WorldWideScience

Sample records for angle-correlated particle-particle propagation

  1. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13 C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system

  2. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  3. PENTACLE: Parallelized particle-particle particle-tree code for planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Oshino, Shoichi; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hori, Yasunori

    2017-10-01

    We have newly developed a parallelized particle-particle particle-tree code for planet formation, PENTACLE, which is a parallelized hybrid N-body integrator executed on a CPU-based (super)computer. PENTACLE uses a fourth-order Hermite algorithm to calculate gravitational interactions between particles within a cut-off radius and a Barnes-Hut tree method for gravity from particles beyond. It also implements an open-source library designed for full automatic parallelization of particle simulations, FDPS (Framework for Developing Particle Simulator), to parallelize a Barnes-Hut tree algorithm for a memory-distributed supercomputer. These allow us to handle 1-10 million particles in a high-resolution N-body simulation on CPU clusters for collisional dynamics, including physical collisions in a planetesimal disc. In this paper, we show the performance and the accuracy of PENTACLE in terms of \\tilde{R}_cut and a time-step Δt. It turns out that the accuracy of a hybrid N-body simulation is controlled through Δ t / \\tilde{R}_cut and Δ t / \\tilde{R}_cut ˜ 0.1 is necessary to simulate accurately the accretion process of a planet for ≥106 yr. For all those interested in large-scale particle simulations, PENTACLE, customized for planet formation, will be freely available from https://github.com/PENTACLE-Team/PENTACLE under the MIT licence.

  4. Angle-correlated cross sections in the framework of the continuum shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerschel, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    In the present thesis in the framework of the continuum shell modell a concept for the treatment of angle-correlated cross sections was developed by which coincidence experiments on electron scattering on nuclei are described. For this the existing Darmstadt continuum-shell-model code had to be extended to the calculation of the correlation coefficients in which nuclear dynamics enter and which determine completely the angle-correlated cross sections. Under inclusion of the kinematics a method for the integration over the scattered electron was presented and used for the comparison with corresponding experiments. As application correlation coefficients for the proton channel in 12 C with 1 - and 2 + excitations were studied. By means of these coefficients finally cross sections for the reaction 12 C (e,p) 11 B could be calculated and compared with the experiment whereby the developed methods were proved as suitable to predict correctly both the slope and the quantity of the experimental cross sections. (orig.) [de

  5. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggelen, Helen van; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-01-01

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H 2 , and eliminates delocalization errors in H 2 + and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies – competitive with the ph-RPA – with the correct R −6 asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations

  6. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H2, and eliminates delocalization errors in H2(+) and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies--competitive with the ph-RPA--with the correct R(-6) asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  7. Hydrodynamic Flow in PbPb Collisions Observed via Azimuthal Angle Correlations of Charged Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00192137

    2012-01-01

    Azimuthal angle correlations of charged hadrons were measured in $\\sqrt s_{NN}$ = 2.76 TeV PbPb collisions by the CMS experiment. The distributions exhibit anisotropies that are correlated with the event-by-event orientation of the reaction plane. Several methods were employed to extract the strength of the signal: the event-plane, cumulant and Lee-Yang Zeros methods. These methods have different sensitivity to correlations that are not caused by the collective motion in the system (non-flow correlations due to jets, resonance decays, and quantum correlations). The second Fourier coefficient of the charged hadron azimuthal distributions was measured as a function of transverse momentum, pseudorapidity and centrality in a broad kinematic range: $0.3 < p_T < 12.0$ GeV/c, $|\\eta| < 2.4$, as a function of collision centrality. In addition, the third through sixth Fourier components were measured at midrapidity using selected methods.

  8. A new method to determine the energy of vanishing flow, using particle-particle azimuthal correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buta, A. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire]|[Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Angelique, J.C.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Cussol, D. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire; Auger, G.; Cabot, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Cassagnou, Y. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Crema, E. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire]|[Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; El Masri, Y. [Louvain Univ., Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Unite de Physique Nucleaire; and others

    1996-09-01

    Measuring the in-plane flow parameter appears to be a promising method to gain information on the equation of state of nuclear matter. A new method, based on particle-particle azimuthal correlations is proposed. This method does not require the knowledge of the reaction plane. The collisions Zn+Ni and Ar+Al are presented as an example. (K.A.).

  9. Numerical prediction effects of particle-particle collisions on gas-particle flows in swirl chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Liu Xue; Li Guohui; Jiang Lixiang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a unified-second-order-moment two-phase turbulent model incorporating into the kinetic theory of granular flows for considering particle-particle collision (USM-θ) is proposed to study the turbulent gas-particle flows in swirl chamber. Anisotropy of gas-solid two-phase stress and the interaction between two-phase stresses are fully considered by constructing a two-phase Reynolds stress model and a transport equation of two-phase stress correlation. Sommerfeld et al. (1991) experimental data is used to quantitatively validate USM-θ and USM model for analysis the effects of particle-particle collision. Numerical predicted results show that time-averaged velocity and fluctuation velocity of gas and particle using particle temperature model are better than those of without particle temperature model. Maximum particle concentration and temperature located at thin shear layer adjacent to wall surface due to particle inertia. Small-scale particle fluctuation due to particle-particle collision is smaller than large-scale gas-particle turbulence fluctuation. Particle-particle collision leads to the redistribution dissipation of Reynolds stress and particle turbulence kinetic energy.

  10. Measurement of angle-correlated differential (n,2n) reaction cross section with pencil-beam DV neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, S.; Kondo, K.; Shido, S.; Miyamaru, H.; Murata, I.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Nishitani, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Angle-correlated differential cross-section for 9 Be(n,2n) reaction has been measured with the coincidence detection technique and a pencil-beam DT neutron source at FNS, JAEA. Energy spectra of two emitted neutrons were obtained for azimuthal and polar direction independently. It was made clear from the experiment that there are noise signals caused by inter-detector scattering. The ratio of the inter-detector scattering components in the detected signals was estimated by MCNP calculation to correct the measured result. By considering the inter-detector scattering components, the total 9 Be(n,2n) reaction cross-section agreed with the evaluated nuclear data within the experimental error. (author)

  11. Animating Wall-Bounded Turbulent Smoke via Filament-Mesh Particle-Particle Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiangyun; Si, Weixin; Yuan, Zhiyong; Sun, Hanqiu; Qin, Jing; Wang, Qiong; Heng, Pheng-Ann; Xiangyun Liao; Weixin Si; Zhiyong Yuan; Hanqiu Sun; Jing Qin; Qiong Wang; Pheng-Ann Heng

    2018-03-01

    Turbulent vortices in smoke flows are crucial for a visually interesting appearance. Unfortunately, it is challenging to efficiently simulate these appealing effects in the framework of vortex filament methods. The vortex filaments in grids scheme allows to efficiently generate turbulent smoke with macroscopic vortical structures, but suffers from the projection-related dissipation, and thus the small-scale vortical structures under grid resolution are hard to capture. In addition, this scheme cannot be applied in wall-bounded turbulent smoke simulation, which requires efficiently handling smoke-obstacle interaction and creating vorticity at the obstacle boundary. To tackle above issues, we propose an effective filament-mesh particle-particle (FMPP) method for fast wall-bounded turbulent smoke simulation with ample details. The Filament-Mesh component approximates the smooth long-range interactions by splatting vortex filaments on grid, solving the Poisson problem with a fast solver, and then interpolating back to smoke particles. The Particle-Particle component introduces smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) turbulence model for particles in the same grid, where interactions between particles cannot be properly captured under grid resolution. Then, we sample the surface of obstacles with boundary particles, allowing the interaction between smoke and obstacle being treated as pressure forces in SPH. Besides, the vortex formation region is defined at the back of obstacles, providing smoke particles flowing by the separation particles with a vorticity force to simulate the subsequent vortex shedding phenomenon. The proposed approach can synthesize the lost small-scale vortical structures and also achieve the smoke-obstacle interaction with vortex shedding at obstacle boundaries in a lightweight manner. The experimental results demonstrate that our FMPP method can achieve more appealing visual effects than vortex filaments in grids scheme by efficiently simulating

  12. Energy-angle correlation correction algorithm for monochromatic computed tomography based on Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhijun; Du, Yingchao; Huang, Wenhui; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-12-01

    The necessity for compact and relatively low cost x-ray sources with monochromaticity, continuous tunability of x-ray energy, high spatial coherence, straightforward polarization control, and high brightness has led to the rapid development of Thomson scattering x-ray sources. To meet the requirement of in-situ monochromatic computed tomography (CT) for large-scale and/or high-attenuation materials based on this type of x-ray source, there is an increasing demand for effective algorithms to correct the energy-angle correlation. In this paper, we take advantage of the parametrization of the x-ray attenuation coefficient to resolve this problem. The linear attenuation coefficient of a material can be decomposed into a linear combination of the energy-dependent photoelectric and Compton cross-sections in the keV energy regime without K-edge discontinuities, and the line integrals of the decomposition coefficients of the above two parts can be determined by performing two spectrally different measurements. After that, the line integral of the linear attenuation coefficient of an imaging object at a certain interested energy can be derived through the above parametrization formula, and monochromatic CT can be reconstructed at this energy using traditional reconstruction methods, e.g., filtered back projection or algebraic reconstruction technique. Not only can monochromatic CT be realized, but also the distributions of the effective atomic number and electron density of the imaging object can be retrieved at the expense of dual-energy CT scan. Simulation results validate our proposal and will be shown in this paper. Our results will further expand the scope of application for Thomson scattering x-ray sources.

  13. Experimental study on flames propagating through zirconium particle clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yi; Sun Jinhua; Ding Yibin; Guo Song; He Xuechao

    2009-01-01

    To reveal the mechanisms of flame propagation through the hardly volatile metal dust clouds clearly, the flame propagating through zirconium particle clouds has been examined experimentally. A high-speed video camera was used to record the propagation process of the flame. Combustion zone temperature was detected by a fine thermocouple. Based on the experimental results, structure of flame and combustion courses of zirconium particles were analyzed, the combustion propagation in zirconium dust was investigated, and the velocity and temperature characteristics of the combustion zone were also elucidated. The combustion zone propagating through zirconium particle clouds consists of luminous particles. Particle concentration plays an important role in the combustion zone propagation process. With the increase of zirconium particle concentration, the maximum temperature of the combustion zone increases at the lower concentration, takes a maximum value, and then decreases at the higher concentration. It is also found that the propagation velocity of the combustion zone has a linear relationship with its maximum temperature.

  14. Benchmark tests and spin adaptation for the particle-particle random phase approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; van Aggelen, Helen; Steinmann, Stephan N; Peng, Degao; Yang, Weitao

    2013-11-07

    The particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) provides an approximation to the correlation energy in density functional theory via the adiabatic connection [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)]. It has virtually no delocalization error nor static correlation error for single-bond systems. However, with its formal O(N(6)) scaling, the pp-RPA is computationally expensive. In this paper, we implement a spin-separated and spin-adapted pp-RPA algorithm, which reduces the computational cost by a substantial factor. We then perform benchmark tests on the G2/97 enthalpies of formation database, DBH24 reaction barrier database, and four test sets for non-bonded interactions (HB6/04, CT7/04, DI6/04, and WI9/04). For the G2/97 database, the pp-RPA gives a significantly smaller mean absolute error (8.3 kcal/mol) than the direct particle-hole RPA (ph-RPA) (22.7 kcal/mol). Furthermore, the error in the pp-RPA is nearly constant with the number of atoms in a molecule, while the error in the ph-RPA increases. For chemical reactions involving typical organic closed-shell molecules, pp- and ph-RPA both give accurate reaction energies. Similarly, both RPAs perform well for reaction barriers and nonbonded interactions. These results suggest that the pp-RPA gives reliable energies in chemical applications. The adiabatic connection formalism based on pairing matrix fluctuation is therefore expected to lead to widely applicable and accurate density functionals.

  15. Radiowave - Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Martin P. M.; Barclay, Leslie W.

    The effects of the earth atmosphere on the radio-wave propagation (RWP) and their implications for telecommunication systems are discussed in reviews based on lectures presented at the Second IEE Vacation School on Radiowave Propagation, held at the University of Surrey in September 1986. A general overview of propagation phenomena is presented, and particular attention is given to the theory of EM wave propagation; radio system parameters; surface wave propagation; RWP in the ionosphere; VLF, LF, and MF applications and predictions; HF applications and predictions; clear-air aspects of the troposphere and their effects on RWP; and the nature of precipitation, clouds, and atmospheric gases and their effects on RWP. Also considered are terrestrial and earth-space propagation path predictions, the prediction of interference levels and coordination distances for frequencies above 1 GHz, propagation effects on VHF and UHF broadcasting, and propagation effects on mobile communication services.

  16. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watanabe, Takehito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Evidence for persisting mean field effects at E/A = 60 MeV from particle-particle correlation measurements and theoretical investigations with the Landau Vlasov equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardouin, D.; Basrak, Z.; Schuck, P.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Gelbke, C.K.; Lynch, W.G.; Maier, M.; Pochodzalla, J.; Bizard, G.; Lefebvres, F.; Tamain, B.

    1988-01-01

    We here report on proton-proton large angle correlation measurements for the heavy systems Ar + Au and Ar + Ti at E/A = 60 MeV. Simultaneously we give a theoretical interpretation of the results using the Landau Vlasov equation. (orig./HSI)

  18. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  19. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    -dimensional (HR3D) velocity field can be used as a representation of near bed open-channel flows. Both approaches are used to simulate saltating sediment particles using a 3D Lagrangian particle tracking model. This tracking model is composed by generalized sub-models for particle collision with the bed, bed-roughness representation, and particle free-flight between wall collisions. We analyze the hydrodynamic forces (drag, virtual mass, lift, Basset, Magnus and buoyancy) involved in particle saltation. For validation purposes, we compare our simulation results with experimental data from Niño and García (1998) and Lee and Hsu (1994). Finally we use the logarithmic velocity profile to analyze the importance of particle-particle collision using a sub-model based on the conservation of linear and angular momentum during collision. We analyze simulation results with different particle sizes within the sand range, different flow intensities, and different particle concentrations, in terms of particle diffusion and changes in velocity, rotation and trajectory during collision. To identify the importance of particle-particle collisions, simulations with and without collision among particles were carried out.

  20. Part two: Error propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this chapter include a discussion of exact results as related to nuclear materials management and accounting in nuclear facilities; propagation of error for a single measured value; propagation of error for several measured values; error propagation for materials balances; and an application of error propagation to an example of uranium hexafluoride conversion process

  1. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  2. Modelling the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    Scaling of the Landau gauge gluon propagator calculated at {beta} = 6.0 and at {beta} = 6.2 is demonstrated. A variety of functional forms for the gluon propagator calculated on a large (32{sup 3} x 64) lattice at {beta} = 6.0 are investigated.

  3. DROMO Propagator Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutxua, H.; Sanjurjo-Rivo, M.; Peláez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In year 2000 a house-made orbital propagator was developed by the SDGUPM (former Grupo de Dinámica de Tethers) based in a set of redundant variables including Euler parameters. This propagator was called DROMO. and it was mainly used in numerical simulations of electrodynamic tethers. It was presented for the first time in the international meeting V Jornadas de Trabajo en Mecánica Celeste, held in Albarracín, Spain, in 2002 (see reference 1). The special perturbation method associated with DROMO can be consulted in the paper.2 In year 1975, Andre Deprit in reference 3 proposes a propagation scheme very similar to the one in which DROMO is based, by using the ideal frame concept of Hansen. The different approaches used in references 3 and 2 gave rise to a small controversy. In this paper we carried out a different deduction of the DROMO propagator, underlining its close relation with the Hansen ideal frame concept, and also the similarities and the differences with the theory carried out by Deprit in 3. Simultaneously we introduce some improvements in the formulation that leads to a more synthetic propagator.

  4. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  5. Tropical Cyclone Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, William

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of tropical cyclone propagation or why the average tropical cyclone moves 1-2 m/s faster and usually 10-20 deg to the left of its surrounding (or 5-7 deg radius) deep layer (850-300 mb) steering current...

  6. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 5. Flood Wave Propagation-The Saint Venant Equations. P P Mujumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 5 May 2001 pp 66-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/05/0066-0073 ...

  7. PIV uncertainty propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciacchitano, A.; Wieneke, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the propagation of the instantaneous uncertainty of PIV measurements to statistical and instantaneous quantities of interest derived from the velocity field. The expression of the uncertainty of vorticity, velocity divergence, mean value and Reynolds stresses is derived. It

  8. UWB Propagation through Walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schejbal, V.; Bezoušek, P.; Čermák, D.; NĚMEC, Z.; Fišer, Ondřej; Hájek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2006), s. 17-24 ISSN 1210-2512 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA2/030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ultra wide band * UWB antenna s * UWB propagation * multipath effects Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  9. Atmospheric and laser propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Stein, K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews three phenomena that affect the propagation of electro-optical radiation through the atmosphere: absorption and scattering, refraction and turbulence. The net effect on imaging or laser systems is a net reduction of the effective range, or a degradation of the information

  10. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I available for forecasting the propagation of the flood wave. Introduction. Among all natural disasters, floods are the most frequently occurring phenomena that affect a large section of population all over the world, every year. Throughout the last century, flood- ing has been one of the most devastating disasters both in terms.

  11. Gauge engineering and propagators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Axel

    2017-01-01

    The dependence of the propagators on the choice of these complete gauge-fixings will then be investigated using lattice gauge theory for Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the implications for the infrared, and to some extent mid-momentum behavior, can be substantial. In going beyond the Yang-Mills case it turns out that the influence of matter can generally not be neglected. This will be briefly discussed for various types of matter.

  12. Shallow Water Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ice terminates or regenerates along the propagation direction. (2) New capabilities for elastic and poro-elastic sediments • Range-dependent...standard Euler- Bernoulli bean theory can be applied in the x-z plane. The top right panel illustrates a side view of the subunit. A shearing force F...bottom panel is a table in which the second column has representative values for these three quantities, for the most common types of clay minerals in

  13. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  14. Stochastic model in microwave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranfagni, A.; Mugnai, D.

    2011-01-01

    Further experimental results of delay time in microwave propagation are reported in the presence of a lossy medium (wood). The measurements show that the presence of a lossy medium makes the propagation slightly superluminal. The results are interpreted on the basis of a stochastic (or path integral) model, showing how this model is able to describe each kind of physical system in which multi-path trajectories are present. -- Highlights: ► We present new experimental results on electromagnetic “anomalous” propagation. ► We apply a path integral theoretical model to wave propagation. ► Stochastic processes and multi-path trajectories in propagation are considered.

  15. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  16. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  17. Laser propagation code study

    OpenAIRE

    Rockower, Edward B.

    1985-01-01

    A number of laser propagation codes have been assessed as to their suitability for modeling Army High Energy Laser (HEL) weapons used in an anti- sensor mode. We identify a number of areas in which systems analysis HEL codes are deficient. Most notably, available HEL scaling law codes model the laser aperture as circular, possibly with a fixed (e.g. 10%) obscuration. However, most HELs have rectangular apertures with up to 30% obscuration. We present a beam-quality/aperture shape scaling rela...

  18. An analysis of rumor propagation based on propagation force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen-jun; Liu, Yong-mei; Wang, Ke-xi

    2016-02-01

    A propagation force is introduced into the analysis of rumor propagation to address uncertainty in the process. The propagation force is portrayed as a fuzzy variable, and a category of new parameters with fuzzy variables is defined. The classic susceptible, infected, recovered (SIR) model is modified using these parameters, a fuzzy reproductive number is introduced into the modified model, and the rationality of the fuzzy reproductive number is illuminated through calculation and comparison. Rumor control strategies are also discussed.

  19. Propagation into an unstable state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dee, G.

    1985-01-01

    We describe propagating front solutions of the equations of motion of pattern-forming systems. We make a number of conjectures concerning the properties of such fronts in connection with pattern selection in these systems. We describe a calculation which can be used to calculate the velocity and state selected by certain types of propagating fronts. We investigate the propagating front solutions of the amplitude equation which provides a valid dynamical description of many pattern-forming systems near onset

  20. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  1. Precursors in Front Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, D.A

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical construction of the leading edge of propagating fronts. Whereas the steady-state front is typically an exponential, far ahead of the front, the front falls off much faster, in a fashion determined by the Green's function of tile problem. We show that there is a universal transition Tom the steady-state exponential front to a Gaussian falloff. The transition region is of width t 1/2 , and moves out ahead of the front at a constant velocity greater than the steady-state front speed. This Gaussian front then is in general modified even further ahead of the front to match onto the expected Green's function behavior. We demonstrate this in the case of the Ginzburg-Landau and Korteweg-De Vries equations. We also discuss the relevance of this mechanism for velocity selection in the Fisher equation

  2. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  3. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  4. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  5. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  6. Dressing the nucleon propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Gersten, A.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleon propagator in the ''nested bubbles'' approximation is analyzed. The approximation is built from the minimal set of diagrams which is needed to maintain the unitarity condition under two-pion production threshold in the two-nucleon Bethe--Salpeter equation. Recursive formulas for subsets of ''nested bubbles'' diagrams calculated in the framework of the pseudoscalar interaction are obtained by the use of dispersion relations. We prove that the sum of all the ''nested bubbles'' diverges. Moreover, the successive iterations are plagued with ghost poles. We prove that the first approximation--which is the so-called chain approximation--has ghost poles for any nonvanishing coupling constant. In an earlier paper we have shown that ghost poles lead to ghost cuts. These cuts are present in the ''nested bubbles.'' Ghost elimination procedures are discussed. Modifications of the ''nested bubbles'' approximation are introduced in order to obtain convergence and in order to eliminate the ghost poles and ghost cuts. In a similar way as in the Lee model, cutoff functions are introduced in order to eliminate the ghost poles. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the absence of ghost poles are formulated and analyzed. The spectral functions of the modified ''nested bubbles'' are analyzed and computed. Finally, we present a theorem, similar in its form to Levinson's theorem in scattering theory, which enables one to compute in a simple way the number of ghost poles

  7. Transionospheric propagation predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucher, J. A.; Basu, S.; Basu, S.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Davies, K.; Donatelli, D. E.; Fremouw, E. J.; Goodman, J. M.; Hartmann, G. K.; Leitinger, R.

    1979-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of the capability to make transionospheric propagation predictions are addressed, highlighting the effects of the ionized media, which dominate for frequencies below 1 to 3 GHz, depending upon the state of the ionosphere and the elevation angle through the Earth-space path. The primary concerns are the predictions of time delay of signal modulation (group path delay) and of radio wave scintillation. Progress in these areas is strongly tied to knowledge of variable structures in the ionosphere ranging from the large scale (thousands of kilometers in horizontal extent) to the fine scale (kilometer size). Ionospheric variability and the relative importance of various mechanisms responsible for the time histories observed in total electron content (TEC), proportional to signal group delay, and in irregularity formation are discussed in terms of capability to make both short and long term predictions. The data base upon which predictions are made is examined for its adequacy, and the prospects for prediction improvements by more theoretical studies as well as by increasing the available statistical data base are examined.

  8. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  9. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M and O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M and O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report

  10. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  11. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  12. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  13. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessling, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result.

  14. Propagation of dynamic measurement uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessling, J P

    2011-01-01

    The time-dependent measurement uncertainty has been evaluated in a number of recent publications, starting from a known uncertain dynamic model. This could be defined as the 'downward' propagation of uncertainty from the model to the targeted measurement. The propagation of uncertainty 'upward' from the calibration experiment to a dynamic model traditionally belongs to system identification. The use of different representations (time, frequency, etc) is ubiquitous in dynamic measurement analyses. An expression of uncertainty in dynamic measurements is formulated for the first time in this paper independent of representation, joining upward as well as downward propagation. For applications in metrology, the high quality of the characterization may be prohibitive for any reasonably large and robust model to pass the whiteness test. This test is therefore relaxed by not directly requiring small systematic model errors in comparison to the randomness of the characterization. Instead, the systematic error of the dynamic model is propagated to the uncertainty of the measurand, analogously but differently to how stochastic contributions are propagated. The pass criterion of the model is thereby transferred from the identification to acceptance of the total accumulated uncertainty of the measurand. This increases the relevance of the test of the model as it relates to its final use rather than the quality of the calibration. The propagation of uncertainty hence includes the propagation of systematic model errors. For illustration, the 'upward' propagation of uncertainty is applied to determine if an appliance box is damaged in an earthquake experiment. In this case, relaxation of the whiteness test was required to reach a conclusive result

  15. Group symmetries and information propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draayer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Spectroscopy concerns itself with the ways in which the Hamiltonian and other interesting operators defined in few-particle spaces are determined or determine properties of many-particle systems. But the action of the central limit theorem (CLT) filters the transmission of information between source and observed so whether propagating forward from a few-particle defining space, as is usual in theoretical studies, or projecting backward to it from measured things, each is only sensitive to averaged properties of the other. Our concern is with the propagation of spectroscopic information in the presence of good symmetries when filtering action of the CLT is effective. Specifically, we propose to address the question, What propagates and how. We begin with some examples, using both scalar and isospin geometries to illustrate simple propagation. Examples of matrix propagation are studied; contact with standard tensor algebra is established and an algorithm put forward for the expansion of any operator in terms of another set, complete or not; shell-model results for 20 Ne using a realistic interaction and two trace-equivalent forms are presented; and some further challenges are mentioned

  16. Signal propagation along the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2018-03-08

    Axons link distant brain regions and are usually considered as simple transmission cables in which reliable propagation occurs once an action potential has been generated. Safe propagation of action potentials relies on specific ion channel expression at strategic points of the axon such as nodes of Ranvier or axonal branch points. However, while action potentials are generally considered as the quantum of neuronal information, their signaling is not entirely digital. In fact, both their shape and their conduction speed have been shown to be modulated by activity, leading to regulations of synaptic latency and synaptic strength. We report here newly identified mechanisms of (1) safe spike propagation along the axon, (2) compartmentalization of action potential shape in the axon, (3) analog modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission and (4) alteration in conduction time after persistent regulation of axon morphology in central neurons. We discuss the contribution of these regulations in information processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  18. Azimuthal angle correlations at large rapidities. Revisiting density variation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotsman, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Levin, E. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Particle Physics, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Science, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departemento de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-11-15

    We discuss the angular correlation present in hadron-hadron collisions at large rapidity difference (anti α{sub S}y{sub 12} >> 1). We find that in the CGC/saturation approach the largest contribution stems from the density variation mechanism. Our principal results are that the odd Fourier harmonics (v{sub 2n+1}) decrease substantially as a function of y{sub 12}, while the even harmonics (v{sub 2n}) increase considerably with the growth of y{sub 12}. (orig.)

  19. SIS Epidemic Propagation on Hypergraphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodó, Ágnes; Katona, Gyula Y; Simon, Péter L

    2016-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of epidemic propagation on networks is extended to hypergraphs in order to account for both the community structure and the nonlinear dependence of the infection pressure on the number of infected neighbours. The exact master equations of the propagation process are derived for an arbitrary hypergraph given by its incidence matrix. Based on these, moment closure approximation and mean-field models are introduced and compared to individual-based stochastic simulations. The simulation algorithm, developed for networks, is extended to hypergraphs. The effects of hypergraph structure and the model parameters are investigated via individual-based simulation results.

  20. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  1. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media, specifically in electromagnetic materials. An account is presented of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials. The author presents the theory of time-varying electromagnetic fields, which involves a discussion of Faraday's laws, Maxwell's equations and their application to electromagnetic wave propagation under a variety of conditions. The author gives a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. Chapters are included on quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity. The mathematical foundation of electromagnetic waves vis a vis partial differential equations is discussed

  2. Nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The nonequilibrium theory of flame propagation is considered as applied to the following three processes of wave propagation: the combustion waves of the second kind, the combustion waves with broad reaction zones, and the combustion waves with chemical stages. Kinetic and combustion wave parameters are presented for different in composition mixtures of boron and transition metals, such as Zr, Hf, Ti, Nb, Ta, Mo, as well as for the Ta-N, Zr-C-H, Nb-B-O systems to illustrate specific features of the above-mentioned processes [ru

  3. Influences of magnetic particle-particle interactions on orientational distributions and rheological properties for a colloidal dispersion composed of rod-like particle with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaka, Ryo; Aoshima, Masayuki; Satoh, Akira

    We have investigated mainly the influences of magnetic particle-particle interactions on the orientational distribution and viscosity of a semi-dense dispersion, which is composed of rod-like particles with a magnetic moment magnetized normal to the particle axis. In addition, the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution and rheological properties have been clarified. The mean field approximation has been applied to take into account magnetic interactions between rod-like particles. The basic equation of the orientational distribution function has been derived from the balance of torques and solved by the numerical analysis method. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. For a strong magnetic field, the rotational motion of the rod-like particle is restricted in a plane normal to the shearing plane since the magnetic moment of the particle is restricted in the magnetic field direction. Under circumstances of a very strong magnetic interaction between particles, the magnetic moment is strongly restricted in the magnetic field direction, so that the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. For a strong shear flow, a directional characteristic of rod-like particles is enhanced, and this leads to a more significant one-peak-type distribution of the orientational distribution function. Magnetic interactions between particles do not contribute to the increase in the viscosity because the mean-field vector has only a component along the magnetic field direction.

  4. Self-Averaging Expectation Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    We investigate the problem of approximate inference using Expectation Propagation (EP) for large systems under some statistical assumptions. Our approach tries to overcome the numerical bottleneck of EP caused by the inversion of large matrices. Assuming that the measurement matrices are realizat...... on a signal recovery problem of compressed sensing and compare with standard EP....

  5. Wave propagation in mechanical metamaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In mechanical metamaterials, large deformations can occur in systems which are topological from the point of view of linear waves. The interplay between such nonlinearities and topology affects wave propagation. Beyond perfectly periodic systems, defects provide a way to modify and control

  6. Radio Propagation into Modern Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2014-01-01

    constructions. These materials are used in favor of achieving a proper level of thermal isolation, but it has been noticed that they can impact heavily on radio signal propagation. This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of the outdoor-to-indoor attenuation experienced in several modern constructions...... presented along the paper are useful for future radio network planning considerations....

  7. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  8. UWB radar multipath propagation effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, D.; Schejbal, V.; NĚMEC, Z.; Bezoušek, P.; Fišer, Ondřej

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), --- ISSN 1211-6610 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA2/030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : UWB radar * multipath propagation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  9. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...

  10. Galactic propagation of cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarsky, C.J.

    1982-09-01

    After introducing various phenomenological models of cosmic ray propagation in the galaxy, we examine how some of them fare when compared to the data. We show that a model based on resonant diffusion of cosmic rays off an interstellar spectrum of hydromagnetic waves can account for the presently available evidence on cosmic rays and the interstellar medium

  11. Prop-fan noise propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-07

    This report summarizes studies of enroute propfan noise propagation involving noise data obtained by DOT/TSC at ground stations during fly-over tests on October 30-31, 1987. These data have been analsyzed by DOT/TSC for comparison with in flight data...

  12. Assessment of the hybrid propagation model, Volume 1: Analysis of noise propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    This is the first of two volumes of a report on the Hybrid Propagation Model (HPM), an advanced prediction model for aviation noise propagation. This volume presents the noise level predictions for eleven different sets of propagation conditions, run...

  13. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  14. Scaling Analysis of Affinity Propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Furtlehner , Cyril; Sebag , Michèle; Xiangliang , Zhang

    2010-01-01

    14 pages, 11 figures; International audience; We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the {\\em Affinity Propagation} (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck (2007). Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces t...

  15. Propagator for finite range potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown

  16. Interprocedural Analysis with Lazy Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Møller, Anders; Thiemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We propose lazy propagation as a technique for flow- and context-sensitive interprocedural analysis of programs with objects and first-class functions where transfer functions may not be distributive. The technique is described formally as a systematic modification of a variant of the monotone...... framework and its theoretical properties are shown. It is implemented in a type analysis tool for JavaScript where it results in a significant improvement in performance....

  17. Propagating separable equalities in an MDD store

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadzic, Tarik; Hooker, John N.; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present a propagator that achieves MDD consistency for a separable equality over an MDD (multivalued decision diagram) store in pseudo-polynomial time. We integrate the propagator into a constraint solver based on an MDD store introduced in [1]. Our experiments show that the new propagator pro...... provides substantial computational advantage over propagation of two inequality constraints, and that the advantage increases when the maximum width of the MDD store increases....

  18. Propagating pulsed Bessel beams in periodic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, S; Janner, D; Laporta, P

    2004-01-01

    An analytical study of vectorial pulsed Bessel beam propagation in one-dimensional photonic bandgaps, based on a Wannier-function approach, is presented, and the conditions for dispersion-free and diffraction-free propagation are derived. The analysis is applied, as a particular case, to Bessel beam propagation in periodic layered structures

  19. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  20. Light propagation in linear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Glen D; Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Light Propagation in Linear Optical Media describes light propagation in linear media by expanding on diffraction theories beyond what is available in classic optics books. In one volume, this book combines the treatment of light propagation through various media, interfaces, and apertures using scalar and vector diffraction theories. After covering the fundamentals of light and physical optics, the authors discuss light traveling within an anisotropic crystal and present mathematical models for light propagation across planar boundaries between different media. They describe the propagation o

  1. Propagation phenomena in real world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Damien; Gabryś, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Propagation, which looks at spreading in complex networks, can be seen from many viewpoints; it is undesirable, or desirable, controllable, the mechanisms generating that propagation can be the topic of interest, but in the end all depends on the setting. This book covers leading research on a wide spectrum of propagation phenomenon and the techniques currently used in its modelling, prediction, analysis and control. Fourteen papers range over topics including epidemic models, models for trust inference, coverage strategies for networks, vehicle flow propagation, bio-inspired routing algorithms, P2P botnet attacks and defences, fault propagation in gene-cellular networks, malware propagation for mobile networks, information propagation in crisis situations, financial contagion in interbank networks, and finally how to maximize the spread of influence in social networks. The compendium will be of interest to researchers, those working in social networking, communications and finance and is aimed at providin...

  2. Radio wave propagation and parabolic equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Apaydin, Gokhan

    2018-01-01

    A thorough understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation is fundamental to the development of sophisticated communication and detection technologies. The powerful numerical methods described in this book represent a major step forward in our ability to accurately model electromagnetic wave propagation in order to establish and maintain reliable communication links, to detect targets in radar systems, and to maintain robust mobile phone and broadcasting networks. The first new book on guided wave propagation modeling and simulation to appear in nearly two decades, Radio Wave Propagation and Parabolic Equation Modeling addresses the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation generally, with a specific focus on radio wave propagation through various media. The authors explore an array of new applications, and detail various v rtual electromagnetic tools for solving several frequent electromagnetic propagation problems. All of the methods described are presented within the context of real-world scenari...

