotic genomes, leading to altered cell phenotype. In contrast to single-nucleotide variations, SVs provide a much deeper insight into organization of bacterial genomes at a much better resolution. SVs can confer change in gene copy number, creation of new genes, altered gene expression and many other functional consequences. High-throughput technologies have now made it possible to explore SVs at a much refined resolution in bacterial genomes. Through this review, we aim to highlight the importance of the less explored field of SVs in prokaryotic genomes and their impact. We also discuss its potential applicability in the emerging fields of synthetic biology and genome engineering where targeted SVs could serve to create sophisticated and accurate genome editing.

  15. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Rose, Annika H; Gibson, Gregory A; Gardner, Christina L; Sun, Chengqun; Reed, Douglas S; Lam, L K Metthew; St Croix, Claudette M; Strick, Peter L; Klimstra, William B; Watkins, Simon C

    2017-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  16. High-Resolution Data for a Low-Resolution World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Brendan Williams [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-10

    In the past 15 years, the upper section of Cañon de Valle has been severely altered by wildfires and subsequent runoff events. Loss of root structures on high-angle slopes results in debris flow and sediment accumulation in the narrow canyon bottom. The original intent of the study described here was to better understand the changes occurring in watershed soil elevations over the course of several post-fire years. An elevation dataset from 5 years post-Cerro Grande fire was compared to high-resolution LiDAR data from 14 years post-Cerro Grande fire (also 3 years post-Las Conchas fire). The following analysis was motivated by a problematic comparison of these datasets of unlike resolution, and therefore focuses on what the data reveals of itself. The objective of this study is to highlight the effects vegetation can have on remote sensing data that intends to read ground surface elevation.

  17. Ambiguity Resolution in English Language Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐慧君; 黄曦

    2013-01-01

    Language ambiguity resolution has been widely studied by psycholinguists. Studies of lexical ambiguity resolution, syn⁃tactic ambiguity resolution and anaphoric ambiguity resolution have showed different results. One account assumes that ambigui⁃ty resolution involves“competition”of analysis which causes processing difficulties. The other account claims that an initial analy⁃sis is adopt and“reanalysis”occurs when the initial analysis turns out to be implausible.

  18. Investigating visual analogies for visual insight problems

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Sas; Eric Luchian; Linden Ball

    2010-01-01

    Much research has focused on the impact of analogies in insight problem solving, but less work has investigated how the visual analogies for insight are actually constructed. Thus, it appears that in the search for their facilitative impact on the incubation effect, the understanding of what makes good visual analogies has somehow been lost. This paper presents preliminary work of constructing a set of 6 visual analogies and evaluating their impact on solving the visual problem of eight coins...

  19. Space Biotech: Hindsight, Insight, Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Over the past forty years, microgravity has inspired and enabled applications in a wide range of sectors including medicine, materials, computers, communications, and national defense. Trends show that demand for high-tech solutions is increasing in these sectors, solutions that require higher resolution, greater precision, novel materials, innovative processes, and more sophisticated tools. These are areas where microgravity can offer unique capabilities for innovation. The Emerging Space Office (ESO) has engaged in multiple studies over the past year that have found that microgravity RD is one of the most promising technology areas for contributing to economic growth and to NASAs mission. The focus of these studies was on terrestrial markets rather than NASA applications, applied research rather than basic research, and commercial rather than academic investigators. There have been more success stories than are generally appreciated and there are significant areas of promising future potential. Many of the problems that have limited commercial microgravity development in the past are being solved. Microgravity research and development (RD) requires iteration and learning, as rapidly as possible. New technologies enable high throughput and rapid data collection in increasingly small payloads. The International Space Station is in orbit and provides a laboratory that is available 247 at least until 2024. Frequent flights by commercial space providers to and from the ISS now enable the fast learning cycles needed by high-tech industries. Launch costs are decreasing and the ability to return payloads to Earth is increasing. New commercial space laboratories, such as those being developed by SpaceX and Bigelow Aerospace, are in the final stages of development and testing. This ecosystem for microgravity RD has never been available before. These are game-changer conditions for attracting high-tech industries to space for terrestrial, as well as NASA, applications

  20. Insight and theory of mind in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Fish, Scott; Granholm, Eric

    2015-01-30

    Theory of mind (ToM) impairment is common in individuals with schizophrenia and is associated with poor social functioning. Poor insight has also been linked to poor outcome in schizophrenia. Social developmental research has shown representations of self (insight) and representations of others (ToM) are related. In schizophrenia, contradictory reports of associations between insight and ToM have emerged, possibly due to a failure to account for neurocognitive impairments and symptoms associated with both mentalization constructs. This study investigated the relationships between ToM (intentions of others on the Hinting Task) and clinical and cognitive insight, while accounting for shared variance with neurocognitive impairment and symptom severity in 193 individuals with schizophrenia. Clinical, but not cognitive, insight was associated with ToM. A unique association between Awareness of Mental Illness and Hinting Task performance was found, independent of shared variance with neurocognition and symptoms. Importantly, ToM was found to mediate Awareness of Mental Illness and neurocognition. Results suggested that treatments targeting mentalization abilities that contribute to representations of self and others may improve insight deficits associated with poor outcome in schizophrenia.

  1. Ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging of the human cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Sapeta, Sabina; Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmidinger, Gerald; Aranha dos Santos, Valentin; Aschinger, Gerold C.; Baumgartner, Isabella; Pircher, Niklas; Schwarzhans, Florian; Pantalon, Anca; Dua, Harminder; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2017-01-01

    We present imaging of corneal pathologies using optical coherence tomography (OCT) with high resolution. To this end, an ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain OCT (UHR-OCT) system based on a broad bandwidth Ti:sapphire laser is employed. With a central wavelength of 800 nm, the imaging device allows to acquire OCT data at the central, paracentral and peripheral cornea as well as the limbal region with 1.2 µm x 20 µm (axial x lateral) resolution at a rate of 140 000 A-scans/s. Structures of the anterior segment of the eye, not accessible with commercial OCT systems, are visualized. These include corneal nerves, limbal palisades of Vogt as well as several corneal pathologies. Cases such as keratoconus and Fuchs’s endothelial dystrophy as well as infectious changes caused by diseases like Acanthamoeba keratitis and scarring after herpetic keratitis are presented. We also demonstrate the applicability of our system to visualize epithelial erosion and intracorneal foreign body after corneal trauma as well as chemical burns. Finally, results after Descemet’s membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) are imaged. These clinical cases show the potential of UHR-OCT to help in clinical decision-making and follow-up. Our results and experience indicate that UHR-OCT of the cornea is a promising technique for the use in clinical practice, but can also help to gain novel insight in the physiology and pathophysiology of the human cornea. PMID:28271013

  2. Investigating Hydrocarbon Seep Environments with High-Resolution, Three-Dimensional Geographic Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, D. F.; Gharib, J. J.; Mitchell, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed photographic imagery and bathymetric maps of the seafloor acquired by deep submergence vehicles such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are expanding how scientists and the public view and ultimately understand the seafloor and the processes that modify it. Several recently acquired optical and acoustic datasets, collected during ECOGIG (Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf) and other Gulf of Mexico expeditions using the National Institute for Undersea Science Technology (NIUST) Eagle Ray, and Mola Mola AUVs, have been fused with lower resolution data to create unique three-dimensional geovisualizations. Included in these data are multi-scale and multi-resolution visualizations over hydrocarbon seeps and seep related features. Resolution of the data range from 10s of mm to 10s of m. When multi-resolution data is integrated into a single three-dimensional visual environment, new insights into seafloor and seep processes can be obtained from the intuitive nature of three-dimensional data exploration. We provide examples and demonstrate how integration of multibeam bathymetry, seafloor backscatter data, sub-bottom profiler data, textured photomosaics, and hull-mounted multibeam acoustic midwater imagery are made into a series a three-dimensional geovisualizations of actively seeping sites and associated chemosynthetic communities. From these combined and merged datasets, insights on seep community structure, morphology, ecology, fluid migration dynamics, and process geomorphology can be investigated from new spatial perspectives. Such datasets also promote valuable inter-comparisons of sensor resolution and performance.

