WorldWideScience

Sample records for angle-resolved electron energy

  1. Angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, U.; Preisinger, A.; Schattschneider, P.; Varga, P.

    We report on angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection mode with low primary energy on a graphite single crystal. Measurements with primary electron energy of 175 eV have been performed in off-Bragg-reflex geometry in two different directions within the (0001) surface plane of the graphite single crystal. In addition, EELS measurements in specular reflection mode with different primary energies and angles of incidence were done in order to distinguish between surface and bulk plasmon losses. The energy losses and the transferred momenta of the losses have been analyzed. The results are compared with the loss functions for bulk and surface excitations calculated from the dielectric function ɛ(ω, q) obtained from TEELS-data (EELS in transmission mode) [Springer Tracts Mod. Phys. 54 (1970) 77].

  2. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometry: new electron optics and detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new spectrometer system is described, designed to measure angle-resolved energy distributions of photoemitted electrons efficiently. Some results are presented of measurements on a Si(001) surface. (Auth.)

  3. Imaging electron dynamics with time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study how time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can be applied for imaging coherent electron dynamics in molecules. We consider a process in which a pump pulse triggers coherent electronic dynamics in a molecule by creating a valence electron hole. An ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) probe pulse creates a second electron hole in the molecule. Information about the electron dynamics is accessed by analyzing angular distributions of photoemission probabilities at a fixed photoelectron energy. We demonstrate that a rigorous theoretical analysis, which takes into account the indistinguishability of transitions induced by the ultrashort, broadband probe pulse and electron hole correlation effects, is necessary for the interpretation of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra. We show how a Fourier analysis of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra from a molecule can be applied to follow its electron dynamics by considering photoelectron distributions from an indol...

  4. Angle-resolved photoemission from γ-Ce: Distinguishing band peaks from f-electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectra from single crystal γ-Ce(100) are presented and discussed. Valence-band peaks are observed for photon energies below 40 eV. These peaks disperse with electron exit angle and obey simple one-electron selection rules. For photon energies above 50 eV, two peaks, at the Fermi level and at 2-eV binding energy, dominate the spectra. These peaks do not disperse, and do not obey the one-electron selection rules. They are identified as atomiclike 4f emission

  5. Angle-Resolved Photoemission of Solvated Electrons in Sodium-Doped Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    West, Adam H C; Luckhaus, David; Saak, Clara-Magdalena; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the unpaired electron in sodium-doped water, methanol, ammonia, and dimethyl ether clusters is presented. The experimental observations and the complementary calculations are consistent with surface electrons for the cluster size range studied. Evidence against internally solvated electrons is provided by the photoelectron angular distribution. The trends in the ionization energies seem mainly determined by the degree of hydrogen bonding in the solvent and the solvation of the ion core. The onset ionization energies of water and methanol clusters do not level off at small cluster sizes, but decrease slightly with increasing cluster size.

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission study of Si electronic structure: Boron concentration dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron concentration dependence of the Si electronic structure of Si(1 0 0)2 x 1 surfaces were investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The ARPES spectra exhibit rigid shifts toward lower binding energy as the boron concentration increases. The band dispersion was obtained from fitting procedure, and it is found that the top of the valence band does not exceed the Fermi level even with a boron concentration 35 times larger than the critical concentration of the metal-insulator transition.

  7. The electronic structure of spintronic materials as seen by spin-polarized angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Introduction of spin-dependent effects in modern angle-resolved photoemission from the point of view of potential applications in spintronics. •Review on modern spin-polarimeters, including the historical development of the field. •Several examples to illustrate the application of spin-polarized photoemission to ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic sample systems. -- Abstract: The key quantity in spintronic devices is the spin polarization of the current flowing through the various device components, which in turn is closely determined by the components’ electronic structure. Modern spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) can map the details of the spin-polarized electronic structure in many novel material systems – both magnetic and nonmagnetic. In order to separate close-lying electronic states, however, an improvement in energy and angular resolution as well as information depth is still mandatory. We review several types of modern photoemission spectrometers capable of spin analysis and discuss the application of the technique for several physical systems including ferromagnetic thin films and topological insulators

  8. A high performance angle-resolving electron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Rossnagel, K; Skibowski, M; Harm, S

    2001-01-01

    We report on our new versatile photoelectron spectrometer Angular Spectrometer for Photoelectrons with High Energy REsolution (ASPHERE) which is part of beamline W3.2 (photon energies from 5 to 40 eV) but also compatible with beamline BW3 (40-1500 eV) at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB). ASPHERE is a 180 deg. spherical analyzer (r sub 0 =100 mm) with a four-element input lens and is mounted on a two-axes goniometer with computer-controlled stepper motors which enables sequential angle-scanned measurements. The input lens is equipped with an iris aperture so that the angular resolution can be continuously adjusted from 0.2 deg. to 5 deg. sign . The fringe field of the condenser has been corrected for by tilting the angle of the input lens against the base plane of the hemispheres resulting in an overall energy resolution of 10 meV. To improve the speed of data acquisition three standard channeltron detectors are installed in the image plane of the analyzer which will be replaced by a multidet...

  9. Angle resolved ion-electron spectroscopy (ARIES), a new technique to study surface structural features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle Resolved Ion-Electron Spectroscopy (ARIES), combined with Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), is presented as a new technique with a wide applicability to study solid surfaces. Energy and angular distribution of secondary electrons emitted due to the ionization of (ad)-sorbates on a Cu(001) surface upon bombardment with 10 keV He+ are examined. When sulphur atoms - diffused from the bulk to the surface upon a 6000C anneal - are involved in the emission process, a strongly anisotropical emission is found. The anisotropy is related only to the incoming beam direction and appears to be fully independent of the copper target orientation. Some points of importance for a theoretical description are discussed. The anisotropy effect can effectively be used to determine the relative position of contaminant and substrate atoms in the uppermost surface layers. Thus, it is found that (1) sulphur atoms diffused to positions just below the surface occupy substitutional sites and (2) in this situation surface relaxation for the copper atoms in the first layer is negligible. (author)

  10. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  11. Energy and angle resolved ion scattering spectroscopy: new possibilities for surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the design and development of a novel, very sensitive and high-resolving spectrometer for surface analysis is described. This spectrometer is designed for Energy and Angle Resolved Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (EARISS). There are only a few techniques that are sensitive enough to study the outermost atomic layer of surfaces. One of these techniques, Low-Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), is discussed in chapter 2. Since LEIS is destructive, it is important to make a very efficient use of the scattered ions. This makes it attractive to simultaneously carry out energy and angle dependent measurements (EARISS). (Auth.)

  12. Electronic and geometric structure of the PTCDA/Ag(110) interface probed by angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wießner, M.; Hauschild, D.; Schöll, A.; Reinert, F.; Feyer, V.; Winkler, K.; Krömker, B.

    2012-07-01

    The properties of molecular films are determined by the geometric structure of the first layers near the interface. These are in contact with the substrate and feel the effect of the interfacial bonding, which particularly, for metal substrates, can be substantial. For the model system 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride on Ag(110), the geometric structure of the first monolayer can be modified by preparation parameters. This leads to significant differences in the electronic structure of the first layer. Here, we show that, by combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with low-energy electron diffraction, we cannot only determine the electronic structure of the interfacial layer and the unit cell of the adsorbate superstructure, but also the arrangement of the molecules in the unit cell. Moreover, in bilayer films, we can distinguish the first from the second layer and, thus, study the formation of the second layer and its influence on the buried interface.

  13. Experimental electronic structure and Fermi-surface instability of the correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 : High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, S.; Fazekas, P.; Søndergaard, C.; Ariosa, D.; Barišić, N.; Berger, H.; Cloëtta, D.; Forró, L.; Höchst, H.; Kupčić, I.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2007-04-01

    The correlated 3d sulphide BaVS3 exhibits an interesting coexistence of one-dimensional and three-dimensional properties. Our experiments determine the electronic band structure and shed light on this puzzle. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements in a 4-eV -wide range below the Fermi energy level uncover and investigate the coexistence of a1g wide-band and eg narrow-band d electrons, which lead to the complicated electronic properties of this material. We explore the effects of strong correlations and the Fermi surface instability associated with the metal-insulator transition.

  14. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions

  15. Electronic structure of single crystal UPd3, UGe2, and USb2 from hard X-ray and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Electronic structure of single crystal UPd3, UGe2, and USb2 was measured by hard X-ray and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. → Angle resolved photoemission results demonstrate hybridization between U 5f and Pd 4d electrons within UPd3. → HAXPES probing of bulk features within of UPd3, UGe2, and USb2 samples with native oxide contamination demonstrated. → Two distinct spectral features identified for Sb I and Sb II sites within USb2 HAXPES spectrum. → Line shape analysis reveals correlations between Doniach-Sunjic asymmetry coefficients and 5f localization. - Abstract: Electronic structure of single crystal UPd3, UGe2, and USb2 has been measured from hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with 7.6 keV photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Lower photon energy angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) was also performed at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). Herein the following results are presented: (i) ARPES results demonstrate hybridization between the U 5f and Pd 4d electrons within UPd3. (ii) The greatly reduced surface sensitivity of HAXPES enabled observation of the bulk core levels in spite of surface oxidation. Photoelectron mean-free-path versus oxide layer thickness considerations were used to model the effectiveness of HAXPES for probing bulk features of in-air cleaved samples. (iii) Two distinct features separated by 800 meV were observed for the Sb 3d core level. These two features are attributed to manifestations of two distinct Sb sites within the USb2 single crystal as supported by consideration of interatomic distances and enthalpy-of-formation. (iv) Doniach-Sunjic line shape analysis of core level spectral features revealed correlations between asymmetry coefficients and 5f localization.

  16. Method to map one-dimensional electronic wave function by using multiple Brillouin zone angle resolved photoemission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Wook Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES is a powerful tool to investigate electronic structures in solids and has been widely used in studying various materials. The electronic structure information by ARPES is obtained in the momentum space. However, in the case of one-dimensional system, we here show that we extract the real space information from ARPES data taken over multiple Brillouin zones (BZs. Intensities in the multiple BZs are proportional to the photoemission matrix element which contains information on the coefficient of the Bloch wave function. It is shown that the Bloch wave function coefficients can be extracted from ARPES data, which allows us to construct the real space wave function. As a test, we use ARPES data from proto-typical one-dimensional system SrCuO2 and construct the real space wave function.

  17. Electronic structure of HfN/sub 0.93/(100) studied by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of HfN is reported. Results from angle-resolved photoemission experiments on HfN/sub 0.93/(100) are presented and interpreted with use of calculated results. The bulk-band structure of stoichiometric HfN was calculated relativistically and nonrelativistically using the linear augmented-plane-wave method. Predicted band locations and dispersions along the Γ--X direction are compared with experimental results. In general the experiment indicates smaller bandwidths and locates the bands deeper below the Fermi level than the calculated values. Calculations of photoemission spectra, made nonrelativistically, are also reported and these spectra are found to reflect the recorded spectra fairly well

  18. Electronic structure study of Cu-doped 1T-TiSe{sub 2} by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jinwon; Jeong, Jinhwan [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Han-Jin, E-mail: ffnhj@chonnam.ac.k [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Baek [Laboratory of Pohang Emergent Materials and Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.-D. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We synthesized single crystals of TiSe{sub 2} with various Cu concentrations, and have performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study in order to understand the CDW mechanism and to reveal the role of the Cu atoms in Cu-doped 1T-TiSe{sub 2}. The measurements reveal that during the well-known charge density wave (CDW) transition the pristine TiSe{sub 2} sample undergoes a transition from a very small indirect gap semiconductor to a larger one. No nesting sign was observed in the Fermi surface in the CDW phase. The transition is suppressed in the Cu-doped samples, and an electron pocket appears near the L point, which may help appearance of the superconductivity of Cu{sub x}TiSe{sub 2} through the BCS-Eliashberg relation.

  19. An experimental setup for high resolution 10.5 eV laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using a time-of-flight electron analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, M H; Götberg, O; Tjernberg, O

    2011-09-01

    We present an experimental setup for laser-based angle-resolved time-of-flight photoemission. Using a picosecond pulsed laser, photons of energy 10.5 eV are generated through higher harmonic generation in xenon. The high repetition rate of the light source, variable between 0.2 and 8 MHz, enables high photoelectron count rates and short acquisition times. By using a time-of-flight analyzer with angle-resolving capabilities, electrons emitted from the sample within a circular cone of up to ±15° can be collected. Hence, simultaneous acquisition of photoemission data for a complete area of the Brillouin zone is possible. The current photon energy enables bulk sensitive measurements, high angular resolution, and the resulting covered momentum space is large enough to enclose the entire Brillouin zone in cuprate high-T(c) superconductors. Fermi edge measurements on polycrystalline Au shows an energy resolution better than 5 meV. Data from a test measurement of the Au(111) surface state are presented along with measurements of the Fermi surface of the high-T(c) superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8 + δ) (Bi2212). PMID:21974625

  20. Electronic structure of ion arsenic high temperature superconductors studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the present thesis is to present our ARPES results on the iron arsenic superconductors. As revealed by a series of ARPES measurements on both the AEFe2As2 and the RFeAs(O,F) families (parent compound and carrier-doped systems), the electronic structures of the pnictides are complicated, three dimensional, and closely linked to their superconducting behavior (13; 14; 15; 16; 17; 18; 19). Parent compounds of these materials exhibit the basic hole-electron pocket dual plus an apparent Fermi surface reconstruction caused by long range antiferromagnetism (13; 15). When carriers are introduced, the chemical potential shifts in accordance with the Luttinger theorem and the rigid band shifting picture (13). Importantly, both the appearance and disappearance of the superconducting dome at low and high doping levels have intimate relation with topological changes at the Fermi surfaces, resulting in a specific Fermi topology being favored by superconductivity (15; 16). On the low doping side, superconductivity emerges in the phase diagram once the antiferromagnetic reconstruction disappears below the Fermi level, returning the Fermi surface to its paramagnetic-like appearance. On the high doping side, superconductivity disappears around a doping level at which the central hole pocket vanishes due to increasing electron concentration. Such phenomena are evidence for the governing role the electronic structure plays in their superconducting behavior.

  1. Depth- and momentum- resolved electronic structure at buried oxide interfaces from standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadley, Charles

    2015-03-01

    It is clear that interfaces in complex oxide heterostructures often represent emergent materials that possess surprising properties not associated with the parent oxides, such as two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs), superconductivity, and magnetism. A detailed knowledge of the composition, atomic structure, and electronic structure through such interfaces is thus critical. Photomission (PES) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) represent techniques of choice for such studies, but have certain limitations in being too surface sensitive and in not being able to focus specifically on buried interfaces or heterostructure layers. In this talk, I will discuss combining two newer elements of PES/ARPES to deal with this challenge: - the use of soft x-rays in the ca. few hundred-to-2000 eV regime, or even into the true hard x-ray regime, to probe more deeply into the structure, and - tailoring of the x-ray intensity profile into a strong standing wave (SW) through reflection from a multilayer heterostructure to provide much enhanced depth resolution. The relative advantages of soft/hard x-ray PES and ARPES and their complementarity to conventional VUV ARPES in the ca. 5-150 eV regime will be considered. As illustrative examples, by combining SW-PES and SW-ARPES, it has been possible to measure for the first time the detailed concentration profiles and momentum-resolved electronic structure at the SrTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 interface and to directly measure the depth profile of the 2DEG at SrTiO3/GdTiO3 interfaces. Future directions for such measurements will also be discussed. Supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, ARO-MURI Grant W911-NF-09-1-0398, and the PALM-APTCOM Project (France).

  2. Angle-resolved energy distributions of laser ablated silver ions in vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.N.; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distributions of ions ablated from silver in vacuum have been measured in situ for pulsed laser irradiation at 355 nm. We have determined the energy spectra for directions ranging from 5 degrees to 75 degrees with respect to the normal in the intensity range from 100 to 400 MW/cm(2). At...

  3. Introductory Lecture. Probing wavepacket dynamics with femtosecond energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Takatsuka, Kazuo; Arasaki, Yasuki; Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated how well-suited femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectra are for mapping wavepacket dynamics in molecular systems. Theoretical studies of femtosecond photoelectron spectra which incorporate a robust description of the underlying photoionization dynamics should enhance the utility of such spectra as a probe of wavepackets and of the evolution of electronic structure. This should be particularly true in regions of avoided crossings where the photo...

  4. Angle-resolved photoemission analysis on electronic structures and thermoelectric properties of off-stoichiometric Fe2-xV1+xAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic states of Heusler (L21)-type off-stoichiometric Fe2-xV1+xAl have been investigated by soft X-ray angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) in order to clarify the origin of their large thermoelectric powers, which cannot be explained in terms of the rigid band model. In off-normal and normal ARPES, Fe2.05V0.95Al shows a weakly dispersive bulk band around the binding energy of 0.3 eV in the Γ-X direction and an almost dispersion-less one around 0.3 eV in a gap of dispersive bulk bands in the Γ-L direction, which is attributed to the anti-site Fe defect. At the Γ point, the bulk band does not appear to cross the Fermi level EF, consistent with the rigid band model for the excess Fe content bringing about the increase in the valence electrons, but no band crossing EF down is found at the X point. The anti-site Fe defect states near EF might push up the band at the X point and cause the p-type thermoelectric properties, unexpected with the rigid band picture. The change in the electronic structures and thermoelectric properties are discussed on the off-stoichiometry and substitution of the forth element. (author)

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission study and first-principles calculation of the electronic structure of LaSb2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present valence band studies of LaSb2 using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and compare these data with band structure calculations. Valence band spectra reveal that Sb 5p states are dominant near the Fermi level and are hybridized with the La 5d states just below. The calculations show a fair agreement with the experimentally determined valence band spectra, allowing an identification of the observed features. We measured some dispersion for kbar, especially for Sb 5p states; no significant dispersion was found for k||. (letter to the editor)

  6. A spin- and angle-resolving photoelectron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of hemispherical electron energy analyzer that permits angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy has been developed. The analyzer permits standard angle resolved spectra to be recorded with a two-dimensional detector in parallel with spin detection using a mini-Mott polarimeter. General design considerations as well as technical solutions are discussed and test results from the Au(111) surface state are presented.

  7. Fermi surface of MoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen measurements, and electronic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Kündel, Jörg; Klemm, Matthias; Horn, Siegfried; Hofmann, Philip; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Eyert, Volker

    2009-03-01

    A comprehensive study of the electronic properties of monoclinic MoO2 from both an experimental and a theoretical point of view is presented. We focus on the investigation of the Fermi body and the band structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, de Haas-van Alphen measurements, and electronic structure calculations. For the latter, the full-potential augmented spherical wave method has been applied. Very good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results is found. In particular, all Fermi surface sheets are correctly identified by all three approaches. Previous controversies concerning additional holelike surfaces centered around the Z and B points could be resolved; these surfaces were artifacts of the atomic-sphere approximation used in the old calculations. Our results underline the importance of electronic structure calculations for the understanding of MoO2 and the neighboring rutile-type early transition-metal dioxides. This includes the low-temperature insulating phases of VO2 and NbO2 , which have crystal structures very similar to that of molybdenum dioxide and display the well-known prominent metal-insulator transitions.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy observation of anomalous electronic states in EuFe2As2−xPx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure and the Fermi surface of EuFe2As2, EuFe2As1.4P0.6 and EuFe2P2. We observed doubled core level peaks associated with the pnictide atoms. Using K atoms evaporated at the surface to affect the surface quality, we show that one component of these doubled peaks is related to a surface state. Nevertheless, strong electronic dispersion along the c-axis, especially pronounced in EuFe2P2, is observed for at least one band, thus indicating that the Fe states, albeit probably affected at the surface, do not form pure two-dimensional surface states. We determine the evolution of the Fermi surface as a function of the P content and reveal that the hole Fermi surface pockets enlarge with increasing P content. We also show that the spectral weight near the Fermi level of EuFe2P2 is reduced as compared to that of EuFe2As2 and EuFe2As1.4P0.6. Finally, we identify the electronic states associated with the Eu2+ f states and show an anomalous jump in EuFe2P2. (paper)

  9. Orbital character and electron correlation effects on two- and three-dimensional Fermi surfaces in KFe2As2 revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei eYoshida

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated orbital character and electron correlation effects on Fermi surfaces in the hole-overdoped iron pnictide superconductor KFe2As2, which shows a low Tc of ~4 K, by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. From the polarization-dependence of the ARPES spectra, we have determined the orbital character of each Fermi surface. Electron mass renormalization of each band is quantitatively consistent with de Haas-van Alphen results. The outer beta and middle zeta Fermi surfaces show large renormalization factor of m*/mb ~6-7, while the inner Fermi surface has a smaller factor m*/mb ~2. Middle hole Fermi surface zeta has strong three-dimensionality compared to other Fermi surfaces, indicating the d3z2-r2 orbital character, which may be related to the octet-line nodes recently observed by laser ARPES. The observed orbital-dependent mass renormalization would give constraints on the pairing mechanism with line nodes of this system.

  10. Observation of an ''extended'' Van Hove singularity in YBa2Cu4O8 by ultrahigh energy resolution angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterize the nature of the Van Hove singularity near the Fermi energy (EF) in YBa2Cu4O8 using ultrahigh energy resolution (10 meV) angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, together with corresponding first-principles spectra intensity computations. The singularity, related to CuO2 planes, is located about 19 meV below EF at the Y point in the Brillouin zone and arises from a band which is nearly dispersionless along the Γ to Y direction. Such an ''extended'' saddle point would render the band structure quasi-1D and yield a power law divergence in the density of states, allowing the occurrence of Tc's of order 100 K even in a weak coupling BCS scheme

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Bromberger, H; Belli, F; Liu, H; Calegari, F; Chavez-Cervantes, M; Li, M T; Lin, C T; Abdolvand, A; Russell, P St J; Cavalleri, A; Travers, J C; Gierz, I

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  13. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials

  14. Electronic structure as a function of doping in YBa2Cu3Ox(6.2≤x≤6.9) studied by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report angle-resolved photoemission studies on YBa2Cu3Ox with oxygen stoichiometry varied in the range 6.2≤x≤6.9. The distinct 1-eV peak, observed with hν=24 eV at the X(Y) point(s), shifts monotonically toward higher binding energies (as much as 0.20 eV) as oxygen stoichiometry is reduced from x=6.9 to 6.3. The direction and the magnitude of the shift are consistent with a simple rigid-band filling picture. However, another distinct peak observed at the X(Y) point(s), but with energy very close to EF, remains at nearly the same energy when the oxygen stoichiometry is varied from 6.9 to 6.4. This behavior is not consistent with a rigid-band picture. The intensities of the 1-eV peak and the peak at EF are significantly attenuated when the material becomes insulating

  15. Electronic structure of charge-density-wave state in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze characterized by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on an angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of layered quasi-two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum purple bronze KMo6O17 in order to study and characterizes the transition to a charge-density-wave (CDW) state. We have performed photoemission temperature dependent measurements cooling down from room temperature (RT) to 32 K, well below the Peierls transition for this material, with CDW transition temperature Tc =110 K. The spectra have been taken at a selected kF point of the Fermi surface (FS) that satisfies the nesting condition of the FS, looking for the characteristic pseudo-gap opening in this kind of materials. The pseudogap has been estimated and it result to be in agreement with our previous works. The shift to lower binding energy of crossing Fermi level ARPES feature have been also confirmed and studied as a function of temperature, showing a rough like BCS behaviour. Finally we have also focused on ARPES measurements along ΓM¯ high symmetry direction for both room and low temperature states finding some insight for ‘shadow’ or back folded bands indicating the new periodicity of real lattice after the CDW lattice distortion.

  16. Electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenides PdTe2 and Cu0.05PdTe2 superconductors obtained by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Yu, Li; Lin, Cheng-Tian; Hu, Cheng; Liu, De-Fa; Peng, Ying-Ying; Xie, Zhuo-Jin; He, Jun-Feng; Chen, Chao-Yu; Feng, Ya; Yi, He-Mian; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shao-Long; Liu, Guo-Dong; Dong, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Chuang-Tian; Xu, Zu-Yan; Weng, Hong-Ming; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, Xing-Jiang

    2015-06-01

    The layered transition metal chalcogenides have been a fertile land in solid state physics for many decades. Various MX2-type transition metal dichalcogenides, such as WTe2, IrTe2, and MoS2, have triggered great attention recently, either for the discovery of novel phenomena or some extreme or exotic physical properties, or for their potential applications. PdTe2 is a superconductor in the class of transition metal dichalcogenides, and superconductivity is enhanced in its Cu-intercalated form, Cu0.05PdTe2. It is important to study the electronic structures of PdTe2 and its intercalated form in order to explore for new phenomena and physical properties and understand the related superconductivity enhancement mechanism. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies on PdTe2 and Cu0.05PdTe2 single crystals, combined with the band structure calculations. We present in detail for the first time the complex multi-band Fermi surface topology and densely-arranged band structure of these compounds. By carefully examining the electronic structures of the two systems, we find that Cu-intercalation in PdTe2 results in electron-doping, which causes the band structure to shift downwards by nearly 16 meV in Cu0.05PdTe2. Our results lay a foundation for further exploration and investigation on PdTe2 and related superconductors. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11190022), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB921703 and 2011CBA00110), and the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07020300).

  17. Time and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy using femtosecond visible and high-harmonic light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathias, S; Deicke, F; Ruffing, A; Aeschlimann, M [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Wiesenmayer, M; Bauer, M [Institut fuer experimentelle und angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts Universitaet zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Miaja-Avila, L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C, E-mail: SMathias@gmx.d [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a leading technique in identifying static key properties of complex systems such as the electronic band structure of adsorbed molecules, ultrathin quantum-well films or high temperature superconductors. We efficiently combined ARPES by using a two-dimensional analyzer for parallel energy (E) and momentum (k{sub ||}) detection with femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopies. Using time and angle resolved two photon photoemission (2PPE) with visible light pulses, the hot electron dynamics in complex electronic structures are directly accessible by means of angle resolved hot electron lifetime mapping. Furthermore, femtosecond ARPES spectra recorded with high harmonic generation (HHG) light pulses are presented, showing the potential of this technique for future investigations of surface dynamics and photo-induced phase transition processes.

  18. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of fluorescence light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. W.; Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-06-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of photon energy of incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed, especially for the 1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Ji=1 /2 +γ1→(1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 →1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Jf=1 /2 +γ2 photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the γ2 fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate (1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 overlapping resonances owing to their finite lifetime (linewidth). We therefore suggest that accurate measurements of the angular distribution and linear polarization might help identify the sequence and small splittings of closely spaced energy levels, even if they cannot be spectroscopically resolved.

  19. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely-spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of the fluorescence light

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Z W; Surzhykov, A; Dong, C Z; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of the density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of the photon energy of the incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed especially for the $1s^{2}2s^{2}2p^{6}3s\\;\\, J_{i}=1/2 \\,+\\, \\gamma_{1} \\:\\rightarrow\\: (1s^{2}2s2p^{6}3s)_{1}3p_{3/2}\\;\\, J=1/2, \\, 3/2 \\:\\rightarrow\\: 1s^{2}2s^{2}2p^{6}3s\\;\\, J_{f}=1/2 \\,+\\, \\gamma_{2}$ photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the $\\gamma_{2}$ fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate $(1s^{2}2s2p^{6}3s)_{1}3p_{3/2}\\;\\, J=1/2,...

  20. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the valence orbitals of SiCl4 as a function of photon energy from 14 to 80 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with synchrotron radiation have been used to measure partial cross sections and angular distribution parameters, β, from a photon energy of 14 to 80 eV for SiCl4. Parallel to these measurements, calculations have been made using the continuum multiple scattering Xα method. The results have been examined, primarily in terms of the phenomena of the Cooper minimum and shape resonances. Minima in both the cross sections and β values were found for each of the first five orbitals of SiCl4: 2t1, 8t2, 2e, 7t2, and 7a1. These minima were examined for their energy positions and, in the case of the β values, the depth of the minimum. Shape resonances were calculated in the photoionization of each of the orbitals, and a number of experimental features due to shape resonances are identified. The results, both experimental and theoretical, are compared with earlier work on CC14

  1. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of Cl2 as a function of photon energy from 18 to 70 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation has been carried out on gaseous chlorine as a function of photon energy from 18 to 70 eV. From this data the partial cross sections and angular distribution parameter ν have been derived for the first three orbitals. For the lone pair orbitals 2π/sub g/ and 2π/sub u/, distinct minima are found in both the partial cross sections and ν values in the region of photoelectron energies from 30 to 40 eV. Less well-defined minima are also seen in the case photoionization for the nonlone pair orbital 5sigma/sub g/. These features are believed related to the Cooper minimum that arises from an atomic 3p subshell. Calculations have also been carried out on the partial cross sections and ν values using the multiple scattering Xα method. Comparison with experiment gives excellent qualitative agreement with regard to the ''Cooper minimum.'' The nature of the Cooper minimum in molecules and its usefulness in understanding photoelectron dynamics is discussed

  2. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiji, Liang; Chaoyu, Chen; Zhijun, Wang; Youguo, Shi; Ya, Feng; Hemian, Yi; Zhuojin, Xie; Shaolong, He; Junfeng, He; Yingying, Peng; Yan, Liu; Defa, Liu; Cheng, Hu; Lin, Zhao; Guodong, Liu; Xiaoli, Dong; Jun, Zhang; M, Nakatake; H, Iwasawa; K, Shimada; M, Arita; H, Namatame; M, Taniguchi; Zuyan, Xu; Chuangtian, Chen; Hongming, Weng; Xi, Dai; Zhong, Fang; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3Bi (A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na3Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x –k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ∼150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na3Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. Project supported by the

  3. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO{sub 3} embedded in GdTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemšák, S. [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Peter-Grünberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Conti, G.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Fadley, C. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cho, S.; Rault, J. E.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M.-C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Balents, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9530 (United States); Schneider, C. M. [Peter-Grünberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO{sub 3} (GTO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}, with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggested is the critical thickness for 2DEG formation. We have studied these with Ti-resonant angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission and find that the spectral feature in the spectra associated with the 2DEG is present in the 1.5 unit cell sample, but not in the 1.0 unit cell sample. We also observe through core-level spectra additional states in Ti and Sr, with the strength of a low-binding-energy state for Sr being associated with the appearance of the 2DEG, and we suggest it to have an origin in final-state core-hole screening.

  4. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO3 embedded in GdTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO3 (GTO) and SrTiO3 (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7, with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggested is the critical thickness for 2DEG formation. We have studied these with Ti-resonant angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission and find that the spectral feature in the spectra associated with the 2DEG is present in the 1.5 unit cell sample, but not in the 1.0 unit cell sample. We also observe through core-level spectra additional states in Ti and Sr, with the strength of a low-binding-energy state for Sr being associated with the appearance of the 2DEG, and we suggest it to have an origin in final-state core-hole screening

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Identification of Nodal Kink in Electron-Doped (Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 Superconductor from Laser-Based Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou X. J.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on the electron-doped (Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 high temperature superconductor. We have revealed a clear kink at ~60 meV in the dispersion along the (0,0–(π,π nodal direction, accompanied by a peak-dip-hump feature in the photoemission spectra. This indicates that the nodal electrons are coupled to collective excitations (bosons in electron-doped superconductors, with the phonons as the most likely candidate of the boson. This finding has established a universality of nodal electron coupling in both hole- and electron-doped high temperature cuprate superconductors.

  7. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the many-body effects in the electronic structure of high-Tc cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work some steps are done towards understanding the anomalous effects observed in the single-particle excitation spectra of cuprates. First, the electronic properties of BSCCO are considered. The main result of this part of the work is a model of the Green's function that is later used for calculating the two-particle excitation spectrum. Then, the matrix element effects in the photoemission spectra of cuprates are discussed. After a general introduction to the problem, the thesis focuses on the recently discovered anomalous behavior of the ARPES spectra that partially originates from the momentum-dependent photoemission matrix element. The momentum- and excitation energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed ''waterfalls'', is covered in full detail. Understanding the role of the matrix element effects in this phenomenon proves crucial, as they obstruct the view of the underlying excitation spectrum that is of indisputable interest. For the optimally doped bilayer Bi-based cuprate, the renormalized two-particle correlation function in the superconducting state is calculated from ARPES data within an itinerant model based on the random phase approximation (RPA). (orig.)

  8. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the many-body effects in the electronic structure of high-T{sub c} cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inosov, Dmytro S.

    2008-06-18

    In the present work some steps are done towards understanding the anomalous effects observed in the single-particle excitation spectra of cuprates. First, the electronic properties of BSCCO are considered. The main result of this part of the work is a model of the Green's function that is later used for calculating the two-particle excitation spectrum. Then, the matrix element effects in the photoemission spectra of cuprates are discussed. After a general introduction to the problem, the thesis focuses on the recently discovered anomalous behavior of the ARPES spectra that partially originates from the momentum-dependent photoemission matrix element. The momentum- and excitation energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed ''waterfalls'', is covered in full detail. Understanding the role of the matrix element effects in this phenomenon proves crucial, as they obstruct the view of the underlying excitation spectrum that is of indisputable interest. For the optimally doped bilayer Bi-based cuprate, the renormalized two-particle correlation function in the superconducting state is calculated from ARPES data within an itinerant model based on the random phase approximation (RPA). (orig.)

  9. Angle-Resolved Spectroscopy of Parametric Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Feng-kuo

    2013-01-01

    The parametric fluorescence from a nonlinear crystal forms a conical radiation pattern. We measure the angular and spectral distributions of parametric fluorescence in a beta-barium borate crystal pumped by a 405-nm diode laser employing angle-resolved imaging spectroscopy. The experimental angle-resolved spectra and the generation efficiency of parametric down conversion are compared with a plane-wave theoretical analysis. The parametric fluorescence is used as a broadband light source for the calibration of the instrument spectral response function in the wavelength range from 450 to 1000 nm.

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  12. Exploring the Electronic Structure and Chemical Homogeneity of Individual Bi2Te3 Nanowires by Nano-Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Janina; Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Zhang, Zeying; Sigle, Wilfried; Zhang, Hongbin; Trautmann, Christina; Asensio, Maria Carmen; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia

    2016-07-13

    Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, cylindrical Bi2Te3 nanowires are employed as model systems to investigate the chemistry and the unique conductive surface states of topological insulator nanomaterials. We report on nanoangle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) characterization of individual cylindrical Bi2Te3 nanowires with a diameter of 100 nm. The nanowires are synthesized by electrochemical deposition inside channels of ion-track etched polymer membranes. Core level spectra recorded with submicron resolution indicate a homogeneous chemical composition along individual nanowires, while nano-ARPES intensity maps reveal the valence band structure at the single nanowire level. First-principles electronic structure calculations for chosen crystallographic orientations are in good agreement with those revealed by nano-ARPES. The successful application of nano-ARPES on single one-dimensional nanostructures constitutes a new avenue to achieve a better understanding of the electronic structure of topological insulator nanomaterials. PMID:27311702

  13. Charge density waves in 1T-TaS2: an angle-resolved photoemission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerc, F. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Bovet, M. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Berger, H. [Institut de Physique Appliquee, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Despont, L. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Koitzsch, C. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Garnier, M.G. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Aebi, P. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Neuchatel, Rue A.L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: philipp.aebi@unine.ch

    2004-09-15

    The transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is a layered material exhibiting charge density waves. Based on angle-resolved photoemission experiments mapping spectral weight at the Fermi surface and density functional theory calculations we discuss possible mechanisms involved with the creation of charge density waves. At first the flat parts of the elliptically shaped Fermi surface appear to play an important role via Fermi surface nesting. A closer analysis of the charge density wave induced new Brillouin zones and the possible energy balance between elastic deformation energy and electronic energy points to a more complicated scenario.

