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Sample records for angle dependent correction

  1. Determination of light output function and angle dependent correction for a stilbene crystal scintillation neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, W. E-mail: hansen@metrs1.mw.tu-dresden.de; Richter, D

    2002-01-01

    In addition to liquid NE213 scintillators also stilbene solid crystals are applied traditionally for fast neutron spectrometry. A proper evaluation of experimental data provides a precise determination of the nonlinear light output function for the given scintillator/photomultiplier combination, and for stilbene additionally an adequate correction of the anisotropy effect. Calibration experiments with monoenergetic neutrons (1.2, 2.5, 5.0, 13.95, 14.8, 19.0 MeV) and various neutron incidence angles were carried out at the accelerator facility of the PTB Braunschweig for two cylindrical scintillators (diameter 30 mm x 25 mm, diameter 10 mm x 10 mm). An improved analytic light output function as well as an adequate angle dependent correction function were derived.

  2. Off-Angle Iris Correction Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Thompson, Joseph T [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    In many real world iris recognition systems obtaining consistent frontal images is problematic do to inexperienced or uncooperative users, untrained operators, or distracting environments. As a result many collected images are unusable by modern iris matchers. In this chapter we present four methods for correcting off-angle iris images to appear frontal which makes them compatible with existing iris matchers. The methods include an affine correction, a retraced model of the human eye, measured displacements, and a genetic algorithm optimized correction. The affine correction represents a simple way to create an iris image that appears frontal but it does not account for refractive distortions of the cornea. The other method account for refraction. The retraced model simulates the optical properties of the cornea. The other two methods are data driven. The first uses optical flow to measure the displacements of the iris texture when compared to frontal images of the same subject. The second uses a genetic algorithm to learn a mapping that optimizes the Hamming Distance scores between off-angle and frontal images. In this paper we hypothesize that the biological model presented in our earlier work does not adequately account for all variations in eye anatomy and therefore the two data-driven approaches should yield better performance. Results are presented using the commercial VeriEye matcher that show that the genetic algorithm method clearly improves over prior work and makes iris recognition possible up to 50 degrees off-angle.

  3. Angle Class II correction with MARA appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Chiqueto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects produced by the MARA appliance in the treatment of Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion. METHODS: The sample consisted of 44 young patients divided into two groups: The MARA Group, with initial mean age of 11.99 years, treated with the MARA appliance for an average period of 1.11 years, and the Control Group, with initial mean age of 11.63 years, monitored for a mean period of 1.18 years with no treatment. Lateral cephalograms were used to compare the groups using cephalometric variables in the initial and final phases. For these comparisons, Student's t test was employed. RESULTS: MARA appliance produced the following effects: Maxillary growth restriction, no change in mandibular development, improvement in maxillomandibular relationship, increased lower anterior facial height and counterclockwise rotation of the functional occlusal plane. In the upper arch, the incisors moved lingually and retruded, while the molars moved distally and tipped distally. In the lower arch, the incisors proclined and protruded, whereas the molars mesialized and tipped mesially. Finally, there was a significant reduction in overbite and overjet, with an obvious improvement in molar relationship. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the MARA appliance proved effective in correcting Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion while inducing skeletal changes and particularly dental changes.OBJETIVO: avaliar os efeitos proporcionados pelo aparelho MARA no tratamento da má oclusão de Classe II, 1ª divisão. MÉTODOS: utilizou-se uma amostra de 44 jovens, divididos em dois grupos - Grupo MARA, com idade inicial média de 11,99 anos e tratado com o aparelho MARA por um período médio de 1,11 ano; e Grupo Controle, com idade inicial média de 11,63 ano e observado por um período médio de 1,18 ano, sem nenhum tratamento. Utilizou-se as telerradiografias em norma lateral para comparar os grupos quanto às variáveis cefalométricas das

  4. Symmetry constraints for the emission angle dependence of HBT radii

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W; Lisa, M A; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2002-01-01

    We discuss symmetry constraints on the azimuthal oscillations of two-particle correlation (Hanbury Brown--Twiss interferometry) radii for non-central collisions between equal spherical nuclei. We also propose a new method for correcting in a model-independent way the emission angle dependent correlation function for finite event plane resolution and angular binning effects.

  5. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  6. Off-Angle Iris Correction using a Biological Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Joseph T [ORNL; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Barstow, Del R [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This work implements an eye model to simulate corneal refraction effects. Using this model, ray tracing is performed to calculate transforms to remove refractive effects in off-angle iris images when reprojected to a frontal view. The correction process is used as a preprocessing step for off-angle iris images for input to a commercial matcher. With this method, a match score distribution mean improvement of 11.65% for 30 degree images, 44.94% for 40 degree images, and 146.1% improvement for 50 degree images is observed versus match score distributions with unmodi ed images.

  7. Off-Angle Iris Correction using a Biological Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Barstow, Del R [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    This work implements an eye model to simulate corneal refraction effects. Using this model, ray tracing is performed to calculate transforms to remove refractive effects in off-angle iris images when reprojected to a frontal view. The correction process is used as a preprocessing step for off-angle iris images for input to a commercial matcher. With this method, a match score distribution mean improvement of 11.65% for 30 degree images, 44.94% for 40 degree images, and 146.1% improvement for 50 degree images is observed versus match score distributions with unmodified images.

  8. View angle dependence of cloud optical thicknesses retrieved by MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether cloud inhomogeneity influences the view angle dependence of MODIS cloud optical thickness (tau) retrieval results. The degree of cloud inhomogeneity is characterized through the local gradient in 11 microns brightness temperature. The analysis of liquid phase clouds in a one year long global dataset of Collection 4 MODIS data reveals that while optical thickness retrievals give remarkably consistent results for all view directions if clouds are homogeneous, they give much higher tau-values for oblique views than for overhead views if clouds are inhomogeneous and the sun is fairly oblique. For solar zenith angles larger than 55deg, the mean optical thickness retrieved for the most inhomogeneous third of cloudy pixels is more than 30% higher for oblique views than for overhead views. After considering a variety of possible scenarios, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in three-dimensional radiative interactions that are not considered in current, one-dimensional retrieval algorithms. Namely, the radiative effect of cloud sides viewed at oblique angles seems to contribute most to the enhanced tau-values. The results presented here will help understand cloud retrieval uncertainties related to cloud inhomogeneity. They complement the uncertainty estimates that will start accompanying MODIS cloud products in Collection 5 and may eventually help correct for the observed view angle dependent biases.

  9. [Correction Multiplicative Effects in Raman Spectra through Vector Angle Transformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-xiang; Sun, Zeng-qiang; Su, Hui; Yuan, Hong-fu

    2016-02-01

    obtained at different Raman integral times and have remarkable multiplicative effects. In predicting results, the correlation coefficient (r) and the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) from class PLS respectively are 0.911 9 and 0.110 2, and 0.906 0 and 0.100 8 are for the preprocessing by multiplicative scatter correction (MSC). In contrast, r and RMSEP under the VAPLS, presented by this thesis, respectively are 0.998 7 and 0.015 2 and are significantly better than others. The VAPLS has eliminated the multiplicative effects of Raman spectra and improved the accuracy of Raman quantitative analysis and it owes to the preprocessing of the vector angle transformation.

  10. Bicycle helmet ventilation and comfort angle dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühwiler, Paul A; Ducas, Charline; Huber, Roman; Bishop, Phillip A

    2004-09-01

    Five modern bicycle helmets were studied to elucidate some of the variations in ventilation performance, using both a heated manikin headform and human subjects (n = 7). Wind speed and head angle were varied to test their influence on the measured steady-state heat exchange (cooling power) in the skull section of the headform. The cooling power transmitted by the helmets varied from about 60% to over 90% of that of the nude headform, illustrating the range of present manufacturer designs. Angling the head forward by 30 degrees was found to provide better cooling power to the skull (up to 25%) for three of the helmets and almost equal cooling power in the remaining two cases. Comparisons of skull ventilation at these angles with human subjects strongly supported the headform results.

  11. Two-Photon-Exchange Correction to Elastic ep Scattering in the Forward Angle Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-Qing

    2009-01-01

    The two-photon-exchange (TPE) correction to elastic ep ecattering in the forward angle region is discussed based on a simple hadronic model.It is found that the correction is exactly zero in the forward angle limit.This analytical result gives a good explanation of the previous numerical results and shows the clear power behavior of the TPE correction to elastic ep scattering in the forward angle region.

  12. Capillary rise with velocity-dependent dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Ralston, J; Sedev, R

    2008-11-04

    The classic description of the rate of capillary rise given by the Washburn equation, which assumes that the contact angle preserves the equilibrium value at all times, has been recently questioned in the light of the known experimental dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the velocity of the contact line. For a number of such proposed functions of velocity for the dynamic contact angle, we analyze the resulting dependences of the contact angle and of the time of rise, respectively, on the height of the capillary rise. By applying our results to the particular cases of a high-viscosity silicone oil and water, respectively, in a glass capillary, we show that, in general, strong similarities arise between the various approaches and the classic theory in what concerns the time dependence of the capillary rise, which explains the lack of consistent experimental evidence for deviations in the rate of capillary rise from the Washburn equation. However, for a strong dependency of the contact angle on the velocity in the range of small velocities, as in the case of water on glass, one of the models predicts significant deviations even for the time dependence of the capillary rise. Moreover, our results show that the time or height dependence of the contact angle during the capillary rise can clearly discriminate between the various models.

  13. Drop Size Dependence of the Contact Angle of Nanodroplets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-Kai; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The contact angle of nanosized non-polarized argon sessile droplets on a solid substrate is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations.It is found that the drop size dependence of the contact angle is sensitive to the interaction between the liquid molecules and solid molecules.The contact angle decreases with the decreasing drop size for larger interaction between the liquid molecules and the solid substrate, and vice versa.This observation is consistent with most of the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  14. Angle dependence of Andreev scattering at semiconductor-superconductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1999-01-01

    We study the angle dependence of the Andreev scattering at a semiconductor-superconductor interface, generalizing the one-dimensional theory of Blonder, Tinkham, and Klapwijk (BTK),An increase of the momentum parallel to the interface leads to suppression of the probability of Andreev reflection...

  15. Method for Correcting Control Surface Angle Measurements in Single Viewpoint Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, Alpheus W. (Inventor); Barrows, Danny A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of determining a corrected control surface angle for use in single viewpoint photogrammetry to correct control surface angle measurements affected by wing bending. First and second visual targets are spaced apart &om one another on a control surface of an aircraft wing. The targets are positioned at a semispan distance along the aircraft wing. A reference target separation distance is determined using single viewpoint photogrammetry for a "wind off condition. An apparent target separation distance is then computed for "wind on." The difference between the reference and apparent target separation distances is minimized by recomputing the single viewpoint photogrammetric solution for incrementally changed values of target semispan distances. A final single viewpoint photogrammetric solution is then generated that uses the corrected semispan distance that produced the minimized difference between the reference and apparent target separation distances. The final single viewpoint photogrammetric solution set is used to determine the corrected control surface angle.

  16. The changes of the interspace angle after anterior correction and instrumentation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Qi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic scoliosis patients, after anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, the discs (interspace angle between the lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV and the next caudal vertebra became more wedged. We reviewed these patients and analyzed the changes of the angle. Methods By reviewing the medical records and roentgenograms of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients underwent anterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, Cobb angle of the curve, correction rate, coronal balance, LIV rotation, interspace angle were measured and analyzed. Results There were total 30 patients included. The mean coronal Cobb angle of the main curve (thoracolumbar/lumbar curve before and after surgery were 48.9° and 11.7°, respectively, with an average correction rate of 76.1%. The average rotation of LIV before surgery was 2.1 degree, and was improved to 1.2 degree after surgery. The interspace angle before surgery, on convex side-bending films, after surgery, at final follow up were 3.2°, -2.3°, 1.8° and 4.9°, respectively. The difference between the interspace angle after surgery and that preoperatively was not significant (P = 0.261, while the interspace angle at final follow-up became larger than that after surgery, and the difference was significant(P = 0.012. The interspace angle after surgery was correlated with that on convex side-bending films (r = 0.418, P = 0.022, and the interspace angle at final follow-up was correlated with that after surgery (r = 0.625, P = 0.000. There was significant correlation between the loss of the interspace angle and the loss of coronal Cobb angle of the main curve during follow-up(r = 0.483, P = 0.007. Conclusion The interspace angle could be improved after anterior correction and instrumentation surgery, but it became larger during follow-up. The loss of the interspace angle was correlated with the loss of coronal Cobb angle of the main curve during follow-up.

  17. XFEL OSCILLATOR SIMULATION INCLUDING ANGLE-DEPENDENT CRYSTAL REFLECTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawley, William; Lindberg, Ryan; Kim, K-J; Shvyd' ko, Yuri

    2010-08-23

    The oscillator package within the GINGER FEL simulation code has now been extended to include angle-dependent reflectivity properties of Bragg crystals. Previously, the package was modified to include frequencydependent reflectivity in order to model x-ray FEL oscillators from start-up from shot noise through to saturation. We present a summary of the algorithms used for modeling the crystal reflectivity and radiation propagation outside the undulator, discussing various numerical issues relevant to the domain of high Fresnel number and efficient Hankel transforms. We give some sample XFEL-O simulation results obtained with the angle-dependent reflectivity model, with particular attention directed to the longitudinal and transverse coherence of the radiation output.

  18. Numerical method for angle-of-incidence correction factors for diffuse radiation incident photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill

    2017-05-01

    A numerical method is provided for solving the integral equation for the angle-of-incidence (AOI) correction factor for diffuse radiation incident photovoltaic (PV) modules. The types of diffuse radiation considered include sky, circumsolar, horizon, and ground-reflected. The method permits PV module AOI characteristics to be addressed when calculating AOI losses associated with diffuse radiation. Pseudo code is provided to aid users in the implementation, and results are shown for PV modules with tilt angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. Diffuse AOI losses are greatest for small PV module tilt angles. Including AOI losses associated with the diffuse irradiance will improve predictions of PV system performance.

  19. Coulomb Correction to the Screening Angle of the Moliere Multiple Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tarasov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb correction to the screening angular parameter of the Moliere multiple scattering theory is found. Numerical calculations are presented in the range of nuclear charge from Z=4 to Z=82. Comparison with the approximate Moliere result for the screening angle reveals up to 30% deviation from it for sufficiently heavy elements of the target material.