  3. Adaptive resolution simulation of oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Paulo A.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Nucleic acids are characterized by a complex hierarchical structure and a variety of interaction mechanisms with other molecules. These features suggest the need of multiscale simulation methods in order to grasp the relevant physical properties of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and RNA using in silico experiments. Here we report an implementation of a dual-resolution modeling of a DNA oligonucleotide in physiological conditions; in the presented setup only the nucleotide molecule and the solvent and ions in its proximity are described at the atomistic level; in contrast, the water molecules and ions far from the DNA are represented as computationally less expensive coarse-grained particles. Through the analysis of several structural and dynamical parameters, we show that this setup reliably reproduces the physical properties of the DNA molecule as observed in reference atomistic simulations. These results represent a first step towards a realistic multiscale modeling of nucleic acids and provide a quantitatively solid ground for their simulation using dual-resolution methods.

  4. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  5. Spontaneous resolution of subfoveal perfluorocarbon

    OpenAIRE

    Oellers P; Charkoudian LD; Hahn P

    2015-01-01

    Patrick Oellers,1 Leon D Charkoudian,2 Paul Hahn11Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Cape Fear Retinal Associates, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: Perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCL) have transformed the surgical approach to complex retinal detachments, but their use can be complicated by subretinal retention. Migration of peripherally located subretinal PFCL towards the fovea is well established, but spontaneous resolution of subfoveal PFCL witho...

  6. Box graphs and resolutions I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas P. Braun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU(5 by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  7. Box graphs and resolutions I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2016-04-01

    Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial) toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU (5) by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  8. Sensitivity of point scale runoff predictions to rainfall resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Hearman

    2006-11-01

    infiltration excess or saturation excess depending on the resolution of rainfall data was determined (ln g*<2. Infiltration excess predicted from high resolution rainfall is short and intense, whereas saturation excess produced from low resolution rainfall is more constant and less intense. This has important implications for the accuracy of current hydrological models that use time averaged rainfall under these soil and rainfall conditions and predictions of further thresholds such as erosion. It offers insight into areas where the understanding of the dynamics of high resolution rainfall is required and a means by which we can improve our understanding of the way variations in rainfall intensities within a storm relate to hydrological thresholds and model predictions.

  9. ZnS0.8Se0.2 film for high resolution liquid crystal light valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Da-ke(沈大可); HAN Gao-rong(韩高荣); DU Pi-yi(杜丕一); QUE Duan-lin(阙端麟); SOU I.K.

    2004-01-01

    The structural characteristics and optical and electrical properties of molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) grown ZnS0.8Se0.2 thin films on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrates were investigated in this work. The X-ray diffraction (XRD)results indicated that high quality polycrystalline ZnS0.8Se0.2 thin film grown at the optimized temperature had a preferred orientation along the (111) planes. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) cross-sectional micrograph of the sample showed a well defined columnar structure with lateral crystal dimension in the order ofa few hundred angstroms. Ultraviolet (UV) photoresponsivity as high as 0.01 A/W had been demonstrated and for wavelengths longer than 450 nm, the response was down from the peak response by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The thin ZnS0.8Se0.2 photosensor layer, with a wide energy gap and anisotropic electrical property, makes a transmission UV liquid crystal light valve ( LCLV) with high resolution feasible.

  10. ZnS0.8Se0.2 film for high resolution liquid crystal light valve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈大可; 韩高荣; 杜丕一; 阙端麟; SOUI.K

    2004-01-01

    The structural characteristics and optical and electrical properties of molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) grown ZnS0.8Se0.2 thin films on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrates were investigated in this work. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that high quality polycrystalline ZnS0.8Se0.2 thin film grown at the optimized temperature had a preferred orientation along the (111) planes. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) cross-sectional micrograph of the sample showed a well defined columnar structure with lateral crystal dimension in the order of a few hundred angstroms. Ultraviolet(UV) photoresponsivity as high as 0.01 A/W had been demonstrated and for wavelengths longer than 450 nm, the response was down from the peak response by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The thin ZnS0.8Se0,2 photosensor layer, with a wide energy gap and anisotropic electrical property, makes a transmission UV liquid crystal light valve (LCLV) with high resolution feasible.

  11. Crystal and Molecular Structure of a Collagen-Like Peptide at 1.9 overset{circ}{A} Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Jordi; Eaton, Mark; Brodsky, Barbara; Berman, Helen M.

    1994-10-01

    The structure of a protein triple helix has been determined at 1.9 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallographic studies of a collagen-like peptide containing a single substitution of the consensus sequence. This peptide adopts a triple-helical structure that confirms the basic features determined from fiber diffraction studies on collagen: supercoiling of polyproline II helices and interchain hydrogen bonding that follows the model II of Rich and Crick. In addition, the structure provides new information concerning the nature of this protein fold. Each triple helix is surrounded by a cylinder of hydration, with an extensive hydrogen bonding network between water molecules and peptide acceptor groups. Hydroxyproline residues have a critical role in this water network. The interaxial spacing of triple helices in the crystal is similar to that in collagen fibrils, and the water networks linking adjacent triple helices in the crystal structure are likely to be present in connective tissues. The breaking of the repeating (X-Y-Gly)_n pattern by a Gly-->Ala substitution results in a subtle alteration of the conformation, with a local untwisting of the triple helix. At the substitution site, direct interchain hydrogen bonds are replaced with interstitial water bridges between the peptide groups. Similar conformational changes may occur in Gly-->X mutated collagens responsible for the diseases osteogenesis imperfecta, chondrodysplasias, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

  12. Accuracy and Resolution of Kinect Depth Data for Indoor Mapping Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Oude Elberink

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Consumer-grade range cameras such as the Kinect sensor have the potential to be used in mapping applications where accuracy requirements are less strict. To realize this potential insight into the geometric quality of the data acquired by the sensor is essential. In this paper we discuss the calibration of the Kinect sensor, and provide an analysis of the accuracy and resolution of its depth data. Based on a mathematical model of depth measurement from disparity a theoretical error analysis is presented, which provides an insight into the factors influencing the accuracy of the data. Experimental results show that the random error of depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor, and ranges from a few millimeters up to about 4 cm at the maximum range of the sensor. The quality of the data is also found to be influenced by the low resolution of the depth measurements.