  14. Charge density waves in 1T-TaS2: an angle-resolved photoemission study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is a layered material exhibiting charge density waves. Based on angle-resolved photoemission experiments mapping spectral weight at the Fermi surface and density functional theory calculations we discuss possible mechanisms involved with the creation of charge density waves. At first the flat parts of the elliptically shaped Fermi surface appear to play an important role via Fermi surface nesting. A closer analysis of the charge density wave induced new Brillouin zones and the possible energy balance between elastic deformation energy and electronic energy points to a more complicated scenario

  15. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of Sr_2CuO_2Cl_2 - a revisit

    OpenAIRE

    Duerr, C; Legner, S.; Hayn, R.; Borisenko, S. V.; Z. Hu; Theresiak, A.; Knupfer, M.; Golden, M. S.; Fink, J.; Ronning, F.; Shen, Z.-X.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Janowitz, C.; Mueller, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the lowest binding-energy electronic structure of the model cuprate Sr_2CuO_2Cl_2 using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Our data from about 80 cleavages of Sr_2CuO_2Cl_2 single crystals give a comprehensive, self-consistent picture of the nature of the first electron-removal state in this model undoped CuO_2-plane cuprate. Firstly, we show a strong dependence on the polarization of the excitation light which is understandable in the context of the matri...

  16. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Yamaoka, H.

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H+, H2+ and H3+ ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H+ and H- ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H3+ ion injection and less than a half of that for H2+ ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H+ ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation.

  17. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H+, H2+ and H3+ ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H+ and H− ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H3+ ion injection and less than a half of that for H2+ ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H+ ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation

  18. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S., E-mail: eun1302@mail4.doshsha.ac.jp [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Tanaka, N. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sasao, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Tokushima Bunri University, Yamashiro, Tokushima 770-8514 (Japan); Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H{sup +} and H{sup −} ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H{sub 3}{sup +} ion injection and less than a half of that for H{sub 2}{sup +} ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H{sup +} ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation.

  19. Commissioning Results Of Angle-Resolved Photoemission System At The Siam Photon Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the first results obtained by the angle-resolved photoemission system at the Siam Photon Laboratory. Nickel single crystal with (111) surface was selected as the sample. Sample preparation methods as well as measurement procedures are described. The total energy resolution at photon energy of 35 eV was 370 MeV. Surface energy band structure of the nickel was obtained from angle-resolved photoemission spectra along two lines of symmetry: τto Τto Κand τto ΣtoΜ. The experimental energy band structure is qualitatively agreed with a theoretical calculation

  20. Tachometer Derived From Brushless Shaft-Angle Resolver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    1995-01-01

    Tachometer circuit operates in conjunction with brushless shaft-angle resolver. By performing sequence of straightforward mathematical operations on resolver signals and utilizing simple trigonometric identity, generates voltage proportional to rate of rotation of shaft. One advantage is use of brushless shaft-angle resolver as main source of rate signal: no brushes to wear out, no brush noise, and brushless resolvers have proven robustness. No switching of signals to generate noise. Another advantage, shaft-angle resolver used as shaft-angle sensor, tachometer input obtained without adding another sensor. Present circuit reduces overall size, weight, and cost of tachometer.

  1. Valence-band dispersion in angle-resolved resonant photoemission from LaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectra taken on single crystals of LaSb at the La 4d→4f resonance show dispersion of resonantly emitted valence-band electrons. This is the first direct demonstration that the Bloch component of valence states participates in resonant photoemission. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. The Fermi surface and band folding in La2-xSrxCuO4, probed by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic angle-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure of La2-xSrxCuO4 in a wide doping range is presented in this paper. In addition to the main energy band, we observed a weaker additional band, the (π, π) folded band, which shows unusual doping dependence. The appearance of the folded band suggests that a Fermi surface reconstruction is doping dependent and could already occur at zero magnetic field.

  3. The Fermi surface and band folding in La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, probed by angle-resolved photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razzoli, E; Radovic, M; Patthey, L; Shi, M [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sassa, Y; Chang, J [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Drachuck, G; Keren, A; Shay, M [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Maansson, M; Mesot, J [Laboratory for Synchrotron and Neutron Spectroscopy, EPF Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Berntsen, M H; Tjernberg, O [Materials Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, S-16440 Kista (Sweden); Pailhes, S [CEA, CNRS, CE Saclay, Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Momono, N [Department of Applied Sciences, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Oda, M; Ido, M [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Lipscombe, O J; Hayden, S M, E-mail: ming.shi@psi.c [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    A systematic angle-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in a wide doping range is presented in this paper. In addition to the main energy band, we observed a weaker additional band, the ({pi}, {pi}) folded band, which shows unusual doping dependence. The appearance of the folded band suggests that a Fermi surface reconstruction is doping dependent and could already occur at zero magnetic field.

  4. Attosecond angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report experiments on the characterization of a train of attosecond pulses obtained by high-harmonic generation, using mixed-color (XUV+IR) atomic two-photon ionization and electron detection on a velocity map imaging detector. We demonstrate that the relative phase of the harmonics is encoded both in the photoelectron yield and the angular distribution as a function of XUV-IR time delay, thus making the technique suitable for the detection of single attosecond pulses. The timing of the attosecond pulse with respect to the field oscillation of the driving laser critically depends on the target gas used to generate the harmonics

  5. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  6. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules using angle-resolved photoemmision data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F. Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G.; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The frontier electronic orbitals of molecules are the prime determinants of the respective compounds' chemical, electronic, and optical properties. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and energy levels are directly observable. As has been shown in recent publications, angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) intensity maps of organic molecular layers are related to the absolute value of the Fourier transform of the initial state molecular orbital. However, the lost phase information impedes the back-transformation of the orbital into real space. Here, we show how molecular orbital images as well as the absent phase information can be retrieved by applying an iterative procedure which takes experimental ARPES maps as input and only assumes spatial confinement of the orbital. The method is demonstrated for several molecular orbitals of two proto-typical pi-conjugated molecules: the LUMO, HOMO, and HOMO-1 of pentacene, and the LUMO and HOMO of PTCDA. The technique is simple and robust and further emphasizes the capabilities of ARPES looking at spatial distributions of wave functions of adsorbed molecules thereby complementing data obtained from scanning probe methods.

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of the CdTe(110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, H.; Kanski, J.; Nilsson, P. O.; Karlsson, U. O.

    1991-06-01

    The electronic structure of the CdTe(110) surface has been studied with angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. An empirical tight-binding linar combination of atomic orbitals band structure has been derived, based on normal-emission spectra. Several, previously unreported, surface-related states have been observed in off-normal emission, and their dispersions have been mapped along symmetry directions of the surface Brillouin zone.

  8. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Shen, Zhi-Xun [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Liu, Zhongkai [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zong, Alfred [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Jefferson, C. Michael; Merriam, Andrew J. [Lumeras LLC, 207 McPherson St, Santa Cruz, California 95060 (United States); Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10{sup 12} photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å{sup −1}, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å{sup −1}, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  9. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 1012 photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å−1, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å−1, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors

  10. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission with Tabletop 11eV Laser

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yu; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, Michael; Moore, Robert; Kirchmann, Patrick; Merriam, Andrew; Shen, Zhixun

    2015-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with $113.778$nm wavelength (10.897eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10MHz, provides a flux of 2$\\times$10$^{12}$ photons/second, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2meV and 0.012\\AA$^{-1}$, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2\\AA$^{-1}$, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source, and sho...

  11. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C Michael; Moore, Robert G; Kirchmann, Patrick S; Merriam, Andrew J; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 10(12) photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å(-1), respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å(-1), granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors. PMID:26827301

  12. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission with tabletop 11 eV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; Vishik, Inna M.; Yi, Ming; Yang, Shuolong; Liu, Zhongkai; Lee, James J.; Chen, Sudi; Rebec, Slavko N.; Leuenberger, Dominik; Zong, Alfred; Jefferson, C. Michael; Moore, Robert G.; Kirchmann, Patrick S.; Merriam, Andrew J.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-01-01

    We developed a table-top vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser with 113.778 nm wavelength (10.897 eV) and demonstrated its viability as a photon source for high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). This sub-nanosecond pulsed VUV laser operates at a repetition rate of 10 MHz, provides a flux of 2 × 1012 photons/s, and enables photoemission with energy and momentum resolutions better than 2 meV and 0.012 Å-1, respectively. Space-charge induced energy shifts and spectral broadenings can be reduced below 2 meV. The setup reaches electron momenta up to 1.2 Å-1, granting full access to the first Brillouin zone of most materials. Control over the linear polarization, repetition rate, and photon flux of the VUV source facilitates ARPES investigations of a broad range of quantum materials, bridging the application gap between contemporary low energy laser-based ARPES and synchrotron-based ARPES. We describe the principles and operational characteristics of this source and showcase its performance for rare earth metal tritellurides, high temperature cuprate superconductors, and iron-based superconductors.

  13. Angle-resolved ion TOF spectrometer with a position sensitive detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Norio [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Heiser, F.; Wieliczec, K.; Becker, U.

    1996-07-01

    A angle-resolved ion time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a position sensitive anode has been investigated. Performance of this spectrometer has been demonstrated by measuring an angular distribution of a fragment ion pair, C{sup +} + O{sup +}, from CO at the photon energy of 287.4 eV. The obtained angular distribution is very close to the theoretically expected one. (author)

  14. Surface band structure of CdTe(111)-2 × 2 by angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowitz, C.; Manzke, R.; Skibowski, M.; Orlowski, B. A.

    1991-05-01

    The surface band structure of non-cleavable CdTe(111)-2 × 2 reconstructed surfaces is determined by means of angle-resolved photoemission and constant-final-state (CFS) spectroscopy. The experiments were performed with He I radiation and synchrotron radiation from the DORIS II storage ring at HASYLAB. High-quality (111)-2 × 2 surfaces were prepared by sputtering and annealing controlled by electron diffraction (LEED and RHEED). In order to distinguish between surface and bulk related emissions in the spectra we utilized, besides the criteria that the k∥ dispersion of surface states should reveal the 2 × 2 periodicity of the surfac mesh, also photon energy dependent CFS series at several critical points of the surface Brillouin zone. The data on CdTe(111) will be compared with experimental and theoretical results which are available for the electronically similar GaAs(111) surface.

  15. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  16. Fingerprints of entangled spin and orbital physics in itinerant ferromagnets via angle-resolved resonant photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pieve, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method for mapping the local spin and orbital nature of the ground state of a system via corresponding flip excitations is proposed based on angle-resolved resonant photoemission and related diffraction patterns, obtained here via an ab initio modified one-step theory of photoemission. The analysis is done on the paradigmatic weak itinerant ferromagnet bcc Fe, whose magnetism, a correlation phenomenon given by the coexistence of localized moments and itinerant electrons, and the observed non-Fermi-Liquid behavior at extreme conditions both remain unclear. The combined analysis of energy spectra and diffraction patterns offers a mapping of local pure spin-flip, entangled spin-flip-orbital-flip excitations and chiral transitions with vortexlike wave fronts of photoelectrons, depending on the valence orbital symmetry and the direction of the local magnetic moment. Such effects, mediated by the hole polarization, make resonant photoemission a promising tool to perform a full tomography of the local magnetic properties even in itinerant ferromagnets or macroscopically nonmagnetic systems.

  17. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-c films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davor Pavuna; Daniel Ariosa; Dominique Cloetta; Claudia Cancellieri; Mike Abrecht

    2008-02-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≃ 15 nm thin La2-SrCuO4 (LSCO) films we almost double c to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under tensile strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet c drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO2 plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases c, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a `Napoleon-cake', i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternating with softer `reservoir', that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced c.

  18. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO$_3$ embedded in GdTiO$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Nemšák, S.; CONTI, G; Pálsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Cho, S.; Rault, J.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. -C.; Jackson, C; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Balents, L.

    2015-01-01

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO$_3$ (GTO) and SrTiO$_3$ (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO$_3$)$_{0.3}$(Sr$_2$AlTaO$_6$)$_{0.7}$ (LSAT), with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggeste...

  19. Tetragonal and collapsed-tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2 : A view from angle-resolved photoemission and dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Shi, Xun; Wu, Shangfei; Zeng, Lingkun; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Qian, Tian; Sefat, Athena S.; Biermann, Silke; Ding, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "screened exchange + dynamical mean field theory" scheme.

  20. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations

  1. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinemann@tu-berlin.de; Klapp, Sabine H. L., E-mail: klapp@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Palczynski, Karol, E-mail: karol.palczynski@helmholtz-berlin.de; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Institute of Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  2. Size Effects in Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Free Rare-Gas Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolles, D.; Zhang, H.; Pesic, Z.D.; Bilodeau, R.C.; Wills, A.; Kukk, E.; Rude, B.S.; Ackerman, G.D.; Bozek, J.D.; Muino, R.D.; de Abajo, F.J.G.; Berrah, N.; /Western

    2007-05-23

    The photoionization of free Xe clusters is investigated by angle-resolved time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution parameter as a function of photon energy and cluster size. While the overall photon-energy-dependent behavior of the photoelectrons from the clusters is very similar to that of the free atoms, distinct differences in the angular distribution point at cluster-size-dependent effects. Multiple scattering calculations trace their origin to elastic photoelectron scattering.

  3. Metal-insulator transition of naxwo3 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, Satyabrata; Sato, Takafumi; Souma, Seigo; Takahashi, Takashi; Sarma, DD; Mahadevan, Priya

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of sodium tungsten bronzes NaxWO3 is investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The ARPES spectra measured in both insulating and metallic phases of NaxWO3 reveals the origin of metal-insulator transition (MIT) in sodium tungsten bronze system. It is found that in insulating NaxWO3 the states near the Fermi level (E-F) are localized due to the strong disorder caused by the random distribution of Na+ ions in WO3 lattice. Due t...

  4. Nodal Quasiparticle Meltdown in Ultra-High Resolution Pump-Probe Angle-Resolved Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Jeff; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Chris L.; Eisaki, H.; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2011-06-03

    High-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors are characterized by a strong momentum-dependent anisotropy between the low energy excitations along the Brillouin zone diagonal (nodal direction) and those along the Brillouin zone face (antinodal direction). Most obvious is the d-wave superconducting gap, with the largest magnitude found in the antinodal direction and no gap in the nodal direction. Additionally, while antin- odal quasiparticle excitations appear only below T{sub c}, superconductivity is thought to be indifferent to nodal excitations as they are regarded robust and insensitive to T{sub c}. Here we reveal an unexpected tie between nodal quasiparticles and superconductivity using high resolution time- and angle-resolved photoemission on optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}. We observe a suppression of the nodal quasiparticle spectral weight following pump laser excitation and measure its recovery dynamics. This suppression is dramatically enhanced in the superconducting state. These results reduce the nodal-antinodal dichotomy and challenge the conventional view of nodal excitation neutrality in superconductivity. The electronic structures of high-Tc cuprates are strongly momentum-dependent. This is one reason why the momentum-resolved technique of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been a central tool in the field of high-temperature superconductivity. For example, coherent low energy excitations with momenta near the Brillouin zone face, or antinodal quasiparticles (QPs), are only observed below T{sub c} and have been linked to superfluid density. They have therefore been the primary focus of ARPES studies. In contrast, nodal QPs, with momenta along the Brillouin zone diagonal, have received less attention and are usually regarded as largely immune to the superconducting transition because they seem insensitive to perturbations such as disorder, doping, isotope exchange, charge ordering, and temperature. Clearly

  5. High-resolution three-dimensional spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectrometer using vacuum ultraviolet laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Nakayama, Mitsuhiro; Ishida, Yukiaki; Fukushima, Akiko; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2016-05-01

    We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser (hν = 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7∘ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.

  6. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-Tc films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuna, Davor; Ariosa, Daniel; Cloetta, Dominique; Cancellieri, Claudia; Abrecht, Mike

    2008-02-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (<30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-T_{c} superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial ({compressive vs. tensile}) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≈15 nm thin La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO) films we almost double T_{c} to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under {tensile} strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet T_{c} drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO_{2} plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases T_{c}, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a `Napoleon-cake', i.e. rigid CuO_{2 } planes alternating with softer `reservoir', that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced T_{c}.

  7. Probing the momentum-dependent response of the charge density wave phase in TbTe3 by ultrafast time- and angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charge density wave (CDW) systems such as TbTe3 offer fascinating options for studying the correlation of electrons and the lattice. We investigate the ultrafast response of the charge density wave (CDW) phase in TbTe3 after femtosecond IR excitation using time- and angle-resolved photoemission. The time-dependent photoemission intensity at the Fermi level yields a characteristic time for the closing of the CDW bandgap. With increasing laser fluence the bandgap closes faster, pointing to an increasing slope of the excited potential energy surface. As function of electron momentum the amplitude of the response increases strongly at the position of the Fermi wave vector kF. These results vividly demonstrate that the CDW system is most susceptible to electronic excitations near kF and that these electronic perturbations drive collective excitations of the coupled electron-lattice system.

  8. Angle-Resolved Plasmonic Properties of Single Gold Nanorod Dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wu; Xuxing Lu; Qiannan Zhu; Junwei Zhao; Qishun Shen; Li Zhan; Weihai Ni

    2014-01-01

    Through wet-chemical assembly methods, gold nanorods were placed close to each other and formed a dimer with a gap distance*1 nm, and hence degenerated plasmonic dipole modes of individual nanorods coupled together to produce hybridized bonding and antibonding resonance modes. Previous studies using a condenser for illumination result in averaged signals over all excitation angles. By exciting an individual dimer obliquely at different angles, we demonstrate that these two new resonance modes are highly tunable and sensitive to the angle between the excitation polarization and the dimer orientation, which follows cos2u dependence. Moreover, for dimer structures with various structure angles, the resonance wavelengths as well as the refractive index sensitivities were found independent of the structure angle. Cal-culated angle-resolved plasmonic properties are in good agreement with the measurements. The assembled nanostructures investigated here are important for fundamental researches as well as potential applications when they are used as building blocks in plasmon-based optical and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Spin-orbit-induced photoelectron spin polarization in angle-resolved photoemission from both atomic and condensed matter targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of highly spin polarized photoelectrons emitted from non-magnetic solids as well as from unpolarized atoms and molecules has been found to be very common in many studies over the past 40 years. This so-called Fano effect is based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the photoionization or the photoemission process. In a non-angle-resolved photoemission experiment, circularly polarized radiation has to be used to create spin polarized photoelectrons, while in angle-resolved photoemission even unpolarized or linearly polarized radiation is sufficient to get a high spin polarization. In past years the Rashba effect has become very important in the angle-resolved photoemission of solid surfaces, also with an observed high photoelectron spin polarization. It is the purpose of the present topical review to cross-compare the spin polarization experimentally found in angle-resolved photoelectron emission spectroscopy of condensed matter with that of free atoms, to compare it with the Rashba effect and topological insulators to describe the influence and the importance of the spin-orbit interaction and to show and disentangle the matrix element and phase shift effects therein. The relationship between the energy dispersion of these phase shifts and the emission delay of photoelectron emission in attosecond-resolved photoemission is also discussed. Furthermore the influence of chiral structures of the photo-effect target on the spin polarization, the interferences of different spin components in coherent superpositions in photoemission and a cross-comparison of spin polarization in photoemission from non-magnetic solids with XMCD on magnetic materials are presented; these are all based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in angle-resolved photoemission. (topical review)

  10. Angle-resolved multioctave supercontinua from mid-infrared laser filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Mitryukovsky, S I; Rozhko, M V; Pugžlys, A; Fedotov, A B; Panchenko, V Ya; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved spectral analysis of a multioctave high-energy supercontinuum output of mid-infrared laser filaments is shown to provide a powerful tool for understanding intricate physical scenarios behind laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared. The ellipticity of the mid-infrared driver beam breaks the axial symmetry of filamentation dynamics, offering a probe for a truly (3+1)-dimensional spatiotemporal evolution of mid-IR pulses in the filamentation regime. With optical harmonics up to the 15th order contributing to supercontinuum generation in such filaments alongside Kerr-type and ionization-induced nonlinearities, the output supercontinuum spectra span over five octaves from the mid-ultraviolet deep into the mid-infrared. Full (3+1)-dimensional field evolution analysis is needed for an adequate understanding of this regime of laser filamentation. Supercomputer simulations implementing such analysis articulate the critical importance of angle-resolved measurements for both descriptive and predictive power of filamentation modeling. Strong enhancement of ionization-induced blueshift is shown to offer new approaches in filamentation-assisted pulse compression, enabling the generation of high-power few- and single-cycle pulses in the mid-infrared. PMID:27472598

  11. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission on the topological Kondo insulator candidate: SmB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Ding, Hong; Shi, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Topological Kondo insulators are a new class of topological insulators in which metallic surface states protected by topological invariants reside in the bulk band gap at low temperatures. Unlike other 3D topological insulators, a truly insulating bulk state, which is critical for potential applications in next-generation electronic devices, is guaranteed by many-body effects in the topological Kondo insulator. Furthermore, the system has strong electron correlations that can serve as a testbed for interacting topological theories. This topical review focuses on recent advances in the study of SmB6, the most promising candidate for a topological Kondo insulator, from the perspective of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with highlights of some important transport results.

  12. Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission on the topological Kondo insulator candidate: SmB6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nan; Ding, Hong; Shi, Ming

    2016-09-14

    Topological Kondo insulators are a new class of topological insulators in which metallic surface states protected by topological invariants reside in the bulk band gap at low temperatures. Unlike other 3D topological insulators, a truly insulating bulk state, which is critical for potential applications in next-generation electronic devices, is guaranteed by many-body effects in the topological Kondo insulator. Furthermore, the system has strong electron correlations that can serve as a testbed for interacting topological theories. This topical review focuses on recent advances in the study of SmB6, the most promising candidate for a topological Kondo insulator, from the perspective of spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with highlights of some important transport results. PMID:27391865

  13. Dynamics of Molecular Orientation Observed Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy during Deposition of Pentacene on Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-04-19

    A real-time method to observe both the structural and the electronic configuration of an organic molecule during deposition is reported for the model system of pentacene on graphite. Structural phase transition of the thin films as a function of coverage is monitored by using in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results to observe the change of the electronic configuration at the same time. A photoemission theory that uses independent atomic center approximations is introduced to identify the molecular orientation from the ARPES technique. This study provides a practical insight into interpreting ARPES data regarding dynamic changes of molecular orientation during initial growth of molecules on a well-defined surface. PMID:26999332

  14. Angle-resolved Beutler-Fano profile and dynamics for the predissociation of H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingnan; Wang, Jie; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-05-01

    The asymmetric photoabsorption line profile (Beutler-Fano profile) arising from two interacting channels has applications in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics. In this work, the angle-resolved and fully-rotationally-resolved Beutler-Fano profiles for the predissociation of H2,H2+h v →H ( 1 s )+H ( 2 s )/H (2 p ) , have been measured. It is found that the Beutler-Fano profiles display different shapes for the fragments H(2 s ,2 p ) recoiling at the parallel and perpendicular directions relative to the polarization direction of the dissociation laser. Tuning the excitation photon energy from the resonance center to the lower energies within the Beutler-Fano profile, the branching ratios H(2 s )/[H(2 s )+H(2 p )] decrease, and the fragment angular distributions change in a trend indicating the presence of more components of direct dissociation channels in comparison with the predissociation channel.

  15. Modeling angle-resolved photoemission of graphene and black phosphorus nano structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on electronic structure are difficult to interpret, because various factors such as atomic structure and experimental setup influence the quantum mechanical effects during the measurement. Therefore, we simulated ARPES of nano-sized molecules to corroborate the interpretation of experimental results. Applying the independent atomic-center approximation, we used density functional theory calculations and custom-made simulation code to compute photoelectron intensity in given experimental setups for every atomic orbital in poly-aromatic hydrocarbons of various size, and in a molecule of black phosphorus. The simulation results were validated by comparing them to experimental ARPES for highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. This database provides the calculation method and every file used during the work flow. PMID:27164313

  16. Orbital Rashba effect and its detection by circular dichroism angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hong; Kim, Choong H.; Rhim, Jun-Won; Han, Jung Hoon

    2012-05-01

    We show, by way of tight-binding and first-principles calculations, that a one-to-one correspondence between an electron's crystal momentum k and nonzero orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a generic feature of surface bands. The OAM forms a chiral structure in momentum space much as its spin counterpart in Rashba model does, as a consequence of the inherent inversion symmetry breaking at the surface but not of spin-orbit interaction. This is the orbital counterpart of conventional Rashba effect and may be called the “orbital Rashba effect.” The circular dichroism (CD) angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) method is an efficient way to detect this new order, and we derive formulas explicitly relating the CD-ARPES signal to the existence of OAM in the band structure. The cases of degenerate p- and d-orbital bands are considered.

  17. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  18. Tunable VUV laser based spectrometer for Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph; Giesber, Henry G; Egan, John J; Kaminski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable VUV laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3eV and 7eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on KBBF crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10^14 photons/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the kz dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  19. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J. [Advanced Photonic Crystals LLC, Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of the superconducting gap symmetry in Fe-based superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-B. Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting gap is the fundamental parameter that characterizes the superconducting state, and its symmetry is a direct consequence of the mechanism responsible for Cooper pairing. Here we discuss about angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements of the superconducting gap in the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. We show that the superconducting gap is Fermi surface dependent and nodeless with small anisotropy, or more precisely, a function of the momentum location in the Brillouin zone. We show that while this observation seems inconsistent with weak coupling approaches for superconductivity in these materials, it is well supported by strong coupling models and global superconducting gaps. We also suggest that a smaller lifetime of the superconducting Cooper pairs induced by the momentum dependent interband scattering inherent to these materials could affect the residual density of states at low energies, which is critical for a proper evaluation of the superconducting gap.

  1. Dual analyzer system for surface analysis dedicated for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at liquid surfaces and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, Inga; Kolbeck, Claudia; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The investigation of liquid surfaces and interfaces with the powerful toolbox of ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-based surface science techniques generally has to overcome the issue of liquid evaporation within the vacuum system. In the last decade, however, new classes of liquids with negligible vapor pressure at room temperature—in particular, ionic liquids (ILs)—have emerged for surface science studies. It has been demonstrated that particularly angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS) allows for investigating phenomena that occur at gas-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces on the molecular level. The results are not only relevant for IL systems but also for liquids in general. In all of these previous ARXPS studies, the sample holder had to be tilted in order to change the polar detection angle of emitted photoelectrons, which restricted the liquid systems to very thin viscous IL films coating a flat solid support. We now report on the concept and realization of a new and unique laboratory "Dual Analyzer System for Surface Analysis (DASSA)" which enables fast ARXPS, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, imaging XPS, and low-energy ion scattering at the horizontal surface plane of macroscopically thick non-volatile liquid samples. It comprises a UHV chamber equipped with two electron analyzers mounted for simultaneous measurements in 0° and 80° emission relative to the surface normal. The performance of DASSA on a first macroscopic liquid system will be demonstrated.

  2. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the non-saturate magnetoresistance material WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Juan; Niu, Xiaohai; Xie, Binping; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Donglai

    2015-03-01

    By performing high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we obtain the detailed electronic structure of WTe2, which has an extremely large non-saturated magnetoresistance. Unlike the simple one electron and one hole pocket as expected, we resolved a rather complicated Fermi surface in WTe2. There is a hole pocket around the Brillouin zone center Γ, two hole pockets and two electron pockets along the tungsten chain direction. Thus the large magnetoresistance cannot be simply attributed to the electron-hole compensation, since this is based on a two carrier assumption model, the real case in WTe2 should be more complicated. Surprisingly, the circular dichroism ARPES result shows a strong intensity inversion between the data under the right-circular polarized light and the left-circular polarized light. This, indicates a proper different orbital angular momentum along the tungsten chain direction, which might also related to the different spin angular momentum since there're coupled with each other. Therefore, we propose that to fully understand the large magnetoresistance in WTe2, spin channel should also be involved where backscattering are forbidden under zero field.

  3. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S., E-mail: suhaimihas@uthm.edu.my; Yusof, M. S., E-mail: mdsalleh@uthm.edu.my; Maksud, M. I., E-mail: midris1973@gmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Embong, Z., E-mail: zaidi@uthm.edu.my [Faculty of Science, Technology and Human Development, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La(OH){sub 3}. The information of oxygen species, O{sup 2-} component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O{sup 2−}), two chemisorb component (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and La(OH){sub 3} and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  4. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S.; Yusof, M. S.; Embong, Z.; Maksud, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La2O3) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La2O3 deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La2O3 and La(OH)3. The information of oxygen species, O2- component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O2-), two chemisorb component (La2O3) and La(OH)3 and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  5. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La2O3) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La2O3 deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La2O3 and La(OH)3. The information of oxygen species, O2- component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O2−), two chemisorb component (La2O3) and La(OH)3 and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later

  6. Angle resolved photoemission from organic semiconductors: orbital imaging beyond the molecular orbital interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fascinating pictures that can be interpreted as showing molecular orbitals have been obtained with various imaging techniques. Among these, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a particularly powerful method. Orbital images have been used to underline the physical credibility of the molecular orbital concept. However, from the theory of the photoemission process it is evident that imaging experiments do not show molecular orbitals, but Dyson orbitals. The latter are not eigenstates of a single-particle Hamiltonian and thus do not fit into the usual simple interpretation of electronic structure in terms of molecular orbitals. In a combined theoretical and experimental study we thus check whether a Dyson-orbital and a molecular-orbital based interpretation of ARPES lead to differences that are relevant on the experimentally observable scale. We discuss a scheme that allows for approximately calculating Dyson orbitals with moderate computational effort. Electronic relaxation is taken into account explicitly. The comparison reveals that while molecular orbitals are frequently good approximations to Dyson orbitals, a detailed understanding of photoemission intensities may require one to go beyond the molecular orbital picture. In particular we clearly observe signatures of the Dyson-orbital character for an adsorbed semiconductor molecule in ARPES spectra when these are recorded over a larger momentum range than in earlier experiments. (paper)

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the insulating NaxWO3: Anderson localization, polaron formation, and remnant Fermi surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Hashimoto, D; Matsui, H; Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Sarma, D D; Mahadevan, Priya; Oishi, S

    2006-04-14

    The electronic structure of the insulating sodium tungsten bronze, Na(0.025)WO(3), is investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find that near-E(F) states are localized due to the strong disorder arising from random distribution of Na+ ions in the WO(3) lattice, which makes the system insulating. The temperature dependence of photoemission spectra provides direct evidence for polaron formation. The remnant Fermi surface of the insulator is found to be the replica of the real Fermi surface in the metallic system. PMID:16712121

  8. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, M.; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Malzer, W.; Beckhoff, B.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  9. Shape resonances in the angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of the Si 2p shell of SiCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The partial cross sections and angular distribution parameters, β, have been determined for the 2p subshell in SiCl4. These data were obtained with angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and the use of synchrotron radiation for a range of photon energies from 114 to 150 eV. The same quantities were calculated by use of a multiple scattering Xα method, and the agreement between experiment and theory is very good. In particular, the behavior of shape resonances was well predicted. The nature of shape resonances as a function of molecular orbitals in SiCl4 is discussed, and the importance of such intercomparison is emphasized

  10. Angle-resolved heat capacity of heavy fermion superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Toshiro; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-09-01

    Owing to a strong Coulomb repulsion, heavy electron superconductors mostly have anisotropic gap functions which have nodes for certain directions in the momentum space. Since the nodal structure is closely related to the pairing mechanism, its experimental determination is of primary importance. This article discusses the experimental methods of the gap determination by bulk heat capacity measurements in a rotating magnetic field. The basic idea is based on the fact that the quasiparticle density of states in the vortex state of nodal superconductors is field and direction dependent. We present our recent experimental results of the field-orientation dependence of the heat capacity in heavy fermion superconductors CeTIn5 (T  =  Co, Ir), UPt3, CeCu2Si2, and UBe13 and discuss their gap structures. PMID:27482621

  11. CuPc/Au(1 1 0): Determination of the azimuthal alignment by a combination of angle-resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Complete structural determination of a Copper-Phthalocyanice monolayer on Au(1 1 0). • Orbital tomography method identifies emission at 1.2 eV as the HOMO of CuPc. • Retain correct orbital order by using hybrid functional calculations. - Abstract: Here we report on a combined experimental and theoretical study on the structural and electronic properties of a monolayer of Copper-Phthalocyanine (CuPc) on the Au(1 1 0) surface. Low-energy electron diffraction reveals a commensurate overlayer unit cell containing one adsorbate species. The azimuthal alignment of the CuPc molecule is revealed by comparing experimental constant binding energy (kxky)-maps using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with theoretical momentum maps of the free molecule's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). This structural information is confirmed by total energy calculations within the framework of van-der-Waals corrected density functional theory. The electronic structure is further analyzed by computing the molecule-projected density of states, using both a semi-local and a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. In agreement with experiment, the HOMO is located about 1.2 eV below the Fermi-level, while there is no significant charge transfer into the molecule and the CuPc LUMO remains unoccupied on the Au(1 1 0) surface

  12. Two dimensional band structure mapping of organic single crystals using the new generation electron energy analyzer ARTOF

    OpenAIRE

    Vollmer, A.; R. Ovsyannikov; Gorgoi, M.; Krause, S.; Oehzelt, M.; Lindblad, Andreas; Mårtensson, Nils; Svensson, Svante; Karlsson, P; Lundvuist, M.; Schmeiler, T.; Pflaum, J.; Koch, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a novel type of photoemission detector, the Angle Resolved Time Of Flight electron energy analyzer (ARTOF 10k), which enables electronic band structure determination under measurement conditions that are ideal for radiation-sensitive samples. This is facilitated through the combination of very high electron transmission and wide accessible angular range in one geometry. These properties make the ARTOF 10k predestined to investigate specimens that strongly suffer from radiation da...

  13. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valbuena, M.A. [LURE, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Bat. 209D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Avila, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM - CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - B.P. 48, 91192 GIF-SUR-YVETTE Cedex (France); Pantin, V. [LURE, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Bat. 209D, B.P. 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Drouard, S. [LEPES-CENES, B.P. 166x, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Guyot, H. [LEPES-CENES, B.P. 166x, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Asensio, M.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM - CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain) and Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - B.P. 48, 91192 GIF-SUR-YVETTE Cedex (France)]. E-mail: asensio@synchrotron-soleil.fr

    2006-05-30

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T {approx}40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature T {sub CDW} {approx}120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along {gamma}M high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative k {sub F} point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, E {sub F}, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} blue bronze.

  14. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo 6O 17 purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Pantin, V.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo 6O 17 purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T ˜40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature TCDW ˜120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along ΓM high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative kF point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, EF, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K 0.3MoO 3 blue bronze.

  15. Charge-density-wave partial gap opening in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low dimensional (LD) metallic oxides have been a subject of continuous interest in the last two decades, mainly due to the electronic instabilities that they present at low temperatures. In particular, charge density waves (CDW) instabilities associated with a strong electron-phonon interaction have been found in Molybdenum metallic oxides such as KMo6O17 purple bronze. We report an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study from room temperature (RT) to T ∼40 K well below the Peierls transition temperature for this material, with CDW transition temperature T CDW ∼120 K. We have focused on photoemission spectra along ΓM high symmetry direction as well as photoemission measurements were taken as a function of temperature at one representative k F point in the Brillouin zone in order to look for the characteristic gap opening after the phase transition. We found out a pseudogap opening and a decrease in the density of states near the Fermi energy, E F, consistent with the partial removal of the nested portions of the Fermi surface (FS) at temperature below the CDW transition. In order to elucidate possible Fermi liquid (FL) or non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviour we have compared the ARPES data with that one reported on quasi-1D K0.3MoO3 blue bronze

  16. Soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of heavily boron-doped superconducting diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokoya, T. Nakamura, T. Matushita, T. Muro, H. Okazaki, M. Arita, K. Shimada, H. Namatame, M. Taniguchi, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, T. Takenouchi, H. Kawarada and T. Oguchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SXARPES of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond films with different B concentrations in order to study the origin of the metallic behavior of superconducting diamond. SXARPES results clearly show valence band dispersions with a bandwidth of ~23 eV and with a top of the valence band at gamma point in the Brillouin zone, which are consistent with the calculated valence band dispersions of pure diamond. Boron concentration-dependent band dispersions near the Fermi level (EF exhibit a systematic shift of EF, indicating depopulation of electrons due to hole doping. These SXARPES results indicate that diamond bands retain for heavy boron doping and holes in the diamond band are responsible for the metallic states leading to superconductivity at low temperature. A high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy spectrum near EF of a heavily boron-doped diamond superconductor is also presented.