  20. Response versus scan-angle corrections for MODIS reflective solar bands using deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Rajendra; Angal, Amit; Doelling, David R.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng; Haney, Conor O.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Gopalan, Arun

    2016-05-01

    The absolute radiometric calibration of the reflective solar bands (RSBs) of Aqua- and Terra-MODIS is performed using on-board calibrators. A solar diffuser (SD) panel along with a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system, which tracks the degradation of the SD over time, provides the baseline for calibrating the MODIS sensors. MODIS also views the moon and deep space through its space view (SV) port for lunar-based calibration and computing the background, respectively. The MODIS instrument views the Earth's surface using a two-sided scan mirror, whose reflectance is a function of the angle of incidence (AOI) and is described by response versus scan-angle (RVS). The RVS for both MODIS instruments was characterized prior to launch. MODIS also views the SD and the moon at two different AOIs. There is sufficient evidence that the RVS is changing on orbit over time and as a function of wavelength. The SD and lunar observation scans can only track the RVS variation at two AOIs. Consequently, the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) developed enhanced approaches that supplement the onboard calibrator measurements with responses from the pseudo-invariant desert sites. This approach has been implemented in Level 1B (L1B) Collection 6 (C6) for select short-wavelength bands. This paper presents an alternative approach of characterizing the mirror RVS to derive the time-dependent RVS correction factors for MODIS RSBs using tropical deep convective cloud (DCC) targets. An initial assessment of the DCC response from Aqua-MODIS band 1 C6 data indicates evidence of RVS artifacts, which are not uniform across the scans and are more prevalent at the beginning of the earth-view scan.

  1. Active correction of the tilt angle of the surface plane with respect to the rotation axis during azimuthal scan

    CERN Document Server

    Sereno, M; Debiossac, M; Kalashnyk, N; Roncin, P

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to measure the residual tilt angle $\\tau$ between a flat surface and the azimuthal rotation axis of the sample holder is described. When the incidence angle $\\theta$ and readout of the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ are controlled by motors, an active compensation mechanism can be implemented to reduce the effect of the tilt angle during azimuthal motion. After this correction, the effective angle of incidence is kept fixed, and only the small residual oscillation of the scattering plane remains.

  2. Position error correction in absolute surface measurement based on a multi-angle averaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibo; Wu, Biwei; Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Jian; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-04-01

    We present a method for position error correction in absolute surface measurement based on a multi-angle averaging method. Differences in shear rotation measurements at overlapping areas can be used to estimate the unknown relative position errors of the measurements. The model and the solving of the estimation algorithm have been discussed in detail. The estimation algorithm adopts a least-squares technique to eliminate azimuthal errors caused by rotation inaccuracy. The cost functions can be minimized to determine the true values of the unknowns of Zernike polynomial coefficients and rotation angle. Experimental results show the validity of the method proposed.

  3. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  4. Contact angle dependence of the resonant properties of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre sessile drops of glycerol/water mixtures with glycerol compositions ranging from 0% to 75%. A photodiode was used to detect time dependent variations in the intensity of laser light reflected from the droplets. The intensity variations were Fourier transformed to obtain information about the resonant properties of the drops (frequency and width of the resonance). These experiments were performed on a range of different substrates where the contact angle formed by the droplets varied between 38±2^o and 160±4^o. The measured resonant frequency values were found to be in agreement with a recently developed theory of vibrations which considers standing wave states along the profile length of the droplet. The widths of the resonances were also compared with theories which predict the influence of substrate effects, surface contamination effects and bulk viscous effects on the damping of capillary waves at the free surface of the droplets. These experiments indicate that the dominant source of damping in sessile liquid droplet is due to bulk viscous effects but that for small contact angles damping due to the droplet/substrate interaction becomes more important.

  5. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  6. The solar zenith angle dependence of desert albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2005-03-01

    Most land models assume that the bare soil albedo is a function of soil color and moisture but independent of solar zenith angle (SZA). However, analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and albedo data over thirty desert locations indicate that bare soil albedo does vary with SZA. This is further confirmed using the in situ data. In particular, bare soil albedo normalized by its value at 60° SZA can be adequately represented by a one-parameter formulation (1 + C)/(1 + 2C * cos(SZA)) or a two-parameter formulation (1 + B1 * f1(SZA) + B2 * f2(SZA)). Using the MODIS and in situ data, the empirical parameters C, B1, and B2 are taken as 0.15, 0.346 and 0.063. The SZA dependence of soil albedo is also found to significantly affect the modeling of land surface energy balance over a desert site.

  7. Solute concentration-dependent contact angle hysteresis and evaporation stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-07-08

    The presence of nonvolatile solutes in a liquid drop on a solid surface can affect the wetting properties. Depending on the surface-activity of the solutes, the extent of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can vary with their concentration and the pattern of the evaporation stain is altered accordingly. In this work, four types of concentration-dependent CAH and evaporation stains are identified for a water drop containing polymeric additives on polycarbonate. For polymers without surface-activity such as dextran, advancing and receding contact angles (θa and θr) are independent of solute concentrations, and a concentrated stain is observed in the vicinity of the drop center after complete evaporation. For polymers with weak surface-activity such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), both θa and θr are decreased by solute addition, and the stain pattern varies with increasing PEG concentration, including a concentrated stain and a mountain-like island. For polymers with intermediate surface-activity such as sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS), θa descends slightly, but θr decreases significantly after the addition of a substantial amount of NaPSS, and a ring-like stain pattern is observed. Moreover, the size of the ring stain can be controlled by NaPSS concentration. For polymers with strong surface-activity such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), θa remains essentially a constant, but θr is significantly lowered after the addition of a small amount of PVP, and the typical ring-like stain is seen.

  8. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  9. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-09-01

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10-3, due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  10. Electroweak two-loop corrections to the effective weak mixing angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awramik, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Czakon, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik]|[Silesia Univ., Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Field Theory and Particle Physics; Freitas, A. [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2006-08-15

    Recently exact results for the complete electroweak two-loop contributions to the effective weak mixing angle were published. This paper illustrates the techniques used for this computation, in particular the methods for evaluating the loop diagrams and the proper definition of Z-pole observables at next-to-next -to-leading order. Numerical results are presented in terms of simple parametrization formulae and compared in detail with a previous result of an expansion up to next-to-leading order in the top-quark mass. Finally, an estimate of the remaining theoretical uncertainties from unknown higher-order corrections is given. (Orig.)

  11. NEAs: Phase Angle Dependence of Asteroid Class and Diameter from Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Jehin, Emmanuel; Howell, Ellen S.; Nolan, Michael C.; Ryan, Erin; Fernandez, Yan; Harker, David; Reddy, Vishnu; Benner, Lance AM; Lovell, Amy; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Kerr, Tom; Woodward, Charles

    2015-08-01

    We will discuss the results of a planned observation campaign of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), 1999 CU3, 2002 GM2, 2002 FG7, and 3691 Bede with instruments on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) from 15-Mar-2015 to 28-April 2015 UT. We will study the phase-angle dependence of the reflectance and thermal emission spectra. Recent publications reveal that the assignment of the asteroid class from visible and near-IR spectroscopy can change with phase angle for NEAs with silicate-bearing minerals on their surfaces (S-class asteroids) (Thomas et al. 2014, Icarus 228, 217; Sanchez et al. 2012 Icarus 220, 36). Only three of the larger NEAs have been measured at a dozen phase angles and the trends are not all the same, so there is not yet enough information to create a phase-angle correction. Also, the phase angle effect is not characterized well for the thermal emission including determination of the albedo and the thermal emission. The few NEAs were selected for our study amongst many possible targets based on being able to observe them through a wide range of phase angles, ranging from less than about 10 degrees to greater than 45 degrees over the constrained date range. The orbits of NEAs often generate short observing windows at phase angles higher than 45 deg (i.e., whizzing by Earth and/or close to dawn or dusk). Ultimately, lowering the uncertainty of the translation of asteroid class to meteorite analog and of albedo and size determinations are amongst our science goals. On a few specific nights, we plan to observe the 0.75-2.5 micron spectra with IRTF+SpeX for comparison with UKIRT data including 5-20 micron with UKIRT+UIST/Michelle to determine as best as possible the albedos. To ensure correct phasing of spectroscopic data, we augment with TRAPPIST-telescope light curves and R-band guider image data. Our observations will contribute to understanding single epoch mid-IR and near-IR measurements to obtain albedo, size and IR beaming parameters (the

  12. NEAs: Phase Angle Dependence of Asteroid Class and Diameter from Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Bus, Schlete; Tokunaga, Alan; Jehin, Emmanuel; Howell, Ellen S.; Nolan, Michael C.; Ryan, Erin; Fernandez, Yan; Harker, David; Benner, Lance A.; Lovell, Amy; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Kerr, Tom; Woodward, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We will discuss the results of a planned observation campaign of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs), 1999 CU3, 2002 GM2, 2002 FG7, and 3691 Bede with instruments on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) from 15-Mar-2015 to 28-April 2015 UT. We will study the phase-angle dependence of the reflectance and thermal emission spectra. Recent publications reveal that the assignment of the asteroid class from visible and near-IR spectroscopy can change with phase angle for NEAs with silicate-bearing minerals on their surfaces (S-class asteroids) (Thomas et al. 2014, Icarus 228, 217; Sanchez et al. 2012 Icarus 220, 36). Only three of the larger NEAs have been measured at a dozen phase angles and the trends are not all the same, so there is not yet enough information to create a phase-angle correction. Also, the phase angle effect is not characterized well for the thermal emission including determination of the albedo and the thermal emission. The few NEAs were selected for our study amongst many possible targets based on being able to observe them through a wide range of phase angles, ranging from less than about 10 degrees to greater than 45 degrees over the constrained date range. The orbits of NEAs often generate short observing windows at phase angles higher than 45 deg (i.e., whizzing by Earth and/or close to dawn or dusk). Ultimately, lowering the uncertainty of the translation of asteroid class to meteorite analog and of albedo and size determinations are amongst our science goals. On a few specific nights, we plan to observe the 0.75-2.5 micron spectra with IRTF+SpeX for comparison with UKIRT data including 5-20 micron with UKIRT+UIST/Michelle to determine as best as possible the albedos. To ensure correct phasing of spectroscopic data, we augment with TRAPPIST-telescope light curves and R-band guider image data. Our observations will contribute to understanding single epoch mid-IR and near-IR measurements to obtain albedo, size and IR beaming parameters (the

  13. Bias-corrected estimation of stable tail dependence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beirlant, Jan; Escobar-Bach, Mikael; Goegebeur, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    We consider the estimation of the stable tail dependence function. We propose a bias-corrected estimator and we establish its asymptotic behaviour under suitable assumptions. The finite sample performance of the proposed estimator is evaluated by means of an extensive simulation study where...

  14. Design of a structure with low incident and viewing angle dependence inspired by Morpho butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Gu, Jiajun; Liu, Qinglei; Deng, Tao; Zhang, Di; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Morpho butterflies are well known for their brilliant iridescent colors, which arise from periodic arrays of scales. These brilliant colors have a low angle dependence, in contrast to similar phenomena that are commonly caused by the periodic structures. We designed a structure with a low incident and viewing angle dependence inspired by Morpho butterflies. This structure was studied using the finite-difference time-domain method. The lamellae distribution of tree-like structure was found to be the determining factor for producing a low incident angle dependence. Two advanced models were designed to produce a low viewing angle dependence. Model I was constructed using two layers of scales. The particle swarm optimization algorithm was used to construct Model II. The angle dependence of Model II exhibited a large viewing angle range under various incident angles. PMID:24305852

  15. Dynamic behavior of polymer surface and the time dependence of contact angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinping; CHEN Zhifang; SHEN Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Time-dependent contact angles were measured by depositing sessile drops of water on the polymer surfaces and monitoring the drop shape as a function of time. It was found that contact angles decreased sharply with contact time and the equilibrium contact angle was finally attained after a certain time. Values of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe) obtained by the sessile drop method depend on polymer properties. The Wilhelmy plate technique was used to measure advancing and receding contact angles. The variations of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe), advancing (θa) and receding contact angles (θr) have been studied on the oxidized surface of polymers containing polybutadiene block to explore the cause of time-dependence in contact angle measurement and the meaning of θs and θe. The results showed the linear relationships between starting (θs) and advancing contact angles (θa), the equilibrium (θe) and receding contact angles (θr). The similar relationship was also established between the contact angle hysteresis (θa-θr) and differences (θs-θe) in starting contact angles and equilibrium contact angles. Therefore, time-dependence in contact angle measurement was mainly attributed to the surface reconstruction when water drops were deposited on polymer surfaces. The starting contact angle was contributed by the hydrophobic component on polymer surface and the equilibrium contact angle mainly by the hydrophilic component of polymer. These results not only demonstrated the interdependency between two contact angle measurements, the sessile drop method and the Wilhelmy plate technique, but also provided the experimental evidence to explain the cause of time-dependent contact angle. This may also provide a new method to study dynamic behavior of polymer surface.

  16. Empirical angle-dependent Biot and MBA models for acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Il; Hughes, E R; Humphrey, V F; Leighton, T G; Choi, Min Joo

    2007-01-01

    The Biot and the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) models have been found useful to understand ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone. However, neither of the models, as previously applied to cancellous bone, allows for the angular dependence of acoustic properties with direction. The present study aims to account for the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone, by introducing empirical angle-dependent input parameters, as defined for a highly oriented structure, into the Biot and the MBA models. The anisotropy of the angle-dependent Biot model is attributed to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment. The angle-dependent MBA model employs a simple empirical way of using the parametric fit for the fast and the slow wave speeds. The angle-dependent models were used to predict both the fast and slow wave velocities as a function of propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone. The predictions were compared with those of the Schoenberg model for anisotropy in cancellous bone and in vitro experimental measurements from the literature. The angle-dependent models successfully predicted the angular dependence of phase velocity of the fast wave with direction. The root-mean-square errors of the measured versus predicted fast wave velocities were 79.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 36.1 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). They also predicted the fact that the slow wave is nearly independent of propagation angle for angles about 50 degrees , but consistently underestimated the slow wave velocity with the root-mean-square errors of 187.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 240.8 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). The study indicates that the angle-dependent models reasonably replicate the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

  17. Identifying microproduction inaccuracies with Knudsen number depending correction functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, R.; Gomez, J.

    2016-11-01

    The pressure drop of a transonic Laval nozzle depends on the rarefaction of the gas flow. So relative deviations of the numerical data are a measure for describing the influence of the rarefaction of the gas flow. This deviation is predicted by using a second-order modeling approximation for the Knudsen number depending correction function in the slip-flow regime. The production accuracy is able to be read in these deviation functions because of a deviation from the analytical solutions of the slip-flow influence. With the usage of experimental data the correction function can be calibrated through elimination of the error resulting from the accuracy. The investigated case is a micronozzle flow with Knudsen numbers of slip-flow regime near the nozzle throat in vacuum environment. Compared gases are neon, argon, krypton and xenon.