  3. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  4. Steady propagation of delamination events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter; Baumgardner, John

    1981-06-01

    Delamination of the lithospheric thermal boundary from overlying continental crust propagates laterally from the line of initiation, accelerating as the sinking slab of detached lithosphere grows longer. This propagation has been numerically modeled with steady state equations in a moving reference frame by matching an interior finite element solution to flexible boundary conditions which represent the mechanical and thermal response of the surroundings. The form of the solution depends on the shear coupling of intruding asthenosphere to the top of the sinking slab across a thin layer of crustal material. Without coupling, the tip of the intrusion cools and stiffens to form a wedge dividing the crust (cold mode). With coupling, the intrusion is forced to convect and remains ductile (hot mode). The cold mode can propagate at all velocities; the hot mode has a lower limiting velocity of 1-2 cm/year but offers less resistance at higher speeds. Resistance to delamination includes a constant term from the buoyant crustal downwarp, plus a velocity-proportional term representing viscous deformation. However, the proportionality constant of the latter term is only weakly dependent on crust and lithosphere viscosities. Matching this resistance to loading lines of 100- to 800-km slabs sinking in a mantle of 1022 P, velocities of 0.3-8.0 cm/year are obtained. Changes in viscosity affect this rate, but cold mode delamination is unstoppable except at continental margins or by failure in the sinking slab. The surface expression of delamination is a leading `outer rise' followed by a submarine trough with a large negative free-air anomaly, which finally evolves into a 1-km plateau. If crustal viscosity and velocity are both low, however, there is a montonic crustal uplift with no trough. Thus the present lack of linear supracontinental oceans does not preclude delamination at up to 4 cm/year driven by slabs up to 400 km in length.

  5. Fast imaging of streamer propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Baede, A.H.F.M.; Hayashi, D.; Rutgers, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Recently measurement methods are becoming available to study the corona discharge in more detail. One of the most promising methods is laser-induced fluorescence to determine radical density. Recent improvements in CCD cameras makes it now possible to improve measurements of the discharge structure to a resolution of 1 ns in time and 10 μm in space. This paper shows the first results of the spontaneous emission of a point-to-plane corona discharge in air using such a camera. It clearly indicates that the 2-D approach for streamer propagation under these conditions is insufficient

  6. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  7. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  8. Quantum propagation across cosmological singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2017-05-01

    The initial singularity is the most troubling feature of the standard cosmology, which quantum effects are hoped to resolve. In this paper, we study quantum cosmology with conformal (Weyl) invariant matter. We show that it is natural to extend the scale factor to negative values, allowing a large, collapsing universe to evolve across a quantum "bounce" into an expanding universe like ours. We compute the Feynman propagator for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds exactly, identifying curious pathologies in the case of curved (open or closed) universes. We then include anisotropies, fixing the operator ordering of the quantum Hamiltonian by imposing covariance under field redefinitions and again finding exact solutions. We show how complex classical solutions allow one to circumvent the singularity while maintaining the validity of the semiclassical approximation. The simplest isotropic universes sit on a critical boundary, beyond which there is qualitatively different behavior, with potential for instability. Additional scalars improve the theory's stability. Finally, we study the semiclassical propagation of inhomogeneous perturbations about the flat, isotropic case, at linear and nonlinear order, showing that, at least at this level, there is no particle production across the bounce. These results form the basis for a promising new approach to quantum cosmology and the resolution of the big bang singularity.

  9. Propagation of light ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Niu, Keishiro.

    1983-01-01

    A method of rotating ion layer is proposed as a possible driver for inertial confinement fusion for the purpose of obtaining more stable ion beam against various micro- and macroinstabilities. The analysis was carried out within the frameworks of Vlasov and fluid models. A rotating ion layer propagating in the Z-direction is considered. The beam is described by a distribution function which satisfies the Vlasov equation. The equilibrium and microstability were studied. The filamentation instability is suppressed by a magnetic field due to the rotation of ion beam. To study the properties of the equilibrium state from the macroscopic standpoint, the equation of continuity of ion beam, the equation of motion and the Maxwell equations are considered. It is shown that the macroinstability is stabilized by the magnetic field in the Z-direction. It was found that the most dangerous instability for the problem of the propagation of ion beam was able to be atabilized by using a rotating ion layer. (Kato, T.)

  10. Simplified propagation of standard uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    An essential part of any measurement control program is adequate knowledge of the uncertainties of the measurement system standards. Only with an estimate of the standards'' uncertainties can one determine if the standard is adequate for its intended use or can one calculate the total uncertainty of the measurement process. Purchased standards usually have estimates of uncertainty on their certificates. However, when standards are prepared and characterized by a laboratory, variance propagation is required to estimate the uncertainty of the standard. Traditional variance propagation typically involves tedious use of partial derivatives, unfriendly software and the availability of statistical expertise. As a result, the uncertainty of prepared standards is often not determined or determined incorrectly. For situations meeting stated assumptions, easier shortcut methods of estimation are now available which eliminate the need for partial derivatives and require only a spreadsheet or calculator. A system of simplifying the calculations by dividing into subgroups of absolute and relative uncertainties is utilized. These methods also incorporate the International Standards Organization (ISO) concepts for combining systematic and random uncertainties as published in their Guide to the Expression of Measurement Uncertainty. Details of the simplified methods and examples of their use are included in the paper

  11. Propagation engineering in radio links design

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Propagation Engineering in Radio Link Design covers the basic principles of radiowaves propagation in a practical manner.  This fundamental understanding enables the readers to design radio links efficiently. This book elaborates on new achievements as well as recently developed propagation models.  This is in addition to a comprehensive overview of fundamentals of propagation in various scenarios. It examines theoretical calculations, approaches and applied procedures needed for radio links design. The authors study and analysis of the main propagation phenomena and its mechanisms based on the recommendations of International Telecommunications Union, (ITU). The book has been organized in 9 chapters and examines the role of antennas and passive reflectors in radio services, propagation mechanisms related to radar, satellite, short distance, broadcasting and trans-horizon radio links, with two chapters devoted to radio noise and main  parameters of radio link design. The book presents some 278 illustration...

  12. Progress in front propagation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim; Pujol, Toni

    2008-08-01

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  13. Singularities formation, structure, and propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    2015-01-01

    Many key phenomena in physics and engineering are described as singularities in the solutions to the differential equations describing them. Examples covered thoroughly in this book include the formation of drops and bubbles, the propagation of a crack and the formation of a shock in a gas. Aimed at a broad audience, this book provides the mathematical tools for understanding singularities and explains the many common features in their mathematical structure. Part I introduces the main concepts and techniques, using the most elementary mathematics possible so that it can be followed by readers with only a general background in differential equations. Parts II and III require more specialised methods of partial differential equations, complex analysis and asymptotic techniques. The book may be used for advanced fluid mechanics courses and as a complement to a general course on applied partial differential equations.

  14. Progress in front propagation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Joaquim [Departament de Fisica, Campus de Montilivi, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain); Pujol, Toni [Departament de Mecanica, Campus de Montilivi, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    We review the progress in the field of front propagation in recent years. We survey many physical, biophysical and cross-disciplinary applications, including reduced-variable models of combustion flames, Reid's paradox of rapid forest range expansions, the European colonization of North America during the 19th century, the Neolithic transition in Europe from 13 000 to 5000 years ago, the description of subsistence boundaries, the formation of cultural boundaries, the spread of genetic mutations, theory and experiments on virus infections, models of cancer tumors, etc. Recent theoretical advances are unified in a single framework, encompassing very diverse systems such as those with biased random walks, distributed delays, sequential reaction and dispersion, cohabitation models, age structure and systems with several interacting species. Directions for future progress are outlined.

  15. Front propagation in flipping processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, T; Ben-Avraham, D; Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2008-01-01

    We study a directed flipping process that underlies the performance of the random edge simplex algorithm. In this stochastic process, which takes place on a one-dimensional lattice whose sites may be either occupied or vacant, occupied sites become vacant at a constant rate and simultaneously cause all sites to the right to change their state. This random process exhibits rich phenomenology. First, there is a front, defined by the position of the leftmost occupied site, that propagates at a nontrivial velocity. Second, the front involves a depletion zone with an excess of vacant sites. The total excess Δ k increases logarithmically, Δ k ≅ ln k, with the distance k from the front. Third, the front exhibits ageing-young fronts are vigorous but old fronts are sluggish. We investigate these phenomena using a quasi-static approximation, direct solutions of small systems and numerical simulations

  16. PROPAGATION-BASED CONSTRAINT SOLVER IN IMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ol. Blynov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Article compiling the main ideas of creating propagation-based constraint solver, theoretical basis of constraint programming and its implementation in IMS (Insertion Modeling System

  17. Neural network construction via back-propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burwick, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    A method is presented that combines back-propagation with multi-layer neural network construction. Back-propagation is used not only to adjust the weights but also the signal functions. Going from one network to an equivalent one that has additional linear units, the non-linearity of these units and thus their effective presence is then introduced via back-propagation (weight-splitting). The back-propagated error causes the network to include new units in order to minimize the error function. We also show how this formalism allows to escape local minima

  18. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  19. Propagation handbook for wireless communication system design

    CERN Document Server

    Crane, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    PROPAGATION PHENOMENA AFFECTING WIRELESS SYSTEMS Types of SystemsDesign Criteria Antenna Considerations Propagation Effects Propagation Models Model Verification Statistics and RiskList of Symbols ReferencesPROPAGATION FUNDAMENTALSMaxwell's EquationsPlane Waves Spherical Waves Reflection and Refraction Geometrical OpticsRay TracingScalar Diffraction Theory Geometrical Theory of Diffraction List of Symbols ReferencesABSORPTION Molecular Absorption Absorption on a Slant Path ACTS Statistics List of Symbols ReferencesREFRACTION Ray BendingPath Delay ScintillationList of Symbols ReferencesATTENUAT

  20. Stochastic and epistemic uncertainty propagation in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clavreul, Julie; Guyonnet, Dominique; Tonini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    When performing uncertainty propagation, most LCA practitioners choose to represent uncertainties by single probability distributions and to propagate them using stochastic methods. However, the selection of single probability distributions appears often arbitrary when faced with scarce information...... manner and apply it to LCA. A case study is used to show the uncertainty propagation performed with the proposed method and compare it to propagation performed using probability and possibility theories alone.Basic knowledge on the probability theory is first recalled, followed by a detailed description...

  1. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    radio systems. From the point of view Working Group 2 of the COST 296 Action, interest lies with effects associated

    with propagation via the ionosphere of signals within the HF band. Several aspects are covered in this paper:

    a The directions of arrival and times of flight of signals received over a path oriented along the trough have

    been examined and several types of propagation effects identified. Of particular note, combining the HF observations

    with satellite measurements has identified the presence of irregularities within the floor of the trough that

    result in propagation displaced from the great circle direction. An understanding of the propagation effects that

    result in deviations of the signal path from the great circle direction are of particular relevance to the operation

    of HF radiolocation systems.

    b Inclusion of the results from the above mentioned measurements into a propagation model of the northerly

    ionosphere (i.e. those regions of the ionosphere located poleward of, and including, the mid-latitude trough

    and the use of this model to predict the coverage expected from transmitters where the signals impinge on the

    northerly ionosphere

  2. Radio Channel Modelling Using Stochastic Propagation Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution the radio channel model proposed in [1] is extended to include multiple transmitters and receivers. The propagation environment is modelled using random graphs where vertices of a graph represent scatterers and edges model the wave propagation between scatterers. Furthermore...

  3. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development

  4. Content Propagation in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blenn, N.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents methods and techniques to analyze content propagation within online social networks (OSNs) using a graph theoretical approach. Important factors and different techniques to analyze and describe content propagation, starting from the smallest entity in a network, representing a

  5. The ACTS propagation terminal delivery and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation terminal delivery and support are included. Topics covered include: the ACTS propagation terminal (APT) development program; terminal overview; physical units; test results; status of terminals and schedule; shipping cartons; and site support.

  6. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  7. Uncertainty Propagation in an Ecosystem Nutrient Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New aspects and advancements in classical uncertainty propagation methods were used to develop a nutrient budget with associated error for a northern Gulf of Mexico coastal embayment. Uncertainty was calculated for budget terms by propagating the standard error and degrees of fr...

  8. Transhorizon Radiowave Propagation due to Evaporation Dueting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    waves to propagate beyond the horizon. Over the years, much research has been undertaken to explain the mecha- nism of radiowave propagation in evaporation ducts. Background Theory. The lowest part of the earth's atmosphere is called the tropo- sphere. Typically, the troposphere extends from the surface of the.

  9. In vitro propagation of Irvingia gabonensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Full-grown plantlets were obtained and work is in progress on mass propagation. ... subsequent mass propagation to produce seedlings for farmers, and to improve food security and ... Shooting and rooting were observed, and full grown plantlets were obtained. ¼ MS +0.2 mg KIN. +0.1 mg NAA. Rooting ...

  10. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  11. A vector model for error propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Geraldo, L.P.

    1989-03-01

    A simple vector model for error propagation, which is entirely equivalent to the conventional statistical approach, is discussed. It offers considerable insight into the nature of error propagation while, at the same time, readily demonstrating the significance of uncertainty correlations. This model is well suited to the analysis of error for sets of neutron-induced reaction cross sections. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Lightninig Induced Sferics Correlated with Whistler Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compston, A. J.; Said, R.; Linscott, I.; Inan, U. S.; Parrot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lightning discharges generate broadband electromagnetic pulses, known as sferics, that efficiently propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Some sferic energy can escape the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and propagate in a whistler mode, enabled by Earth's magnetic field, through the ionosphere. In this presentation, we correlate lightning discharge location and time data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the United States with burst mode electric field measurements from the DEMETER spacecraft to quantify and model whistler propagation through the ionosphere. Using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model for electron density and the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model for magnetic field, we compare measured propagation with the Full Wave Method (FWM) finite element numerical code developed by N. G. Lehtinen and U. S. Inan. While a few studies have analyzed whistler propagation through the ionosphere using spacecraft measurements, spacecraft data have yet to be compared with the FWM as we have done here.

  13. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  14. Scaling analysis of affinity propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtlehner, Cyril; Sebag, Michèle; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-06-01

    We analyze and exploit some scaling properties of the affinity propagation (AP) clustering algorithm proposed by Frey and Dueck [Science 315, 972 (2007)]. Following a divide and conquer strategy we setup an exact renormalization-based approach to address the question of clustering consistency, in particular, how many cluster are present in a given data set. We first observe that the divide and conquer strategy, used on a large data set hierarchically reduces the complexity O(N2) to O(N(h+2)/(h+1)) , for a data set of size N and a depth h of the hierarchical strategy. For a data set embedded in a d -dimensional space, we show that this is obtained without notably damaging the precision except in dimension d=2 . In fact, for d larger than 2 the relative loss in precision scales such as N(2-d)/(h+1)d . Finally, under some conditions we observe that there is a value s∗ of the penalty coefficient, a free parameter used to fix the number of clusters, which separates a fragmentation phase (for ss∗ ) of the underlying hidden cluster structure. At this precise point holds a self-similarity property which can be exploited by the hierarchical strategy to actually locate its position, as a result of an exact decimation procedure. From this observation, a strategy based on AP can be defined to find out how many clusters are present in a given data set.

  15. Correspondence propagation with weak priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Yan, Shuicheng; Liu, Jianzhuang; Tang, Xiaoou; Huang, Thomas S

    2009-01-01

    For the problem of image registration, the top few reliable correspondences are often relatively easy to obtain, while the overall matching accuracy may fall drastically as the desired correspondence number increases. In this paper, we present an efficient feature matching algorithm to employ sparse reliable correspondence priors for piloting the feature matching process. First, the feature geometric relationship within individual image is encoded as a spatial graph, and the pairwise feature similarity is expressed as a bipartite similarity graph between two feature sets; then the geometric neighborhood of the pairwise assignment is represented by a categorical product graph, along which the reliable correspondences are propagated; and finally a closed-form solution for feature matching is deduced by ensuring the feature geometric coherency as well as pairwise feature agreements. Furthermore, our algorithm is naturally applicable for incorporating manual correspondence priors for semi-supervised feature matching. Extensive experiments on both toy examples and real-world applications demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm over the state-of-the-art feature matching techniques.

  16. Failure propagation tests and analysis at PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Miyake, O.; Daigo, Y.; Sato, M.

    1984-01-01

    Failure propagation tests have been conducted using the Large Leak Sodium Water Reaction Test Rig (SWAT-1) and the Steam Generator Safety Test Facility (SWAT-3) at PNC in order to establish the safety design of the LMFBR prototype Monju steam generators. Test objectives are to provide data for selecting a design basis leak (DBL), data on the time history of failure propagations, data on the mechanism of the failures, and data on re-use of tubes in the steam generators that have suffered leaks. Eighteen fundamental tests have been performed in an intermediate leak region using the SWAT-1 test rig, and ten failure propagation tests have been conducted in the region from a small leak to a large leak using the SWAT-3 test facility. From the test results it was concluded that a dominant mechanism was tube wastage, and it took more than one minute until each failure propagation occurred. Also, the total leak rate in full sequence simulation tests including a water dump was far less than that of one double-ended-guillotine (DEG) failure. Using such experimental data, a computer code, LEAP (Leak Enlargement and Propagation), has been developed for the purpose of estimating the possible maximum leak rate due to failure propagation. This paper describes the results of the failure propagation tests and the model structure and validation studies of the LEAP code. (author)

  17. Network propagation in the cytoscape cyberinfrastructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Carlin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Network propagation is an important and widely used algorithm in systems biology, with applications in protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and patient stratification. However, up to this point it has required significant expertise to run. Here we extend the popular network analysis program Cytoscape to perform network propagation as an integrated function. Such integration greatly increases the access to network propagation by putting it in the hands of biologists and linking it to the many other types of network analysis and visualization available through Cytoscape. We demonstrate the power and utility of the algorithm by identifying mutations conferring resistance to Vemurafenib.

  18. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  19. Propagating confined states in phase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, H.R.; Deissler, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the nonlinear phase equation that applies to propagating patterns allows for a large range of parameter values for propagating confined states for which a spatially localized region with wavelengths different from that of the background travels on this background. This phenomenon is the generalization of the stationary confined states predicted a few years ago by the authors, which have since been seen experimentally in various systems. We suggest that the propagating confined states found here could arise in spirals in Taylor vortex flow or in convective systems showing traveling waves far above onset. We find that the propagating confined states can be replaced by a pattern that is irregular in space and time as the control parameter in the nonlinear phase equation is varied

  20. ADVANCES IN THE PROPAGATION OF RAMBUTAN TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA APARECIDA DE ANDRADE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The reality of Brazilian fruit farming is demonstrating increasing demand for sustainable information about native and exotic fruit, which can diversify and elevate the efficiency of fruit exploitation. Research on propagation of fruits tree is very important so that it can provide a protocol for suitable multiplication of this fruitful. Due to the great genetic diversity of rambutan plants, it is recommended the use of vegetative propagated plants. This research aimed to evaluate the propagation of rambutan by cuttings, layering and grafting, as well as seed germination and viability without storage. The results of this research indicate that this species can be successfully propagated by layering, grafting and seeds. We also observed that the germination percentage of seeds kept inside the fruits for six days were not influenced by the different substrates used in this experiment.

  1. SDEM modelling of fault-propagation folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Poulsen, Jane Bang

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics and kinematics of fault-propagation-folding is important for evaluating the associated hydrocarbon play, for accomplishing reliable section balancing (structural reconstruction), and for assessing seismic hazards. Accordingly, the deformation style of fault-propagation-......Understanding the dynamics and kinematics of fault-propagation-folding is important for evaluating the associated hydrocarbon play, for accomplishing reliable section balancing (structural reconstruction), and for assessing seismic hazards. Accordingly, the deformation style of fault......-propagation-folding has already been the topic of a large number of empirical studies as well as physical and computational model experiments. However, with the newly developed Stress-based Discrete Element Method (SDEM), we have, for the first time, explored computationally the link between self-emerging fault patterns...

  2. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  3. Generalized Back Propagation for Training Pattern Derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří

    1994-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (1994), s. 91-98 ISSN 1210-0552 Grant - others:ALTEC(XE) IC-1000 Keywords : back propagation * smoothness constraints * multi-layered network * expert system * explicite kulle * trainning pattern derivatives * generalization

  4. ADVANCES IN PEACH, NECTARINE AND PLUM PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEWTON ALEX MAYER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nursery trees of stone fruits (Prunus spp. are traditionally produced by union of two distinct genotypes - the rootstock and the scion - which, by grafting, form a composite plant that will be maintained throughout of all plant life. In Brazil, the rootstocks are predominantly seed propagated and therefore usually results in heterogeneous trees for vigor and edaphic adaptation. However, with advances in rootstock breeding programs that released cultivars and certification in several countries (notably in Europe, the system will come gradually evolving for vegetative propagation (cuttings and tissue culture and use of seeds of selected rootstocks with specific characteristics and potted nursery trees production. For scion cultivar propagation, the budding system (with its many variations has predominantly been adopted in major producing countries. This review had as objective to comment main propagation methods adopted for rootstocks and scion in peach, nectarine and plum, and recent technical progress obtained as well as the needs of improvement for nursery tree production.

  5. Modeling Propagation of Gas Path Damage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be tracked and modeled for a range of fault modes in some modules of commercial high bypass aircraft engines. To that...

  6. Propagator for the double delta potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The propagator for the double delta potential is calculated starting from the integral form of the Schroedinger equation. A compact expression of its Laplace transform is found, that can be explicitly inverted in some limiting cases

  7. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  8. Propagation of inflationary shocks in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Rodríguez Vargas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an estimation of propagation effects of inflationary shocks to groups and specific products of the CPI using a SVAR framework.  We found significant propagation effects for 6 out of the 12 groups of the CPI, which together account for 72% of the basket.  These groups include those related to food, home apparel and housekeeping services and transportation. The estimations suggest that shocks to Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages and to fuels are passed through entirely to the rest of the CPI basket. The majority of the most important propagation effects occur between 6 and 10 months after the shocks.  This includes propagation effects stemming from shocks to fuels, products with regulated price, tradables and the IPPI index.

  9. On the Coulomb gauge quark propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloker, M.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Krenn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A solution of the quark Dyson-Schwinger equation including transverse gluons is presented. The corresponding retardation effects in the quark propagator are discussed. Especially, their effects on confinement properties and dynamical mass generation are described. (author)

  10. Configurational forces and couples for crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarić Jovo P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the approach of Gurtin and Podio-Guidugli (1998, the problem of crack propagation based on the notion of configurational forces and couples in micropolar continua is considered. .

  11. Contour Propagation With Riemannian Elasticity Regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Sapru, W.

    2011-01-01

    guided corrections. This study compares manual delineations in replanning CT scans of head-and-neck patients to automatic contour propagation using deformable registration with Riemannian regularization. The potential benefit of locally assigned regularization parameters according to tissue type...

  12. Entropy Generation Analysis of Wildfire Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Guelpa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation is commonly applied to describe the evolution of irreversible processes, such as heat transfer and turbulence. These are both dominating phenomena in fire propagation. In this paper, entropy generation analysis is applied to a grassland fire event, with the aim of finding possible links between entropy generation and propagation directions. The ultimate goal of such analysis consists in helping one to overcome possible limitations of the models usually applied to the prediction of wildfire propagation. These models are based on the application of the superimposition of the effects due to wind and slope, which has proven to fail in various cases. The analysis presented here shows that entropy generation allows a detailed analysis of the landscape propagation of a fire and can be thus applied to its quantitative description.

  13. The Gluon Propagator without lattice Gribov copies

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Follana, E; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2001-01-01

    We study the gluon propagator on the lattice using the Laplacian gauge which is free of lattice Gribov copies. We compare our results with those obtained in the Landau gauge on the lattice, as well as with various approximate solutions of the Dyson Schwinger equations. We find a finite value $\\sim (250 \\rm{MeV})^{-2}$ for the zero-momentum propagator, and a pole mass $\\sim 640 \\pm 110$ MeV.

  14. The photon propagator in the Poincare gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelos-Neto, J. (Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Inst. de Fisica (Brazil)); Galvao, C.A.P.; Gaete, P. (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, CBPF/CNPq, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1991-07-22

    After a brief analysis of the covariant gauge condition known as the Fock-Schwinger gauge, we establish its corresponding non-covariant version which we call the Poincare gauge. Using the path integral formalism, within the Senjanovic framework, we calculate the photon propagator in this gauge. Some formal similarities between our results and the expressions for the photon propagator in the Coulomb gauge are pointed out. (orig.).

  15. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  16. Tsunami Propagation Models Based on First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    tsunami which was recorded at 76 tide gauge stations in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Japan, Galapagos Islands , Peru and Chile. The tsunami caused $1.5...ease. Third, there are no landmasses or large islands to block or interfere with the propagation of tsunamis formed in the ocean. Fourth, the ocean...itself is dotted with small islands which pose little interference with tsunami propagation, but provide valuable platforms for recording tsunami

  17. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  18. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics; Parrinello, C. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Soni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16{sup 3}{times}40 lattice at {beta}=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  19. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); Parrinello, C. (New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3][times]40 lattice at [beta]=6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others.

  20. The gluon propagator in momentum space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C. (Dept. of Physics, Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Parrinello, C. (Physics Dept., New York Univ., NY (United States) Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Soni, A. (Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    We consider quenched QCD on a 16[sup 3] x 40 lattice at [beta] = 6.0. We give preliminary numerical results for the lattice gluon propagator evaluated both in coordinate and momentum space. Our findings are compared with earlier results in the literature at zero momentum. In addition, by considering nonzero momenta we attempt to extract the form of the propagator and compare it to continuum predictions formulated by Gribov and others. (orig.)

  1. The structure of the gluon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinweber, D.B.; Parrinello, C.; Skullerud, J.I.; Williams, A.G

    1999-03-01

    The gluon propagator has been calculated for quenched QCD in the Landau gauge at {beta} = 6.0 for volumes 16{sup 3} x 48 and 32{sup 3} x 64, and at {beta} 6.2 for volume 24{sup 3} x 48. The large volume and different lattice spacings allow us to identify and minimise finite volume and finite lattice spacing artefacts. We also study the tensor structure of the gluon propagator, confirming that it obeys the lattice Landau gauge condition.

  2. FX-25 and FX-100 Propagation Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    TECHNICAL DETAILS 1. FX-100 Accelerator The FX-IO0 accelerator was a gas-insulated coaxial transmission line that was DC charged with a Van de Graaff ...physics of intense relativistic electron-beam propagation in low-density air is in pro- gress using beam generators at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory...experiments to investigate the physics of intense relativistic electron-beam propagation in low-density air is in progress using beam generators at the

  3. Optical pulse propagation with minimal approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsler, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Propagation equations for optical pulses are needed to assist in describing applications in ever more extreme situations -- including those in metamaterials with linear and nonlinear magnetic responses. Here I show how to derive a single first order propagation equation using a minimum of approximations and a straightforward "factorization" mathematical scheme. The approach generates exact coupled bi-directional equations, after which it is clear that the description can be reduced to a singl...

  4. Light propagation in Swiss-cheese cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Sebastian J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneities on light propagation. The Sachs equations are solved numerically in the Swiss-cheese models with inhomogeneities modeled by the Lemaitre-Tolman solutions. Our results imply that, within the models we study, inhomogeneities may partially mimic the accelerated expansion of the Universe provided the light propagates through regions with lower than the average density. The effect of inhomogeneities is small and full randomization of the photons' trajectories reduces it to an insignificant level.

  5. Sound propagation in selenium and tellurium melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Kim, S.G.; Sulejmenov, T.

    1989-01-01

    Methods, that under similar frequences of ten MHz and using one sample permit to study temperature dependences and propagation velocities, the absorption coefficient of the sound in melts, are described. As a result studying selenium and tellurium melts intricate polytherms of sound propagation velocity and absorption coefficient, that are interpreted usiung representations on breaking chains in associated liquid(selenium) and dissolution of short chains in the melt(tellurium) atomic matrix, are constructed

  6. Observations of Obliquely Propagating Electron Bernstein Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R. J.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Stenzel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation.......Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation....

  7. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...about Arctic acoustics during the Cold War is now obsolete. The goal of the Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE) is to determine the...Canada Basin (McLaughlin et al., 2011). These changing conditions make the Canada Basin an ideal location to test the hypothesis put forward by P

  8. Formation and Propagation of Local Traffic Jam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-sheng Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large scale traffic congestion often stems from local traffic jam in single road or intersection. In this paper, macroscopic method was used to explore the formation and propagation of local traffic jam. It is found that (1 the propagation of traffic jam can be seen as the propagation of traffic signal parameters, that is, virtual split and virtual green time; (2 for a road with endogenous flow, entrance location influences the jam propagation. With the same demand (upstream links flow and entrance flow, the upstream got more influence; (3 when a one-lane road is thoroughly congested, virtual signal parameters everywhere are the same as that at stop line; for a basic road, the virtual signals work in a cooperative manner; (4 phase sequence is one important parameter that influences traffic performances during peak hour where spill back of channelization takes place. The same phase plan for left-turn flow and through flow would be preferred; (5 signal coordination plays an important role in traffic jam propagation and hence effective network signal parameters should be designed to prevent jam from propagation to the whole network. These findings would serve as a basis for future network traffic congestion control.

  9. Rumor propagation on networks with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixia; Li, Deyu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on growth and preferential attachment mechanism, we give a network generation model aiming at generating networks with community structure. There are three characteristics for the networks generated by the generation model. The first is that the community sizes can be nonuniform. The second is that there are bridge hubs in each community. The third is that the strength of community structure is adjustable. Next, we investigate rumor propagation behavior on the generated networks by performing Monte Carlo simulations to reveal the influence of bridge hubs, nonuniformity of community sizes and the strength of community structure on the dynamic behavior of the rumor propagation. We find that bridge hubs have outstanding performance in propagation speed and propagation size, and larger modularity can reduce rumor propagation. Furthermore, when the decay rate of rumor spreading β is large, the final density of the stiflers is larger if the rumor originates in larger community. Additionally, when on networks with different strengths of community structure, rumor propagation exhibits greater difference in the density of stiflers and in the peak prevalence if the decay rate β is larger.

  10. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  11. NLO error propagation exercise: statistical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, D.J.; Downing, D.J.

    1985-09-01

    Error propagation is the extrapolation and cumulation of uncertainty (variance) above total amounts of special nuclear material, for example, uranium or 235 U, that are present in a defined location at a given time. The uncertainty results from the inevitable inexactness of individual measurements of weight, uranium concentration, 235 U enrichment, etc. The extrapolated and cumulated uncertainty leads directly to quantified limits of error on inventory differences (LEIDs) for such material. The NLO error propagation exercise was planned as a field demonstration of the utilization of statistical error propagation methodology at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio from April 1 to July 1, 1983 in a single material balance area formed specially for the exercise. Major elements of the error propagation methodology were: variance approximation by Taylor Series expansion; variance cumulation by uncorrelated primary error sources as suggested by Jaech; random effects ANOVA model estimation of variance effects (systematic error); provision for inclusion of process variance in addition to measurement variance; and exclusion of static material. The methodology was applied to material balance area transactions from the indicated time period through a FORTRAN computer code developed specifically for this purpose on the NLO HP-3000 computer. This paper contains a complete description of the error propagation methodology and a full summary of the numerical results of applying the methodlogy in the field demonstration. The error propagation LEIDs did encompass the actual uranium and 235 U inventory differences. Further, one can see that error propagation actually provides guidance for reducing inventory differences and LEIDs in future time periods

  12. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  13. Airyprime beams and their propagation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Chen, Ruipin; Ru, Guoyun

    2014-01-01

    A type of Airyprime beam is introduced in this document. An analytical expression of Airyprime beams passing through a separable ABCD paraxial optical system is derived. The beam propagation factor of the Airyprime beam is proved to be 3.676. An analytical expression of the kurtosis parameter of an Airyprime beam passing through a separable ABCD paraxial optical system is also presented. The kurtosis parameter of the Airyprime beam passing through a separable ABCD paraxial optical system depends on the two ratios B/(Az rx ) and B/(Az ry ). As a numerical example, the propagation characteristics of an Airyprime beam is demonstrated in free space. In the source plane, the Airyprime beam has nine lobes, one of which is the central dominant lobe. In the far field, the Airyprime beam becomes a dark-hollow beam with four uniform lobes. The evolvement of an Airyprime beam propagating in free space is well exhibited. Upon propagation, the intensity distribution of the Airyprime beam becomes flatter and the kurtosis parameter decreases from the maximum value 2.973 to a saturated value 1.302. The Airyprime beam is also compared with the second-order elegant Hermite–Gaussian beam. The novel propagation characteristics of Airyprime beams denote that they could have potential application prospects such as optical trapping. (letter)

  14. The propagation-weighted priority immunization strategy based on propagation tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, Fuzhong; Ren, Song; Dang, Zhongkai

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we constructed the virus propagation tree for any infected node through improving the k-shell decomposition method. Supposing we determine the position of infected nodes, the root node of the propagation tree is an infected node and its children nodes are susceptible nodes. The virus can be diffused from the bottom to top along with the tree. Based on the analysis of the virus propagation tree, a propagation-weighted priority immunization strategy was proposed to vaccinate the influential nodes(the nodes are the several nodes of the most risky in the high-risk node and it is convenient for us to immune). The mathematical proof and the computer simulation on scale-free network are given. The results show that the propagation-weighted priority immunization is effective to prevent the virus from diffusing.

  15. Large scale propagation intermittency in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Ali

    2000-11-01

    Long-term (several minutes to hours) amplitude variations observed in outdoor sound propagation experiments at Disneyland, California, in February 1998 are explained in terms of a time varying index of refraction. The experimentally propagated acoustic signals were received and recorded at several locations ranging from 300 meters to 2,800 meters. Meteorological data was taken as a function of altitude simultaneously with the received signal levels. There were many barriers along the path of acoustic propagation that affected the received signal levels, especially at short ranges. In a downward refraction situation, there could be a random change of amplitude in the predicted signals. A computer model based on the Fast Field Program (FFP) was used to compute the signal loss at the different receiving locations and to verify that the variations in the received signal levels can be predicted numerically. The calculations agree with experimental data with the same trend variations in average amplitude.

  16. Error propagation analysis for a sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Hawkins, J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a program to develop reliability methods for operational use with reactor sensors and protective systems, error propagation analyses are being made for each model. An example is a sensor system computer simulation model, in which the sensor system signature is convoluted with a reactor signature to show the effect of each in revealing or obscuring information contained in the other. The error propagation analysis models the system and signature uncertainties and sensitivities, whereas the simulation models the signatures and by extensive repetitions reveals the effect of errors in various reactor input or sensor response data. In the approach for the example presented, the errors accumulated by the signature (set of ''noise'' frequencies) are successively calculated as it is propagated stepwise through a system comprised of sensor and signal processing components. Additional modeling steps include a Fourier transform calculation to produce the usual power spectral density representation of the product signature, and some form of pattern recognition algorithm

  17. Anisotropy and sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    will be considered. The computations are based on the geometry of the glass wool that is decribed by the density of fibers and their diameters. The air drags viscously on the fibers, and movements of the fiber skeleton are important at low frequencies. Propagation of elastic waves in the skeleton is computed...... by regarding it as a continuous medium described by its elastic moduli and mass density. The computed attenuation of sound waves, for frequencies 50–5000 Hz, will be compared with experimental results for glass wool with fiber diameters of 6.8 micrometers, mass density of 15 and 30 kg/m3, and elastic moduli......Sound propagation in glass wool is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical computation of attenuation and phase velocity for plane, harmonic waves will be presented. Glass wool is a highly anisotropic material, and sound waves propagating in different directions in the material...

  18. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  19. Polarization Shaping for Control of Nonlinear Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Larocque, Hugo; Yao, Alison M; Travis, Christopher; De Leon, Israel; Rubano, Andrea; Karimi, Ebrahim; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Boyd, Robert W

    2016-12-02

    We study the nonlinear optical propagation of two different classes of light beams with space-varying polarization-radially symmetric vector beams and Poincaré beams with lemon and star topologies-in a rubidium vapor cell. Unlike Laguerre-Gauss and other types of beams that quickly experience instabilities, we observe that their propagation is not marked by beam breakup while still exhibiting traits such as nonlinear confinement and self-focusing. Our results suggest that, by tailoring the spatial structure of the polarization, the effects of nonlinear propagation can be effectively controlled. These findings provide a novel approach to transport high-power light beams in nonlinear media with controllable distortions to their spatial structure and polarization properties.