  17. Spin-polarized surface bands of a three-dimensional topological insulator studied by high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spin-polarized surface band structure of the three-dimensional (3D) quantum spin Hall phase of Bi1-xSbx (x=0.12-0.13) was studied by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES) using a high-yield spin polarimeter equipped with a high-resolution electron spectrometer. The spin-integrated spectra were also measured and compared to those of Bi1-xSbx with x=0.04. Band dispersions of the edge states were fully elucidated between the two time-reversal-invariant points, Γ-bar and M-bar, of the (111) surface Brillouin zone. The observed spin-polarized band dispersions at x=0.12-0.13 indicate an odd number of the band crossing at the Fermi energy, giving unambiguous evidence that this system is a 3D strong topological insulator, and determine the 'mirror chirality' to be -1, which excludes the existence of a Dirac point in the middle of the Γ-bar-M-bar line. The present research demonstrates that the SARPES measurement with energy resolution ≤50 meV is one of the critical techniques for complementing the topological band theory for spins and spin currents.

  18. Methods in angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction: Slab method versus separable propagator cluster approach

    OpenAIRE

    H. Wu; Chu, TP; Tong, SY; Ng, CY

    1998-01-01

    We have compared multiple-scattering results of angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction spectra between the exact slab method and the separable propagator perturbation cluster method. In the slab method, the source wave and multiple scattering within strongly scattering layers are expanded in spherical waves while the scattering among different layers is expressed in plane waves. The transformation between spherical waves and plane waves is done exactly. The plane waves are then matched acro...

  19. Angle resolved photoemission from organic semiconductors: orbital imaging beyond the molecular orbital interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Dauth, M.; Wiessner, M.; Feyer, V.; Schöll, A.; Puschnig, P.; Reinert, F.; Kümmel, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fascinating pictures that can be interpreted as showing molecular orbitals have been obtained with various imaging techniques. Among these, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a particularly powerful method. Orbital images have been used to underline the physical credibility of the molecular orbital concept. However, from the theory of the photoemission process it is evident that imaging experiments do not show molecular orbitals, but Dyson orbitals. The latter ar...

  20. Angle-resolved x-ray circular and magnetic circular dichroisms: Definitions and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, DSY; X Guo; Tobin, JG; Waddill, GD

    1996-01-01

    We introduce definitions of angle-resolved x-ray circular dichroism (ARXCD) and magnetic x-ray circular dichroism (ARMXCD). As defined, the much larger effect of circular dichroism (ARXCD) is separated from the smaller magnetic (ARMXCD) effect. In all materials, ARXCD is zero along mirror planes while nonzero elsewhere. ARMXCD is nonzero only in magnetic materials. The measurement and analysis of ARMXCD allow element specific surface magnetism and surface structure as well as their inter-rela...

  1. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dakovski, Georgi L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yinwan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  2. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  3. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition...

  4. Angle resolved photoemission study of Fermi surfaces and single-particle excitations of quasi-low dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, Gey-Hong

    Using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) as the main experimental tool and the single particle Green's function as the main theoretical tool, materials of various degrees of low dimensionality and different ground states are studied. The underlying theme of this thesis is that of one dimensional physics, which includes charge density waves (CDW's) and the Luttinger liquid (LL). The LL is the prime example of a lattice non-Fermi liquid (non-FL) and CDW fluctuations also give non-FL behaviors. Non-FL physics is an emerging paradigm of condensed matter physics. It is thought by some researchers that one dimensional LL behavior is a key element in solving the high temperature superconductivity problem. TiTe2 is a quasi-2 dimensional (quasi-2D) Fermi liquid (FL) material very well suited for ARPES lineshape studies. I report ARPES spectra at 300 K which show an unusual behavior of a peak moving through the Fermi energy (EF). I also report a good fit of the ARPES spectra at 25 K obtained by using a causal Green's function proposed by K. Matho. SmTe3 is a quasi-2D CDW material. The near EF ARPES spectra and intensity map reveal rich details of an anisotropic gap and imperfectly nested Fermi surface (FS) for a high temperature CDW. A simple model of imperfect nesting can be constructed from these data and predicts a CDW wavevector in very good agreement with the value known from electron diffraction. NaMo6O17 and KMo 6O17 are also quasi-2D CDW materials. The "hidden nesting" or "hidden 1 dimensionality" picture for the CDW is confirmed very well by our direct image of the FS. K0.3MoO3, the so-called "blue bronze," is a quasi-1 dimensional (quasi-1D) CDW material. Even in its metallic phase above the CDW transition temperature, its photoemission spectra show an anomalously weak intensity at EF and no clear metallic Fermi edge. I compare predictions of an LL model and a CDW fluctuation model regarding these aspects, and find that the LL scenario explains them

  5. Angle-Resolved Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Gyroid Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Peng, Siying; Hon, Philip; Zhang, Runyu; Chen, Hongjie; Sweatlock, Luke A.; Braun, Paul; Atwater, Harry A.

    Photonic topological insulators form a new class of materials with exciting properties. Theory has indicated that gyroid photonic crystals are photonic topological insulators. In this paper, we experimentally characterize the photonic properties of gyroid photonic crystals at mid-infrared wavelengths, using angle-resolved spectroscopy with coherent light from a quantum cascade laser tuned from 7.7 μm to 11.1 μm and focused onto a 100 μm × 100 μm spot. From measurements of reflection and transmission spectra over incidence angles, we construct the band structure of the photonic crystals. In this study, the photonic crystals are single and double gyroid made of amorphous silicon, with unit cell size of 5 μm, sitting on an intrinsic silicon substrate. Simulations predict band gaps for the single gyroid and Weyl points for the double gyroid. We compare results of angle-resolved spectroscopy experiments with simulations for nanofabricated gyroid structures and discuss the topological features observable in angle-resolved scattering.

  6. Valence band structure of the ZnO(1-bar 0-bar 1-bar -bar 0) surface studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic band structure of the ZnO(1-bar 0-bar 1-bar -bar 0) surface has been studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation. Photon-energy-dependent measurements and K- and O2-adsorption studies revealed that the O 2p dangling-bond state exists at 3.7eV below the Fermi level at the Γ-bar point. Polarization-dependent measurements show that the state has dominant contribution of the O 2px orbital (x is parallel to the (1-bar 2-bar -bar 1-bar 0) direction) at the Γ-bar point. It is found that the O 2p dangling-bond band lies within the projected bulk bands along the ΓX-bar -bar and-bar ΓX'-bar axes in the surface Brillouin zone. This result settles a controversial issue on the energetic position of the O 2p dangling-bond band, which has been in dispute among theoretical studies. The dispersion widths are found to be 0.8 and 0.5eV along the ΓX-bar -bar and-bar ΓX'-bar directions, respectively

  7. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of topmost surface for LaNiO 3 thin film grown on SrTiO 3 substrate by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P.; Xu, S. Y.; Lin, J.; Ong, C. K.; Cui, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    The LaNiO 3 thin film was grown on SrTiO 3 (001) substrate by computer-controlled laser molecular beam epitaxy (laser MBE). In situ monitoring of the growing film surface was performed with a reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) indicated that the terminating plane of the LaNiO 3 film was the LaO atomic plane, and the SrTiO 3 (001) surfaces of as-supplied substrate as well as HF-pretreated substrate were predominantly terminated with TiO atomic plane. The structural conversion of the topmost atomic layer from NiO to LaO occurred during the LaNiO 3 epitaxial growth process.

  8. Angle-resolved analysis of magnetic hysteresis for micro-magnetic clusters with local deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic dynamic process for an octagonal micro-magnetic cluster with one dislocation loop was simulated by pseudo-nonequilibrial Monte Carlo method including pseudo-dipole interaction. The results showed that the magnetic hysteresis curves of micro-magnetic clusters with one dislocation loop and of those without any deformation differ. The difference is more clearly shown for noise pattern of magnetization process, which depends on dynamic behavior of spin ensemble. A series of snapshots for spin ensemble displays that the magnetization process depends on the direction of the applied magnetic field. We propose usefulness of angle-resolved analysis of magnetic dynamic process to evaluate magnetic clusters

  9. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Shirley, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  10. In situ positioning of a few hundred micrometer-sized cleaved surfaces for soft-x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy by use of an optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to position samples with small cleaved regions has been developed to be applied to the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) which uses soft-x-ray synchrotron radiation focused down to 160x180 μm2. A long-working-distance optical microscope is used for the sample observation. A selected region on a sample can be optimally set at the position of measurements, which is realized by the spatial resolution of the photoelectron analyzer. Using this method, electronic band dispersions of bulk silicon have been measured by ARPES for a partially cleaved region with a size of ∼200x500 μm2.

  11. Coexistence of two sharp-mode couplings and their unusual momentum dependence in the superconducting state of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) revealed by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Wentao; Bok, Jin Mo; Mou, Daixiang; Zhao, Lin; Peng, Yingying; He, Shaolong; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Wen, J S; Xu, Z J; Gu, G D; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Choi, H-Y; Varma, C M; Zhou, X J

    2013-09-01

    High-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) (Bi2212) superconductors to investigate momentum dependence of electron coupling with collective excitations (modes). Two coexisting energy scales are clearly revealed over a large momentum space for the first time in the superconducting state of the overdoped Bi2212 superconductor. These two energy scales exhibit distinct momentum dependence: one keeps its energy near 78 meV over a large momentum space while the other changes its energy from ∼40  meV near the antinodal region to ∼70  meV near the nodal region. These observations provide a new picture on momentum evolution of electron-boson coupling in Bi2212 that electrons are coupled with two sharp modes simultaneously over a large momentum space in the superconducting states. Their unusual momentum dependence poses a challenge to our current understanding of electron-mode-coupling and its role for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprate superconductors. PMID:25166699

  12. Accessing Phonon Polaritons in Hyperbolic Crystals by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Principi, Alessandro; Song, Justin C. W.; Levitov, Leonid S.; Polini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Recently studied hyperbolic materials host unique phonon-polariton (PP) modes. The ultrashort wavelengths of these modes, as well as their low damping, hold promise for extreme subdiffraction nanophotonics schemes. Polar hyperbolic materials such as hexagonal boron nitride can be used to realize long-range coupling between PP modes and extraneous charge degrees of freedom. The latter, in turn, can be used to control and probe PP modes. Here we analyze coupling between PP modes and plasmons in an adjacent graphene sheet, which opens the door to accessing PP modes by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). A rich structure in the graphene ARPES spectrum due to PP modes is predicted, providing a new probe of PP modes and their coupling to graphene plasmons.

  13. The triple correlation function as a tool for angle resolved structural analysis of spherical clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Finite charged particle ensembles in externally controlled confinement geometries allow for a systematic investigation of correlation effects over broad ranges of plasma parameters. Additionally, the formation of distinct shells emerges as a governing finite-size effect in systems of trapped ions and dusty plasma as well. As a sensitive tool to study the internal cluster structure, we introduce the 'Triple Correlations Function' (TCF), which allows for an angle resolved structure analysis. The TCF can not only resolve the transition probability of particles between shells, but also structural modifications within the shells during dynamic processes, e.g. melting or excitation. In particular this quantity is not affected by rotational invariance (i.e. rotation of the entire cluster). Using the TCF we study the effect of Coulomb screening, temperature, and special symmetries of different ground and metastable states with respect to the exact particle number as well as the limiting case of large N.

  14. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission

  15. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Ferrara, Via G. Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Madami, M.; Carlotti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Information Storage Materials Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  16. Angle resolved XPS of monomolecular layer of 5-chlorobenzotriazole on oxidized metallic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazansky, L. P.; Selyaninov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, Yu. I.

    2012-10-01

    Angle resolved XPS is used to study adsorption of 5-chlorobenzotriazole (5-chloroBTAH) on surfaces of the oxidized metals: mild steel, copper and zinc from borate buffer solution (pH 7.4). It is shown that for the metals studied the 5-chloroBTA anions, when adsorbed, form a monomolecular layer whose thickness is ∼6 Å comparable with the size of BTA. As XPS evidences adsorption proceeds with deprotonation of 5-chloroBTAH and formation of the coordination bonds between the lone pair of nitrogens and cation of a metal. Measuring XPS at two different angles unequivocally points out almost vertical arrangement of the anions toward the sample surface, when chlorine atoms form outmost virtual layer.

  17. Improving the measurement performance of angle-resolved scattermetry by use of pupil optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Zhang, Qingyun; Lu, Hailiang; Duan, Lifeng; Li, Xiaoping

    2012-03-01

    As feature sizes decrease, requirements on critical dimension uniformity have become very strict. To monitor variations in lithography process and perform advanced process control it is important to establish a fast and accurate measurement technique for characterizing critical dimension, sidewall angle and height of the resist profile. Various techniques for feature measurement such as CD-SEM, AFM, FE-SEM, and scatterometry have been developed. Among these techniques, scatterometry has both high accuracy and a non-deconstructive measurement modality. It thus provides advantages of low-cost, high throughput, and robustness. Angle-resolved scatterometry has already been shown to provide in-line feedback information necessary for tight process control. In present paper, we introduce a novel angle-resolved scatterometer with pupil optimization. The intensity distribution of the incident light in the pupil plane is optimized considering the feature and the image sensor response properties, which improve the measurement performance of the scatterometer. A first order analysis of measurement sensitivity at different polarization conditions is carried out on resist-coated wafers with 45nm and 22nm features using Rigorous Coupled- Wave analysis (RCWA). Based on the criteria defined as the sum of the absolute difference of the relative intensity values between the nominal and varied conditions in the pupil, the sensitivity of the new technique and traditional scatterometer is compared. Simulation results show that, for 45nm feature, the sensitivity in s and p-polarization is increased by 400% and 300% respectively. While for 22nm feature, the sensitivity is increased by 200% and 130%. Reproducibility of measurement is also analyzed on 45nm and 22nm features using a Monte Carlo method and models for detector noise. Comparison of reproducibility for CD, sidewall angle, and resist height measurement is demonstrated.

  18. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs. PMID:25251075

  19. Anisotropy of chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite C2F revealed with angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okotrub, Alexander V; Yudanov, Nikolay F; Asanov, Igor P; Vyalikh, Denis V; Bulusheva, Lyubov G

    2013-01-22

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite characterized by a low misorientation of crystallites is fluorinated using a gaseous mixture of BrF(3) with Br(2) at room temperature. The golden-colored product, easily delaminating into micrometer-size transparent flakes, is an intercalation compound where Br(2) molecules are hosted between fluorinated graphene layers of approximate C(2)F composition. To unravel the chemical bonding in semifluorinated graphite, we apply angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and quantum-chemical modeling. The strong angular dependence of the CK and FK edge NEXAFS spectra on the incident radiation indicates that room-temperature-produced graphite fluoride is a highly anisotropic material, where half of the carbon atoms are covalently bonded with fluorine, while the rest of the carbon atoms preserve π electrons. Comparison of the experimental CK edge spectrum with theoretical spectra plotted for C(2)F models reveals that fluorine atoms are more likely to form chains. This conclusion agrees with the atomic force microscopy observation of a chain-like pattern on the surface of graphite fluoride layers. PMID:23214423

  20. High-resolution soft-X-ray beamline ADRESS at Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T; U. Flechsig; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A; Q. Chen; J. Raabe; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; A. Piazzalunga; X Wang; Grioni, M.; Patthey, L.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft-X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) and Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES). The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 deg rotatable linear polarizations) but als...

  1. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T; U. Flechsig; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A; Q. Chen; J. Raabe; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; X Wang; Grioni, M.; A. Piazzalunga; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also...

  2. Direct evidence for the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoemission satellites from several systems have been found to exhibit exactly the same angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) as found in the main peaks, when referred to the equivalent photoelectron wave number k for their own photoelectrons. This provides a direct and powerful method for experimentally determining the angular momentum parameters and the intrinsic/extrinsic nature of core-level photoemission satellites. We present ARPEFS satellite data for nitrogen 1s line in c(2x2)N2/Ni(100), the nickel 3p line in clean nickel (111), the carbon 1s lines in (√(3)x√(3))R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110), and the cobalt 1s line in p(1x1) Co/Cu(100). For the last two cases the open-quotes satelliteclose quotes structure is actually the low-energy tail of a Doniach-Sunjic line shape. The satellite peaks and the tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes exhibit ARPEFS curves that in all cases except one indicate angular-momentum parameters identical to the main peak and an intrinsic nature. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for VO2 thin films grown on TiO2 (0 0 1) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements of metallic VO2 thin films. The VO2 thin films have been grown on TiO2 (0 0 1) single crystal substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The films exhibit a first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 305 K. In the ARPES spectra of the metallic phase for the films, the O 2p band shows highly dispersive feature in the binding energy range of 3-8 eV along the Γ-Z direction. The periodicity of the dispersive band is found to be 2.2 A-1 which is almost identical with the periodicity expected from the c-axis length of the VO2 thin films. The overall feature of the experimental band structure is similar to the band structure calculations, supporting that we have succeeded in observing the dispersive band of the O 2p state in the metallic VO2 thin film. The present work indicates that the ARPES measurements using epitaxial thin films are promising for determining the band structure of VO2.

  4. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and superconductivity of strained high-Tc films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain. In overdoped and underdoped in-plane compressed (the strain is induced by the choice of substrate) ≅ 15 nm thin La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) films we almost double Tc to 40 K, from 20 K and 24 K, respectively. Yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially two-dimensional. In contrast, ARPES data under tensile strain exhibit the dispersion that is three-dimensional, yet Tc drastically decreases. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from CuO2 plane, enhances the two-dimensional character of the dispersion and increases Tc, while the tensile strain acts in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is three-dimensional. We have established the shape of the FS for both cases, and all our data are consistent with other ongoing studies, like EXAFS. As the actual lattice of cuprates is like a Napoleon-cake, i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternating with softer reservoir, that distort differently under strain, our data rule out all oversimplified two-dimensional (rigid lattice) mean field models. The work is still in progress on optimized La-doped Bi-2201 films with enhanced Tc. (author)

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Chemistry; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US). Dept. of Chemistry and Physics; Hussain, Z. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the po final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA

  7. Angle resolved XPS of monomolecular layer of 5-chlorobenzotriazole on oxidized metallic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Adsorption of 5-chloroBTA on oxidized metals is studied by ARXPS. ► When adsorbed, 5-chloroBTA forms a monolayer whose thickness is close to molecule size. ► According to ARXPS, the planes of 5-chloroBTA anions are vertical to a metal oxide surface. ► Metal cations of the surface coordinate nitrogen atoms of 5-chloroBTA. ► Chlorine atoms forming outmost virtual layer. - Abstract: Angle resolved XPS is used to study adsorption of 5-chlorobenzotriazole (5-chloroBTAH) on surfaces of the oxidized metals: mild steel, copper and zinc from borate buffer solution (pH 7.4). It is shown that for the metals studied the 5-chloroBTA anions, when adsorbed, form a monomolecular layer whose thickness is ∼6 Å comparable with the size of BTA. As XPS evidences adsorption proceeds with deprotonation of 5-chloroBTAH and formation of the coordination bonds between the lone pair of nitrogens and cation of a metal. Measuring XPS at two different angles unequivocally points out almost vertical arrangement of the anions toward the sample surface, when chlorine atoms form outmost virtual layer.

  8. Doping dependence of the (π, π) shadow band in La-based cuprates studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (π, π) shadow band (SB) in the La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy over a wide doping range from x=0.01 to x=0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (EF) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x=1/8, we found that it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent (π, π) wave vector but a strongly doping-dependent intensity: it is strongest at x∼0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x∼0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding-energy-dependent analysis of the SB at x=0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity for a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  9. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 µm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement. - Highlights: • We model elastic scattering of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape. • We calculate cross sections and Mueller matrix using random particle shape model. • Scatter models employ refractive index and measured size distribution as inputs. • Discrete dipole approximation (DDA) with parallelization enables model calculations. • DDA-modeled cross section and Mueller matrix agree well with measurements at 1.55 μm

  10. Gap anisotropy in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ by ultrahigh-resolution angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrahigh-resolution (ΔE up to 10 meV) angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on single crystals of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) show a highly anisotropic superconducting energy gap: the gap is minimized, with a value close to zero, along the Γ-X and Γ-Y symmetry directions, while a large gap (Δ=22 meV) is observed along the Γ-bar M (Cu-O bond) direction. However, the observation of gap anisotropy may depend on sample conditions; in a few cases the gap becomes more isotropic. A dip in the spectral weight at 65 meV below the Fermi energy is clearly observed only in samples with an anisotropic gap

  11. Momentum and Energy Dependence of the Anomalous High-Energy Dispersion in the Electronic Structure of High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inosov, D. S.; Fink, J.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Borisenko, S. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Schuster, R.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Follath, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Eberhardt, W.; Hinkov, V.; Keimer, B.; Berger, H.

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-Tc superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p→3dx2-y2 edge. We conclude that the high-energy “waterfall” dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  12. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi L. Dakovski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy, which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15 eV, 12 fs pulses, we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate that non-monotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in stark contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.

  13. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of the Mott Insulator to Superconductor Evolution in Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Kyle Michael

    2005-09-02

    It is widely believed that many of the exotic physical properties of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors arise from the proximity of these materials to the strongly correlated, antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state. Therefore, one of the fundamental questions in the field of high-temperature superconductivity is to understand the insulator-to-superconductor transition and precisely how the electronic structure of Mott insulator evolves as the first holes are doped into the system. This dissertation presents high-resolution, doping dependent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the cuprate superconductor Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, spanning from the undoped parent Mott insulator to a high-temperature superconductor with a T{sub c} of 22 K. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain how the spectral lineshape, the quasiparticle band dispersion, and the chemical potential all progress with doping in a logical and self-consistent framework. This model is based on Franck-Condon broadening observed in polaronic systems where strong electron-boson interactions cause the quasiparticle residue, Z, to be vanishingly small. Comparisons of the low-lying states to different electronic states in the valence band strongly suggest that the coupling of the photohole to the lattice (i.e. lattice polaron formation) is the dominant broadening mechanism for the lower Hubbard band states. Combining this polaronic framework with high-resolution ARPES measurements finally provides a resolution to the long-standing controversy over the behavior of the chemical potential in the high-T{sub c} cuprates. This scenario arises from replacing the conventional Fermi liquid quasiparticle interpretation of the features in the Mott insulator by a Franck-Condon model, allowing the reassignment of the position of the quasiparticle pole. As a function of hole doping, the chemical potential shifts smoothly into the valence band while spectral weight is transferred

  14. Phonon contribution to quasiparticle lifetimes in Cu measured by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The line shape of the photoelectron spectrum emitted from the sp-derived surface state at bar Γ on Cu(111) is investigated. The line shape is Lorentzian, and the temperature dependence of the width is linear, varying from 30 meV at 30 K to 75 meV at 625 K. Less than 5-meV variation with binding energy is observed. The temperature dependence is explained as the phonon contribution to the inverse hole lifetime, predicted to be 2πλkbT allowing the determination that the electron-phonon mass enhancement parameter λ=0.14±0.02 for this surface state at bar Γ. This is compared to λ=0.15 reported as an average over the bulk Fermi surface

  15. Multiple Bosonic Mode Coupling in Electron Self-Energy of (La_2-xSr_x)CuO_4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-06-02

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data with significantly improved statistics reveal tne structure in the electron self-energy of the underdoped (La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}) CuO{sub 4} (x=0.03, 0.036 and 0.07) samples in the normal state. Four fine structure have been identified near 27, 45, 61 and 75 meV. These features show good correspondence to the structure in the phonon density of states as measured from neutron scattering.

  16. High energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomchuk, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  17. Nanofocusing, shadowing, and electron mean free path in the photoemission from aerosol droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorell, Ruth; Goldmann, Maximilian; Yoder, Bruce L.; Bodi, Andras; Chasovskikh, Egor; Lang, Lukas; Luckhaus, David

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol droplets is a promising method for the determination of electron mean free paths in liquids. It is particularly attractive for volatile liquids, such as water. Here we report the first angle-resolved photoelectron images of droplets with defined sizes, viz. of water, glycerol, and dioctyl phthalate droplets. Simulations of water droplet photoelectron images and data for electron mean free paths for liquid water at low kinetic energy (<3 eV) are provided. We present an approach that allows one to gradually vary the conditions from shadowing to nanofocusing to optimize the information content contained in the photoelectron images.

  18. Nanofocusing, shadowing, and electron mean free path in the photoemission from aerosol droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Signorell, Ruth; Yoder, Bruce L; Bodi, Andras; Chasovskikh, Egor; Lang, Lukas; Luckhaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol droplets is a promising method for the determination of electron mean free paths in liquids. It is particularly attractive for volatile liquids, such as water. Here we report the first angle-resolved photoelectron images of droplets with defined sizes, viz. of water, glycerol, and dioctyl phthalate droplets. We present an approach that allows one to gradually vary the conditions from dominant shadowing to dominant nanofocusing to optimize the information content contained in the photoelectron images. Example simulations of water droplet photoelectron images and preliminary data for electron mean free paths for liquid water at low kinetic energy (<3eV) are provided.

  19. Metal-insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3, studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3, which exhibit a metal-insulator transition as a function of x. We found that the near-EF states are localized in NaxWO3 (x=+ ions in the WO3 lattice, which makes the system insulating. In the metallic regime we found that the rigid shift of band structure can explain the metallic NaxWO3 band structure with respect to Na doping

  20. Electronic energy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    One-electron wave functions are reviewed and approximate solutions of two-electron systems are given in terms of these one-electron functions. The symmetry effects associated with electron spin are reviewed and the effects of electron exchange on energy levels of the two-electron system are given. The coupling of electronic orbital and spin angular momentum is considered next and the Lande interval rule for Russell-Saunders or LS coupling is derived. The configurations possible for various multi-electron LS couplings are enumerated (examples from the first two rows of the periodic table are given), and the meaning of the spectroscopic nomenclature is discussed, particularly with respect to the degeneracies of the electron states involved. Next the nomenclature, symmetries, and degeneracies for electron states of diatomic molecules are discussed, and some examples for N2, O2, and NO are presented. The electronic partition functions and derivative thermodynamic properties are expressed in terms of these energies and degeneracies, and examples are given for some of the simple gas species encountered in the earth's atmosphere.

  1. High-resolution soft-X-ray beamline ADRESS at Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    Strocov, V N; Flechsig, U; Schmidt, T; Imhof, A; Chen, Q; Raabe, J; Betemps, R; Zimoch, D; Krempasky, J; Piazzalunga, A; Wang, X; Grioni, M; Patthey, L

    2009-01-01

    We describe the concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft-X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) and Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES). The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 deg rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well-established scheme of plane grating monochromator (PGM) operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/dE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed vs lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Due to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, high photon flux is achieved up to 1.0e13 photons/s/0.01%BW at 1 keV. Ellipsoida...

  2. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  3. Symmetric and anti-symmetric magnetic resonances in double-triangle nanoparticle arrays fabricated via angle-resolved nanosphere lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Pan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report experimentally that for a particular high-symmetry planar periodic arrangement of metal double-triangle nanoparticle arrays fabricated via angle resolved nanosphere lithography, both anti-symmetric and symmetric magnetic resonances can be explicitly excited at off-normal incidence. Further, we demonstrate that the underlying mechanism for the formation of these two modes is a result of direct interactions with the incident electric and magnetic fields, respectively. As a consequence, with increasing the incident angle there is a relatively small blue-shift in the transmission for the electric-field induced anti-symmetric mode, while a remarkable red-shift is observed for the magnetic-field induced symmetric mode.

  4. The orbital structure of {pi}-conjugated organic molecules on metal surfaces probed by angle-resolved photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziroff, Johannes; Wiessner, Michael; Forster, Frank; Schoell, Achim [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Puschnig, Peter [University of Leoben, Chair of Atomistic Modelling and Design of Materials, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Reinert, Friedrich [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); FZ Karlsruhe, Gemeinschaftslabor fuer Nanoanalytik, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present angle resolved photoemission spectra of monolayers of {pi}-conjugated molecules adsorbed on single-crystalline metal surfaces. Comparing the experimental k-dependant intensity distribution of the molecular states to DFT calculations for the free molecule allows to detect sophisticated modifications of the molecular orbitals at the interface. In case of the single-domain system PTCDA on Ag(110) the 2D emission pattern confirms that the now occupied interface state is mainly derived from the former LUMO-orbital. Moreover, a clear contribution of metal states is evident from additional intensity in normal emission. In the contrary, the structure of the molecular HOMO changes only slightly upon chemisorption on Ag surfaces. Additional data on other planar {pi}-conjugated organic molecules such as coronene or NTCDA demonstrates the potential of this approach in analysing the interaction at metal-organic interfaces in great detail.

  5. Depth profile analysis of polymerized fluorine compound on photo-resist film with angle-resolved XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) is an observation technique which is very effective in chemical depth analysis method less than photoelectron detected depth. For the analysis of depth profile, several analysis methods have been proposed to calculate the depth profile using the ARXPS method. The present report is the measurements of depth profile of the fluorine in a fluorine-containing photo-resist film using the ARXPS method and the depth profile of concentration have been successfully determined using the ARCtick 1.0 software. It has been observed that thickness of the fluorocarbon enriched surface layer of the photo-resist was 2.7 nm, and so that the convert of the ARXPS data from the angle profile to the depth profile was proved to be useful analysis method for the ultrathin layer depth. (author)

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the Fermi surface topology of NaxCoO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a systematic study on NaxCoO2 (0.3≤x≤0.72) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), with a focus on the Fermi surface topology of the metallic samples. Within this doping range, we observed only one large hexagonal Fermi surface around the Γ-point, which comes from the a1g band. Contrary to most band calculations, our results show that the eg' bands never cross the Fermi level to form small Fermi surface pockets near the K-point. The enclosed area of the a1g Fermi surface is found to be consistent with the Luttinger theorem within the doping range in this study. We also found that, at x = 1/3, the Fermi surface coincides with the zone boundary of the √3x√3 commensurate ordering, indicating the importance of charge fluctuations in this material

  7. High-resolution-angle resolved photoemission studies of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent photoemission studies of Y 123 and Bi 2212 performed with high energy and angular resolution. They provide detailed information on the nature of the states near the Fermi level. Measurements of the superconducting gap, band dispersion, and the density of states near the Fermi level in the normal state all support a Fermi liquid description of these materials

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of band tails in lightly doped cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, A. S.; Reynolds, K.

    2007-01-01

    We amend ab initio strongly-correlated band structures by taking into account the band-tailing phenomenon in doped charge-transfer Mott-Hubbard insulators. We show that the photoemission from band tails accounts for sharp "quasi-particle" peaks, rapid loss of their intensities in some directions of the Brillouin zone ("Fermi-arcs") and high-energy "waterfall" anomalies as a consequence of matrix-element effects of disorder-localised states in the charge-transfer gap of doped cuprates.

  9. Molar concentration-depth profiles at the solution surface of a cationic surfactant reconstructed with angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current work, we first reconstructed the molar fraction-depth profiles of cation and anion near the surface of tetrabutylammonium iodide dissolved in formamide by a refined calculation procedure, based on angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. In this calculation procedure, both the transmission functions of the core levels and the inelastic mean free paths of the photoelectrons have been taken into account. We have evaluated the partial molar volumes of surfactant and solvent by the densities of such solutions with different bulk concentrations. With those partial molar volumes, the molar concentration-depth profiles of tetrabutylammonium ion and iodide ion were determined. The surface excesses of both surfactant ions were then achieved directly by integrating these depth profiles. The anionic molar concentration-depth profiles and surface excesses have been compared with their counterparts determined by neutral impact ion scattering spectroscopy. The comparisons exhibit good agreements. Being capable of determining molar concentration-depth profiles of surfactant ions by core levels with different kinetic energies may extend the applicable range of ARXPS in investigating solution surfaces.

  10. Electron energies in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern era of electron-electron interactions began a decade ago. Plummer's group initiated a program of using angular resolved photoemission to examine the band structure of the simple metals. Beginning with aluminum, and carrying on to sodium and potassium, they always found that the occupied energy bands were much narrower than expected. For example, the compressed energy bands for metallic potassium suggest a band effective mass of m* = 1.33me. This should be compared to the band mass found from optical conductivity m*/me = 1.01 ± 0.01. The discrepancy between these results is startling. It was this great difference which started my group doing calculations. Our program was two-fold. On one hand, we reanalyzed the experimental data, in order to see if Plummer's result was an experimental artifact. On the other hand, we completely redid the electron-electron self-energy calculations for simple metals, using the most modern choices of local-field corrections and vertex corrections. Our results will be reported in these lectures. They can be summarized as following: Our calculations give the same effective masses as the older calculations, so the theory is relatively unchanged; Our analysis of the experiments suggests that the recent measurements of band narrowing are an experimental artifact. 38 refs., 9 figs

  11. Magnetic dichroism in angle-resolved hard x-ray photoemission from buried layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, Xeniya; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Ouardi, Siham; Balke, Benjamin; Felser, Claudia; Schönhense, Gerd; Ikenaga, Eiji; Sugiyama, Takeharu; Kawamura, Naomi; Suzuki, Motohiro; Taira, Tomoyuki; Uemura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wang, Wenhong; Inomata, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the measurement of magnetic dichroism in angular-resolved photoemission from in-plane magnetized buried thin films. The high bulk sensitivity of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in combination with circularly polarized radiation enables the investigation of the magnetic properties of buried layers. HAXPES experiments with an excitation energy of 8 keV were performed on exchange-biased magnetic layers covered by thin oxide films. Two types of structures were investigated with the IrMn exchange-biasing layer either above or below the ferromagnetic layer: one with a CoFe layer on top and another with a Co2FeAl layer buried beneath the IrMn layer. A pronounced magnetic dichroism is found in the Co and Fe 2p states of both materials. The localization of the magnetic moments at the Fe site conditioning the peculiar characteristics of the Co2FeAl Heusler compound, predicted to be a half-metallic ferromagnet, is revealed from the magnetic dichroism detected in the Fe 2p states.

  12. Two dimensional band structure mapping of organic single crystals using the new generation electron energy analyzer ARTOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, A.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Gorgoi, M.; Krause, S.; Oehzelt, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lindblad, A.; Martensson, N.; Svensson, S. [Uppsala University, Department of Materials Chemistry and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden); Karlsson, P.; Lundvuist, M. [VG Scienta AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Schmeiler, T.; Pflaum, J. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik VI, Universitaet Wuerzburg und ZAE Bayern, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Koch, N., E-mail: norbert.koch@physik.hu-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel type of photoemission detector is introduced: the Angle Resolved Time Of Flight electron energy analyzer (ARTOF). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It enables electronic band structure determination under measurement conditions that are ideal for radiation-sensitive samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The band structures of rubrene single crystal is confirmed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The absence of HOMO-band dispersion for tetracene single crystals is revealed. - Abstract: We report on a novel type of photoemission detector, the Angle Resolved Time Of Flight electron energy analyzer (ARTOF 10k), which enables electronic band structure determination under measurement conditions that are ideal for radiation-sensitive samples. This is facilitated through the combination of very high electron transmission and wide accessible angular range in one geometry. These properties make the ARTOF 10k predestined to investigate specimens that strongly suffer from radiation damage during photoemission experiments under 'standard' conditions, such as organic single crystals, as extremely low fluxes can be used while not compromising spectra accumulation times and signal-to-noise ratio. Even though organic single crystals are of increasing fundamental and applied scientific interest, knowledge of their electronic properties is still largely based on theoretical calculations due to major experimental challenges in measuring photoemission. In this work we show that the band structures of rubrene and tetracene single crystals can be obtained with unprecedented quality using the ARTOF 10k detector. The dispersion of the highest occupied band in rubrene is confirmed in accordance with an earlier report and we disclose the absence of notable dispersion for the highest occupied energy level on the surface of tetracene single crystals.