  18. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  19. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  20. Evaluation of angle dependence in spectral emissivity of ceramic tiles measured by FT-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, C.; Ogasawara, N.; Yamada, H.; Yamada, S.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-05-01

    Ceramic tiles are widely used for building walls. False detections are caused in inspections by infrared thermography because of the infrared reflection and angle dependence of emissivity. As the first problem, ceramic tile walls are influenced from backgrounds reflection. As the second problem, in inspection for tall buildings, the camera angles are changed against the height. Thus, to reveal the relation between the emissivity and angles is needed. However, there is very little data about it. It is impossible to decrease the false detection on ceramic tile walls without resolving these problems; background reflection and angle dependence of emissivity. In this study, the angle problem was investigated. The purpose is to establish a revision method in the angle dependence of the emissivity for infrared thermography. To reveal the relation between the emissivity and angles, the spectral emissivity of a ceramic tile at various angles was measured by FT-IR and infrared thermographic instrument. These two experimental results were compared with the emissivity-angle curves from the theoretical formula. In short wavelength range, the two experimental results showed similar behavior, but they did not agree with the theoretical curve. This will be the subject of further study. In long wavelength range, the both experimental results almost obeyed the theoretical curve. This means that it is possible to revise the angle dependence of spectral emissivity, for long wavelength range.

  1. Method for correction of errors in observation angles for limb thermal emission measurements. [for satellite sounding of atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Shapiro, G. L.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements of the earth's stratospheric limb from space platforms require an accurate knowledge of the observation angles for retrieval of temperature and constituent distributions. Without the use of expensive stabilizing systems, however, most observational instruments do not meet the required pointing accuracies, thus leading to large errors in the retrieval of atmospheric data. This paper describes a self-constituent method of correcting errors in pointing angles by using information contained in the observed spectrum. Numerical results based on temperature inversions of synthetic thermal emission spectra with assumed random errors in pointing angles are presented.

  2. Relativistic calculations of angle-dependent photoemission time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, Anatoli; Mandal, Ankur; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Dolmatov, Valeriy K.; Keating, David A.; Manson, Steven T.

    2016-07-01

    Angular dependence of photoemission time delay for the valence n p3 /2 and n p1 /2 subshells of Ar, Kr, and Xe is studied in the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. Strong angular anisotropy of the time delay is reproduced near respective Cooper minima while the spin-orbit splitting affects the time delay near threshold.

  3. Effect of measurement error on tests of density dependence of catchability for walleyes in northern Wisconsin angling and spearing fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M.J.; Beard, T.D.; Hewett, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine how much measurement errors affected tests of density dependence of spearing and angling catchability for walleye Sander vitreus by quantifying relationships between spearing and angling catch rates (catch/h) and walleye population density (number/acre) in northern Wisconsin lakes. The mean measurement error of spearing catch rates was 43.5 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities, whereas the mean measurement error of angling catch rates was only 5.6 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities. The bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between spearing catch rate and adult walleye population density was similar to the ordinary-least-squares regression estimate but differed significantly from the geometric mean (GM) functional regression estimate. In contrast, the bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between angling catch rate and total walleye population density was intermediate between ordinary-least-squares and GM functional regression estimates. Catch rates of walleyes in both spearing and angling fisheries were not linearly related to walleye population density, which indicated that catch rates in both fisheries were hyperstable in relation to walleye population density. For both fisheries, GM functional regression overestimated the degree of hyperdepletion in catch rates and ordinary-least-squares regression overestimated the degree of hyperstability in catch rates. However, ordinary-least-squares regression induced significantly less bias in tests of density dependence than GM functional regression, so it may be suitable for testing the degree of density dependence in fisheries for which fish population density is estimated with mark-recapture methods similar to those used in our study. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  4. Incidence Angle and Polarization Dependence of Photo-Induced FMR in Co/Pd Multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Saeki, J; Matsuda, T; Kitamoto, Y; Munekata, H

    2014-01-01

    Dependence of photo-induced FMR (phi-FMR) on incident angle of excitation and probing laser beams has been studied in a [Co (dCo = 0.78 nm) / Pd (dPd = 0.81 nm) ]5 multi-layer film with the aim to find experimentally the limitation of inducement and detection of magnetization dynamics with oblique light incidence. We have found, in the experiments changing the incident angle of a pump beam, that phi-FMR is observed up to the grazing incident angle of 88 degrees with p-polarized excitation pulses, whereas it disappears at the incidence angle of around 65 degrees with s-polarized excitation. As for the experiments changing the incident angle of a probe beam, phi-FMR disappears at the incidence angle of 65 degrees for both s- and p-polarizations, whereas it reappears with further increasing the angle for the p-polarization and vanishes at 75 degrees.

  5. THE BEHAVIOR OF THE PITCH ANGLE OF SPIRAL ARMS DEPENDING ON OPTICAL WAVELENGTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; Puerari, Ivânio; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Luna, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); González-Lópezlira, Rosa A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacán, México, C.P. 58089 (Mexico); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura, E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, U. P. Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, 07730 México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-09-20

    Based on integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey, we investigate the possible dependence of spiral arm pitch angle with optical wavelength. For three of the five studied objects, the pitch angle gradually increases at longer wavelengths. This is not the case for two objects where the pitch angle remains constant. This result is confirmed by the analysis of SDSS data. We discuss the possible physical mechanisms to explain this phenomenon, as well as the implications of the results.

  6. Refined Monte Carlo method for simulating angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-S.

    1982-01-01

    A refined algorithm for generating emission frequencies from angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution functions R sub II and R sub III is described. The improved algorithm has as its basis a 'rejection' technique that, for absorption frequencies x less than 5, involves no approximations. The resulting procedure is found to be essential for effective studies of radiative transfer in optically thick or temperature varying media involving angle-dependent partial frequency redistributions.

  7. Angle-Dependent Ionization of Small Molecules by Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction and an Absorbing Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-06-04

    The angle-dependence of strong field ionization of O2, N2, CO2, and CH2O has been studied theoretically using a time-dependent configuration interaction approach with a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). Calculation of the ionization yields as a function of the direction of polarization of the laser pulse produces three-dimensional surfaces of the angle-dependent ionization probability. These three-dimensional shapes and their variation with laser intensity can be interpreted in terms of ionization from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lower lying orbitals, and the Dyson orbitals for the ground and excited states of the cations.

  8. Optimization of nonimaging focusing heliostat in dynamic correction of astigmatism for a wide range of incident angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kok-Keong

    2010-05-15

    To overcome astigmatism has always been a great challenge in designing a heliostat capable of focusing the sunlight on a small receiver throughout the year. In this Letter, a nonimaging focusing heliostat with a dynamic adjustment of facet mirrors in a group manner has been analyzed for optimizing the astigmatic correction in a wide range of incident angles. This what is to the author's knowledge a new heliostat is not only designed to serve the purpose of concentrating sunlight to several hundreds of suns, but also to significantly reduce the variation of the solar flux distribution with the incident angle.

  9. The Dependency of Nematic and Twist-bend Mesophase Formation on Bend Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, Richard J.; Archbold, Craig T.; Sarju, Julia P.; Andrews, Jessica L.; Goodby, John W.

    2016-11-01

    We have prepared and studied a family of cyanobiphenyl dimers with varying linking groups with a view to exploring how molecular structure dictates the stability of the nematic and twist-bend nematic mesophases. Using molecular modelling and 1D 1H NOESY NMR spectroscopy, we determine the angle between the two aromatic core units for each dimer and find a strong dependency of the stability of both the nematic and twist-bend mesophases upon this angle, thereby satisfying earlier theoretical models.

  10. Impacts of gantry angle dependent scanning beam properties on proton PBS treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuting; Clasie, Benjamin; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jacob; Shen, Tim; Jee, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-01

    While proton beam models in treatment planning systems are generally assumed invariant with respect to the beam deliveries at different gantry angles. Physical properties of scanning pencil beams can change. The gantry angle dependent properties include the delivered charge to the monitor unit chamber, the spot position and the spot shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of the changes and their dosimetric impacts using historical pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment data. Online beam delivery records at the time of the patient-specific qualify assurance were retrospectively collected for a total of 34 PBS fields from 28 patients treated at our institution. For each field, proton beam properties at two different gantry angles (the planned and zero gantry angles) were extracted by a newly-developed machine log analysis method and used to reconstruct the delivered dose distributions in the cubic water phantom geometry. The reconstructed doses at the two different angles and a planar dose measurement by a 2D ion-chamber array were compared and the dosimetric impacts of the gantry angle dependency were accessed by a 3D γ-index analysis. In addition, the pencil beam spot size was independently characterized as a function of the gantry angle and the beam energy. The dosimetric effects of the perturbed beam shape were also investigated. Comparisons of spot-by-spot beam positions between both gantry angles show a mean deviation of 0.4 and 0.7 mm and a standard deviation of 0.3 and 0.6 mm for x and y directions, respectively. The delivered giga-protons per spot show a percent mean difference and a standard deviation of 0.01% and 0.3%, respectively, from each planned spot weight. These small deviations lead to an excellent agreement in dose comparisons with an average γ passing rate of 99.1%. When each calculation for both planned and zero gantry angles was compared to the measurement, a high correlation in γ values was also observed, also

  11. Impacts of gantry angle dependent scanning beam properties on proton PBS treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuting; Clasie, Benjamin; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Flanz, Jacob; Shen, Tim; Jee, Kyung-Wook

    2017-01-21

    While proton beam models in treatment planning systems are generally assumed invariant with respect to the beam deliveries at different gantry angles. Physical properties of scanning pencil beams can change. The gantry angle dependent properties include the delivered charge to the monitor unit chamber, the spot position and the spot shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent of the changes and their dosimetric impacts using historical pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment data. Online beam delivery records at the time of the patient-specific qualify assurance were retrospectively collected for a total of 34 PBS fields from 28 patients treated at our institution. For each field, proton beam properties at two different gantry angles (the planned and zero gantry angles) were extracted by a newly-developed machine log analysis method and used to reconstruct the delivered dose distributions in the cubic water phantom geometry. The reconstructed doses at the two different angles and a planar dose measurement by a 2D ion-chamber array were compared and the dosimetric impacts of the gantry angle dependency were accessed by a 3D γ-index analysis. In addition, the pencil beam spot size was independently characterized as a function of the gantry angle and the beam energy. The dosimetric effects of the perturbed beam shape were also investigated. Comparisons of spot-by-spot beam positions between both gantry angles show a mean deviation of 0.4 and 0.7 mm and a standard deviation of 0.3 and 0.6 mm for x and y directions, respectively. The delivered giga-protons per spot show a percent mean difference and a standard deviation of 0.01% and 0.3%, respectively, from each planned spot weight. These small deviations lead to an excellent agreement in dose comparisons with an average γ passing rate of 99.1%. When each calculation for both planned and zero gantry angles was compared to the measurement, a high correlation in γ values was also observed, also

  12. Modeling and Correcting the Time-Dependent ACS PSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Taylor, James E.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2006-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using 10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST s apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present MultiDrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the MultiDrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.

  13. A mechanism for the dependence of sunspot group tilt angles on cycle strength

    CERN Document Server

    Işık, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The average tilt angle of sunspot groups emerging throughout the solar cycle determines the net magnetic flux crossing the equator, which is correlated with the strength of the subsequent cycle. I suggest that a deep-seated, non-local process can account for the observed cycle-dependent changes in the average tilt angle. Motivated by helioseismic observations indicating cycle-scale variations in the sound speed near the base of the convection zone, I determined the effect of a thermally perturbed overshoot region on the stability of flux tubes and on the tilt angles of emerging flux loops. I found that 5-20 K of cooling is sufficient for emerging flux loops to reproduce the reported amplitude of cycle-averaged tilt angle variations, suggesting that it is a plausible effect responsible for the nonlinearity of the solar activity cycle.

  14. Application of Chang's attenuation correction technique for single-photon emission computed tomography partial angle acquisition of Jaszczak phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Saha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition and processing of the Jaszczak phantom is a recommended test by the American College of Radiology for evaluation of gamma camera system performance. To produce the reconstructed phantom image for quality evaluation, attenuation correction is applied. The attenuation of counts originating from the center of the phantom is greater than that originating from the periphery of the phantom causing an artifactual appearance of inhomogeneity in the reconstructed image and complicating phantom evaluation. Chang's mathematical formulation is a common method of attenuation correction applied on most gamma cameras that do not require an external transmission source such as computed tomography, radionuclide sources installed within the gantry of the camera or a flood source. Tomographic acquisition can be obtained in two different acquisition modes for dual-detector gamma camera; one where the two detectors are at 180° configuration and acquire projection images for a full 360°, and the other where the two detectors are positioned at a 90° configuration and acquire projections for only 180°. Though Chang's attenuation correction method has been used for 360° angle acquisition, its applicability for 180° angle acquisition remains a question with one vendor's camera software producing artifacts in the images. This work investigates whether Chang's attenuation correction technique can be applied to both acquisition modes by the development of a Chang's formulation-based algorithm that is applicable to both modes. Assessment of attenuation correction performance by phantom uniformity analysis illustrates improved uniformity with the proposed algorithm (22.6% compared to the camera software (57.6%.

  15. Parametric Study of the Device Angle Dependency of a Single Vortex Generator on a Flat Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    . The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have been com-pared with a wind tunnel experiment, where the corresponding parametric study was per-formed over a single vane mounted on the test section wall in low-speed wind tunnel. In this experiment the flow was recorded using Stereoscopic Particle Image...... Velocimetry (S-PIV) in cross-planes at various positions downstream of the vane. The main goal of this article is to study the angle dependency of a single VG mounted on a test section wall; for this purpose CFD simulations have been carried out and compared with a wind tunnel experiment and an analytical......A detailed study of the device angle dependency of a single vortex generator (VG) is presented in this paper. A single Vortex Generator on a test section wall case, with four different positions of the device angle to the incoming flow, has been designed and solved by computational methods...

  16. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungeon; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom, E-mail: jbra@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Cardiac x-ray CT imaging is still challenging due to heart motion, which cannot be ignored even with the current rotation speed of the equipment. In response, many algorithms have been developed to compensate remaining motion artifacts by estimating the motion using projection data or reconstructed images. In these algorithms, accurate motion estimation is critical to the compensated image quality. In addition, since the scan range is directly related to the radiation dose, it is preferable to minimize the scan range in motion estimation. In this paper, the authors propose a novel motion estimation and compensation algorithm using a sinogram with a rotation angle of less than 360°. The algorithm estimates the motion of the whole heart area using two opposite 3D partial angle reconstructed (PAR) images and compensates the motion in the reconstruction process. Methods: A CT system scans the thoracic area including the heart over an angular range of 180° + α + β, where α and β denote the detector fan angle and an additional partial angle, respectively. The obtained cone-beam projection data are converted into cone-parallel geometry via row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning. Two conjugate 3D PAR images, whose center projection angles are separated by 180°, are then reconstructed with an angular range of β, which is considerably smaller than a short scan range of 180° + α. Although these images include limited view angle artifacts that disturb accurate motion estimation, they have considerably better temporal resolution than a short scan image. Hence, after preprocessing these artifacts, the authors estimate a motion model during a half rotation for a whole field of view via nonrigid registration between the images. Finally, motion-compensated image reconstruction is performed at a target phase by incorporating the estimated motion model. The target phase is selected as that corresponding to a view angle that is orthogonal to the center view angles of

  17. THE VIRIAL OF ANGLE-DEPENDENT POTENTIALS IN MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEKKER, H; AHLSTROM, P

    1994-01-01

    It is proved that the scalar virial of potentials that only depend on angles is zero. This is proved for nonperiodic boundary conditions as well as periodic boundary condition (PBC) systems. This theory is tested on an molecular dynamics simulation of butane with PBC.