  20. Polarization Shaping for Control of Nonlinear Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Larocque, Hugo; Yao, Alison M.; Travis, Christopher; De Leon, Israel; Rubano, Andrea; Karimi, Ebrahim; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-12-01

    We study the nonlinear optical propagation of two different classes of light beams with space-varying polarization—radially symmetric vector beams and Poincaré beams with lemon and star topologies—in a rubidium vapor cell. Unlike Laguerre-Gauss and other types of beams that quickly experience instabilities, we observe that their propagation is not marked by beam breakup while still exhibiting traits such as nonlinear confinement and self-focusing. Our results suggest that, by tailoring the spatial structure of the polarization, the effects of nonlinear propagation can be effectively controlled. These findings provide a novel approach to transport high-power light beams in nonlinear media with controllable distortions to their spatial structure and polarization properties.

  1. Heat pulse propagation studies in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Callen, J.D.; Colchin, R.J.; Efthimion, P.C.; Hill, K.W.; Izzo, R.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Monticello, D.A.; McGuire, K.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-02-01

    The time scales for sawtooth repetition and heat pulse propagation are much longer (10's of msec) in the large tokamak TFTR than in previous, smaller tokamaks. This extended time scale coupled with more detailed diagnostics has led us to revisit the analysis of the heat pulse propagation as a method to determine the electron heat diffusivity, chi/sub e/, in the plasma. A combination of analytic and computer solutions of the electron heat diffusion equation are used to clarify previous work and develop new methods for determining chi/sub e/. Direct comparison of the predicted heat pulses with soft x-ray and ECE data indicates that the space-time evolution is diffusive. However, the chi/sub e/ determined from heat pulse propagation usually exceeds that determined from background plasma power balance considerations by a factor ranging from 2 to 10. Some hypotheses for resolving this discrepancy are discussed. 11 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Geometrical approach to gaussian beam propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laures, P

    1967-04-01

    The curvature of the wavefront and the spot size of a propagating Gaussian beam may be determined from simple geometrical transformations of the lateral foci. The analysis starts from the construction of the lateral foci in the case of a spherical Fabry-Perot. Then the cases of Gaussian beam propagation through media with different refractive indices, lenses, and simple optical systems are treated. Constructions show how propagation in the image space is readily determined in each case. This analysis is the generalization of the technique outlined by Deschamps and Mast. The geometrical constructions developed for simple cases are applied to the design of some special cases of interest in laser optics: cavities by a lens, laser zoom telescope, and ring cavity.

  3. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  4. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  5. Semiclassical propagation: Hilbert space vs. Wigner representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D.

    2018-03-01

    A unified viewpoint on the van Vleck and Herman-Kluk propagators in Hilbert space and their recently developed counterparts in Wigner representation is presented. Based on this viewpoint, the Wigner Herman-Kluk propagator is conceptually the most general one. Nonetheless, the respective semiclassical expressions for expectation values in terms of the density matrix and the Wigner function are mathematically proven here to coincide. The only remaining difference is a mere technical flexibility of the Wigner version in choosing the Gaussians' width for the underlying coherent states beyond minimal uncertainty. This flexibility is investigated numerically on prototypical potentials and it turns out to provide neither qualitative nor quantitative improvements. Given the aforementioned generality, utilizing the Wigner representation for semiclassical propagation thus leads to the same performance as employing the respective most-developed (Hilbert-space) methods for the density matrix.

  6. Propagation of solar disturbances - Theories and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments and construction of several models for the propagation of solar disturbances from the sun and their continuation throughout heliospheric space are discussed. Emphasis centers on physical mechanisms as well as mathematical techniques (i.e., analytical and numerical methods). This outline will lead to a discussion of the state-of-the-art of theoretically based modeling efforts in this area. It is shown that the fundamental theory for the study of propagation of disturbances in heliospheric space is centered around the self-consistent analysis of wave and mass motion within the context of magnetohydrodynamics in which the small scale structures will be modified by kinetic effects. Finally, brief mention is made of some interesting problems for which attention is needed for advancement of the understanding of the physics of large scale propagation of solar disturbances in heliospheric space.

  7. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  8. Stability of propagating long ion ring layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Niu, Keishiro; Ikeda, Mitsuru.

    1982-06-01

    An energy principle is developed to derive a sufficient condition for treating the low frequency stability of an axi-symmetric infinitely-long rotating ion layer which propagates along the axis. This kind of a long ion layer may be used as an energy deriver in LIB-ICF. Ion Particles that carry both the axial and azimuthal currents are described in the Vlasov formalism while the motion of background plasma is approximately analyzed by using the two-fluid equations. Stability boundaries are plotted in a parameter space regarding an ion layer propagating in the rarefied plasma. (author)

  9. Information propagation for interacting-particle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, Norbert [Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, MC 305-16, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Harrison, Sarah K. [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, United Kingdome (United Kingdom); Osborne, Tobias J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Leibniz-Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, DE-30167 Hannover (Germany); Institute for Advanced Study Berlin, DE-14193 Berlin (Germany); Eisert, Jens [Institute for Advanced Study Berlin, DE-14193 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, DE-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    We study the speed at which information propagates through systems of interacting quantum particles moving on a regular lattice and show that for a certain class of initial conditions there exists a maximum speed of sound at which information can propagate. Our argument applies equally to quantum spins, bosons such as in the Bose-Hubbard model, fermions, anyons, and general mixtures thereof, on arbitrary lattices of any dimension. It also pertains to dissipative dynamics on the lattice, and generalizes to the continuum for quantum fields. Our result can be seen as an analog of the Lieb-Robinson bound for strongly correlated models.

  10. Influence of network structure on rumor propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jie [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Liu Zonghua [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117542-46 Singapore (Singapore)], E-mail: zonghualiu72@yahoo.com; Li Baowen [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117542-46 Singapore (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2007-09-03

    Rumor propagation in complex networks is studied analytically and numerically by using the SIR model. Analytically, a mean-field theory is worked out by considering the influence of network topological structure and the unequal footings of neighbors of an infected node in propagating the rumor. It is found that the final infected density of population with degree k is {rho}(k)=1-exp(-{alpha}k), where {alpha} is a parameter related to network structure. The number of the total final infected nodes depends on the network topological structure and will decrease when the structure changes from random to scale-free network. Numerical simulations confirm the theoretical predictions.

  11. Microwave Propagation Through Cultural Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahad

    The need to understand the interaction of microwaves with vegetation canopies has markedly increased in recent years. This is due to advances made in remote sensing science, microwave technology, and signal processing circuits. One class of the earth's vegetation cover is man-made canopies, such as agricultural fields, orchards, and artificial forests. Contrary to natural vegetation terrain, location, spacing, and density of plants in a man-made vegetation canopy are deterministic quantities. As a result, the semi-deterministic nature of cultural vegetation canopies violate the random assumption of the radiative transfer theory and leads to experimented results that are in variance with model calculations. Hence, an alternative approach is needed to model the interaction of microwaves with such canopies. This thesis examines the propagation behavior through a canopy of corn plants. The corn canopy was selected as a representative of cultural vegetation canopies that are planted in parallel rows with an approximately fixed spacing between adjacent plants. Several experimental measurements were conducted to determine the transmission properties of a corn canopy in the 1-10 GHz range. The measurements which included horizontal propagation through the canopy as well as propagation at oblique incidence, were performed for defoliated canopies and for canopies with leaves. Through experimental observations and model development, the propagation behavior was found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength and the path length. At a wavelength in the neighborhood of 20 cm, for example, it was found that scattering by the stalks was coherent in nature for waves propagating horizontally through the canopy, which necessitated the development of a coherent-field model that uses Bragg scattering to account for the observed interference pattern in the transmitted beam. As the wavelength is made shorter, the semi-random spacing between plants becomes significant relative to the

  12. Enhancing data locality by using terminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Driessche, R. [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. Computer Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Terminal propagation is a method developed in the circuit placement community for adding constraints to graph partitioning problems. This paper adapts and expands this idea, and applies it to the problem of partitioning data structures among the processors of a parallel computer. We show how the constraints in terminal propagation can be used to encourage partitions in which messages are communicated only between architecturally near processors. We then show how these constraints can be handled in two important partitioning algorithms, spectral bisection and multilevel-KL. We compare the quality of partitions generated by these algorithms to each other and to Partitions generated by more familiar techniques.

  13. Information and influence propagation in social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Lakshmanan, Laks V S

    2013-01-01

    Research on social networks has exploded over the last decade. To a large extent, this has been fueled by the spectacular growth of social media and online social networking sites, which continue growing at a very fast pace, as well as by the increasing availability of very large social network datasets for purposes of research. A rich body of this research has been devoted to the analysis of the propagation of information, influence, innovations, infections, practices and customs through networks. Can we build models to explain the way these propagations occur? How can we validate our models

  14. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  15. Ripple Tank Demonstration of Gaussian Beam Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jude, Kathy J.; Wilson, Thomas E.

    1997-10-01

    We have reproduced a ripple tank experimentfootnote 'Ripple Tank Studies of Wave Motion' by W. Llowarch (Oxford University Press, 1961) in order to illustrate the effects of focusing and diffraction of a capillary planewave by a bi-convex carbon tetrachloride 'lens'. We compare the experimental results, captured by a video camera, to the theoretical results obtained using the ABCD matrix method for the gaussian beam propagation through this paraxial 'optical' systemfootnote 'Lasers' by Anthony Siegman (University Science Book, Mill Valley, CA, 1986). The diffraction-limited focusing of the propagating wave is clearly visible; this is a feature not easily demonstrable in optics.

  16. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide with embedded quantum dots in a regime where the pulse is subjected to both waveguide and material dispersion. The group index and the transmission are investigated by finite...... broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...

  17. Demonstration of slow light propagation in an optical fiber under dual pump light with co-propagation and counter-propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Yuda; Yang, Yujing; Gao, Yuan; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a general theory of coherent population oscillation effect in an Er3+ -doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation at room temperature is presented. Using the numerical simulation, in case of dual frequency light waves (1480 nm and 980 nm) with co-propagation and counter-propagation, we analyze the effect of the pump optical power ratio (M) on the group speed of light. The group velocity of light can be varied with the change of M. We research the time delay and fractional delay in an Er3+-doped fiber under the dual-frequency pumping laser with counter-propagation and co-propagation. Compared to the methods of the single pumping, the larger time delay can be got by using the technique of dual-frequency laser pumped fiber with co-propagation and counter-propagation.

  18. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX XX) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nassar (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting and associated Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop convene yearly to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom)industry, academia, and government with an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation have peer discussion of work in progress, disseminate propagation results, and interact with the satcom industry. NAPEX XX, in Fairbanks, Alaska, June 4-5, 1996, had three sessions: (1) "ACTS Propagation Study: Background, Objectives, and Outcomes," covered results from thirteen station-years of Ka-band experiments; (2) "Propagation Studies for Mobile and Personal Satellite Applications," provided the latest developments in measurement, modeling, and dissemination of propagation phenomena of interest to the mobile, personal, and aeronautical satcom industry; and (3)"Propagation Research Topics," covered a range of topics including space/ground optical propagation experiments, propagation databases, the NASA Propagation Web Site, and revision plans for the NASA propagation effects handbooks. The ACTS Miniworkshop, June 6, 1996, covered ACTS status, engineering support for ACTS propagation terminals, and the ACTS Propagation Data Center. A plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  19. Ocean Acoustic Propagation and Coherence Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Propagation variability is an inescapable complicating factor for both active and passive sonar systems, and for underwater acoustic communications...framework, to be exploited in the use of underwater sound in shallow water. Our knowledge of acoustic field patterns in shallow water, building block...Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory . Five acoustic studies are planned: 1. Canyon and slope acoustics : Identify purely geometrically controlled

  20. Neutrino propagation in a weakly magnetized medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The organization of the paper is as follows: In §2 we discuss the basics of neutrino–photon effective action and the fermion propagators in a magnetized medium. Section 3 contains the details of the calculation of the one-loop diagram and in §4 we consider the weak-field limit. Finally, we conclude with a discussion.

  1. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  2. IMPROVING PROPAGATION SUCCESS OF D. MELANOXYLON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    ABSTRACT. Dalbergia melanoxylon is a plant with valuable wood in the world and therefore is over harvested for timber while its regeneration is very low. The propagation efforts by techniques such as tissue culture or mycorrhiza have not been investigated which instigated conduction of this study. Soil and cuttings were ...

  3. Simulation of action potential propagation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Nerush, Vladimir; Orlova, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2011-12-21

    Action potential is considered to be one of the primary responses of a plant to action of various environmental factors. Understanding plant action potential propagation mechanisms requires experimental investigation and simulation; however, a detailed mathematical model of plant electrical signal transmission is absent. Here, the mathematical model of action potential propagation in plants has been worked out. The model is a two-dimensional system of excitable cells; each of them is electrically coupled with four neighboring ones. Ion diffusion between excitable cell apoplast areas is also taken into account. The action potential generation in a single cell has been described on the basis of our previous model. The model simulates active and passive signal transmission well enough. It has been used to analyze theoretically the influence of cell to cell electrical conductivity and H(+)-ATPase activity on the signal transmission in plants. An increase in cell to cell electrical conductivity has been shown to stimulate an increase in the length constant, the action potential propagation velocity and the temperature threshold, while the membrane potential threshold being weakly changed. The growth of H(+)-ATPase activity has been found to induce the increase of temperature and membrane potential thresholds and the reduction of the length constant and the action potential propagation velocity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation principle for nonlinear wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Lee, Y.C.; Nishikawa, Kyoji; Hojo, H.; Yoshida, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Variation principle is derived which determines stationary nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in the self-consistent density profile. Example is given for lower-hybrid waves and the relation to the variation principle for the Lagrangian density of electromagnetic fluids is discussed

  5. Propagation Techniques for Highland Bamboo (Arundinaria alpina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (survival rate 17-26%) primarily to strong wind and storm and most probably moisture fluctuations under .... to bamboo forests and other vegetations that can serve as wind break for established propagules and newly ..... Propagating Bamboo, Training Manual, Technology Information, Forecasting and. Assessment Council ...

  6. Transhorizon Radiowave Propagation due to Evaporation Dueting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 1. Transhorizon Radiowave Propagation due to Evaporation Ducting - The Effect of Tropospheric Weather Conditions on VHF and UHF Radio Paths Over the Sea. Salil David Gunashekar D R Siddle E M Warrington. General Article Volume 11 ...

  7. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto C. Piqueira

    2010-01-01

    information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignorant-Spreader-Stifler rumor spreading model is studied. By using concepts from the Dynamical Systems Theory, stability of equilibrium points is established, according to propagation parameters and initial conditions. Some numerical experiments are conducted in order to validate the model.

  8. Solitary wave propagation in solar flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdelyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time-dependent dynamic evolution, and interaction of nonlinear propagating (i.e., solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint, which is typical for photospheric regions. Nonlinear waves that develop into solitary waves are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2.0D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions, axisymmetric solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes in a magnetic flux tube are applied. In the present case, we focus on the sausage mode only. The dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. The equilibrium state is perturbed by a Gaussian at the flux tube footpoint. Two solitary solutions are found by solving the full nonlinear MHD equations. First, the nonlinear wave propagation with external sound speed is investigated. Next, the solitary wave propagating close to the tube speed, also found in the numerical solution, is studied. In contrast to previous analytical and numerical works, here no approximations were made to find the solitary solutions. A natural application of the present study may be spicule formation in the low chromosphere. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested

  9. Vegetative propagation of African walnut ( Plukenetia conophora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While semi-hardwood cuttings gave higher number of shoot when dipped in water, softwood cuttings (at 2- 4WAP) did better when dipped in coconut water. Available data suggest that softwood cuttings of this species are more amenable to clonal propagation. However, if semi-hardwood cuttings must be used, then dipping ...

  10. Optimization of directional elastic energy propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Chang, Hannah R.; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how topology optimization can be used to design a periodically perforated plate, in order to obtain a tailored anisotropic group velocity profile. The main method is demonstrated on both low and high frequency bending wave propagation in an aluminum plate...

  11. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaohua; Chen Jianxin; Butler, James P.; Wang Ning

    2005-01-01

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load (∼0.4 μm surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions

  12. An Immunization Strategy Based on Propagation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the ubiquity of smart phones, wearable equipment, and wireless sensors, the topologies of networks composed by them change along with time. The immunization strategies in which network immune nodes are chosen by analyzing the static aggregation network topologies have been challenged. The studies about interaction propagations between two pathogens show that the interaction can change propagation threshold and the final epidemic size of each other, which provides a new thinking of immunization method. The eradication or inhibition of the virus can be achieved through the spread of its opposite party. Here, we put forward an immunization strategy whose implementation does not depend on the analysis of network topology. The immunization agents are randomly placed on a few of individuals of network and spread out from these individuals on network in a propagation method. The immunization agents prevent virus infecting their habitat nodes with certain immune success rate. The analysis and simulation of evolution equation of the model show that immune propagation has a significant impact on the spread threshold and steady-state density of virus on a finite size of BA networks. Simulations on some real-world networks also suggest that the immunization strategy is feasible and effective.

  13. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  14. Propagation behaviour of overhead transmission lines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-02-27

    Feb 27, 2004 ... leading to low Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) and consequent reduced propagation conditions require specific transmission and reception conditions over .... the ambient temperature and wind velocity, intensity of solar radiation, conditions of conductor surface and the conductor resistance. This temperature ...

  15. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tural engineering or to hydrocarbon/geothermal processes. References. Bear J, Sorek S, Ben-Dor G and Mazor G 1992 Displacement waves in saturated thermoelastic porous media, I. Basic equations; Fluid Dyn. Res. 9 155–164. Biot M A 1956a The theory of propagation of elastic waves in a fluid-saturated porous solid, ...

  16. Front propagation in nonlinear parabolic equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feireisl, Eduard; Hilhorst, D.; Petzeltová, Hana; Takáč, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 2 (2014), s. 551-572 ISSN 0024-6107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : nonlinear parabolic equations * front propagation * travelling wave Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.820, year: 2014 http://jlms.oxfordjournals.org/content/90/2/551

  17. An optimal design problem in wave propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellido, J.C.; Donoso, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We consider an optimal design problem in wave propagation proposed in Sigmund and Jensen (Roy. Soc. Lond. Philos. Trans. Ser. A 361:1001-1019, 2003) in the one-dimensional situation: Given two materials at our disposal with different elastic Young modulus and different density, the problem consists...

  18. Radio Propagation in Open-pit Mines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Caldwell, George; Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an extensive measurement campaign performed at two large iron ore mining centers in Brazil at the 2.6 GHz band. Although several studies focusing on radio propagation in underground mines have been published, measurement data and careful analyses for open-p...

  19. Characteristics of microwave propagation in vapourised troposphere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microwave communication equipment design in temperate region may not be very suitable in the tropics because the characteristics of the troposphere as the medium of propagation differ appreciably. This paper present an investigation on effect of vertical gradient of water vapour on refractivity gradient and microwave ...

  20. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shepherd, Joseph E [CALTECH

    2009-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  1. Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation. S Ram. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v12i1.15563 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  2. Resonance propagation in heavy-ion scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The calculated invariant pmass distributions are presented for the p-meson production using optical potentials estimated within ... detailed calculation on light nuclei has been reported by Saito et al [6]. They find that the average ... resonance inside the nuclear medium as a function of its speed of propagation. The general ...

  3. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  4. MICRO PROPAGATION OF WORMWOOD ( Artemisia annua L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A study was carried out to determine the effect of varying concentrations of some plant growth hormones on the in vitro propagation of Artemisia annua from leaf primordial in the Biotechnology. Laboratory of Plant Science Department of Ahmadu. Bello University, Zaria. Leaf primordial from a. Chinyong variety ...

  5. Acoustical Wave Propagation in Sonic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Girip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss the technique of controlling the mechanical properties of sonic composites. The idea is to architecture the scatterers and material from which they are made, their number and geometry in order to obtain special features in their response to external waves. We refer to perfectly reflecting of acoustical waves over a desired range of frequencies or to prohibit their propagation in certain directions, or confining the waves within specified volumes. The internal structure of the material has to be chosen in such a way that to avoid the scattering of acoustical waves inside the material. This is possible if certain band-gaps of frequencies can be generated for which the waves are forbidden to propagate in certain directions. These bandgaps can be extended to cover all possible directions of propagation by resulting a full band-gap. If the band-gaps are not wide enough, their frequency ranges do not overlap. These band-gaps can overlap due to reflections on the surface of thick scatterers, as well as due to wave propagation inside them. growth.

  6. VAMPIRA - RF Propagation Measurement and Model Validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, H.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The propagation conditions of radar (RF) and infrared (IR) radiation in the atmosphere are determined by meteorological parameters including aerosols, gas concentrations and their gradients, and turbulence. To investigate the so-called RF-IR synergism (the simultaneous existence of RF and IR sub-

  7. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eSantana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. Neuronal classification has been a difficult problem because it is unclear what a neuronal cell class actually is and what are the best characteristics are to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological or molecular characteristics, when applied to selected datasets, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. We explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. In fact, using a combined anatomical/physiological dataset, our algorithm differentiated parvalbumin from somatostatin interneurons in 49 out of 50 cases. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits.

  8. Stable propagation of 'selfish'genetic elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These elements exhibit a variety of `selfish' strategies to ensure their replication and propagation during the growth of their host cells. To establish long-term ... The 2 m plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related yeast plasmids provide models for optimized eukaryotic selfish DNA elements. Selfish DNA elements ...

  9. Optical system defect propagation in ABCD systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKinley, W.G.; Yura, H.T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1988-01-01

    We describe how optical system defects (tilt/jitter, decenter, and despace) propagate through an arbitrary paraxial optical system that can be described by an ABCD ray transfer matrix. A pedagogical example is given that demonstrates the effect of alignment errors on a typical optical system...

  10. Effect-specific analysis of propagation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortgies, G.; Ruecker, F.; Dintelmann, F.; Jakoby, R.

    1992-08-01

    Results of propagation measurements with the satellite OLYMPUS carried out at 12.5, 20, and 30 GHz at the Research Center of the Deutsche Bundespost Telekom are discussed. In particular, attenuation, scintillation, and depolarization measurements are analyzed with special emphasis on frequency scaling of the various effects.

  11. Mapping surface plasmon polariton propagation via counter-propagating light pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Christoph; Leißner, Till; Jauernik, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    interface recorded in a counter-propagating pump-probe geometry. In comparison to former work this approach provides a very intuitive real-time access to the SPP wave packet. The quantitative analysis of the PEEM data enables us to determine in a rather direct manner the propagation characteristics......In an interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (ITR-PEEM) experiment, the near-field associated with surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be locally sensed via interference with ultrashort laser pulses. Here, we present ITR-PEEM data of SPP propagation at a gold vacuum...

  12. NASA Lunar Base Wireless System Propagation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    There have been many radio wave propagation studies using both experimental and theoretical techniques over the recent years. However, most of studies have been in support of commercial cellular phone wireless applications. The signal frequencies are mostly at the commercial cellular and Personal Communications Service bands. The antenna configurations are mostly one on a high tower and one near the ground to simulate communications between a cellular base station and a mobile unit. There are great interests in wireless communication and sensor systems for NASA lunar missions because of the emerging importance of establishing permanent lunar human exploration bases. Because of the specific lunar terrain geometries and RF frequencies of interest to the NASA missions, much of the published literature for the commercial cellular and PCS bands of 900 and 1800 MHz may not be directly applicable to the lunar base wireless system and environment. There are various communication and sensor configurations required to support all elements of a lunar base. For example, the communications between astronauts, between astronauts and the lunar vehicles, between lunar vehicles and satellites on the lunar orbits. There are also various wireless sensor systems among scientific, experimental sensors and data collection ground stations. This presentation illustrates the propagation analysis of the lunar wireless communication and sensor systems taking into account the three dimensional terrain multipath effects. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate the lunar surface material, terrain geometry and antenna location are the important factors affecting the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, surface material and operating frequency. The

  13. Propagating waves in human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka eTakahashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in non-human primates have shown that beta oscillations (15-30Hz of local field potentials (LFPs in the arm/hand areas of primary motor cortex (MI propagate as traveling waves across the cortex. These waves exhibited two stereotypical features across animals and tasks: 1 The waves propagated in two dominant modal directions roughly 180 degrees apart, and 2 their propagation speed ranged from 10 ~ 35 cm/s. It is, however, unknown if such cortical waves occur in the human motor cortex. This study shows that the two properties of propagating beta waves are present in MI of a tetraplegic human patient while he was instructed to perform an instruction delay center out task using a cursor controlled by the chin. Moreover, we show that beta waves are sustained and have similar properties whether the subject was engaged in the task or at rest. The directions of the successive sustained waves both in the human subject and a nonhuman primate (NHP subject tended to switch from one dominant mode to the other, and at least in the NHP subject the estimated distance travelled between successive waves traveling into and out of the central sulcus is consistent with the hypothesis of wave reflection between the border of motor and somatosensory cortices. Further, we show that the occurrence of the beta waves is not uniquely tied to periods of increased power in the beta frequency band. These results demonstrate that traveling beta waves in MI are a general phenomenon occurring in human as well as non-human primates. Consistent with the non-human primate data, the dominant directions of the beta LFP waves in human aligned to the proximal to distal gradient of joint representations in MI somatotopy. This consistent finding of wave propagation may imply the existence of a hardwired organization of motor cortex that mediates this spatio-temporal pattern.

  14. Glueball masses from the refined Gribov propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capri, M.A.L. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil); Dudal, D.; Vandersickel, N. [Ghent University (Belgium); Gomez, A.J.; Guimaraes, M.S.; Lemes, V.E.R.; Sorella, S.P.; Tedesco, D.G. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The quantum description of the non-abelian Yang-Mills theory at low energy scales is a long standing unsolved problem. This is a confining theory, meaning that the physical degrees of freedom are not described by the fundamental fields appearing in its defining action functional. The physical states are thus created by composite fields operators. In the pure Yang-Mills theory the fundamental, non-physical, excitations are the gluons and the physical states are named as glueballs and are created by gauge invariant operators. Recent results coming from lattice simulations of the Yang-Mills theory points to a gluon propagator which violates positivity and tends to a constant non-zero value at zero-momentum. The best fitting for this behavior is provided by a propagator whose analytic form describes the propagation of complex mass excitations, the so-called i-particles. These are supposed to be the low energy, confined, non-physical gluons. This propagator coincides with the one derived from the Refined Gribov-Zwanziger (RGZ) theory, which takes into account nonperturbative physics related to gauge copies and dimension two condensates. In this work we construct local, gauge invariant, composite operators with the quantum numbers of the lightest glueball states J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}; 0{sup -+}; 2{sup ++}. The correlation functions of these operators are evaluated by employing a lattice input for the mass scales of the low energy RGZ gluon propagator. We obtain for the glueball masses, in the lowest order approximation, the values m{sub 0++} {approx} 1.96 GeV, m{sub 0-+} {approx} 2.19 GeV, m{sub 2++} {approx} 2.04 GeV, in the SU(3) case, all within a 20% range of the corresponding lattice values. We also recover the mass hierarchy m{sub 0++} < m{sub 2++} < m{sub 0-+}.(author)

  15. DBEM crack propagation for nonlinear fracture problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Citarella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional crack propagation simulation is performed by the Dual Boundary Element Method (DBEM. The Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs along the front of a semi elliptical crack, initiated from the external surface of a hollow axle, are calculated for bending and press fit loading separately and for a combination of them. In correspondence of the latter loading condition, a crack propagation is also simulated, with the crack growth rates calculated using the NASGRO3 formula, calibrated for the material under analysis (steel ASTM A469. The J-integral and COD approaches are selected for SIFs calculation in DBEM environment, where the crack path is assessed by the minimum strain energy density criterion (MSED. In correspondence of the initial crack scenario, SIFs along the crack front are also calculated by the Finite Element (FE code ZENCRACK, using COD, in order to provide, by a cross comparison with DBEM, an assessment on the level of accuracy obtained. Due to the symmetry of the bending problem a pure mode I crack propagation is realised with no kinking of the propagating crack whereas for press fit loading the crack propagation becomes mixed mode. The crack growth analysis is nonlinear because of normal gap elements used to model the press fit condition with added friction, and is developed in an iterative-incremental procedure. From the analysis of the SIFs results related to the initial cracked configuration, it is possible to assess the impact of the press fit condition when superimposed to the bending load case.

  16. Action potential propagation: ion current or intramembrane electric field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Albert; Pérez, Juan J; Madrenas, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    The established action potential propagation mechanisms do not satisfactorily explain propagation on myelinated axons given the current knowledge of biological channels and membranes. The flow across ion channels presents two possible effects: the electric potential variations across the lipid bilayers (action potential) and the propagation of an electric field through the membrane inner part. The proposed mechanism is based on intra-membrane electric field propagation, this propagation can explain the action potential saltatory propagation and its constant delay independent of distance between Ranvier nodes in myelinated axons.

  17. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with γ-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C γ(air) 298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a γ-radiation source in which two γ-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter 22 Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes. Presently, as an innovative improvement, were used BaF 2

  18. Efficient Geometric Sound Propagation Using Visibility Culling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Anish

    2011-07-01

    Simulating propagation of sound can improve the sense of realism in interactive applications such as video games and can lead to better designs in engineering applications such as architectural acoustics. In this thesis, we present geometric sound propagation techniques which are faster than prior methods and map well to upcoming parallel multi-core CPUs. We model specular reflections by using the image-source method and model finite-edge diffraction by using the well-known Biot-Tolstoy-Medwin (BTM) model. We accelerate the computation of specular reflections by applying novel visibility algorithms, FastV and AD-Frustum, which compute visibility from a point. We accelerate finite-edge diffraction modeling by applying a novel visibility algorithm which computes visibility from a region. Our visibility algorithms are based on frustum tracing and exploit recent advances in fast ray-hierarchy intersections, data-parallel computations, and scalable, multi-core algorithms. The AD-Frustum algorithm adapts its computation to the scene complexity and allows small errors in computing specular reflection paths for higher computational efficiency. FastV and our visibility algorithm from a region are general, object-space, conservative visibility algorithms that together significantly reduce the number of image sources compared to other techniques while preserving the same accuracy. Our geometric propagation algorithms are an order of magnitude faster than prior approaches for modeling specular reflections and two to ten times faster for modeling finite-edge diffraction. Our algorithms are interactive, scale almost linearly on multi-core CPUs, and can handle large, complex, and dynamic scenes. We also compare the accuracy of our sound propagation algorithms with other methods. Once sound propagation is performed, it is desirable to listen to the propagated sound in interactive and engineering applications. We can generate smooth, artifact-free output audio signals by applying

  19. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-07-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with {gamma}-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C{sub {gamma}}{sub (air)}298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a {gamma}-radiation source in which two {gamma}-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter {sup 22}Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes

  20. Belief Propagation Algorithm for Portfolio Optimization Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi; Yasuda, Muneki

    2015-01-01

    The typical behavior of optimal solutions to portfolio optimization problems with absolute deviation and expected shortfall models using replica analysis was pioneeringly estimated by S. Ciliberti et al. [Eur. Phys. B. 57, 175 (2007)]; however, they have not yet developed an approximate derivation method for finding the optimal portfolio with respect to a given return set. In this study, an approximation algorithm based on belief propagation for the portfolio optimization problem is presented using the Bethe free energy formalism, and the consistency of the numerical experimental results of the proposed algorithm with those of replica analysis is confirmed. Furthermore, the conjecture of H. Konno and H. Yamazaki, that the optimal solutions with the absolute deviation model and with the mean-variance model have the same typical behavior, is verified using replica analysis and the belief propagation algorithm.

  1. Radial propagation of microturbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy confinement time in tokamaks exhibits a clear dependence on global plasma parameters. This is not the case for transport coefficients; their dependence on local plasma parameters cannot be precisely established. The aim of the present paper is to give a possible explanation of this behaviour; turbulence propagates radially because of departure from cylindrical geometry. This implies that the turbulence level at a given point and hence transport coefficients are not only functions of local plasma parameters. A quantitative estimate of the propagation velocity is derived from a Lagrangian formalism. Two cases are considered: the effect of toroidicity and the effect of non linear mode-mode coupling. The consequences of this model are discussed. This process does not depend on the type of instability. For the sake of simplicity only electrostatic perturbations are considered

  2. Positive Surge Propagation in Sloping Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Pietro Viero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model for the upstream propagation of a positive surge in a sloping, rectangular channel is presented. The model is based on the assumptions of a flat water surface and negligible energy dissipation downstream of the surge, which is generated by the instantaneous closure of a downstream gate. Under these hypotheses, a set of equations that depends only on time accurately describes the surge wave propagation. When the Froude number of the incoming flow is relatively small, an approximate analytical solution is also proposed. The predictive ability of the model is validated by comparing the model results with the results of an experimental investigation and with the results of a numerical model that solves the full shallow water equations.

  3. Microscopic Mechanisms for Propagating Deformation Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott

    2001-03-01

    Alloys often deform through the propagation of slowly moving ( cm/s) fronts separating strained and unstrained regions. Theories for these Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) fronts are mostly on the macroscopic level, dealing with strains instead of dislocation populations. In these models diffusion, a possible mechanism for propagation, fails to produce front behavior consistent with experiments. Previous work* used a nonlocal strain-rate to successfully reproduce many different aspects of experimentally observed fronts. Ananthakrishna has proposed a set of equations that describe the evolution of different dislocation populations. These equations reproduce the temporal behavior of the PLC effect, serrated stress-strain curves accompanying smooth loading. It is natural to ask whether diffusive or other spatial coupling terms added to this model result in fronts. I will discuss simulations of these equations with added spatial terms and attempt to compare the results with experiments. *S. Franklin, F. Mertens, and M. Marder, Phys. Rev. E V. 62 (2000)

  4. Unidirectional reflectionless light propagation at exceptional points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of unidirectional reflectionless light propagation in photonic devices at exceptional points (EPs. EPs, which are branch point singularities of the spectrum, associated with the coalescence of both eigenvalues and corresponding eigenstates, lead to interesting phenomena, such as level repulsion and crossing, bifurcation, chaos, and phase transitions in open quantum systems described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Recently, it was shown that judiciously designed photonic synthetic matters could mimic the complex non-Hermitian Hamiltonians in quantum mechanics and realize unidirectional reflection at optical EPs. Unidirectional reflectionlessness is of great interest for optical invisibility. Achieving unidirectional reflectionless light propagation could also be potentially important for developing optical devices, such as optical network analyzers. Here, we discuss unidirectional reflectionlessness at EPs in both parity-time (PT-symmetric and non-PT-symmetric optical systems. We also provide an outlook on possible future directions in this field.

  5. Improved Generalized Belief Propagation for Vision Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized belief propagation (GBP is a region-based belief propagation algorithm which can get good convergence in Markov random fields. However, the computation time is too heavy to use in practical engineering applications. This paper proposes a method to accelerate the efficiency of GBP. A caching technique and chessboard passing strategy are used to speed up algorithm. Then, the direction set method which is used to reduce the complexity of computing clique messages from quadric to cubic. With such a strategy the processing speed can be greatly increased. Besides, it is the first attempt to apply GBP for solving the stereomatching problem. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can speed up by 15+ times for typical stereo matching problem and infer a more plausible result.