  13. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocov, V N; Schmitt, T; Flechsig, U; Schmidt, T; Imhof, A; Chen, Q; Raabe, J; Betemps, R; Zimoch, D; Krempasky, J; Wang, X; Grioni, M; Piazzalunga, A; Patthey, L

    2010-09-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 degrees rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/DeltaE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 x 10(13) photons s(-1) (0.01% BW)(-1) at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 microm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/DeltaE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  14. Spin orbit splitting in the valence bands of ZrSxSe2−x: Angle resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We performed high resolution ARPES on 1T–ZrSxSe2−x. ► A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived VB along high symmetry directions was observed. ► The splitting size at the A point of the BZ is found to increase from 0.06 to 0.31 eV from ZrS2 towards ZrSe2. ► Electronic structure calculations based on the DFT were performed using the model of TB–MBJ. ► The calculations show that the splitting is due to SO coupling of the valence bands. -- Abstract: Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation has been performed on 1T–ZrSxSe2−x, where x varies from 0 to 2, in order to study the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the valence bands. The crystals were grown by chemical vapour transport technique using Iodine as transport agent. A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands along high symmetry directions has been observed experimentally. The size of the splitting increases with the increase of the atomic number of the chalcogenide, e.g. at the A point of the Brillouin zone from 0.06 eV to 0.31 eV with an almost linear dependence with x, as progressing from ZrS2 towards ZrSe2, respectively. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed using the model of Tran–Blaha [1] and the modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [2] (TB–MBJ) both with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The calculations show that the splitting is mainly due to spin-orbit coupling and the degeneracy of the valance bands is lifted

  15. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloff, L.-P.; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  16. Angle-resolved inverse photoemission of the H-etched 6H-SiC(0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghdassi, Nabi; Ostendorf, Ralf; Zacharias, Helmut [Physikalisches Institut, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The etching of 6H-SiC(0001) substrates in molecular hydrogen at elevated temperatures leads to an ordered silicate adlayer as it is confirmed by LEED and AES. LEED patterns clearly feature a ({radical}(3) x {radical}(3))R30 periodicity while AES spectra are evidence for the presence of Si-O bonds. The generated surfaces appear to be fully passivated and therefore stable in ambient air. After cleaning the samples by heating in UHV up to temperatures around 750 C angle-resolved inverse photoemission is performed on the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. The IPE spectra reveal five features above the Fermi level around 0.5 eV, 1.2 eV, 2.3 eV, 3.5 eV and 5.5 eV, respectively, which show only a weak dispersion along the {gamma} - M and {gamma} - K directions of the (1 x 1) surface Brillouin zone.

  17. A model-based approach for the calibration and traceability of the angle resolved scattering light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, Jörg; Eifler, Matthias; Schneider, Frank; Kirsch, Benjamin; Aurich, Jan C.

    2016-06-01

    Within the field of geometric product specification there is a growing need for the application of inline measurement systems. The use of inline measurement requires robust and fast measurement principles. A very robust optical measurement principle is the angle resolved scattering light (ARS) sensor. The ARS sensor provides high precision and high resolution measurement data of technical surfaces because the surface angles are measured as an intensity distribution on a detector instead of measuring a series of discrete height values. However, until now, there were no specific measurement standards for the calibration of the ARS sensor and no traceability was ensured. In this paper, new strategies for the calibration of an ARS sensor are proposed. A new mathematical model for the ARS sensor is introduced. Based on this, two new measurement standards for the calibration of the sensor parameters are derived. These standards are designed with a model-based approach and can calibrate sensor-specific properties of the ARS sensor. The manufacturing of the standards is described and measurement results are provided.

  18. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  19. Spin orbit splitting in the valence bands of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}: Angle resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustafa, Mohamed, E-mail: moustafa@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Engineering, Pharos University in Alexandria, Canal El Mahmoudia Str., Alexandria (Egypt); Ghafari, Aliakbar; Paulheim, Alexander; Janowitz, Christoph; Manzke, Recardo [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We performed high resolution ARPES on 1T–ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}. ► A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived VB along high symmetry directions was observed. ► The splitting size at the A point of the BZ is found to increase from 0.06 to 0.31 eV from ZrS{sub 2} towards ZrSe{sub 2}. ► Electronic structure calculations based on the DFT were performed using the model of TB–MBJ. ► The calculations show that the splitting is due to SO coupling of the valence bands. -- Abstract: Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation has been performed on 1T–ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}, where x varies from 0 to 2, in order to study the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the valence bands. The crystals were grown by chemical vapour transport technique using Iodine as transport agent. A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands along high symmetry directions has been observed experimentally. The size of the splitting increases with the increase of the atomic number of the chalcogenide, e.g. at the A point of the Brillouin zone from 0.06 eV to 0.31 eV with an almost linear dependence with x, as progressing from ZrS{sub 2} towards ZrSe{sub 2}, respectively. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed using the model of Tran–Blaha [1] and the modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [2] (TB–MBJ) both with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The calculations show that the splitting is mainly due to spin-orbit coupling and the degeneracy of the valance bands is lifted.

  20. Use of angle-resolved XPS to determine depth profiles based on Fick's second law of diffusion: description of method and simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An iterative algorithm is proposed to extract depth profiles based on Fick's second law of diffusion in a multi-element system from data supplied by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). Parameters related to the concentration profiles are obtained by fitting the experimental angle-dependent relative photoelectron intensities to predictions from the algorithm. The use of relative instead of absolute photoelectron intensities eliminates error due to changes in absolute photoelectron intensities resulting from the change of system geometries in angle-resolved experiments. Simulations using an infinite source diffusion model have been conducted to study the influence of errors in the raw data and to demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm. The algorithm is tested based on preliminary experimental ARXPS data from a chemically treated polymer film

  1. Superconductivity-Induced Self-Energy Evolution of the Nodal Electron in Optimally-Doped Bi2212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.

    2010-05-03

    The temperature dependent evolution of the renormalization effect in optimally-doped Bi2212 along the nodal direction has been studied via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Fine structure is observed in the real part of the self-energy (Re{Sigma}), including a subkink and maximum, suggesting that electrons couple to a spectrum of bosonic modes, instead of just one mode. Upon cooling through the superconducting phase transition, the fine structures of the extracted Re{Sigma} exhibit a two-processes evolution demonstrating an interplay between kink renormalization and superconductivity. We show that this two-process evolution can be qualitatively explained by a simple Holstein model in which a spectrum of bosonic modes is considered.

  2. Effect of Strong Correlations on the High Energy Anomaly in Hole- and Electron-Doped High-Tc Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, B.; /SLAC, SIMES; Schmitt, F.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Meevasana, W.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Johnston, S.; /SLAC, SIMES /Waterloo U.; Motoyama, E.M.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Greven, M.; /SLAC, SIMES /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, C.; /IPAP, Seoul; Scalettar, R.T.; /UC, Davis; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SIMES /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Devereaux, T.P.; /SLAC, SIMES

    2010-02-15

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has been used to highlight an anomalously large band renormalization at high binding energies in cuprate superconductors: the high energy 'waterfall' or high energy anomaly (HEA). This paper demonstrates, using a combination of new ARPES measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that the HEA is not simply the byproduct of matrix element effects, but rather represents a cross-over from a quasi-particle band at low binding energies near the Fermi level to valence bands at higher binding energy, assumed to be of strong oxygen character, in both hole- and electron-doped cuprates. While photoemission matrix elements clearly play a role in changing the aesthetic appearance of the band dispersion, i.e. the 'waterfall'-like behavior, they provide an inadequate description for the physics that underlies the strong band renormalization giving rise to the HEA. Model calculations of the single-band Hubbard Hamiltonian showcase the role played by correlations in the formation of the HEA and uncover significant differences in the HEA energy scale for hole- and electron-doped cuprates. In addition, this approach properly captures the transfer of spectral weight accompanying both hole and electron doping in a correlated material and provides a unifying description of the HEA across both sides of the cuprate phase diagram.

  3. Direct angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (DARPES) on high-Tc films: doping, strains, Fermi surface topology and superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuna, D.; Ariosa, D.; Cancellieri, C.; Cloetta, D.; Abrecht, M.

    2008-03-01

    Since 1997 we systematically perform Direct ARPES ( = DARPES) on in-situ grown, non-cleaved, ultra-thin (<25nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low energy electronic structure and properties of high-Tc films under different degree of epitaxial (compressive vs tensile) strain. In overdoped in-plane compressed La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) thin films we double Tc from 20K to 40K, yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially 2-dimensional (2D). In contrast, tensile strained films show 3-dimensional (3D) dispersion, while Tc is drastically reduced. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO2 plane, enhances the 2D character of the dispersion and increases Tc, while the tensile strain seems to act exactly in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is 3D. We have the FS topology for both cases. As the actual lattice of cuprates is 'Napoleon-cake' -like i.e. rigid CuO2 planes alternate with softer 'reservoir' (that strains distort differently) our results tend to rule out 2D rigid lattice mean field models. Finally, we briefly discuss recent successful determination of the FS topology from the observed wavevector quantization by DARPES in cuprate films thinner than 18 units cells (<24nm). Such an approach is of broader interest as it can be extended to other similar confined (ultra-thin) functional oxide systems.

  4. The Use of XPS and Angle Resolved XPS for the Characterization of Self Assembled Monolayer Grown on Substrate Surfaces for Specific Biological Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and angle resolved XPS have been utilised to characterise the chemistry and structure of SAMs grown on gold surfaces for biological applications. A study of a series of alkane thiol SAMs on gold showed that the film thickness is proportional to alkane chain length and that changes in the sulphur chemistry indicate different bonding modes at low and high overlayer coverage. It is determined that a well ordered matrix thiol has a SAM film thickness confirming that the molecules are aligned at a 27 degree tilt angle to the surface normal and bond to the gold surface via the sulphur group. (author)

  5. High energy electron crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrometer has been developed to measure relativistic electrons produced in different types of plasmas, such as tokamak plasmas and laser produced plasmas. The spectrometer consists of nine Y2SiO5:Ce crystals, which are shielded by stainless steel filters. The absolute calibration of the spectrometer was performed at the superconducting electron linear accelerator Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance. The spectrometer can provide information about energy distribution of electrons and their numbers for the energy range between 4 and 30 MeV. The spectrum is analyzed by means of the Monte Carlo three-dimensional GEANT4 code. An energy resolution of about 10% is achieved.

  6. Direct angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (DARPES) on high-T{sub c} films: doping, strains, Fermi surface topology and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavuna, D; Ariosa, D; Cancellieri, C; Cloetta, D; Abrecht, M [Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, FSB, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: davor.pavuna@epfl.ch

    2008-03-15

    Since 1997 we systematically perform Direct ARPES ( = DARPES) on in-situ grown, non-cleaved, ultra-thin (<25nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low energy electronic structure and properties of high-T{sub c} films under different degree of epitaxial (compressive vs tensile) strain. In overdoped in-plane compressed La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO) thin films we double T{sub c} from 20K to 40K, yet the Fermi surface (FS) remains essentially 2-dimensional (2D). In contrast, tensile strained films show 3-dimensional (3D) dispersion, while T{sub c} is drastically reduced. It seems that the in-plane compressive strain tends to push the apical oxygen far away from the CuO{sub 2} plane, enhances the 2D character of the dispersion and increases T{sub c}, while the tensile strain seems to act exactly in the opposite direction and the resulting dispersion is 3D. We have the FS topology for both cases. As the actual lattice of cuprates is 'Napoleon-cake' -like i.e. rigid CuO{sub 2} planes alternate with softer 'reservoir' (that strains distort differently) our results tend to rule out 2D rigid lattice mean field models. Finally, we briefly discuss recent successful determination of the FS topology from the observed wavevector quantization by DARPES in cuprate films thinner than 18 units cells (<24nm). Such an approach is of broader interest as it can be extended to other similar confined (ultra-thin) functional oxide systems.

  7. Angle - resolved photoemission study of two phases of the GaAs(100)-c(4x4) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cukr, Miroslav; Jiříček, Petr; Bartoš, Igor; Sadowski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 100, - (2008), 072017/1-072017/4. ISSN 1742-6588 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100628; GA ČR GA202/07/0601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium arsenide * molecular beam epitaxy * photoelectron spectroscopy * surface reconstruction * surface phases * electron states Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. ARPES Studies of Low-energy electronic structure of the strong spin-orbit semimetal SrIrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yuefeng; King, Philip D. C.; Wei, Haofei; Uchida, Masaki; Harter, John; Monkman, Eric; Shai, Daniel; Schlom, Darrell; Shen, Kyle

    2013-03-01

    The similar energy scales of spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron correlation strength lead to exotic Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulating ground states for layered Ruddlesden-Popper 5d iridates, Srn+1IrnO3n+1. A metal-insulator transition occurs upon increasing dimensionality from the two-dimensional layered Sr2IrO4 to the three-dimensional perovskite SrIrO3. However, little is known about the electronic structure and nature of the metallic states in SrIrO3. We synthesized epitaxial SrIrO3 films on (001) LSAT substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and investigated their electronic structure using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find an exotic semi-metallic state comprised of massive hole-like bands, whose extrema are pinned very close to the chemical potential, and rapidly dispersive electron bands which dominate the transport. Intriguingly, the bandwidths of SrIrO3 are smaller than in its Mott insulating counterpart Sr2IrO4, indicating that metal-insulator transitions in Ruddlesden-Popper iridates are not simply driven by band narrowing resulting from reduced dimensionality.

  9. Imaging the formation of high-energy dispersion anomalies in the actinide UCoGa$_5$

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Tanmoy; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Joyce, John J.; Sarrao, John L.; Graf, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to image the emergence of substaintial dispersion anomalies in the electronic renormalization of the actinide compound UCoGa$_5$ which was presumed to belong to a conventional Fermi liquid family. Kinks or abrupt breaks in the slope of the quasiparticle dispersion are detected both at low ($\\sim$130 meV) and high ($\\sim$1 eV) binding energies below the Fermi energy, ruling out any significant contribution of phonons. We perform numerica...

  10. Use of Electron Correlation to Make Attosecond Measurements without Attosecond Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe how correlations between electrons can be used to trace the dynamics of correlated two-electron ionization with attosecond precision, without using attosecond pulses. The approach is illustrated using the example of Auger or Coster-Kronig decay triggered by photoionization with an extreme ultraviolet pulse. It requires correlated measurements of angle-resolved energy spectra of both the photo- and Auger electrons in the presence of a laser pulse. To reconstruct the dynamics, we use not only classical time and energy correlation, but also entanglement between the two electrons

  11. Metal-insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronzes, Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}, studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, S. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)]. E-mail: raj@arpes.phys.tohoku.ac.jp; Hashimoto, D. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsui, H. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Souma, S. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Sato, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Takahashi, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Ray, S. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chakraborty, A. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Sarma, D.D. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mahadevan, P. [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Oishi, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); McCarroll, W.H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rider University, NJ 08648 (United States); Greenblatt, M. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, The State University of New Jersey, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    We report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on sodium tungsten bronzes, Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}, which exhibit a metal-insulator transition as a function of x. We found that the near-E{sub F} states are localized in Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} (x=<0.25) due to the strong disorder caused by the random distribution of Na{sup +} ions in the WO{sub 3} lattice, which makes the system insulating. In the metallic regime we found that the rigid shift of band structure can explain the metallic Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} band structure with respect to Na doping.

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission study of untwinned PrBa2Cu3O7: Undoped CuO2 plane and doped CuO3 chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission study on untwinned PrBa2Cu3O7, which has low resistivity but does not show superconductivity. We have observed a dispersive feature with a band maximum around (π/2,π/2), indicating that this band is derived from the undoped CuO2 plane. We have observed another dispersive band exhibiting one-dimensional character, which we attribute to signals from the doped CuO3 chain. The overall band dispersion of the one-dimensional band agrees with the prediction of the t-J model calculation with parameters relevant to cuprates except that the intensity near the Fermi level is considerably suppressed in the experiment. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  13. On Angle Resolved RF Magnetron Sputtering of Ge-Sb-Te Material Doped by Si or Se

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wágner, T.; Gutwirth, J.; Bezdička, Petr; Bartoš, M.; Kotulanová, Eva; Vlček, Milan; Orava, J.; Frumar, M.

    San Francisco: Materials Research Society, 2008. G5.7. [Spring Meeting MRS - Phase-Change Materials for Reconfigurable Electronics and Memory Applications. 24.03.2008-27.03.2008, San Francisco] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523; GA ČR GA203/06/1368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : thin films * magnetron sputtering Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://www.mrs.org/s_mrs/doc.asp?DID=208849&CID=13713&SID=1&VID=2&RTID=0

  14. Growth dynamics and thickness-dependent electronic structure of topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films on Si

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yao-Yi; Wang, Guang; Zhu, Xie-Gang; Liu, Min-Hao; Ye, Cun; Chen, Xi; Wang, Ya-Yu; He, Ke; Wang, Li-Li; Ma, Xu-Cun; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Xie, Xin-Cheng; Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    We use real-time reflection high energy electron diffraction intensity oscillation to establish the Te-rich growth dynamics of topological insulator thin films of Bi2Te3 on Si(111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. In situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy and ex situ transport measurements reveal that the as-grown Bi2Te3 films without any doping are an intrinsic topological insulator with its Fermi level intersecting only the metallic surface...

  15. Effects of symmetry on circular and linear magnetic dichroism in angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Gd/Y (0001) and Fe-Ni//Cu (001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, K.W.; Tobin, J.G.; Schumann, F.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Willis, R.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gammon, J.W. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States); Pappas, D.P. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States); Kortright, J.B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Denlinger, J.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rotenberg, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Warwick, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Smith, N.V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-26

    We have observed circular and linear magnetic dichroism in angle- resolved photoemission spectra of 50-monolayer Gd film grown on Y(0001) and 6-monolayer Fe-Ni alloy films grown on Cu(001). The 4f level of Gd and the Fe 3p level of the Fe-Ni alloy were measured. A different geometry was used for the magnetic circular dichroism than was used to measure the magnetic linear dichroism. The geometries were chosen so that the shape of the magnetic circular dichroism is predicted to be equal to the shape of the magnetic linear dichroism for four-fold symmetric Fe-Ni/Cu(001) but not for three-fold symmetric Gd/Y(0001). Experimental results are presented. In this paper we examine the effect of symmetry (experimental geometry and sample geometry) on magnetic linear and circular dichroism in angle- resolved photoemission. In particular we chose separate geometries for measuring magnetic circular and magnetic linear dichroism. The geometries were chosen such that samples with four-fold symmetry about the sample normal may have magnetic circular and magnetic linear dichroism of the same shape. But samples with three-fold symmetry should not exhibit circular and magnetic linear dichroism of the same shape. The samples studied are three-fold symmetric Gd films grown on Y(0001) and four-fold symmetric Fe-Ni alloy grown on Cu(001). After presenting the methods of the experiment, we briefly review parts of a model of magnetic dichroism developed by Venus and coworkers and our specialization and extension of it, particularly for FeNi/Cu(001). We then show the results of our measurements.

  16. Phenomenological model for the normal-state angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy line shapes of high-temperature superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Kazue; Gweon, G-H

    2013-12-13

    Providing a full theoretical description of the single-particle spectral function observed for high-temperature superconductors in the normal state is an important goal, yet unrealized. Here, we present a phenomenological model approaching towards this goal. The model results from implementing key phenomenological improvement in the so-called extremely correlated Fermi-liquid model. The model successfully describes the dichotomy of the spectral function as functions of momentum and energy and fits data for different materials (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and La2-xSrxCuO4), with an identical set of intrinsic parameters. The current analysis goes well beyond the prevalent analysis of the spectral function as a function of momentum alone. PMID:24483680

  17. Housing Electrons: Relating Quantum Numbers, Energy Levels, and Electron Configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Anthony

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that combines the concepts of quantum numbers and probability locations, energy levels, and electron configurations in a concrete, hands-on way. Uses model houses constructed out of foam board and colored beads to represent electrons. (JRH)

  18. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  19. Angle-resolved cathodoluminescence nanoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Coenen

    2014-01-01

    The field of microscopy is an important cornerstone of physical and biological sciences. The development of high-resolution microscopy/nanoscopy techniques has enabled a revolution in science and technology, greatly improving our understanding of the microscopic world around us, and forming the basi

  20. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  1. Cation profiling of passive films on stainless steel formed in sulphuric and acetic acid by deconvolution of angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach for determining depth gradients of metal-ion concentrations in passive films on stainless steel using angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) is described. The iterative method, which is based on analyses of the oxidised metal peaks, provides increased precision and hence allows faster ARXPS measurements to be carried out. The method was used to determine the concentration depth profiles for molybdenum, iron and chromium in passive films on 316L/EN 1.4432 stainless steel samples oxidised in 0.5 M H2SO4 and acetic acid diluted with 0.02 M Na2B4O7 · 10H2O and 1 M H2O, respectively. The molybdenum concentration in the film is pin-pointed to the oxide/metal interface and the films also contained an iron-ion-enriched surface layer and a chromium-ion-dominated middle layer. Although films of similar composition and thickness (i.e., about 2 nm) were formed in the two electrolytes, the corrosion currents were found to be three orders of magnitude larger in the acetic acid solution. The differences in the layer composition, found for the two electrolytes as well as different oxidation conditions, can be explained based on the oxidation potentials of the metals and the dissolution rates of the different metal ions.

  2. Omnidirectional Measurements of Angle-Resolved Heat Capacity for Complete Detection of Superconducting Gap Structure in the Heavy-Fermion Antiferromagnet UPd_{2}Al_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yusei; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige; Homma, Yoshiya; Aoki, Dai

    2016-07-15

    Quasiparticle excitations in UPd_{2}Al_{3} were studied by means of heat-capacity (C) measurements under rotating magnetic fields using a high-quality single crystal. The field dependence shows C(H)∝H^{1/2}-like behavior at low temperatures for both two hexagonal crystal axes, i.e., H∥[0001] (c axis) and H∥[112[over ¯]0] (a axis), suggesting the presence of nodal quasiparticle excitations from heavy bands. At low temperatures, the polar-angle (θ) dependence of C exhibits a maximum along H∥[0001] with a twofold symmetric oscillation below 0.5 T, and an unusual shoulder or hump anomaly has been found around 30°-60° from the c axis in C(θ) at intermediate fields (1≲μ_{0}H≲2  T). These behaviors in UPd_{2}Al_{3} purely come from the superconducting nodal quasiparticle excitations, and can be successfully reproduced by theoretical calculations assuming the gap symmetry with a horizontal linear line node. We demonstrate the whole angle-resolved heat-capacity measurements done here as a novel spectroscopic method for nodal gap determination, which can be applied to other exotic superconductors. PMID:27472129

  3. Angle-resolved and core-level photoemission study of interfacing the topological insulator Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 with Ag, Nb, and Fe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Jong; E. Frantzeskakis; B. Zwartsenberg; Y.K. Huang; D. Wu; P. Hlawenka; J. Sanchez-Barriga; A. Varykhalov; E. van Heumen; M.S. Golden

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces between a bulk-insulating topological insulator (TI) and metallic adatoms have been studied using high-resolution, angle-resolved, and core-level photoemission. Fe, Nb, and Ag were evaporated onto Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 (BSTS) surfaces both at room temperature and 38 K. The coverage and tem

  4. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {l_brace}0001{r_brace} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emtsev, Konstantin

    2009-06-03

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{l_brace}0001{r_brace} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  5. Complete Fermi Surface and Surface State in WTe2 Revealed by High-Resolution Laser-Based Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenlu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Guodong; Mao, Zhiqiang; He, Shaolong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Zhou, Xingjiang

    WTe2, an unique transition metal dichalcogenide, attracts considerable attention recently, which shows an extremely large magnetoresistance (MR) with no saturation under very high field. In this talk, we will present our high resolution laser-ARPES study on WTe2. Our distinctive ARPES system is equipped with the VUV laser and the time-of-flight (TOF) electron energy analyzer, being featured by super-high energy resolution, simultaneous data acquisition for two-dimensional momentum space and much reduced nonlinearity effect. With this advanced apparatus, the very high quality of electronic structure data are obtained for WTe2 which gives a full picture of the Fermi surface. Meanwhile, the obtained systematic temperature dependence of its electronic state leads us to a better understanding on the origin of large magnetoresistance in WTe2.

  6. Momentum-resolved electron-phonon coupling and self-energy effects in YBa2Cu3O7: an LDA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of kinks in the electronic dispersion of high-Tc cuprates by angle resolved photoemission experiments has revived the discussion about the importance of electron-phonon interaction in the cuprates. Here we determine the effect of the electron-phonon coupling on the electronic self-energy in the normal state within the local-density approximation. Using a realistic phonon spectrum we determine the momentum and frequency dependence of α2F(k,ω) in YBa2Cu3O7 for the bonding, antibonding, and chain band. We find that the maximum in the real part of the self-energy at low frequencies is about a factor 5 too small compared to the experiment. The renormalization factor Z(k,ω), which determines the change in the slope of the electronic dispersion due to the interaction, varies smoothly as a function of frequency and momentum. These findings show that, at least within the LDA, phonons cannot produce well-pronounced kinks in YBa2Cu3O7

  7. China's Electronic Information Product Energy Consumption Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The electronic information industry of China is facing increasingly urgent ecological challenges. This year, China will study and advance an electronic information product energy consumption standard, and establish a key list of pollution controls and classified frame system.

  8. NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NaI(Tl) electron energy resolution ηe was measured using the Modified Compton Coincidence Technique (MCCT). The MCCT allowed detection of nearly monoenergetic internal electrons resulting from the scattering of incident 662 keV gamma rays within a primary NaI(Tl) detector. Scattered gamma rays were detected using a secondary HPGe detector in a coincidence mode. Measurements were carried out for electron energies ranging from 16 to 438 keV, by varying the scattering angle. Measured HPGe coincidence spectra were deconvolved to determine the scattered energy spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector. Subsequently, the NaI(Tl) electron energy spectra were determined by subtracting the energy of scattered spectra from the incident source energy (662 keV). Using chi-squared minimization, iterative deconvolution of the internal electron energy spectra from the measured NaI(Tl) spectra was then used to determine ηe at the electron energy of interest. ηe values determined using this technique represent variations in light production from monoenergetic electrons, light collection at the photomultiplier tube (PMT) photocathode, photoelectron production, photoelectron collection at the first dynode, and PMT gain, as well as noise from the accompanying electronics. It has been found that the electron energy resolution varies from 24.8% at 16 keV to 6.7% at 438 keV. Results from this study can be used to verify the significance of the different contributions to intrinsic energy resolution

  9. Automated classification of single airborne particles from two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns by non-linear filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Pan, Yong-Le; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Casati, Caterina; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Chang, Richard K.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2013-12-01

    Measurement of two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns is an attractive technique for detecting and characterizing micron-sized airborne particles. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. By reformulating the problem in statistical learning terms, a solution is proposed herewith: rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified through a learning machine, where feature extraction interacts with multivariate statistical analysis. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine FOURIER transform and non-linear operations. Multivariate statistical analysis includes computation of the principal components and supervised training, based on the maximization of a suitable figure of merit. All algorithms have been combined together to analyze TAOS patterns, organize feature vectors, design classification experiments, carry out supervised training, assign unknown patterns to classes, and fuse information from different training and recognition experiments. The algorithms have been tested on a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns. The parameters that control the algorithms at different stages have been allowed to vary within suitable bounds and are optimized to some extent. Classification has been targeted at discriminating aerosolized Bacillus subtilis particles, a simulant of anthrax, from atmospheric aerosol particles and interfering particles, like diesel soot. By assuming that all training and recognition patterns come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to 20% false negatives from B. subtilis particles and <11% false positives from all other aerosol particles. The most effective operations have consisted of thresholding TAOS patterns in order to reject defective ones

  10. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  11. Probabilistic method to determine electron correlation energy

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna, T. R. S.

    2006-01-01

    A new method to determine electron correlation energy is described. This method is based on a better representation of the potential due to interacting electrons that is obtained by specifying both the average and standard deviation. The standard deviation is determined from a probabilistic interpretation of the Coulomb interaction between electrons. This leads to a better representation of orbital energies as Ei (plus-minus) delta(Ei), where Ei is the Hartree-Fock orbital energy and delta(Ei...

  12. Low energy electron interactions with water

    OpenAIRE

    Monckton, Rhiannon

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the radiation chemistry of water is important in many disciplines including the nuclear industry, astrochemistry, and medicine. In recent years, low-energy electrons have been paid much greater attention, due to their abundance and reactivity in irradiated materials. Electrons with energies < 20 eV may interact via the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) mechanism, which has been found to cause single-strand breaks in DNA.DEA in water involves the capture of a low energy elec...

  13. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantsar, A.; Grosswendt, B.; Pszona, S.; Kula, J.

    2009-02-01

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  14. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bantsar, A. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Grosswendt, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Pszona, S. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)], E-mail: pszona@ipj.gov; Kula, J. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-02-11

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, {sup 125}I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  15. Single track nanodosimetry of low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides (for instance, 125I) with a predominant energy spectrum below 3 keV are an active area of research towards the clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals. Hence, the necessity for an adequate description of the effects of radiation by low-energy electrons on nanometric biological targets seems to be unquestionable. Experimental nanodosimetry for low-energy electrons has been accomplished with a device named JET COUNTER. The present paper describes, for the first time, nanodosimetric experiments in nanometer-sized cavities of nitrogen using low energy electrons ranging from 100 eV to 2 keV.

  16. Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides PdTe2 and Cu0.05PdTe2 Superconductors Obtained by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianzhou; Yu, Li; Lin, Chengtian; Hu, Cheng; Liu, Defa; Peng, Yingying; Xie, Zhuojin; He, Junfeng; Chen, Chaoyu; Feng, Ya; Yi, Hemian; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong

    2015-01-01

    The layered transition metal chalcogenides have been a fertile land in solid state physics for many decades. Various MX2-type transition metal dichalcogenides, such as WTe2, IrTe2, and MoS2, have triggered great attention recently, either for the discovery of novel phenomena or some extreme or exotic physical properties, or for their potential applications. PdTe2 is a superconductor in the class of transition metal dichalcogenides, and superconductivity is enhanced in its Cu-intercalated form...

  17. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase velocity c/n, where n is the complex index of refraction. The angle-resolved energy-loss spectrum of a Drude conductor is analyzed in detail and it is shown that the low-energy peak due to Ohmic losses is enhanced compared to the classical approximation

  18. Electron-beam induced disorder effects in optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x single crystal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.; Margaritondo, G.; Forro, L.; Grioni, M.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Onellion, M.; EPFL Collaboration; Laboratoire Des Solides Irradiés Collaboration

    2000-03-01

    We report on the effects of electron-beam induced disorder in optimally doped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x single crystal samples, measured with angle-resolved photoemission. In the superconducting state, the disorder fills in the gap, without changing the binding energy or the width of the narrow coherent feature.[1] In the normal state, disorder leads to an anisotropic pseudogap in angle-resolved photoemission, with the largest pseudogap near the (0,p) point and no pseudogap in the direction.[2,3] We discuss implications of these data. 1. I. Vobornik et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 , 3128 (1999). 2. I. Vobornik, Ph.D. thesis, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, October, 1999. 3. I. Vobornik et.al., unpublished.

  19. Scanning transmission low energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Frank, Luděk

    New York : IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 2010. s. 25. [LEEM/PEEM /7./. 08.08.2010-13.08.2010, New York] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscope * he low energy electron microscope * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. Statistical theory of electronic energy relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 'statistical method' is developed for treating electronic and electronic-translational energy transfer in systems of atoms having multiple electronic states. This method is based on the assumption that the states produced in a collision are distributed according to the equilibrium distribution for the energy available to the collision partners. The approach is readily incorporated into Monte Carlo gas dynamic calculations. Results of such calculations are reported for several cases of relaxation of electronic energy in a static gas and in a cylindrical source flow

  1. Collective energy loss of attosecond electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, A., E-mail: ogata@post.kek.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kondoh, T.; Norizawa, K.; Yang, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Kashiwagi, S. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kaneko, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Ridai-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan)

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we have analytically shown that if the electron bunch length is in the 100-as range, the energy loss of the bunch is proportional to the square of the number of electrons in the bunch. If the number of electrons is large, the collective loss introduces a high-energy-density state in the target. The results were verified by carrying out 2D PIC simulations.

  2. Collective energy loss of attosecond electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we have analytically shown that if the electron bunch length is in the 100-as range, the energy loss of the bunch is proportional to the square of the number of electrons in the bunch. If the number of electrons is large, the collective loss introduces a high-energy-density state in the target. The results were verified by carrying out 2D PIC simulations.

  3. Scanning Very Low Energy Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mikmeková, Eliška; Frank, Luděk

    Ostrava : Tanger spol. s r. o, 2011, s. 238-243. ISBN 978-80-87294-27-7. [NANOCON 2011. International Conference /3./. Brno (CZ), 21.09.2011-23.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/11/2270; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * low energy electrons * grain contrast * transmitted electrons * dopant contrast * thin films Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Electron Microscopy at Ultralow Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk

    Kerala : IUMSE, 2015. s. 36. [WCM 2015. World Congress on Microscopy: Instrumentation , Techniques and Applications in Life Sciences and Materials Sciences. 09.10.2015-11.10.2015, Kerala] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SEM * STEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Soft X-ray ARPES and Fermiology of strongly correlated electron systems and PES by hard X-ray and extremely low energy photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk sensitivity is inevitable for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) when one studies bulk electronic structures of strongly correlated electron systems, which are often much different from surface electronic structures. Combination of soft and hard X-ray PES (SXPES and HAXPES) is a promising approach for this purpose by quantitatively evaluating the contribution of the surface in the observed angle integrated PES spectra. Even in the angle resolved PES studies (ARPES), the bulk sensitivity of the SX-ARPES is required to get the real bulk band dispersions and Fermi surface topology, which may be noticeably modified in the surface region as seen in several materials studied in this paper. Although hard X-ray ARPES is feasible, deep attention is required for the discussion of the possible recoil effects for the valence band. Besides, extremely low energy PES (ELEPES) by use of microwave excited Xe, Kr and Ar lamps will be as useful as those by synchrotron radiation and laser to realize a very high resolution of better than 5 meV with bulk sensitivity under certain conditions.

  6. Low Energy Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Konvalina, Ivo; Matsuda, K.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Pokorná, Zuzana; Walker, Christopher

    Chiang Mai : Chiang Mai University, 2015. s. 20. [International Conference on the Physical Properties and Application of Advanced Materials (ICPMAT) /10./. 17.11.2015-21.11.2015, Chiang Mai] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low energy electrons * contrast in scanning electron microscope * transmission mode in SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. Low energy electron scattering from polyatomic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakoo, Murtadha A; Muse, John; Campbell, Colin [Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92834 (United States); Lopes, Maria Cristina A; Silva, Helen [Departamento de Fisica, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora-MG, CEP 36036-330 (Brazil); Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent, E-mail: mkhakoo@fullerton.ed [A. A. Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Low energy elastic electron scattering cross-sections from water and several alcohols are presented. This paper addresses accurately measuring quantitative differential elastic scattering cross-sections, using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and focuses on the long range dipole interaction of the scattering electron with these polar targets. The electron-dipole interaction dominates the scattering for these molecules and contributes significantly to their integral elastic cross-sections.