  13. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  14. A Semiquantitative Framework for Gene Regulatory Networks: Increasing the Time and Quantitative Resolution of Boolean Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Geris, Liesbet

    2015-01-01

    Boolean models have been instrumental in predicting general features of gene networks and more recently also as explorative tools in specific biological applications. In this study we introduce a basic quantitative and a limited time resolution to a discrete (Boolean) framework. Quantitative resolution is improved through the employ of normalized variables in unison with an additive approach. Increased time resolution stems from the introduction of two distinct priority classes. Through the implementation of a previously published chondrocyte network and T helper cell network, we show that this addition of quantitative and time resolution broadens the scope of biological behaviour that can be captured by the models. Specifically, the quantitative resolution readily allows models to discern qualitative differences in dosage response to growth factors. The limited time resolution, in turn, can influence the reachability of attractors, delineating the likely long term system behaviour. Importantly, the information required for implementation of these features, such as the nature of an interaction, is typically obtainable from the literature. Nonetheless, a trade-off is always present between additional computational cost of this approach and the likelihood of extending the model’s scope. Indeed, in some cases the inclusion of these features does not yield additional insight. This framework, incorporating increased and readily available time and semi-quantitative resolution, can help in substantiating the litmus test of dynamics for gene networks, firstly by excluding unlikely dynamics and secondly by refining falsifiable predictions on qualitative behaviour. PMID:26067297

  15. Rotation in Jets from Young Stars: investigating NUV lines with very high Spectral Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciotti, Francesca

    2003-07-01

    Optical STIS spectra of the jets from DG Tau, RW Aur, TH 28 and LkHa 231 obtained by us {prop IDs. 7311, 9435} show systematic transverse radial velocity shifts in the region where the flow has just been accelerated and collimated {Bacciotti et al, 2002}, i.e. within about 100 AU from the source. We interpret such shifts as evidence for jet rotation. Whether YSO jets rotate is a fundamental question in star formation because it has been suggested that jets might be the way excess angular momentum is removed from the star/disk system, thereby allowing the star to accrete. In particular it is important to know if observed toroidal velocities are in agreement with predictions of magneto-centrifugal jet launching models. The limited spatial and spectral resolution of STIS in the optical however, only allows one to say qualitatively that the observed rotational velocities are in rough agreement with theory. Moreover only the resolved peripheral regions of the flow can be studied. We are proposing here to exploit the higher spatial and spectral resolution of STIS in the NUV to measure transverse jet velocity profiles.This is a task which can only be undertaken by the HST and which is ideally suited to the STIS. To measure the velocity profiles, we will observe the Mg II doublet at 2800 Angstrom {using the E230M echelle and the 6 X 0.2 slit transverse to the flow}. In comparison to the optical, the NUV affords us double the spatial resolution and we will be able to detect velocity differences across the jet down to 2 km/s. Not only should we be able to determine for the first time the detailed rotational velocity profile across a jet but we also expect to spatially resolve the high velocity axial core of the jet in the NUV. Finally we add that as very few NUV observations of the initial jet beam of YSO jets are available, our datasets should be a valuable contribution to the HST archive.

  16. High Resolution Bathymetry Estimation Improvement with Single ImageSuper Resolution Algorithm Super Resolution Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    process of the SRF algorithm, we were able to further increase the mean PSNR score of the high resolution estimated data from previously used bicubic...This meant that implementing the edited variance before the bicubic estimates were created caused the mean PSNR to increase the most, and all...interpolation (by about 1 dB). Figure 7: PSNR comparison (with mean scores) between Bicubic Interpolation and SRF Figure 7 shows the comparison between

  17. Is Insight Always the Same? A Protocol Analysis of Insight in Compound Remote Associate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Edward A.; Moss, Jarrod

    2012-01-01

    Compound Remote Associate (CRA) problems have been used to investigate insight problem solving using both behavioral and neuroimaging techniques. However, it is unclear to what extent CRA problems exhibit characteristics of insight such as impasses and restructuring. CRA problem-solving characteristics were examined in a study in which…

  18. VT Hydrography Dataset - High Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Hydrography Dataset (VHD) is compliant with the local resolution (also known as High Resolution) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)...

  19. High-resolution image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, K

    1986-01-01

    In many departments of cytology, cytogenetics, hematology, and pathology, research projects using high-resolution computerized microscopy are now being mounted for computation of morphometric measurements on various structural components, as well as for determination of cellular DNA content. The majority of these measurements are made in a partially automated, computer-assisted mode, wherein there is strong interaction between the user and the computerized microscope. At the same time, full automation has been accomplished for both sample preparation and sample examination for clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. At the time of writing, approximately 1,000 robot differential counting microscopes are in the field, analyzing images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the overall rate of about 100,000 slides per day. This mammoth through-put represents a major accomplishment in the application of machine vision to automated microscopy for hematology. In other areas of automated high-resolution microscopy, such as cytology and cytogenetics, no commercial instruments are available (although a few metaphase-finding machines are available and other new machines have been announced during the past year). This is a disappointing product, considering the nearly half century of research effort in these areas. This paper provides examples of the state of the art in automation of cell analysis for blood smears, cervical smears, and chromosome preparations. Also treated are new developments in multi-resolution automated microscopy, where images are now being generated and analyzed by a single machine over a range of 64:1 magnification and from 10,000 X 20,000 to 500 X 500 in total picture elements (pixels). Examples of images of human lymph node and liver tissue are presented. Semi-automated systems are not treated, although there is mention of recent research in the automation of tissue analysis.

  20. Ultra-high resolution AMOLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ghosh, Amal

    2011-06-01

    AMOLED microdisplays continue to show improvement in resolution and optical performance, enhancing their appeal for a broad range of near-eye applications such as night vision, simulation and training, situational awareness, augmented reality, medical imaging, and mobile video entertainment and gaming. eMagin's latest development of an HDTV+ resolution technology integrates an OLED pixel of 3.2 × 9.6 microns in size on a 0.18 micron CMOS backplane to deliver significant new functionality as well as the capability to implement a 1920×1200 microdisplay in a 0.86" diagonal area. In addition to the conventional matrix addressing circuitry, the HDTV+ display includes a very lowpower, low-voltage-differential-signaling (LVDS) serialized interface to minimize cable and connector size as well as electromagnetic emissions (EMI), an on-chip set of look-up-tables for digital gamma correction, and a novel pulsewidth- modulation (PWM) scheme that together with the standard analog control provides a total dimming range of 0.05cd/m2 to 2000cd/m2 in the monochrome version. The PWM function also enables an impulse drive mode of operation that significantly reduces motion artifacts in high speed scene changes. An internal 10-bit DAC ensures that a full 256 gamma-corrected gray levels are available across the entire dimming range, resulting in a measured dynamic range exceeding 20-bits. This device has been successfully tested for operation at frame rates ranging from 30Hz up to 85Hz. This paper describes the operational features and detailed optical and electrical test results for the new AMOLED WUXGA resolution microdisplay.

  1. Estimating uncertainty in resolution tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goncalves, DP

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Resolution Test Objects, Graphic Arts Research Center, Rochester Institute of Tech- nology, Rochester, NY H208491977H20850. 10. ISO/IEC 17025:1999, ?General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories.? 11. I. Miller and J. E... stream_source_info goncalves_2006.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 28641 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name goncalves_2006.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Estimating uncertainty...