  6. Topology Optimization for Transient Wave Propagation Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René

    as for vectorial elastic wave propagation problems using finite element analysis [P2], [P4]. The concept is implemented in a parallel computing code that includes efficient techniques for performing gradient based topology optimization. Using the developed computational framework the thesis considers four...... are derived by use of the adjoint variable method. Many wave propagation problems are open-region problems, i.e. the outer boundaries of the modeling domain must be re ection-less. The thesis contains new and independent developments within perfectly matched layer techniques for scalar as well......The study of elastic and optical waves together with intensive material research has revolutionized everyday as well as cutting edge technology in very tangible ways within the last century. Therefore it is important to continue the investigative work towards improving existing as well as innovate...

  7. Propagation of a small disturbance in Aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, M.; Prakash, R.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the present communication is to provide a mathematical model for the propagation of a small disturbance in the aorta. A differential equation governing the growth and decay of the small disturbance has been obtained. It is observed that the compressive pulses may grow into a shock wave. A mathematical model which is based on geometrical and mechanical properties of aorta admits disturbances in the propagating pulses which are not observed in human beings under normal physiological conditions. It is also observed that friction effects are to resist the tendency of shock formation in the model. The application of the results to the human arterial system shows that strong disturbances or shock waves are not expected under normal physiological conditions, while, in the case of a pathologically increased pressure rise at the root of aorta, shocklike transition may develop in the periphery. Some special cases of interest have also been discussed

  8. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  9. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of submillimeter waves (smm) in tokamak plasma was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses were carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system was employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes were developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements. 5 references, 2 figures

  10. Propagating Qualitative Values Through Quantitative Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Deepak

    1992-01-01

    In most practical problems where traditional numeric simulation is not adequate, one need to reason about a system with both qualitative and quantitative equations. In this paper, we address the problem of propagating qualitative values represented as interval values through quantitative equations. Previous research has produced exponential-time algorithms for approximate solution of the problem. These may not meet the stringent requirements of many real time applications. This paper advances the state of art by producing a linear-time algorithm that can propagate a qualitative value through a class of complex quantitative equations exactly and through arbitrary algebraic expressions approximately. The algorithm was found applicable to Space Shuttle Reaction Control System model.

  11. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  12. Manifold Adaptive Label Propagation for Face Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaobing; Lyu, Zehua; Chen, Changqing; Chen, Chuanbo

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel label propagation (LP) method is presented, called the manifold adaptive label propagation (MALP) method, which is to extend original LP by integrating sparse representation constraint into regularization framework of LP method. Similar to most LP, first of all, MALP also finds graph edges from given data and gives weights to the graph edges. Our goal is to find graph weights matrix adaptively. The key advantage of our approach is that MALP simultaneously finds graph weights matrix and predicts the label of unlabeled data. This paper also derives efficient algorithm to solve the proposed problem. Extensions of our MALP in kernel space and robust version are presented. The proposed method has been applied to the problem of semi-supervised face clustering using the well-known ORL, Yale, extended YaleB, and PIE datasets. Our experimental evaluations show the effectiveness of our method.

  13. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  14. Vegetative Propagation and the Genetic Improvement of North American Hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Farmer

    1973-01-01

    Progress and problems in vegetative propagation of important North American hardwoods are reviewed with emphasis on rooting cuttings and the application of propagation techniques in breeding research. Some problems in rooting physiology are discussed.

  15. Sonic boom propagation through atmospheric turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; 山下, 博; 大林, 茂

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the homogeneous atmospheric turbulence on the sonic boom propagation has been investigated. The turbulence field is represented by a finite sum of discrete Fourier modes based on the von Karman and Pao energy spectrum. The sonic boom signature is calculated by the modified Waveform Parameter Method, considering the turbulent velocities. The results show that in 59 % of the cases, the intensity of the sonic boom had decreased, and in other 41 % of the cases had increased the soni...

  16. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  17. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...... of artificial branches of the refractive index and simplicity in implementation. We prove the validity of the method on three case studies of homogeneous magnetized plasma, bi-cross and U-shaped metamaterials....

  18. Resonance propagation in heavy-ion scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    КЬЭ ЖЖК. ЖЖ→ЬЭ. (8) which gives a measure of the strength of ЬЭ production in ЖЖ collision (except for the free space resonance propagator). With this we get .... This exercise would be of use if the theoretical formalism describes the reaction dynamics correctly and the data do not have much uncertainty. Alternatively ...

  19. Uncertainty and its propagation in dynamics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring together some characteristics due to uncertainty when we deal with dynamic models and therefore to propagation of uncertainty. The respective role of uncertainty and inaccuracy is examined. A mathematical formalism based on Chapman-Kolmogorov equation allows to define a open-quotes subdynamicsclose quotes where the evolution equation takes the uncertainty into account. The problem of choosing or combining models is examined through a loss function associated to a decision

  20. Radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyras, George; Declaris, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves serves as a text in electrical engineering or electrophysics. The book discusses the electromagnetic theory; plane electromagnetic waves in homogenous isotropic and anisotropic media; and plane electromagnetic waves in inhomogenous stratified media. The text also describes the spectral representation of elementary electromagnetic sources; the field of a dipole in a stratified medium; and radiation in anisotropic plasma. The properties and the procedures of Green's function method of solution, axial currents, as well as cylindrical boundaries a

  1. Survey Propagation as local equilibrium equations

    OpenAIRE

    Braunstein, A.; Zecchina, R.

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown experimentally that a decimation algorithm based on Survey Propagation (SP) equations allows to solve efficiently some combinatorial problems over random graphs. We show that these equations can be derived as sum-product equations for the computation of marginals in an extended space where the variables are allowed to take an additional value -- $*$ -- when they are not forced by the combinatorial constraints. An appropriate ``local equilibrium condition'' cost/energy functi...

  2. Propagation and Purification of Baculovirus oryctes Huger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susamto Somowiyarjo

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available An isolate of Baculovirus oryctes, a possible biological control agent for coconut beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros Huger from East Java was propagated and purified. The virus could be transmitted by feeding the imago with 10% sucrose containing virus from homogenate of infected beetles. Effectivity of virus to 9 healthy females by sexual copulation. Virus be succesfully purified by a method of Payne. Key words: Baculovirus oryctes, transmission, purification

  3. Feynman propagator in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelas, P.; Raine, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Wick rotation is generalized in a covariant manner so as to apply to curved manifolds in a way that is independent of the analytic properties of the manifold. This enables us to show that various methods for defining a Feynman propagator to be found in the literature are equivalent where they are applicable. We are also able to discuss the relation between certain regularization methods that have been employed

  4. Propagating distributions up directed acyclic graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, E B; Smith, W D

    1999-01-01

    In a previous article, we considered game trees as graphical models. Adopting an evaluation function that returned a probability distribution over values likely to be taken at a given position, we described how to build a model of uncertainty and use it for utility-directed growth of the search tree and for deciding on a move after search was completed. In some games, such as chess and Othello, the same position can occur more than once, collapsing the game tree to a directed acyclic graph (DAG). This induces correlations among the distributions at sibling nodes. This article discusses some issues that arise in extending our algorithms to a DAG. We give a simply described algorithm for correctly propagating distributions up a game DAG, taking account of dependencies induced by the DAG structure. This algorithm is exponential time in the worst case. We prove that it is #P complete to propagate distributions up a game DAG correctly. We suggest how our exact propagation algorithm can yield a fast but inexact heuristic.

  5. Wave propagation in the magnetosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed for identifying the spatial regimes of various modes of wave propagation in the Jupiter magnetosphere that may be encountered by flyby missions. The Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram of plasma physics is utilized to identify the frequency regimes in which different modes of propagation occur in the magnetoplasma. The Gledhill model and the Ioannidis and Brice model of the magnetoplasma are summarized, and configuration-space CMA diagrams are constructed for each model for frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The distinctive propagation features, the radio noise regimes, and the wave-particle interactions are discussed. It is concluded that the concentration of plasma in the equatorial plane makes this region of vital importance for radio observations with flyby missions. Local radio noise around the electron cyclotron frequency will probably differ appreciably from its terrestrial counterpart due to the lack of field-line guidance. Hydromagnetic wave properties at frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency and below will probably be similar to the terrestrial case.

  6. Intense relativistic electron beam: generation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, K.C.; Mondal, J.

    2010-01-01

    A general review of relativistic electron beam extracted from explosive field emission diode has been presented here. The beam current in the diode gap taking into account cathode and anode plasma expansion velocity and excluding the self magnetic field effect is directly proportional to gap voltage V 3/2 and inversely proportional to the square of the effective diode gap (d-vt). In the limit of high current, self magnetic field focusing effect comes into play and results in a critical current at which pinching will take place. When the diode current exceeds the critical current, the electron flow is in the para-potential regime. Different diode geometries such as planner, coaxial, rod-pinched, reflex triode are discussed qualitatively. When the beam is injected into a vacuum drift tube the propagation of the beam is only possible in presence of a strong axial magnetic field which prevents the beam expansion in the radial direction. If the beam is injected in the drift tube filled with dense plasma, then the redistribution of the plasma electrons effectively neutralizes the beam space charge, resulting subsequent propagation of the beam along the drift tube. The beam propagation through neutral gas is similar to the plasma filled drift tube. In this case both the neutral gas pressure and the beam current regulate the transmission of the REB. (author)

  7. Quantum Graphical Models and Belief Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leifer, M.S.; Poulin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Belief Propagation algorithms acting on Graphical Models of classical probability distributions, such as Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks, are amongst the most powerful known methods for deriving probabilistic inferences amongst large numbers of random variables. This paper presents a generalization of these concepts and methods to the quantum case, based on the idea that quantum theory can be thought of as a noncommutative, operator-valued, generalization of classical probability theory. Some novel characterizations of quantum conditional independence are derived, and definitions of Quantum n-Bifactor Networks, Markov Networks, Factor Graphs and Bayesian Networks are proposed. The structure of Quantum Markov Networks is investigated and some partial characterization results are obtained, along the lines of the Hammersley-Clifford theorem. A Quantum Belief Propagation algorithm is presented and is shown to converge on 1-Bifactor Networks and Markov Networks when the underlying graph is a tree. The use of Quantum Belief Propagation as a heuristic algorithm in cases where it is not known to converge is discussed. Applications to decoding quantum error correcting codes and to the simulation of many-body quantum systems are described

  8. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. M.; Molitoris, J. D.

    2006-07-01

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P ˜ 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P ˜ 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  9. Single pit propagation on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtault, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical characterization of metastable events such as pitting corrosion of stainless steel in chloride electrolyte remains complex because many individual processes may occur simultaneously on the alloy surface. To overcome these difficulties, an experimental setup, the flow micro-device, has been developed to achieve the initiation of a single pit and to propagate the single pit in three dimensions. In this work, we take advantage of such a device in order to revisit the pitting process on a 316L stainless steel in a chloride - sulphate bulk. In a first step, the time evolution of the pit geometry (depth, radius) and the chemical evolution of the pit solution investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy have shown that the pit depth propagation depends on the formation of a metal chloride and sulphate gel in the pit solution, and is controlled by the metallic cations diffusion from the pit bottom to the pit mouth. The pit radius growth is defined by the initial surface de-passivation, by the presence of a pit cover and by the gel development in the solution. all of these phenomena are function of applied potential and chemical composition of the solution. In a last step, it was demonstrated that a critical chloride concentration is needed in order to maintain the pit propagation. This critical concentration slightly increases with the pit depth. From statistical analysis performed on identical experiments, a zone diagram showing the pit stability as a function of the chloride concentration and the pit dimensions was built. (author) [fr

  10. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, R Alves; Evoli, C; Sigl, G; Van Vliet, A; Erdmann, M; Kuempel, D; Mueller, G; Walz, D; Kampert, K-H; Winchen, T

    2015-01-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 10 17 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python. (paper)

  11. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul; Pizzolato, Marco; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Masserey, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness and beam skewing of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes A 0 and S 0 were investigated. Experimental measurements using contact wedge transducer excitation and laser measurement were conducted. Good agreement was found between the theoretically calculated angular dependency of the phase slowness and measurements for different propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation. Significant wave skew and beam widening was observed experimentally due to the anisotropy, especially for the S 0 mode. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted to visualize and quantify the guided wave beam skew. Good agreement was found for the A 0 mode, but a systematic discrepancy was observed for the S 0 mode. These effects need to be considered for the non-destructive testing of wafers using guided waves.

  12. Cosmic ray propagation with CRPropa 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Batista, R.; Erdmann, M.; Evoli, C.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kuempel, D.; Mueller, G.; Sigl, G.; Van Vliet, A.; Walz, D.; Winchen, T.

    2015-05-01

    Solving the question of the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) requires the development of detailed simulation tools in order to interpret the experimental data and draw conclusions on the UHECR universe. CRPropa is a public Monte Carlo code for the galactic and extragalactic propagation of cosmic ray nuclei above ∼ 1017 eV, as well as their photon and neutrino secondaries. In this contribution the new algorithms and features of CRPropa 3, the next major release, are presented. CRPropa 3 introduces time-dependent scenarios to include cosmic evolution in the presence of cosmic ray deflections in magnetic fields. The usage of high resolution magnetic fields is facilitated by shared memory parallelism, modulated fields and fields with heterogeneous resolution. Galactic propagation is enabled through the implementation of galactic magnetic field models, as well as an efficient forward propagation technique through transformation matrices. To make use of the large Python ecosystem in astrophysics CRPropa 3 can be steered and extended in Python.

  13. From guided to optical microvave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuffi, L.

    1987-05-01

    A wide theoretical study on quasi-optical microwave propagation has been carried out in the range 3 GHz - 300 GHz. A high power TEMOO Gaussian beam can be propagated for long distances with low losses if a nearly-confocal system of mirrors is used as phase corrector. The theory of beam waveguides using elliptic paraboloidal reflectors has been critically revisited and developed. All the kind of losses (diffraction, matching, truncation, divergence, ohmic, atmospheric, depolarization, misalignment) have been examinated into detail. Criteria to find the best design parameters of a quasi-optical transmission line are given once the frequency, the power and the available room are known. In general, a well designed Reflecting Beam Waveguide should permit the propagation of several MW in CW without a sensible beam shape deformation, and with total losses of about a fraction of % in 10 meters. Several examples at different frequencies are herein reported, and applications to high power Electron Cyclotron Heating and Lower Hybrid Heating of a plasma find a good solution using quasi-optical schemes. The wide bandwidth, the fact of having a single line needing no cooling and without requirements of high mechanical precision (as in certain waveguide components at high frequency), are other advantages of the Reflecting Beam Waveguide System (RBWS) which have been examined in this work

  14. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  15. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  16. Error propagation analysis for a sensor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeater, M.L.; Hockenbury, R.W.; Hawkins, J.; Wilkinson, J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a program to develop reliability methods for operational use with reactor sensors and protective systems, error propagation analyses are being made for each model. An example is a sensor system computer simulation model, in which the sensor system signature is convoluted with a reactor signature to show the effect of each in revealing or obscuring information contained in the other. The error propagation analysis models the system and signature uncertainties and sensitivities, whereas the simulation models the signatures and by extensive repetitions reveals the effect of errors in various reactor input or sensor response data. In the approach for the example presented, the errors accumulated by the signature (set of ''noise'' frequencies) are successively calculated as it is propagated stepwise through a system comprised of sensor and signal processing components. Additional modeling steps include a Fourier transform calculation to produce the usual power spectral density representation of the product signature, and some form of pattern recognition algorithm.

  17. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intende...

  18. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  19. Coherence approach to neutron polarization propagation in instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.O.; Van Well, A.A.; Plomp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of the mutual coherence function is a well known method to describe the effects of neutron’s propagation through scattering instruments. This method is extended with the description of the coherence matrix to account for neutron polarization effects and its propagation through an

  20. Gauge-dependent condensates and the quark propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavelle, M.J.; Oleszczuk, M.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the contributions of the condensates , and to the vector two-point sum rule and to the quark propagator. We demonstrate that whilst in the sum rule only the contributions and occur, in the quark propagator gauge-dependent combinations enter. This latter property also holds at the pole of the propagator. (orig.)

  1. Modeling UHF Radio Propagation in Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honcharenko, Walter

    The potential implementation of wireless Radio Local Area Networks and Personal Communication Services inside buildings requires a thorough understanding of signal propagation within buildings. This work describes a study leading to a theoretical understanding of wave propagation phenomenon inside buildings. Covered first is propagation in the clear space between the floor and ceiling, which is modeled using Kirchoff -Huygens diffraction theory. This along with ray tracing techniques are used to develop a model to predict signal coverage inside buildings. Simulations were conducted on a hotel building, two office buildings, and a university building to which measurements of CW signals were compared, with good agreement. Propagation to other floors was studied to determine the signal strength as a function of the number of floors separating transmitter and receiver. Diffraction paths and through the floor paths which carry significant power to the receivers were examined. Comparisons were made to measurements in a hotel building and an office building, in which agreements were excellent. As originally developed for Cellular Mobile Radio (CMR) systems, the sector average is obtained from the spatial average of the received signal as the mobile traverses a path of 20 or so wavelengths. This approach has also been applied indoors with the assumption that a unique average could be obtained by moving either end of the radio link. However, unlike in the CMR environment, inside buildings both ends of the radio link are in a rich multipath environment. It is shown both theoretically and experimentally that moving both ends of the link is required to achieve a unique average. Accurate modeling of the short pulse response of a signal within a building will provide insight for determining the hardware necessary for high speed data transmission and recovery, and a model for determining the impulse response is developed in detail. Lastly, the propagation characteristics of

  2. Visual attitude propagation for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Samir A.

    As electronics become smaller and more capable, it has become possible to conduct meaningful and sophisticated satellite missions in a small form factor. However, the capability of small satellites and the range of possible applications are limited by the capabilities of several technologies, including attitude determination and control systems. This dissertation evaluates the use of image-based visual attitude propagation as a compliment or alternative to other attitude determination technologies that are suitable for miniature satellites. The concept lies in using miniature cameras to track image features across frames and extracting the underlying rotation. The problem of visual attitude propagation as a small satellite attitude determination system is addressed from several aspects: related work, algorithm design, hardware and performance evaluation, possible applications, and on-orbit experimentation. These areas of consideration reflect the organization of this dissertation. A "stellar gyroscope" is developed, which is a visual star-based attitude propagator that uses relative motion of stars in an imager's field of view to infer the attitude changes. The device generates spacecraft relative attitude estimates in three degrees of freedom. Algorithms to perform the star detection, correspondence, and attitude propagation are presented. The Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) approach is applied to the correspondence problem to successfully pair stars across frames while mitigating falsepositive and false-negative star detections. This approach provides tolerance to the noise levels expected in using miniature optics and no baffling, and the noise caused by radiation dose on orbit. The hardware design and algorithms are validated using test images of the night sky. The application of the stellar gyroscope as part of a CubeSat attitude determination and control system is described. The stellar gyroscope is used to augment a MEMS gyroscope attitude propagation

  3. Particle-particle interactions in aluminum reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, K.V.; McLemore, W.J.S.; Sparrow, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute has been studying the use of thermite reactions for the production of specialized compounds since the mid-1950's. One of the goals of the research at GTRI is to define the reaction mechanism in order to be ble to predict the resultant reaction behaviour and thus prevent hazardous conditions. Thermite processing advantages are discussed in this paper. A typical thermite type of reaction to produce a composite titanium diboride/alumina is shown. The reactions typically use three starting materials for the production of a specific compound. A preliminary experimental mechanistic model of the extremely exothermic oxidation-reduction reaction is being developed

  4. Modelling particle - particle interaction at the micro scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1983-03-01

    In high-strength alloys, microstructure can influence toughness in a manner not yet fully quantified. Computational mechanics offers a tool whereby the events leading to fracture may be simulated, but the success of such an enterprise depends heavily upon the quality of the model employed. This report outlines a sequence of events thought to precede ductile fracture and presents a finite element model designed to capture the main events. The model is considered to be an improvement over an earlier one, and data are presented to support this conclusion. Work of this type requires a fine degree of resolution which normally will entail very large, detailed finite element maps. Such map sizes could easily exceed the capacity of research computers, and a substructuring technique is essential to pursue research of this sort. Such a technique has been developed for use without modification to an existing code, i.e., it may be implemented on a standard finite element program directly.

  5. Particles, particle labels, and quanta: The toll of unacknowledged metaphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redhead, M. (Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)); Teller, P. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The practice of describing multiparticle quantum systems in terms of labeled particles indicates that the authors think of quantum entities as individuatable. The labels, together with particle indistinguishability, create the need for symmetrization or antisymmetrization (or, in principle, higher-order symmetries), which in turn results in surplus formal structure' in the formalism, formal structure which corresponds to nothing in the real world. The authors argue that these facts show quanta to be unindividuatable entities, things in principle incapable of supporting labels, and so things which support no factual difference if two of them are thought of as being switched. When thinking of the metaphysics of quanta, one should eschew the misleading labels of the tensor product Hilbert space formalism and prefer the ontologically more faithful description of the Fock space formalism. This conception eliminates puzzles about the quantum statistics of bosons.

  6. Application of propagation calculations in air quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuelske, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a methodics of propagation calculation since the foundation of the 'Landesanstalt fuer Immissionsschutz' in 1963, and its practical use in air quality control. In this context, it deals with methods for calculating stack heights and the Gaussian propagation model adopted by the Technical Code on Clean Air, the propagation of flue gas emitted via cooling towers, the propagation of accidentally released substances, odours and automobile emissions, and with flow and propagation calculation for the proximity zone of buildings as well as for meteorological fields with space and time variations and topographically varied terrain. (orig.) [de

  7. A representation independent propagator. Pt. 1. Compact Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, W.A.

    1995-01-01

    Conventional path integral expressions for propagators are representation dependent. Rather than having to adapt each propagator to the representation in question, it is shown that for compact Lie groups it is possible to introduce a propagator that is representation independent. For a given set of kinematical variables this propagator is a single function independent of any particular choice of fiducial vector, which monetheless, correctly propagates each element of the coherent state representation associated with these kinematical variables. Although the configuration space is in general curved, nevertheless the lattice phase-space path integral for the representation independent propagator has the form appropriate to flat space. To illustrate the general theory a representation independent propagator is explicitly constructed for the Lie group SU(2). (orig.)

  8. Simulations of Seismic Wave Propagation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Ruan, Youyi; Metthez, Nathan; Khan, Amir; Leng, Kuangdai; van Driel, Martin; Wieczorek, Mark; Rivoldini, Attilio; Larmat, Carène S.; Giardini, Domenico; Tromp, Jeroen; Lognonné, Philippe; Banerdt, Bruce W.

    2017-10-01

    We present global and regional synthetic seismograms computed for 1D and 3D Mars models based on the spectral-element method. For global simulations, we implemented a radially-symmetric Mars model with a 110 km thick crust (Sohl and Spohn in J. Geophys. Res., Planets 102(E1):1613-1635, 1997). For this 1D model, we successfully benchmarked the 3D seismic wave propagation solver SPECFEM3D_GLOBE (Komatitsch and Tromp in Geophys. J. Int. 149(2):390-412, 2002a; 150(1):303-318, 2002b) against the 2D axisymmetric wave propagation solver AxiSEM (Nissen-Meyer et al. in Solid Earth 5(1):425-445, 2014) at periods down to 10 s. We also present higher-resolution body-wave simulations with AxiSEM down to 1 s in a model with a more complex 1D crust, revealing wave propagation effects that would have been difficult to interpret based on ray theory. For 3D global simulations based on SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we superimposed 3D crustal thickness variations capturing the distinct crustal dichotomy between Mars' northern and southern hemispheres, as well as topography, ellipticity, gravity, and rotation. The global simulations clearly indicate that the 3D crust speeds up body waves compared to the reference 1D model, whereas it significantly changes surface waveforms and their dispersive character depending on its thickness. We also perform regional simulations with the solver SES3D (Fichtner et al. Geophys. J. Int. 179:1703-1725, 2009) based on 3D crustal models derived from surface composition, thereby addressing the effects of various distinct crustal features down to 2 s. The regional simulations confirm the strong effects of crustal variations on waveforms. We conclude that the numerical tools are ready for examining more scenarios, including various other seismic models and sources.

  9. Swell Propagation over Indian Ocean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchandra A. Bhowmick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Swells are the ocean surface gravity waves that have propagated out of their generating fetch to the distant coasts without significant attenuation. Therefore they contain a clear signature of the nature and intensity of wind at the generation location. This makes them a precursor to various atmospheric phenomena like distant storms, tropical cyclones, or even large scale sea breeze like monsoon. Since they are not affected by wind once they propagate out of their generating region, they cannot be described by regional wave models forced by local winds. However, their prediction is important, in particular, for ship routing and off shore structure designing. In the present work, the propagation of swell waves from the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean to the central and northern Indian Ocean has been studied. For this purpose a spectral ocean Wave Model (WAM has been used to simulate significant wave height for 13 years from 1993–2005 using NCEP blended winds at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1°. It has been observed that Indian Ocean, with average wave height of approximately 2–3 m during July, is mostly dominated by swell waves generated predominantly under the extreme windy conditions prevailing over the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean. In fact the swell waves reaching the Indian Ocean in early or mid May carry unique signatures of monsoon arriving over the Indian Subcontinent. Pre-monsoon month of April contains low swell waves ranging from 0.5–1 m. The amplitudes subsequently increase to approximately 1.5–2 meters around 7–15 days prior to the arrival of monsoon over the Indian Subcontinent. This embedded signature may be utilized as one of the important oceanographic precursor to the monsoon onset over the Indian Ocean.

  10. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  11. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  12. PROPAGATOR: a synchronous stochastic wildfire propagation model with distributed computation engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    D´Andrea, M.; Fiorucci, P.; Biondi, G.; Negro, D.

    2012-04-01

    PROPAGATOR is a stochastic model of forest fire spread, useful as a rapid method for fire risk assessment. The model is based on a 2D stochastic cellular automaton. The domain of simulation is discretized using a square regular grid with cell size of 20x20 meters. The model uses high-resolution information such as elevation and type of vegetation on the ground. Input parameters are wind direction, speed and the ignition point of fire. The simulation of fire propagation is done via a stochastic mechanism of propagation between a burning cell and a non-burning cell belonging to its neighbourhood, i.e. the 8 adjacent cells in the rectangular grid. The fire spreads from one cell to its neighbours with a certain base probability, defined using vegetation types of two adjacent cells, and modified by taking into account the slope between them, wind direction and speed. The simulation is synchronous, and takes into account the time needed by the burning fire to cross each cell. Vegetation cover, slope, wind speed and direction affect the fire-propagation speed from cell to cell. The model simulates several mutually independent realizations of the same stochastic fire propagation process. Each of them provides a map of the area burned at each simulation time step. Propagator simulates self-extinction of the fire, and the propagation process continues until at least one cell of the domain is burning in each realization. The output of the model is a series of maps representing the probability of each cell of the domain to be affected by the fire at each time-step: these probabilities are obtained by evaluating the relative frequency of ignition of each cell with respect to the complete set of simulations. Propagator is available as a module in the OWIS (Opera Web Interfaces) system. The model simulation runs on a dedicated server and it is remote controlled from the client program, NAZCA. Ignition points of the simulation can be selected directly in a high-resolution, three

  13. Botnet Propagation Via Public Websited Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Juknius

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The networks of compromised and remotely controlled computers (bots are widely used in many Internet fraudulent activities, especially in the distributed denial of service attacks. Brute force gives enormous power to bot masters and makes botnet traffic visible; therefore, some countermeasures might be applied at early stages. Our study focuses on detecting botnet propagation via public websites. The provided algorithm might help with preventing from massive infections when popular web sites are compromised without spreading visual changes used for malware in botnets.Article in English

  14. NLO error propagation exercise data collection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keisch, B.; Bieber, A.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A combined automated and manual system for data collection is described. The system is suitable for collecting, storing, and retrieving data related to nuclear material control at a bulk processing facility. The system, which was applied to the NLO operated Feed Materials Production Center, was successfully demonstrated for a selected portion of the facility. The instrumentation consisted of off-the-shelf commercial equipment and provided timeliness, convenience, and efficiency in providing information for generating a material balance and performing error propagation on a sound statistical basis.

  15. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D' Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  16. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  17. Light Propagation Through Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Christopher; Paul, Jagannath; Zhang, Haoxiang; Stier, Andreas; Karaiskaj, Denis

    C.E.STEVENS,J.PAUL,H.ZHANG, Dept. of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, USA. A.V.STIER, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, D. KARAISKAJ, Dept. of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, USA. - Using broadband light, the propagation of light through MoSe2 and WSe2 was investigated. Measuring the optical density for samples with different number of layers, we found that these values differ from what the Beer-Lambert Law predicts. The results were also modeled theoretically according to an effective two-band model. Funded by The Department of Energy.

  18. Propagator theory of atomic and molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrn, Y.

    1976-01-01

    It is not at all obvious which methods of use in quantum chemistry can be characterized as being without wavefunctions. There are, however, a number of methods that purpose to calculate atomic and molecular electronic structure and properties without the explicit use of many-electron wavefunctions. Fully realizing the arbitrariness of any classification of such methods as well as the absence of sharp boundaries between any choice of groups, the author separates the three kinds of approaches: (i) Local Density Energy Functional Methods, (ii) Density Matrix Methods, (iii) Propagator or Green's Function Methods. (Auth.)

  19. Scattering and Propagation in Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    WAVE PROPAGATION CHARACTERISTICS by S.F.Ulbtd, RJ.HU, R.B.Fritz, RLA.BoDhde; and R.W.McMIIhn 16 IMAGERIE OPTIQUE A TRAVERS LA TURBULENCE ATMOSPHERIQUE...cross sec- tinn is proeseted Is Section 11. Rare , a multiple-ecattering factor io Introduced, The explicit forms of thia factor for the weak and strong...8217. Ata Terr Phys 45 (1983) 595-605. 13-10 34 B J Usainoki, N 0 Booker and M Mariens, "Intensity fluctuations due to a deep phasescreen with a power

  20. NLO error propagation exercise data collection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keisch, B.; Bieber, A.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A combined automated and manual system for data collection is described. The system is suitable for collecting, storing, and retrieving data related to nuclear material control at a bulk processing facility. The system, which was applied to the NLO operated Feed Materials Production Center, was successfully demonstrated for a selected portion of the facility. The instrumentation consisted of off-the-shelf commercial equipment and provided timeliness, convenience, and efficiency in providing information for generating a material balance and performing error propagation on a sound statistical basis

  1. Infrared propagator corrections for constant deceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T M; Miao, S P; Prokopec, T [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R P [Department of Physics, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu

    2008-12-21

    We derive the propagator for a massless, minimally coupled scalar on a D-dimensional, spatially flat, homogeneous and isotropic background with arbitrary constant deceleration parameter. Our construction uses the operator formalism by integrating the Fourier mode sum. We give special attention to infrared corrections from the nonzero lower limit associated with working on finite spatial sections. These corrections eliminate infrared divergences that would otherwise be incorrectly treated by dimensional regularization, resulting in off-coincidence divergences for those special values of the deceleration parameter at which the infrared divergence is logarithmic. As an application we compute the expectation value of the scalar stress-energy tensor.

  2. Laser beam propagation through random media

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Larry C

    2005-01-01

    Since publication of the first edition of this text in 1998, there have been several new, important developments in the theory of beam wave propagation through a random medium, which have been incorporated into this second edition. Also new to this edition are models for the scintillation index under moderate-to-strong irradiance fluctuations; models for aperture averaging based on ABCD ray matrices; beam wander and its effects on scintillation; theory of partial coherence of the source; models of rough targets for ladar applications; phase fluctuations; analysis of other beam shapes; plus exp

  3. Acoustic propagation mode in a cylindrical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Idehara, Toshitaka; Inada, Hideyo

    1975-01-01

    The sound velocity in a cylindrical plasma produced by a high frequency discharge is measured by an interferometer system. The result shows that the acoustic wave guide effect does exist in a neutral gas and in a plasma. It is found that the wave propagates in the mode m=2 in a rigid boundary above the cut-off frequency fsub(c) and in the mode m=0 below fsub(c). Because the mode m=0 is identical to a plane wave, the sound velocity in free space can be evaluated exactly. In the mode m=2, the sound velocity approaches the free space value, when the frequency increases sufficiently. (auth.)

  4. Mass propagation of Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, U; Rahman, M S M; Islam, S; Haque, N; Khatun, M; Jubair, T A; Paul, B C

    2008-05-01

    A protocol for mass propagation through axillary bud proliferation was established for Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth. (Apocynaceae). MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg L(-1) BA and 0.2 mg L(-1) NAA elicited the maximum number of shoots (4 multiple shoots) from nodal explants. These adventitious shoots were best rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L(-1) each of IBA and IAA. The in vitro raised plants were acclimatized in glass house and successfully transplanted to field condition with almost 95% survival.

  5. [Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

    2013-06-01

    The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information.

  6. Electron Beam Propagation in a Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung W. Min

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam propagation in a fully ionized plasma has been studied using a one-dimensional particle simulation model. We compare the results of electrostatic simulations to those of electromagnetic simulations. The electrostatic results show the essential features of beam-plasma instability which accelerates ambient plasmas. The results also show the heating of ambient plasmas and the trapping of plasmas due to the locally generated electric field. The level of the radiation generated by the same non-relativistic beam is slightly higher than the noise level. We discuss the results in context of the heating of coronal plasma during solar flares.

  7. Uncertainty propagation within the UNEDF models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen, T.; Kortelainen, M.

    2017-04-01

    The parameters of the nuclear energy density have to be adjusted to experimental data. As a result they carry certain uncertainty which then propagates to calculated values of observables. In the present work we quantify the statistical uncertainties of binding energies, proton quadrupole moments and proton matter radius for three UNEDF Skyrme energy density functionals by taking advantage of the knowledge of the model parameter uncertainties. We find that the uncertainty of UNEDF models increases rapidly when going towards proton or neutron rich nuclei. We also investigate the impact of each model parameter on the total error budget.

  8. The Propagation and Evolution of Design Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, V. V.; Howard, Thomas J.; Culley, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The research in this paper reports a case study of a design project which had two scopes for a variant and an adaptive design type. This is quite common practice where designers commonly propose short and long term solutions to design problems. In this particular case, preference was not voiced...... for an adaptive solution until the 3rd stage-gate of the project. The researcher acted as project manager of the design project using a participatory action research methodology. During the design work the researcher recorded and classified the various design constraints introduced and propagated throughout...