  8. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster

  9. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Radlička, Tomáš; Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    Singapore: National University of Singapore, 2010. s. 98-99. [CPO /8./ International Conference on Charged Particle Optics. 12.07.2010-16.07.2010, Singapore] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : very low energy scanning electron microscopy * cathode lens * BSE detector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. Food irradiation by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For some special cases, the use of low energy electrons has advantages over the use of gamma-rays or higher energy electrons for the direct irradiation of food. These advantages arise from details of the interaction processes which are responsible for the production of physical, chemical and biological effects. Factors involved include depth of penetration, dose distribution, irradiation geometry, the possible production of radioactivity and costs

  11. Stability of electron energy in the Fermilab electron cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A powerful electron beam (4.3 MeV, 0.1 A DC) generated by an electrostatic accelerator has been used at Fermilab for three years to cool antiprotons in the Recycler ring. For electron cooling to be effective, the electron energy should not deviate from its optimum value by more than 500V. The main tool for studying the energy stability is the electron beam position in a high-dispersion area. The energy ripple (frequencies above 0.2 Hz) was found to be less than 150 eV rms; the main cause of the ripple is the fluctuations of the chain current. In addition, the energy can drift to up to several keV that is traced to two main sources. One of them is a drift of the charging current, and another is a temperature dependence of generating voltmeter readings. The paper describes the efforts to reach the required level of stability as well as the setup, diagnostics, results of measurements, and operational experience

  12. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, U. M.; Lee, K. B.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The use of renewable energy sources are increased because of the depletion of natural resources and the increasing pollution level from energy production. The wind energy and the solar energy are most widely used among the renewable energy sources. Power electronics is needed in almost all kinds...... of renewable energy system. It controls the renewable source and interfaces with the load effectively, which can be grid-connected or van work in stand-alone mode. In this presentation, overview of wind and photovoltaic energy systems are introduced. Next, the power electronic circuits behind the most common...... wind and photovoltaic configurations are discussed. Finally, their controls and important requirements for grid connection are explained....

  13. FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITVINENKO,V.N.

    2007-08-31

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation of such beams is too feeble to provide significant cooling: even in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with 7 TeV protons, the longitudinal damping time is about thirteen hours. Decrements of traditional electron cooling decrease rapidly as the high power of beam energy, and an effective electron cooling of protons or antiprotons at energies above 100 GeV seems unlikely. Traditional stochastic cooling still cannot catch up with the challenge of cooling high-intensity bunched proton beams--to be effective, its bandwidth must be increased by about two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high-energy hadron beams are optical stochastic cooling (OSC) and coherent electron cooling (CEC)--the latter is the focus of this paper. In the early 1980s, CEC was suggested as a possibility for using various instabilities in an electron beam to enhance its interaction with hadrons (i.e., cooling them). The capabilities of present-day accelerator technology, Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), and high-gain Free-Electron Lasers (FELs), finally caught up with the idea and provided the all necessary ingredients for realizing such a process. In this paper, we discuss the principles, and the main limitations of the CEC process based on a high-gain FEL driven by an ERL. We also present, and summarize in Table 1, some numerical examples of CEC for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC.

  14. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Yates, Brent; Hong, Ling; Khakoo, Murtadha A. [California State University at Fullerton, CA (US). Physics Department; Bettega, Marcio H.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Costa, Romarly F. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, Marco A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  15. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  16. Electronic market places in the energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic market places in the energy domain occurred at the end of the 90's in the US and have started to develop in Europe in the year 2000. About 60 platforms are registered today and this development can be explained by the advantages raised by such an infrastructure: simplification of purchase procedures, reduction of delays in the purchase decision, reduction of administrative costs etc.. However, today none of these electronic market places is profitable and several have closed down. On the other hand, this tool will certainly become necessary in the future and all energy actors are developing projects in this way. This study analyzes the electronic market places phenomenon in the energy domain using 10 market places examples with their key-factors of success. It draws out a complete status of the initiatives developed today and presents some scenarios of evolution. (J.S.)

  17. Power electronics for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is a demand to double the power capacity within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as technological efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregul......, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics are changing from being minor energy sources to be acting as important power sources in the energy system........ Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources may be very high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One is to change the electrical power production...... sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources...

  18. Electron cooling for low-energy antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divergence and size of stored ion beams can be reduced superimposing on them an intense, monoenergetic electron beam with little transverse motion ('electron cooling'). The present work first considers the theoretical foundations of the method and then describes the planning and construction of an electron beam device for cooling antiprotons with MeV energies in the storage ring LEAR and CERN. With respect to the quantitative description of the method, the microscopic processes during the damping of the ion motion, the effect of the damping on an ion in a storage ring, and the properties of the intense, magnetically guided electron beam are discussed. Special attention is paid to the improvement of ion beam cooling due to the magnetic field guiding the electron beam. The electron beam device, operated in ultra-high vacuum, and the experience gained during its construction are described; experiments performed during the test period are presented. The work further develops a numerical simulation of electron cooling on the basis of the theory discussed. Given realistic external parameters, the simulation yields cooling times and equilibrium states of the ion beam during electron cooling in a storage ring. Finally, non-destructive methods for measuring the velocity distribution in the electron beam are described, which may prove helpful for optimizing the beam cooling. (orig.)

  19. Powering the Digital: From Energy Ecologies to Electronic Environmentalism

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrys, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Electronics and all that they plug into are energy intensive. Energy is another form of waste, like electronic waste that contributes to the material footprint of electronic technologies. This chapter examines the particular ways in which electronics use energy, from manufacture to powering devices to running cloud servers. While electronics consume energy, they are also used to manage energy consumption with the hope of achieving greater sustainability. By developing the concept of “electron...

  20. Impact of Electron-Electron Cusp on Configuration Interaction Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Prendergast, David; Nolan, M.; Filippi, Claudia; Fahy, Stephen; Greer, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the electron-electron cusp on the convergence of configuration interaction (CI) wave functions is examined. By analogy with the pseudopotential approach for electron-ion interactions, an effective electron-electron interaction is developed which closely reproduces the scattering of the Coulomb interaction but is smooth and finite at zero electron-electron separation. The exact many-electron wave function for this smooth effective interaction has no cusp at zero electron-electron...

  1. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  2. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  3. Electron energy deposition in carbon monoxide gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihong; Victor, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive set of electron impact cross sections for carbon monoxide molecules is presented on the basis of the most recent experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The processes by which energetic electrons lose energy in CO gas are analyzed with these input cross sections. The efficiencies are computed of vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociation, ionization, and heating for CO gas with fractional ionization ranging from 0% to 10%. The calculated mean energy per ion pair for neutral CO gas is 32.3 eV, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 32.2 eV. It increases to 35.6 eV at a fractional ionization of 1%, typical of supernovae ejecta.

  4. Electron-electron coincidence measurements on the Ar 1s → 4p resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have measured the Ar L2,3MM Auger lines in coincidence with the KL2,3L2,3 Auger line and the KL1L2,3 Auger line, respectively, using monochromatized synchrotron radiation at beam line X24A at NSLS. The photon energy was tuned to the Ar 1s → 4p resonance. The KLL Auger electrons were detected with an angle-resolving CMA. The subsequent decay of the holes in the L-shell can give rise to the ejection of additional Auger electrons (LMM) which were detected by a Time-of-Flight spectrometer. The authors' set-up allows them to record all LMM Auger lines at once in coincidence with one KLL Auger line selected in energy and angle. The resulting coincidence spectra will be presented and discussed

  5. Measurement of energy distributions of secondary electrons ejected from water vapor by fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vroom, D.A.; Palmer, R.L.

    1977-04-15

    Energy distributions of the secondary electrons ejected from water vapor ionized by fast electrons have been measured. The energies of the primary electron beam ranged from 1 to 10 keV and ejected electron energies up to 300 eV were considered. Measurement of the secondary electron spectra has been made for electrons ejected over the total sphere and at angles of 30degree, 60degree, 90degree, 120degree, and 150degree with respect to the primary electron beam.

  6. Electron-ion recombination at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is based on results obtained with a merged-beams experiment. A beam of electronics with a well characterized density and energy distribution was merged with a fast, monoenergetic ion beam. Results have been obtained for radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination at low relative energies (0 to ∼70eV). The obtained energy resolution was improved by about a factor of 30. High vacuum technology was used to suppress interactions with electrons from the environments. The velocity distribution of the electron beam was determined. State-selective dielectronic-recombination measurements were performable. Recombination processes were studied. The theoretical background for radiative recombination and Kramers' theory are reviewed. The quantum mechanical result and its relation to the semiclassical theory is discussed. Radiative recombination was also measured with several different non-bare ions, and the applicability of the semiclassical theory to non-bare ions was investigated. The use of an effective charge is discussed. For dielectronic recombination, the standard theoretical approach in the isolated resonance and independent-processes approximation is debated. The applicability of this method was tested. The theory was able to reproduce most of the experimental data except when the recombination process was sensitive to couplings between different electronic configurations. The influence of external perturbing electrostatic fields is discussed. (AB) (31 refs.)

  7. Design of energy filters for electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, Katsushige

    1999-11-01

    Software for simulating 3D electric and magnetic fields followed by the direct ray tracing in individual field and combined fields (EO3D, MO3D and CO3D) are well applied to the design of energy filters attached to electron microscopes. When we had designed a high resolution EELS instrument, we had no 3D software, and encountered problems in designing a retarding Wien filter used as the monochromator and analyzer. At that time, electric field homogeneity inside the gap of magnet and the deflection of beam at the fringing region due to the deviation of the Wien condition were unsolved problems. When we designed a low energy reflection electron microscope (LEEM), we had 3D software, and some of the above problems were solved. We used an arc shaped electrode for the beam separator and an eight-pole filter for the analyzer. The coincidence of the magnetic and electric fringing field distributions at the fringing regions (Wien condition) was not perfect but was improved. We have designed an omega filter for in-column energy filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM). The omega filter consists of four sector magnets. Optical behavior of the system is very complicated. First, we designed the filter by 2D approximation and then checked by electron trajectories by the 3D software. The designed omega filter works successfully.

  8. Transfer of chirality from adsorbed chiral molecules to the substrates highlighted by circular dichroism in angle-resolved valence photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contini, G.; Turchini, S.; Sanna, Simone;

    2012-01-01

    state, that the presence of molecular chiral domains induces asymmetry in the interaction with the substrate and locally transfers the chiral character to the underlying metal atoms participating in the adsorption process; combined information related to the asymmetry of the initial electronic state......Studies of self-assembled chiral molecules on achiral metallic surfaces have mostly focused on the determination of the geometry of adsorbates and their electronic structure. The aim of this paper is to provide direct information on the chirality character of the system and on the chirality......, which is expected to be chiral, and the final electronic state, which locally probes the asymmetry of the potential, has been obtained. Identification of chirality in the adsorption footprint sheds new light on the transfer of chirality from a chiral modifier to a symmetric metal surface and represents...

  9. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  10. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e2/r12, with r12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  11. Prediction of electron energies in metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Aron; Butler, Keith T

    2014-02-18

    The ability to predict energy levels in metal oxides is paramount to developinguseful materials, such as in the development of water photolysis catalysts and efficient photovoltaic cells. The binding energy of electrons in materials encompasses a wealth of information concerning their physicochemistry. The energies control the optical and electrical properties, dictating for which kinds of chemistry and physics a particular material is useful. Scientists have developed theories and models for electron energies in a variety of chemical systems over the past century. However, the prediction of quantitative energy levels in new materials remains a major challenge. This issue is of particular importance in metal oxide research, where novel chemistries have opened the possibility of a wide range of tailored systems with applications in important fields including light-emitting diodes, energy efficient glasses, and solar cells. In this Account, we discuss the application of atomistic modeling techniques, covering the spectrum from classical to quantum descriptions, to explore the alignment of electron energies between materials. We present a number of paradigmatic examples, including a series of oxides (ZnO, In2O3, and Cu2O). Such calculations allow the determination of a "band alignment diagram" between different materials and can facilitate the prediction of the optimal chemical composition of an oxide for use in a given application. Throughout this Account, we consider direct computational solutions in the context of heuristic models, which are used to relate the fundamental theory to experimental observations. We review a number of techniques that have been commonly applied in the study of electron energies in solids. These models have arisen from different answers to the same basic question, coming from solid-state chemistry and physics perspectives. We highlight common factors, as well as providing a critical appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of each

  12. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure versus function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since...... such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  13. Energy Transformation in Molecular Electronic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasha, Michael

    1999-05-17

    This laboratory has developed many new ideas and methods in the electronic spectroscopy of molecules. This report covers the contract period 1993-1995. A number of the projects were completed in 1996, and those papers are included in the report. The DOE contract was terminated at the end of 1995 owing to a reorganizational change eliminating nationally the projects under the Office of Health and Environmental Research, U. S. Department of Energy.

  14. Numerical modeling of fast electron energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper methods of calculating energy transport by fast electrons that are currently used in the ''Diana'' program are described; this program is intended to address issues in laser thermonuclear fusion. A method is proposed for solving a kinetic equation which has the following properties: conservativeness, the absence of constraints on the grid spacing relation, monitonicity, and second order approximation. The applicability of a ''front-back'' approximation is analyzed

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of (Ca, Na) sub 2 CuO sub 2 Cl sub 2 crystals: Fingerprints of a magnetic insulator in a heavily underdoped superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Kohsaka, Y; Ronning, F

    2003-01-01

    Electric evolution from an antiferromagnet to a high-T sub c superconductor is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission experiments on tetragonal Ca sub 1 sub . sub 9 Na sub 0 sub . sub 1 CuO sub 2 Cl sub 2 single crystals, which were successfully grown for the first time under high pressures. In this underdoped superconductor, we found clear fingerprints of the parent insulator: a shadow band and a large pseudogap. These observations are most likely described by a 'chemical potential shift', which contrasts clearly with the prevailing wisdom of the pinned chemical potential' learned from the prototype La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 , demonstrating that the route to a high-T sub c superconductor is not unique. (author)

  16. Metal-insulator transition and tunable Dirac-cone surface state in the topological insulator TlBi1 -xSbxTe2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Chi Xuan; Wang, Zhiwei; Yamada, Keiko; Souma, Seigo; Sato, Takafumi; Takahashi, Takashi; Segawa, Kouji; Ando, Yoichi

    2016-04-01

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on topological insulator (TI) TlBi1 -xSbxTe2 which is bulk insulating at 0.5 ≲x ≲0.9 and undergoes a metal-insulator-metal transition with the Sb content x . We found that this transition is characterized by a systematic hole doping with increasing x , which results in the Fermi-level crossings of the bulk conduction and valence bands at x ˜0 and x ˜1 , respectively. The Dirac point of the topological surface state is gradually isolated from the valence-band edge, accompanied by a sign reversal of Dirac carriers. We also found that the Dirac velocity is the largest among known solid-solution TI systems. The TlBi1 -xSbxTe2 system thus provides an excellent platform for Dirac-cone engineering and device applications of TIs.

  17. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 (R= Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2010-02-15

    We present a detailed ARPES investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven Charge Density Wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi Surface (FS) (up to 0.4eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k-space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple 2D tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure, by comparing our ARPES measurements with Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and, for the first time, of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k-space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(Ef), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  18. Energy relaxation in the spin-polarized disordered electron liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Burmistrov, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    The energy relaxation in the spin-polarized disordered electron systems is studied in the diffusive regime. We derived the quantum kinetic equation in which the kernel of electron-electron collision integral explicitly depends on the electron magnetization. As the consequence, the inelastic scattering rate is found to have non-monotonic dependence on the spin polarization of the electron system.

  19. Electron beam accelerator energy control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control system has been developed for the energy control of the electron beam accelerator using PLC. The accelerating voltage of 3 MV has been obtained by using parallel coupled voltage multiplier circuit. A autotransformer controlled variable 0-10 KV DC is fed to a tube based push pull oscillator to generate 120 Khz, 10 KV AC. Oscillator output voltage is stepped up to 0-300 KV/AC using a transformer. 0-300 KVAC is fed to the voltage multiplier column to generate the accelerating voltage at the dome 0-3 MV/DC. The control system has been designed to maintain the accelerator voltage same throughout the operation by adjusting the input voltage in close loop. Whenever there is any change in the output voltage either because of beam loading or arcing in the accelerator. The instantaneous accelerator voltage or energy is a direct proportional to 0-10 KVDC obtained from autotransformer. A PLC based control system with user settable energy level has been installed for 3 MeV, EB accelerator. The PLC takes the user defined energy value through a touch screen and compares it to the actual accelerating voltage (obtained using resistive divider). Depending upon the error the PLC generates the pulses to adjust the autotransformer to bring the actual voltage to the set value within the window of error (presently set to +/- 0.1%). (author)

  20. Low-energy electron scattering from calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The B-spline R-matrix method (BSR) is used to investigate the integrated cross sections (ICS) of elastic electron scattering from neutral calcium in the ultra-low energy range from threshold to 0.5 eV. The close-coupling expansion includes 39 bound states of neutral calcium, covering all states from the ground state to 4s8s 1S. The computational model was described in detail. Briefly, we generate an accurate target description by using multiconfiguration expansions, accounting for both valence and core-valence correlations. Very importantly, we use term-dependent valence orbitals, which are optimized individually for the various states of interest. We also account for relaxation of the core orbitals, due to the deep penetration of the 3d orbital. As a result, we have a set of normalized orthogonal one-electron orbitals for each state, but the orbitals from different sets do not form an orthonormal basis. In this work we compared the total and partial electron-impact cross sections from Ca in the ultra-low energy region, calculated in two different R-matrix approaches: the present BSR method and R-matrix with pseudostates method (RMPS). As seen from our calculations, basic difference between the cross sections in two R-matrix approaches comes mainly from the dominated 2Po partial wave. In the same time, partial cross sections for the 2Se and 2De partial waves in these two methods practically coincide. In the present work we also have compared the total BSR39 and RMPS cross sections with experimental data of Romaniuk et al.. Overall, the agreement between both R-matrix (BSR39 and RMPS) results and the experimental data is satisfactory, although a few discrepancies remain. We have compared 2Se, 2Po and 2De partial eigen-phases of electron-impact scattering from Ca at low energies region between most recent calculations: BSR39 (the present calculation), RMPS and the method of static-exchange formalism. Again, the largest discrepancy between different methods

  1. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  2. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  3. Electronic excitation processes in rare gas clusters studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the electron energy loss spectra for Ar clusters as a function of incident electron energy and of cluster size. In spectra measured with 100 eV incident electron energy the bulk excitation peak becomes visible for a mean cluster size above 170 atoms per cluster. For 250 eV incident electron energy the bulk excitation peak is clearly observable even for a mean cluster size of 120 atoms per cluster. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by a simple calculation that accounts for the mean free path of electrons in Ar clusters; i.e., the penetration depth of incident electrons into the cluster.

  4. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Goldmann, Maximilian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. Firstly, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Secondly, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  5. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles

  6. Measurement of energy distributions of secondary electrons ejected from argon by fast electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy distributions of secondary electrons emitted in the ionization of argon by fast electrons have been measured. Their spectra and single and double differential cross sections were obtained for electron impact energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV, and electrons ejected with energies up to 300 eV. Where possible, the results are compared with existing experimental data and with theoretical calculations

  7. Angle-resolved cathodoluminescence imaging polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Clara I; Brenny, Benjamin; Polman, Albert; Koenderink, A Femius

    2015-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL) allows characterizing light emission in bulk and nanostructured materials and is a key tool in fields ranging from materials science to nanophotonics. Previously, CL measurements focused on the spectral content and angular distribution of emission, while the polarization was not fully determined. Here we demonstrate a technique to access the full polarization state of the cathodoluminescence emission, that is the Stokes parameters as a function of the emission angle. Using this technique, we measure the emission of metallic bullseye nanostructures and show that the handedness of the structure as well as nanoscale changes in excitation position induce large changes in polarization ellipticity and helicity. Furthermore, by exploiting the ability of polarimetry to distinguish polarized from unpolarized light, we quantify the contributions of different types of coherent and incoherent radiation to the emission of a gold surface, silicon and gallium arsenide bulk semiconductor...

  8. Optimal Electron Energies for Driving Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey; Alexander, David

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher, Canfield, & McClymont (1985a,b,c), who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Furt...

  9. Energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft x-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares

  10. Sterilization of foods with low-energy electrons ('soft-electrons')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons with an energy of 300 keV or lower were defined as 'Soft-electrons', which showed several advantages over conventional irradiation with gamma-rays or high-energy electrons in decontamination of grains and spices. Energies of electrons necessary to reduce microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g were 60 keV for brown rice, 75 keV for wheat, 100 keV for white pepper, coriander and basil, 130 keV for buckwheat, 160 keV for rough rice, and 210 keV for black pepper. Electrons with such energies did not significantly influence the quality

  11. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  12. High-energy attosecond nanoplasmonic-based electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, S. R.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We present the design of an ultrafast conical lens based nanoplasmonic electron gun. Through excitation with a radially polarized laser pulse, and a combination of magnetostatic and spatial filtering, high energy electron packets with attosecond durations can be achieved.

  13. Common Electronic Features and Electronic Nematicity in Parent Compounds of Iron-Based Superconductors and FeSe/SrTiO3 Films Revealed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Fa, Liu; Lin, Zhao; Shao-Long, He; Yong, Hu; Bing, Shen; Jian-Wei, Huang; Ai-Ji, Liang; Yu, Xu; Xu, Liu; Jun-Feng, He; Dai-Xiang, Mou; Shan-Yu, Liu; Hai-Yun, Liu; Guo-Dong, Liu; Wen-Hao, Zhang; Fang-Sen, Li; Xu-Cun, Ma; Qi-Kun, Xue; Xian-Hui, Chen; Gen-Fu, Chen; Li, Yu; Jun, Zhang; Zu-Yan, Xu; Chuang-Tian, Chen; Xing-Jiang, Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11190022, 11334010 and 11534007, the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No 2015CB921000, and the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No XDB07020300.

  14. New Thermal Field Electron Emission Energy Conversion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptitsin V.E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available New thermal field electron emission energy conversion method for vacuum electron-optical systems (EOS with a nanostructured surface electron sources is offered and developed. Physical and numerical modeling of an electron emission and transport processes for different EOS is carried out. It is shown that at the specific configuration of electrostatic and magnetic fields in the EOS offered method permits to realize energy conversion processes with high efficiency.

  15. Engineering Electronic Structure of a Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Bi(111) Bilayer on Sb Nanofilms by Quantum Confinement Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Guang; Wang, Zhengfei; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Xu, Caizhi; Xu, SuYang; Miller, Thomas; Hasan, M Zahid; Liu, Feng; Chiang, Tai-Chang

    2016-03-22

    We report on the fabrication of a two-dimensional topological insulator Bi(111) bilayer on Sb nanofilms via a sequential molecular beam epitaxy growth technique. Our angle-resolved photoemission measurements demonstrate the evolution of the electronic band structure of the heterostructure as a function of the film thickness and reveal the existence of a two-dimensional spinful massless electron gas within the top Bi bilayer. Interestingly, our first-principles calculation extrapolating the observed band structure shows that, by tuning down the thickness of the supporting Sb films into the quantum dimension regime, a pair of isolated topological edge states emerges in a partial energy gap at 0.32 eV above the Fermi level as a consequence of quantum confinement effect. Our results and methodology of fabricating nanoscale heterostructures establish the Bi bilayer/Sb heterostructure as a platform of great potential for both ultra-low-energy-cost electronics and surface-based spintronics. PMID:26932368

  16. Very Low Energy Scanning Electron Microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrnčiřík, Petr; Müllerová, Ilona

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2004), s. 47-49. ISSN 1439-4243 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB2065405 Keywords : Scanning Electron Microscope * SLEEM * SLETEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  17. Electronic excitation of some silicium compounds in the vacuum ultravi olet region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectra have been measured for the tetramethylsilane, trimethylchlorosilane and dimethyldichloresilane molecules in the 5 - 300 eV energy range. The spectra have been obtained at 1 KeV incident energy, with an energy resolution of about 0.5 eV (valense region) and 0.8 eV (inner-shell region). Both the valence and core-level excitation bands can be as associated to transitions to Rydber and valence states. No dipole-allowed transition has been observed in the spectra measured in the angular range of 1 to 9 degrees (valence region) and 3 to 7 degrees (inner-shell region). (Author)

  18. Disentangling bulk from surface contributions in the electronic structure of black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golias, E.; Krivenkov, M.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.

    2016-02-01

    Most recently, black phosphorus has come into focus as a promising material for future applications in nanoelectronic devices due to its unique electronic and transport properties. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio calculations within the framework of density-functional theory to disentangle surface from the bulk contributions in the electronic structure of black phosphorus. We find good agreement between our theoretical predictions for the intra- and interlayer energy-momentum dispersions and the experimentally obtained three-dimensional band structure of this material. Our results provide compelling evidence for the existence of surface-resonant states near the top of the valence band, which can play an important role in the performance of electronic devices based on black phosphorus.

  19. Secondary-electron-emission spectroscopy of tungsten: Angular dependence and phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Roy F.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    1978-01-01

    Angle-resolved energy-distribution measurements of secondary-electron emission (SEE) from metals reveal spectral fine structure that relates directly to the density distribution of the one-electron states throughout E-K→ space located above the vacuum level Ev. The angular dependence of the SEE...... have been carried out in both "reduced" and "extended" K→ space in order to assess the relative contribution of elastic umklapp scattering to the density distribution of contributing states profiles. The results indicate that the overall secondary-electron yield may be represented as the sum of....... Bulk and surface band-structure effects are concurrently manifest in the SEE spectra via the wave-matching conditions imposed at the solid-vacuum interface. The results are discussed within the general conceptual framework provided by "the (time-reversed) incoming final-state wave-function" approach to...

  20. Casimir self-energy of a free electron

    OpenAIRE

    Rosencwaig, Allan

    2006-01-01

    We derive the electromagnetic self-energy and the radiative correction to the gyromagnetic ratio of a free electron using a Casimir energy approach. This method provides an attractive and straightforward physical basis for the renormalization process.

  1. Power electronic converter systems for direct drive renewable energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents power electronic conversion systems for wind and marine energy generation applications, in particular, direct drive generator energy conversion systems. Various topologies are presented and system design optimization and reliability are briefly discussed....

  2. ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers in the format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series, and within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 will composed of four Terms throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10:00 to 12:30. The...

  3. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  4. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces

  5. Electron Clouds in High Energy Hadron Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-01-01

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use...

  6. Low Energy Electron Gun Power Control Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, Chad

    1998-01-01

    Orbiting spacecraft are subject to surface charging induced by plasma currents. The reaction of spacecraft materials to electron and ion bombardments is a major factor in spacecraft surface charging. A key bombardment process known to induce severe spacecraft surface charging is secondary electron emission. NASA funds the Surface Science Group in the Physics Department at Utah State University to research and document different secondary electron emission material characteristics. The Surface...

  7. Current trends in scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk

    Zagreb: Croatian Society for Electron Microscopy, 2003 - (Milat, O.; Ježek, D.), s. 85 - 86 [MCEM. Pula (HR), 01.06.2003-05.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1065304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * primary beam energy * field emission gun Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  8. Validation of Geant4 simulation of electron energy deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Batic, Matej; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Geant4-based simulations of the energy deposited by electrons in various materials are quantitatively compared to high precision calorimetric measurements taken at Sandia Laboratories. The experimental data concern electron beams of energy between a few tens of keV and 1 MeV at various incidence angles. Two experimental scenarios are evaluated: the longitudinal energy deposition pattern in a finely segmented detector, and the total energy deposited in a larger size calorimeter. The simulations are produced with Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 9.6; they involve models of electron-photon interactions in the standard and low energy electromagnetic packages, and various implementations of electron multiple scattering. Significant differences in compatibility with experimental data are observed in the longitudinal energy deposition patterns produced by the examined Geant4 versions, while the total deposited energy exhibits smaller variations across the various Geant4 versions, with the exception Geant4 9.4. The valida...

  9. Scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A source of spin polarized electrons with remarkable characteristics based on negative electron affinity (NEA) GaAs has recently been developed. It constitutes a unique tool to investigate spin dependent interactions in electron scattering processes. The characteristics and working principles of the source are briefly described. Some theoretical aspects of the scattering of polarized low-energy electrons by ferromagnetic metals are discussed. Finally, the results of the first polarized low-energy electron diffraction experiment using the NEA GaAs source are reviewed; they give information about the surface magnetization of ferromagnetic Ni (110). (Author)

  10. Influence of binding energies of electrons on nuclear mass predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Guo, Jian-You

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear mass contains a wealth of nuclear structure information, and has been widely employed to extract the nuclear effective interactions. The known nuclear mass is usually extracted from the experimental atomic mass by subtracting the masses of electrons and adding the binding energy of electrons in the atom. However, the binding energies of electrons are sometimes neglected in extracting the known nuclear masses. The influence of binding energies of electrons on nuclear mass predictions are carefully investigated in this work. If the binding energies of electrons are directly subtracted from the theoretical mass predictions, the rms deviations of nuclear mass predictions with respect to the known data are increased by about 200 keV for nuclei with Z, N ⩾ 8. Furthermore, by using the Coulomb energies between protons to absorb the binding energies of electrons, their influence on the rms deviations is significantly reduced to only about 10 keV for nuclei with Z, N ⩾ 8. However, the binding energies of electrons are still important for the heavy nuclei, about 150 keV for nuclei around Z = 100 and up to about 500 keV for nuclei around Z = 120. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the binding energies of electrons to reliably predict the masses of heavy nuclei at an accuracy of hundreds of keV. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205004)

  11. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Intitute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung, Indonesia 40132 dhani@as.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  12. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole

  13. Electrothermal energy conversion using electron gas volumetric change inside semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, K.; Shakouri, A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and analyze an electrothermal energy converter using volumetric changes in non-equilibrium electron gas inside semiconductors. The geometric concentration of electron gas under an electric field increases the effective pressure of the electrons, and then a barrier filters out cold electrons, acting like a valve. Nano- and micro-scale features enable hot electrons to arrive at the contact in a short enough time to avoid thermalization with the lattice. Key length and time scales, preliminary device geometry, and anticipated efficiency are estimated for electronic analogs of Otto and Brayton power generators and Joule-Thomson micro refrigerators on a chip. The power generators convert the energy of incident photons from the heat source to electrical current, and the refrigerator can reduce the temperature of electrons in a semiconductor device. The analytic calculations show that a large energy conversion efficiency or coefficient of performance may be possible.

  14. Short-range exchange-correlation energy of a uniform electron gas with modified electron-electron interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Toulouse, Julien; Savin, Andreas; Flad, Heinz-Juergen

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the short-range exchange-correlation energy of the uniform electron gas with two modified electron-electron interactions. While the short-range exchange functionals are calculated analytically, coupled-cluster and Fermi hypernetted-chain calculations are carried out for the correlation energy and the results are fitted to an analytical parametrization. These data enable us to construct the local density approximation corresponding to these modified interactions.

  15. A wide bandpass low energy electron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a high efficiency, wide bandpass solenoid spectrometer for the detection of electrons between 1 and 20 keV. The apparatus utilizes baffles to impose minimum and maximum constraints on the radii of the electron trajectories, and therefore on the component of their momentum perpendicular to the magnetic field. Electric fields parallel to the magnetic field and time-of-flight information are used to constrain the electron's momentum component along the magnetic axis. A microchannel plate detects the electrons with high efficiency and provides fast timing. The performance of the apparatus was studied through a comparison between binary encounter approximation (BEA) calculations and measurements of delta-electron emission in 5 MeV proton collisions with thin solid carbon targets. (orig.)

  16. Theoretical Study of Lithium Ionic Conductors by Electronic Stress Tensor Density and Electronic Kinetic Energy Density

    CERN Document Server

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, ${\\rm Li_3PO_4}$ and ${\\rm Li_3PS_4}$, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density.

  17. Power Electronics Control of Wind Energy in Distributed Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine...... energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources will be high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One...... is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most...

  18. Power electronics - The key technology for Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    and effectively, energy conversion systems, currently based on power electronics technology, will again play an essential role in this energy paradigm shift. Using highly efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced control...... solutions, can pave the way for renewable energies. In light of this, some of the most emerging renewable energies, e.g. wind energy and photovoltaic, which by means of power electronics are changing character as a major part in the electricity generation, are explored in this paper. Issues like technology...... development, implementation, power converter technologies, control of the systems, and synchronization are addressed. Special focuses are paid on the future trends in power electronics for those systems like how to lower the cost of energy and to develop emerging power devices and better reliability tool....

  19. Silicon thin films for mobile energy electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Ahnood, A.

    2011-01-01

    Consumer needs for mobile devices include the requirement for longer battery life, so that recharging can be performed less frequently or eliminated completely. To this end a key component of any mobile system is a high power and high energy density battery. An alternative to better batteries is for mobile devices to harvest some of their own energy. Solar energy is an accessible, free and environmentally friendly source of energy, making it ideal for powering mobile devices. ...

  20. Treatment of foods with 'soft-electrons' (low-energy electrons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower were defined as soft-electrons'. Soft-electrons can eradicate microorganisms residing on the surface of grains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables, tea leaves and seeds, and reduce their microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g with little quality deterioration. Soft-electrons can inactivate insect pests infesting grains and pulses and inhibit sprouting of potatoes. (author)

  1. Treatment of foods with 'soft-electrons' (low-energy electrons)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toru [Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute (NFRI), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Electrons with energies of 300 keV or lower were defined as soft-electrons'. Soft-electrons can eradicate microorganisms residing on the surface of grains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables, tea leaves and seeds, and reduce their microbial loads to levels lower than 10 CFU/g with little quality deterioration. Soft-electrons can inactivate insect pests infesting grains and pulses and inhibit sprouting of potatoes. (author)

  2. Fully electrostatic low energy scanning electron column

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanovský, V.; El-Gomati, M.; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    Brno : Ústav přístrojové techniky Akademie věd České republiky, 2002 - (Frank, L.), s. 33 - 34 ISBN 80-238-8986-9. [Recent trends in charged particle optics and surface physics instrumentation. Skalský dvůr (CZ), 08.07.2002-12.07.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : electron optical computations Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  3. Energy Sharing in the 2-Electron Attosecond Streak Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Price, H; Emmanouilidou, A

    2011-01-01

    Using the recently developed concept of the 2-electron streak camera (see NJP 12, 103024 (2010)), we have studied the energy-sharing between the two ionizing electrons in single-photon double ionization of He(1s2s). We find that the most symmetric and asymmetric energy sharings correspond to different ionization dynamics with the ion's Coulomb potential significantly influencing the latter. This different dynamics for the two extreme energy sharings gives rise to different patterns in asymptotic observables and different time-delays between the emission of the two electrons. We show that the 2-electron streak camera resolves the time-delays between the emission of the two electrons for different energy sharings.

  4. Energy sharing in the two-electron attosecond streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the recently developed concept of the two-electron streak camera (see Emmanouilidou et al 2010 New J. Phys. 12 103024), we studied the energy sharing between the two ionizing electrons in single-photon double ionization of He(1s2s). We found that the most symmetric and asymmetric energy sharings correspond to different ionization dynamics with the ion's Coulomb potential significantly influencing the latter. This different dynamics for the two extreme energy sharings gives rise to different patterns in asymptotic observables and different time delays between the emission of the two electrons. We show that the two-electron streak camera resolves the time delays between the emission of the two electrons for different energy sharings.

  5. Energy sharing in the two-electron attosecond streak camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, H; Emmanouilidou, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Staudte, A, E-mail: a.emmanouilidou@ucl.ac.uk [Joint Laboratory for Attosecond Science, University of Ottawa and National Research Council, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Using the recently developed concept of the two-electron streak camera (see Emmanouilidou et al 2010 New J. Phys. 12 103024), we studied the energy sharing between the two ionizing electrons in single-photon double ionization of He(1s2s). We found that the most symmetric and asymmetric energy sharings correspond to different ionization dynamics with the ion's Coulomb potential significantly influencing the latter. This different dynamics for the two extreme energy sharings gives rise to different patterns in asymptotic observables and different time delays between the emission of the two electrons. We show that the two-electron streak camera resolves the time delays between the emission of the two electrons for different energy sharings.