  2. Human Performance on Insight Problem Solving: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yun; MacGregor, James N.

    2011-01-01

    The article provides a review of recent research on insight problem-solving performance. We discuss what insight problems are, the different types of classic and newer insight problems, and how we can classify them. We also explain some of the other aspects that affect insight performance, such as hints, analogs, training, thinking aloud, and…

  3. Transference, Insight, and the Course of Time-Limited Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M.; Wine, Bruce; Jones, Alissa; Friedman, Suzanne C.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the interactive role of therapist-rated transference and insight in predicting both the outcome of time-limited therapy and the course of therapist-rated transference and insight. Results indicate that neither transference nor insight alone predicted outcome; the interaction of transference and emotional insight influenced client- and…

  4. Insight, Cognitive Insight and Sociodemographic Features in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Presenting with Reactive and Autogeneus Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre ÇAMLI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to test hypothesis that obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD patients who have autogenous obsessions and reactive obsessions show different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with different insight and cognitive insight levels. Method: Sixty-one patients diagnosed as OCD according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID-I are recruited. 31 patients had reactive obsessions and 30 had autogenous obsessions. The sociodemographic characteristics of patients and the symptomatology were evaluated using psychiatric scales including SCID-I, Yale Brown Obsessive- Compulsive Scale (YBOCS, Yale Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale-Symptom Checklist (YBOCS-SC and Beck Insight Scale. Results: The percentage of women in reactive obsessive group was higher and also this group had significantly less antipsychotic medication prescribed than the autogenous obsessive group. No significant difference was found for the other demographic variables. No significant difference was identified for the Beck Insight Self-Reflectiveness subscale but for the Self-Certainty subscale, reactive obsessives had higher scores. Although there was no significant difference for the composit index points, which is the subtraction of the two subscales, the p value was close to the limit. On the other hand YBOCS item- 11 scores which evaluates insight were higher in autogenous obsessives meaning low levels of insight. Conclusion: For the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics; there was no significant difference between the groups except gender distribution and antipsychotic medication. Our data about insight seems inconsistent but insight and cognitive insight can be different entities which show different levels of insight. Further investigation with different obsession types is needed.

  5. On Radar Resolution in Coherent Change Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, Douglas L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    It is commonly observed that resolution plays a role in coherent change detection. Although this is the case, the relationship of the resolution in coherent change detection is not yet defined . In this document, we present an analytical method of evaluating this relationship using detection theory. Specifically we examine the effect of resolution on receiver operating characteristic curves for coherent change detection.

  6. 33 CFR 385.23 - Dispute resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dispute resolution. 385.23... Processes § 385.23 Dispute resolution. (a) Disputes with the non-Federal sponsor concerning a Project Cooperation Agreement shall be resolved under the specific dispute resolution procedures of that...

  7. 21 CFR 312.48 - Dispute resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dispute resolution. 312.48 Section 312.48 Food and... USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Administrative Actions § 312.48 Dispute resolution. (a... resolution. Appropriate issues to raise with the ombudsman include resolving difficulties in...

  8. 10 CFR 74.57 - Alarm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alarm resolution. 74.57 Section 74.57 Energy NUCLEAR... Quantities of Strategic Special Nuclear Material § 74.57 Alarm resolution. (a) Licensees subject to § 74.51 shall provide the MC&A alarm resolution capabilities described in paragraphs (b) through (f) of...

  9. 14 CFR 158.83 - Informal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal resolution. 158.83 Section 158.83... PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES (PFC'S) Termination § 158.83 Informal resolution. The Administrator shall undertake informal resolution with the public agency or any other affected party if, after review...

  10. 12 CFR 611.1220 - Termination resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Termination resolution. 611.1220 Section 611... Institution Status § 611.1220 Termination resolution. No more than 1 week before you submit your plan of termination to us, your board of directors must adopt a termination resolution stating its support...

  11. 49 CFR 397.75 - Dispute resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dispute resolution. 397.75 Section 397.75... resolution. (a) Petition. One or more States or Indian tribes may petition the Administrator to resolve a... this subpart. (b) Filing. Each petition for dispute resolution filed under this section must: (1)...

  12. 21 CFR 314.103 - Dispute resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dispute resolution. 314.103 Section 314.103 Food... Applications § 314.103 Dispute resolution. (a) General. FDA is committed to resolving differences between... application. If resolution is not achieved, the applicant may raise the matter with the person designated...

  13. 28 CFR 542.13 - Informal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informal resolution. 542.13 Section 542.13 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.13 Informal resolution. (a) Informal resolution....

  14. High-resolution eye tracking using V1 neuron activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, James M.; Bondy, Adrian G.; Cumming, Bruce G.; Butts, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of high-acuity visual cortical processing have been limited by the inability to track eye position with sufficient accuracy to precisely reconstruct the visual stimulus on the retina. As a result, studies on primary visual cortex (V1) have been performed almost entirely on neurons outside the high-resolution central portion of the visual field (the fovea). Here we describe a procedure for inferring eye position using multi-electrode array recordings from V1 coupled with nonlinear stimulus processing models. We show that this method can be used to infer eye position with one arc-minute accuracy – significantly better than conventional techniques. This allows for analysis of foveal stimulus processing, and provides a means to correct for eye-movement induced biases present even outside the fovea. This method could thus reveal critical insights into the role of eye movements in cortical coding, as well as their contribution to measures of cortical variability. PMID:25197783

  15. Gestures and insight in advanced mathematical thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-10-01

    What role do gestures play in advanced mathematical thinking? We argue that the role of gestures goes beyond merely communicating thought and supporting understanding - in some cases, gestures can help generate new mathematical insights. Gestures feature prominently in a case study of two participants working on a sequence of calculus activities. One participant uses gestures to clarify the relationships between a function, its derivative and its antiderivative. We show how these gestures help create a virtual mathematical construct, which in turn leads to a new problem-solving strategy. These results suggest that gestures are a productive, but potentially undertapped resource for generating new insights in advanced levels of mathematics.

  16. Dust devil track survey at Elysium Planitia, Mars: Implications for the InSight landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2016-03-01

    The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) robotic lander is scheduled to land in Elysium Planitia on Mars in September 2016. InSight will perform the first comprehensive surface-based geophysical investigation including seismic measurements. Knowledge about encounter rates of dust devils with the InSight lander are important for two main reasons: (1) dust devils will affect the scientific measurements, i.e., wind-induced seismic noise, and (2) the power-supply of the InSight lander and instruments is provided by solar arrays and previous landers and rovers on Mars were affected by a steady decline in electrical power output due to atmospheric dust deposition on the solar panels. Long term science operations were only made possible by dust clearing events of the solar arrays caused by wind gusts and dust devils. In this study we analyzed dust devil tracks (DDTs) at the final InSight landing site region in Elysium Planitia. Formation of DDTs is caused by the removal of a layer of dust by passing dust devils, hence in principle the same process as clearing of dust from solar panels. We mapped the number, size (width and length), and orientation of DDTs in repeat observations using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images covering the exact same surface area acquired within a relatively short time span (solar panel clearing recurrence interval estimate of ∼11 Mars years using the mean annual DDT formation rate, and the mean DDT width and length from all measured DDTs. Due to several uncertainties this solar panel clearing recurrence interval for the InSight landing should be seen as an upper limit estimate.