  9. Pressure wave propagation in sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was done on the pressure wave propagation within the pipes and mixture vessel of a termohydraulic loop for thermal shock with sodium. It was used the characteristic method to solve the one-dimensional continuity and momentum equations. The numerical model includes the pipes and the effects of valves and other accidents on pressure losses. The study was based on designer informations and engineering tables. It was evaluated the pressure wave sizes, parametrically as a function of the draining valve closure times. (author) [pt

  10. Laser beam propagation in nonlinear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    ""This is very unique and promises to be an extremely useful guide to a host of workers in the field. They have given a generalized presentation likely to cover most if not all situations to be encountered in the laboratory, yet also highlight several specific examples that clearly illustrate the methods. They have provided an admirable contribution to the community. If someone makes their living by designing lasers, optical parametric oscillators or other devices employing nonlinear crystals, or designing experiments incorporating laser beam propagation through linear or nonlinear media, then

  11. Spectral transfer functions of body waves propagating through a stratified medium. Part 1: Basic theory by means of matrix propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, R.; Correig, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic wave propagation is described by a second order differential equation for medium displacement. By Fourier transforming with respect to time and space, wave equation transforms into a system of first order linear differential equations for the Fourier transform of displacement and stress. This system of differential equations is solved by means of Matrix Propagator and applied to the propagation of body waves in stratified media. The matrix propagators corresponding to P-SV and SH waves in homogeneous medium are found as an intermediate step to obtain the spectral response of body waves propagating through a stratified medium with homogeneous layers. (author) 14 refs

  12. EPIC: an Error Propagation/Inquiry Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The use of a computer program EPIC (Error Propagation/Inquiry Code) will be discussed. EPIC calculates the variance of a materials balance closed about a materials balance area (MBA) in a processing plant operated under steady-state conditions. It was designed for use in evaluating the significance of inventory differences in the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear plants. EPIC rapidly estimates the variance of a materials balance using average plant operating data. The intent is to learn as much as possible about problem areas in a process with simple straightforward calculations assuming a process is running in a steady-state mode. EPIC is designed to be used by plant personnel or others with little computer background. However, the user should be knowledgeable about measurement errors in the system being evaluated and have a limited knowledge of how error terms are combined in error propagation analyses. EPIC contains six variance equations; the appropriate equation is used to calculate the variance at each measurement point. After all of these variances are calculated, the total variance for the MBA is calculated using a simple algebraic sum of variances. The EPIC code runs on any computer that accepts a standard form of the BASIC language. 2 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  13. Designing microcapsule arrays that propagate chemical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Balazs, Anna C.

    2010-08-01

    Using analysis and simulation, we show how ordered arrays of microcapsules in solution can be harnessed to propagate chemical signals in directed and controllable ways, allowing the signals to be transmitted over macroscopic distances. The system encompasses two types of capsules that are localized on an adhesive surface. The “signaling” capsules release inducer molecules, which trigger “targets” to release nanoparticles. The released nanoparticles can bind to the underlying surface and thus, create adhesion gradients, which then propel the signaling capsules to shuttle between neighboring targets. This arrangement acts like a relay, so that triggering target capsules at a particular location in the array also triggers target capsules in adjacent locations. For an array containing two target columns, our simulations and analysis show that steady input signal leads to a sustained periodic output. For an array containing multiple target columns, we show that by introducing a prescribed ratio of nanoparticle release rates between successive target columns, a chemical signal can be propagated along the array without dissipation. We also demonstrate that similar signal transmission cannot be performed via diffusion alone.

  14. Front propagation in a chaotic flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvarzi, C. O.; Paul, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate numerically the dynamics of a propagating front in the presence of a spatiotemporally chaotic flow field. The flow field is the three-dimensional time-dependent state of spiral defect chaos generated by Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a spatially extended domain. Using large-scale parallel numerical simulations, we simultaneously solve the Boussinesq equations and a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a Fischer-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov reaction for the transport of the scalar species in a large-aspect-ratio cylindrical domain for experimentally accessible conditions. We explore the front dynamics and geometry in the low-Damköhler-number regime, where the effect of the flow field is significant. Our results show that the chaotic flow field enhances the front propagation when compared with a purely cellular flow field. We quantify this enhancement by computing the spreading rate of the reaction products for a range of parameters. We use our results to quantify the complexity of the three-dimensional front geometry for a range of chaotic flow conditions.

  15. Nonlinear transient wave propagation in homgeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The transient phenomena associated with the propagation of nonlinear high frequency waves in homogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic plasma are considered. The basic equation for the different wave types included in this analysis are derived by using a two-fluid description of the plasma. Before discussing the importance of different nonlinearities the main results from a linear treatment are given. Generation of harmonic and local changes in the plasma frequency caused by ponderomotive forces are the nonlinear phenomena which are included in the nonlinear treatment. Generation of harmonics is only important for extraordinary waves and this case is discussed in detail. The density perturbations are described either as forced non-dispersive or as forced dispersive low frequency electrostatic waves. The differences between these two descriptions are first considered analytically then by a numerical analysis of the problem with the influence of the density variations on the propagation of the high frequency wave included. A one-dimensional description is used in all cases. (Auth.)

  16. A general approach to error propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A computational approach to error propagation is explained. It is shown that the application of the first-order Taylor theory to a fairly general expression representing an inventory or inventory-difference quantity leads naturally to a data structure that is useful for structuring error-propagation calculations. This data structure incorporates six types of data entities: (1) the objects in the material balance, (2) numerical parameters that describe these objects, (3) groups or sets of objects, (4) the terms which make up the material-balance equation, (5) the errors or sources of variance and (6) the functions or subroutines that represent Taylor partial derivatives. A simple algorithm based on this data structure can be defined using formulas that are sums of squares of sums. The data structures and algorithms described above have been implemented as computer software in FORTRAN for IBM PC-type machines. A free-form data-entry format allows users to separate data as they wish into separate files and enter data using a text editor. The program has been applied to the computation of limits of error for inventory differences (LEIDs) within the DOE complex. 1 ref., 3 figs

  17. Neutrino propagation in a fluctuating sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.P.; Michaud, D.

    1997-01-01

    We adapt to neutrino physics a general formulation for particle propagation in fluctuating media, initially developed for applications to electromagnetism and neutron optics. In leading approximation this formalism leads to the usual MSW effective Hamiltonian governing neutrino propagation through a medium. Next-to-leading contributions describe deviations from this description, which arise due to neutrino interactions with fluctuations in the medium. We compute these corrections for two types of fluctuations: (i) microscopic thermal fluctuations and (ii) macroscopic fluctuations in the medium s density. While the first of these reproduces standard estimates, which are negligible for applications to solar neutrinos, we find that the second can be quite large, since it grows in size with the correlation length of the fluctuation. We consider two models in some detail. For fluctuations whose correlations extend only over a local region in space of length l, appreciable effects for MSW oscillations arise if (δn/n) 2 l approx-gt 100m or so. Alternatively, a crude model of helioseismic p-waves gives appreciable effects only when (δn/n)approx-gt 1%. In general the dominant effect is to diminish the quality of the resonance, making the suppression of the 7 Be neutrinos a good experimental probe of fluctuations deep within the sun. Fluctuations can also provide a new mechanism for reducing the solar neutrino flux, giving an energy-independent suppression factor of 1/2 away from the resonant region, even for small vacuum mixing angles. copyright 1997 Academic Press, Inc

  18. Optimizing online social networks for information propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-Bing Chen

    Full Text Available Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved.

  19. Optimizing online social networks for information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved.

  20. Atmospheric propagation of infrasound across mountain ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois

    2017-11-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze trapping of infrasound within the lower tropospheric waveguide during propagation above a mountain range. Atmospheric flow produced by the mountains is predicted by a nonlinear mounatin wave model. For the infrasound component, we solve the wave equation under the effective sound speed approximation using both a spectral collocation method and a WKB approach. It is shown that in realistic configurations, the mountain waves can deeply perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. To interpret these results each acoustic mode is tracked separately as the horizontal distance increases. It is shown that during statically stable situations, roughly representative of winter or night situations, the mountain waves induce a Foehn effect downstream which shrinks significantly the waveguide. This yields a new form of infrasound absorption, that can largely outweigh the direct effect the moutain induces on the low-level waveguide. For the opposite case, when the low level flow is less statically stable (summer or day situations), mountain wave dynamics do not produce dramatic responses downstream. Instead, it favors the passage of infrasound, which somehow mitigates the direct effect of the obstacle.

  1. Dynamical Models for Computer Viruses Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. C. Piqueira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, digital computer systems and networks are the main engineering tools, being used in planning, design, operation, and control of all sizes of building, transportation, machinery, business, and life maintaining devices. Consequently, computer viruses became one of the most important sources of uncertainty, contributing to decrease the reliability of vital activities. A lot of antivirus programs have been developed, but they are limited to detecting and removing infections, based on previous knowledge of the virus code. In spite of having good adaptation capability, these programs work just as vaccines against diseases and are not able to prevent new infections based on the network state. Here, a trial on modeling computer viruses propagation dynamics relates it to other notable events occurring in the network permitting to establish preventive policies in the network management. Data from three different viruses are collected in the Internet and two different identification techniques, autoregressive and Fourier analyses, are applied showing that it is possible to forecast the dynamics of a new virus propagation by using the data collected from other viruses that formerly infected the network.

  2. Edit propagation using geometric relationship functions

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrero, Paul

    2014-04-15

    We propose a method for propagating edit operations in 2D vector graphics, based on geometric relationship functions. These functions quantify the geometric relationship of a point to a polygon, such as the distance to the boundary or the direction to the closest corner vertex. The level sets of the relationship functions describe points with the same relationship to a polygon. For a given query point, we first determine a set of relationships to local features, construct all level sets for these relationships, and accumulate them. The maxima of the resulting distribution are points with similar geometric relationships. We show extensions to handle mirror symmetries, and discuss the use of relationship functions as local coordinate systems. Our method can be applied, for example, to interactive floorplan editing, and it is especially useful for large layouts, where individual edits would be cumbersome. We demonstrate populating 2D layouts with tens to hundreds of objects by propagating relatively few edit operations. © 2014 ACM 0730-0301/2014/03- ART15 $15.00.

  3. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the front from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the front profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. One major result of our analysis is a comparison between freely propagating fronts and fronts locked to an externally moving stimulus. We show that the latter are much more robust to noise, since the stochastic wandering of the mean front profile is described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process rather than a Wiener process, so that the variance in front position saturates in the long time limit rather than increasing linearly with time. Finally, we consider a stochastic neural field that supports a pulled front in the deterministic limit, and show that the wandering of such a front is now subdiffusive. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Theoretical models for ultrashort electromagnetic pulse propagation in nonlinear metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Shuangchun; Xiang, Yuanjiang; Dai, Xiaoyu; Tang, Zhixiang; Su, Wenhua; Fan, Dianyuan

    2007-01-01

    A metamaterial (MM) differs from an ordinary optical material mainly in that it has a dispersive magnetic permeability and offers greatly enhanced design freedom to alter the linear and nonlinear properties. This makes it possible for us to control the propagation of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses at will. Here we report on generic features of ultrashort electromagnetic pulse propagation and demonstrate the controllability of both the linear and nonlinear parameters of models for pulse propagation in MMs. First, we derive a generalized system of coupled three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equations (NLSEs) suitable for few-cycle pulse propagation in a MM with both nonlinear electric polarization and nonlinear magnetization. The coupled equations recover previous models for pulse propagation in both ordinary material and a MM under the same conditions. Second, by using the coupled NLSEs in the Drude dispersive model as an example, we identify the respective roles of the dispersive electric permittivity and magnetic permeability in ultrashort pulse propagation and disclose some additional features of pulse propagation in MMs. It is shown that, for linear propagation, the sign and magnitude of space-time focusing can be controlled through adjusting the linear dispersive permittivity and permeability. For nonlinear propagation, the linear dispersive permittivity and permeability are incorporated into the nonlinear magnetization and nonlinear polarization, respectively, resulting in controllable magnetic and electric self-steepening effects and higher-order dispersively nonlinear terms in the propagation models

  5. Pathogen Propagation Model with Superinfection in Vegetatively Propagated Plants on Lattice Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuma Sakai

    Full Text Available Many clonal plants have two reproductive patterns, seed propagation and vegetative propagation. By vegetative propagation, plants reproduce the genetically identical offspring with a low mortality, because resources are supplied from the other individuals through interconnected ramets at vegetative-propagated offspring. However, the ramets transport not only resources but also systemic pathogen. Pathogens evolve to establish and spread widely within the plant population. The superinfection, which is defined as the ability that an established pathogen spreads widely by infecting to already-infected individuals with other strains of a pathogen, is important to the evolution of pathogens. We examine the dynamics of plant reproduction and pathogen propagation considering spatial structure and the effect of superinfection on genetic diversity of pathogen by analysis of several models, 1-strain and multiple-strain models, on two-dimensional square lattice. In the analysis of 1-strain model, we derive equilibrium value by mean-field approximation and pair approximation, and its local stability by Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. In the multiple-strain models, we analyze the dynamics by numerical simulation of mean-field approximation, pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. Through the analyses, we show the effect of parameter values to dynamics of models, such as transition of dominant strain of pathogen, competition between plants and pathogens and density of individuals. As a result, (i The strain with intermediate cost becomes dominant when both superinfection rate and growth rate are low. (ii The competition between plants and pathogens occurs in the phase of coexistence of various strains by pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. (iii Too high growth rate leads to the decrease of plant population in all models. (iv Pathogens are easy to maintain their genetic diversity with low superinfection rate. However, if they do not

  6. Pathogen Propagation Model with Superinfection in Vegetatively Propagated Plants on Lattice Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuma; Takada, Takenori

    2016-01-01

    Many clonal plants have two reproductive patterns, seed propagation and vegetative propagation. By vegetative propagation, plants reproduce the genetically identical offspring with a low mortality, because resources are supplied from the other individuals through interconnected ramets at vegetative-propagated offspring. However, the ramets transport not only resources but also systemic pathogen. Pathogens evolve to establish and spread widely within the plant population. The superinfection, which is defined as the ability that an established pathogen spreads widely by infecting to already-infected individuals with other strains of a pathogen, is important to the evolution of pathogens. We examine the dynamics of plant reproduction and pathogen propagation considering spatial structure and the effect of superinfection on genetic diversity of pathogen by analysis of several models, 1-strain and multiple-strain models, on two-dimensional square lattice. In the analysis of 1-strain model, we derive equilibrium value by mean-field approximation and pair approximation, and its local stability by Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. In the multiple-strain models, we analyze the dynamics by numerical simulation of mean-field approximation, pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. Through the analyses, we show the effect of parameter values to dynamics of models, such as transition of dominant strain of pathogen, competition between plants and pathogens and density of individuals. As a result, (i) The strain with intermediate cost becomes dominant when both superinfection rate and growth rate are low. (ii) The competition between plants and pathogens occurs in the phase of coexistence of various strains by pair approximation and Monte Carlo simulation. (iii) Too high growth rate leads to the decrease of plant population in all models. (iv) Pathogens are easy to maintain their genetic diversity with low superinfection rate. However, if they do not superinfect, the

  7. Adaptive laser link reconfiguration using constraint propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, M. S.; Julich, P. M.; Cook, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes Harris AI research performed on the Adaptive Link Reconfiguration (ALR) study for Rome Lab, and focuses on the application of constraint propagation to the problem of link reconfiguration for the proposed space based Strategic Defense System (SDS) Brilliant Pebbles (BP) communications system. According to the concept of operations at the time of the study, laser communications will exist between BP's and to ground entry points. Long-term links typical of RF transmission will not exist. This study addressed an initial implementation of BP's based on the Global Protection Against Limited Strikes (GPALS) SDI mission. The number of satellites and rings studied was representative of this problem. An orbital dynamics program was used to generate line-of-site data for the modeled architecture. This was input into a discrete event simulation implemented in the Harris developed COnstraint Propagation Expert System (COPES) Shell, developed initially on the Rome Lab BM/C3 study. Using a model of the network and several heuristics, the COPES shell was used to develop the Heuristic Adaptive Link Ordering (HALO) Algorithm to rank and order potential laser links according to probability of communication. A reduced set of links based on this ranking would then be used by a routing algorithm to select the next hop. This paper includes an overview of Constraint Propagation as an Artificial Intelligence technique and its embodiment in the COPES shell. It describes the design and implementation of both the simulation of the GPALS BP network and the HALO algorithm in COPES. This is described using a 59 Data Flow Diagram, State Transition Diagrams, and Structured English PDL. It describes a laser communications model and the heuristics involved in rank-ordering the potential communication links. The generation of simulation data is described along with its interface via COPES to the Harris developed View Net graphical tool for visual analysis of communications

  8. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  9. Drone-borne GPR design: Propagation issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Madhu; Tanzi, Tullio Joseph

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we shall address the electromagnetic wave propagation issues that are critical to determining the feasibility of a drone-borne ground-penetrating radar sensor for humanitarian applications, particularly in the context of disaster management. Frequency- and polarization-dependent scattering, attenuation and dispersion of radar signals penetrating into the sub-surface region will determine the applicability of a drone-mounted radar sensor capable of registering radar echoes for observing and monitoring sub-surface features. The functionality of the radar will thus be assessed depending on key radar parameters that include the central radar frequency, the modulation depth, and the mode of radar operation (pulsed FM, FM-CW), the antenna type, the available power-budget. In the analysis to be presented, the radar equation, together with the aforementioned propagation effects, will be used to simulate the signal strength of radar echoes under different conditions arising from the chosen key-radar parameters and the assumed physical properties of the sub-surface earth medium. The analysis to be presented will indicate whether or not the drone-borne ground-penetrating radar is a feasible system and if it could be constructed with the technologies available today. Taking into account the strict constraints involved to design drone applications for Public Protection and Disaster Relief (PPDR), the ideas developed hereafter are both prospective and exploratory. The objective is to see if a solution can be found in the near future. xml:lang="fr" Dans l'analyse présentée, l'équation radar, ainsi que les effets de propagation susmentionnés, serviront à simuler la puissance du signal des échos radar sous différentes conditions découlant des paramètres clés choisis et les propriétés physiques du milieu sous la surface. L'étude a pour objectif de démontrer si le système est réalisable et s'il peut être construit avec les technologies disponibles

  10. Research on Trust Propagation Models in Reputation Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Feedback based reputation systems continue to gain popularity in eCommerce and social media systems today and reputation management in large social networks needs to manage cold start and sparseness in terms of feedback. Trust propagation has been widely recognized as an effective mechanism to handle these problems. In this paper we study the characterization of trust propagation models in the context of attack resilience. We characterize trust propagation models along three dimensions: (i uniform propagation and conditional propagation, (ii jump strategies for breaking unwanted cliques, and (iii decay factors for differentiating recent trust history from remote past history. We formally and experimentally show that feedback similarity is a critical measure for countering colluding attacks in reputation systems. Without feedback similarity guided control, trust propagations are vulnerable to different types of colluding attacks.

  11. The Energy Dissipation of Propagating Cracks in Solnhofen Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, A.; Kalthoff, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Crack propagation events are initiated in Solnhofen limestone under impact loading conditions. The Fracture energy respectively the fracture toughness and the velocity of propagating cracks are measured by means of an optimized strain gauge measuring technique. Cracks are accelerated to velocities in the range of 1500 m/s. The measured crack propagation energies/crack propagation toughnesses are significantly higher than the crack initiation energy/crack initiation toughness. Control measurements on the basis of a global energy approach by means of Charpy pendulum impact tests verify the found behaviour. The results explain characteristic peculiarities of the crack propagation behaviour of brittle fracture in rock. Keywords: Fracture energy, fracture toughness, crack propagation, crack velocity, rock

  12. How fast does a signal propagate through proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui T Young

    Full Text Available As the molecular basis of signal propagation in the cell, proteins are regulated by perturbations, such as mechanical forces or ligand binding. The question arises how fast such a signal propagates through the protein molecular scaffold. As a first step, we have investigated numerically the dynamics of force propagation through a single (Ala[Formula: see text] protein following a sudden increase in the stretching forces applied to its end termini. The force propagates along the backbone into the center of the chain on the picosecond scale. Both conformational and tension dynamics are found in good agreement with a coarse-grained theory of force propagation through semiflexible polymers. The speed of force propagation of [Formula: see text]50Å ps(-1 derived from these simulations is likely to determine an upper speed limit of mechanical signal transfer in allosteric proteins or molecular machines.

  13. Multimodal imaging of spike propagation: a technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Grant, P E; Suzuki, N; Madsen, J R; Bergin, A M; Hämäläinen, M S; Stufflebeam, S M

    2012-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy, who had cortical dysplasia in the right superior frontal gyrus. Spatiotemporal source analysis of MEG and EEG spikes demonstrated a similar time course of spike propagation from the superior to inferior frontal gyri, as observed on intracranial EEG. The tractography reconstructed from DTI showed a fiber connection between these areas. Our multimodal approach demonstrates spike propagation and a white matter tract guiding the propagation.

  14. An ocean scatter propagation model for aeronautical satellite communication applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper an ocean scattering propagation model, developed for aircraft-to-satellite (aeronautical) applications, is described. The purpose of the propagation model is to characterize the behavior of sea reflected multipath as a function of physical propagation path parameters. An accurate validation against the theoretical far field solution for a perfectly conducting sinusoidal surface is provided. Simulation results for typical L band aeronautical applications with low complexity antennas are presented.

  15. A Simple Insight into Iterative Belief Propagation's Success

    OpenAIRE

    Dechter, Rina; Mateescu, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In Non - ergodic belief networks the posterior belief OF many queries given evidence may become zero.The paper shows that WHEN belief propagation IS applied iteratively OVER arbitrary networks(the so called, iterative OR loopy belief propagation(IBP)) it IS identical TO an arc - consistency algorithm relative TO zero - belief queries(namely assessing zero posterior probabilities). This implies that zero - belief conclusions derived BY belief propagation converge AND are sound.More importantly...

  16. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Advertising to Early Trend Propagators: Evidence from Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, A.; Tucker, C. M.; Wiertz, C.

    2018-01-01

    In the digital economy, influencing and controlling the spread of information is a key concern for firms. One way firms try to achieve this is to target firm communications to consumers who embrace and propagate the spread of new information on emerging and `trending' topics on social media. However, little is known about whether early trend propagators are indeed responsive to firm-sponsored messages. To explore whether early propagators of trending topics respond to advertising messages, we...

  18. Advertising to early trend propagators: evidence from Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, A; Tucker, C; Wiertz, C

    2018-01-01

    In the digital economy, influencing and controlling the spread of information is a key concern for firms. One way firms try to achieve this is to target firm communications to consumers who embrace and propagate the spread of new information on emerging and `trending' topics on social media. However, little is known about whether early trend propagators are indeed responsive to firm-sponsored messages. To explore whether early propagators of trending topics respond to advertising messages, we...

  19. Belief Propagation for Probabilistic Slow Feature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Sekiguchi, Tomoki; Okada, Masato

    2017-08-01

    Slow feature analysis (SFA) is a time-series analysis method for extracting slowly-varying latent features from multi-dimensional data. A recent study proposed a probabilistic framework of SFA using the Bayesian statistical framework. However, the conventional probabilistic framework of SFA can not accurately extract the slow feature in noisy environments since its marginal likelihood function was approximately derived under the assumption that there exists no observation noise. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic framework of SFA with rigorously derived marginal likelihood function. Here, we rigorously derive the marginal likelihood function of the probabilistic framework of SFA by using belief propagation. We show using numerical data that the proposed probabilistic framework of SFA can accurately extract the slow feature and underlying parameters for the latent dynamics simultaneously even under noisy environments.

  20. Expectation propagation for continuous time stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseke, Botond; Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Opper, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of reconstructing the posterior measure over the trajectories of a diffusion process from discrete time observations and continuous time constraints. We cast the problem in a Bayesian framework and derive approximations to the posterior distributions of single time marginals using variational approximate inference, giving rise to an expectation propagation type algorithm. For non-linear diffusion processes, this is achieved by leveraging moment closure approximations. We then show how the approximation can be extended to a wide class of discrete-state Markov jump processes by making use of the chemical Langevin equation. Our empirical results show that the proposed method is computationally efficient and provides good approximations for these classes of inverse problems. (paper)

  1. Effective propagation in a perturbed periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Agnès; Pagneux, Vincent

    2008-08-01

    In a recent paper [D. Torrent, A. Hakansson, F. Cervera, and J. Sánchez-Dehesa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 204302 (2006)] inspected the effective parameters of a cluster containing an ensemble of scatterers with a periodic or a weakly disordered arrangement. A small amount of disorder is shown to have a small influence on the characteristics of the acoustic wave propagation with respect to the periodic case. In this Brief Report, we inspect further the effect of a deviation in the scatterer distribution from the periodic distribution. The quasicrystalline approximation is shown to be an efficient tool to quantify this effect. An analytical formula for the effective wave number is obtained in one-dimensional acoustic medium and is compared with the Berryman result in the low-frequency limit. Direct numerical calculations show a good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  2. Effective propagation in a perturbed periodic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, Agnes; Pagneux, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper [D. Torrent, A. Hakansson, F. Cervera, and J. Sanchez-Dehesa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 204302 (2006)] inspected the effective parameters of a cluster containing an ensemble of scatterers with a periodic or a weakly disordered arrangement. A small amount of disorder is shown to have a small influence on the characteristics of the acoustic wave propagation with respect to the periodic case. In this Brief Report, we inspect further the effect of a deviation in the scatterer distribution from the periodic distribution. The quasicrystalline approximation is shown to be an efficient tool to quantify this effect. An analytical formula for the effective wave number is obtained in one-dimensional acoustic medium and is compared with the Berryman result in the low-frequency limit. Direct numerical calculations show a good agreement with the analytical predictions

  3. Acceleration and Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Dalla, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are an important component of Space Weather, including radiation hazard to humans and electronic equipment, and the ionisation of the Earth's atmosphere. We review the key observations of SEPs, our current understanding of their acceleration and transport, and discuss how this knowledge is incorporated within Space Weather forecasting tools. Mechanisms for acceleration during solar flares and at shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are discussed, as well as the timing relationships between signatures of solar eruptive events and the detection of SEPs in interplanetary space. Evidence on how the parameters of SEP events are related to those of the parent solar activity is reviewed and transport effects influencing SEP propagation to near-Earth locations are examined. Finally, the approaches to forecasting Space Weather SEP effects are discussed. We conclude that both flare and CME shock acceleration contribute to Space Weather relevant SEP populations and need to be considered within forecasting tools.

  4. Pair creation constrains superluminal neutrino propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew G; Glashow, Sheldon L

    2011-10-28

    The OPERA collaboration claims that muon neutrinos with a mean energy of 17.5 GeV travel 730 km from CERN to the Gran Sasso at a speed exceeding that of light by about 7.5 km/s or 25 ppm. However, we show that superluminal neutrinos may lose energy rapidly via the bremsstrahlung of electron-positron pairs (ν → ν + e- + e+). For the claimed superluminal velocity and at the stated mean energy, we find that most of the neutrinos would have suffered several pair emissions en route, causing the beam to be depleted of higher energy neutrinos. This presents a significant challenge to the superluminal interpretation of the OPERA data. Furthermore, we appeal to Super-Kamiokande and IceCube data to establish strong new limits on the superluminal propagation of high-energy neutrinos.

  5. New mixed quantum/semiclassical propagation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniou, Dimitri; Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors developed a new method for calculating the quantum evolution of multidimensional systems, for cases in which the system can be assumed to consist of a quantum subsystem and a bath subsystem of heavier atoms. The method combines two ideas: starting from a simple frozen Gaussian description of the bath subsystem, then calculate quantum corrections to the propagation of the quantum subsystem. This follows from recent work by one of them, showing how one can calculate corrections to approximate evolution schemes, even when the Hamiltonian that corresponds to these approximate schemes is unknown. Then, they take the limit in which the width of the frozen Gaussians approaches zero, which makes the corrections to the evolution of the quantum subsystem depend only on classical bath coordinates. The test calculations they present use low-dimensional systems, in which comparison to exact quantum dynamics is feasible

  6. Gravitational wave propagation in isotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, P.A.; O'Shea, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of gravitational waves carrying arbitrary information through isotropic cosmologies. The waves are modeled as small perturbations of the background Robertson-Walker geometry. The perfect fluid matter distribution of the isotropic background is, in general, modified by small anisotropic stresses. For pure gravity waves, in which the perturbed Weyl tensor is radiative (i.e. type N in the Petrov classification), we construct explicit examples for which the presence of the anisotropic stress is shown to be essential and the histories of the wave fronts in the background Robertson-Walker geometry are shear-free null hypersurfaces. The examples derived in this case are analogous to the Bateman waves of electromagnetic theory

  7. Vegetative propagation of northern Salix-hybrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, G.; Sivertsson, E.

    1976-01-01

    The reports deals with ecological aspects of propagation for eventual use in local clone-based, short-rotation-forestry. The hybrideclones included (Salix caprea x nigricans) were grown in plastic greenhouses during one summer in Vidsel (about 66/sup 0/ N lat.). Altogether 6300 cuttings were used in the experiments concerning age of ortets, time of harvesting of the ramets, node-interval of cuttings, substrates and fertilizing. The results indicate that ramets ought to be harvested during winter-dormancy preferably from 2 to 3 year old ortets. The base of the shoots gave the most vital cuttings although only cuttings from the top-internode resulted in survival < 80% and shoot-length about 50% shorter than cuttings from other internodes. For direct use naked cuttings > = 30 cm proved safe. Carex-peat gave the best production. Ingestads nutrient solution was used; 25 g nitrogen per cu.m. peat proved sufficient.

  8. In situ fatigue-crack-propagation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Chin, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-reactor fatigue experiment was conducted in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor to determine the effects of dynamic irradiation on fatigue crack propagation. Eight 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were precracked to various initial crack lengths, linked together to form a chain, and inserted into a specially designed in-reactor fatigue machine. Test conditions included a maximum temperature of 460 0 C, an environment of sodium, a frequency of 1 cycle/min, and a stress ratio of 0.10. Results indicated that (1) no effects of dynamic irradiation were observed for a fluence of 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV); and (2) crack growth rates in elevated temperature sodium were a factor of 3 to 4 lower than in room temperature air

  9. Initiation and Propagation in Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, P. M.; Field, J. E.

    1993-05-01

    The initiation and propagation of deflagration and detonation in mercury fulminate, lead azide, mercuric-5-nitrotetrazole and silver-5-nitrotetrazole have been studied using various techniques. Streak and framing high-speed photography were used to observe these events directly. The main aim has been to investigate the factors which affect deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and the related phenomenon of dead-pressing, which may be regarded as a failure of the DDT process at high pressed densities. These factors include the variable properties of pressed density, void structure, confinement and charge dimension and geometry, and also fixed properties (for a given explosive) such as shock and thermal sensitivities, heat of explosion and the quantity and state of the reaction products. The nature and strength of the initiating stimulus also have a major effect on the subsequent reaction.

  10. Survey propagation as local equilibrium equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Alfredo; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2004-06-01

    It has been shown experimentally that a decimation algorithm based on survey propagation (SP) equations allows one to solve efficiently some combinatorial problems over random graphs. We show that these equations can be derived as sum-product equations for the computation of marginals in an extended space where the variables are allowed to take an additional value—*—when they are not forced by the combinatorial constraints. An appropriate 'local equilibrium condition' cost/energy function is introduced and its entropy is shown to coincide with the expected logarithm of the number of clusters of solutions as computed by SP. These results may help to clarify the geometrical notion of clusters assumed by SP for random K-SAT or random graph colouring (where it is conjectured to be exact) and help to explain which kind of clustering operation or approximation is enforced in general/small sized models in which it is known to be inexact.

  11. Protein aggregates stimulate macropinocytosis facilitating their propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerbury, Justin J

    2016-03-03

    Temporal and spatial patterns of pathological changes such as loss of neurons and presence of pathological protein aggregates are characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These patterns are consistent with the propagation of protein misfolding and aggregation reminiscent of the prion diseases. There is a surge of evidence that suggests that large protein aggregates of a range of proteins are able to enter cells via macropinocytosis. Our recent work suggests that this process is activated by the binding of aggregates to the neuron cell surface. The current review considers the potential role of cell surface receptors in the triggering of macropinocytosis by protein aggregates and the possibility of utilizing macropinocytosis pathways as a therapeutic target.

  12. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives...... for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers....... This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus...

  13. Propagating wave correlations in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creagh, Stephen C; Gradoni, Gabriele; Hartmann, Timo; Tanner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel approach for computing wave correlation functions inside finite spatial domains driven by complex and statistical sources. By exploiting semiclassical approximations, we provide explicit algorithms to calculate the local mean of these correlation functions in terms of the underlying classical dynamics. By defining appropriate ensemble averages, we show that fluctuations about the mean can be characterised in terms of classical correlations. We give in particular an explicit expression relating fluctuations of diagonal contributions to those of the full wave correlation function. The methods have a wide range of applications both in quantum mechanics and for classical wave problems such as in vibro-acoustics and electromagnetism. We apply the methods here to simple quantum systems, so-called quantum maps, which model the behaviour of generic problems on Poincaré sections. Although low-dimensional, these models exhibit a chaotic classical limit and share common characteristics with wave propagation in complex structures. (paper)

  14. Propagation modeling in a manufacturing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, J.D.; Horn, R.D.; Rader, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Shourbaji, A.A. [Oak Ridge Centers for Mfg. Technology, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Wireless sensors which utilize low power spread spectrum data transmission have significant potential in industrial environments due to low cabling and installation costs. In addition, this technology imposes fewer constraints upon placement due to cable routing, allowing sensors to be installed in areas with poor access. Limitations are imposed on sensor and receiver placement by electromagnetic propagation effects in the industrial environment, including multipath and the presence of absorbing media. This paper explores the electromagnetic analysis of potential wireless sensor applications using commercially available finite element software. In addition, since the applications environment is often at least partially specified in electronic form using computer-aided drafting software, the importation of information from this software is discussed. Both three-dimensional and two-dimensional examples are presented which demonstrate the utility and limitations of the method.

  15. Quantum teleportation of propagating quantum microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Candia, R.; Felicetti, S.; Sanz, M.; Fedorov, K.G.; Menzel, E.P.; Zhong, L.; Deppe, F.; Gross, R.; Marx, A.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    Propagating quantum microwaves have been proposed and successfully implemented to generate entanglement, thereby establishing a promising platform for the realisation of a quantum communication channel. However, the implementation of quantum teleportation with photons in the microwave regime is still absent. At the same time, recent developments in the field show that this key protocol could be feasible with current technology, which would pave the way to boost the field of microwave quantum communication. Here, we discuss the feasibility of a possible implementation of microwave quantum teleportation in a realistic scenario with losses. Furthermore, we propose how to implement quantum repeaters in the microwave regime without using photodetection, a key prerequisite to achieve long distance entanglement distribution. (orig.)

  16. Wavefront Propagation and Fuzzy Based Autonomous Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Al-Jumaily

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Path planning and obstacle avoidance are the two major issues in any navigation system. Wavefront propagation algorithm, as a good path planner, can be used to determine an optimal path. Obstacle avoidance can be achieved using possibility theory. Combining these two functions enable a robot to autonomously navigate to its destination. This paper presents the approach and results in implementing an autonomous navigation system for an indoor mobile robot. The system developed is based on a laser sensor used to retrieve data to update a two dimensional world model of therobot environment. Waypoints in the path are incorporated into the obstacle avoidance. Features such as ageing of objects and smooth motion planning are implemented to enhance efficiency and also to cater for dynamic environments.