  18. Zeeman Electromagnetically Induced Transparency with crossed pump and probe beams: Small angle dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kaleb; Madkhaly, Samaya; de Medeiros, Dillon; Bali, Samir; Macklin Quantum Information Sciences Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Progress toward undergraduate oriented experiments on image storage in room-temperature atomic vapor using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency is described. Using a scanning longitudinal magnetic field technique we diagnose and suppress stray magnetic fields and polarization impurity. We consider the pump-probe angular dependence of the EIT signal but at much smaller angles of less than a milliradian.

  19. Action-angle coordinates for time-dependent completely integrable Hamiltonian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giachetta, Giovanni; Mangiarotti, Luigi [Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino (Italy)]. E-mails: giovanni.giachetta@unicam.it; luigi.mangiarotti@unicam.it; Sardanashvily, Gennadi [Department of Theoretical Physics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: sard@grav.phys.msu.su

    2002-07-26

    A time-dependent completely integrable Hamiltonian system is proved to admit the action-angle coordinates around any instantly compact regular invariant manifold. Written relative to these coordinates, its Hamiltonian and first integrals are functions only of action coordinates. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  20. Frequency-dependent polarization-angle-phase-shift in the microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Han-Chun; Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-14

    Linear polarization angle, θ, dependent measurements of the microwave radiation-induced oscillatory magnetoresistance, R{sub xx}, in high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron devices have shown a θ dependence in the oscillatory amplitude along with magnetic field, frequency, and extrema-dependent phase shifts, θ{sub 0}. Here, we suggest a microwave frequency dependence of θ{sub 0}(f) using an analysis that averages over other smaller contributions, when those contributions are smaller than estimates of the experimental uncertainty.

  1. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  2. Peeling-angle dependence of the stick-slip instability during adhesive tape peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-12-28

    The influence of peeling angle on the dynamics observed during the stick-slip peeling of an adhesive tape has been investigated. This study relies on a new experimental setup for peeling at a constant driving velocity while keeping constant the peeling angle and peeled tape length. The thresholds of the instability are shown to be associated with a subcritical bifurcation and bistability of the system. The velocity onset of the instability is moreover revealed to strongly depend on the peeling angle. This could be the consequence of peeling angle dependance of either the fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint or the effective stiffness at play between the peeling front and the point at which the peeling is enforced. The shape of the peeling front velocity fluctuations is finally shown to progressively change from typical stick-slip relaxation oscillations to nearly sinusoidal oscillations as the peeling angle is increased. We suggest that this transition might be controlled by inertial effects possibly associated with the propagation of the peeling force fluctuations through elongation waves in the peeled tape.

  3. Method for correction of measured polarization angles from motional Stark effect spectroscopy for the effects of electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Meyer, W. H.; Holcomb, C. T.; Burrell, K. H.; Bergsten, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    An approximate method to correct the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy for the effects of intrinsic plasma electric fields has been developed. The motivation for using an approximate method is to incorporate electric field effects for between-pulse or real-time analysis of the current density or safety factor profile. The toroidal velocity term in the momentum balance equation is normally the dominant contribution to the electric field orthogonal to the flux surface over most of the plasma. When this approximation is valid, the correction to the MSE data can be included in a form like that used when electric field effects are neglected. This allows measurements of the toroidal velocity to be integrated into the interpretation of the MSE polarization angles without changing how the data is treated in existing codes. In some cases, such as the DIII-D system, the correction is especially simple, due to the details of the neutral beam and MSE viewing geometry. The correction method is compared using DIII-D data in a variety of plasma conditions to analysis that assumes no radial electric field is present and to analysis that uses the standard correction method, which involves significant human intervention for profile fitting. The comparison shows that the new correction method is close to the standard one, and in all cases appears to offer a better result than use of the uncorrected data. The method has been integrated into the standard DIII-D equilibrium reconstruction code in use for analysis between plasma pulses and is sufficiently fast that it will be implemented in real-time equilibrium analysis for control applications.

  4. Angle-dependent discoloration structures in wing scales of Morpho menelaus butterfly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU ShiChao; LI Bo; YE JunFeng; MU ZhengZhi; ZHANG JunQiu; LIU Yan; HAN ZhiWu

    2016-01-01

    The Morpho butterfly is famous for its typical structural color and has increasingly attracted the interest of scholars in a wide variety of research fields.Herein,it was found that the color of Morpho menelaus butterfly wings is not only structure-based but also viewing-angle-dependent.Firstly,the discoloration effect of this typical butterfly was confirmed by a series of experiments.Then,the general form,arrangements,and geometrical dimensions of the scales were observed using a stereomicroscope.Scanning electron microscopy was also used to examine the two-dimensional morphologies and structures of a single scale.Afterwards,one model with the optimized three-dimensional profile of the structure was described using Pro-engineer software.The associate model was then analyzed to reconstruct the process between the incident light and the model surface.Finally,the mechanism of the angle-dependent discoloration effect was analyzed by theoretical calculation and optical simulation.Different light propagation paths and the length of the incident light at different angles caused destructive or constructive interference between the light reflected from the different layers.The different spectra of the reflected light make the wings appear with different structural colors,thereby endowing the angle-dependent discoloration effect.The consistency of the calculation and simulation results confirms that these structures possess an excellent angle-dependent discoloration effect.This functional "biomimetic structure" would not only be of great scientific interest but could also have a great impact in a wide range of applications such as reflective displays,credit card security,and military stealth technology.

  5. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  6. Analysis of field-angle dependent specific heat in unconventional superconductors: A comparison between Doppler-shift method and Kramer-Pesch approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko, E-mail: n-hayashi@21c.osakafu-u.ac.j [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Center (N2RC), Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan) and CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nagai, Yuki [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); JST, TRIP, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Higashi, Yoichi [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We theoretically discuss the magnetic-field-angle dependence of the zero-energy density of states (ZEDOS) in superconductors. Point-node and line-node superconducting gaps on spherical and cylindrical Fermi surfaces are considered. The Doppler-shift (DS) method and the Kramer-Pesch approximation (KPA) are used to calculate the ZEDOS. Numerical results show that consequences of the DS method are corrected by the KPA.

  7. Analysis of field-angle dependent specific heat in unconventional superconductors: A comparison between Doppler-shift method and Kramer-Pesch approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Nagai, Yuki; Higashi, Yoichi

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically discuss the magnetic-field-angle dependence of the zero-energy density of states (ZEDOS) in superconductors. Point-node and line-node superconducting gaps on spherical and cylindrical Fermi surfaces are considered. The Doppler-shift (DS) method and the Kramer-Pesch approximation (KPA) are used to calculate the ZEDOS. Numerical results show that consequences of the DS method are corrected by the KPA.

  8. Observation of wavelength-dependent Brewster angle shift in 3D photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Priya,

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of polarized light with photonic crystals exhibit unique features due to its sub-wavelength nature on the surface and the periodic variation of refractive index in the depth of the crystals. Here, we present a detailed study of polarization anisotropy in light scattering associated with three-dimensional photonic crystals with face centered cubic symmetry over a broad wavelength and angular range. The polarization anisotropy leads to a shift in the conventional Brewster angle defined for a planar interface with certain refractive index. The observed shift in Brewster angle strongly depends on the index contrast and lattice constant. Polarization-dependent stop gap measurements are performed on photonic crystals with different index contrast and lattice constants. These measurements indicate unique stop gap branching at high-symmetry points in the Brillouin zone of the photonic crystals. The inherited stop gap branching is observed for TE polarization whereas that is suppressed for TM polarizat...

  9. Simulations of impinging droplets with surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Sashikumaar

    2015-11-01

    An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element scheme for computations of soluble surfactant droplet impingement on a horizontal surface is presented. The numerical scheme solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid flow, scalar convection-diffusion equation for the surfactant transport in the bulk phase, and simultaneously, surface evolution equations for the surfactants on the free surface and on the liquid-solid interface. The effects of surfactants on the flow dynamics are included into the model through the surface tension and surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle. In particular, the dynamic contact angle (θd) of the droplet is defined as a function of the surfactant concentration at the contact line and the equilibrium contact angle (θe0) of the clean surface using the nonlinear equation of state for surface tension. Further, the surface forces are included into the model as surface divergence of the surface stress tensor that allows to incorporate the Marangoni effects without calculating the surface gradient of the surfactant concentration on the free surface. In addition to a mesh convergence study and validation of the numerical results with experiments, the effects of adsorption and desorption surfactant coefficients on the flow dynamics in wetting, partially wetting and non-wetting droplets are studied in detail. It is observed that the effects of surfactants are more in wetting droplets than in the non-wetting droplets. Further, the presence of surfactants at the contact line reduces the equilibrium contact angle further when θe0 is less than 90°, and increases it further when θe0 is greater than 90°. Nevertheless, the presence of surfactants has no effect on the contact angle when θe0 = 90 °. The numerical study clearly demonstrates that the surfactant-dependent contact angle has to be considered, in addition to the Marangoni effect, in order to study the flow dynamics and the equilibrium states of surfactant

  10. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Hooda, R. K.; Sharma, V. P.; Panwar, T. S.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC) measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change - as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal) is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m-3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 or 1 m3 h-1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m-3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min-1) are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 and concentration of about 24 μg m-3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min-1), the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari (India), Beijing (China), and Welgegund (South Africa). In Beijing, the results could also be compared against a

  11. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon observations. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments with high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change – as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ∼3 μg m−3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 or 1 m3 h−1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photo detector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photo detector raw signals. It was found that in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m−3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 and concentration of about 24 μg m−3 (BC accumulation rate ∼0.4 μg min−1, the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari

  12. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change – as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m−3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 or 1 m3 h−1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m−3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 and concentration of about 24 μg m−3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min−1, the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from

  13. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Kaneshiro, Kayleigh [University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Schwarzkopf, Ran [University of California Irvine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Hara, Takeshi [Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  14. Depth resolution, angle dependence, and the sputtering yield of Irganox 1010 by coronene primary ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Martin P; Spencer, Steve J; Shard, Alex G

    2013-10-01

    A study is reported of the depth resolution and angle dependence of sputtering yields using the reference organic material, Irganox 1010, for a new coronene(+) depth profiling ion source at 8 and 16 keV beam energies. This source provides excellent depth profiles as shown by 8.5 nm marker layers of Irganox 3114. Damage occurs but may be ignored for angles of incidence above 70° from the surface normal, as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the C 1s peak structure. Above 70°, XPS profiles of excellent depth resolution are obtained. The depth resolution, after removal of the thickness of the delta layers, shows a basic contribution of 5.7 nm together with a contribution of 0.043 times the depth sputtered. This is lower than generally reported for cluster sources. The coronene(+) source is thus found to be a useful and practical source for depth profiling organic materials. The angle dependencies of both the undamaged and damaged materials are described by a simple equation. The sputtering yields for the undamaged material are described by a universal equation and are consistent with those obtained for C60(+) sputtering. Comparison with the sputtering yields using an argon gas cluster ion source shows great similarities, but the yields for both the coronene(+) and C60(+) primary ion sources are slightly lower.

  15. Plasmonic nanowires arranged in Fibonacci number chain: Excitation angle-dependent optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Raghuwanshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Herein we numerically study the excitation angle-dependant far-field and near-field optical properties of vertical plasmonic nanowires arranged in an unconventional linear geometry: Fibonacci number chain. The first five numbers in the Fibonacci series (1, 1, 2, 3, 5 were mapped to the size of gold nanowires, and arranged in a linear chain to study their optical interactions, and compared them to conventional chain of vertical gold nanowires. By harnessing the radiative and evanescent coupling regimes in the geometry, we found a systematic variation in the far-field extinction and near-field confinement in the geometries. Our simulation studies revealed enhanced backscattered intensity in the far-field radiation pattern at excitation angles along the chain-length of Fibonacci geometry, which was otherwise absent for conventional chain of plasmonic nanowires. Such angular reconfiguration of optical fields in unconventional linear geometries can be harnessed for tunable on-chip plasmonics.

  16. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  17. On Selecting the Correct Root of Angles-Only Initial Orbit Determination Equations of Lagrange, Laplace, and Gauss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Ahn, Jaemyung

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a classical yet still mystifying problem regarding multiple roots of the angles-only initial orbit determination (IOD) polynomial equations of Lagrange, Laplace, and Gauss of the form: f( x) = x 8+ a x 6+ b x 3+ c=0 where a, c0 has been extensively treated in the celestial mechanics literature. However, the literature on applied astrodynamics has not treated this multiple-root issue in detail, and not many specific numerical examples with multiple roots are available in the literature. In this paper, a very simple method of determining the correct root from two or three non-spurious roots is presented, which doesn't utilize any a priori knowledge and/or additional observations of the object. The proposed method exploits a simple approximate polynomial equation of the form: g( x) = x 8+ a x 6=0. An approximate polynomial equation, either g( x) = x 8+ c=0 or g( x) = x 8+ a x 6= x 6( x 2+ a) = 0, can also be used for quickly estimating an initial guess of the correct root.

  18. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Goldmann, Maximilian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. Firstly, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Secondly, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  19. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. H., E-mail: zhaohui@physics.umanitoba.ca; Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2 Canada (Canada); Hemour, S.; Wu, K. [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, H3T 1J4 Canada (Canada); Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S. [The Key Lab for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Houssameddine, D. [Everspin Technologies, 1347 N. Alma School Road, Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  20. Time dependent behavior of impact angle in turbulkent pipe flows experience erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Amador; Oyarzun, Diego; Walczak, Magdalena; Aguirre, Javiera

    Erosion-corrosion in pipe systems transporting slurry turbulent flows is of a great importance in industrial and mining applications, where large volumes of suspended solids are sent up to hundreds of kilometers, to be further processed. The slurry is typically sent over large diameter steel pipes, which not always have an anti-abrasion coating. During the transport, the thickness of the pipe diminishes and eventually leaks and breaks, due to the combined effects of wear and corrosion. The processes of pipe degradation are further enhanced by the content of the slurry electrolytes that might switch from neutral to aggressive. The understanding of these processes in terms of operational parameters is critical for anticipating and mitigating a catastrophic outcome. This paper describes turbulent flow numerical simulations in a slurry transporting steel pipe with an emphasis on the correlation between the time dependent impact angle in the vicinity of the steel pipe and the rate of material loss. Full numerical simulations in a 3D long domain by using an Eulerian -Eulerian two phase flow approach coupled to a κ-epsilon turbulent model are performed for different solid particle concentration and flow velocity and compared to existing experimental and numerical results for validation with and without gravity. Time-dependent axisymmetric turbulent flow simulations are performed for determining both the time dependent behavior of the axial and radial velocities near the pipe wall and the impact angle. Finantial support from Conicyt through the Fondecyt proposal 1141107 is acknowledged.