  17. LCP correlations with improved resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilborn, Lauren; McIntosh, Alan; Jedele, Andrea; Youngs, Mike; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is important to a fundamental understanding of nuclear matter. The density dependence of the asymmetry energy, the least constrained term in the EoS, is critical to describing exotic systems such as neutron-rich heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars. Correlation functions of particles emitted in heavy ion reactions (such a p-p correlations) have been predicted to be sensitive to the asymmetry energy. In order to measure correlation functions with high resolution, the Forward Array Using Silicon Technology (FAUST) at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has been recently re-commissioned with position-sensitive silicons as the delta-E detectors. A new method of position calibration for FAUST has been developed to take advantage of the 200um position resolution within each detector. Data has been collected from reactions of 40Ar +70Zn, 40Ar +58Fe and 40Ca +58Ni at 40 MeV/nucleon. The three systems allow correlation functions to be compared for systems with varying (N-Z)/A while holding constant either the total charge or the total mass. Light charged particles have been measured, and preliminary investigation of correlations from this campaign will be shown. Transport simulations will also be compared and presented.

  18. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan G.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometry has been revolutionized by access to instruments of increasingly high mass-resolving power. For small molecules up to ˜400 Da (e.g., drugs, metabolites, and various natural organic mixtures ranging from foods to petroleum), it is possible to determine elemental compositions (CcHhNnOoSsPp…) of thousands of chemical components simultaneously from accurate mass measurements (the same can be done up to 1000 Da if additional information is included). At higher mass, it becomes possible to identify proteins (including posttranslational modifications) from proteolytic peptides, as well as lipids, glycoconjugates, and other biological components. At even higher mass (˜100,000 Da or higher), it is possible to characterize posttranslational modifications of intact proteins and to map the binding surfaces of large biomolecule complexes. Here we review the principles and techniques of the highest-resolution analytical mass spectrometers (time-of-flight and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and orbitrap mass analyzers) and describe some representative high-resolution applications.

  19. High-resolution video, more is more?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niamut, O.A.; Bachet, T.T.; Limonard, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach and the translation of the outcomes of our market overview on the technical development that we implemented for the FascinatE project. The approach combines market insights and competitive intelligence with technical insights to define the position of the Fasci

  20. Super resolution of images and video

    CERN Document Server

    Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on the super resolution of images and video. The authors' use of the term super resolution (SR) is used to describe the process of obtaining a high resolution (HR) image, or a sequence of HR images, from a set of low resolution (LR) observations. This process has also been referred to in the literature as resolution enhancement (RE). SR has been applied primarily to spatial and temporal RE, but also to hyperspectral image enhancement. This book concentrates on motion based spatial RE, although the authors also describe motion free and hyperspectral image SR problems. Also exa

  1. Analysis of Resolution of Bistatic SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the spatial resolutions at different directions of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BiSAR) have been derived from the ambiguity function. Compared with monostatic signal to noise ratio, BiSAR's resolutions of a fixed point target are varying with slow time since BiSAR system is space-variant. Constraints for the assumption of space-invariant bistatic topology are proposed in the paper. Moreover, under the assumption of invariance, the change of resolutions at different point in the image scene is taken into account, and we have specified two key parameters that affect resolutions directly and analyzed the way how they influence on the resolutions.

  2. Reconcile: A Coreference Resolution Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanov, V; Cardie, C; Gilbert, N; Riloff, E; Buttler, D; Hysom, D

    2009-10-29

    Despite the availability of standard data sets and metrics, approaches to the problem of noun phrase coreference resolution are hard to compare empirically due to the different evaluation setting stemming, in part, from the lack of comprehensive coreference resolution research platforms. In this tech report we present Reconcile, a coreference resolution research platform that aims to facilitate the implementation of new approaches to coreference resolution as well as the comparison of existing approaches. We discuss Reconcile's architecture and give results of running Reconcile on six data sets using four evaluation metrics, showing that Reconcile's performance is comparable to state-of-the-art systems in coreference resolution.

  3. Effects of network resolution on topological properties of human neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero-Garcia, Rafael; Atienza, Mercedes; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2012-01-01

    Graph theoretical analyses applied to neuroimaging datasets have provided valuable insights into the large-scale anatomical organization of the human neocortex. Most of these studies were performed with different cortical scales leading to cortical networks with different levels of small-world or......Graph theoretical analyses applied to neuroimaging datasets have provided valuable insights into the large-scale anatomical organization of the human neocortex. Most of these studies were performed with different cortical scales leading to cortical networks with different levels of small......-world organization. The present study investigates how resolution of thickness-based cortical scales impacts on topological properties of human anatomical cortical networks. To this end, we designed a novel approach aimed at determining the best trade-off between small-world attributes of anatomical cortical...... networks and the number of cortical regions included in the scale. Results revealed that schemes comprising 540–599 regions (surface areas spanning between 250 and 275mm2) at sparsities below 10% showed a superior balance between small-world organization and the size of the cortical scale employed...

  4. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW); (Mount Union); (UW-MED)

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  5. (r) Mass Resolution versus Chamber Resolution in ALICE Dimuon Forward Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao

    2007-01-01

    The precisions and its sources of spatial resolutions of tracking chambers and mass resolutions of dimuon signals in ALICE Dimuon Forward Spectrometer are explored by tracking and reconstruction of AliRoot software. The dependences of (r) mass resolution on spatial resolution of tracking chambers are presented with and without background events through simulations.

  6. Selection of the InSight landing site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombek, M.; Kipp, D.; Warner, N.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Fergason, Robin L.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Beyer, R.; Huertas, A.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Putzig, N.E.; Campbell, B.A.; Morgan, G. A.; Charalambous, C.; Pike, W. T.; Gwinner, K.; Calef, F.; Kass, D.; Mischna, M A; Ashley, J.; Bloom, C.; Wigton, N.; Hare, T.; Schwartz, C.; Gengl, H.; Redmond, L.; Trautman, M.; Sweeney, J.; Grima, C.; Smith, I. B.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Lisano, M.; Benardini, J.; Smrekar, S.E.; Lognonne, P.; Banerdt, W. B.

    2017-01-01

    The selection of the Discovery Program InSight landing site took over four years from initial identification of possible areas that met engineering constraints, to downselection via targeted data from orbiters (especially Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images), to selection and certification via sophisticated entry, descent and landing (EDL) simulations. Constraints on elevation (≤−2.5 km">≤−2.5 km≤−2.5 km for sufficient atmosphere to slow the lander), latitude (initially 15°S–5°N and later 3°N–5°N for solar power and thermal management of the spacecraft), ellipse size (130 km by 27 km from ballistic entry and descent), and a load bearing surface without thick deposits of dust, severely limited acceptable areas to western Elysium Planitia. Within this area, 16 prospective ellipses were identified, which lie ∼600 km north of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Mapping of terrains in rapidly acquired CTX images identified especially benign smooth terrain and led to the downselection to four northern ellipses. Acquisition of nearly continuous HiRISE, additional Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) images, along with radar data confirmed that ellipse E9 met all landing site constraints: with slopes <15° at 84 m and 2 m length scales for radar tracking and touchdown stability, low rock abundance (<10 %) to avoid impact and spacecraft tip over, instrument deployment constraints, which included identical slope and rock abundance constraints, a radar reflective and load bearing surface, and a fragmented regolith ∼5 m thick for full penetration of the heat flow probe. Unlike other Mars landers, science objectives did not directly influence landing site selection.