  17. UWB pulse propagation into human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavagnaro, Marta; Pittella, Erika; Pisa, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the propagation of a UWB pulse into a layered model of the human body is studied to characterize absorption and reflection of the UWB signal due to the different body tissues. Several time behaviours for the incident UWB pulse are considered and compared with reference to the feasibility of breath and heartbeat activity monitoring. Results show that if the UWB source is placed far from the human body, the reflection coming from the interface between air and skin can be used to detect the respiratory activity. On the contrary, if the UWB source is placed close to the human body, a small reflection due to the interface between the posterior lung wall and the bone, which is well distanced in time from the reflections due to the first layers of the body model, can be used to detect lung and heart changes associated with the cardio-respiratory activity. (paper)

  18. Electromagnetic wave propagation in relativistic magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, I.

    1985-01-01

    An improved mathematical technique and a new code for deriving the conductivity tensor for collisionless plasmas have been developed. The method is applicable to a very general case, including both hot (relativistic) and cold magnetized plasmas, with only isotropic equilibrium distributions being considered here. The usual derivation starts from the relativistic Vlasov equation and leads to an integration over an infinite sum of Bessel functions which has to be done numerically. In the new solution the integration is carried out over a product of two Bessel functions only. This reduces the computing time very significantly. An added advantage over existing codes is our capability to perform the computations for waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field. Both improvements greatly facilitate investigations of properties of the plasma under conditions hitherto unexplored

  19. Safe Laser Beam Propagation for Interplanetary Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keith E.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-to-space laser uplinks to Earth–orbiting satellites and deep space probes serve both as a beacon and an uplink command channel for deep space probes and Earth-orbiting satellites. An acquisition and tracking point design to support a high bandwidth downlink from a 20-cm optical terminal on an orbiting Mars spacecraft typically calls for 2.5 kW of 1030-nm uplink optical power in 40 micro-radians divergent beams.2 The NOHD (nominal ocular hazard distance) of the 1030nm uplink is in excess of 2E5 km, approximately half the distance to the moon. Recognizing the possible threat of high power laser uplinks to the flying public and to sensitive Earth-orbiting satellites, JPL developed a three-tiered system at its Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) to ensure safe laser beam propagation through navigational and near-Earth space.

  20. Boundary effects on sound propagation in superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, H.H.; Smith, H.; Woelfle, P.

    1983-01-01

    The attenuation of fourth sound propagating in a superfluid confined within a channel is determined on a microscopic basis, taking into account the scatter of the quasiparticles from the walls. The Q value of a fourth-sound resonance is shown to be inversely proportional to the stationary flow of thermal excitations through the channel due to an external force. Our theoretical estimates of Q are compared with experimentally observed values for 3 He. The transition between first and fourth sound is studied in detail on the basis of two-fluid hydrodynamics, including the slip of the normal component at the walls. The slip is shown to have a strong influence on the velocity and attenuation in the transition region between first and fourth sound, offering a means to examine the interaction of quasiparticles with a solid surface

  1. In vitro propagation of endangered Dianthus taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of recent researches regarding the in vitro culture of 30 endangered Dianthus taxa is presented in this paper. Various in vitro protocols developed for selected rare and threatened Dianthus taxa are analysed in order to provide a useful synthesis of the data obtained with the main principles, techniques and recommendations for futher research and practice. The recapitulated data presented in this review can be used as a tool for the micropropagation of other endangered Dianthus taxa, enabling their propagation and obtaining a sufficient amount of plants for reintroduction. In addition, the obtained results represent the basis for ex situ conservation of the investigated taxa, especially for medium-term and long-term conservation (cryopreservation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007

  2. Dynamic crack propagation through nanoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Wilkerson, Justin

    2015-06-01

    The deformation and failure of nanoporous metals may be considerably different than that of more traditional bulk porous metals. The length scales in traditional bulk porous metals are typically large enough for classic plasticity and buckling to be operative. However, the extremely small length scales associated with nanoporous metals may inhibit classic plasticity mechanisms. Here, we motivate an alternative nanovoid growth mechanism mediated by dislocation emission. Following an approach similar to Lubarda and co-workers, we make use of stability arguments applied to the analytic solutions of the elastic interactions of dislocations and voids to derive a simple stress-based criterion for emission activation. We then propose a dynamic nanovoid growth law that is motivated by the kinetics of dislocation emission. The resulting failure model is implemented into a commercial finite element software to simulate dynamic crack growth. The simulations reveal that crack propagation through a nanoporous media proceeds at somewhat faster velocities than through the more traditional bulk porous metal.

  3. Data Stream Clustering With Affinity Propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2014-07-09

    Data stream clustering provides insights into the underlying patterns of data flows. This paper focuses on selecting the best representatives from clusters of streaming data. There are two main challenges: how to cluster with the best representatives and how to handle the evolving patterns that are important characteristics of streaming data with dynamic distributions. We employ the Affinity Propagation (AP) algorithm presented in 2007 by Frey and Dueck for the first challenge, as it offers good guarantees of clustering optimality for selecting exemplars. The second challenging problem is solved by change detection. The presented StrAP algorithm combines AP with a statistical change point detection test; the clustering model is rebuilt whenever the test detects a change in the underlying data distribution. Besides the validation on two benchmark data sets, the presented algorithm is validated on a real-world application, monitoring the data flow of jobs submitted to the EGEE grid.

  4. Propagation of an ionizing surface electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boev, A.G.; Prokopov, A.V.

    1976-11-01

    The propagation of an rf surface wave in a plasma which is ionized by the wave itself is analyzed. The exact solution of the nonlinear Maxwell equations is discussed for the case in which the density of plasma electrons is an exponential function of the square of the electric field. The range over which the surface wave exists and the frequency dependence of the phase velocity are found. A detailed analysis is given for the case of a plasma whose initial density exceeds the critical density at the wave frequency. An increase in the wave amplitude is shown to expand the frequency range over which the plasma is transparent; The energy flux in the plasma tends toward a certain finite value which is governed by the effective ionization field.

  5. Wave propagation in heterogeneous excitable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1998-04-01

    Heterogeneities deeply affect pulse dynamics in excitable media. In one dimension, spatially periodic variation of the excitation threshold leads to a characteristic dependence of the propagation speed on the modulation period d with a maximum at a certain optimal value dopt. The maximum speed may be larger than the pulse velocity in an effective homogeneous medium. In two dimensions, the geometry and size of heterogeneities determine the wave dynamics. For example, an excitability distribution made of oblique stripes with different angles of inclination can result in a speedup or a slowdown of the pulse. The calculations are carried out with a modified Oregonator model for light-sensitive Belouzov-Zhabotinskii media where a heterogeneous distribution of excitability can be achieved by inhomogeneous illumination. Nevertheless, the results do not depend on the details of the local kinetics, but apply to the general case of excitable media.

  6. Quantum teleportation of propagating quantum microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Candia, R.; Felicetti, S.; Sanz, M. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Physical Chemistry, Bilbao (Spain); Fedorov, K.G.; Menzel, E.P. [Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meissner-Institut, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Zhong, L.; Deppe, F.; Gross, R. [Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meissner-Institut, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Marx, A. [Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Walther-Meissner-Institut, Garching (Germany); Solano, E. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Physical Chemistry, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Propagating quantum microwaves have been proposed and successfully implemented to generate entanglement, thereby establishing a promising platform for the realisation of a quantum communication channel. However, the implementation of quantum teleportation with photons in the microwave regime is still absent. At the same time, recent developments in the field show that this key protocol could be feasible with current technology, which would pave the way to boost the field of microwave quantum communication. Here, we discuss the feasibility of a possible implementation of microwave quantum teleportation in a realistic scenario with losses. Furthermore, we propose how to implement quantum repeaters in the microwave regime without using photodetection, a key prerequisite to achieve long distance entanglement distribution. (orig.)

  7. Charmonium propagation through a dense medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeliovich B.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of a colourless c̄c dipole propagating with a large momentum through a hot medium originates from two sources, Debye screening (melting, and inelastic collisions with surrounding scattering centres (absorption. The former never terminates completely production of a bound charmonium in heavy ion collisions, even at very high temperatures. The latter, is controlled my the magnitude of the dipole cross section, related to the transport coefficient, which is the rate of transverse momentum broadening in the medium. A novel procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schrödinger equation is developed, which allows to calculate the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. A novel mechanism of charmonium regeneration in a dense medium is proposed.

  8. Role of Compressibility on Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Kirby, James T.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, we aim to reduce the discrepancies between tsunami arrival times evaluated from tsunami models and real measurements considering the role of ocean compressibility. We perform qualitative studies to reveal the phase speed reduction rate via a modified version of the Mild Slope Equation for Weakly Compressible fluid (MSEWC) proposed by Sammarco et al. (2013). The model is validated against a 3-D computational model. Physical properties of surface gravity waves are studied and compared with those for waves evaluated from an incompressible flow solver over realistic geometry for 2011 Tohoku-oki event, revealing reduction in phase speed.Plain Language SummarySubmarine earthquakes and submarine mass failures (SMFs), can generate long gravitational waves (or tsunamis) that propagate at the free surface. Tsunami waves can travel long distances and are known for their dramatic effects on coastal areas. Nowadays, numerical models are used to reconstruct the tsunamigenic events for many scientific and socioeconomic aspects i.e. Tsunami Early Warning Systems, inundation mapping, risk and hazard analysis, etc. A number of typically neglected parameters in these models cause discrepancies between model outputs and observations. Most of the tsunami models predict tsunami arrival times at distant stations slightly early in comparison to observations. In this study, we show how ocean compressibility would affect the tsunami wave propagation speed. In this framework, an efficient two-dimensional model equation for the weakly compressible ocean has been developed, validated and tested for simplified and real cases against three dimensional and incompressible solvers. Taking the effect of compressibility, the phase speed of surface gravity waves is reduced compared to that of an incompressible fluid. Then, we used the model for the case of devastating Tohoku-Oki 2011 tsunami event, improving the model accuracy. This study sheds light for future model development

  9. Mobile terawatt laser propagation facility (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Lawrence; Roumayah, Patrick; Bodnar, Nathan; Bradford, Joshua D.; Maukonen, Douglas; Richardson, Martin C.

    2017-03-01

    This presentation will describe the design and construction status of a new mobile high-energy femtosecond laser systems producing 500 mJ, 100 fs pulses at 10 Hz. This facility is built into a shipping container and includes a cleanroom housing the laser system, a separate section for the beam director optics with a retractable roof, and the environmental control equipment necessary to maintain stable operation. The laser system includes several innovations to improve the utility of the system for "in field" experiments. For example, this system utilizes a fiber laser oscillator and a monolithic chirped Bragg grating stretcher to improve system robustness/size and employs software to enable remote monitoring and system control. Uniquely, this facility incorporates a precision motion-controlled gimbal altitude-azimuth mount with a coudé path to enable aiming of the beam over a wide field of view. In addition to providing the ability to precisely aim at multiple targets, it is also possible to coordinate the beam with separate tracking/diagnostic sensing equipment as well as other laser systems. This mobile platform will be deployed at the Townes Institute Science and Technology Experimental Facility (TISTEF) located at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to utilize the 1-km secured laser propagation range and the wide array of meteorological instrumentation for atmospheric and turbulence characterization. This will provide significant new data on the propagation of high peak power ultrashort laser pulses and detailed information on the atmospheric conditions in a coastal semi-tropical environment.

  10. Vegetative propagation of Cecropia obtusifolia (Cecropiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis M. LaPierre

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cecropia is a relatively well-known and well-studied genus in the Neotropics. Methods for the successful propagation of C. obtusifolia Bertoloni. 1840 from cuttings and air layering are described, and the results of an experiment to test the effect of two auxins, naphthalene acetic acid (NAA and indole butyric acid (IBA, on adventitious root production in cuttings are presented. In general. C. obtusifolia cuttings respond well to adventitious root production (58.3 % of cuttings survived to root, but air layering was the better method (93 % of cuttings survived to root. The concentration of auxins used resulted in an overall significantly lower quality of roots produced compared with cuttings without auxin treatment. Future experiments using Cecropia could benefit from the use of isogenic plants produced by vegetative propagationCecropia es un género bien conocido y bien estudiado en los Neotrópicos. Se discuten métodos exitosos para la propagación de C. obtusifolia Bertoloni, 1840 de fragmentos de troncos y acodos aéreos. A continuación se presentan los resultados de un experimento para examinar los efectos de dos tipos de hormonas (NAA e IBA en la producción de raíces adventicias en fragmentos de troncos. En general, los fragmentos de C. abtusifalia responden bien en la producción de raíces adventicias (y sobreviven al azar 58.3% de los cortes, pero el método de acodos aéreos funcionó mejor (sobreviven al azar 93 %. El uso de hormonas resultó en raíces de baja calidad en comparación con cortes sin hormonas. Experimentos en el futuro que usan Cecropia pueden beneficiar al usar plantas isogénicas producidas por propagación vegetativa

  11. Seismotectonics of mid-ocean ridge propagation in Hess Deep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Jacqueline S; Tolstoy, Maya; Mutter, John C; Scholz, Christopher H

    2002-11-29

    Hydroacoustic data from the eastern equatorial Pacific reveal low-magnitude seismicity concentrated at the propagating tip of the Galapagos Rise in Hess Deep. The patterns of seismicity and faulting are similar to those observed in the process zone of laboratory-scale propagating tensile cracks. Because the fracture energy required for propagation scales with crack length and process zone size, it follows that ridges can propagate stably in the brittle crust without exceptional resisting forces as proposed by previous models based on linear elastic fracture mechanics.

  12. Wind turbine noise propagation modelling: An unsteady approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine sound generation and propagation phenomena are inherently time dependent, hence tools that incorporate the dynamic nature of these two issues are needed for accurate modelling. In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine by considering the effects of unste......Wind turbine sound generation and propagation phenomena are inherently time dependent, hence tools that incorporate the dynamic nature of these two issues are needed for accurate modelling. In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine by considering the effects...

  13. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector. Numerical experiments demonstrate that as the non-linearity of this relation gets stronger, the pulses propagating in silica become more immune to decay and distortion whereas the pulses propagating in free-space suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  14. Wave propagation in a magnetically structured atmosphere. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic fields may introduce structure (inhomogeneity) into an otherwise uniform medium and thus change the nature of wave propagation in that medium. As an example of such structuring, wave propagation in an isolated magnetic slab is considered. It is supposed that disturbances outside the slab are laterally non-propagating. The effect of gravity is ignored. The field can support the propagation of both body and surface waves. The existence and nature of these waves depends upon the relative magnitudes of the sound speed c 0 and Alfven speed upsilonsub(A) inside the slab, and the sound speed csub(e) in the field-free environment. (orig./WL)

  15. Proceedings of the Fourteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 14) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. NAPEX XIV was held on May 11, 1990, at the Balcones Research Centers, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. The meeting was organized into two technical sessions: Satellite (ACTS) and the Olympus Spacecraft, while the second focused on the fixed and mobile satellite propagation studies and experiments. Following NAPEX XIV, the ACTS Miniworkshop was held at the Hotel Driskill, Austin, Texas, on May 12, 1990, to review ACTS propagation activities since the First ACTS Propagation Studies Workshop was held in Santa Monica, California, on November 28 and 29, 1989.

  16. Proceedings of the Twentieth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 20) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) Meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications (satcom) industry, academia, and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at these meetings by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satcom industry.

  17. Visual Motion Discrimination by Propagating Patterns in Primate Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Rory G; Solomon, Selina S; Martin, Paul R; Solomon, Samuel G; Gong, Pulin

    2017-10-18

    Visual stimuli can evoke waves of neural activity that propagate across the surface of visual cortical areas. The relevance of these waves for visual processing is unknown. Here, we measured the phase and amplitude of local field potentials (LFPs) in electrode array recordings from the motion-processing medial temporal (MT) area of anesthetized male marmosets. Animals viewed grating or dot-field stimuli drifting in different directions. We found that, on individual trials, the direction of LFP wave propagation is sensitive to the direction of stimulus motion. Propagating LFP patterns are also detectable in trial-averaged activity, but the trial-averaged patterns exhibit different dynamics and behaviors from those in single trials and are similar across motion directions. We show that this difference arises because stimulus-sensitive propagating patterns are present in the phase of single-trial oscillations, whereas the trial-averaged signal is dominated by additive amplitude effects. Our results demonstrate that propagating LFP patterns can represent sensory inputs at timescales relevant to visually guided behaviors and raise the possibility that propagating activity patterns serve neural information processing in area MT and other cortical areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Propagating wave patterns are widely observed in the cortex, but their functional relevance remains unknown. We show here that visual stimuli generate propagating wave patterns in local field potentials (LFPs) in a movement-sensitive area of the primate cortex and that the propagation direction of these patterns is sensitive to stimulus motion direction. We also show that averaging LFP signals across multiple stimulus presentations (trial averaging) yields propagating patterns that capture different dynamic properties of the LFP response and show negligible direction sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that sensory stimuli can modulate propagating wave patterns reliably in the cortex. The relevant

  18. Volcanotectonic earthquakes induced by propagating dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    Volcanotectonic earthquakes are of high frequency and mostly generated by slip on faults. During chamber expansion/contraction earthquakes are distribution in the chamber roof. Following magma-chamber rupture and dike injection, however, earthquakes tend to concentrate around the dike and follow its propagation path, resulting in an earthquake swarm characterised by a number of earthquakes of similar magnitudes. I distinguish between two basic processes by which propagating dikes induce earthquakes. One is due to stress concentration in the process zone at the tip of the dike, the other relates to stresses induced in the walls and surrounding rocks on either side of the dike. As to the first process, some earthquakes generated at the dike tip are related to pure extension fracturing as the tip advances and the dike-path forms. Formation of pure extension fractures normally induces non-double couple earthquakes. There is also shear fracturing in the process zone, however, particularly normal faulting, which produces double-couple earthquakes. The second process relates primarily to slip on existing fractures in the host rock induced by the driving pressure of the propagating dike. Such pressures easily reach 5-20 MPa and induce compressive and shear stresses in the adjacent host rock, which already contains numerous fractures (mainly joints) of different attitudes. In piles of lava flows or sedimentary beds the original joints are primarily vertical and horizontal. Similarly, the contacts between the layers/beds are originally horizontal. As the layers/beds become buried, the joints and contacts become gradually tilted so that the joints and contacts become oblique to the horizontal compressive stress induced by a driving pressure of the (vertical) dike. Also, most of the hexagonal (or pentagonal) columnar joints in the lava flows are, from the beginning, oblique to an intrusive sheet of any attitude. Consequently, the joints and contacts function as potential shear

  19. Near Vertical Incidence Skywave: Interaction of antenna and propagation mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    In areas where no telecommunication infrastructure exists, or when that infrastructure is destroyed by a natural disaster, Near Vertical Incidence Skywave (NVIS) radio wave propagation may provide a lifeline to the outside world. To exploit NVIS propagation, radio waves are transmitted straight up,

  20. Propagation predictions and verification for communication and radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The study, by CSIR Defence, Peace, Safety and Security is using propagation prediction software to predict the propagation effects of both communication and radar systems. These are the models used in the study: Free Space Model; Rn Model; Ground...

  1. Comparative study of three methods of propagation of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Jatropha curcas L. is an Euphorbiaceae known for its oleaginous seed characters. Its propagation following a specific technical route is not yet established. This study aimed at comparing the growth of seedlings through three methods of propagation in southeastern of Gabon. Methodology and Results: This study ...

  2. Characteristics of micro-propagated banana (Musa spp.) cultures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... was conducted to assess the effect of NaCl and PEG separately as well as in combination on plant micro- propagation efficiency of banana (Musa spp.) cv., Basrai. In this experiment, 4-weeks old plantlets of the 3rd sub- culture with well propagation on MS2b nutrient were sub- cultured on three differentially ...

  3. In vitro propagation of Alstroemeria using rhizome explants derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alstroemeria with beautiful and long shelf life of cut flower is one of the most important ornamental plants. This plant could propagate by splitting of the in vivo produced rhizomes but the propagation rate is rather low. In the present study, regeneration ability of plantlets was compared using in vitro and in vivo grown rhizome ...

  4. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Propagation of both low and high frequency waves in a plasma consisting of electrons, ions, positrons and charged dust particles have been theoretically studied. The characteristics of dust acoustic wave propagating through the plasma has been analysed and the dispersion relation deduced is a generalization of ...

  5. Propagation in a waveguide with range-dependent seabed properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Charles W

    2010-11-01

    The ocean environment contains features affecting acoustic propagation that vary on a wide range of time and space scales. A significant body of work over recent decades has aimed at understanding the effects of water column spatial and temporal variability on acoustic propagation. Much less is understood about the impact of spatial variability of seabed properties on propagation, which is the focus of this study. Here, a simple, intuitive expression for propagation with range-dependent boundary properties and uniform water depth is derived. It is shown that incoherent range-dependent propagation depends upon the geometric mean of the seabed plane-wave reflection coefficient and the arithmetic mean of the cycle distance. Thus, only the spatial probability distributions (pdfs) of the sediment properties are required. Also, it is shown that the propagation over a range-dependent seabed tends to be controlled by the lossiest, not the hardest, sediments. Thus, range-dependence generally leads to higher propagation loss than would be expected, due for example to lossy sediment patches and/or nulls in the reflection coefficient. In a few instances, propagation over a range-dependent seabed can be calculated using range-independent sediment properties. The theory may be useful for other (non-oceanic) waveguides.

  6. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation ...

  7. Crack propagation along polymer/non-polymer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, Willem-Pier; Fedorov, Alexander; De Hosson, Jeff T.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of the propagation of crack fronts along interfaces between a glassy polymer and metal or glass are discussed. Specifically, the systems studied are Poly-Ethylene Terephthalate (PETG) spin-coated on A1, PETG-glass and PETG hot-pressed on Cr-sputtered glass. Cracks studied propagate in an

  8. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires consideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces less distortion in the ...

  9. Topology Optimization in wave-propagation and flow problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Gersborg-Hansen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss recent extensions of the topology optimization method to wave-propagation and flow problems. More specifically, we optimize material distribution in scalar wave propagation problems modelled by Helmholtz equation. Moreover, we investigate the influence of the inertia term on the optimal...

  10. Models for seismic wave propagation in periodically layered porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudarova, A.; Van Dalen, K.N.; Drijkoningen, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Several models are discussed for seismic wave propagation in periodically layered poroelastic media where layers represent mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities that are larger than the pore and grain sizes but smaller than the wavelength. The layers behave according to Biot’s theory. Wave propagation

  11. k-Essence, superluminal propagation, causality and emergent geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Vikman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The k-essence theories admit in general the superluminal propagation of the perturbations on classical backgrounds. We show that in spite of the superluminal propagation the causal paradoxes do not arise in these theories and in this respect they are not less safe than General Relativity

  12. Simplified chiral superfield propagators for chiral constant mass superfields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    Unconstrained superfield potentials are introduced to derive Feynman rules for chiral superfields following conventional procedure which is easy and instructive. Propagators for the case when the mass parameters are constant chiral superfields are derived. The propagators reported here are very simple compared to those available in literature and allow a manageable calculation of higher loops. (Author) [pt

  13. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires consideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces ...

  14. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.; Luding, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed in dense granular media with a narrow polydisperse size-distribution and a linear contact-force law. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves, is examined. A size variation

  15. Propagation pattern of Machaerium Lunatum (Linn F) ducke in five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Propagation pattern of Machaerium Lunatum (Linn F) ducke in five different soil types. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... A study of the possibility of the propagation of this plant outside its natural aquatic environment, what part of the stem will grow and what soil type will be most suitable for it ...

  16. Subwavelength propagation and localization of light using surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-09

    Jan 9, 2014 ... didate to propagate and localize light at subwavelength scales. By tailoring the geometry ... optics and spectroscopy. Here we focus on plasmon-assisted light propagation and confinement in coupled ..... In spite of being a very useful technique, it is very challenging to trap metallic particles because of their ...

  17. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co .... mass propagation of sugarcane genotypes grown in. Ethiopia, and due to this the .... transferred cultures showed multiple shooting with an average of 9.10 ± 0.10 shoots ...

  18. Propagation of phase-change fronts in moving fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1977-05-01

    The transient propagation of a phase-change front during the depressurization of a subcooled liquid has been analyzed for the case of thermal equilibrium without friction or heat addition, using wave diagram solutions. Various modes of phase-change front propagation speeds are impossible while others require the simultaneous formation of shocks. Qualitative and quantitative results are given for two simple geometries

  19. Modeling paraxial wave propagation in free-electron laser oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, J.G.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Volokhine, I.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators requires calculation of both the light-beam interaction within the undulator and the light propagation outside the undulator. We have developed a paraxial optical propagation code that can be combined with various existing models of gain media, for

  20. Surface effects on the propagation of sound in Fermi liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, K.; Woelfle, P.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of sound in a resonator is discussed in both the normal and superfluid Fermi liquids. A set of model hydrodynamic equations is developed for describing the transition from the hydrodynamic regime to the collisionless regime. Surface effects are incorporated by using a slip boundary condition. The resonance condition for the sound propagation in a cylindrical resonator is derived

  1. Propagation of positional error in 3D GIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biljecki, Filip; Heuvelink, Gerard B.M.; Ledoux, Hugo; Stoter, Jantien

    2015-01-01

    While error propagation in GIS is a topic that has received a lot of attention, it has not been researched with 3D GIS data. We extend error propagation to 3D city models using a Monte Carlo simulation on a use case of annual solar irradiation estimation of building rooftops for assessing the

  2. Dynamical regimes and intracavity propagation delay in external ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E JAYAPRASATH

    2017-10-31

    Oct 31, 2017 ... to increase as the external cavity feedback rate of TL is increased, while an increment in the injection rate between the two lasers resulted in a reduction of intracavity propagation delay. Keywords. Semiconductor lasers; chaos synchronization; intracavity propagation delay. PACS Nos 42.55.−f; 42.55.

  3. Effects of irregularity and anisotropy on the propagation of shear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The propagation of shear waves differs between geo-media due to layer's structure and irregularity present in different layers. This paper studies the propagation of shear waves in a monoclinic layer with irregularity lying between two isotropic semiinfinite elastic medium. The displacement in the monoclinic layer is obtained ...

  4. In vitro propagation of walnut - A review | Payghamzadeh | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro propagation of walnut has played a very important role in rapid multiplication of cultivars with desirable traits and production of healthy and disease-free plants. During the last several years, different approaches have been made for in vitro propagation of walnut. Micropropagation using apicale bud, nodale ...

  5. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires con- sideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces less ...

  6. Wave Packet Propagation and Electric Conductivity of Nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maeda, Munehiko; Saito, Keiji; Miyashita, Seiji; Raedt, Hans De

    2004-01-01

    We compute the electric conductivity of nanowires in the presence of magnetic domain walls by the method of wave packet propagation. We demonstrate that the propagation through the wire depends on the initial state used in the wave packet simulation. We propose a procedure, based on the Landauer

  7. Modeling of Reverberant Radio Channels Using Propagation Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Steinböck, Gerhard; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2012-01-01

    decaying power. We model the channel as a propagation graph in which vertices represent transmitters, receivers, and scatterers, while edges represent propagation conditions between vertices. The recursive structure of the graph accounts for the exponential power decay and the avalanche effect. We derive...... that the graph's recursive structure yields both an exponential power decay and an avalanche effect....

  8. Analysis of flexural wave propagation in poroelastic composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wave propagation in an infinitely long poroelastic composite hollow cylinder in is examined by employing Biot's theory of wave propagation in poroelastic media. A poroelastic composite hollow cylinder consists of two concentric poroelastic cylindrical layers both of which are made of different poroelastic materials with each ...

  9. Free wave propagation in continuous pipes carrying a flowing fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espindola, J.J. de; Silva, J.B. da

    1982-01-01

    The propagation constants of a periodically supported pipe are computed. Use is made of a general free wave-propagation theory, based on transfer matrices. Comparison is made with previously published results, computed through a simpler, limited scope theory. (Author) [pt

  10. Subwavelength propagation and localization of light using surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-09

    Jan 9, 2014 ... didate to propagate and localize light at subwavelength scales. By tailoring the geometry and ... photon into plasmon waves, leading to either propagating optical fields or localized optical fields. .... Figures 5a and 5b show the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of a sin- gle and a cluster of ...

  11. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  12. Laser beam trapping and propagation in cylindrical plasma columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Fleck, J.A. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the scheme to heat magnetically confined plasma columns to kilovolt temperatures with a laser beam requires consideration of two propagation problems. The first question to be answered is whether stable beam trapping is possible. Since the laser beam creates its own density profile by heating the plasma, the propagation of the beam becomes a nonlinear phenomenon, but not necessarily a stable one. In addition, the electron density at a given time depends on the preceding history of both the medium and the laser pulse. A self-consistent time dependent treatment of the beam propagation and the medium hydrodynamics is consequently required to predict the behavior of the laser beam. Such calculations have been carried out and indicate that propagation of a laser beam in an initially uniform plasma can form a stable filament which alternately focuses and defocuses. An additional question that is discussed is whether diffractive losses associated with long propagation paths are significant

  13. Effects of crack tip plasticity on fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    A simple model for fatigue crack propagation has been proposed based on the modified Dugdale model of crack tip plasticity and energy balance approach to stable crack propagation. To verify the proposed model, fatigue tests were performed on the specimens of Type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718. To measure the effect of crack tip bluntness on the fatigue crack propagation, specimens of different thickness were used. Results show that the theoretical prediction of fatigue crack propagation agreed well with the experimental test results. It is suggested that the prediction of fatigue crack propagation should take account of the different plasticity related to the variation of specimen thickness, stress state and material's tearing modulus in the crack tip region. (orig.)

  14. Confinement and propagation characteristics of subwavelength plasmonic modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulton, R F; Bartal, G; Zhang, X; Pile, D F P

    2008-01-01

    We have studied subwavelength confinement of the surface plasmon polariton modes of various plasmonic waveguides and examined their relative merits using a graphical parametric representation of their confinement and propagation characteristics. While the same plasmonic phenomenon governs mode confinement in all these waveguides, the various architectures can exhibit distinctive behavior in terms of effective mode area and propagation distance. We found that the waveguides based on metal and one dielectric material show a similar trade-off between energy confinement and propagation distance. However, a hybrid plasmon waveguide, incorporating metal, low index and high index dielectric materials, exhibits longer propagation distances for the same degree of confinement. We also point out that plasmonic waveguides with sharp features can provide an extremely strong local field enhancement, which is not necessarily accompanied by strong confinement of the total electromagnetic energy. In these waveguides, a mode may couple strongly to nearby atoms, but suffer relatively low propagation losses due to weak confinement.

  15. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  16. Propagation characteristics of thunderstorms in southern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, M.; Bartenschlager, B.; Finke, U.

    1998-05-01

    The propagation of thunderstorms in southern Germany was investigated. The thunderstorms were observed by a lightning position system during the summer months of the years 1992 to 1996. On average every second day thunderstorms were observed anywhere in southern Germany. In general thunderstorms approach from westerly and south-westerly directions. The average speed is 13 m/s. No significant relation between the occurrence of thunderstorms and the large scale synoptic pattern described by the Grosswetterlagen (large scale weather pattern) was found. Thunderstorms were observed during almost all Grosswetterlagen. The reduction to 8 weather pattern based on the low-level flow in southern Germany showed that thunderstorms are likely when the flow has westerly directions (43%) or easterly directions (20%). Three distinct groups of different lightning patterns could be identified; stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the wind shear were retrieved from the radio soundings from Muenchen and Stuttgart. On average CAPE was 583 J/kg for stationary, 701 J/kg for moving thunderstorms, and 876 J/kg for thunderstorm lines. The average bulk Richardson numbers are 152, 80 and 52 for stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines, respectively. The steering level was found to be at about 3 and 6 km m.s.l. However, it should be noted, that in most cases the soundings do not completely describe the local environment of thunderstorms, since radio soundings are only available twice a day. (orig.)

  17. Shock propagation in a heterogeneous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbaz, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the inertial confinement fusion in direct drive, the use of foams as ablator allows the reduction of hydrodynamic instabilities created on the target by the direct laser irradiation. The foam is made up of carbon (CH) fibers impregnated of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT). In the past, studies have been carried out considering this foam to be a homogeneous medium. Yet, the foam presents heterogeneous features. We study the effects of this heterogeneity on the shock velocity when the laser irradiates the target. Thanks to experimental and numerical studies, we show that the shock propagates faster in the heterogeneous medium than in the homogeneous one with the same averaged density. This velocity gap depends on the presence rate of the CH fibers in the foam, the density ratio, the adiabatic coefficient and the foam geometry. We model the foam by different ways, more and more complex. The shock velocity modification is due to the baroclinicity which, during the interaction between the shock front and the interface, creates a vorticity deposition, responsible for the shock acceleration. Accordingly, an interface, which is plane and perpendicular to the front shock, maximizes the vorticity deposition and increases the velocity gaps between heterogeneous and homogeneous media. We found a correlation between the kinetic energy behind the shock front and the velocities relative difference. We compared our results with two analytical models. However, the system is not closed, so we can't for the moment develop a predictive model. (author) [fr

  18. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  19. Some properties of light propagation in relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazanski, Stanislaw L.

    1998-01-01

    An outline of a formalism is proposed that describes relativistic effects associated with the propagation of light rays which after being initially split start to reconverge and intersect each other again. Beside a general geometric description that uses the approach of geometric optics, it has been shown how to compute both the difference of the proper times of arrivals of the two light beams to a measuring apparatus, as well as the frequency shifts of each of the beams taken separately. The formalism used here is applicable to both the special and the general theory of relativity, and it can be used equally well either when the light split is produced by a man-made optical device or when it is caused by the gravity field itself. The geometric description used in the formalism is independent of the physical origin of the frequency shift; of whether it is a Doppler, gravitational or cosmological frequency shift effect. Two simple examples of the application of the formalism have been worked out, which illustrate its results for families of inertial and noninertial observers respectively. Furthermore, a short description of a continuous version of the formalism has been presented in the last section of the article

  20. Synchronization with propagation - The functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rǎsvan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    The structure represented by one or several oscillators couple to a one-dimensional transmission environment (e.g. a vibrating string in the mechanical case or a lossless transmission line in the electrical case) turned to be attractive for the research in the field of complex structures and/or complex behavior. This is due to the fact that such a structure represents some generalization of various interconnection modes with lumped parameters for the oscillators. On the other hand the lossless and distortionless propagation along transmission lines has generated several research in electrical, thermal, hydro and control engineering leading to the association of some functional differential equations to the basic initial boundary value problems. The present research is performed at the crossroad of the aforementioned directions. We shall associate to the starting models some functional differential equations - in most cases of neutral type - and make use of the general theorems for existence and stability of forced oscillations for functional differential equations. The challenges introduced by the analyzed problems for the general theory are emphasized, together with the implication of the results for various applications.

  1. Cosmic axion background propagation in galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Francesca V., E-mail: francesca.day@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2016-02-10

    Many extensions of the Standard Model include axions or axion-like particles (ALPs). Here we study ALP to photon conversion in the magnetic field of the Milky Way and starburst galaxies. By modelling the effects of the coherent and random magnetic fields, the warm ionized medium and the warm neutral medium on the conversion process, we simulate maps of the conversion probability across the sky for a range of ALP energies. In particular, we consider a diffuse cosmic ALP background (CAB) analogous to the CMB, whose existence is suggested by string models of inflation. ALP–photon conversion of a CAB in the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters has been proposed as an explanation of the cluster soft X-ray excess. We therefore study the phenomenology and expected photon signal of CAB propagation in the Milky Way. We find that, for the CAB parameters required to explain the cluster soft X-ray excess, the photon flux from ALP–photon conversion in the Milky Way would be unobservably small. The ALP–photon conversion probability in galaxy clusters is 3 orders of magnitude higher than that in the Milky Way. Furthermore, the morphology of the unresolved cosmic X-ray background is incompatible with a significant component from ALP–photon conversion. We also consider ALP–photon conversion in starburst galaxies, which host much higher magnetic fields. By considering the clumpy structure of the galactic plasma, we find that conversion probabilities comparable to those in clusters may be possible in starburst galaxies.