  1. Future constraints on angle-dependent non-Gaussianity from large radio surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Norris, Ray P.; Parkinson, David

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how well future large-scale radio surveys could measure different shapes of primordial non-Gaussianity; in particular we focus on angle-dependent non-Gaussianity arising from primordial anisotropic sources, whose bispectrum has an angle dependence between the three wavevectors that is characterized by Legendre polynomials PL and expansion coefficients cL. We provide forecasts for measurements of galaxy power spectrum, finding that Large-Scale Structure (LSS) data could allow measurements of primordial non-Gaussianity that would be competitive with, or improve upon, current constraints set by CMB experiments, for all the shapes considered. We argue that the best constraints will come from the possibility to assign redshift information to radio galaxy surveys, and investigate a few possible scenarios for the EMU and SKA surveys. A realistic (futuristic) modeling could provide constraints of fNLloc ≈ 1(0 . 5) for the local shape, fNL of O(10) (O(1)) for the orthogonal, equilateral and folded shapes, and cL=1 ≈ 80(2) , cL=2 ≈ 400(10) for angle-dependent non-Gaussianity showing that only futuristic galaxy surveys will be able to set strong constraints on these models. Nevertheless, the more futuristic forecasts show the potential of LSS analyses to considerably improve current constraints on non-Gaussianity, and so on models of the primordial Universe. Finally, we find the minimum requirements that would be needed to reach σ(cL=1) = 10, which can be considered as a typical (lower) value predicted by some (inflationary) models.

  2. Multiplicity dependent and non-binomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    CERN Document Server

    Bzdak, Adam; Koch, Volker

    2016-01-01

    In this note we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [1,2]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as a non-binomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  3. Improving the solar zenith angle dependence of broadband UV radiometers calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Cancillo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focusses on the proposal of a new method for the calibration of broadband ultraviolet radiometers. The advantage of the method proposed is the accurate modelling of the dependence on the solar zenith angle. The new model is compared with other one-step calibration methods and with the two-step method, which requires the knowledge of the actual response of the broadband radiometer. For this purpose, three broadband radiometers are calibrated against a spectrophotometer of reference. The new method is validated comparing its predictions with the spectrophotometer measurements using an independent data set.

  4. Polarimetric Scattering Properties of Landslides in Forested Areas and the Dependence on the Local Incidence Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shibayama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the local incidence angle dependence of several polarimetric indices corresponding to landslides in forested areas. Landslide is deeply related to the loss of human lives and their property. Various kinds of remote sensing techniques, including aerial photography, high-resolution optical satellite imagery, LiDAR and SAR interferometry (InSAR, have been available for landslide investigations. SAR polarimetry is potentially an effective measure to investigate landslides because fully-polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data contain more information compared to conventional single- or dual-polarization SAR data. However, research on landslide recognition utilizing polarimetric SAR (PolSAR is quite limited. Polarimetric properties of landslides have not been examined quantitatively so far. Accordingly, we examined the polarimetric scattering properties of landslides by an assessment of how the decomposed scattering power components and the polarimetric correlation coefficient change with the local incidence angle. In the assessment, PolSAR data acquired from different directions with both spaceborne and airborne SARs were utilized. It was found that the surface scattering power and the polarimetric correlation coefficient of landslides significantly decrease with the local incidence angle, while these indices of surrounding forest do not. This fact leads to establishing a method of effective detection of landslide area by polarimetric information.

  5. Angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine based on coherent dipole-dipole coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shan-He; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jin-Can; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between molecules or within a molecule have been widely observed in biological systems and exhibit broad application for molecular structural studies. Quantum delocalization of molecular dipole moments has inspired researchers to explore new avenues to utilize this physical effect for energy harvesting devices. Herein, we propose a simple model of the angle-dependent quantum Otto heat engine which seeks to facilitate the conversion of heat to work. Unlike previous studies, the adiabatic processes are accomplished by varying only the directions of the magnetic field. We show that the heat engine continues to generate power when the angle relative to the vector r joining the centres of coupled dipoles departs from the magic angle θm where the static coupling vanishes. A significant improvement in the device performance has to be attributed to the presence of the quantum delocalized levels associated with the coherent dipole-dipole coupling. These results obtained may provide a promising model for the biomimetic design and fabrication of quantum energy generators.

  6. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc, E-mail: m.baldus@uu.nl [NMR Spectroscopy, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina [Department of Physics, Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, PO Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ivanov, Konstantin L., E-mail: ivanov@tomo.nsc.ru [International Tomography Center, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Institutskaya 3a, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia and Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, Novosibirsk 63009 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  7. Renormalizing coupled scalars with a momentum dependent mixing angle in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz, M A

    1994-01-01

    The renormalization of a system of coupled scalars fields is analyzed. By introducing a momentum dependent mixing angle we diagonalize the inverse propagator matrix at any momentum p^2. The zeros of the inverse propagator matrix, \\ie, the physical masses, are then calculated keeping the full momentum dependence of the self energies. The relation between this method and others previously published is studied. This idea is applied to the one-loop renormalization of the CP-even neutral Higgs sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Model, considering top and bottom quarks and squarks in the loops. Presented in the Eighth Meeting of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society ``DPF'94'', The University of New Mexico Albuquerque NM, August 2-6, 1994.

  8. Future Constraints on Angle-Dependent Non-Gaussianity from Large Radio Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bartolo, Nicola; Bertacca, Daniele; Liguori, Michele; Matarrese, Sabino; Norris, Ray P; Parkinson, David

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how well future large-scale radio surveys could measure different shapes of primordial non-Gaussianity; in particular we focus on angle-dependent non-Gaussianity arising from primordial anisotropic sources, whose bispectrum has an angle dependence between the three wavevectors that is characterized by Legendre polynomials $\\mathcal{P}_L$ and expansion coefficients $c_L$. We provide forecasts for measurements of galaxy power spectrum, finding that Large-Scale Structure (LSS) data could allow measurements of primordial non-Gaussianity competitive or improving upon current constraints set by CMB experiments, for all the shapes considered. We argue that the best constraints will come from the possibility to assign redshift information to radio galaxy surveys, and investigate a few possible scenarios for the EMU and SKA surveys. A realistic (futuristic) modeling could provide constraints of $f_{\\rm NL}^{\\rm loc} \\approx 1 (0.5)$ for the local shape, $f_{\\rm NL}$ of $\\mathcal{O}(10) (\\mathcal{O}(1))$...

  9. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau theory for hot rotating nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugam; P Arumugam

    2001-07-01

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for temperatures greater than 1 MeV but plays significant role at lower temperatures.

  10. Dependence of convective secondary flow on inclination angle in an inclined pulse tube refrigerator revealed by visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Masao; Takamatsu, Koichi; Murakami, Masahide; Nakano, Akihiro

    2004-02-01

    Secondary flow in an inclined orifice pulse tube refrigerator at typical inclination angles of 0-180° was studied by using a smoke-wire flow visualization technique. It was revealed that the secondary flow formed a unicellular convective flow in the pulse tube and had two flow patterns depending on the angle. This dependence of flow pattern on the inclination angle is well explained by the superposition of gravity-driven convective flow on acoustic streaming. Even if the cold end was lower than the hot end, the gravity-driven convective flow occurred and the secondary flow was affected by gravity.

  11. Study of variations of the Bolton index in the Moroccan population depending on angle malocclusion class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerouaoui, Mohamed Fadel; Bahije, Loubna; Zaoui, Fatima; Regragui, Salwa

    2014-06-01

    Many difficulties may arise during the finishing phase of orthodontic treatment on account of discrepancy between mandibular and maxillary tooth size. In 1958, Bolton devised the index that bears his name and enables possible tooth-size discrepancy to be diagnosed. Use of this index in practice has shown that it can vary depending on the different angle malocclusion classes. The aim of this work is to study variations of the Bolton index as a function of the malocclusion class in the Moroccan population, and to compare the results obtained with those of other populations. Ninety models were therefore selected in different groups of dental Class I, Class II and Class III malocclusions. The mesiodistal (MD) diameters of 12 maxillary and mandibular teeth were measured and the anterior and general Bolton indices were calculated. The results obtained show that there is no significant difference between the various groups of angle malocclusion classes, and that some other populations present results similar to those of the Moroccan sample.

  12. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations in high-mobility semimetal LuPtBi

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guizhou

    2017-03-14

    The recent discovery of ultrahigh mobility and large positive magnetoresistance in topologically non-trivial Half-Heusler semimetal LuPtBi provides a unique playground for studying exotic physics and significant perspective for device applications. As an fcc-structured electron-hole-compensated semimetal, LuPtBi theoretically exhibits six symmetrically arranged anisotropic electron Fermi pockets and two nearly-spherical hole pockets, offering the opportunity to explore the physics of Fermi surface with a simple angle-related magnetotransport properties. In this work, through the angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance measurements, in combination with high-field SdH quantum oscillations, we achieved to map out a Fermi surface with six anisotropic pockets in the high-temperature and low-field regime, and furthermore, identify a possible magnetic field driven Fermi surface change at lower temperatures. Reasons account for the Fermi surface change in LuPtBi are discussed in terms of the field-induced electron evacuation due to Landau quantization.

  13. Photon energy dependence of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayria, Pourya; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Czank, Thomas R.; Tanaka, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Riichiro

    2015-11-01

    The photon energy dependence of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in graphene is investigated experimentally and theoretically. By applying light with energy of around 46 eV , we found an unexpected increase in the ARPES relative intensity of graphene for the p branch (ARPES spectra brightened by the p -polarized light) with respect to the s branch (those brightened by the s -polarized light). The origin of the enhanced p -branch intensity is explained by first-principles calculations, in which we show (1) the optical dipole vector as a function of final-state energies of the excited electron, (2) the absorption intensity as a function of the incident light angle, and (3) the symmetry of the initial and the final states. The calculated results imply that the dipole vector of the excited electron near 46 eV has an exceptionally large component in the normal direction of the graphene surface compared to that within the graphene plane, which could be the main reason for the enhancement of the p -branch intensity.

  14. Angle dependent magnetothermopower of α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovska, D.; Steven, E.; Choi, E. S.; Brooks, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    The magnetic field and angle dependences of the thermopower and Nernst effect for the quasi-two dimensional (q2D) organic conductor α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 are measured at temperatures below (4 K) and above (9 K) the transition temperature in fields of up to 31 T. In addition, a theoretical model involving a magnetic breakdown effect between the q1D and q2D bands is proposed in order to simulate the data. Analysis of the background components of the thermopower and Nernst effect imply that at low temperatures, in the CDW state, the properties of α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 are determined mostly by the orbits on new, open Fermi sheets. The quantum oscillations observed in both thermoelectric effects at fields above 8 T are caused only by the α orbit.

  15. Angular phase shift in polarization-angle dependence of microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Chun; Samaraweera, Rasanga L.; Mani, R. G.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the microwave frequency (f ) variation of the angular phase shift, θ0, observed in the polarization-angle dependence of microwave-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in a high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two-dimensional electron system. By fitting the diagonal resistance Rx x versus θ plots to an empirical cosine square law, we extract θ0 and trace its quasicontinuous variation with f . The results suggest that the overall average of θ0 extracted from Hall bar device sections with length-to-width ratios of L /W =1 and 2 is the same. We compare the observations with expectations arising from the "ponderomotive force" theory for microwave radiation-induced transport phenomena.

  16. Impact of pitch angle setup error and setup error correction on dose distribution in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Akihiro; Togawa, Kumiko; Yokoi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Shinichi; Noto, Kimiya; Kojima, Hironori; Isomura, Naoki; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2016-07-01

    In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer, a positional and rotational error correction is performed according to the position and angle of the prostate. The correction often involves body leaning, and there is concern regarding variation in the dose distribution. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the impact of body pitch rotation on the dose distribution regarding VMAT. Treatment plans were obtained retrospectively from eight patients with prostate cancer. The body in the computed tomography images for the original VMAT plan was shifted to create VMAT plans with virtual pitch angle errors of ±1.5° and ±3°. Dose distributions for the tilted plans were recalculated with use of the same beam arrangement as that used for the original VMAT plan. The mean value of the maximum dose differences in the dose distributions between the original VMAT plan and the tilted plans was 2.98 ± 0.96 %. The value of the homogeneity index for the planning target volume (PTV) had an increasing trend according to the pitch angle error, and the values of the D 95 for the PTV and D 2ml, V 50, V 60, and V 70 for the rectum had decreasing trends (p < 0.05). However, there was no correlation between differences in these indexes and the maximum dose difference. The pitch angle error caused by body leaning had little effect on the dose distribution; in contrast, the pitch angle correction reduced the effects of organ displacement and improved these indexes. Thus, the pitch angle setup error in VMAT for prostate cancer should be corrected.

  17. The perceived personality traits of adults with digitally induced large angle strabismus and the impact of its correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To ascertain the effect of digitally induced large angle strabismus and its correction on social bias against strabismic adults. Subjects and Methods: This prospective, observational study included 10 orthotropic subjects whose face photographs were digitally altered to produce esotropia, exotropia, and hypertropia. Three batches of non-medical professionals, each consisting of 14 subjects, adjudged personality traits of the altered face photographs on a 10-item questionnaire. The same evaluators effected the appraisal of the orthotropic photographs. The personality score of the strabismic photograph of a subject was compared with its own orthotropic photograph. Results: The 10 subjects whose photographs were digitally modified were of the same age (21 years and had equal gender distribution. The evaluation of the photographs was performed by 42 evaluators aged 38.3 ± 14.9 years, of whom 21 were males. Different personality traits were rated negatively in the strabismic photographs. The statistically significant negative impact was apparent on more number of personality traits for esotropia (7 out of 10 as compared to exotropia (4 out of 10 or hypertropia (3 out of 10. Rating of the strabismic photographs was significantly lower by female evaluators (P = 0.006. However, there was no difference whether the subject evaluating the photograph of the strabismic individual was of the same gender or the opposite gender. Internal consistency of the questionnaire was excellent (Cronbach′s Alpha = 0.81. Conclusion: There was a significant negative impact of strabismus on the perceived personality traits of the digitally altered face photographs of the adults when compared to their orthotropic photograph.

  18. Exploring the Tilt-Angle Dependence of electron tunneling across Molecular junction of Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Munuera, C.; Ocal, C.;

    2009-01-01

    by contacting the molecular layers with the tip of a conductive force microscope. Measurements done under low-load conditions permit us to obtain reliable tilt-angle and molecular length dependencies of the low-bias conductance through the alkanethiol layers. The observed dependence on tilt-angle is stronger...... for the longer molecular chains. Our calculations confirm the observed trends and explain them as a result of two mechanisms, namely, a previously proposed intermolecular tunneling enhancement as well as a hitherto overlooked tilt-dependent molecular gate effect....