  7. Global China Insights June 2014 : CGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Rien T.; Fischer, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Journal in which the Groningen Confucius Institute (GCI) shares different perspectives on China and provides insights into China from as many different aspects as possible. GCI aims to provide a full view of real China to the readers as well as featuring international and comprehensive perspectives,

  8. Insight in schizophrenia : Associations with empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenborg, G. H. M.; Spikman, J. M.; Jeronimus, B. F.; Aleman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many people with schizophrenia (50-80 %) demonstrate impaired insight, something which has been associated with a poorer outcome. Two types of empathy can be distinguished: affective empathy via shared emotions and cognitive empathy, also referred to as Theory of Mind (ToM). ToM can be subdivided in

  9. Creativity and Insight in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnabi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thought process involved in problem solving and its categorization as creative thinking as defined by psychologist R. Weisberg (2006). Additionally, the notion of insight, sometimes present in unconscious creative thinking and often leading to creative ideas, is discussed in the context of geometry problem solving. In…

  10. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  11. Gestures and Insight in Advanced Mathematical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    What role do gestures play in advanced mathematical thinking? We argue that the role of gestures goes beyond merely communicating thought and supporting understanding--in some cases, gestures can help generate new mathematical insights. Gestures feature prominently in a case study of two participants working on a sequence of calculus activities.…

  12. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may pro...

  13. Factorising a Quadratic Expression with Geometric Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for factorising a quadratic expression to facilitate instruction and learning. It appeals to elementary geometry which may provide better insights to some students or teachers. There have been many methods for factorising a quadratic expression described in school text books. However, students often seem to struggle with…

  14. InSight Planetary Protection Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James; Vaishampayan, Parag; Chen, Fei; Kazarians, Gayane; Willis, Jason; Witte, Joe; Hendrickson, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The InSight Project is a Discovery mission that consists of a single spacecraft with an overarching mission goal of illuminating the fundamentals of formation and evolution of terrestrial planets by investigating the interior structure and processes of Mars. The flight system is comprised of a 2008 Phoenix mission heritage cruise stage, aeroshell (heatshield and backshell), and lander. The lander payload contains cameras, a seismometer, a mole to penetrate the regolith (≤5 meters) to measure the geothermal gradient of Mars, and an auxiliary payload sensor suite to measure wind, temperature, and pressure. As a Mars lander mission without life detection instruments, the InSight mission has been designated PP Category IVa. Therefore, planetary protection bioburden requirements are applicable to this mission and require microbial reduction procedures and biological burden reports. Due to primary payload technical issues, InSight's 2016 launch has been delayed by NASA. The mission is currently under a re-planning phase. InSight has completed an approved Planetary Protection Plan, Subsidiary PP Plans, PP Implementation Documentation, and ~50% of the PPO verification biological assays. The flight system and additional payloads were assembled and being readied for launch at the launch site at the time of the project stand-down and has since been secured for storage. The status of the PP activities will be reported.

  15. Proteomics insights into plant signaling and development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaufmann, K.; Smaczniak, C.D.; Vries, de S.C.; Angenent, G.C.; Karlova, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is used to gain insight into the abundance and subcellular localization of cellular signaling components, the composition of molecular complexes and the regulation of signaling pathways. Multicellular organisms have evolved signaling networks and fast responses to

  16. Innovative Leadership: Insights from a Learning Technologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Professor Ricardo Torres Kompen is a leading proponent for, and researcher in, personal learning environments (PLEs). During his interview, Torres Kompen clarified his research on PLEs, particularly the digital toolbox within PLEs. He elaborated on experiences with implementing PLE initiatives, personal insights on using social media and Web 2.0…

  17. Cognitive Psychology--An Educational Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive psychology offers relevant insights into improving the teaching and learning process. The author has selected ten questions from a graduate class in cognition and learning taken at The Teachers College, Columbia University. The questions will be used to examine the most effective ways to learn and recall information.

  18. Insight in schizophrenia : Associations with empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenborg, G. H. M.; Spikman, J. M.; Jeronimus, B. F.; Aleman, A.

    Many people with schizophrenia (50-80 %) demonstrate impaired insight, something which has been associated with a poorer outcome. Two types of empathy can be distinguished: affective empathy via shared emotions and cognitive empathy, also referred to as Theory of Mind (ToM). ToM can be subdivided

  19. Gestures and Insight in Advanced Mathematical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    What role do gestures play in advanced mathematical thinking? We argue that the role of gestures goes beyond merely communicating thought and supporting understanding--in some cases, gestures can help generate new mathematical insights. Gestures feature prominently in a case study of two participants working on a sequence of calculus activities.…

  20. Creativity and Insight in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnabi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thought process involved in problem solving and its categorization as creative thinking as defined by psychologist R. Weisberg (2006). Additionally, the notion of insight, sometimes present in unconscious creative thinking and often leading to creative ideas, is discussed in the context of geometry problem solving. In…

  1. Improved prediction of RNA tertiary structure with insights into native state dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bida, John Paul; Maher, L James

    2012-03-01

    The importance of RNA tertiary structure is evident from the growing number of published high resolution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of RNA molecules. These structures provide insights into function and create a knowledge base that is leveraged by programs such as Assemble, ModeRNA, RNABuilder, NAST, FARNA, Mc-Sym, RNA2D3D, and iFoldRNA for tertiary structure prediction and design. While these methods sample native-like RNA structures during simulations, all struggle to capture the native RNA conformation after scoring. We propose RSIM, an improved RNA fragment assembly method that preserves RNA global secondary structure while sampling conformations. This approach enhances the quality of predicted RNA tertiary structure, provides insights into the native state dynamics, and generates a powerful visualization of the RNA conformational space. RSIM is available for download from http://www.github.com/jpbida/rsim.

  2. Resolution of the Chiral Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG JinGen; ZHU Jin

    2001-01-01

    @@ Chiral drugs are generally not permitted to be used in racemic form so that unintended side effects and unnecessary environmental hazards are avoided. Moreover, homochiral molecules are required immediately to progress key toxicological and clinical studies in the drug discovery. One series of technologies which can rapidly supply homochiral compounds is the separation of racemates, and of those the technique of crystallization of diastereomers is extremely effective-principally because it is simple to operate and it affords both enantiomers. In classical resolution via diastereoisomeric salt formation, the resolved compounds are limited to a given racemic acid or base and the choice of a suitable resolving agent for a racemic target compound is achieved by time-consuming trial-and-error procedure.