  6. Low energy electron cooler for the Heidelberg CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cryogenic storage ring (CSR) is currently under development at MPI-K in Heidelberg. The CSR is an electrostatic ring intended for storing ions in the 20-300 keV energy range (E/Q) in cryogenic environment at temperature down to 2 K. CSR will be equipped with an electron cooler which has to combine cooler and electron target functions. For cooling operation at given ion energies corresponding electron energies are in the range from 160 down to a few eV. Main problems in such operation mode are the decrease of electron beam intensity, the degradation of the electron longitudinal energy spread and the distortion of stored low energy ion trajectories during beams merging. For the CSR a new merging beam section layout together with a photocathode based cold electron source (tested at the Heidelberg TSR) have been proposed. In this paper we present the design of CSR electron cooler including the cryogenic implementation together with numerical calculations of the electron beam longitudinal and transverse energy spread in merged beam section

  7. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  8. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device

  9. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  10. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  11. Electronically droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2012-01-01

    A report is presented on free falling droplet energy harvesting using piezoelectric cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever which is composed of five layers of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet kinetic energy is transferred into the form of mechanical stress forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate. Experimental results show energy of 0.3 μJ per droplet. The scenario of moderate falling drop intensity, i.e. 230 drops per second, yields a total energy of 400 μJ. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  12. Correlation of electron self-energy with geometric structure in low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) studies of surface geometries where the energy dependence of the intensities is analyzed, the in-plane lattice parameter of the surface is usually set to a value determined by x-ray diffraction for the bulk crystal. In cases where it is not known, for instance in films that are incommensurate with the substrate, it is desirable to fit the in-plane lattice parameters in the same analysis as the perpendicular interlayer spacings. We show that this is not possible in a conventional LEED I(E) analysis because the inner potential, which is typically treated as an adjustable parameter, is correlated with the geometrical structure. Therefore, without having prior knowledge of the inner potential, it is not possible to determine the complete surface structure simply from LEED I(E) spectra, and the in-plane lattice parameter must be determined independently before the I(E) analysis is performed. This can be accomplished by establishing a more precise experimental geometry. Further, it is shown that the convention of omitting the energy dependency of the real part of the inner potential means geometrical LEED results cannot be trusted beyond a precision of approximately 0.01 Å. (paper)

  13. Low-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on differential cross section results for low-energy electron collisions with the biologically relevant species a-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol. Electron-impact excitation measurements of the electronic states of a-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol were carried out at incident energies between 15-50 eV and for scattering angles in the range 20-90°. Elastic differential cross section have also been calculated within the Independent Atom Model and using the Screening Corrected Additivity Rule approach at selected energies between 1-1000 eV.

  14. Development of a high-resolution soft x-ray (30--1500 eV) beamline at the Advanced Light Source and its use for the study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALS Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 is for high resolution spectroscopy, with circularly polarized light. Fixed included-angle SGM uses three gratings for 30--1500 eV photons; circular polarization is produced by an aperture for selecting the beam above or below the horizontal plane. Photocurrent from upper and lower jaws of entrance slit sets a piezoelectric drive feedback loop on the vertically deflecting mirror for stable beam. End station has a movable platform. With photomeission data from Stanford, structure of c(2x2)P/Fe(100) was determined using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS). Multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations indicate that P atoms adsorb in fourfold hollow sites 1.02A above the first Fe layer. Self-consistent-field Xα scattered wave calculation confirm that the Fe1-Fe2 space is contracted for S/Fe but not for P/Fe; comparison is made to atomic N and O on Fe(100). Final-state effects on ARPEFS curves used literature data from the S 1s and 2p core levels of c(2x2)S/Ni(001); a generalized Ramsauer-Townsend splitting is present in the 1s but not 2p data. An approximate method for analyzing ARPEFS data from a non-s initial state using only the higher-ell partial wave was tested successfully. ARPEFS data from clean surfaces were collected normal to Ni(111) (3p core levels) and 5 degree off-normal from Cu(111)(3s, 3p). Fourier transforms (FT) resemble adsorbate systems, showing backscattering signals from atoms up to 4 layers below emitters. 3p FTs show scattering from 6 nearest neighbors in the same crystal layer as the emitters. MSSW calulation indicate that Cu 3p photoemission is mostly d-wave. FTs also indicate double-scattering and single-scattering from laterally distant atoms; calculations indicate that the signal is dominated by photoemission from the first 2 crystal layers

  15. CAMAC high energy physics electronics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMAC hardware for high energy physics large spectrometers and control systems is reviewed as is the development of CAMAC modules at the High Energy Laboratory, JINR (Dubna). The total number of crates used at the Laboratory is 179. The number of CAMAC modules of 120 different types exceeds 1700. The principles of organization and the structure of developed CAMAC systems are described. (author)

  16. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6. ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  17. Scattering of high energy electrons on deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to obtain information on the neutron form factor from the study of the scattering of electrons on deuterium. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical study of the elastic and inelastic scattering. We introduce different form factors: Sachs form factor, the Pauli and Dirac form factors, they appear in the analytic expression of the scattering cross-section. We show how the deuteron form factors can be deduced from neutron's and proton's form factors. In the case of the inelastic scattering we show how the cross section can be broken into components associated to partial waves and we obtain different formulas for the inelastic cross-section based on the Breit formula or the Durand formalism. The second part is dedicated to the experiment setting of electron scattering on deuterium. The elastic scattering experiment has been made on solid or liquid CD2 targets while inelastic scattering has been studied on a liquid target. We have used an electron beam produced by the Orsay linear accelerator and the scattered electrons have been analysed by a magnetic spectrometer and a Cerenkov detector. The results give a very low value (slightly positive)for the charge form factor of the neutron and a magnetic form factor for the neutron slightly below that of the proton

  18. Spatial distribution of energy deposited in nitrogen by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of the energy deposited by kilovolt electrons moving through gaseous molecular nitrogen was measured. The range of electrons of initial energy 300 eV to 5 keV was obtained and can be expressed by the formula R=K1+K2E/subA/1-K3E/subA/2, where R is the range, E is the initial energy of the electrons, and K/subi/,A/subi/ are constants. The range, in this energy interval, is greater than that determined by previous measurements. A source of error, not previously discussed, is considered. The energy region (above 1 keV) where the simpler expression R=KE/subA/ holds is discussed. It is shown that this is the energy region where the energy and range dependence of the energy deposition curve can be removed and a normalized, characteristic energy deposition curve lambda can be obtained. The efficiency of conversion of electron energy at 1 keV and 280 μ pressure to energy of photons at 3914 A was measured to be (0.28+-0.03) %

  19. Electron tunneling in single layer graphene with an energy gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xu-Guang; Zhang Chao; Xu Gong-Jie; Cao Jun-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    When a single layer graphene is epitaxially grown on silicon carbide, it will exhibit a finite energy gap like a conventional semiconductor, and its energy dispersion is no longer linear in momentum in the low energy regime. In this paper, we have investigated the tunneling characteristics through a two-dimensional barrier in a single layer graphene with an energy gap. It is found that when the electron is at a zero angle of incidence, the transmission probability as a function of incidence energy has a gap. Away from the gap the transmission coefficient oscillates with incidence energy which is analogous to that of a conventional semiconductor. The conductance under zero temperature has a gap. The properties of electron transmission may be useful for developing graphene-based nano-electronics.

  20. Spin- and valley-coupled electronic states in monolayer WSe{sub 2} on bilayer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, K.; Souma, S. [WPI Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, T.; Tanaka, Y. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, T. [WPI Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    We have fabricated a high-quality monolayer WSe{sub 2} film on bilayer graphene by epitaxial growth and revealed the electronic states by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observed a direct energy gap at the Brillouin-zone corner in contrast to the indirect nature of gap in bulk WSe{sub 2}, which is attributed to the lack of interlayer interaction and the breaking of space-inversion symmetry in monolayer film. A giant spin splitting of ∼0.5 eV, which is the largest among known monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides, is observed in the energy band around the zone corner. The present results suggest a high potential applicability of WSe{sub 2} to develop advanced devices based with the coupling of spin- and valley-degrees of freedom.

  1. Spin- and valley-coupled electronic states in monolayer WSe2 on bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated a high-quality monolayer WSe2 film on bilayer graphene by epitaxial growth and revealed the electronic states by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observed a direct energy gap at the Brillouin-zone corner in contrast to the indirect nature of gap in bulk WSe2, which is attributed to the lack of interlayer interaction and the breaking of space-inversion symmetry in monolayer film. A giant spin splitting of ∼0.5 eV, which is the largest among known monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides, is observed in the energy band around the zone corner. The present results suggest a high potential applicability of WSe2 to develop advanced devices based with the coupling of spin- and valley-degrees of freedom

  2. Electronic structure of a superconducting topological insulator Sr-doped Bi2Se3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, the atomic and low energy electronic structure of the Sr-doped superconducting topological insulators (SrxBi2Se3) was studied. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that most of the Sr atoms are not in the van der Waals gap. After Sr doping, the Fermi level was found to move further upwards when compared with the parent compound Bi2Se3, which is consistent with the low carrier density in this system. The topological surface state was clearly observed, and the position of the Dirac point was determined in all doped samples. The surface state is well separated from the bulk conduction bands in the momentum space. The persistence of separated topological surface state combined with small Fermi energy makes this superconducting material a very promising candidate for the time reversal invariant topological superconductor

  3. Development of total-skin electron therapy at two energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-Skin Electron Therapy (TSET) modalities have been developed at two energies on a Varian Clinac 1800. The physical criteria for the beams were determined mainly from the requirement of continuing the Stanford treatment technique, which was 12 Total-Skin Electron Therapy portals combined in six pairs. The penetration of the lower energy mode matches that previously obtained at Stanford on the Varian Clinac 10, (about 4 mm for the 80% isodose contour in the 12-field treatment). The penetration of the higher energy mode is about 8 mm at the 80% contour. The Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes necessarily use electrons produced by the two standard electron-beam modes of lowest energy, nominally 6 and 9 MeV. Measurements to verify the beam specifications were carried out with diodes, a variety of ionization chambers, and a specially constructed circular phantom for film dosimetry. Initially, the penetration of the Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams was too large to match our criteria, so two methods of reducing it were explored: (a) the energies of the electron beams produced by the machine were reduced (which also reduced the energies of the corresponding standard electron modes) and (b) a large polymethylmethacrylate degrader (2.4 m X 1.2 m) 1 cm thick was placed just in front of the patient plane. Acceptable Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams could be produced by either method and the latter was finally used. The use of the standard dose monitoring system for the Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes considerably simplifies the daily treatment delivery as well as the implementation. However, the need for reasonable dose rates at the treatment plane (3.5 meters beyond the isocenter) requires dose rates of 24 Gy/min at the isocenter. Nevertheless, it is possible to use the internal dose monitor provided the problems associated with high dose rates are addressed

  4. In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2012-01-01

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

  5. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable...... higher-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that...... explicit use of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  6. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  7. Strongly anisotropic spin-orbit splitting in a two-dimensional electron gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michiardi, Matteo; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Miwa, Jill; Hoesch, Moritz; Kim, Timur K.; Matzen, Peter; Mi, Jianli; Bremholm, Martin; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt; Hofmann, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Near-surface two-dimensional electron gases on the topological insulator Bi$_2$Te$_2$Se are induced by electron doping and studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A pronounced spin-orbit splitting is observed for these states. The $k$-dependent splitting is strongly anisotropic to a...

  8. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy with very low energy (0 to 15 eV) electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very intensive peak of low energy electrons (≤15 eV) appears in the electron energy spectrum, measured by a high transmission magnetic spectrometer, if a negative voltage of more than about 20 volts is applied to the Moessbauer absorber. The MB-spectrum of enriched stainless steel, recorded with these electrons, shows a high resonance effect of about 700% with countrates of 103 sec-1, compared to 750% and 60 sec-1 at the K-edge. Two processes seem to be responsible with characteristic attenuation length of about 40 A and about 400 A. We conclude, that part of these electrons are produced directly by Moessbauer absorption and conversion, resulting in low energy Auger electron emission, showing a high surface sensitivity as well. (orig.)

  9. Medipix 2 detector applied to low energy electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gastel, van R.; Sikharulidze, I.; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, B.; Tromp, R.M.; Molen, van der S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photo-emission electron microscopy (PEEM) traditionally use microchannel plates (MCPs), a phosphor screen and a CCD-camera to record images and diffraction patterns. In recent years, however, MCPs have become a limiting factor for these types of microscopy.

  10. Analysis of electron energy-loss spectra and images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W.J. Sorber (Lianne)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSeveral methods are proposed for the elemental analysis of biological material with the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) in a Zeiss EM902. For spectra, the Simplex-method was tested and compared to Egerton's 2- area method, the Stee

  11. Catalogue of Radionuclide Low-Energy Electron Spectra (LEES)

    CERN Document Server

    Vylov, T D; Kovalik, A; Yakushev, E A; Mahmoud, M; Novgorodov, A F; Lebedev, N A; Filossofov, D V; Briançon, C; Walen, R J; Coursol, N F; Minkova, A; Petev, P; Dragoun, O; Brabec, V; Inoyatov, A

    2003-01-01

    More than 100 of apparatus low-energy electron spectra from radionuclides with Z=24-95 are collected in the presented LEES Catalogue. These spectra have been recorded in systematical investigations of Auger and internal conversion electrons with the ESA-50 electrostatic spectrometer during past 20 years.

  12. Computation of the average energy for LXY electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of an atomic rearrangement model in which we only consider the three shells K, L and M, to compute the counting efficiency for electron capture nuclides, requires a fine averaged energy value for LMN electrons. In this report, we illustrate the procedure with two example, ''125 I and ''109 Cd. (Author) 4 refs

  13. Extensive water cluster fragmentation after low energy electron ionization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lengyel, Jozef; Pysanenko, Andriy; Poterya, Viktoriya; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Fárník, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 612, SEP 2014 (2014), s. 256-261. ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08937S; GA ČR GA14-14082S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : physical chemistry * Electron energies * Electron ionization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2014

  14. Utilization of low-energy electron accelerators in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are more than 20 electron accelerators in Korea. Most of those are installed in factories for heat-resistant cables, heat-shrinkable cables, radial tires, foams, tube/ films, curing, etc. Four low-energy electron accelerators are in operation for research purposes such as polymer modification, purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, modification of semiconductor characteristics, etc. (author)

  15. Recent applications of low energy electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is obvious that radiation processing reduces energy consumption and avoids pollution because the coatings are solventless; but as important these factors may be, they alone do not justify the investment of an electron beam accelerator. With a few examples from the industry, motivations of users to choose electron processing is explained. (author)

  16. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of free fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure samples of C60 and C70 were analyzed using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By varying the energy of the primary electrons optically allowed transitions could be distinguished from optically forbidden ones and from collective excitations. The collective excitation lines of C60 could be assigned to dipole and monopole excitations. The EEL-spectra of C70 exhibited a splitting of the plasmon excitation which is attributed to the non-sperical shape of the C70 molecule. (orig.)

  17. Energy exchange between free electrons and an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodorow and Susskind (1964) have demonstrated that an electron beam bunched to dimensions on the order of an optical wavelength can radiate electromagnetic energy in the way a klystron does. In the present paper, a klystron operating at optical wavelengths is discussed whose design is similar to that of a microwave klystron and incorporates a bunching section, a drift region, and an output section. The amount of energy exchange is calculated for a single pass of the electrons through the field

  18. Scanning low-and very low energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk; Knápek, Alexandr; Konvalina, Ivo; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Walker, Christopher; Müllerová, Ilona

    Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2015, s. 218-220. ISBN 978-963-05-9653-4. [MCM 2015. Multinational Congress on Microscopy /12./. Eger (HU), 23.08.2015-28.08.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : very low energy * scanning low energy electron microscopy * crystallography, graphene * tissue sections Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suresh, L; Dash, Subhransu; Panigrahi, Bijaya

    2015-01-01

    The book is a collection of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers presented in Proceedings of International Conference on Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems (ICPERES 2014) held at Rajalakshmi Engineering College, Chennai, India. These research papers provide the latest developments in the broad area of Power Electronics and Renewable Energy. The book discusses wide variety of industrial, engineering and scientific applications of the emerging techniques. It presents invited papers from the inventors/originators of new applications and advanced technologies.

  20. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng, E-mail: dssu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  1. Electron spectroscopy at the high-energy endpoint of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Univ. Giessen (Germany); Hagmann, Siegbert [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Banas, Dariusz [Univ. Kielce (Poland); Brandau, Carsten [Extreme Matter Institute Darmstadt (Germany); Univ. Giessen (Germany); Doerner, Reinhard [Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); De Filippo, Enrico [INFN Catania (Italy); Gumberidze, Alexandre [Extreme Matter Institute Darmstadt (Germany); Guo, Dalong [IMP Lanzhou (China); Univ. Beijing (China); Jakubassa-Amundsen, Doris [Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Lestinsky, Michael; Spillmann, Uwe [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Litvinov, Yuri [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan [Univ. Giessen (Germany); Rothard, Hermann [CIRIL GANIL Caen (France); Surzhykov, Andrey [Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany); Trotsenko, Sergey [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany); Voitkiv, Alexander [MPI-K Heidelberg (Germany); Yerokhin, Vladimir [Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation); Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany); Univ. Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The high-energy endpoint of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung has been studied in inverse kinematics: For collisions U{sup 88+}+N{sub 2} → U{sup 88+}+[N{sub 2}{sup +}]{sup *} + e{sup -} + γ the energy distribution of electrons scattered under θ{sub e}{sup lab} = 0 {sup circle} with v{sub e} ∼ v{sub proj} was measured coincident with the bremsstrahlung photons emitted under various angles θ{sub γ}{sup lab}. The triple-differential cross sections provide a stringent test for the fully relativistic theory of electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung. Furthermore the studied process, also termed radiative electron capture to continuum RECC, was compared to the competing processes of non-radiative electron capture to continuum ECC and the electron loss to continuum ELC.

  2. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials

  3. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes

  4. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borka, D.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes.

  5. Interaction of low energy electrons with platinum surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borka, D., E-mail: dusborka@vinca.rs [Atomic Physics Laboratory (040), Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Tőkési, K. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    We present Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons backscattered from platinum (Pt) surface. We take into account both elastic and inelastic collisions during the simulation. For the case of the elastic scattering of electrons by Pt atoms we use the static field approximation with non-relativistic Schrödinger partial wave analysis. For the case of inelastic scattering we use the dielectric response formalism. In our simulations the primary electron energy is 250 eV and the incidence angle of the electron beam with respect to the surface is varied between 1° and 90°. The backscattered electron energy loss distributions for primary and as well for secondary electrons and the distribution of maximum electron penetration depths in the Pt sample were calculated using only the bulk and also the surface dielectric function. We found that the maximum attained depth of the electrons is around 20 Å, i.e. the electrons are at the vicinity of the surface. Therefore we expect that the experimental data will be close to our simulation using surface-excitations modes.

  6. Hot Electrons and Energy Transport in Metals at MK Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukes, Michael Lee

    Using a new technique involving the generation of hot carriers, we directly measure energy loss lifetimes for electrons in impure metals at mK temperatures. At these temperatures very weak inelastic scattering processes determine energy transport out of the electron gas. A temperature difference between the electron gas and the lattice can be induced by applying an extremely small electric field (of order 1 (mu)V/cm at 25 mK). This temperature difference reflects the rate at which electrons lose energy to the surroundings. The experiment is carried out using a pair of interdigitated thin film resistors mounted on a millidegree demagnetization cryostat: we obtain electron temperature directly by observing current fluctuations. Noise generated by the resistors is measured using an ultra-sensitive two -channel dc SQUID system, providing femtoamp resolution at KHz frequencies. A dc voltage applied across one resistor imposes the bias field causing electron heating. Phonon temperature in the metal lattice is obtained by measuring noise from a second (unbiased) resistor, which is tightly coupled thermally to the first (biased). Our measurements show that electron heating follows an E('2/5) power law in the regime where electron temperature is largely determined by the electric field, E. This implies a T('-3) law for the energy loss lifetime, suggesting electron -acoustic phonon processes dominate. In the mK temperature regime the conductivity is impurity limited and remains ohmic, even as the electrons heat. Assuming a T('3) dependence and extrapolating our measured rates to higher temperatures, we find agreement with electron-phonon rates measured above 1K in clean bulk metals. This contrasts with results from weak localization experiments showing a power law differing from T('3) and much faster rates. This difference arises because weak localization experiments measure the electron phase coherence lifetime; our electron heating experiments, however, measure an energy

  7. Controlling the Electron Energy Distribution Function Using an Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.; Hopkins, Mathew M.

    2014-10-01

    Positively biased electrodes inserted into plasmas influence the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) by providing a sink for low energy electrons that would otherwise be trapped by ion sheaths at the chamber walls. We develop a model for the EEDF in a hot filament generated discharge in the presence of positively biased electrodes of various surface areas, and compare the model results with experimental Langmuir probe measurements and particle-in-cell simulations. In the absence of an anode, the EEDF is characterized by a cool trapped population at energies below the sheath energy, and a comparatively warm tail population associated with the filament primaries. Anodes that are small enough to collect a negligible fraction of the electrons exiting the plasma have little affect on the EEDF, but as the anode area approaches √{me /mi }Aw , where Aw is the chamber wall area, the anode collects most of the electrons leaving the plasma. This drastically reduces the density of the otherwise trapped population, causing an effective heating of the electrons and a corresponding density decrease. A global model is developed based on the EEDF model and current balance, which shows the interconnected nature of the electron temperature, density and the plasma potential. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000, and by the University of Iowa Old Gold Program.

  8. FNAL R and D in medium energy electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaitsev, S; Crawford, A C; Kroc, T; MacLachlan, J; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C W; Shemyakin, A; Warner, A

    2000-01-01

    The first stage of the Fermilab Electron Cooling R and D program is now complete: a technology necessary to generate hundreds of milliamps of electron beam current at MeV energies has been demonstrated. Conceptual design studies show that with an electron beam current of 200 mA and with a cooling section of 20 m electron cooling in the 8.9 GeV/c Fermilab Recycler ring can provide antiproton stacking rates suitable for the Tevatron upgrades beyond Run II luminosity goals. A novel electron beam transport scheme with a weak magnetic field at the cathode and in the cooling section, and with discrete focusing elements in between will be used. A prototype of such an electron cooling system is now being built at Fermilab as part of the continuing R and D program. This paper describes the status of the electron cooling R and D program at Fermilab.

  9. Technological conditions of electronic energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restructurization of Polish power industry is discussed. The national power system will be controlled by Transmission Grid Management and therefore a free trade of electric energy will be limited. A nature of power industry requires control coordination of infrastructure modernization and investments. The conditions of free market are analysed. The third party access to transmission system will be allowed. The energy law and actions towards an electric market development require taking into accounts the technical conditions and the systematic character of generation and transmission

  10. Energy Filtering and Coaxial Detection of the Backscattered Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-Zhong; P. Morin; N. Rosenberg

    2000-01-01

    A new detection system in scanning electron microscope, which filters in energy and detects the backscattered electrons close to the microscope axis, is described. This technique ameliorates the dependence of the back. scat tering coefficient on atomic number, and suppresses effectively the relief contrast at the same time. Therefore this new method is very suitable to the composition analysis.

  11. Energy threshold in multiple ionization by electron or positron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy threshold for the formation of highly charged ions is experimentally well-known and measured. For single ionization, it is the binding energy of the outermost electrons. For multiple ionization, the ionization begins at impact energies much larger than the theoretically expected ones. In this contribution we present a simple expression for the energy threshold for multiple ionization by electron or positron impact. It was obtained as the mean value of the energy transferred to each ionized electron by using Thompson classical approximation. Present results reproduce quite well the experimental thresholds. Moreover, the inclusion of these values in the theoretical multiple ionization cross sections allows describing rather well the experimental data for single up to sextuple ionization of rare gases

  12. Evaluation of Miscellaneous and Electronic Device Energy Use in Hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Douglas R.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; Lai, Judy; Brown, Richard E.; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-09-01

    Miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) consume about one-thirdof the primary energy used in US buildings, and their energy use is increasing faster than other end-uses. In healthcare facilities, 30percent of the annual electricity was used by MELs in 2008. This paper presents methods and challenges for estimating medical MELs energy consumption along with estimates of energy use in a hospital by combining device-level metered data with inventories and usage information. An important finding is that common, small devices consume large amounts of energy in aggregate and should not be ignored when trying to address hospital energy use.

  13. Electron beam energy QA - a note on measurement tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Juergen; Nyflot, Matthew J; Smith, Wade P; Wottoon, Landon S; Young, Lori; Yang, Fei; Kim, Minsun; Hendrickson, Kristi R G; Ford, Eric; Kalet, Alan M; Cao, Ning; Dempsey, Claire; Sandison, George A

    2016-01-01

    Monthly QA is recommended to verify the constancy of high-energy electron beams generated for clinical use by linear accelerators. The tolerances are defined as 2%/2 mm in beam penetration according to AAPM task group report 142. The practical implementation is typically achieved by measuring the ratio of readings at two different depths, preferably near the depth of maximum dose and at the depth corresponding to half the dose maximum. Based on beam commissioning data, we show that the relationship between the ranges of energy ratios for different electron energies is highly nonlinear. We provide a formalism that translates measurement deviations in the reference ratios into change in beam penetration for electron energies for six Elekta (6-18 MeV) and eight Varian (6-22 MeV) electron beams. Experimental checks were conducted for each Elekta energy to compare calcu-lated values with measurements, and it was shown that they are in agreement. For example, for a 6 MeV beam a deviation in the measured ionization ratio of ± 15% might still be acceptable (i.e., be within ± 2 mm), whereas for an 18 MeV beam the corresponding tolerance might be ± 6%. These values strongly depend on the initial ratio chosen. In summary, the relationship between differences of the ionization ratio and the corresponding beam energy are derived. The findings can be translated into acceptable tolerance values for monthly QA of electron beam energies. PMID:27074488

  14. Construction and characteristics of electron-lens systems specifically designed for low energy electron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four multi-element tube-lenses are employed in two systems of an electron gun and an analyzer. The former system consists of an electron gun of the Erdman and Zipf type, a three-element tube-lens, a cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) and a four-element tube-lens. The latter system consists of a seven-element tube-lens, CMA and a three-element tube-lens. The paraxial equation is solved numerically by the Runge-Kutta method to obtain electron trajectories through each multi-element tube-lens. Focal properties, magnifications, and filling factors are given respectively for every multi-element tube-lens on the basis of the calculated trajectories. Optimum geometries are presented for the systems of low energy electron scattering experiments. The gun system is capable of providing electron beams with energies between a few and 1,000 eV, which have an energy spread below 0.1 eV. The analyzing system has an energy resolution about 0.1 eV. The detection efficiency is to be constant and independent of scattered electron energies in energy loss spectrum measurements. (author)

  15. Development of a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, A V; Roy, Arnab; Kumar, P S Anil; Kirschner, J

    2016-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system working in the reflected electron pulse counting mode. This system is capable of measuring asymmetries due to spin-orbit and exchange interactions. Photoemission from a strained GaAs/GaAsP super lattice is used as the source of spin polarized electrons. Spin-orbit asymmetry is evaluated for Ir(100) single crystal at various energies. Subsequently, exchange asymmetry has been evaluated on 40 monolayer Fe deposited on Ir(100). This instrument proves to be useful in understanding structure and magnetism at surfaces. PMID:26931865

  16. Modelling low energy electron interactions for biomedical uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current radiation based medical applications in the field of radiotherapy, radio-diagnostic and radiation protection require modelling single particle interactions at the molecular level. Due to their relevance in radiation damage to biological systems, special attention should be paid to include the effect of low energy secondary electrons. In this study we present a single track simulation procedure for photons and electrons which is based on reliable experimental and theoretical cross section data and the energy loss distribution functions derived from our experiments. The effect of including secondary electron interactions in this model will be discussed.

  17. Very low energy scanning electron microscopy in nanotechnology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Mika, Filip; Mikmeková, Eliška; Mikmeková, Šárka; Pokorná, Zuzana; Frank, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, 8/9 (2012), s. 695-716. ISSN 1475-7435 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OE08012; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * very low energy electrons * cathode lens * grain contrast * strain contrast * imaging of participates * dopant contrast * very low energy STEM * graphene Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2012

  18. Power Electronics and Reliability in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Zhou, Dao

    2012-01-01

    Power Electronics are needed in almost all kind of renewable energy systems. It is used both for controlling the renewable source and also for interfacing to the load, which can be grid-connected or working in stand-alone mode. More and more efforts are put into making renewable energy systems...... better in terms of reliability in order to ensure a high availability of the power sources, in this case the knowledge of mission profile of a certain application is crucial for the reliability evaluation/design of power electronics. In this paper an overview on the power electronic circuits behind the...

  19. Electronic structure and formation energy of a vacancy in aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, B.; Siegel, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    The electronic structure of a vacancy in Al was calculated self-consistently using norm-conserving ionic pseudopotentials obtained from ab initio atomic calculations. A 27-atom-site supercell containing 1 vacancy and 26 atoms was used to simulate the environment of the vacancy. A vacancy formation energy of 1.5 eV was also calculated (cf. the experimental value of 0.66 eV). The effects of the supercell and the nature of the ionic potential on the resulting electronic structure and formation energy are discussed. Results for the electronic structure of a divacancy are also presented. 3 figures.

  20. Electronic structure and formation energy of a vacancy in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of a vacancy in Al was calculated self-consistently using norm-conserving ionic pseudopotentials obtained from ab initio atomic calculations. A 27-atom-site supercell containing 1 vacancy and 26 atoms was used to simulate the environment of the vacancy. A vacancy formation energy of 1.5 eV was also calculated (cf. the experimental value of 0.66 eV). The effects of the supercell and the nature of the ionic potential on the resulting electronic structure and formation energy are discussed. Results for the electronic structure of a divacancy are also presented. 3 figures

  1. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Rub, Haitham; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Compiles current research into the analysis and design of power electronic converters for industrial applications and renewable energy systems, presenting modern and future applications of power electronics systems in the field of electrical vehicles With emphasis on the importance and long-term viability of Power Electronics for Renewable Energy this book brings together the state of the art knowledge and cutting-edge techniques in various stages of research.  The topics included are not currently available for practicing professionals and aim to enable the reader to directly apply the know

  2. Soft electron (low energy electron) processing of foods for microbial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Soft-electron' is a new term we have created referring to electrons with energies of 300 kV or lower. Homogenous irradiation of surfaces with soft electrons can decontaminate dry food ingredients such as gains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables and tealeaves without detrimental effects. Treatment of soybeans with electrons of acceleration voltages at 170 kV reduced their microbial count to an undetectable level. Pre-treatment of soybeans with soft electrons enabled the extension of soymilk without sterilization process at a high temperature (120 deg. C). The gelatinized property of soymilk from soft electron-treated beans was better than that of high-temperature sterilized soymilks. These results indicate that soft-electron sterilization improved the quality of soybeans for the processing of soymilk and Tofu(soymilk curd)

  3. Soft electron (low energy electron) processing of foods for microbial control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoriki, Setsuko E-mail: setsuko@nfri.affrc.go.jp; Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko; Nakaoka, Motoko; Miike, Mika; Hayashi, Toru

    2002-03-01

    'Soft-electron' is a new term we have created referring to electrons with energies of 300 kV or lower. Homogenous irradiation of surfaces with soft electrons can decontaminate dry food ingredients such as gains, pulses, spices, dehydrated vegetables and tealeaves without detrimental effects. Treatment of soybeans with electrons of acceleration voltages at 170 kV reduced their microbial count to an undetectable level. Pre-treatment of soybeans with soft electrons enabled the extension of soymilk without sterilization process at a high temperature (120 deg. C). The gelatinized property of soymilk from soft electron-treated beans was better than that of high-temperature sterilized soymilks. These results indicate that soft-electron sterilization improved the quality of soybeans for the processing of soymilk and Tofu(soymilk curd)

  4. Low-energy electron transport in non-uniform media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulated the transport of low and medium energy electrons with energies between 1.26 eV and 10 keV in non-uniform carbon targets using the track structure Monte Carlo code TRAX which has several applications in biophysics and radiation physics. Cross sections for electrons incident on carbon have been critically assessed. Furthermore the code has been extended to handle non-uniform targets allowing a complex geometry description. Solid state targets, which are commonly used as targets in electron spectrometers and other devices can be non-uniform, e.g. have highly irregular surfaces or pinholes. The resulting electron spectra can be significantly affected by these non-uniformities. We reproduce experimental data obtained by GSI’s Toroid electron spectrometer using thin solid state foils as targets. This unique experiment was designed to gain further insight in the emission and transport of low energy electrons in solids to improve the description of microscopic energy deposition. The realistic implementation of non-uniform targets in TRAX was verified by comparison with available experimental data. The increased backscattering due to the roughness of an unpolished target in comparison with polished ones could be reproduced as well as secondary electron spectra from the Toroid

  5. Electrons with continuous energy distribution from energetic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties and origin of continuous electron spectrum emitted in high energy heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The basic processes causing the characteristic regions of the continuous spectrum are described. The contribution of electrons ejected from the target and from the projectile are investigated in detail in the cases of light and heavy projectiles. The recently recognized mechanisms, electron-capture-to-continuum (ECC) and electron-loss-to-continuum (ELC), leading to a cusp in forward direction, and their theoretical interpretations are discussed. The importance of data from ion-atom collisions in the field of atomic physics and in applications are briefly summarized. (D.Gy)

  6. Orbital characters and electronic correlations in KCo2Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. H.; Zhao, Y. G.; Li, Y.; Jia, L. L.; Cai, Y. P.; Zhou, S.; Xia, T. L.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.; Wang, S. C.

    2015-07-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the tridimensional nature and orbital characters of the low-energy electronic structure in KCo2Se2, using polarization- and photon energy-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observed one electron-like Fermi surface (FS) at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center, four electron-like FSs centered at the BZ corner, and one hole-like FS at the BZ boundary. The FSs show weak dispersion along the kz direction, indicating the near-two-dimensional nature of FSs in KCo2Se2. In combination with the local-density approximation calculations, we determined the orbital characters of the low-energy electronic bands, which are mainly derived from the Co 3d orbital, mixed with part of the Se 4p states. The {{d}{{x2}-{{y}2}}} orbital gives a significant contribution to the band crossing the Fermi level. A band renormalization of about 1.6 is needed to capture the essential dispersive features, which suggests that electronic correlations are much weaker than that in KyFe2-xSe2.

  7. Renewable Energy Systems in the Power Electronics Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Teodorescu, Remus

    2005-01-01

    of the most important area is renewable energy systems. This paper will discuss the basic courses for the power electronics curriculum. It will also discuss how to teach power electronic systems efficiently through a projectoriented and problem-based learning approach with Aalborg University in Denmark......Power Electronics is still an emerging technology and its applications are increasing. The primary function is to convert electrical energy from one stage to another and it is used in many different applications. The power electronics curriculum is multidisciplinary covering fields like devices......, magnetics, electrical machines, power systems, analogue and digital control, materials, power converters, electronics, materials, thermal design and EMC. However, those fields may not be enough in order to give the students enough skills. It is also necessary to learn about systems and for the moment one...

  8. Compact 180 deg magnetic energy analyzer for relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact, 180 deg deflection magnetic energy analyzer has been designed and used to measure the energy spectrum of the beam produced by the Tesla Transformer-Pulse forming line type Relativistic Electron Beam (REB) generator being used in the FEL experiments that are currently underway at Institute for Plasma Research. Relativistic electron beams have been used in many applications ranging from free-electron lasers to virtual cathode oscillators and other high power microwave devices. In all these cases, it is required that the electron beam is propagated without considerable loss across a drift region and it is also imperative that accurate energy measurements are required for dependable estimates and analysis regarding the output parameters of the system. In the case of a free-electron laser, the output wavelength of the FEL has a strong dependence on the beam energy and hence it is important to determine as accurately as possible, the energy of the electron beam in order to accurately estimate the FEL radiation frequency

  9. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  10. Power Electronics as Efficient Interface of Renewable Energy Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe; Kjær, Søren Bækhøj

    2004-01-01

    renewable energy conversion system, will play an important part in our future energy supply. But other sources like microturbines, photovoltaics and fuel cell systems may also be serious contributor to the power supply. Characteristically, power electronics will be an efficient and important interface...