  19. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  20. Dosimetric dependence on the collimator angle in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Isa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV and organs-at-risk (OARs in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT when varying collimator angle. The collimator angle has the largest impact and is worth considering, so, its awareness is essential for a planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a reasonable time frame. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. The conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, gradient index (GI, machine monitor units (MUs, dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum dose of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, the dose-volume histogram and mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as the bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans.Results: There was no significant difference, based on the planned dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. A higher CI (0.53 and lower HI (0.064 were found in the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided a lower value of HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. Collimator angles of 75o and 90o were found to be good for rectum sparing, and collimator angles of 75o and 30o were found to be good for sparing of right and left femur, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: Our study indicates that the dosimetric results provide support and guidance to allow the clinical radiation physicists to make careful decisions in implementing suitable collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OARs sparing in prostate VMAT.

  1. Spatial resolution is dependent on image content for SPECT with iterative reconstruction incorporating distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Daniel; Barnden, Leighton

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the dependence of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) spatial resolution on the content of images for iterative reconstruction with distance dependent resolution (DDR) correction. An experiment was performed using a perturbation technique to measure change in resolution of line sources in simple and complex images with iterative reconstruction with increasing iteration. Projections of the line sources were reconstructed alone and again after the addition of projections of a uniform flood or a complex phantom. An alternative experiment used images of a realistic brain phantom and evaluated an effective spatial resolution by matching the images to the digital version of the phantom convolved with 3D Gaussian kernels. The experiments were performed using ordered subset expectation maximisation iterative reconstruction with and without the use of DDR correction. The results show a significant difference in reconstructed resolution between images of line sources depending on the content of the added image. The full width at half maximum of images of a line source reconstructed using DDR correction increased by 20-30 % when the added image was complex. Without DDR this difference was much smaller and disappeared with increasing iteration. Reported SPECT resolution should be taken as indicative only with regard to clinical imaging if the measurement is made using a point or line source alone and an iterative reconstruction algorithm is used.

  2. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  3. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  4. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Carlini

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope's pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample.

  5. Characterization of Angle Dependent Color Travel of Printed Multi-Color Effect Pigment on Different Color Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirica Karlovits

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Color-travel pigments, which exhibit much more extensive color change as well provide angle-dependent optical effect can be used in many industrial products. In present paper the multi-color effect pigment printed on three different foils with different background color (black, silver and transparent was investigated. The pigment was based on synthetically produced transparent silicon dioxide platelets coated with titanium dioxide. CIEL*a*b* values and reflection of prints were measured by multi-angle spectrophotometer at constant illumination at an angle of 45º and different viewing angles (-15º, 15°, 25º, 45º, 75º and 110º were used. The measurements of printed multi-color pigment showed that CIEL*a*b* color coordinates varied to great extents, depending on detection angles as well on color of the printing substrate. The study revealed that pigmnet printed on black background obtained significant change in color. The study has also shown that when viewing angle increases, the reflection curves decreases.

  6. Target mass corrections for spin-dependent structure functions in collinear factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A

    2008-01-01

    We derive target mass corrections (TMC) for the spin-dependent nucleon structure function g1 and polarization asymmetry A1 in collinear factorization at leading twist. The TMCs are found to be significant for g1 at large xB, even at relatively high Q^2 values, but largely cancel in A1. A comparison of TMCs obtained from collinear factorization and from the operator product expansion shows that at low Q^2 the corrections drive the proton A1 in opposite directions.

  7. Multiplicity-dependent and nonbinomial efficiency corrections for particle number cumulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdak, Adam; Holzmann, Romain; Koch, Volker

    2016-12-01

    In this article we extend previous work on efficiency corrections for cumulant measurements [Bzdak and Koch, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044904 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044904; Phys. Rev. C 91, 027901 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.91.027901]. We will discuss the limitations of the methods presented in these papers. Specifically we will consider multiplicity dependent efficiencies as well as nonbinomial efficiency distributions. We will discuss the most simple and straightforward methods to implement those corrections.

  8. Multiscale geometrical Lagrangian statistics: scale-dependent curvature and torsion angles in particle-laden turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kai; Kadoch, Benjamin; Bassenne, Maxime; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Farge, Marie; Bos, Wouter

    2016-11-01

    We present multiscale statistics of particle trajectories in isotropic turbulence and compare the behaviour of fluid and inertial particles. The directional change of inertial particles is quantified by considering the curvature angle for different time increments. Distinct scaling behaviors of the mean angle are observed for short, intermediate and long time lags. We also introduce the scale-dependent torsion angle, which quantifies the directional change of particles moving out of the plane. The influence of the Stokes and Reynolds numbers on the mean angles and on the probability distributions are analyzed. Finally, we assess the impact of LES and particle SGS modeling on those statistics. MF and KS thankfully acknowledge financial support from CTR, Stanford.

  9. Application of time-dependent sessile drop contact angles on compacts to characterise the surface energetics of sulfathiazole crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2002-03-02

    The time-dependent wetting of sulfathiazole compacts with sessile water drops was evaluated using video microscopy. The influence of sulfathiazole crystalline form, particle size, pre-saturation with water, humidity and compaction pressure on the droplet spreading kinetics and contact angles are reported. The rate and extent of droplet spreading decreased for compact surfaces of high microscopic roughness; this was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Pre-saturation of powder compacts with water (pre-saturated with sulfathiazole) enhanced droplet spreading and enabled pseudo-equilibrium contact angles to be determined for up to 10 min. Sessile-drop contact angles on both sulfathiazole powder compacts and single crystals are compared with particle contact angles determined by liquid penetration. This study has led to an improved understanding of the influence of physical heterogeneities and the face-specific surface chemistry of individual crystals on the wetting characteristics of pharmaceutical compacts.

  10. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  11. Immediate effects of scoliosis-specific corrective exercises on the Cobb angle after one week and after one year of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Zapata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are unaware of any studies describing the immediate effects of scoliosis-specific exercises on the Cobb angle measured by radiograph. This study aimed to describe the differences between radiographs obtained with and without corrective exercises after initial training and after one year. Methods A female with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was first seen at age 13 years, 0 months with a Risser 0. She had a 43o left lumbar, 15o right thoracic curve. She was seen again after 6, 18 and 30 months and performed exercises from 18 to 30 months. She performed Barcelona Scoliosis Physical Therapy School (BSPTS exercises for a four-curve type (lumbar dominant with pelvis deviation to the lumbar concave side. At 18 and 30 months, x-rays were obtained with and without performing corrective exercises. Results At 6 months, her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 41o and 28o, respectively. At 18 months, her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 47 o and 30o, respectively. Also at 18 months, immediately after her x-ray in the relaxed standing position, she performed her corrective exercises in standing with arms lowered for a second x-ray. Her lumbar and thoracic curves remained similar and measured 43o and 32o, respectively. At 30 months, she performed unsolicited corrective exercises during the x-ray. Her lumbar and thoracic curves measured 26o and 41o, respectively. Another x-ray in the relaxed position revealed lumbar and thoracic curves measuring 39o and 35o, respectively. The immediate effect of corrective exercises after a year of training was a 33 % improvement at the lumbar spine compared to only a 9 % improvement the previous year. Conclusion After initial training, corrective exercises during a standing x-ray did not significantly improve the Cobb angle for the major lumbar curve compared to the relaxed standing x-ray. However, a year after performing exercises, unsolicited corrective exercises resulted in a

  12. 基于车轮侧偏角的汽车自适应前照灯的转角修整方法%Correction Method of the Angle of Vehicle Adaptive Front- lighting System Based on Wheel Slip Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李礼夫; 潘斌

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the calculation accuracy of the angle of AFS, we integrate the kinematics property of vehicle to propose a correction model to improve the calculated result by the difference between values of the side slip angles of the front and rear wheels. And then,we establish a simulation model in the TESIS/veDYNA software to simulate and analyze. According to the simulation results,this method can correct the AFS angle by 17.21% to 29. 47%.%结合汽车的动力学特性,提出了利用前后车轮侧偏角之差来改善AFS转角计算精度的方法,建立了AFS转角修整模型,在此基础上,运用整车动力学仿真软件TESIS/veDYNA软件对该方法进行了仿真分析.仿真结果表明,该法对研究车型的AFS转角的修整率为17.21 %~29.47%.

  13. Polarization-angle dependence of photoluminescence intensity of ordered GaInP{sub 2} layers: observation of polarization memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Brito-Orta, R. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parma (Italy)

    2008-09-15

    We compare measured and calculated polarization-angle dependencies of the intensity of the photoluminescence emission from MOVPE-grown GaInP{sub 2} layers with different ordering parameters. We measured the polarization-angle dependencies of the emission propagating along the [001],[110] and [1 anti 10] directions at room temperature. Symmetry considerations were used to calculate the dependence of the relative intensity of the PL emission which was linearly polarized along different directions and to estimate the value of the valence-band splitting by fitting the measured dependencies with calculated curves. An intriguing influence of the polarization of the exciting beam on the relative amount of the polarized PL emission was observed in the emission from the (110) plane. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Accardi, Alberto [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  15. Time dependent corrections to absolute gravity determinations in the establishment of modern gravity control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykowski, Przemyslaw; Krynski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of modern gravity control with the use of exclusively absolute method of gravity determination has significant advantages as compared to the one established mostly with relative gravity measurements (e.g. accuracy, time efficiency). The newly modernized gravity control in Poland consists of 28 fundamental stations (laboratory) and 168 base stations (PBOG14 - located in the field). Gravity at the fundamental stations was surveyed with the FG5-230 gravimeter of the Warsaw University of Technology, and at the base stations - with the A10-020 gravimeter of the Institute of Geodesy and Cartography, Warsaw. This work concerns absolute gravity determinations at the base stations. Although free of common relative measurement errors (e.g. instrumental drift) and effects of network adjustment, absolute gravity determinations for the establishment of gravity control require advanced corrections due to time dependent factors, i.e. tidal and ocean loading corrections, atmospheric corrections and hydrological corrections that were not taken into account when establishing the previous gravity control in Poland. Currently available services and software allow to determine high accuracy and high temporal resolution corrections for atmospheric (based on digital weather models, e.g. ECMWF) and hydrological (based on hydrological models, e.g. GLDAS/Noah) gravitational and loading effects. These corrections are mostly used for processing observations with Superconducting Gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project. For the area of Poland the atmospheric correction based on weather models can differ from standard atmospheric correction by even ±2 µGal. The hydrological model shows the annual variability of ±8 µGal. In addition the standard tidal correction may differ from the one obtained from the local tidal model (based on tidal observations). Such difference at Borowa Gora Observatory reaches the level of ±1.5 µGal. Overall the sum of atmospheric and

  16. Tracing magnetic separators and their dependence on IMF clock angle in global magnetospheric simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, C M; Dorelli, J C; Glocer, A; Kuznetsova, M M

    2013-01-01

    A new, efficient, and highly accurate method for tracing magnetic separators in global magnetospheric simulations with arbitrary clock angle is presented. The technique is to begin at a magnetic null and iteratively march along the separator by finding where four magnetic topologies meet on a spherical surface. The technique is verified using exact solutions for separators resulting from an analytic magnetic field model that superposes dipolar and uniform magnetic fields. Global resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations are performed using the three-dimensional BATS-R-US code with a uniform resistivity, in eight distinct simulations with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angles ranging from 0 (parallel) to 180 degrees (anti-parallel). Magnetic nulls and separators are found in the simulations, and it is shown that separators traced here are accurate for any clock angle, unlike the last closed field line on the Sun-Earth line that fails for southward IMF. Trends in magnetic null locations and the struc...

  17. Calculation of effective dose in whole body in dependence of angle of collimator for photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenzalida, M. [Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco (Chile). Programa de Magister en Fisica Medica; Varon, C.; Piriz, G.; Banguero, Y.; Lozano, E.; Mancilla, C., E-mail: fisicamedica@incancer.c [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Santiago (Chile). Unidad de Fisica Medica

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain quantifiable data of whole body effective dose for photons fields of 6 MV and 18 MV in function of the collimator angle of a Varian Clinac 21EX lineal accelerator. It has been made a variety of studies which investigate the form to reduce the dose in whole body with photons fields, specially over the potential risks and the influence of the collimator angle, as performed Stanthakis et al. [1] with the Monte Carlo method. As a result of this work, the values of whole body effective doses are higher with a 0 deg collimator than with a 90 deg collimator, and as the field size increases, the effective doses difference in whole body, between 0 deg and 90 deg collimator angle, for both energies, becomes smaller. (author)

  18. Distance-dependent influences on angle metrology with autocollimators in deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas

    2008-08-01

    The application of electronic autocollimators to the deflectometric measurement of synchrotron optics in beamline metrology laboratories is steadily increasing. The main reason for this is the availability of commercial high-resolution autocollimators capable of providing highly stable angle metrology down to aperture sizes of a few millimeters, even for uncoated optical surfaces. The measuring beam of the autocollimator not only provides the straight propagation of light as a natural straightness standard, but also tracing back the angle measurement to primary standards via calibration enables one to measure surface shape without any recourse to material straightness artifacts. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) provides the traceability of angle measurements by autocollimators to the radian (rad) - the SI unit of the plane angle - by use of its WMT 220 angle comparator. The fundamental principle of this comparator is the subdivision of the circle, representing an error-free natural standard of 2π rad. It is realized by various self- and cross-calibration methods. Autocollimators are calibrated by direct comparison with this primary standard with standard uncertainties down to 0.003 arcsec (15 nrad). As the aperture sizes of autocollimators decrease, issues such as the transferability / applicability of the calibration to the measurement conditions in the deflectometric set-up become more and more significant. In this paper we are focusing on the investigation of the influence of the distance between the autocollimator and the surface under test on its angle response. Information on the optimized use and accurate calibration of autocollimators for deflectometric applications is provided.

  19. Gauge angle dependence in TDHFB calculations of ${}^{20}$O + ${}^{20}$O head-on collisions with the Gogny interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    A numerical method to solve the TDHFB equations by using a hybrid basis of the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator eigenfunctions and one-dimensional Lagrange mesh with the Gogny effective interaction is applied to the head-on collisions of the superfluid nuclei ${}^{20}$O's. Taking the energies around the barrier top energy, the trajectories, pairing energies, and numbers of transferred nucleons are displayed. Their dependence on the relative gauge angle at the initial time is studied by taking typical sample points of the gauge angle. It turned out that the functional form of the flux of the neutrons across a section plane is proportional to the sine of the two times of the gauge angle.

  20. Lifetime dependence of nitrided carbon stripper foils on sputter angle during N{sup +} ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugai, I., E-mail: isao.Sugai@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Accelerator Laboratory, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Oyaizu, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Accelerator Laboratory, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawakami, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawasaki, K.; Hattori, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kadono, T. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, 7-3-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated high-lifetime thin nitride carbon stripper (NCS) foils with high nitrogen contents using ion-beam sputtering with reactive nitrogen gas and investigated the dependence of their lifetimes on the sputter angle. The nitrogen in carbon foils plays a critical role in determining their lifetime. Therefore, in order to investigate the effects of the nitrogen level in NCS foils on foil lifetime, we measured the sputtering yield for different sputter angles at a sputtering voltage of 10 kV while using carbon-based targets. We also measured the nitrogen-to-carbon thickness ratios of the foils using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The foils made at a sputter angle of 15° using a glassy amorphous carbon target exhibited an average increase of 200-fold in lifetime when compared to commercially available foils.