  3. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  4. Resolution of the Chiral Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; JinGen

    2001-01-01

    Chiral drugs are generally not permitted to be used in racemic form so that unintended side effects and unnecessary environmental hazards are avoided. Moreover, homochiral molecules are required immediately to progress key toxicological and clinical studies in the drug discovery. One series of technologies which can rapidly supply homochiral compounds is the separation of racemates, and of those the technique of crystallization of diastereomers is extremely effective-principally because it is simple to operate and it affords both enantiomers. In classical resolution via diastereoisomeric salt formation, the resolved compounds are limited to a given racemic acid or base and the choice of a suitable resolving agent for a racemic target compound is achieved by time-consuming trial-and-error procedure.  ……

  5. High-resolution land topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Didier; Elachi, Charles

    2006-11-01

    After a description of the background, methods of production and some scientific uses of high-resolution land topography, we present the current status and the prospect of radar interferometry, regarded as one of the best techniques for obtaining the most global and the most accurate topographic maps. After introducing briefly the theoretical aspects of radar interferometry - principles, limits of operation and various capabilities -, we will focus on the topographic applications that resulted in an almost global topographic map of the earth: the SRTM map. After introducing the Interferometric Cartwheel system, we will build on its expected performances to discuss the scientific prospects of refining a global topographic map to sub-metric accuracy. We also show how other fields of sciences such as hydrology may benefit from the products generated by interferometric radar systems. To cite this article: D. Massonnet, C. Elachi, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  6. Thermodynamics of adaptive molecular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.

    2016-11-01

    A relatively general thermodynamic formalism for adaptive molecular resolution (AMR) is presented. The description is based on the approximation of local thermodynamic equilibrium and considers the alchemic parameter λ as the conjugate variable of the potential energy difference between the atomistic and coarse-grained model Φ=U(1)-U(0). The thermodynamic formalism recovers the relations obtained from statistical mechanics of H-AdResS (Español et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064115, 2015 (doi:10.1063/1.4907006)) and provides relations between the free energy compensation and thermodynamic potentials. Inspired by this thermodynamic analogy, several generalizations of AMR are proposed, such as the exploration of new Maxwell relations and how to treat λ and Φ as `real' thermodynamic variables. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  7. High-resolution slug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemansky, G M; McElwee, C D

    2005-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) variation has important ramifications for ground water flow and the transport of contaminants in ground water. The delineation of the nature of that variation can be critical to complete characterization of a site and the planning of effective and efficient remedial measures. Site-specific features (such as high-conductivity zones) need to be quantified. Our alluvial field site in the Kansas River valley exhibits spatial variability, very high conductivities, and nonlinear behavior for slug tests in the sand and gravel aquifer. High-resolution, multilevel slug tests have been performed in a number of wells that are fully screened. A general nonlinear model based on the Navier-Stokes equation, nonlinear frictional loss, non-Darcian flow, acceleration effects, radius changes in the wellbore, and a Hvorslev model for the aquifer has been used to analyze the data, employing an automated processing system that runs within the Excel spreadsheet program. It is concluded that slug tests can provide the necessary data to identify the nature of both horizontal and vertical K variation in an aquifer and that improved delineation or higher resolution of K structure is possible with shorter test intervals. The gradation into zones of higher conductivity is sharper than seen previously, and the maximum conductivity observed is greater than previously measured. However, data from this project indicate that well development, the presence of fines, and the antecedent history of the well are important interrelated factors in regard to slug-test response and can prevent obtaining consistent results in some cases.

  8. Bed roughness of palaeo-ice streams: insights and implications for contemporary ice sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Francesca; Rippin, David; Selby, Katherine; Krabbendam, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    Bed roughness is the vertical variation of elevation along a horizontal transect. It is an important control on ice stream location and dynamics, with a correspondingly important role in determining the behaviour of ice sheets. Previous studies of bed roughness have been limited to insights derived from Radio Echo Sounding (RES) profiles across parts of Antarctica and Greenland. Such an approach has been necessary due to the inaccessibility of the underlying bed. This approach has led to important insights, such as identifying a general link between smooth beds and fast ice flow, as well as rough beds and slow ice flow. However, these insights are mainly derived from relatively coarse datasets, so that links between roughness and flow are generalised and rather simplistic. Here, we explore the use of DTMs from the well-preserved footprints of palaeo-ice streams, coupled with high resolution models of palaeo-ice flow, as a tool for investigating basal controls on the behaviour of contemporary, active ice streams in much greater detail. Initially, artificial transects were set up across the Minch palaeo-ice stream (NW Scotland) to mimic RES flight lines from past studies in Antarctica. We then explored how increasing data-resolution impacted upon the roughness measurements that were derived. Our work on the Minch palaeo-ice stream indicates that different roughness signatures are associated with different glacial landforms, and we discuss the potential for using these insights to infer, from RES-based roughness measurements, the occurrence of particular landform assemblages that may exist beneath contemporary ice sheets.

  9. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  10. Understanding reconstructed Dante spectra using high resolution spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M. J., E-mail: may13@llnl.gov; Widmann, K.; Kemp, G. E.; Thorn, D.; Colvin, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Moore, A.; Blue, B. E. [L-170 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Weaver, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Dante is an 18 channel filtered diode array used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux between 50 eV and 20 keV from various targets. The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and a reconstruction algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The reconstructed spectra are very low resolution with features consistent with the instrument response and are not necessarily consistent with the spectral emission features from the plasma. Errors may exist between the reconstructed spectra and the actual emission features due to assumptions in the algorithm. Recently, a high resolution convex crystal spectrometer, VIRGIL, has been installed at NIF with the same line of sight as the Dante. Spectra from L-shell Ag and Xe have been recorded by both VIRGIL and Dante. Comparisons of these two spectroscopic measurements yield insights into the accuracy of the Dante reconstructions.

  11. Evaluation of the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, M.; Usera, G.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the Actuator Line Model (ALM) in spatial resolutions coarser than what is generally recommended, also using larger time steps. To accomplish this, the ALM has been implemented in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi and validated against experimental measurements of two wind tunnel campaigns (stand alone wind turbine and two wind turbines in line, case A and B respectively), taking into account two spatial resolutions: R/8 and R/15 (R is the rotor radius). A sensitivity analysis in case A was performed in order to get some insight into the influence of the smearing factor (3D Gaussian distribution) and time step size in power and thrust, as well as in the wake, without applying a tip loss correction factor (TLCF), for one tip speed ratio (TSR). It is concluded that as the smearing factor is larger or time step size is smaller the power is increased, but the velocity deficit is not as much affected. From this analysis, a smearing factor was obtained in order to calculate precisely the power coefficient for that TSR without applying TLCF. Results with this approach were compared with another simulation choosing a larger smearing factor and applying Prandtl's TLCF, for three values of TSR. It is found that applying the TLCF improves the power estimation and weakens the influence of the smearing factor. Finally, these 2 alternatives were tested in case B, confirming that conclusion.

  12. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Leishmania Major Phosphodiesterase LmjPDEB1 and Insight into the Design of hte Parasite-Selective Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang,H.; Yan, Z.; Geng, J.; Kunz, S.; Seebeck, T.; Ke, H.