  11. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory

  12. An energy recovery electron linac-on-ring collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merminga, L.; Krafft, G.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2000-09-14

    We present the design of high-luminosity electron-proton/ion colliders in which the electrons are produced by an Energy Recovering Linac (ERL). Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33}(per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at currents of a few hundred mA and multi-GeV energies. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  13. Study of absorbed dose distribution to high energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth absorbed dose distribution by electron beams was studied. The influence of the beam energy, the energy spread, field size and design characteristics of the accelerator was relieved. Three accelerators with different scattering and collimation systems were studied leading todifferent depth dose distributions. A theoretical model was constructed in order to explain the increase in the depth dose in the build-up region with the increase of the energy. The model utilizes a three-dimensional formalism based on the Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, with the introduction of modifications that takes into account the criation of secondary electrons. (Author)

  14. Modelling low energy electron and positron tracks for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, A. G.; Fuss, M. C.; Roldán, A. M.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; García, G.

    2012-11-01

    In order to incorporate the effect of low energy electrons and positron in radiation damage models, the simulation method proposed here is based on experimental and theoretical cross section data and energy loss spectra we have previously derived. After a summary of the main techniques used to obtain reliable input data, the basis of a Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is established. Single electron and positron tracks in liquid water are presented and the possibility of using these results to develop tools for nanodosimetry is discussed.

  15. Modelling low energy electron and positron tracks for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to incorporate the effect of low energy electrons and positron in radiation damage models, the simulation method proposed here is based on experimental and theoretical cross section data and energy loss spectra we have previously derived. After a summary of the main techniques used to obtain reliable input data, the basis of a Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is established. Single electron and positron tracks in liquid water are presented and the possibility of using these results to develop tools for nanodosimetry is discussed.

  16. Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-04-01

    A concrete interest in running RHIC at low energies in a range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon total energy of a single beam has recently emerged. Providing collisions in this energy range, which in the RHIC case is termed 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with electron cooling applied directly in RHIC at low energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvement with electron cooling, possible technical approaches and various limitations.

  17. Household energy consumption and consumer electronics: The case of television

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic rise in the number of consumer electronics in households. These new technologies and the services that support them enable new highly energy intensive behaviours. Using in-depth interview data collected from 20 households in 2006, this paper explores these energy intensive behaviours, using the example of the use of televisions. In doing so, it illustrates how the design and marketing of consumer electronics, and the services which support them, actively encourage energy intensive behaviours and how householders are reconfiguring their homes and lifestyles to fit these behaviours. This latter point is significant because, as householders change their homes and daily lives to fit energy intensive consuming behaviours, it will become increasingly difficult to encourage people to reduce their household energy consumption. This paper concludes with the implications of the research findings for policies designed to reduce household energy consumption

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  19. Power electronics - key technology for renewable energy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas;

    2011-01-01

    as efficient as possible. Further, the emerging climate changes is arguing to find sustainable future solutions. Of many options, two major technologies will play important roles to solve parts of those future problems. One is to change the electrical power production from conventional, fossil based energy...... sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics...... are changing and challenging the future electrical infrastructure but also contributes steadily more to non-carbon based electricity production. Most focus in the paper is on the power electronics technologies used. In the case of photovoltaics transformer-less systems are discussed as they have the potential...

  20. Trends in Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Iov, Florin; Kerekes, Tamas;

    2010-01-01

    are done as efficient as possible. Further, emerging climate changes argues to find future solutions which also are sustainable. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve parts of those future problems. One is the change the electrical power production from conventional, fossil (and short...... term) based energy sources to renewable energy sources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss trends of the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy and photovoltaics, which...... by means of power electronics are changing the future electrical infrastructure but also contributes steadily more to non-carbon based electricity production. Most focus is on the power electronics technologies used. In the case of photovoltaics transformer-less systems are discussed as they have...

  1. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  2. Technical Training: ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics - Spring Term ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms: the Winter Term, Introduction to electronics in HEP, already took place; the next three Terms will run throughout the year: Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) - now open for registration Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Ele...

  3. Design for Reliability of Power Electronics in Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai;

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics is the enabling technology for maximizing the power captured from renewable electrical generation, e.g., the wind and solar technology, and also for an efficient integration into the grid. Therefore, it is important that the power electronics are reliable and do not have too many...... failures during operation which otherwise will increase cost for operation, maintenance and reputation. Typically, power electronics in renewable electrical generation has to be designed for 20–30 years of operation, and in order to do that, it is crucial to know about the mission profile of the power...... electronics technology as well as to know how the power electronics technology is loaded in terms of temperature and other stressors relevant, to reliability. Hence, this chapter will show the basics of power electronics technology for renewable energy systems, describe the mission profile of the technology...

  4. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  5. Locating the magnetic centerline with a low energy electron probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following is a narrative of the oral report on 'Locating the Magnetic Centerline with a Low Energy Electron Probe' presented at the First International Workshop of Accelerator Alignment. The low energy electron probe (LEEP) was originally developed at LLNL by Gene Lauer and has seen many modifications to improve accuracy and resolution. The technique is specifically designed to map the transverse position of a field line vs. its axial position in a solenoidal coil. The diagnostic uses a low energy (∼ 4 keV) electron beam, which is propagated from within the focusing field of the first accelerator cell. Due to the low energy of the electron beam, it will remain on the same flux potential that it is launched on, i.e. it will follow a flux line (this statement can be in error if the electron beam is launched several mm from the solenoid axis, but for paraxial measurements the errors remain below the resolution of the detectors, < 10 μm). A phosphor screen has been used, in the past, to intercept the electron beam and convert it to a light spot which can be located in X and Y. The axial position of the phosphor screen is recorded with the X-Y location to produce a flux line map (for a single flux line) through the entire accelerator

  6. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Finally, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons. - Highlights: • Following-up secondary electron energy cut-offs. • Energy distribution of Secondary electron distribution of a 100 MeV proton in PADC. • Sub-ionization electrons and formation of latent track in PADC

  7. Development of a Measurement Technique for Medium-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Asamura, K.; Takashima, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2009-06-01

    The information on energy spectra of 1-100 keV electrons is expected to provide an important clue to understand heating and acceleration mechanisms of magnetospheric plasmas. However, electrons of several keV to several tens of keV are not properly verified by observations owing to the problems in the measurement techniques. This study aims to bridge this gap by applying Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) to the detection of electrons. The internal gain of APDs enables high-resolution detection of low-energy electrons down to several keV. We have tested an APD: Type spl 3989, Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. The APD responded to 2-40 keV electrons with the fine peaks of the out put pulse height distributions. Although the experiment is limited to 40 keV, electrons up to about 60 keV are predicted to be detectable with this APD from the simulation. We also have successfully made a verification test by the sounding rocket of ISAS/JAXA targeting medium energy electrons.

  8. Electronic structure of reconstructed InAs(001) surfaces - identification of bulk and surface bands based on their symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowska, Natalia; Kolodziej, Jacek J.

    2016-02-01

    Using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) band structures of indium- and arsenic-terminated InAs(001) surfaces are investigated. These surfaces are highly reconstructed, elementary cells of their lattices contain many atoms in different chemical configurations, and moreover, they are composed of domains having related but different reconstructions. These domain-type surface reconstructions result in the reciprocal spaces containing regions with well-defined k→∥-vector and regions with not-well-defined one. In the ARPES spectra most of the surface related features appear as straight lines in the indeterminate k→∥-vector space. It is shown that, thanks to differences in crystal and surface symmetries, the single photon energy ARPES may be successfully used for classification of surface and bulk bands of electronic states on complex, highly reconstructed surfaces instead of the most often used variable photon energy studies.

  9. Energy-resolved electron particle and energy fluxes in positive column plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with electron flux densities and electron energy flux densities in positive column discharges. Recent kinetic calculations by Uhrlandt and Winkler have revealed the interesting physical phenomenon of radially inward directed energy flux densities in positive column plasmas. We have used a self-consistent positive column model, based on an accurate and highly detailed Monte Carlo code, to study this effect in more depth. The results of this study show a rather complex physical picture of electron particle and energy flux densities. Electrons with low energies usually exhibit radially outward directed particle and energy flux densities. At energies above the threshold for electronic excitation particle and energy flux densities are usually inward directed. Only close to the wall, at total energies above the wall potential energy, do these flux densities point towards the wall. The thickness of this 'wall loss region' scales with the electron mean-free-path for momentum transfer, i.e. with the inverse of the neutral gas density. The results presented can be qualitatively interpreted in terms of the total-energy picture for the electrons. (author)

  10. Energy-resolved electron particle and energy fluxes in positive column plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortshagen, U. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lawler, J.E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, WI (United States)

    1999-11-07

    This paper deals with electron flux densities and electron energy flux densities in positive column discharges. Recent kinetic calculations by Uhrlandt and Winkler have revealed the interesting physical phenomenon of radially inward directed energy flux densities in positive column plasmas. We have used a self-consistent positive column model, based on an accurate and highly detailed Monte Carlo code, to study this effect in more depth. The results of this study show a rather complex physical picture of electron particle and energy flux densities. Electrons with low energies usually exhibit radially outward directed particle and energy flux densities. At energies above the threshold for electronic excitation particle and energy flux densities are usually inward directed. Only close to the wall, at total energies above the wall potential energy, do these flux densities point towards the wall. The thickness of this 'wall loss region' scales with the electron mean-free-path for momentum transfer, i.e. with the inverse of the neutral gas density. The results presented can be qualitatively interpreted in terms of the total-energy picture for the electrons. (author)

  11. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd2Fe14B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small

  12. The electronic states of ordered thin films of perylene on Ag (1 1 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of perylene on Ag (1 1 0) has been studied by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements and low-energy electron diffraction. Four emission features of the organic material are located at 3.5, 4.8, 6.4 and 8.5 eV, respectively, below the Fermi level. An ordered structure of c(6x2) can be observed when the organic film is about a monolayer (3 Angst thickness). The angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the molecular plane of perylene near the interface is parallel to the substrate. The desorption of the organic material occurs with warming the substrate; the perylene molecules are stable on the Ag (1 1 0) surface and no decomposition is observed below 140 deg. C

  13. Effect of Symmetry Breaking on Electronic Band Structure: Gap Opening at the High Symmetry Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Vasseur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Some characteristic features of band structures, like the band degeneracy at high symmetry points or the existence of energy gaps, usually reflect the symmetry of the crystal or, more precisely, the symmetry of the wave vector group at the relevant points of the Brillouin zone. In this paper, we will illustrate this property by considering two-dimensional (2D-hexagonal lattices characterized by a possible two-fold degenerate band at the K points with a linear dispersion (Dirac points. By combining scanning tunneling spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission, we study the electronic properties of a similar system: the Ag/Cu(111 interface reconstruction characterized by a hexagonal superlattice, and we show that the gap opening at the K points of the Brillouin zone of the reconstructed cell is due to the symmetry breaking of the wave vector group.

  14. Energy response of liquid scintillator using Compton tagged electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid scintillation detectors have been widely used for the fast neutron spectroscopy. These detectors have very good time resolution (≲ns) comparable to the plastic scintillators. In addition, these detectors have pulse shape discrimination (PSD) property which enables unambiguous detection of the neutrons in the presence of gamma rays. The knowledge of absolute efficiency which is a function of incident neutron energy and threshold is essential for folding of the neutron spectra. Accurate determination of threshold for the analysis of the neutron spectra and neutron response function require very precise energy calibration. The position of pulse height associated with the maximum energy of recoil electrons is taken in between the maximum edge and the 'half maximum' of the spectrum and the arbitrary selection of the calibration point introduced the error in the energy calibration. A coincidence between Compton scattered gamma rays and the recoil electron is used for the energy calibration in the scale of electron energy equivalent. In this paper, the response of the liquid scintillator (EJ-301 equivalent to NE-213) to the electron is reported along with the neutron time of flight (TOF) and pulse shape discrimination

  15. High energy electron generation in surface wave produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical model predicting production of hot electrons in the high frequency field of surface wave produced plasmas is presented. The fast particle generation is caused by the radial component of the surface wave electric field near the boundary of the discharge by mechanisms not considered so far. As a result of acceleration due to the interaction with the surface wave field and due to energy loss by excitation and ionization of atoms in the main volume of the plasma the hot electron tail of the energy distribution funtion is formed. Such distributions are calculated for some simple models of inelastic collisions. Effective temperatures are found. The proposed mechanism of hot electron generation are described for cases where the wave frequency is larger than the electron collision frequency. (orig.)

  16. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  17. Bunch shape monitors using low energy secondary electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feschenko, A. V.

    1992-07-01

    To measure a longitudinal charge distribution in an ion linac beam it is preferable to apply bunch shape monitors using a low energy secondary emission electrons. Monitors of this type and their development are discussed. Different varieties of rf deflectors for a transverse modulation of secondary electrons are considered. Preliminary parameters of a bunch shape monitor for the SSC linac are presented. A detector to measure both longitudinal and transverse distributions of a two component ion beam is described.

  18. Bunch shape monitors using low energy secondary electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure a longitudinal charge distribution in an ion linac beam it is preferable to apply bunch shape monitors using a low energy secondary emission electrons. Monitors of this type and their development are discussed. Different varieties of rf deflectors for a transverse modulation of secondary electrons are considered. Preliminary parameters of a bunch shape monitor for the SSC linac are presented. A detector to measure both longitudinal and transverse distributions of a two component ion beam is described

  19. Electron radiative self-energy of highly stripped heavy atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new algorithm is presented for the evaluation of the electron radiative self-energy in heavy atoms, for which Zα is not a perturbative expansion parameter. The algorithm for hydrogenic ions is presented in detail. The terms to be evaluated numerically are finite, free of spurious gauge dependent parts, and are not in the form of a subtraction. The extension to many electron ions is also discussed. copyright 1991 Academic Press, Inc

  20. Low-energy electron collisions with sulfur hexafluoride, SF6

    OpenAIRE

    Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2004-01-01

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic collisions of low-energy electrons with sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. Elastic cross sections are computed within the fixed-nuclei approximation, with polarization effects incorporated. Inelastic cross sections for nine low-lying states are computed in a few-channel approximation. We compare our cross sections to previous experimental and computational results where possible.

  1. A novel method for measuring energy loss in electron rings

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, John M.; De Santis, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel method for measuring the energy loss per turn in an electron storage ring. The method involves the accurate measurement of the change in the rotation period of an uncaptured electron bunch using a dual-sweep streak camera. In our opinion, this method is more direct and accurate than other techniques. We present examples of measurements performed at the Advanced Light Source.

  2. Practical resolution limit in the scanning low energy electron microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk

    Durban: Microscopy society of Southern Africa, 2002 - (Engelbrecht, J.; Sewell, T.; Witcomb, M.; Cross, R.; Richards, P.), s. 99 - 100 ISBN 0-620-29294-6. [ICEM. Durban (ZA), 01.09.2002-06.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1065901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : low-energy SEM * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  3. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension positionsensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out(FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown.

  4. Stochasticity of the energy absorption in the electron cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy absorption mechanism in cyclotron resonance of the electrons is a present problem, since it could be considered from the stochastic point of view or this related with a non-homogeneous but periodical of plasma spatial structure. In this work using the Bogoliubov average method for a multi periodical system in presence of resonances, the drift equations were obtained in presence of a RF field for the case of electron cyclotron resonance until first order terms with respect to inverse of its cyclotron frequency. The absorbed energy equation is obtained on part of electrons in a simple model and by drift method. It is showed the stochastic character of the energy absorption. (Author)

  5. Ionization cross sections for low energy electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Hee; Saracco, Paolo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2011-01-01

    Two models for the calculation of ionization cross sections by electron impact on atoms, the Binary-Encouter-Bethe and the Deutsch-Maerk models, have been implemented; they are intended to extend and improve Geant4 simulation capabilities in the energy range below 1 keV. The physics features of the implementation of the models are described, and their differences with respect to the original formulations are discussed. Results of the verification with respect to the original theoretical sources and of extensive validation with respect to experimental data are reported. The validation process also concerns the ionization cross sections included in the Evaluated Electron Data Library used by Geant4 for low energy electron transport. Among the three cross section options, the Deutsch-Maerk model is identified as the most accurate at reproducing experimental data over the energy range subject to test.

  6. High-Energy Electron Beam Application to Air Pollutants Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of electron beam (EB) process in pollutants removal is connected to its high efficiency to transfer high amount of energy directly into the matter under treatment. Disadvantage which is mostly related to high investment cost of accelerator may be effectively overcome in future as the result of use accelerator new developments. The potential use of medium to high-energy high power EB accelerators for air pollutants removal is demonstrated in [1]. The lower electrical efficiencies of accelerators with higher energies are partially compensated by the lower electron energy losses in the beam windows. In addition, accelerators with higher electron energies can provide higher beam powers with lower beam currents [1]. The total EB energy losses (backscattering, windows and in the intervening air space) are substantially lower with higher EB incident energy. The useful EB energy is under 50% for 0.5 MeV and about 95% above 3 MeV. In view of these arguments we decided to study the application of high energy EB for air pollutants removal. Two electron beam accelerators are available for our studies: electron linear accelerators ALIN-10 and ALID-7, built in the Electron Accelerator Laboratory, INFLPR, Bucharest, Romania. Both accelerators are of traveling-wave type, operating at a wavelength of 10 cm. They utilize tunable S-band magnetrons, EEV M 5125 type, delivering 2 MW of power in 4 μ pulses. The accelerating structure is a disk-loaded tube operating in the 2 mode. The optimum values of the EB peak current IEB and EB energy EEB to produce maximum output power PEB for a fixed pulse duration EB and repetition frequency fEB are as follows: for ALIN-10: EEB = 6.23 MeV; IEB =75 mA; PEB 164 W (fEB = 100 Hz, EB = 3.5 s) and for ALID-7: EEB 5.5 MeV; IEB = 130 mA; PEB = 670 W (fEB = 250 Hz, EB = 3.75 s). This paper presents a special designed installation, named SDI-1, and several representative results obtained by high energy EB application to SO2, NOx and VOCs

  7. Power Electronics and Control of Renewable Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Sera, Dezso;

    2007-01-01

    The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is a demand to double the power capacity within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as technological efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregul......, wind energy and photovoltaics, which by means of power electronics are changing from being minor energy sources to be acting as important power sources in the energy system........ Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources may be very high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One is to change the electrical power production...... sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. Another is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss some of the most emerging renewable energy sources...

  8. Superconductor digital electronics: Scalability and energy efficiency issues (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolpygo, Sergey K.

    2016-05-01

    Superconductor digital electronics using Josephson junctions as ultrafast switches and magnetic-flux encoding of information was proposed over 30 years ago as a sub-terahertz clock frequency alternative to semiconductor electronics based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Recently, interest in developing superconductor electronics has been renewed due to a search for energy saving solutions in applications related to high-performance computing. The current state of superconductor electronics and fabrication processes are reviewed in order to evaluate whether this electronics is scalable to a very large scale integration (VLSI) required to achieve computation complexities comparable to CMOS processors. A fully planarized process at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, perhaps the most advanced process developed so far for superconductor electronics, is used as an example. The process has nine superconducting layers: eight Nb wiring layers with the minimum feature size of 350 nm, and a thin superconducting layer for making compact high-kinetic-inductance bias inductors. All circuit layers are fully planarized using chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of SiO2 interlayer dielectric. The physical limitations imposed on the circuit density by Josephson junctions, circuit inductors, shunt and bias resistors, etc., are discussed. Energy dissipation in superconducting circuits is also reviewed in order to estimate whether this technology, which requires cryogenic refrigeration, can be energy efficient. Fabrication process development required for increasing the density of superconductor digital circuits by a factor of ten and achieving densities above 107 Josephson junctions per cm2 is described.

  9. Collective electron driven linac for high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A linac design is presented in which an intense ultrarelativistic electron bunch is used to excite fields in a series of cavities and accelerate charged particles. The intense electron bunch is generated in a simple storage ring to have the required transverse and longitudinal dimensions. The bunch is then transferred to the linac. The linac structure can be inexpensively constructed of spacers and washers. The fields in the cells resulting from the bunch passage are calculated using the program BCI. The results show that certain particles within the driving bunch and also trailing particles of any sign charge can be accelerated. With existing electron storage rings, accelerating gradients greater than 16 MV/m are possible. Examples of two accelerators are given: a 30 GeV electron/positron accelerator useful as an injector for a high energy storage ring and 2) a 110 GeV per beam electron-positron collider

  10. Some aspects of electron cooling technique at different energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reva, Vladimir B. E-mail: v.b.reva@inp.nsk.su

    2004-10-11

    The cooling rate depends on the property of collision between an ion and electron. The magnetized electron cooling is able to strongly increase the cooling rate and enables it to obtain higher parameters of the ion (proton) beams. At medium and high energies of the electron beam it is difficult to have magnetized motion of electron at a whole cooling device. The length of the Larmor spiral is larger or almost equal to the characteristic length of parts of a cooler device, moreover it is difficult to combine the longitudinal magnetic field with RF accelerating structures. So, the special methods for the electron transport along a cooler are necessary. In this article, the different ways of problem solving are described. The merits and demerits of variants with continuous and discontinuous longitudinal magnetic fields are discussed.

  11. Optimum target source term estimation for high energy electron accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, M. K.; Sahu, T. K.; Nair, Haridas G.; Nandedkar, R. V.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R. M.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-05-01

    Optimum target for bremsstrahlung emission is defined as the thickness of the target material, which produces maximum bremsstrahlung yield, on interaction of electron with the target. The bremsstrahlung dose rate per unit electron beam power at a distance of 1 m from the target material gives the optimum target source term. In the present work, simulations were performed for three different electron energies, 450, 1000 and 2500 MeV using EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code to determine the optimum thickness. An empirical relation for optimum target as a function of electron energy and atomic number of the target materials is found out from results. Using the simulated optimum target thickness, experiments are conducted to determine the optimum target source term. For the experimental determination, two available electron energies, 450 MeV and 550 MeV from booster synchrotron of Indus facility is used. The optimum target source term for these two energies are also simulated. The experimental and simulated source term are found to be in very good agreement within ±3%. Based on the agreement of the simulated source term with the experimental source term at 450 MeV and 550 MeV, the same simulation methodology is used to simulate optimum target source term up to 2500 MeV. The paper describes the simulations and experiments carried out on optimum target bremsstrahlung source term and the results obtained.

  12. Energy Spectrum Of Nonthermal Electrons Accelerated At A Plane Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the energy spectra of cosmic ray (CR) protons and electrons at a plane shock with quasi-parallel magnetic fields, using time-dependent, diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) simulations, including energy losses via synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton (IC) scattering. A thermal leakage injection model and a Bohm type diffusion coefficient are adopted. The electron spectrum at the shock becomes steady after the DSA energy gains balance the synchrotron/IC losses, and it cuts off at the equilibrium momentum p_{eq}. In the postshock region the cutoff momentum of the electron spectrum decreases with the distance from the shock due to the energy losses and the thickness of the spatial distribution of electrons scales as p^{-1}. Thus the slope of the downstream integrated spectrum steepens by one power of p for p_{br}electron spectrum exhibit a concave curvature and...

  13. In situ electron energy-loss spectroscopy in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Megan E; Yu, Yingchao; Gao, Jie; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2013-08-01

    In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the liquid cell holder shadows the detector and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS in the study of chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap, and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio regime as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in an aqueous solution. The potential for the use of valence EELS to understand in situ STEM reactions is demonstrated for beam-induced deposition of metallic copper: as copper clusters grow, EELS develops low-loss peaks corresponding to metallic copper. From these techniques, in situ imaging and valence EELS offer insights into the local electronic structure of nanoparticles and chemical reactions. PMID:23721691

  14. TESLA ENERGY SPACE FOR MIE–SCHWINGER CONTINUOUS ELECTRON

    OpenAIRE

    Bulyzhenkov, I.

    2013-01-01

    Tesla reading of electricity through invisible energy ether between visible bodies corresponds to the found radial solution for a continuous source. The Mie–Schwinger distributed electron extends over the very structure of its Coulomb radial field. The electric charge is not a basic concept of Maxwell-Tesla electrodynamics but is the field energy distribution under the unified, non-dual approach to matter-energy in the nonempty world space. Electric self-energy of such a unified nonlocal carrier ...

  15. Stopping power of diamond for low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models used to describe the interaction of electrons with the valence band of insulators are discussed. Results for the application of these models to calculate stopping power and mean-free path of low-energy electrons (< 10 KeV) in diamond are presented. The influence of core polarizability, oscillator strength coupling between core and valence electrons, and exchange corrections is included. The contributions to the mean-free path and stopping power from ionization of inner shells have been evaluated from sum-rule-constrained classical binary-collision model. (author)

  16. Ion induced high energy electron emission from copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.ar; Ferron, J. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Universidad Nacional del Litoral Gueemes 3450 CC 91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2008-11-15

    We present measurements of secondary electron emission from Cu induced by low energy bombardment (1-5 keV) of noble gas (He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} and Ar{sup +}) and Li{sup +} ions. We identify different potential and kinetic mechanisms and find the presence of high energetic secondary electrons for a couple of ion-target combinations. In order to understand the presence of these fast electrons we need to consider the Fermi shuttle mechanism and the different ion neutralization efficiencies.

  17. Low-energy electron accelerators in industry and applied research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelaers, W.

    1998-04-01

    The use of electron accelerators in industry involve a broad range of machines and applications. The major actual large-scale applications are crosslinking of wire and cable insulation, plastic films and foam, curing of coatings and rubbers, and sterilisation of medical products. The recent availability, at attractive costs, of electron accelerators with high beam power (up to 200 kW) covering an energy range up to 10 MeV, has created new possibilities for a substantial expansion of the application range. The actual position of electron accelerators in industry is reviewed, new emerging applications and novel opportunities for multipurpose facilities are described.

  18. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  19. Electronic structure of undoped and potassium doped coronene investigated by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Friedrich; Bauer, Johannes; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We performed electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies in transmission in order to obtain insight into the electronic properties of potassium intercalated coronene, a recently discovered superconductor with a rather high transition temperature of about 15\\,K. A comparison of the loss function of undoped and potassium intercalated coronene shows the appearance of several new peaks in the optical gap upon potassium addition. Furthermore, our core level excitation data clearly signal filling of ...

  20. Anomalous broadening of energy distributions in photoemitted electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Vincenzo

    1996-06-01

    Photoemission is widely used to generate electron beams with an energy spread lower than by thermoemission. However, when a photocathode is illuminated by a multimode laser this feature is lost and an electron beam with several eV of energy spread is produced. We have developed an explanation for this anomalous behavior pointing out its origin in the combined effect of charge relaxation, taking place within the beam, together with the modulation of the laser power imposed by laser modes. The model permits a correct interpretation overall experimental evidences.

  1. Computation of electron energy loss spectra by an iterative method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval, Peter [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM-MPC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Ljungberg, Mathias Per [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Foerster, Dietrich [LOMA, Université de Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Sánchez-Portal, Daniel [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 4, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM-MPC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Paseo Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    A method is presented to compute the dielectric function for extended systems using linear response time-dependent density functional theory. Localized basis functions with finite support are used to expand both eigenstates and response functions. The electron-energy loss function is directly obtained by an iterative Krylov-subspace method. We apply our method to graphene and silicon and compare it to plane-wave based approaches. Finally, we compute electron-energy loss spectrum of C{sub 60} crystal to demonstrate the merits of the method for molecular crystals, where it will be most competitive.

  2. Computation of electron energy loss spectra by an iterative method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented to compute the dielectric function for extended systems using linear response time-dependent density functional theory. Localized basis functions with finite support are used to expand both eigenstates and response functions. The electron-energy loss function is directly obtained by an iterative Krylov-subspace method. We apply our method to graphene and silicon and compare it to plane-wave based approaches. Finally, we compute electron-energy loss spectrum of C60 crystal to demonstrate the merits of the method for molecular crystals, where it will be most competitive

  3. Development of real-time low energy electron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low energy electron beam calorimeter with a thin film window has been fabricated to facilitate a reliable method of dose assessment for electron beam energies down to 200 keV. The system was designed to incorporate a data-logger in order that it could be used on the self-shielded 200 keV facility at MINT. In use, the calorimeter started logging temperature a short time before it passed under the beam and it continued taking data until well after the end of the irradiation. Data could be retrieved at any time after the calorimeter had emerged from the irradiator

  4. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of monochromators for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) is developing into a unique technique to study the band structure and optical properties of nanoscale materials. This article discusses practical aspects of spatially resolved VEELS performed in scanning transmission mode and the alignments necessary to achieve the current optimum performance of ∼0.15 eV energy resolution with an electron probe size of ∼1 nm. In particular, a collection of basic concepts concerning the acquisition process, the optimization of the energy resolution, the spatial resolution and the data processing are provided. A brief study of planar defects in a Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ high-temperature superconductor illustrates these concepts and shows what kind of information can be accessed by VEELS

  5. Study on the high spectral intensity at the Dirac energy of single-layer graphene on an SiC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinwoong; Hwang, Choongyu

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated electron band structure of epitaxially grown graphene on an SiC(0001) substrate using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In single-layer graphene, abnormal high spectral intensity is observed at the Dirac energy whose origin has been questioned between in-gap states induced by the buffer layer and plasmaron bands induced by electron–plasmon interactions. With the formation of double-layer graphene, the Dirac energy does not show the high spectral intensity any longer different from the single-layer case. The inconsistency between the two systems suggests that the main ingredient of the high spectral intensity at the Dirac energy of single-layer graphene is the electronic states originating from the coupling of the graphene π bands to the localized π states of the buffer layer, consistent with the theoretical prediction on the presence of in-gap states.

  6. Demonstration of large electron-beam energy extraction by a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-beam energy spectral measurements were made on a tapered-wiggler free-electron laser amplifier. A 10 MeV electron beam from a traveling-wave linear accelerator interacted in a tapered-wiggler with an intense 10.6μm CO/sub 2/ laser beam. The electron spectra show a 4 percent net energy loss and a 9 percent peak loss. Measurements of electron energy spectra, extraction efficiency as a function of electron-beam energy, and extraction efficiency as a function of optical power are presented and are consistent with theoretically predicted performance

  7. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost εT is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost εT is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured εT from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated εT from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured εT

  8. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  9. Streaking at high energies with electrons and positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    State-of-the-art attosecond metrology deals with the detection and characterization of photon pulses with typical energies up to the hundreds of eV and time resolution of several tens of attoseconds. Such short pulses are used for example to control the motion of electrons on the atomic scale or to measure inner-shell atomic dynamics. The next challenge of time-resolving the inner-nuclear dynamics, transient meson states and resonances requires photon pulses below attosecond duration and with energies exceeding the MeV scale. Here we discuss a detection scheme for time-resolving high-energy gamma ray pulses down to the zeptosecond timescale. The scheme is based on the concept of attosecond streak imaging, but instead of conversion of photons into electrons in a nonlinear medium, the high-energy process of electron-positron pair creation is utilized. These pairs are produced in vacuum through the collision of a test pulse to be characterized with an intense laser pulse, and they acquire additional energy and momentum depending on their phase in the streaking pulse at the moment of production. A coincidence measurement of the electron and positron momenta after the interaction provides information on the pair production phase within the streaking pulse. We examine the limitations imposed by quantum radiation reaction in multiphoton Compton scattering on this detection scheme, and discuss other necessary conditions to render the scheme feasible in the upcoming Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) laser facility.

  10. Wettability Modification of Nanomaterials by Low-Energy Electron Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchinsky I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controllable modification of surface free energy and related properties (wettability, hygroscopicity, agglomeration, etc. of powders allows both understanding of fine physical mechanism acting on nanoparticle surfaces and improvement of their key characteristics in a number of nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the method we developed for electron-induced surface energy and modification of basic, related properties of powders of quite different physical origins such as diamond and ZnO. The applied technique has afforded gradual tuning of the surface free energy, resulting in a wide range of wettability modulation. In ZnO nanomaterial, the wettability has been strongly modified, while for the diamond particles identical electron treatment leads to a weak variation of the same property. Detailed investigation into electron-modified wettability properties has been performed by the use of capillary rise method using a few probing liquids. Basic thermodynamic approaches have been applied to calculations of components of solid–liquid interaction energy. We show that defect-free, low-energy electron treatment technique strongly varies elementary interface interactions and may be used for the development of new technology in the field of nanomaterials.

  11. Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectra beyond the optical limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A position-dependent Inverse Inelastic Mean Free Path (IIMFP), calculated according to the Chen–Kwei theory of inelastic scattering, is used to obtain Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectra (REELS) by a Monte Carlo approach. The basic ingredient of the theory is the energy-loss and momentum-transfer dependent dielectric function, for which we use a plasmon-pole approximation to the Lindhard dielectric function. The dependence on the momentum transfer enters by assuming a proper dispersion relation for the energy loss. Experiments reveal however that, beside energy loss, also plasmon damping disperses with momentum transfer. By comparing measured and calculated REEL spectra, we explore the role of damping dispersion for a quasi-free-electron material like silicon

  12. Secondary electrons monitor for continuous electron energy measurements in UHF linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous energy measurement become now an obligatory in accelerator facility dedicated to radiation sterilization process. This is one of several accelerator parameters, like dose rate, beam current, beam scan width, conveyer speed, which must be recorded as it is required condition of accelerator validation procedure. The described below secondary electrons monitor for continuous energy measurement has been tested at accelerator facility with scanned electron beam, typically applied for radiation sterilization. Data processing and visualization is performed by control computer, which utilizes collected information for irradiation process parameters optimization. (author)

  13. When Superconductivity Meets Magnetism: Electronic, Magnetic and Structural Properties of YBa2Cu3O7-x /La1-xSrxMnO3 Heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The relationship between superconductivity and magnetic order is an important issue for both fundamental and applicative research. The recent progress in manufacturing heterostructures provides an opportunity to study the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. Knowing that the valence electrons in cuprates as well as in manganites are subject to strong magnetic interactions, the magnetization at the interface accompanied with the charge transfer are expected to have a crucial influence in these systems. To study the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism we are investigating a series of n(YBCO)/m(LSMO) bilayers and multilayers (n and m are numbers of YBCO and LSMO unit cells respectively grown on STO (001)). We are using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) (study of electronic structure), Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) (to reveal the depth profile of the magnetic induction) and Resonant Inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements (for resolving the low energy magnetic excitations in with orbital sensitivity). (author)

  14. A Flexible Power Electronics Configuration for Coupling Renewable Energy Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Mattia Filippini; Marta Molinas; Eneko Olea Oregi

    2015-01-01

    A combination of series, parallel and multilevel power electronics has been investigated as a potential interface for two different types of renewable energy sources and in order to reach higher power levels. Renewable energy sources are typically dispersed in a territory, and sources, like wind and solar, allow small to medium-scale generation of electricity. The configuration investigated in this article aims at adapting the coupling solution to the specific generation characteristics of th...

  15. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  16. Modified Fermi Energy of Electrons in a Superhigh Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, C; Li, X D; Wang, N; Yuan, J P; Peng, Q H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electron Landau-level stability and its influence on the electron Fermi energy, $E_{\\rm F}(e)$, in the circumstance of magnetars, which are powered by magnetic field energy. In a magnetar, the Landau levels of degenerate and relativistic electrons are strongly quantized. A new quantity $g_{n}$, the electron Landau-level stability coefficient is introduced. According to the requirement that $g_{n}$ decreases with increasing the magnetic field intensity $B$, the magnetic-field index $\\beta$ in the expression of $E_{\\rm F}(e)$ must be positive. By introducing the Dirac$-\\delta$ function, we deduce a general formulae for the Fermi energy of degenerate and relativistic electrons, and obtain a particular solution to $E_{\\rm F}(e)$ in a superhigh magnetic field. This solution has a low magnetic-field index of $\\beta=1/6$, compared with the previous one, and works when $\\rho\\geq 10^{7}$~g cm$^{-3}$ and $B_{\\rm cr}\\ll B\\leq 10^{17}$~Gauss. By modifying the phase space of relativistic ...