  1. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small b...

  2. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  3. Doppler shift generated by diffraction gratings under time-dependent incidence angle near a Wood anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Dossou, Kokou B

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are famous for their ability to exhibit, near a Wood anomaly, an arbitrarily large angular dispersion, e.g., with respect to the incidence angle or wavelength. For a diffraction grating under incidence by a plane wave at a fixed frequency, by rotating the incidence angle at a given angular velocity, the field propagated by a nonzero diffraction order will rotate at increasingly fast angular velocity as the incidence angle approaches the angle where Wood anomaly occurs. Such a fast rotating diffracted field has the potential to generate a substantial Doppler shift. Indeed, under the assumption of a grating with infinite extent, the expression for the instantaneous frequency shift perceived by an observer, who is looking into the light radiated by the diffraction order, is derived and it is in full agreement with the prediction from an interpretation based on the Doppler shift generated by a rotation of light sources. In particular the classical (non-relativistic) Doppler shift can take arb...

  4. Temperature dependent small-angle neutron scattering of CTABr-magnetic fluid emulsion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; J V Joshi; P S Goyal; Rajesh Patel; R V Upadhyay; R V Mehta

    2004-08-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering studies have been carried out to check the structural integrity of citryltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr) micelles in a magnetic fluid for different magnetic fluid concentrations at two different temperatures 303 and 333 K. It is found that the CTABr micelles grow with increasing magnetic fluid concentration and there is a decrease in the micellar size with increase in temperature.

  5. Correcting direction-dependent gains in the deconvolution of radio interferometric images

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatnagar, S; Golap, K; Uson, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical imaging using aperture synthesis telescopes requires deconvolution of the point spread function as well as calibration of instrumental and atmospheric effects. In general, such effects are time-variable and vary across the field of view as well, resulting in direction-dependent (DD), time-varying gains. Most existing imaging and calibration algorithms assume that the corruptions are direction independent, preventing even moderate dynamic range full-beam, full-Stokes imaging. We present a general framework for imaging algorithms which incorporate DD errors. We describe as well an iterative deconvolution algorithm that corrects known DD errors due to the antenna power patterns and pointing errors for high dynamic range full-beam polarimetric imaging. Using simulations we demonstrate that errors due to realistic primary beams as well as antenna pointing errors will limit the dynamic range of upcoming higher sensitivity instruments and that our new algorithm can be used to correct for such errors. We...

  6. Phase-Angle Dependence of Determinations of Diameter, Albedo, and Taxonomy: A Case Study of NEO 3691 Bede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Lederer, Susan M.; Jehin, Emmanuel; Howell, Ellen S.; Fernandez, Yan; Harker, David E.; Ryan, Erin; Lovell, Amy; Woodward, Charles E.; Benner, Lance A.

    2015-01-01

    Parameters important for NEO risk assessment and mitigation include Near-Earth Object diameter and taxonomic classification, which translates to surface composition. Diameters of NEOs are derived from the thermal fluxes measured by WISE, NEOWISE, Spitzer Warm Mission and ground-based telescopes including the IRTF and UKIRT. Diameter and its coupled parameters Albedo and IR beaming parameter (a proxy for thermal inertia and/or surface roughness) are dependent upon the phase angle, which is the Sun-target-observer angle. Orbit geometries of NEOs, however, typically provide for observations at phase angles greater than 20 degrees. At higher phase angles, the observed thermal emission is sampling both the day and night sides of the NEO. We compare thermal models for NEOs that exclude (NEATM) and include (NESTM) night-side emission. We present a case study of NEO 3691 Bede, which is a higher albedo object, X (Ec) or Cgh taxonomy, to highlight the range of H magnitudes for this object (depending on the albedo and phase function slope parameter G), and to examine at different phase angles the taxonomy and thermal model fits for this NEO. Observations of 3691 Bede include our observations with IRTF+SpeX and with the 10 micrometer UKIRT+Michelle instrument, as well as WISE and Spitzer Warm mission data. By examining 3691 Bede as a case study, we highlight the interplay between the derivation of basic physical parameters and observing geometry, and we discuss the uncertainties in H magnitude, taxonomy assignment amongst the X-class (P, M, E), and diameter determinations. Systematic dependencies in the derivation of basic characterization parameters of H-magnitude, diameter, albedo and taxonomy with observing geometry are important to understand. These basic characterization parameters affect the statistical assessments of the NEO population, which in turn, affects the assignment of statistically-assessed basic parameters to discovered but yet-to-be-fully-characterized NEOs.

  7. Evolution of the linear-polarization-angle-dependence of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance-oscillations with microwave power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Tianyu; Mani, R. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-10

    We examine the role of the microwave power in the linear polarization angle dependence of the microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional electron system. The diagonal resistance R{sub xx} was measured at the fixed magnetic fields of the photo-excited oscillatory extrema of R{sub xx} as a function of both the microwave power, P, and the linear polarization angle, θ. Color contour plots of such measurements demonstrate the evolution of the lineshape of R{sub xx} versus θ with increasing microwave power. We report that the non-linear power dependence of the amplitude of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations distorts the cosine-square relation between R{sub xx} and θ at high power.

  8. A deep-seated mechanism for cycle-dependent sunspot group tilt angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Emre

    2016-07-01

    The cycle-averaged tilt angle of sunspot groups is an important quantity in determining the magnetic flux diffusing across the equator, which is highly correlated with the strength of the next cycle. This quantity has recently been reported to be anti-correlated with the strength of the solar cycle. I suggest that a deep-seated thermodynamic cycle can be responsible for the observed correlation. Motivated by helioseismic indications, I calculate the effect of cooling of the convective overshoot region on the stability and dynamics of thin, unstable flux tubes. I find that only 5-20 K of cooling in the layer can explain the observed range of tilt angle fluctuations among different cycles. This mechanism can play a role in the nonlinear saturation and amplitude fluctuations of the solar dynamo.

  9. The Dependence of the Age Parameter from EAS Size and Zenith Angle of Incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Chilingarian, A A; Kazarian, S; Hovsepyan, G G; Mamidjanyan, E A; Melkumyan, L G; Sokhoyan, S H

    2000-01-01

    The quality of the MAKET-ANI detector installation in view of the uniformityof the registration efficiency is demonstrated. Based on a data samplecollected by the MAKET-ANI array in the period of June 1997 - March 1999, thedependencies of the age parameter on the zenith angle and the EAS size(10^5-10^7) are studied. The variation of the age parameter with the showersize can be approximately related to the elongation rate.

  10. Nuclear Dependence in Weak Structure Functions and the Determination of Weak Mixing Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Simo, I Ruiz; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We have studied nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F^A_2(x)$ and $F^A_3(x)$ and in the extraction of weak mixing angle using Paschos Wolfenstein(PW) relation. We have modified the PW relation for nonisoscalar nuclear target. We have incorporated the medium effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, nuclear binding energy, nucleon correlations, pion $\\&$ rho cloud contributions, and shadowing and antishadowing effects.

  11. INVESTIGATION ON SILICON SOLAR CELL CAPACITANCE AND ITS DEPENDENCE ON BOTH TEMPERATURE AND INCIDENCE ANGLE

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate a theoretical study of a vertical junction silicon solar cell capacitance under monochromatic illumination. By solving the continuity equation and using a one dimensional model in frequency modulation, we derive the analytical expressions of both excess minority carrier density and photovoltage. Based on these expressions, the solar cell capacitance was calculated; we then exhibited the effects of both temperature and incidence angle on the solar cell ca...

  12. Fluid epitaxialization effect on velocity dependence of dynamic contact angle in molecular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Hirata, Yosuke; Kukita, Yutaka

    2010-02-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effect of epitaxial ordering of the fluid molecules on the microscopic dynamic contact angle. The simulations were performed in a Couette-flow-like geometry where two immiscible fluids were confined between two parallel walls moving in opposite directions. The extent of ordering was varied by changing the number density of the wall particles. As the ordering becomes more evident, the change in the dynamic contact angle tends to be more sensitive to the increase in the relative velocity of the contact line to the wall. Stress components around the contact line is evaluated in order to examine the stress balance among the hydrodynamic stresses (viscous stress and pressure), the deviation of Young's stress from the static equilibrium condition, and the fluid-wall shear stress induced by the relative motion between them. It is shown that the magnitude of the shear stress on the fluid-wall surface is the primary contribution to the sensitivity of the dynamic contact angle and that the sensitivity is intensified by the fluid ordering near the wall surface.

  13. First observation of angle-dependent Stark cyclotron resonance in bulk crystals: High-electric-field interlayer magnetotransport in a layered organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, A.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Osada, T., E-mail: osada@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We report a novel angle-dependent magnetotransport phenomenon in layered conductors under strong interlayer electric fields. Interlayer conduction shows the Stark cyclotron resonance (SCR) when electron orbital motion becomes periodic in k-space. The SCR amplitude oscillates depending on magnetic field orientations. The conventional angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillation (AMRO) switches to the angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields. We predict angle-dependent SCR due to electron orbital motion in layered conductors with coherent interlayer coupling. In addition, we demonstrate the expected switching from conventional AMRO to angle-dependent SCR in high electric fields using an organic conductor {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}NH{sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}. This is the first observation of the SCR with orbital origin in bulk crystals.

  14. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence, E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Golubev, Nikolay [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Steinmann, Stephan N., E-mail: sns25@duke.edu [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  15. Angle-dependent hard X-ray photoemission study of Nb hydride formation in high-pressure supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soda, Kazuo, E-mail: j45880a@cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kondo, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Kanta; Kato, Masahiko [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiraki, Tatsuhito; Niwa, Ken; Kusaba, Keiji; Hasegawa, Masashi [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Xeniya, Kozina; Ikenaga, Eiji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nb hydrides in 10-GPa supercritical water are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. • The hydride components of the Nb 3d core-level spectra are increased with the depth. • The bulk valence-band spectrum shows a split band due to the Nb–H bond formation. • The hydrides are formed in the bulk and their surfaces are covered with Nb oxides. - Abstract: Nb hydrides formation in 10-GPa supercritical water has been investigated by angle-dependent micro-beam hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In the Nb 3d core-level spectra, Nb hydride components are found in the slightly high binding energy side of the metallic components, and the oxide ones are observed even though little oxides are recognized in X-ray diffraction patterns. Obtained emission-angle dependence of the Nb 3d core-level spectra of Nb hydride specimens shows that the Nb hydride components increase with the emission angle decreased i.e. the sampling depth increased, while the oxide ones decrease. The bulk valence-band spectrum is obtained by decomposing the measured valence-band spectra into a bulk and surface components with use of the emission-angle dependence of the core-level and valence-band spectra; it consists of two bands. This implies the Nb–H chemical bond formation and Nb in an oxidation state, consistent with reported band structure calculations and the observed core-level chemical shifts. Thus it is confirmed by valence-band and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy that the Nb hydrides are formed inside the specimen, irrespective to the well-known high oxidation ability of supercritical water.

  16. Capillary pressure overshoot for unstable wetting fronts is explained by Hoffman's velocity-dependent contact-angle relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Christine E.; Parlange, J.-Yves; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; DiCarlo, David A.; Wallach, Rony; Durnford, Deanna S.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2014-06-01

    Pore velocity-dependent dynamic contact angles provide a mechanism for explaining the formation of fingers/columns in porous media. To study those dynamic contact angles when gravity is present, rectangular capillary tubes were used to facilitate observation of the complete interface without geometric distortion. Results show that the Hoffman (1975) relationship between dynamic contact angle and water velocity applies to gravity-affected flow fields, and that it (when adjusted for nonzero static contact angles) can be used to model dynamic capillary pressures for unstable wettings fronts in porous media by assuming that (1) pressure at the wetting front is discontinuous, (2) the flow field behind the fingertip is highly heterogeneous, and (3) the front line advances one or a few pores at the time. We demonstrate the utility of the Hoffman relationship for porous media with a published infiltration experiment by calculating the capillary pressure successfully at the unstable wetting front as a function of the flux of water in the finger and the grain size diameter.

  17. Valley-dependent Brewster angles and Goos-Hänchen effect in strained graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenhua; Zhai, F; Peeters, F M; Xu, H Q; Chang, Kai

    2011-04-29

    We demonstrate theoretically how local strains in graphene can be tailored to generate a valley-polarized current. By suitable engineering of local strain profiles, we find that electrons in opposite valleys (K or K') show different Brewster-like angles and Goos-Hänchen shifts, exhibiting a close analogy with light propagating behavior. In a strain-induced waveguide, electrons in K and K' valleys have different group velocities, which can be used to construct a valley filter in graphene without the need for any external fields.

  18. Characterizing time-dependent contact angles for sands hydrophobized with oleic and stearic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, S; Kawamoto, K; Jayarathna, L

    2012-01-01

    -frequency precipitation. A potential solution is to alter soil grain surfaces to become water repellent by mixing or coating the soil cover material with hydrophobic agents (HAs). In this study, hydrophobic CBs comprised of sands mixed with environmentally friendly HAs (oleic acid [OA] and stearic acid [SA]) were studied....... Water repellency (WR) characteristics for hydrophobized sand samples with different HA contents and representing different coating methods (mixing in and solvent aided) were measured. Initial contact angles (αi) for OA-coated samples sharply increased with increasing HA content and reached peak values...

  19. Flight Test Techniques for Quantifying Pitch Rate and Angle of Attack Rate Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of maneuvers were designed to separately quantify pitch rate and angle of attack rate contributions to the nondimensional aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient. These maneuvers combined pilot inputs and automatic multisine excitations, and were own with the subscale T-2 and Bat-4 airplanes using the NASA AirSTAR flight test facility. Stability and control derivatives, in particular C(sub mq) and C(sub m alpha(.)) were accurately estimated from the flight test data. These maneuvers can be performed with many types of aircraft, and the results can be used to increase simulation prediction fidelity and facilitate more accurate comparisons with wind tunnel experiments or numerical investigations.

  20. Experimental study on the incident-angle-dependent laser coupling features of polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunsong; Huang, Chengwu; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin; Wei, Huiyue; Du, Huabing; Che, Xingsen; Mei, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Laser-produced plasmas have attracted great interest due to their potential utility in wide-ranging applications, especially in the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). For direct-driven ICF, laser coupling with polystyrene targets is a crucial and fundamental problem. In addition, oblique incidence is also a common phenomenon for laser facilities with multiple beams. It is necessary to evaluate the effects of oblique incidence on the laser coupling features relevant to the direct-driven ICF. Experiments using an intense nanosecond flat-top laser at around 4× {10}14 W cm-2 to irradiate polystyrene planar targets from three different incidence angles have been performed on the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The time-integrated absolute values of the full aperture backscatter (FABS), near backscatter scattering (NBS), and the x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) have been measured quantitatively. According to the experimental results, with the increase of the incidence angle, the percentage of the stimulated Brillouin backscatter and the overall x-ray CE decreased while the stimulated Raman backscatter fraction rose. Theoretical analyses based on hydrodynamic simulations and linear theory were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. In addition, the specularly reflected light was also observed at 30° laser oblique incidence.