    2007-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis is a major public health problem in many countries, but chemotherapy is in an unsatisfactory state. Leishmania major phosphodiesterases (LmjPDEs) have been shown to play important roles in cell proliferation and apoptosis of the parasite. Thus LmjPDE inhibitors may potentially represent a novel class of drugs for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Reported here are the kinetic characterization of the LmjPDEB1 catalytic domain and its crystal structure as a complex with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) at 1.55 Angstroms resolution. The structure of LmjPDEB1 is similar to that of human PDEs. IBMX stacks against the conserved phenylalanine and forms a hydrogen bond with the invariant glutamine, in a pattern common to most inhibitors bound to human PDEs. However, an extensive structural comparison reveals subtle, but significant differences between the active sites of LmjPDEB1 and human PDEs. In addition, a pocket next to the inhibitor binding site is found to be unique to LmjPDEB1. This pocket is isolated by two gating residues in human PDE families, but constitutes a natural expansion of the inhibitor binding pocket in LmjPDEB1. The structure particularity might be useful for the development of parasite-selective inhibitors for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  14. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amin...... acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches....

  15. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Michelle A; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as "resolution pharmacology."

  16. Resolution of Inflammation: What Controls Its Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Michelle A.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2016-01-01

    An effective resolution program may be able to prevent the progression from non-resolving acute inflammation to persistent chronic inflammation. It has now become evident that coordinated resolution programs initiate shortly after inflammatory responses begin. In this context, several mechanisms provide the fine-tuning of inflammation and create a favorable environment for the resolution phase to take place and for homeostasis to return. In this review, we focus on the events required for an effective transition from the proinflammatory phase to the onset and establishment of resolution. We suggest that several mediators that promote the inflammatory phase of inflammation can simultaneously initiate a program for active resolution. Indeed, several events enact a decrease in the local chemokine concentration, a reduction which is essential to inhibit further infiltration of neutrophils into the tissue. Interestingly, although neutrophils are cells that characteristically participate in the active phase of inflammation, they also contribute to the onset of resolution. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate resolution may be instrumental to develop pro-resolution strategies to treat complex chronic inflammatory diseases, in humans. The efforts to develop strategies based on resolution of inflammation have shaped a new area of pharmacology referred to as “resolution pharmacology.” PMID:27199985

  17. Crystal structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease. New insights into catalytic mechanism and cleavage specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtley, James R; Knox, Stephen R; Jaulent, Agnès M; Brick, Peter; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Curry, Stephen

    2005-03-25

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a widespread and economically devastating disease of domestic livestock. Although FMDV vaccines are available, political and technical problems associated with their use are driving a renewed search for alternative methods of disease control. The viral RNA genome is translated as a single polypeptide precursor that must be cleaved into functional proteins by virally encoded proteases. 10 of the 13 cleavages are performed by the highly conserved 3C protease (3C(pro)), making the enzyme an attractive target for antiviral drugs. We have developed a soluble, recombinant form of FMDV 3C(pro), determined the crystal structure to 1.9-angstroms resolution, and analyzed the cleavage specificity of the enzyme. The structure indicates that FMDV 3C(pro) adopts a chymotrypsin-like fold and possesses a Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad in a similar conformation to the Ser-His-Asp triad conserved in almost all serine proteases. This observation suggests that the dyad-based mechanisms proposed for this class of cysteine proteases need to be reassessed. Peptide cleavage assays revealed that the recognition sequence spans at least four residues either side of the scissile bond (P4-P4') and that FMDV 3C(pro) discriminates only weakly in favor of P1-Gln over P1-Glu, in contrast to other 3C(pro) enzymes that strongly favor P1-Gln. The relaxed specificity may be due to the unexpected absence in FMDV 3C(pro) of an extended beta-ribbon that folds over the substrate binding cleft in other picornavirus 3C(pro) structures. Collectively, these results establish a valuable framework for the development of FMDV 3C(pro) inhibitors.

  18. Linear versus non-linear structural information limit in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aert, S; Chen, J H; Van Dyck, D

    2010-10-01

    A widely used performance criterion in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is the information limit. It corresponds to the inverse of the maximum spatial object frequency that is linearly transmitted with sufficient intensity from the exit plane of the object to the image plane and is limited due to partial temporal coherence. In practice, the information limit is often measured from a diffractogram or from Young's fringes assuming a weak phase object scattering beyond the inverse of the information limit. However, for an aberration corrected electron microscope, with an information limit in the sub-angstrom range, weak phase objects are no longer applicable since they do not scatter sufficiently in this range. Therefore, one relies on more strongly scattering objects such as crystals of heavy atoms observed along a low index zone axis. In that case, dynamical scattering becomes important such that the non-linear and linear interaction may be equally important. The non-linear interaction may then set the experimental cut-off frequency observed in a diffractogram. The goal of this paper is to quantify both the linear and the non-linear information transfer in terms of closed form analytical expressions. Whereas the cut-off frequency set by the linear transfer can be directly related with the attainable resolution, information from the non-linear transfer can only be extracted using quantitative, model-based methods. In contrast to the historic definition of the information limit depending on microscope parameters only, the expressions derived in this paper explicitly incorporate their dependence on the structure parameters as well. In order to emphasize this dependence and to distinguish from the usual information limit, the expressions derived for the inverse cut-off frequencies will be referred to as the linear and non-linear structural information limit. The present findings confirm the well-known result that partial temporal coherence has

  19. Structure-function insights of membrane and soluble proteins revealed by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreaden, Tina M; Devarajan, Bharanidharan; Barry, Bridgette A; Schmidt-Krey, Ingeborg

    2013-01-01

    Electron crystallography is emerging as an important method in solving protein structures. While it has found extensive applications in the understanding of membrane protein structure and function at a wide range of resolutions, from revealing oligomeric arrangements to atomic models, electron crystallography has also provided invaluable information on the soluble α/β-tubulin which could not be obtained by any other method to date. Examples of critical insights from selected structures of membrane proteins as well as α/β-tubulin are described here, demonstrating the vast potential of electron crystallography that is first beginning to unfold.

  20. The "Insight Paradox" in Schizophrenia: Magnitude, Moderators and Mediators of the Association Between Insight and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvederi Murri, Martino; Amore, Mario; Calcagno, Pietro; Respino, Matteo; Marozzi, Valentina; Masotti, Mattia; Bugliani, Michele; Innamorati, Marco; Pompili, Maurizio; Galderisi, Silvana; Maj, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The so-called "insight paradox" posits that among patients with schizophrenia higher levels of insight are associated with increased levels of depression. Although different studies examined this issue, only few took in account potential confounders or factors that could influence this association. In a sample of clinically stable patients with schizophrenia, insight and depression were evaluated using the Scale to assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia. Other rating scales were used to assess the severity of psychotic symptoms, extrapyramidal symptoms, hopelessness, internalized stigma, self-esteem, and service engagement. Regression models were used to estimate the magnitude of the association between insight and depression while accounting for the role of confounders. Putative psychological and sociodemographic factors that could act as mediators and moderators were examined using the PROCESS macro. By accounting for the role of confounding factors, the strength of the association between insight into symptoms and depression increased from 13% to 25% explained covariance. Patients with lower socioeconomic status (F = 8.5, P = .04), more severe illness (F = 4.8, P = .03) and lower levels of service engagement (F = 4.7, P = .03) displayed the strongest association between insight and depression. Lastly, hopelessness, internalized stigma and perceived discrimination acted as significant mediators. The relationship between insight and depression should be considered a well established phenomenon among patients with schizophrenia: it seems stronger than previously reported especially among patients with lower socioeconomic status, severe illness and poor engagement with services. These findings may have relevant implications for the promotion of insight among patients with schizophrenia.