  17. A real-time low energy electron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time low energy electron calorimeter with a thin film window has been designed and fabricated to facilitate a reliable method of dose assessment for electron beam energies down to 200 keV. The work was initiated by the Radiation Physics Group of Queen Mary and Westfield College in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington. Irradiations were performed on the low and medium electron energy electron accelerators at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). Calorimeter response was initially tested using the on-line temperature measurements for a 500-keV electron beam. The system was later redesigned by incorporating a data-logger to use on the self-shielded 200-keV beam. In use, the final version of the calorimeter could start logging temperature a short time before the calorimeter passed under the beam and continue measurements throughout the irradiation. Data could be easily retrieved at the end of the exposure. (author)

  18. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 51745-406 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Ghorbanalilu, M. [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  19. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam

  20. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  1. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  2. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Ostrava : Tanger, 2013. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [International Conference NANOCON 2013 /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Collection of signal electrons in Low Energy SEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    Vol. 2. Regensburg: University of Regensburg, 2013, s. 327-328. [Microscopy Conference 2013. Regensburg (DE), 25.08.2013-30. 08.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : signal collection * low energy SEM * trajectory simulations Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  4. Electron emission in collisions of intermediate energy ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work, is the analysis of the processes of electronic emission produced in the collisions of small ions (H+, He++) of intermediate energy (50 a 200 KeV/amu) with light gaseous targets. (A.C.A.G.)

  5. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in the molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. These two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times. (paper)

  6. Aiglon, a magnetic spectrometer for low energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battiston, R. [INFN Sezione di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Burger, W.J., E-mail: william.burger@cern.c [INFN Sezione di Perugia, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Ostaptchouk, A.; Schael, S. [I. Physikalisches Institut B, D-52056 RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2010-05-21

    The magnetic spectrometer is designed to detect low energy electrons (5-50 MeV) with good energy (10%) and angular (<5{sup 0}) resolutions, and sufficiently large acceptance (10cm{sup 2}sr), to monitor short term changes of the trapped particle population in the Earth's magnetic field. The influence of multiple Coulomb scattering is reduced by active collimation, filter planes composed of edgeless silicon microstrip detectors. The incident and exit particle trajectories are reconstructed in four planes of scintillating fibers. The spectrometer is a digital device in the sense that the notion of sampling is omnipresent: at the level of the filter plane design to suppress large angle multiply-scattered electrons, and at the level of the frontend electrons, where silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are used.

  7. Energy sensitivity of LiF-thermoluminescent dosimeters for different electron energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical response of lithium flouride dosimeters is a complicated function of absorbed energy. Since there is a poor correlation between the experimental results of different workers, a Monte Carlo program was used to calculate the energy response of LiF-TLD for electron energies from 5 to 20 MeV

  8. Measurement of electron energy probability function in weakly magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron energy probability function (EEPF) is one of the key factors for the evaluation of the plasma parameters by the Langmuir probe (LP) theories. It is known that the presence of magnetic field can influence the anisotropy of the electron energy probability function (EEPF). Knowledge of the real EEDF is of great importance in understanding the underlying physics of processes occurring at the magnetized plasma, such as the formation of transport barriers, cross-field diffusion coefficients and plasma-substrate interactions. Although the electric probe method is one of the oldest methods in plasma physics itself, it is yet not fully understood in presence of magnetic field. In the present experiment, the application of LPs to evaluate EEPF in presence of magnetic fields within the range (594 - 32) G is investigated. The data recorded for EEPFs in magnetic fields and in dust is acquired using current-voltage characteristics measured in low pressure hydrogen plasma. The values of plasma density, electron temperature and EEPF are evaluated with a single cylindrical Langmuir probe at different axial positions (1 cm to 6 cm) from the magnet. From the recent EEPF observations in presence of magnetic field, it shows a bi-Maxwellian EEPF structure at different magnetic fields. But at different magnetic field, it is observed that the low energy electron population changes whereas the high-energy electron population remains almost constant. EEPF measurement shows almost identical behaviour with the unmagnetized plasma when the larmour radius of electron is greater than or equal to 10 times of the probe radius. (author)

  9. Evolution of the electronic structure during the epitaxial growth of Au on Pt(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengió, S.; Walczak, L.; Vobornik, I.; Segovia, P.; Michel, E. G.

    2016-04-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission study of the electronic structure of Au layers grown epitaxially on Pt(100) in the coverage range 1-10 monolayers (ML). Our results include an analysis of the electronic band structure and the Fermi surface, combined with structural information from low-energy electron diffraction. The Au films grow epitaxially with a (1 × 1) pattern up to 4-5 ML. We monitor the electronic band structure near the surface Xbar-point vs. Au coverage. In the 1-3 ML range we observe interface electronic states related to the formation of a Au-Pt alloy in this coverage range. Starting at 2-3 ML coverage, we identify quantum well states from the incipient Au sp band, which converge into a bulk like Au sp band near 6 ML. After 5-6 ML, a (1 × 7) pattern is observed, due to the formation of a surface reconstruction in the epitaxial Au film with a topmost hexagonal layer, as in the reconstruction of bulk Au(100). We identify specific electronic states of quasi-one-dimensional character coming from the corrugated hexagonal layer. We obtain a complete picture and understanding of the electronic structure of Au/Pt(100), including sp Au band formation, hybridization and electronic confinement, and with implications in the understanding of the distinct electronic behavior of Au layers and particles in the nm size range.

  10. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  11. An Energy Recovery Electron Linac On Ring Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga; Geoffrey Krafft; Valeri Lebedev; Ilan Ben-Zvi

    2001-09-01

    Electron-proton/ion colliders with center of mass energies between 14 GeV and 100 GeV (protons) or 63 GeV/A (ions) and luminosities at the 10{sup 33} (per nucleon) level have been proposed recently as a means for studying hadronic structure. Electron beam polarization appears to be crucial for many of the experiments. Two accelerator design scenarios have been examined in detail: colliding rings and recirculating linac-on-ring. Although the linac-on-ring scenario is not as well developed as the ring-ring scenario, comparable luminosities appear feasible. The linac-on-ring option presents significant advantages with respect to: (1) spin manipulations; (2) reduction of the synchrotron radiation load in the detectors; (3) a wide range of continuous energy variability. Rf power and beam dump considerations require that the electron linac recover the beam energy. This technology has been demonstrated at Jefferson Lab's IR FEL with cw current up to 5 mA and beam energy up to 50 MeV. Based on extrapolations from actual measurements and calculations, energy recovery is expected to be feasible at higher currents (a few hundred mA) and higher energies (a few GeV) as well. The report begins with a brief overview of Jefferson Lab's experience with energy recovery and summarize its benefits. Luminosity projections for the linac-ring scenario based on fundamental limitations are presented next. The feasibility of an energy recovery electron linac-on-proton ring collider is investigated and four conceptual point designs are shown corresponding to electron to proton energies of: 3 GeV on 15 GeV, 5 GeV on 50 GeV and 10 GeV on 250 GeV, and for gold ions with 100 GeV/A. The last two designs assume that the protons or ions are stored in the existing RHIC accelerator. Accelerator physics issues relevant to proton rings and energy recovery linacs are discussed next and a list of required R and D for the realization of such a design is presented.

  12. High proton energies from cone targets: electron acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments in the Trident laser facility (Los Alamos National Laboratory) have shown that hollow conical targets with a flat top at the tip can enhance the maximum energy of proton beams created during the interaction of an ultra-intense short laser pulse with the target (Gaillard S A et al 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056710). The proton energies that have been seen in these experiments are the highest energies observed so far in laser-driven proton acceleration. This is attributed to a new acceleration mechanism, direct light pressure acceleration of electrons (DLLPA), which increases the number and energy of hot electrons that drive the proton acceleration. This acceleration process of protons due to a two-temperature sheath formed at the flat-top rear side is very robust and produces a large number of protons per shot, similar to what is regularly observed in target normal sheath acceleration (Hatchett S P et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 2076, Maksimchuk A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 4108, Snavely R A et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 2945) with flat foils. In this paper, we investigate the electron kinetics during DLLPA, showing that they are governed by two mechanisms, both of which lead to continuous electron acceleration along the inner cone wall. Based on our model, we predict the scaling of the hot electron temperature and ion maximum energy with both laser and target geometrical parameters. The scaling of T=mec02a02/4 with the laser strength parameter a0 leads to an ion energy scaling that surpasses that of some recently proposed acceleration mechanisms such as radiation pressure acceleration (RPA), while in addition the maximum electron energy is found to scale linearly with the length of the cone neck. We find that when optimizing parameters, high proton energies suitable for applications can be reached using compact short-pulse laser systems with pulse durations of only a few tens to hundreds of laser periods. (paper)

  13. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 μm precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  14. Ultra High Energy Electrons Powered by Pulsar Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Swadesh; Osmanov, Zaza; Chkheidze, Nino

    2013-01-01

    A new mechanism of particle acceleration to ultra high energies, driven by the rotational slow down of a pulsar (Crab pulsar, for example), is explored. The rotation, through the time dependent centrifugal force, can very efficiently excite unstable Langmuir waves in the e-p plasma of the star magnetosphere via a parametric process. These waves, then, Landau damp on electrons accelerating them in the process. The net transfer of energy is optimal when the wave growth and the Landau damping times are comparable and are both very short compared to the star rotation time. We show, by detailed calculations, that these are precisely the conditions for the parameters of the Crab pulsar. This highly efficient route for energy transfer allows the electrons in the primary beam to be catapulted to multiple TeV ($\\sim 100$ TeV) and even PeV energy domain. It is expected that the proposed mechanism may, partially, unravel the puzzle of the origin of ultra high energy cosmic ray electrons.

  15. Energy determination and identification of high-energy electrons by energy release measurement near the shower maximum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a simple detector of electrons and photons, consisting of a lead convertor and a scintillation counter, exposed to 6.65 - 40 GeV electrons and 40 GeV hadrons is described. The best energy resolution - delta/E=0.69xEsup(-0.45) (E in GeV), is obtained when the convertor thickness is close to the shower maximum. The detector can be used for electron/hadron discrimination. The probability to identify a 40 GeV hadron as an electron with the same energy is approximately 4x10-3 at 95% electron detection efficiency

  16. Mechanism and Experimental Observability of Global Switching Between Reactive and Nonreactive Coordinates at High Total Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Hiroshi; Toda, Mikito; Takahashi, Masahiko; Kono, Hirohiko; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-08-28

    We present a mechanism of global reaction coordinate switching, namely, a phenomenon in which the reaction coordinate dynamically switches to another coordinate as the total energy of the system increases. The mechanism is based on global changes in the underlying phase space geometry caused by a switching of dominant unstable modes from the original reactive mode to another nonreactive mode in systems with more than 2 degrees of freedom. We demonstrate an experimental observability to detect a reaction coordinate switching in an ionization reaction of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. For this reaction, the reaction coordinate is a coordinate along which electrons escape and its switching changes the escaping direction from the direction of the electric field to that of the magnetic field and, thus, the switching can be detected experimentally by measuring the angle-resolved momentum distribution of escaping electrons. PMID:26371648

  17. Attachment of low energy electrons to ''hot'' SF6 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy electron attachment rate constant, ka, for SF6 has measured in dilute mixtures of SF6 with N2 buffer gas in the temperature, T, range of 300 to 500 K and over a range of E/N values corresponding to mean electron energies, , ranging from 0.19 to 1.0 eV. As the gas temperature increases, the magnitude and energy dependence of ka (, T) remain unaffected. In the same T-range the collisionally stabilized SF6- is very stable with respect to autodetachment; its lifetime is > 1ms. The limiting electric field strength (E/N)lim for SF6 was found to increase by ∼14% as T is raised from 300 to 600 K. The significance of these finding in gaseous dielectrics is indicated

  18. Slowing down of medium-energy electrons in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slowing down of energetic particles in solids has been studied for the special but important case that the energy loss process is independent of any other interaction characteristic. For a realistic variation of the scattering characteristics with energy this allows one to go over from the continuous energy variable to a discrete variable, being equal to the number of inelastic processes. Then, the energy dissipation can be described in terms of partial intensities of particles having experienced a given number of inelastic collisions and the partial energy distributions associated with them. The important advantage of this so-called partial intensity approach is that it can accurately account for the variation of the scattering characteristics with the energy in a simple way. The key point in this procedure is the distribution of the stochastic process governing multiple collisions in the multispeed case. The exact solution as well as an accurate and efficient analytical approximation is given for the probability for n-fold scattering as a function of the traveled path length. Application of the proposed method to inelastic backscattering of electrons from solids leads to excellent agreement with experimental results and simulation data and constitutes a significant improvement over methods that neglect the energy dependence of the interaction characteristics. The method should prove useful for slowing down problems of different types of particles like electrons, ions, etc., in solids. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. Electron beam pumping of CdZnSe quantum well laser structures using a variable energy electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trager-Cowan, C.; Bagnall, D. M.; McGow, F.; McCallum, W.; O'Donnell, K. P.; Smith, P. C.; Wright, P. J.; Cockayne, B.; Prior, K. A.; Mullins, J. T.; Horsburgh, G.; Cavenett, B. C.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper we present experimental results on electron beam pumping of MBE and MOVPE lasers with CdZnSe single quantum wells. Laser emission in the gree and blue occurs under pulsed excitation, with threshold power densities typically less than 2 kW/cm 2 at low temperatures. Threshold curves obtained at different electron beam energies show that there is an optimum electron beam energy for wells at a given depth below the surface. This suggests that it is possible to match the electron beam energy to a given structure. Results are broadly consistent with Monte Carlo calculations of the depth dependence of the energy deposition of the electron beam.

  20. Performance of spin polarized electron source for low energy electron microscopy and applied to high energy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a spin polarized electron source for the spin polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM) that provide detailed real time observation of magnetic domain structure when the magnetic thin film is deposited to the substrate. The interelectrode dark current is kept less than 1nA under the extreme high vacuum environment as 5x10-10 Pa, and the polarized electron beam is drawn out in the electric field intensity of 4.2 MV/m. Also, the beam performance obtained the reduction brightness of 1.3x107A·m-2·sr-1·V-1, as to focus the laser spot diameter to 1.2μm, by having the 90% spin polarization. Moreover, using NEA surface photoemission mechanism, the electron beam with narrow of energy is emitted from photocathode. It seems to be useful for an electron source that needs a low emittance for high-energy accelerator. (author)

  1. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-Tc Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, N. C.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Wang, Y.; Ristić, Z.; Park, J.; Lv, B. Q.; Wang, Z.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shang, T.; Conder, K.; Mesot, J.; Johnston, S.; Shi, M.; Radović, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO3 , an insulating parent compound of doped high-Tc superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO6 breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi3 +/Bi5 + charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6 s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2 p orbitals.

  2. Atomic displacements effects on the electronic properties of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The displacements effects of the oxygen atom associated to the Sr-plane (O3) in the electronic properties of Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (Bi-2223), have been investigated using density functional theory. We determined intervals of the O3 atomic positions for which the band structure calculations show that the Bi-O bands, around the high symmetry point M in the irreducible Brillouin zone, emerge towards higher energies avoiding its contribution at Fermi level, as experimentally has been reported. This procedure does not introduce foreign doping elements into the calculation. Our calculations present a good agreement with the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The two options found differ in character (metallic or nonmetallic) of the Bi-O plane. The are not any experiments, to the best of our knowledge, which determine this character for Bi-2223. (Author)

  3. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-T_{c} Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO_{3}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, N C; Gawryluk, D J; Wang, Y; Ristić, Z; Park, J; Lv, B Q; Wang, Z; Matt, C E; Xu, N; Shang, T; Conder, K; Mesot, J; Johnston, S; Shi, M; Radović, M

    2016-07-15

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO_{3}, an insulating parent compound of doped high-T_{c} superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO_{6} breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi^{3+}/Bi^{5+} charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2p orbitals. PMID:27472130

  4. Analyzer of energy spectra of a magnetized relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzer of magnetized REB instant energy spectrum is described. The analyzer operation principle is based on the application of a sharp change of the direction of force lines of a magnetic field which is non-adiabatic for the beam electrons. The analyzer design is described, the main factors effecting the energy resolution are considered. The analyzer serviceability is examined in the course of experiments on plasma heating using a heavy-current microsecond REB at the GOL-3 device. The analyzer energy resolution which does not exceed 10% at 0.8 MeV energy and 20% at 0.3 MeV is determined. Beam energy spectra are obtained in one of the regimes of beam interaction with plasma. The efficiency of beam interaction with plasma determined using the analyzer achieves 30%. 10 refs.; 7 figs

  5. Free Electron Laser as Energy Driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A FEL based energy driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is proposed. The key element of the scheme is free electron laser system. Novel technical solutions reveal a possibility to construct the FEL system operating at radiation wavelength λ = 0.5 μm and providing flash energy E = 1 MJ and brightness 4 x 1022 W cm-2 sr-1 within steering pulse duration 0.1-2 ns. Total energy efficiency of the proposed ICF energy driver is about of 11% and repetition rate is 40 Hz. Dimensions of such an ICF driver are comparable with those of heavy-ion ICF driver, while the problem of technical realization seems to be more realistic. It is shown that the FEL based ICF energy driver may be constructed at the present level of accelerator technique R and D. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  6. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equ...

  7. Low-Energy Electron Scattering by Sugarcane Lignocellulosic Biomass Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Eliane; Sanchez, Sergio; Bettega, Marcio; Lima, Marco; Varella, Marcio

    2012-06-01

    The use of second generation (SG) bioethanol instead of fossil fuels could be a good strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the efficient production of SG bioethanol has being a challenge to researchers around the world. The main barrier one must overcome is the pretreatment, a very important step in SG bioethanol aimed at breaking down the biomass and facilitates the extraction of sugars from the biomass. Plasma-based treatment, which can generate reactive species, could be an interesting possibility since involves low-cost atmospheric-pressure plasma. In order to offer theoretical support to this technique, the interaction of low-energy electrons from the plasma with biomass is investigated. This study was motived by several works developed by Sanche et al., in which they understood that DNA damage arises from dissociative electron attachment, a mechanism in which electrons are resonantly trapped by DNA subunits. We will present elastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by sugarcane biomass molecules, obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method. Our calculations indicate the formation of π* shape resonances in the lignin subunits, while a series of broad and overlapping σ* resonances are found in cellulose and hemicellulose subunits. The presence of π* and σ* resonances could give rise to direct and indirect dissociation pathways in biomass. Then, theoretical resonance energies can be useful to guide the plasma-based pretreatment to break down specific linkages of interest in biomass.

  8. Low energy electron attachment to cyanamide (NH2CN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanamide (NH2CN) is a molecule relevant for interstellar chemistry and the chemical evolution of life. In the present investigation, dissociative electron attachment to NH2CN has been studied in a crossed electron–molecular beams experiment in the electron energy range from about 0 eV to 14 eV. The following anionic species were detected: NHCN−, NCN−, CN−, NH2−, NH−, and CH2−. The anion formation proceeds within two broad electron energy regions, one between about 0.5 and 4.5 eV and a second between 4.5 and 12 eV. A discussion of possible reaction channels for all measured negative ions is provided. The experimental results are compared with calculations of the thermochemical thresholds of the anions observed. For the dehydrogenated parent anion, we explain the deviation between the experimental appearance energy of the anion with the calculated corresponding reaction threshold by electron attachment to the isomeric form of NH2CN—carbodiimide

  9. Silicon passivation study under low energy electron irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backside illuminated thinned CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) imaging system is a technology developed to increase the signal to noise ratio and the sensibility of such sensors. This configuration is adapted to the electrons detection from the energy range of [1 - 12 keV]. The impinging electron creates by multiplication several hundreds of secondary electrons close to the surface. A P++ highly-doped passivation layer of the rear face is required to reduce the secondary electron surface recombination rate. Thanks to the potential barrier induced by the P++ layer, the passivation layer increases the collected charges number and so the sensor collection gain. The goal of this study is to develop some experimental methods in order to determine the effect of six different passivation processes on the collection gain. Beforehand, the energy profile deposited by an incident electron is studied with the combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and some analytical calculations. The final collection gain model shows that the mirror effect from the passivation layer is a key factor at high energies whereas the passivation layer has to be as thin as possible at low energies. A first experimental setup which consists in irradiating P++/N large diodes allows to study the passivation process impacts on the surface recombinations. Thanks to a second setup based on a single event upset directly on thinned CMOS sensor, passivation techniques are discriminated in term of mirror effect and the implied spreading charges. The doping atoms activation laser annealing is turn out to be a multiplication gain inhomogeneity source impacting directly the matrix uniformity. (author)

  10. The Hückel total p-electron energy puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILJENKO PERIC

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of being based on drastic simplifications, the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO quantum-mechanical model provides a reasonably good description of the properties of p-electrons in conjugated molecules. The HMO approach is found to be particularly successful in the case of the total p-electron energy (E, by means of which it is possible to calculate enthalpies of formation and similar thermodynamic characteristics of conjugated compounds. In this paper it is shown that expressions equivalent to E can be deduced within much more accurate quantum mechanical considerations. This might explain why E agrees so well with experimental findings.

  11. Transmission through thin films by low energy scanning electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Sobota, Jaroslav; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Fořt, Tomáš; Frank, Luděk

    Graz : Verlag der Technischen Universität, 2009, Vol. 1: 163-164. ISBN 978-3-85125-062-6. [MC 2009 - Joint Meeting of Dreiländertagung and Multinational Congress on Microscopy /9./. Graz (AT), 30.08.2009-04.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : low energy electrons * thin fílms * scanning transmission elektron microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://www.univie.ac.at/asem/Graz_MC_09/papers/95398.pdf

  12. Low-energy scattering of electrons by atomic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of polarized pseudostates has been used to calculate cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons by atomic oxygen. These pseudostates are added to the close-coupling expansion to give a polarization potential in agreement with experimental values of polarizability. The resulting elastic cross sections are in good agreement with other theoretical calculations as well as with experiment for energies up to 10 eV. The reactance matrices obtained in this calculation have been used to calculate collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in the ground-state 3P term for electron temperatures above 5000 degree K

  13. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  14. Spatial aspects of electron energy degradation in atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, R. P.; Green, A. E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra for electron energy degradation in atomic oxygen have been obtained using a Monte Carlo method for 25 eV to 10 keV incident electrons. Four-dimensional yield spectra have been analytically represented in terms of a model containing three simple microplumes. We find that the scaled spatial yield spectra for O is approximately the same as for N2. This feature provides a basis for inferring yield spectra for any atmosphere gas or mixture of gases.

  15. The energy of runaway electrons in the LT-4 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes measurements which have been made on LT-4, using calibrated X-ray detectors, to determine the energy of runaway electrons striking the limiter. The detectors were Teledyne NaI(Tl) Integral (S-68-I). The detectors were wrapped in three layers of Metshield. Calibration of the detectors was carried out at the AAEC, Lucas Heights, using the AINSE 1.3 (nominal) Mev Van De Graaff electron accelerator. The calibration is discussed in section 2. In section 3, the results of the measurements made with LT-4 are presented

  16. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  17. Radiation degradation of marine polysaccharides by low energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation degradations of marine polysaccharides by both gamma Co-60 and electron beam irradiations are investigated. Polysaccharides and oligosaccharides can be produced by degradation of corresponding polysaccharides including marine polysaccharides such as alginates, chitin chitosan and carrageenan. The viscosity of alginate, chitosan and carrageenan solution decreases markedly with increase of the low energy electron beam irradiation time and the beam current. Furthermore, the viscosity is reduced sharply in short time for polysaccharide solution with low concentration, for instance carrageenan solution of 1%. (author)

  18. Strain Mapping by Scanning Low Energy Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Man, O.; Pantělejev, L.; Hovorka, Miloš; Müllerová, Ilona; Frank, Luděk; Kouřil, M.

    Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2011 - (Šandera, P.), s. 338-341 ISBN 978-3-03785-006-0. ISSN 1662-9795. [MSMF-6: Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture VI. Brno (CZ), 28.06.2010-30.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk OE08012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM) * contrast of crystal orientation * microscopic strain Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ–Z, Γ–Y and Γ–T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ–Z direction, at a binding energy of −0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ–T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation–anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV–VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis. (paper)

  20. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  1. Electronic self-energy in simple and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In state-of-the art quasi-particle calculations of electrons in crystalline media like metals, semiconductors, and insulators, the dynamical self-energy function of the electrons Σ(r, r'; ω) plays a fundamental role. Beyond this aspect, the self-energy can also be used to calculate the Green's function (G) of the interacting electrons, and the knowledge of G directly leads to such important quantities like occupation number or momentum density distributions. For these reasons, a profound knowledge of Σ is of vital importance for many theoretical purposes. In this contribution, we present and discuss the self-energy function in the GW approximation for simple metals like Na and Al, and transition metals as Cr, Ni, and Cu. A main topic of our work is to investigate if and to what extent our results are influenced by approximations which are frequently described in the literature, namely (i) the neglect of non-diagonal elements of the self-energy and the polarisation matrix, and (ii) the use of the so-called plasmon-pole model for the inverse of the dielectric matrix. (author)

  2. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions

  3. Determining the static electronic and vibrational energy correlations via two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Californial 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Changes in the electronic structure of pigments in protein environments and of polar molecules in solution inevitably induce a re-adaption of molecular nuclear structure. Both changes of electronic and vibrational energies can be probed with visible or infrared lasers, such as two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy or vibrational spectroscopy. The extent to which the two changes are correlated remains elusive. The recent demonstration of two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy potentially enables a direct measurement of this correlation experimentally. However, it has hitherto been unclear how to characterize the correlation from the spectra. In this paper, we present a theoretical formalism to demonstrate the slope of the nodal line between the excited state absorption and ground state bleach peaks in the spectra as a characterization of the correlation between electronic and vibrational transition energies. We also show the dynamics of the nodal line slope is correlated to the vibrational spectral dynamics. Additionally, we demonstrate the fundamental 2DEV spectral line-shape of a monomer with newly developed response functions.

  4. Accounting for both electron--lattice and electron--electron coupling in conjugated polymers: minimum total energy calculations on the Hubbard--Peierls hamiltonian

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Giuseppe

    1993-01-01

    Minimum total energy calculations, which account for both electron--lattice and electron--electron interactions in conjugated polymers are performed for chains with up to eight carbon atoms. These calculations are motivated in part by recent experimental results on the spectroscopy of polyenes and conjugated polymers and shed light on the longstanding question of the relative importance of electron--lattice vs. electron--electron interactions in determining the properties of these systems.

  5. Electronic structure basis for the titanic magnetoresistance in WTe$_2$

    OpenAIRE

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetor...

  6. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200Hg, 114Cd, 165Dy, 168Er, 239U nuclei and the 13C, 28Al 3H and 92Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.)

  7. Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems - Status and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the energy paradigms in many countries are experiencing significant change from fossil-based resources to cleaner renewables. It is expected that the scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced. This requires that the production, distribution...... electronics in generation, transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced controls, can pave the way for renewable energy resources. In view of this, some of the most promising renewable candidates like wind power and photovoltaic, which are becoming a significant part in the...... and use of the energy to be as technological efficient as possible, and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be strengthened. In order to realize the transition smoothly and effectively, power conversion systems will continue to play an essential role. Using highly efficient power...

  8. Probing Plasmonic Nanostructures with Electron Energy - Loss Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren

    generalized nonlocal optical response model, which expands the hydrodynamic model by taking into account the diffusion of free electrons in metals through Fick’s law. We go on to consider the implications of these two nonlocal models in the following plasmonic geometries: metal-insulator interface, nanosphere...... nonlocal response. The experimental work comprises the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to excite and study both localized and propagating surface plasmons in metal structures. Following a short introduction, we present the theoretical foundation to describe nonlocal response in Maxwell......-response approximation. Irrespective of the microscopic origin, we find that nonlocal response modifies the electromagnetic wave equation by an additional Laplacian term. The hydrodynamic model, which includes nonlocal response through the Thomas–Fermi pressure of a free-electron gas, is discussed. We present also the...

  9. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  10. Bremsstrahlung source term estimation for high energy electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick target bremsstrahlung source term for 450 MeV and 550 MeV electrons are experimentally determined using booster synchrotron of Indus facility at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, India. The source term is also simulated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Results from experiment and simulation are found to be in very good agreement. Based on the agreement between experimental and simulated data, the source term is determined up to 3000 MeV by simulation. The paper also describes the studies carried out on the variation of source term when a thin target is considered in place of a thick target, used in earlier studies. - Highlights: • Experimental determination of bremsstrahlung source term at 450 and 550 MeV electrons. • Monte Carlo calculations performed for validation of experimental data. • Thick and thin target bremsstrahlung source term is studied. • Brensstrahlung Source term is determined up to 3 GeV electron energies

  11. Theoretical characterization of electron energy distribution function in RF plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different methods for the modeling of low-temperature plasmas of both technological and fundamental interest are discussed. The main concept of all these models is the electron energy distribution function (eedf) which is necessary to calculate the rate coefficients for any chemical reaction involving electrons. Results of eedf calculations in homogeneous SF6 and SiH4 plasmas are discussed based on solution of the time-dependent Boltzmann equation. The space-dependent eedf in an RF discharge in He is calculated taking into account the sheath oscillations by a Monte Carlo model assuming the plasma heating mechanism and the electric field determined by using a fluid model. The need to take into account the ambipolar diffusion of electrons in RF discharge modeling is stressed. A self-consistent model based on coupling the equations of the fluid model and the chemical kinetics ones is presented. (orig.)

  12. New stopping power formula for intermediate energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hasan

    2008-12-01

    This study presents a new stopping power (SP) formula for electrons. In the modified Bethe-Bloch SP expression, analytical expressions for the effective charge and effective mean excitation energies (EMEE) of target atoms are used, while for the effective charge of incoming electrons, Sugiyama's semiempirical formula from Peterson and Green is used. An analytical expression for practical SP calculations is obtained using the Bethe approximation and a Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. The calculated results of the SP for electrons in some materials, such as H(2)O, H(2), CO(2), N(2), and O(2), are compared with experimental data, together with Penelope code results and a number of other semiempirical and analytical calculations. PMID:18586505

  13. Modeling ellipsometry and electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Keenan A.; Miskovic, Zoran L. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, N2L 3G1, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Diebold, Alain C. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York at Albany, 255 Fuller Rd., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Idrobo, Juan-Carlos [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Recent studies of electronic excitations in graphene by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have revealed massive high-frequency peaks assigned to the π and σ+π plasmons [1], which were semi-quantitatively modeled with a two-dimensional, two-fluid hydrodynamic (HD) model [2]. On the other hand, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) of graphene covers the region of nearly constant absorbance due to graphene’s universal optical conductivity at infrared frequencies, which is not clearly resolved by EELS, and goes up to cover the π-plasmon peak at ultraviolet frequencies [3]. To attempt to model both the SE and EELS, we amend the HD model by including a low-frequency contribution of graphene’s inter-band transitions, while monitoring the fulfillment of the f-sum rule [4] up to frequencies that cover excitations of all valence electrons.

  14. Absorption effects in intermediate-energy electron scattering by difluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Although several solid-based ab-initio theoretical methods have been developed in the past few decades for the investigation on electron-molecule collisions, most of them can only be successfully applied in the low incident electron energy range. The extension of their application to the intermediate-energy range (roughly from the first ionization potential to around 1 keV) is not straightforward. It is known that at these energies the numerous open inelastic scattering channels are responsible for absorption effects that play an important role on the collision dynamics. In the last two decades, several model absorption potentials have been proposed to include absorption effects into the scattering dynamics and so, the resolution of the scattering equations is kept in the single-channel framework. Although these model-potential methods have shown to provide, in general, quite accurate differential (DCS), integral (ICS) and momentum-transfer (MTCS) cross sections for elastic electron-molecule collisions, most of the calculations have systematically underestimated the values of the grand-total (TCS) and total absorption (TACS) cross sections. In recent papers, our group has reported a modified version of the widely used Stazewska's version 3 of the quasi-free scattering model (QFSM3) absorption potential. In order to obtain a better description of screening effects due to the target electronic cloud, we have proposed a multiplicative screening factor that should be applied on the original QFSM3 absorption potential. In our works, we have shown that such a simple modification in the absorption model potential is capable of providing significant improvement in the calculated TCS and TAGS for a variety of targets for intermediate-energy electron-molecule collisions. In the present work we apply our modified model absorption potential to study electron scattering by a strongly polar molecule, cis-difluoroethylene in a wide incident energy range (1-500 e

  15. LEETECH facility as a flexible source of low energy electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Attie, D; Bezshyyko, O; Burmistrov, L; Chaus, A; Colas, P; Fedorchuk, O; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L; Kadenko, I; Krylov, V; Kubytskyi, V; Lopez, R; Monard, H; Rodin, V; Titov, M; Tomassini, D; Variola, A

    2016-01-01

    A new versatile facility LEETECH for detector R&D, tests and calibration is designed and constructed. It uses electrons produced by the photoinjector PHIL at LAL, Orsay and provides a powerful tool for wide range R&D studies of different detector concepts delivering "mono-chromatic" samples of low energy electrons with adjustable energy and intensity. Among other innovative instrumentation techniques, LEETECH will be used for testing various gaseous tracking detectors and studying new Micromegas/InGrid concept which has very promising characteristics of spatial resolution and can be a good candidate for particle tracking and identification. In this paper the importance and expected characteristics of such facility based on detailed simulation studies are addressed.

  16. Electron-positron pair creation characterized by the conversion energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sitiwaldi, Ibrahim; Xie, Bai-Song

    2016-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a pair can be characterized under which mechanism it was created according to its conversion energy, a quantity defined as the sum of electron and its conjugate positron's mass-energy, in the study of electron-positron pair creation. The value of this quantity is checked with quantum field theoretical simulations for several field configurations and found that it can describe the creation process with rich physical picture, showing all the creation channels and giving the yields of each channel specifically. Evenly as a very convenient and powerful detection quantity it can be applicable to some complicated pair creation processes such as that triggered by cooperation of two different photons as well as the dynamically assisted Schwinger mechanism.

  17. National energy use of consumer electronics in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major consumer electronics in U.S. homes accounted for nearly 7 percent of U.S. residential electricity consumption in 1999. We attribute more than half of this figure (3.6 percent) to televisions, videocassette recorders, and DVD players, and nearly one-third (1.8 percent) to audio products. Set-top boxes currently account for a relatively small fraction of residential electricity use (0.7 percent), but we expect this end-use to grow quickly with the proliferation of digital set-top boxes, which currently use 40 percent more energy per unit than the average TV set. In all, these consumer electronics plus telephone products consumed 75 TWh in the U.S. in 1999, half of which was consumed while the products were not in use. This energy use is expected to grow as products with new or advanced functionality hit the market

  18. Influence of Heat-radiating on Multi-photon Compton Scattering High-energy Electron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; WANG Xin-min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model of the inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat-radiation photons, the influence of heat-radiating photons on multi-photon Compton scattering high-energy electrons is studied . The results show that the energy loss, power loss, light resistance and light pressure of the high-energy electron formed by heat radiating are all proportional to the temperature T4 of the vacuum cavity of the electron,the Lorentz factor γ2 of the high-energy electrons, the scattering section of the electron and the number of photons acting at the same time with high-energy electrons. A good method for lessening the energy loss of the high-energy electron by using the one-photon Compton scattering between high-energy electrons and heat radiation photons is proposed.

  19. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  20. Narrow beam dosimetry for high-energy hadrons and electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccioni, M; Ulrici, Luisa

    2001-01-01

    Organ doses and effective dose were calculated with the latest version of the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA in the case of an anthropomorphic mathematical model exposed to monoenergetic narrow beams of protons, pions and electrons in the energy range 10°— 400 GeV. The target organs considered were right eye, thyroid, thymus, lung and breast. Simple scaling laws to the calculated values are given. The present data and formula should prove useful for dosimetric estimations in case of accidental exposures to high-energy beams.