  2. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  3. Mathematical problems in wave propagation theory

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    The papers comprising this collection are directly or indirectly related to an important branch of mathematical physics - the mathematical theory of wave propagation and diffraction. The paper by V. M. Babich is concerned with the application of the parabolic-equation method (of Academician V. A. Fok and M. A, Leontovich) to the problem of the asymptotic behavior of eigenfunc­ tions concentrated in a neighborhood of a closed geodesie in a Riemannian space. The techniques used in this paper have been föund useful in solving certain problems in the theory of open resonators. The topic of G. P. Astrakhantsev's paper is similar to that of the paper by V. M. Babich. Here also the parabolic-equation method is used to find the asymptotic solution of the elasticity equations which describes Love waves concentrated in a neighborhood of some surface ray. The paper of T. F. Pankratova is concerned with finding the asymptotic behavior of th~ eigenfunc­ tions of the Laplace operator from the exact solution for the surf...

  4. Fixing convergence of Gaussian belief propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jason K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bickson, Danny [IBM RESEARCH LAB; Dolev, Danny [HEBREW UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Gaussian belief propagation (GaBP) is an iterative message-passing algorithm for inference in Gaussian graphical models. It is known that when GaBP converges it converges to the correct MAP estimate of the Gaussian random vector and simple sufficient conditions for its convergence have been established. In this paper we develop a double-loop algorithm for forcing convergence of GaBP. Our method computes the correct MAP estimate even in cases where standard GaBP would not have converged. We further extend this construction to compute least-squares solutions of over-constrained linear systems. We believe that our construction has numerous applications, since the GaBP algorithm is linked to solution of linear systems of equations, which is a fundamental problem in computer science and engineering. As a case study, we discuss the linear detection problem. We show that using our new construction, we are able to force convergence of Montanari's linear detection algorithm, in cases where it would originally fail. As a consequence, we are able to increase significantly the number of users that can transmit concurrently.

  5. Tsunami propagation modelling – a sensitivity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tkalich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Indian Ocean (2004 Tsunami and following tragic consequences demonstrated lack of relevant experience and preparedness among involved coastal nations. After the event, scientific and forecasting circles of affected countries have started a capacity building to tackle similar problems in the future. Different approaches have been used for tsunami propagation, such as Boussinesq and Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NSWE. These approximations were obtained assuming different relevant importance of nonlinear, dispersion and spatial gradient variation phenomena and terms. The paper describes further development of original TUNAMI-N2 model to take into account additional phenomena: astronomic tide, sea bottom friction, dispersion, Coriolis force, and spherical curvature. The code is modified to be suitable for operational forecasting, and the resulting version (TUNAMI-N2-NUS is verified using test cases, results of other models, and real case scenarios. Using the 2004 Tsunami event as one of the scenarios, the paper examines sensitivity of numerical solutions to variation of different phenomena and parameters, and the results are analyzed and ranked accordingly.

  6. Azimuthal Angle Correlations for Higgs Boson plus Multi-Jet Events

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    At lowest order in perturbation theory, the scattering matrix element for Higgs boson production in association with dijets displays a strong correlation in the azimuthal angle between the dijets, induced by the CP-properties of the Higgs Boson coupling. However, the phase space cuts necessary for a clean extraction of the CP-properties simultaneously induce large corrections from emissions of hard radiation and thus formation of extra jets. The current study concerns the generalization of CP-studies using the azimuthal angle between dijets beyond tree-level and to events with more than just two jets. By analyzing the High Energy Limit of hard scattering matrix elements we arrive at a set of cuts optimized to enhance the correlation, while maintaining a large cross section, and an observable, which is very stable against higher order corrections. We contrast the description of Higgs boson production in association with jets at different levels: for tree-level hjj and hjjj matrix elements, for hjj matrix eleme...

  7. The effect of propagation methods on some growth and physiological characteristics of seed- and vegetatively propagated Eucalyptus varieties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokotedi, O

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to deepen our understanding of the field performance of micro- and macro-propagated Eucalyptus grandis x nitens (GN), in comparison with seed-propagated E. grandis and E. nitens. The emphasis was on the relationship...

  8. Can Electron Propagator Methods Be Used To Improve Polarization Propagator Methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2008-01-01

    Calculations of Rydberg excitation energies with the second-order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) often produce results which are more in error than the random phase approximation (RPA), which formally is the first-order model. This is obviously because of cancellation of errors...... at the RPA level. On the other hand, valence excitation energies behave as expected, and they are systematically improved in SOPPA compared to RPA. Note that a Rydberg series is related to one of the ionization thresholds of the molecule, and it is thus obvious that a good description of the ionization...

  9. A numerical calculation of outward propagation of solar disturbances. [solar atmospheric model with shock wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The responses of the solar atmosphere due to an outward propagation shock are examined by employing the Lax-Wendroff method to solve the set of nonlinear partial differential equations in the model of the solar atmosphere. It is found that this theoretical model can be used to explain the solar phenomena of surge and spray. A criterion to discriminate the surge and spray is established and detailed information concerning the density, velocity, and temperature distribution with respect to the height and time is presented. The complete computer program is also included.

  10. In propagation Gerbera jamessonii H. Bolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Machado Armas

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerbera is one of the horticultural crops of great demand on the Cuban local market, but its exploitation is limited because with the traditional multiplication methods established, it is not possible to comply with the demands of the “seeds”. This work was carried out at the biofactory of Las Flores de Servicios Comunales”, with the objective of establishing a methodology for the in vitro commercial propagation of Gerbera. Culture media and explant management in the different micropropagation phases were studied. The results obtained showed that with sodium hypochlorite at 0.5% during 10 minutes, a high disinfection of the shoot tips was achieved. With the combination of 6-bencilaminepurine (1.0 mg-l-1 and giberrelic acid (0.1 mg.l-1 in the culture medium, it was possible to increase the number of shoots per explant during establishment. In the multiplication phase, the best results were obtained with a combination of 6-BAP (2.0 mg.l-1 with AIA (0.65 and 1.3 mg.l-1 subculturing the explants greater than 1.0 cm individually in semisolid culture medium. A significant influence on the number of roots and growth of the explants was achieved adding indolacetic acid to the rooting medium and using for the subculture, explants greater than 3.0 cm. The quality of the explants influenced significantly in the acclimatization phase, demonstrating that the plants rooted in vitro should be 3.0 cm in height. Key words: explants, disinfection, shoot tip, culture medium

  11. Sythesis of MCMC and Belief Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungsoo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (South Korea); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shin, Jinwoo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (South Korea)

    2016-05-27

    Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and Belief Propagation (BP) are the most popular algorithms for computational inference in Graphical Models (GM). In principle, MCMC is an exact probabilistic method which, however, often suffers from exponentially slow mixing. In contrast, BP is a deterministic method, which is typically fast, empirically very successful, however in general lacking control of accuracy over loopy graphs. In this paper, we introduce MCMC algorithms correcting the approximation error of BP, i.e., we provide a way to compensate for BP errors via a consecutive BP-aware MCMC. Our framework is based on the Loop Calculus (LC) approach which allows to express the BP error as a sum of weighted generalized loops. Although the full series is computationally intractable, it is known that a truncated series, summing up all 2-regular loops, is computable in polynomial-time for planar pair-wise binary GMs and it also provides a highly accurate approximation empirically. Motivated by this, we first propose a polynomial-time approximation MCMC scheme for the truncated series of general (non-planar) pair-wise binary models. Our main idea here is to use the Worm algorithm, known to provide fast mixing in other (related) problems, and then design an appropriate rejection scheme to sample 2-regular loops. Furthermore, we also design an efficient rejection-free MCMC scheme for approximating the full series. The main novelty underlying our design is in utilizing the concept of cycle basis, which provides an efficient decomposition of the generalized loops. In essence, the proposed MCMC schemes run on transformed GM built upon the non-trivial BP solution, and our experiments show that this synthesis of BP and MCMC outperforms both direct MCMC and bare BP schemes.

  12. Connection between Ocean Acidification and Sound Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Gazioğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Ambient Noise (OAN results from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Varied noise sources are dominant in low (LFB: 10 to 500 Hz, medium (MFB: 500 Hz to 25 kHz and high (HFB:>25 kHz frequency bands. Mostly, LFB is dominated by anthropogenic sources. MFB that cannot spread over long ranges of sound sources contribute to the OAN. Ocean is an exceptionally noisy place. Ocean acidification (OAc from rising Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels will result in decreased sound absorption and therefore, amplified levels of OAN. Carbon dioxide spewed into the atmosphere by burned fossil-fuel which dissolves in the seawater causes more acidic condition in oceans which has strong connection between chemical oceanography and sound propagation. As the ocean becomes more acidic, sound absorption at LFB decreases and acidic oceans would result in significant decreases in ocean sound absorption. In the recent years, the acoustic environment of oceans has reacted to transformations in both natural and anthropogenic impacts. Greenhouse gases concentrations, especially CO2 , rises in atmosphere due to industrial revolution. CO2 dissolved in the seawaters deposited in two major forms (carbonate and bicarbonate, which both lead to decrease pH of surface waters. Over the last 400 million years, pH of oceans has been stable around 8.2 globally. Latest investigations suggest that global pH is around 8.1 globally and various general oceanic circulation models (GOCM calculate that, emissions could reduce ocean pH by a degree between 0.4 units (according to moderate approach and 0.7 units (according to an aggressive one by the end of this century. This article discusses the CO2 considerations both in the atmosphere and hydrosphere which are directly related with seawater pH and oceans noise levels.

  13. Cosmic axion background propagation in galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca V. Day

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many extensions of the Standard Model include axions or axion-like particles (ALPs. Here we study ALP to photon conversion in the magnetic field of the Milky Way and starburst galaxies. By modelling the effects of the coherent and random magnetic fields, the warm ionized medium and the warm neutral medium on the conversion process, we simulate maps of the conversion probability across the sky for a range of ALP energies. In particular, we consider a diffuse cosmic ALP background (CAB analogous to the CMB, whose existence is suggested by string models of inflation. ALP–photon conversion of a CAB in the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters has been proposed as an explanation of the cluster soft X-ray excess. We therefore study the phenomenology and expected photon signal of CAB propagation in the Milky Way. We find that, for the CAB parameters required to explain the cluster soft X-ray excess, the photon flux from ALP–photon conversion in the Milky Way would be unobservably small. The ALP–photon conversion probability in galaxy clusters is 3 orders of magnitude higher than that in the Milky Way. Furthermore, the morphology of the unresolved cosmic X-ray background is incompatible with a significant component from ALP–photon conversion. We also consider ALP–photon conversion in starburst galaxies, which host much higher magnetic fields. By considering the clumpy structure of the galactic plasma, we find that conversion probabilities comparable to those in clusters may be possible in starburst galaxies.

  14. Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Viscoelastic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    Advances in the general theory of wave propagation in layered viscoelastic media reveal new insights regarding seismic waves in the Earth. For example, the theory predicts: 1) P and S waves are predominantly inhomogeneous in a layered anelastic Earth with seismic travel times, particle-motion orbits, energy speeds, Q, and amplitude characteristics that vary with angle of incidence and hence, travel path through the layers, 2) two types of shear waves exist, one with linear and the other with elliptical particle motions each with different absorption coefficients, and 3) surface waves with amplitude and particle motion characteristics not predicted by elasticity, such as Rayleigh-Type waves with tilted elliptical particle motion orbits and Love-Type waves with superimposed sinusoidal amplitude dependencies that decay exponentially with depth. The general theory provides closed-form analytic solutions for body waves, reflection-refraction problems, response of multiple layers, and surface wave problems valid for any material with a viscoelastic response, including the infinite number of models, derivable from various configurations of springs and dashpots, such as elastic, Voight, Maxwell, and Standard Linear. The theory provides solutions independent of the amount of intrinsic absorption and explicit analytic expressions for physical characteristics of body waves in low-loss media such as the deep Earth. The results explain laboratory and seismic observations, such as travel-time and wide-angle reflection amplitude anomalies, not explained by elasticity or one dimensional Q models. They have important implications for some forward modeling and inverse problems. Theoretical advances and corresponding numerical results as recently compiled (Borcherdt, 2008, Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media, Cambridge University Press) will be reviewed.

  15. Propagation law of impact elastic wave based on specific materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the propagation law of the impact elastic wave on the platform, the experimental platform is built by using the specific isotropic materials and anisotropic materials. The glass cloth epoxy laminated plate is used for anisotropic material, and an organic glass plate is used for isotropic material. The PVDF sensors adhered on the specific materials are utilized to collect data, and the elastic wave propagation law of different thick plates and laminated plates under impact conditions is analyzed. The Experimental results show that in anisotropic material, transverse wave propagation speed along the fiber arrangement direction is the fastest, while longitudinal wave propagation speed is the slowest. The longitudinal wave propagation speed in anisotropic laminates is much slower than that in the laminated thick plates. In the test channel arranged along a particular angle away from the central region of the material, transverse wave propagation speed is larger. Based on the experimental results, this paper proposes a material combination mode which is advantageous to elastic wave propagation and diffusion in shock-isolating materials. It is proposed to design a composite material with high acoustic velocity by adding regularly arranged fibrous materials. The overall design of the barrier material is a layered structure and a certain number of 90°zigzag structure.

  16. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  17. Modeling the propagation of mobile phone virus under complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  18. Energy model for rumor propagation on social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuo; Zhuang, Fuzhen; He, Qing; Shi, Zhongzhi; Ao, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    With the development of social networks, the impact of rumor propagation on human lives is more and more significant. Due to the change of propagation mode, traditional rumor propagation models designed for word-of-mouth process may not be suitable for describing the rumor spreading on social networks. To overcome this shortcoming, we carefully analyze the mechanisms of rumor propagation and the topological properties of large-scale social networks, then propose a novel model based on the physical theory. In this model, heat energy calculation formula and Metropolis rule are introduced to formalize this problem and the amount of heat energy is used to measure a rumor’s impact on a network. Finally, we conduct track experiments to show the evolution of rumor propagation, make comparison experiments to contrast the proposed model with the traditional models, and perform simulation experiments to study the dynamics of rumor spreading. The experiments show that (1) the rumor propagation simulated by our model goes through three stages: rapid growth, fluctuant persistence and slow decline; (2) individuals could spread a rumor repeatedly, which leads to the rumor’s resurgence; (3) rumor propagation is greatly influenced by a rumor’s attraction, the initial rumormonger and the sending probability.

  19. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Rohit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  20. Does propagation method affect the field performance of peach trees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Kulkamp de Souza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, peach propagation has been performed mainly by grafting scions of desirable cultivars on rootstocks obtained from seeds. There are, however, other potential propagation methods not widely adopted due to the limited reports on the field performance of the resultant trees. This study addressed this knowledge gap and investigated the field performance of peach trees of the cultivar Maciel that were established in an orchard (5.0 m × 1.4 m spacing in 2011. The trees were trained in a "Y" system, with seedlings from three propagation techniques: 1 Conventional System (CS - vegetative bud grafting of the scion on the rootstock of the Okinawa cultivar obtained from seed; 2 Rootstock by Minicutting (RM - vegetative bud grafting of the scion on the rootstock of the Okinawa cultivar obtained by minicutting in a semi-hydroponic system; 3 Self-Rooting (SR - self-rooting of the scion in a semi-hydroponic system. The vegetative, productive, and fruit quality parameters were assessed during 2012 and 2013. The Maciel peach trees that were propagated by the SR technique were found to have similar or even superior field performance to those propagated by the CS. The RM propagation method was also found to be an important potential alternative to peach propagation, since this it combines two techniques (cutting and grafting to reduce tree vigor, especially if the goal is high-density planting.

  1. Propagation of plasma bullet in U-shape tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, to better understand the propagation mechanism of plasma bullets in capillary tubes, the propagation of plasma stream in a special designed U-shape tube is investigated. First, it’s observed that the smaller the distance d between the bended tubes is, the shorter the total length of the plasma stream is. Second, when d is reduced to 1 mm, the plasma stream in the lower part of the tube propagates along the upper inner surface of the tube rather than propagating in the whole tube uniformly. Third, high-speed photographs show that the plasma bullet starts to accelerate as soon as the secondary discharge is ignited, and propagating along the upper inner surface of the lower part of the tube. Such behavior is totally different with the propagation of plasma streams in straight tube. According to these results, we can conclude that the surface discharge plays an important role in the propagation of the plasma bullet and the conductivity of the plasma channel is relatively low, which is important for understanding the plasma bullet behavior.

  2. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively. PMID:25133209

  3. Dike propagation energy balance from deformation modeling and seismic release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Aoki, Yosuke; Rivalta, Eleonora

    2017-06-01

    Magma is transported in the crust mainly by dike intrusions. In volcanic areas, dikes can ascend toward the free surface and also move by lateral propagation, eventually feeding flank eruptions. Understanding dike mechanics is a key to forecasting the expected propagation and associated hazard. Several studies have been conducted on dike mechanisms and propagation; however, a less in-depth investigated aspect is the relation between measured dike-induced deformation and the seismicity released during its propagation. We individuated a simple x that can be used as a proxy of the expected mechanical energy released by a propagating dike and is related to its average thickness. For several intrusions around the world (Afar, Japan, and Mount Etna), we correlate such mechanical energy to the seismic moment released by the induced earthquakes. We obtain an empirical law that quantifies the expected seismic energy released before arrest. The proposed approach may be helpful to predict the total seismic moment that will be released by an intrusion and thus to control the energy status during its propagation and the time of dike arrest.Plain Language SummaryDike propagation is a dominant mechanism for magma ascent, transport, and eruptions. Besides being an intriguing physical process, it has critical hazard implications. After the magma intrusion starts, it is difficult to predict when and where a specific horizontal dike is going to halt and what its final length will be. In our study, we singled an equation that can be used as a proxy of the expected mechanical energy to be released by the opening dike. We related this expected energy to the seismic moment of several eruptive intrusions around the world (Afar region, Japanese volcanoes, and Mount Etna). The proposed novel approach is helpful to estimate the total seismic moment to be released, therefore allowing potentially predicting when the dike will end its propagation. The approach helps answer one of the

  4. Propagation of singularities for linearised hybrid data impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Guillaume; Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Knudsen, Kim

    2018-02-01

    For a general formulation of linearised hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography, the qualitative properties of the solutions are analysed. Using an appropriate scalar pseudo-differential formulation, the problems are shown to permit propagating singularities under certain non-elliptic conditions, and the associated directions of propagation are precisely identified relative to the directions in which ellipticity is lost. The same result is found in the setting for the corresponding normal formulation of the scalar pseudo-differential equations. A numerical reconstruction procedure based of the least squares finite element method is derived, and a series of numerical experiments visualise exactly how the loss of ellipticity manifests itself as propagating singularities.

  5. The parabolic equation method for outdoor sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arranz, Marta Galindo

    of the ground in a homogeneous atmosphere. Propagation of sound above a mixed impedance ground and up-slope sound propagation is investigated. In the third application the influence of the atmosphere is studied, characterized and implemented in the CNPE-model. The refraction of the sound due to the wind......The parabolic equation method is a versatile tool for outdoor sound propagation. The present study has focused on the Cranck-Nicolson type Parabolic Equation method (CNPE). Three different applications of the CNPE method have been investigated. The first two applications study variations...

  6. Wave propagation in damage assessment of ground anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, B.; Rucka, M.

    2015-07-01

    The inspection possibilities of ground anchors are limited to destructive test such as pull-out test. Guided wave propagation gives an opportunity to develop an inspection system dedicated to determine the condition of inspected element without violation of their integrity. In this paper the experimental study on wave propagation in laboratory models of ground anchors are presented. Experiments were conducted for different bonding lengths and different frequencies of excitation. Waves were generated by a piezoelectric actuator and the laser vibrometry technique was used to register velocity signals. For all tested anchors it was possible to identify the boundary between steel and concrete based on the registered reflections in wave propagation signals.

  7. Spinor and isospinor structure of relativistic particle propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Shvartsman, Sh.M.

    1993-07-01

    Representations by means of path integrals are used to find spinor and isospinor structure of relativistic particle propagators in external fields. For Dirac propagator in an external electromagnetic field all Grassmannian integrations are performed and a general result is presented via a bosonic path integral. The spinor structure of the integrand is given explicitly by its decomposition in the independent γ-matrix structures. A similar technique is used to get the isospinor structure of the scalar particle propagator in an external non-Abelian field. (author). 21 refs

  8. A model for sound propagation between two adsorbing microporous plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Massimiliano; Brandani, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    A model describing the sound propagation between two infinite adsorbing plates is proposed in order to investigate the extension to the audible sound range of the Frequency Response method applied to the measurement of diffusion in micropores. The model relates adsorption parameters (i.e., diffusivity and equilibrium constant) to an acoustic quantity (i.e., propagation constant). The equations describing sound propagation in the presence of adsorbing boundaries are obtained on the basis of the classical Kirchhoff theory [(1868). Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 134, 177-193]. The solution is derived using the Low Reduced Frequency Approximation method [Tijdeman, (1975). J. Sound Vib. 39, 1-33].

  9. Propagators and dimensional reduction of hot SU(2) gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchieri, A.; Karsch, F.; Petreczky, P.

    2001-08-01

    We investigate the large distance behavior of the electric and magnetic propagators of hot SU(2) gauge theory in different gauges using lattice simulations of the full four-dimensional (4D) theory and the effective, dimensionally reduced, 3D theory. A comparison of the 3D and 4D propagators suggests that dimensional reduction works surprisingly well down to the temperature T=2Tc. Within statistical uncertainty the electric screening mass is found to be gauge independent. The magnetic propagator, on the other hand, exhibits a complicated gauge dependent structure at low momentum.

  10. Propagation of Gaussian Beams through Active GRIN Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Varela, A I; Flores-Arias, M T; Bao-Varela, C; Gomez-Reino, C [Grupo de ' Microoptica y Optica GRIN' , Unidad asociada al Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Aragon, ICMA/CSIC, Zaragoza, Espana y Escuela de Optica y OptometrIa, Campus Sur s/n, Universidade de Santiago, E15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); De la Fuente, X, E-mail: maite.flores@usc.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, E50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    We discussed light propagation through an active GRIN material that exhibits loss or gain. Effects of gain or loss in GRIN materials can be phenomenologically taken into account by using a complex refractive index in the wave equation. This work examines the implication of using a complex refractive index on light propagation in an active GRIN material illuminated by a non-uniform monochromatic wave described by a Gaussian beam. We analyze how a Gaussian beam is propagated through the active material in order to characterize it by the beam parameters and the transverse irradiance distribution.

  11. Characteristic of laser diode beam propagation through a collimating lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Han, Yiping; Cui, Zhiwei

    2010-01-20

    A mathematical model of a laser diode beam propagating through a collimating lens is presented. Wave propagation beyond the paraxial approximation is studied. The phase delay of the laser diode wave in passing through the lens is analyzed in detail. The propagation optical field after the lens is obtained from the diffraction integral by the stationary phase method. The model is employed to predict the light intensity at various beam cross sections, and the computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements.

  12. Study of phonon propagation in water using picosecond ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F; Atay, T; Dang, C H; Grimsley, T J; Che, S; Ma, J; Zhang, Q; Nurmikko, A V; Maris, H J

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of ultra-short sound pulses in water is studied by using the picosecond ultrasonic technique. A sound pulse is generated when light is absorbed in a metal transducer film deposited onto a substrate. The sound propagates across a thin layer of water and is then reflected back to the surface at which it was generated. The efficiency of optoacoustic detection of the reflected sound is enhanced through the use of a resonant optical cavity. We show that the variation of the shape of the returning sound pulse with propagation distance agrees with that calculated by using the attenuation of sound in water that has been measured at lower frequencies

  13. Influence of queue propagation and dissipation on route travel times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena

    into account (Bliemer, 2008). Yperman (2007) indicates that there is a significant difference in queue-propagation and queue-dissipation between the LTM and DQM. This results in different route travel times, and can further affect route choice. In this paper, different approaches to represent queue propagation...... and dissipation through the CTM, LTM and DQM are studied. A simple network allows to show how these approaches influence route travel time. Furthermore, the possibility of changing the existing DQM is considered in order to more realistically represent queue propagation and dissipation, which would lead to more...... accurate route travel times....

  14. Spike propagation in driven chain networks with dominant global inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Wonil; Jin, Dezhe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Spike propagation in chain networks is usually studied in the synfire regime, in which successive groups of neurons are synaptically activated sequentially through the unidirectional excitatory connections. Here we study the dynamics of chain networks with dominant global feedback inhibition that prevents the synfire activity. Neural activity is driven by suprathreshold external inputs. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that spike propagation along the chain is a unique dynamical attractor in a wide parameter regime. The strong inhibition permits a robust winner-take-all propagation in the case of multiple chains competing via the inhibition.

  15. Towards a complete propagation uncertainties in depletion calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.S. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Garching (Germany); Zwermann, W.; Gallner, L.; Puente-Espel, Federico; Velkov, K.; Hannstein, V. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Garching (Germany); Cabellos, O. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties to calculated values is interesting for design purposes and libraries evaluation. XSUSA, developed at GRS, propagates cross section uncertainties to nuclear calculations. In depletion simulations, fission yields and decay data are also involved and are a possible source of uncertainty that should be taken into account. We have developed tools to generate varied fission yields and decay libraries and to propagate uncertainties through depletion in order to complete the XSUSA uncertainty assessment capabilities. A generic test to probe the methodology is defined and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Propagation of Porro "petal" beams through a turbulent atmosphere

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available . Construct a series of pseudo–random phase screens from the basis. 3. Implement optical wavefront changes from the pseudo–random phase screens. 4. Propagate the resulting beam to the far field and measure …. Page 11 Phase screen construction 20 40 60 80... constant h is height asl k is the wave number Atmospheric propagation Kolmogorov Turbulence Model Page 10 Atmospheric propagation How to measure turbulence 1. Decompose the turbulence model into a series of orthogonal functions (basis set). 2...

  17. Faraday tarotion: new parameter for electromagnetic pulse propagation in magnetoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, S.C.; Lyons, P.W.

    1976-01-01

    Extreme distortion and time-dependent Faraday rotation occur for propagation of short electromagnetic pulses in magnetoplasma, for some ranges of plasma parameters. In order to relate pulse and monochromatic waves for propagation-path diagnostic purposes, a new parameter is introduced for the transmitted pulse train which has properties that correspond very accurately to results that would be expected for Faraday rotation of a continuous wave having the central frequency of the incident pulse spectrum. Results for 5-ns pulses (10 GHz) are presented for varying propagating length, static magnetic field, electron density, and collisional absorption

  18. Model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part II. Effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkens, B; Blackstock, D T

    1998-09-01

    A model experiment was reported to be successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through a turbulent atmosphere [B. Lipkens and D. T. Blackstock, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 148-158 (1998)]. In this study the effect on N wave characteristics of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence are investigated. The main parameters of interest are the rise time and the peak pressure. The effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance is to flatten the rise time and peak pressure distributions. Rise time and peak pressure distributions always have positive skewness after propagation through turbulence. Average rise time grows with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. The scattering of rise time data is one-sided, i.e., rise times are almost always increased by turbulence. Average peak pressure decreases slowly with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. For the reported data a threefold increase in average rise time is observed and a maximum decrease of about 20% in average peak pressure. Rise times more than ten times that of the no turbulence value are observed. At most, the maximum peak pressure doubles after propagation through turbulence, and the minimum peak pressure values are about one-half the no-turbulence values. Rounded waveforms are always more common than peaked waveforms.

  19. Designing Geoscience Educational Innovations That Propagate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, P.

    2014-12-01

    NSF and other funders have supported the development of undergraduate STEM educational innovations over the past decades, only to see many yield limited uptake and impact beyond the grantee institutions. Numerous factors contribute to this complex problem, but one cause is likely insufficient incorporation of the understanding of how innovations propagate into project design. Following J.W. Dearing and colleagues, "dissemination" can be characterized by "push" approaches, which mainly emphasize one-to-many information sharing. In TUES/CCLI proposals, dissemination strategies have commonly taken the form of the "3 Ps" (presenting, publishing and posting) , with overall modest impact. Since the seminal work of Everett Rogers, however, "diffusion" of innovations has been understood as an inherently social process among potential adopters, which interacts with community norms and existing practices. Keys to diffusion include close understanding of the needs and context of the potential-adopter community and the development of "pull" within it, as well as support for implementation of innovations. Potential approaches to facilitating diffusion of innovations include a) using "lean start-up" methodologies (e.g., NSF's I-Corps-L program), in which explicit business-model hypotheses are tested through customer-discovery interviews, commonly leading to pivots where initial hypotheses are not confirmed, b) providing a range of potential commitment levels for adopters tailored to levels of support ("reverse Kickstarter model"), c) supporting decentralized communities of practice in which adaptations and tacit knowledge can readily be shared, d) encouraging crowd-sourcing of innovations, with an "architecture of participation" informed by successful open-source projects, and e) integrating innovations with discipline-based educational research, e.g., big-data approaches which allow A/B testing and analysis of clickstream data that reveal behaviors along a novice

  20. Characteristics of Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation in Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the solution of the diffusion equation for an electromagnetic field with a time harmonic term, e(sup iwt), is in the form of a traveling wave whose amplitude attenuates over distance into a conducting medium. As the attenuation is an increasing function of frequency, the high frequency components attenuate more rapidly than those of low ones upon entering a well conducting object. At the same time, the phase velocity of an individual component is also an increasing function of frequency causing a broadening of the pulse traveling inside a conductor. In the results of our previous study of numerical simulations, the problem of using a gaussian input pulse was immediately clear. First, having the dominant frequency components distributed around zero, the movement of the peak was not well defined. Second, with the amplitude of fourier components varying slowly over a wide range, the dispersion-induced blurring of the peak position was seen to be severe. For the present study, we have used a gaussian modulated single frequency sinusoidal wave, i. e., the carrier, as an input pulse in an effort to improve the issues related to the unclear movement of peak and dispersion as described above. This was based on the following two anticipated advantages: First, the packet moves in a conductor at the group velocity calculated at the carrier frequency, which means it is well controllable. Second, the amplitude of frequency components other than that of the carrier can be almost negligible, such that the effect of dispersion can be significantly reduced. A series of experiments of transmitting electromagnetic pulses through aluminum plates of various thickness was performed to test the validity of the above points. The results of numerical simulation based on wave propagation are discussed with respect to the experimental results. Finally, a simple simulation was performed based on diffusion of a continuous sine wave input and the results are compared with

  1. Propagating the Kadanoff-Baym equations for atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, Nils Erik; Leeuwen, Robert van; Stan, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    While the use of Green's function techniques has a long tradition in quantum chemistry, the possibility of propagating the Kadanoff-Baym equations has remained largely unexplored. We have implemented the time-propagation for atoms and diatomic molecules, starting from a system in the groundstate. The initial stage of the calculation requires solving the Dyson equation self-consistently for the equilibrium Green's function. This Green's function contains a huge amount of information, and we have found it particularly interesting to compare the self-consistent total energies to the results of variational energy functionals of the Green's function. We also use time-propagation for calculating linear response functions, as a means for obtaining the excitation energies of the system. We have presently implemented the propagation for the second Born approximation, while the GW approximation has now been implemented for the ground state calculations

  2. FATIGUE CRACK PROPAGATION THROUGH AUSTEMPERED DUCTILE IRON MICROSTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Bubenko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron (ADI has a wide range of application, particularly for castings used in automotive and earth moving machinery industries. These components are usually subjected to variable dynamic loading that may promote initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks up to final fracture. Thus, it is important to determine the fatigue crack propagation behavior of ADI. Since fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN vs. stress intensity factor K data describe fatigue crack propagation resistance and fatigue durability of structural materials, da/dN vs. Ka curves of ADI 1050 are reported here. The threshold amplitude of stress intensity factor Kath is also determined. Finally, the influence of stress intensity factor amplitude to the character of fatigue crack propagation through the ADI microstructure is described.

  3. Micro-Propagation of Disease Resistant Cassava Variety in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micro-Propagation of Disease Resistant Cassava Variety in Rwanda. Isidore Mushiyimana, Emmanuel Hakizimana, Gervais Gashaka, Peter Yao Kanze Sallah, Safia Kalisa, Felix Gatunzi, Theodore Asiimwe, Jane Kahia, Daphrose Gahakwa ...

  4. Propagation characteristics of resonance cone in a nonuniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Sanuki, H.

    1984-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of resonance cone field for frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency are described in a mirror magnetic field on the basis of fluid equation. Theoretical results are compared qualitatively with those of experiment

  5. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed.

  6. Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    saturated incompressible porous media. Many studies have discussed the surface wave propagation in elastic media and a com- prehensive review is available in the standard texts, e.g., Ewing et al (1957) and Achenbach. (1976). The surface ...

  7. Topics in Computational Modeling of Shock and Wave Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gazonas, George A; Main, Joseph A; Laverty, Rich; Su, Dan; Santare, Michael H; Raghupathy, R; Molinari, J. F; Zhou, F

    2006-01-01

    This report contains reprints of four papers that focus on various aspects of shock and wave propagation in cellular, viscoelastic, microcracked, and fragmented media that appear in the Proceedings...

  8. Meteorological effects on laser propagation for power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, R. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An examination of possible laser operating parameters for power transmission to earth from solar power satellites is presented, with particular attention paid to assuring optimal delivery at midlatitudes. The degradation of beam efficiency due to molecular scattering, molecular absorption, aerosol scattering, and aerosol absorption during beam propagation through the atmosphere can be alleviated by judicious choice of wavelength windows, elevating the receptor sites, using a vertical propagation path, or by hole boring, i.e., vaporizing the aerosol particles in the beam path. Analyses are given for the beam propagation through fog, haze, clouds, and snow using various transitions. Only weapons-quality lasers are seen as being capable of boring through clouds and aerosols, employing a CW beam with superimposed pulses at high power densities. It is concluded that further short wavelength transmission experiments be performed to demonstrate transmission feasibility with the CW/pulsed mode of beam propagation.

  9. Enhancing blooming period and propagation coefficient of tulip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing blooming period and propagation coefficient of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) using growth regulators. Ramesh Kumar, Nazeer Ahmed, Desh Beer Singh, Om Chand Sharma, Shiv Lal, Mohammad Muzamil Salmani ...

  10. Charged particle beam propagation studies at the Naval Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meger, R.A.; Hubbard, R.F.; Antoniades, J.A.; Fernsler, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Murphy, D.P.; Myers, M.C.; Pechacek, R.E.; Peyser, T.A.; Santos, J.; Slinker, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Division of the Naval Research Laboratory has been performing research into the propagation of high current electron beams for 20 years. Recent efforts have focused on the stabilization of the resistive hose instability. Experiments have utilized the SuperIBEX e-beam generator (5-MeV, 100-kA, 40-ns pulse) and a 2-m diameter, 5-m long propagation chamber. Full density air propagation experiments have successfully demonstrated techniques to control the hose instability allowing stable 5-m transport of 1-2 cm radius, 10-20 kA total current beams. Analytic theory and particle simulations have been used to both guide and interpret the experimental results. This paper will provide background on the program and summarize the achievements of the NRL propagation program up to this point. Further details can be found in other papers presented in this conference

  11. Long-term, global-scale statistics of sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheinet, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The near-surface sound levels emitted due to a point source show a large variability caused by sound propagation through changing meteorological conditions. To assess this variability, this study uses a numerical model of sound propagation which accounts for ground reflection, atmospheric refraction, and turbulence effects. The atmospheric inputs to the model-including turbulence-are calculated from Numerical Weather Prediction data. The method is used to investigate the relative sound levels at a range of 1.5 km from a 40 Hz sound source. The outstanding diversity of sound propagation conditions is illustrated over the globe. Over the long term, the sound propagation climates at selected sites are found to be modulated by the dominant wind regimes, the seasonal and diurnal cycles. The explored sensitivities stress the need for a careful assessment of sound scattering by turbulence and absorption by the surface.

  12. Mixing of fermions and spectral representation of propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, A. E.; Lomov, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    We develop the spectral representation of propagator for n mixing fermion fields in the case of P-parity violation. The approach based on the eigenvalue problem for inverse matrix propagator makes possible to build the system of orthogonal projectors and to represent the matrix propagator as a sum of poles with positive and negative energies. The procedure of multiplicative renormalization in terms of spectral representation is investigated and the renormalization matrices are obtained in a closed form without the use of perturbation theory. Since in theory with P-parity violation the standard spin projectors do not commute with the dressed propagator, they should be modified. The developed approach allows us to build the modified (dressed) spin projectors for a single fermion and for a system of fermions.

  13. Propagation of singularities for linearised hybrid data impedance tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal, Guillaume; Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Knudsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    For a general formulation of linearised hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography, the qualitative properties of the solutions are analysed. Using an appropriate scalar pseudo-differential formulation, the problems are shown to permit propagating singularities under certain non...

  14. Barium ferrite nanoparticles prepared by self-propagating low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    temperature combustion method using ... talline barium ferrite. Keywords. Barium ferrite; self-propagating combustion method; magnetic property; X-ray diffraction; morphology. 1. Introduction .... known that γ-Fe2O3 is a cubic spinel, whose chemical.

  15. Global Bifurcation of a Novel Computer Virus Propagation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper by J. Ren et al. (2012, a novel computer virus propagation model under the effect of the antivirus ability in a real network is established. The analysis there only partially uncovers the dynamics behaviors of virus spread over the network in the case where around bifurcation is local. In the present paper, by mathematical analysis, it is further shown that, under appropriate parameter values, the model may undergo a global B-T bifurcation, and the curves of saddle-node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, and homoclinic bifurcation are obtained to illustrate the qualitative behaviors of virus propagation. On this basis, a collection of policies is recommended to prohibit the virus prevalence. To our knowledge, this is the first time the global bifurcation has been explored for the computer virus propagation. Theoretical results and corresponding suggestions may help us suppress or eliminate virus propagation in the network.

  16. Propagation of Aquilaria malaccensis seedlings through tissue culture techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahbiah Abdul Majid; Zaiton Ahmad; Mohd Rafaie Abdul Salam; Nurhayati Irwan; Affrida Abu Hassan; Rusli Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Aquilaria malaccensis or karas is the principal source of gaharu resin, which is used in many cultures for incense, perfumes and traditional medicines. The species is mainly propagated conventionally through seeds, cuttings and graftings. Propagation by seeds is usually a reliable method for other forest species, but for karas, this technique is inadequate to meet the current demand of seedling supplies. This is principally due to its low seed viability, low germination rate, delayed rooting of seedlings, long life-cycle and rare seed production. Tissue culture has several advantages over conventional propagation, especially for obtaining large number of uniform and high-yielding plantlets or clones. This paper presents the current progress on mass-propagation of Aquilaria malaccensis seedlings through tissue culture technique at Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  17. Network analysis of Chinese air transport delay propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Zanin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese air transport system has witnessed an important evolution in the last decade, with a strong increase in the number of flights operated and a consequent reduction of their punctuality. In this contribution, we propose modelling the process of delay propagation by using complex networks, in which nodes are associated to airports, and links between pairs of them are assigned when a delay propagation is detected. Delay time series are analysed through the well-known Granger Causality, which allows detecting if one time series is causing the dynamics observed in a second one. Results indicate that delays are mostly propagated from small and regional airports, and through flights operated by turbo-prop aircraft. These insights can be used to design strategies for delay propagation dampening, as for instance by including small airports into the system's Collaborative Decision Making.

  18. Counter-propagating patterns in the BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Lindballe, T.B.; Kristensen, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    The counter-propagating geometry opens an extra degree of freedom for shaping light while subsuming single-sided illumination as a special case (i.e., one beam set turned off). In its conventional operation, our BioPhotonics Workstation (BWS) uses symmetric, co-axial counter-propagating beams...... for stable three-dimensional manipulation of multiple particles. In this work, we analyze counter-propagating shaped-beam traps that depart from this conventional geometry. We show that projecting shaped beams with separation distances previously considered axially unstable can, in fact, enhance the trap...... by improving axial and transverse trapping stiffness. We also show interesting results of trapping and micromanipulation experiments that combine optical forces with fluidic forces. These results hint about the rich potential of using patterned counter-propagating beams for optical trapping and manipulation...

  19. Project Integration Architecture: A Practical Demonstration of Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Henry

    2005-01-01

    One of the goals of the Project Integration Architecture (PIA) effort is to provide the ability to propagate information between disparate applications. With this ability, applications may then be formed into an application graph constituting a super-application. Such a super-application would then provide all of the analysis appropriate to a given technical system. This paper reports on a small demonstration of this concept in which a Computer Aided Design (CAD) application was connected to an inlet analysis code and geometry information automatically propagated from one to the other. The majority of the work reported involved not the technology of information propagation, but rather the conversion of propagated information into a form usable by the receiving application.

  20. Prediction of tides using back-propagation neural networks

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.

    Prediction of tides is very much essential for human activities and to reduce the construction cost in marine environment. This paper presents an application of the artificial neural network with back-propagation procedures for accurate prediction...

  1. An ellipsoidal calculus based on propagation and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, L; Sabater, A; Thomas, F

    2002-01-01

    Presents an ellipsoidal calculus based solely on two basic operations: propagation and fusion. Propagation refers to the problem of obtaining an ellipsoid that must satisfy an affine relation with another ellipsoid, and fusion to that of computing the ellipsoid that tightly bounds the intersection of two given ellipsoids. These two operations supersede the Minkowski sum and difference, affine transformation and intersection tight bounding of ellipsoids on which other ellipsoidal calculi are based. Actually, a Minkowski operation can be seen as a fusion followed by a propagation and an affine transformation as a particular case of propagation. Moreover, the presented formulation is numerically stable in the sense that it is immune to degeneracies of the involved ellipsoids and/or affine relations. Examples arising when manipulating uncertain geometric information in the context of the spatial interpretation of line drawings are extensively used as a testbed for the presented calculus.

  2. Vegetative propagation of twelve fodder tree species indigenous to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetative propagation of twelve fodder tree species indigenous to the Sahel, West Africa. Catherine Ky-Dembele, Jules Bayala, Antoine Kalinganire, Fatoumata Tata Traoré, Bréhima Koné, Alain Olivier ...

  3. Theoretical Studies of Stress Wave Propagation in Laterally Confined Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohani, Behzad

    1999-01-01

    .... A considerable body of scientific literature on one-dimensional stress wave propagation for such models has been published in recent years by various researchers, both in the United States and abroad...

  4. Spin and orbital angular momentum propagation in anisotropic media: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picón, Antonio; Benseny, Albert; Mompart, Jordi; Calvo, Gabriel F

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a study of the propagation of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum in optically anisotropic media. We first review some properties of homogeneous anisotropic media, and describe how the paraxial formalism is modified in order to proceed with a new approach dealing with the general setting of paraxial propagation along uniaxial inhomogeneous media. This approach is suitable for describing space-variant optical-axis phase plates

  5. Clear-Air Propagation Modeling using Parabolic Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kvicera

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of radio waves under clear-air conditions is affected bythe distribution of atmospheric refractivity between the transmitterand the receiver. The measurement of refractivity was carried out onthe TV Tower Prague to access evolution of a refractivity profile. Inthis paper, the parabolic equation method is used in modelingpropagation of microwaves when using the measured data. This paperbriefly describes the method and shows some practical results ofsimulation of microwave propagation using real vertical profiles ofatmospheric refractivity.

  6. A wave propagation matrix method in semiclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.

    1977-05-01

    A wave propagation matrix method is used to derive the semiclassical formulae of the multiturning point problem. A phase shift matrix and a barrier transformation matrix are introduced to describe the processes of a particle travelling through a potential well and crossing a potential barrier respectively. The wave propagation matrix is given by the products of phase shift matrices and barrier transformation matrices. The method to study scattering by surface transparent potentials and the Bloch wave in solids is then applied

  7. Accuracy in Orbital Propagation: A Comparison of Predictive Software Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    modified atmospheric drag equations, provided by Richard H. Smith, due to the computer’s processing limitations with Brouwer and Hori’s atmospheric model...positions from PPT3 and SGP4, as well as differences in their accuracy. The atmospheric model within each propagator is determined to be the most...effective component of each propagator to test, as the theoretical atmospheric drag calculation methods of PPT3 and SGP4 differ greatly. PPT3 and SGP4

  8. On wave propagation in a random micropolar generalized thermoelastic medium

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Manindra; Bhattacharyya Rabindra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This paper endeavours to study aspects of wave propagation in a random generalized-thermal micropolar elastic medium. The smooth perturbation technique conformable to stochastic differential equations has been employed. Six different types of waves propagate in the random medium. The dispersion equations have been derived. The effects due to random variations of micropolar elastic and generalized thermal parameters have been computed. Randomness causes change of phase speed and attenuation of...

  9. Propagation considerations for satellite broadcasting at frequencies above 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. V.

    1985-01-01

    At frequencies above 10 GHz, tropospheric propagation effects can significantly alter signal transmission performance. Important phenomena on earth-satellite (slant) paths include attenuation and sky noise increases resulting from atmospheric gases, clouds, and precipitation, depolarization by raindrops and ice crystals, and refractive effects, particularly at low path elevation angles. Various practical aspects of propagation phenomena for satellite broadcasting at frequencies above 10 GHz are reviewed in this paper, with emphasis on the near-term implementation of services at Ku-band.

  10. Projection operator and propagator for an arbitrary integral spin

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Shi Zhong; Wu Ning; Zheng Zhi Peng

    2002-01-01

    Based on the solution of the Bargmann-Wigner equation for an arbitrary integral spin, a direct derivation of the projection operator and propagator for an arbitrary integral spin is presented. The explicit form for the spin projection operators constructed by Behrends and Fronsdal is confirmed. The commutation rules and a general expression for the Feynman propagator for a free particle of arbitrary integral spin are deduced

  11. Total Flooding Time and Rumor Propagation on Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Darcy; Popov, Serguei

    2017-03-01

    We study the discrete time version of the flooding time problem as a model of rumor propagation where each site in the graph has initially a distinct piece of information; we are interested in the number of "conversations" before the entire graph knows all pieces of information. For the complete graph we compare the ratio between the expected propagation time for all pieces of information and the corresponding time for a single piece of information, obtaining the asymptotic ratio 3 / 2 between them.

  12. Dynamic analysis of a stochastic delayed rumor propagation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fangju; Lv, Guangying; Wang, Shuangfeng; Zou, Guang-an

    2018-02-01

    The rapid development of the Internet, especially the emergence of the social networks, has led rumor propagation into a new media era. In this paper, we are concerned with a stochastic delayed rumor propagation model. Firstly, we obtain the existence of the global solution. Secondly, sufficient conditions for extinction of the rumor are established. Lastly, the boundedness of solution is proved and some simulations are given to verify our results.

  13. Propagator for finite range potentials: The case of reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Following a previous study on the transmission propagator for a finite range potential, the problem of reflection is considered. It is found that the Laplace transform of the reflection propagator can be expressed in terms of the usual Fredholm determinant Δ and of a new similar determinant Γ, containing the peculiar characteristics of reflection. As an example, an array of delta potentials is considered. Moreover, a possible application to the calculation of quantum traversal time is shown

  14. Measurement of QCD gluon propagator at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takuya [Hiroshima Univ., Information Media Center, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Atsushi [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Education, Yamagata (Japan); Sakai, Sunao [Hiroshima Univ., Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We calculate gluon screening masses in quenched SU(3) lattice gauge theory at finite temperature by using stochastic gauge fixing method. Although gluon propagator is gauge dependent quantity and is not physical object, we extract the screening masses of SU(3) gluon by the behaviour of gauge fixed gluon propagator. We examine temperature dependences of the electric and magnetic screening masses at the regions, T/T{sub c} = 1 - 6. We also check their gauge dependence is very small. (author)

  15. Propagation of avalanches in Mn12-acetate: magnetic deflagration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoko; Sarachik, M P; Chudnovsky, E M; McHugh, S; Gonzalez-Rubio, R; Avraham, Nurit; Myasoedov, Y; Zeldov, E; Shtrikman, H; Chakov, N E; Christou, G

    2005-09-30

    Local time-resolved measurements of fast reversal of the magnetization of single crystals of Mn12-acetate indicate that the magnetization avalanche spreads as a narrow interface that propagates through the crystal at a constant velocity that is roughly 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of sound. We argue that this phenomenon is closely analogous to the propagation of a flame front (deflagration) through a flammable chemical substance.

  16. Detecting electromagnetic cloaks using backward-propagating waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach for detecting transformation-optics invisibility cloaks is proposed. The detection method takes advantage of the unusual backward-propagation characteristics of recently reported beams and pulses to induce electromagnetic scattering from the cloak. Even though waves with backward-propagating energy flux cannot penetrate the cloaking shell and interact with the cloaked objects (i.e., they do not make the cloaked object visible), they provide a mechanism for detecting the presence of cloaks. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Propagation of polarized light in turbid media: simulated animation sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Gang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2000-01-01

    A time-resolved Monte Carlo technique was used to simulate the propagation of polarized light in turbid media. Calculated quantities include the reflection Mueller matrices, the transmission Mueller matrices, and the degree of polarization (DOP). The effects of the polarization state of the incident light and of the size of scatterers on the propagation of DOP were studied. Results are shown in animation sequences.

  18. Propagative modes along a superfluid helium-4 meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujade, M.; Guthmann, C.; Rolley, E.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a superfluid helium-4 meniscus on a solid substrate. In a pseudo-non-wetting situation, there is no hysteresis of the contact angle. We show that distortions of a liquid meniscus do propagate along the contact line. We have analyzed the propagation of pulses. We find a good agreement with theoretical predictions by Brochard for the dispersion relation of oscillation modes of the contact line. (authors)

  19. Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation through Causal Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0112 Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation through Causal Media Natalie Cartwright RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF STATE... Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation through Causal Media 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0013 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT When an electromagnetic pulse travels through a dispersive material each frequency of the transmitted pulse changes in both

  20. Distributed Software-Attestation Defense against Sensor Worm Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Won Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are vulnerable to sensor worm attacks in which the attacker compromises a few nodes and makes these compromised nodes initiate worm spread over the network, targeting the worm infection of the whole nodes in the network. Several defense mechanisms have been proposed to prevent worm propagation in wireless sensor networks. Although these proposed schemes use software diversity technique for worm propagation prevention under the belief that different software versions do not have common vulnerability, they have fundamental drawback in which it is difficult to realize the aforementioned belief in sensor motes. To resolve this problem, we propose on-demand software-attestation based scheme to defend against worm propagation in sensor network. The main idea of our proposed scheme is to perform software attestations against sensor nodes in on-demand manner and detect the infected nodes by worm, resulting in worm propagation block in the network. Through analysis, we show that our proposed scheme defends against worm propagation in efficient and robust manner. Through simulation, we demonstrate that our proposed scheme stops worm propagation at the reasonable overhead while preventing a majority of sensor nodes from being infected by worm.

  1. Social Media Propagation of Content Promoting Risky Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mina; Sun, Yao; McLaughlin, Margaret L

    2017-05-01

    While social media have been found useful in providing social support and health information, they have also been home to content advocating risky health behavior. This study focused on how content defending and even celebrating anorexia as a lifestyle are circulated among social media users, and investigates the characteristics that promote wide propagation of such messages. We captured anorexia-related content on Tumblr, a popular blog for talking about eating disorders, during a one-month period. Among the 35,432 posts collected, we examined the most highly propagated posts and coded them for message characteristics. Our findings revealed that posts in which the source of a narrative ("testimony") was identified (was either from an anorexic poster or about another's anorexia) and which were positive toward the pro-anorexia perspective were more likely to be propagated on Tumblr. In addition, posts containing content that references an anorexic person and contains an affective tone were more likely to be propagated. We also found that underweight bodies and bodies with a high degree of exposure were associated with propagation of posts. The present study suggested practical implications by focusing on the characteristics of highly propagated but potentially harmful content in social media.

  2. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  3. Numerical Analysis on the Stability of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaobin Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation of dense spacing fracture network is crucial to the hydraulic fracturing treatment of unconventional reservoir. However, one difficulty for fracturing treatment is the lack of clear understanding on the nature of fracture complexity created during the treatment. In this paper, fracture propagation is numerically investigated to find the conditions needed for the stable propagation of complex fracture network. Firstly, starting from a parallel fracture system, the stability of fracture propagation is analyzed and a dimensionless number M is obtained. Then, by developing a hydraulic fracturing simulation model based on displacement discontinuity method, the propagation of parallel fractures is simulated and a clear relation between M and the stability of parallel fractures is obtained. Finally, the investigation on parallel fractures is extended to complex fracture networks. The propagation of complex fracture networks is simulated and the results show that the effects of M on complex fracture networks is the same to that of parallel fractures. The clear relation between M and fracture propagation stability is important for the optimization of hydraulic fracturing operation.

  4. ROLE OF THE INTERCALATED DISC IN CARDIAC PROPAGATION AND ARRHYTHMOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Georges Kleber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis review article discusses mechanisms underlying impulse propagation in cardiac muscle with specific emphasis on the role of the cardiac cell-to-cell junction, called the intercalated disc. The first part of this review deals with the role of gap junction channels, formed by connexin proteins, as a determinant of impulse propagation. It is shown that, depending on the underlying structure of the cellular network, decreasing the conductance of gap junction channels (so-called electrical uncoupling may either only slow, or additionally stabilize propagation and reverse unidirectional propagation block to bidirectional propagation. This is because the safety factor for propagation increases with decreasing intercellular electrical conductance. The role of heterogeneous connexin expression, which may be present in disease states, is also discussed. The hypothesis that so-called ephaptic impulse transmission plays a role in heart and can substitute for electrical coupling has been revived recently. Whereas ephaptic transmission can be demonstrated in theoretical simulations, direct experimental evidence has not yet been presented.The second part of this review deals with the interaction of three protein complexes at the intercalated disc: (1 desmosomal and adherers junction proteins, (2 ion channel proteins, and (3 gap junction channels consisting of connexins. Recent work has revealed multiple interactions between these three protein complexes which occur, at least in part, at the level of protein trafficking. Such interactions are likely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, and may reveal new therapeutic concepts and targets.

  5. Non-Linear Back-propagation: Doing Back-Propagation withoutDerivatives of the Activation Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, John; Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Lautrup, Benny

    1997-01-01

    The conventional linear back-propagation algorithm is replaced by a non-linear version, which avoids the necessity for calculating the derivative of the activation function. This may be exploited in hardware realizations of neural processors. In this paper we derive the non-linear back-propagatio......-propagation algorithms in the framework of recurrent back-propagation and present some numerical simulations of feed-forward networks on the NetTalk problem. A discussion of implementation in analog VLSI electronics concludes the paper.......The conventional linear back-propagation algorithm is replaced by a non-linear version, which avoids the necessity for calculating the derivative of the activation function. This may be exploited in hardware realizations of neural processors. In this paper we derive the non-linear back...

  6. Bubble propagation in Hele-Shaw channels with centred constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gómez, Andrés; Thompson, Alice B.; Hazel, Andrew L.; Juel, Anne

    2018-04-01

    We study the propagation of finite bubbles in a Hele-Shaw channel, where a centred occlusion (termed a rail) is introduced to provide a small axially uniform depth constriction. For bubbles wide enough to span the channel, the system’s behaviour is similar to that of semi-infinite fingers and a symmetric static solution is stable. Here, we focus on smaller bubbles, in which case the symmetric static solution is unstable and the static bubble is displaced towards one of the deeper regions of the channel on either side of the rail. Using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations of a depth-averaged model, we show that a bubble propagating axially due to a small imposed flow rate can be stabilised in a steady symmetric mode centred on the rail through a subtle interaction between stabilising viscous forces and destabilising surface tension forces. However, for sufficiently large capillary numbers Ca, the ratio of viscous to surface tension forces, viscous forces in turn become destabilising thus returning the bubble to an off-centred propagation regime. With decreasing bubble size, the range of Ca for which steady centred propagation is stable decreases, and eventually vanishes through the coalescence of two supercritical pitchfork bifurcations. The depth-averaged model is found to accurately predict all the steady modes of propagation observed experimentally, and provides a comprehensive picture of the underlying steady bifurcation structure. However, for sufficiently large imposed flow rates, we find that initially centred bubbles do not converge onto a steady mode of propagation. Instead they transiently explore weakly unstable steady modes, an evolution which results in their break-up and eventual settling into a steady propagating state of changed topology.

  7. Characteristics of frictional properties' relationship with afterslip propagation speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Matsuzawa, Toru; Burgmann, Roland; Hasegawa, Akira; Hino, Ryota; Hori, Takane

    2017-04-01

    The propagation speed of postseismic slip seems to vary from place to place. For the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake (M8), there was a time lag of about 80 minutes for the largest aftershock (M7.4) at about 40 km distance off Tokachi [Miyazaki and Larson, 2008 GRL] and of one year for the M7 earthquakes off Kushiro about 160 km away [Murakami et al., 2006 GRL]. If these aftershocks were triggered by ΔCFS increase in the passage of afterslip [Uchida et al., 2009 Gondwana Res], these time lags suggest that the propagation speed of the afterslip from the mainshock to the largest aftershock is significantly higher than to the M7 aftershocks off Kushiro. On the Sanriku-Haruka-Oki earthquakes, Matsuzawa et al. [2004 EPS] pointed out that propagation speed of the postseismic slip seems to be on the order of 10 km/day for the shallower part of the subduction plate boundary while it appears to be 10 km/month for the deeper part. These results indicate that the propagation speed of postseismic slip depends on frictional properties and effective normal stress in addition to slip velocity. To better understand the frictional properties controlling the propagation speed of postseismic slip, some numerical simulations of interplate earthquakes based on a rate- and state-dependent friction law (RSF) [Dieterich, 1979 JGR; Ruina, 1983 JGR] have been recently performed. These previous studies suggest the propagation speed of postseismic slip becomes lower in case of higher frictional stability, longer characteristic slip distance [Kato and Hirasawa, 1999 PAGEOPH], and higher effective normal stress [Ariyoshi et al., 2007 EPSL]. Since we do not quantitatively understand why such cases make the postseismic slip propagation slower, it is necessary to find an analytical relation between the frictional properties and the propagation speed of postseismic slip. In this study, we develop an expression for the propagation speed of postseismic slip as a function of frictional properties

  8. Radio Wave Propagation Scene Partitioning for High-Speed Rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio wave propagation scene partitioning is necessary for wireless channel modeling. As far as we know, there are no standards of scene partitioning for high-speed rail (HSR scenarios, and therefore we propose the radio wave propagation scene partitioning scheme for HSR scenarios in this paper. Based on our measurements along the Wuhan-Guangzhou HSR, Zhengzhou-Xian passenger-dedicated line, Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan passenger-dedicated line, and Beijing-Tianjin intercity line in China, whose operation speeds are above 300 km/h, and based on the investigations on Beijing South Railway Station, Zhengzhou Railway Station, Wuhan Railway Station, Changsha Railway Station, Xian North Railway Station, Shijiazhuang North Railway Station, Taiyuan Railway Station, and Tianjin Railway Station, we obtain an overview of HSR propagation channels and record many valuable measurement data for HSR scenarios. On the basis of these measurements and investigations, we partitioned the HSR scene into twelve scenarios. Further work on theoretical analysis based on radio wave propagation mechanisms, such as reflection and diffraction, may lead us to develop the standard of radio wave propagation scene partitioning for HSR. Our work can also be used as a basis for the wireless channel modeling and the selection of some key techniques for HSR systems.

  9. Dynamic Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion Rumor Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyong; Zhu, Linhe

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of the Internet, especially the emergence of the social networks, leads rumor propagation into a new media era. Rumor propagation in social networks has brought new challenges to network security and social stability. This paper, based on partial differential equations (PDEs), proposes a new SIS rumor propagation model by considering the effect of the communication between the different rumor infected users on rumor propagation. The stabilities of a nonrumor equilibrium point and a rumor-spreading equilibrium point are discussed by linearization technique and the upper and lower solutions method, and the existence of a traveling wave solution is established by the cross-iteration scheme accompanied by the technique of upper and lower solutions and Schauder’s fixed point theorem. Furthermore, we add the time delay to rumor propagation and deduce the conditions of Hopf bifurcation and stability switches for the rumor-spreading equilibrium point by taking the time delay as the bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results.

  10. Interactive Sound Propagation using Precomputation and Statistical Approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Lakulish

    Acoustic phenomena such as early reflections, diffraction, and reverberation have been shown to improve the user experience in interactive virtual environments and video games. These effects arise due to repeated interactions between sound waves and objects in the environment. In interactive applications, these effects must be simulated within a prescribed time budget. We present two complementary approaches for computing such acoustic effects in real time, with plausible variation in the sound field throughout the scene. The first approach, Precomputed Acoustic Radiance Transfer, precomputes a matrix that accounts for multiple acoustic interactions between all scene objects. The matrix is used at run time to provide sound propagation effects that vary smoothly as sources and listeners move. The second approach couples two techniques---Ambient Reverberance, and Aural Proxies---to provide approximate sound propagation effects in real time, based on only the portion of the environment immediately visible to the listener. These approaches lie at different ends of a space of interactive sound propagation techniques for modeling sound propagation effects in interactive applications. The first approach emphasizes accuracy by modeling acoustic interactions between all parts of the scene; the second approach emphasizes efficiency by only taking the local environment of the listener into account. These methods have been used to efficiently generate acoustic walkthroughs of architectural models. They have also been integrated into a modern game engine, and can enable realistic, interactive sound propagation on commodity desktop PCs.

  11. Beaconless operation for optimal laser beam propagation through turbulent atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Corruption of the wavefront, beam wondering and power density degradation at the receiving end are the effects typically observed at laser beam propagation through turbulent atmosphere. Compensation of these effects can be achieved if the reciprocal conditions for the propagating wave are satisfied along the propagation range. Practical realization of these conditions requires placing a localized beacon at the receiving end of the range and high-performance adaptive optics system (AOS). The key condition for an effective performance of AOS is a high value of the reciprocal component in the outgoing wave, since only this component is getting compensated after propagating turbulence perturbed path. The nonreciprocal components that is present in the wave directed toward the target is caused by three factors (detailed in this paper) that determine the partial restoration of the structure of the beacon beam. Thus solution of a complex problem of focusing the laser beam propagating through turbulent media can be achieved for the share of the outgoing wave that has a reciprocal component. This paper examines the ways and means that can be used in achieving the stated goal of effective laser power delivery on the distant image-resolved object.

  12. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, F; Joyner, R W; Moore, J W

    1975-04-01

    Described are studies of propagation of action potentials through inhomogenous axon regions through experiments performed on squid giant axons and by computer simulations. The initial speed of propagation of the action potential is dependent upon the stimulus waveform. For a rectangular pulse of current, the action potential travel initally at a high speed that declines over the distance, reaching a constant speed of propagation at about 1-5 resting length constants; this distance depends on the stimulus strength. additional experiments studied the effects of changing the axon diameter and of introducing a temperature step. It was found that the propagated action potential suffers profound modification in shape and velocity as it reaches the region of transition. In both cases, it was possible to obtain reflected action potentials. A region of increased effective diameter was produced experimentally in the squid giant axon by insertion of an axial wire as usually employed in voltage clamps. It was found that the action potential, at the axial wire tip region, undergoes shape changes similar to those obtained tn simulations of a region of increased diameter as in a junction with the axon and soma in motor neurons. It is conducluded that the gaint axon can be used to reproduce simple electrical behaviors in other structures.-Ramón, F., R. W. Joyner and J.W. Moore. Propagation of action potentials in inhomogeneous axon regions.

  13. Infrasound propagation in tropospheric ducts and acoustic shadow zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine D

    2017-10-01

    Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations governing acoustic propagation are performed to investigate infrasound propagation in the troposphere and into acoustic shadow zones. An existing nonlinear finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) solver that constrains input sound speed models to be axisymmetric is expanded to allow for advection and rigid, stair-step topography. The FDTD solver permits realistic computations along a given azimuth. It is applied to several environmental models to examine the effects of nonlinearity, topography, advection, and two-dimensional (2D) variations in wind and sound speeds on the penetration of infrasound into shadow zones. Synthesized waveforms are compared to a recording of a rocket motor fuel elimination event at the Utah Test and Training Range. Results show good agreement in the amplitude, duration, and spectra of synthesized and recorded waveforms for propagation through 2D atmospheric models whether or not topography, advection, or nonlinearity is explicitly included. However, infrasound propagation through a one-dimensional, range-averaged, atmospheric model yields waveforms with lower amplitudes and frequencies, suggesting that small-scale atmospheric variability causes significant scatter within the troposphere, leading to enhanced infrasound penetration into shadow zones. Thus, unresolved fine-scale atmospheric dynamics are not required to explain infrasound propagation into shadow zones.

  14. Convective Propagation Characteristics Using a Simple Representation of Convective Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, R. B.; Mapes, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    Observed equatorial wave propagation is intimately linked to convective organization and it's coupling to features of the larger-scale flow. In this talk we a use simple 4 level model to accommodate vertical modes of a mass flux convection scheme (shallow, mid-level and deep). Two paradigms of convection are used to represent convective processes. One that has only both random (unorganized) diagnosed fluctuations of convective properties and one with organized fluctuations of convective properties that are amplified by previously existing convection and has an explicit moistening impact on the local convecting environment We show a series of model simulations in single-column, 2D and 3D configurations, where the role of convective organization in wave propagation is shown to be fundamental. For the optimal choice of parameters linking organization to local atmospheric state, a broad array of convective wave propagation emerges. Interestingly the key characteristics of propagating modes are the low-level moistening followed by deep convection followed by mature 'large-scale' heating. This organization structure appears to hold firm across timescales from 5-day wave disturbances to MJO-like wave propagation.

  15. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrP(Sc) is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrP(Sc). Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrP(Sc) propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functional role for PrPSc propagation remained undetermined. In our recent in vitro PrP conversion study, we showed that plasminogen substantially stimulates PrP(Sc) propagation in a concentration-dependent manner by accelerating the rate of PrP(Sc) generation, while depletion of plasminogen, destabilization of its structure, and interference with the PrP-plasminogen interaction hinder PrP(Sc) propagation. Further investigation in cell culture models confirmed an increase of PrP(Sc) formation by plasminogen. Although molecular basis of the observed activity for plasminogen remain to be addressed, our results demonstrate that plasminogen is the first cellular protein auxiliary factor proven to stimulate PrP(Sc) propagation.

  16. Propagation of an Airy beam through the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoling; Eyyuboğlu, Halil T; Ji, Guangming; Jia, Xinhong

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, the effect of thermal blooming of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere is examined, and the effect of atmospheric turbulence is not considered. The changes of the intensity distribution, the centroid position and the mean-squared beam width of an Airy beam propagating through the atmosphere are studied by using the four-dimensional (4D) computer code of the time-dependent propagation of Airy beams through the atmosphere. It is shown that an Airy beam can't retain its shape and the structure when the Airy beam propagates through the atmosphere due to thermal blooming except for the short propagation distance, or the short time, or the low beam power. The thermal blooming results in a central dip of the center lobe, and causes the center lobe to spread and decrease. In contrast with the center lobe, the side lobes are less affected by thermal blooming, such that the intensity maximum of the side lobe may be larger than that of the center lobe. However, the cross wind can reduce the effect of thermal blooming. When there exists the cross wind velocity vx in x direction, the dependence of centroid position in x direction on vx is not monotonic, and there exists a minimum, but the centroid position in y direction is nearly independent of vx.

  17. A study on in vitro propagation of Castanopsis argentea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD IMAM SURYA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Surya MI, Kurnita NI, Setyaningsih L, Ismaini L, Muttaqin Z. 2016. A study on in vitro propagation of Castanopsis argentea. Pros Sem Nas Masy Biodiv Indon 2: 10-15. Saninten (Castanopsis argentea is a keystone species that has highly potential as a food material. Mostly, the fruits of C. argentea are eaten by animals. It made us difficults to get the natural regeneration. In vitro propagation is an effort to produce considerable amounts of C. argentea. However, the information about in vitro propagation of C. argentea is still very limited. This study was aimed to determine the initiation methods to propagate C. argentea by in vitro propagation. Two methods of sterilization were used to sterilize the explant of seed and buds. Moreover, the explant was planted on modified MS and WPM. The results show that percentage of survival, number of buds and time of germination were found on seed explants sterilized by first method. The number of callus were found on bud explants sterilized by second method. Furthermore, planting media were not affected to the germination of seed explants, but affected to growth of bud explants.

  18. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu; Namikawa, Tomikazu; Mori, Kazuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of hydromagnetic waves in a magnetic plasma are investigated using the two-plasma fluid equations including the effect of lower-hybrid waves propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves is analysed in terms of phase speed, growth rate, refractive index, polarization and the amplitude relation between the density perturbation and the magnetic-field perturbation for the cases when hydromagnetic waves propagate in the plane whose normal is perpendicular to both the magnetic field and the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves and in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. It is shown that hydromagnetic waves propagating at small angles to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves can be excited by the effect of lower-hybrid waves and the energy of excited waves propagates nearly parallel to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. (author)

  19. Propagation of Threatened Nepenthes khasiana: Methods and Precautions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibankumar S. KHURAIJAM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ex-situ conservation is an important key in the management of rare, endangered and threatened (RET plant species and its effectiveness depends on several factors. Maintenance of viable germplasm and its subsequent propagation plays an important role in long term conservation of many RET species. Nepenthes khasiana is a rare and gravely threatened species in the wild due to over-collection and other threats. The species needs urgent in-situ and ex-situ conservation. Development of easy to propagate techniques would pave faster multiplication for its use of educational, medicinal and horticultural purpose. In the present paper, successful propagation technique of Nepenthes khasiana through seeds is demonstrated along with detailed information on precautions to be taken during the adoption of the techniques.

  20. Nanoscale thermoelectrical detection of magnetic domain wall propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Wells, James; Fernández Scarioni, Alexander; Soban, Zbynek; Janda, Tomas; Hu, Xiukun; Saidl, Vit; Campion, Richard P.; Mansell, Rhodri; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cowburn, Russell P.; Nemec, Petr; Kazakova, Olga; Wunderlich, Joerg; Schumacher, Hans Werner

    2017-06-01

    In magnetic nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) magnetic domain walls (DWs) are narrow and can move rapidly driven by current induced torques. This enables important applications like high-density memories for which the precise detection of the position and motion of a propagating DW is of utmost interest. Today's DW detection tools are often limited in resolution, require complex instrumentation, or can only be applied on specific materials. Here we show that the anomalous Nernst effect provides a simple and powerful tool to precisely track the position and motion of a single DW propagating in a PMA nanowire. We detect field and current driven DW propagation in both metallic heterostructures and dilute magnetic semiconductors over a broad temperature range. The demonstrated spatial accuracy below 20 nm is comparable to the DW width in typical metallic PMA systems.