  1. An experimental and computational study of size-dependent contact-angle of dewetted metal nanodroplets below its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Bruno P.; Yeratapally, Saikumar R.; Kacher, Josh; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Decorating 1D nanostructures (e.g., wires and tubes) with metal nanoparticles serves as a hierarchical approach to integrate the functionalities of metal oxides, semiconductors, and metals. This paper examines a simple and low-temperature approach to self-assembling gold nanoparticles (Au-np)—a common catalytic material—onto silicon nanowires (SiNWs). A conformal ultra-thin film (i.e., contact angle. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging, it is found that annealing temperature profile has a strong effect on the particle size. Additionally, the contact angle is found to be dependent on particle size and temperature even below the eutectic temperature of the Au-Si alloy. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate potential explanations for such experimental observation. In this temperature regime, the simulations reveal the formation of an amorphous phase at the interface between the catalyst and SiNW that is sensitive to temperature. This amorphous layer increases the adhesion energy at the interface and explains the contact angle dependence on temperature.

  2. Electron exchange in conformationally restricted donor-spacer-acceptor dyads: angle dependence and involvement of upper-lying excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benniston, Andrew C; Harriman, Anthony; Li, Peiyi; Patel, Pritesh V; Sams, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    The rate constant for triplet energy transfer (k(TET)) has been measured in fluid solution for a series of mixed-metal Ru-Os bis(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) complexes built around a tethered biphenyl-based spacer group. The length of the tether controls the central torsion angle for the spacer, which can be varied systematically from 37 to 130 degrees . At low temperature, but still in fluid solution, the spacer adopts the lowest-energy conformation and k(TET) shows a clear correlation with the torsion angle. A similar relationship holds for the inverse quantum yield for emission from the Ru-terpy donor. Triplet energy transfer is more strongly activated at higher temperature and the kinetic data require analysis in terms of two separate processes. The more weakly activated step involves electron exchange from the first-excited triplet state on the Ru-terpy donor and the size of the activation barrier matches well with that calculated from spectroscopic properties. The pre-exponential factor derived for this process correlates remarkably well with the torsion angle and there is a large disparity in electronic coupling through pi and sigma orbitals on the spacer. The more strongly activated step is attributed to electron exchange from an upper-lying triplet state localized on the Ru-terpy donor. Here, the pre-exponential factor is larger but shows the same dependence on the geometry of the spacer. Strangely, the difference in coupling through pi and sigma orbitals is much less pronounced. Despite internal flexibility around the spacer, k(TET) shows a marked dependence on the torsion angle computed for the lowest-energy conformation.

  3. Investigation of the zenith angle dependence of cosmic-ray muons at sea level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Bektasoglu; Halil Arslan

    2013-05-01

    Angular distribution of cosmic-ray muons at sea level has been investigated using the Geant4 simulation package. The model used in the simulations was tested by comparing the simulation results with the measurements made using the Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector. Primary particles’ energy and fluxes were obtained from the experimental measurements. Simulations were run at each zenith angle starting from = 0° up to = 70° with 5° increment. The angular distribution of muons at sea level has been estimated to be in the form $I() = I(0^{°}) \\cos^{n}()$, where (0°) is the muon intensity at 0° and is a function of the muon momentum. The exponent = 1.95 ± 0.08 for muons with energies above 1 GeV is in good agreement, within error, with the values reported in the literature.

  4. Cassini UVIS observations of Titan ultraviolet airglow intensity dependence with solar zenith angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, E. M.; Ajello, J. M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; West, R. A.; Esposito, L. W.; Bradley, E. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) observed the airglow (dayglow and nightglow) of Titan over a range of solar zenith angles (SZA) from 14 to 150° on five separate observations obtained between 2008 and 2012. The modeling of the solar cycle normalized UVIS observations indicates that a Chapman layer function provides a satisfactory fit to the intensity of the EUV and FUV airglow molecular emissions of the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (LBH a1Πg→X1>∑g+), the Carroll-Yoshino band system (c4'1>∑u+→X1>∑g+), and of several atomic multiplets of nitrogen (NI, II) as a function of SZA. This result shows that the strongest contribution to the Titan dayglow occurs by processes (photoelectrons and photodissociation) involving the solar EUV flux rather than magnetospheric particle precipitation that dominates emission excitation in the nightglow.

  5. Dependence of elbow joint stiffness measurements on speed, angle, and muscle contraction level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuxhaus, Laurel; Zeng, Sisi; Robinson, Charles J

    2014-03-21

    Elbow joint stiffness is critical to positioning the hand. Abnormal elbow joint stiffness may affect a person's ability to participate in activities of daily living. In this work, elbow joint stiffness was measured in ten healthy young adults with a device adapted from one previously used to measure stiffness in other joints. Measurements of elbow stiffness involved applying a constant-velocity rotational movement to the elbow and measuring the resultant displacement, torque, and acceleration. Elbow stiffness was then computed using a previously-established model for joint stiffness. Measurements were made at two unique elbow joint angles, two speeds, and two forearm muscle contraction levels. The results indicate that the elbow joint stiffness is significantly affected by both rotational speed and forearm muscle contraction level.

  6. Novel therapeutic approaches to correct retinal metabolic abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Common pathogenic aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, i.e., the role of free radicals inducing oxidative damage of the retina and optic nerve, are discussed. Factors that activate free radical reactions as well as multilevel antioxidant protection system are reviewed. Data derived from studies on current antioxidants that are used to treat and prevent dry AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage are compared. Neuroprotection for glaucoma will be considered soon as a basis for its treatment. B vitamins are generally included into therapeutic algorithms for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While being metabolic therapeutics, they stimulate adaptive compensatory mechanisms and reduce the severity of various pathological processes, e.g., hypoxia, lipid peroxidation etc. Neurotrophic, antioxidant, and regenerative effects of B vitamins as wells as their involvement in metabolism, myelinsynthesis and other processes are of special importance for ophthalmologists. Currently, several vitamin and mineral supplements that differ in composition, dosage, and schedule are approved in Russia. SuperOptic, a biologically activeadditive, contains more free lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (500 μg as well as potent antioxidants (vitamin E and vitamin C, microelements (zinc and copper, and balanced vitamin B complex. These components play an important role in ocular health. SuperOptic can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage.

  7. Novel therapeutic approaches to correct retinal metabolic abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Common pathogenic aspects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG, i.e., the role of free radicals inducing oxidative damage of the retina and optic nerve, are discussed. Factors that activate free radical reactions as well as multilevel antioxidant protection system are reviewed. Data derived from studies on current antioxidants that are used to treat and prevent dry AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage are compared. Neuroprotection for glaucoma will be considered soon as a basis for its treatment. B vitamins are generally included into therapeutic algorithms for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While being metabolic therapeutics, they stimulate adaptive compensatory mechanisms and reduce the severity of various pathological processes, e.g., hypoxia, lipid peroxidation etc. Neurotrophic, antioxidant, and regenerative effects of B vitamins as wells as their involvement in metabolism, myelinsynthesis and other processes are of special importance for ophthalmologists. Currently, several vitamin and mineral supplements that differ in composition, dosage, and schedule are approved in Russia. SuperOptic, a biologically activeadditive, contains more free lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (500 μg as well as potent antioxidants (vitamin E and vitamin C, microelements (zinc and copper, and balanced vitamin B complex. These components play an important role in ocular health. SuperOptic can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of AMD and glaucomatous optic nerve damage.

  8. Correction of sound velocity depending on the temperature for unconsolidated marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Choul

    2016-04-01

    laboratory sound velocity measurements with systematic temperature change on unconsolidated marine sediment have been performed to establish the precise correction curves between temperature and the sound velocity. Piston and box core samples recovered from the East Sea and the South Sea of Korea were used for the measurement. The core samples were cooled (at temperature of nearly 0℃) and the temperature was gradually increased (from 0℃ to 30℃) to measure sound velocity depending on the changes in temperature. The sediment texture and physical properties (porosity, water content, and bulk density) were measured separately at the same depth. The rate of velocity increase for muddy, silty, and sandy sediment are about 2.63 m/s/℃, 2.74 m/s/℃, and 2.96 m/s/℃, respectively. This is similar to the velocity change rate, 2.97 m/s/℃ presented by Del Grosso (1952). The samples used in this research, however, have relatively higher porosity than those of Del Grosso (1952). Thus, the possibility of discrepancy is differences in water content which affect the sound velocity and measurement system. We used recently developed digital velocity measurement system using PXI based on LabVIEW. We suggest to employ this correction for the accurate in situ geoacoustic property from laboratory data particularly for the deep cold water sample such as the East Sea sediment that has very low bottom water temperature about 0℃. Keywords : in situ geoacoustic property, temperature correction, East Sea Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Agency for Defense Development (UD14003DD) and by "Marine geological and geophysical mapping of the Korean seas" of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM).

  9. PET energy-based scatter estimation and image reconstruction with energy-dependent corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, L M; Lewitt, Robert M; Matej, Samuel; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 423 Guardian Drive, 4th floor Blockley Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021 (United States)

    2006-06-07

    In this paper we propose a comprehensive energy-based scatter correction approach for positron emission tomography (PET). We take advantage of the marked difference between the energy spectra of the unscattered and scattered photons, and use the detailed energy information that comes with the list-mode data for the estimation of the scattered events distribution in the data space. Also, inside the maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) image reconstruction algorithm, we introduce energy-dependent factors that individualize the correction terms for each event, given its position and energy information. The central piece of our approach is the two-dimensional detector energy response model represented as a linear combination of four components, each one representing a particular state a PET event can be found in: both photons unscattered, the second scattered while the first not, the first photon scattered while the second not and both photons scattered. For a set of events collected in the vicinity of a point in the projection space, the coefficient of each component is determined by applying a statistical estimator. As a result we obtain the number of scattered events that are in the given set. The model also gives us the variation of scatter fraction with the photon pair energies for that particular position in the data space. A simulation study that demonstrates the proposed methods is presented.

  10. Significance of hanging total spine x-ray to estimate the indicative correction angle by brace wearing in idiopathic scoliosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroki Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most idiopathic scoliosis patients subject to conservative treatment in daily clinical practice, there have been no ideal methods to evaluate the spinal flexibility for the patients who are scheduled the brace treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of hanging total spine x-ray to estimate the indicative correction angle by brace wearing in idiopathic scoliosis patients. Methods One hundred seventy-six consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis who were newly prescribed the Osaka Medical College (OMC brace were studied. The study included 14 boys and 162 girls with a mean age of 13 years and 1 month. The type of curves consisted of 62 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar, 22 lumbar, 42 double major, 14 double thoracic, and 13 triple curve pattern. We compared the Cobb angles on initial brace wearing (BA and in hanging position (HA. Of those, 108 patients who had main thoracic curves were selected and evaluated the corrective ability of OMC brace. These subjects were divided into three groups according to the relation between BA and HA (BA HA group, and then, maturity was compared among them. Results The average Cobb angle in upright position (UA of all cases was 31.0 ± 7.8°. The average BA and HA of all cases were 20.3 ± 9.5° and 21.1 ± 8.4°, respectively. The average chronological age was lowest in BA Conclusions The use of hanging total spine x-ray served as a useful tool to estimate the degree of correction possible curve within the OMC brace for main thoracic curve in idiopathic scoliosis. Maturity had some influence on the correlation between HA and BA. Namely, in immature patients, HA tended to be larger than BA. In contrast, in mature patients, HA had a tendency to be smaller than BA. With consideration for spinal flexibility based on maturity, in mature patients, larger BA than HA may be allowed. However, in immature patients, smaller BA than HA should be aimed.

  11. Field-angle and DC-bias dependence of spin-torque diode in giant magnetoresistive microstripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Zhou, Y.; Zheng, C.; Chan, P. H.; Chan, M.; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2016-11-01

    The spin torque diode effect in all metal spintronic devices has been proposed as a microwave detector with a high power limit and resistivity to breakdown. The previous works have revealed the field-angle dependence of the rectified DC voltage (VDC) in the ferromagnetic stripe. The giant magnetoresistive (GMR) microstripe exhibits higher sensitivity compared with the ferromagnetic stripe. However, the influence of the magnetic field direction and bias current in the spin rectification of GMR microstripe is not yet reported. In this work, the angular dependence and bias dependence of resonant frequency (fR) and VDC are investigated. A macrospin model concerning the contribution of magnetic field, shape anisotropy, and unidirectional anisotropy is engaged to interpret the experimental data. fR exhibits a |sin δH| dependence on the in-plane field angle (δH). VDC presents either |sin δH| or |sin2 δH cos δH | relation, depending on the magnitude of Hext. Optimized VDC of 24 μV is achieved under 4 mT magnetic field applied at δH = 170°. Under out-of-plane magnetic field, fR shows a cos 2θH reliance on the polar angle (θH), whereas VDC is sin θH dependent. The Oersted field of the DC bias current (IDC) modifies the effective field, resulting in shifted fR. Enhanced VDC with increasing IDC is attributed to the elevated contribution of spin-transfer torque. Maximum VDC of 35.2 μV is achieved, corresponding to 47% increase compared with the optimized value under zero bias. Higher IDC also results in enlarged damping parameter in the free layer, resulting in increased linewidth in the spin torque diode spectra. This work experimentally and analytically reveals the angular dependence of fR and VDC in the GMR microstripe. The results further demonstrate a highly tunable fR and optimized VDC by bias current without the external magnetic field. GMR microstripe holds promise for application as a high-power, frequency-tunable microwave detector that works under small

  12. Ehrenfest-time dependence of quantum transport corrections and spectral statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltner, Daniel; Kuipers, Jack

    2010-12-01

    The Ehrenfest-time scale in quantum transport separates essentially classical propagation from wave interference and here we consider its effect on the transmission and reflection through quantum dots. In particular, we calculate the Ehrenfest-time dependence of the next-to-leading-order quantum corrections to the transmission and reflection for dc and ac transport and check that our results are consistent with current conservation relations. Looking as well at spectral statistics in closed systems, we finally demonstrate how the contributions analyzed here imply changes in the calculation, given by Brouwer [Phys. Rev. E 74, 066208 (2006)], of the next-to-leading order of the spectral form factor. Our semiclassical result coincides with the result obtained by Tian and Larkin [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035305 (2004)] by field-theoretical methods.

  13. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary-Magnetic-Field Polar Correction

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Boschini, M J; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Tacconi, M

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2-D (radius and colatitude) Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0), was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1\\,AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton...

  14. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  15. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  16. Finite frequency traveltime sensitivity kernels for acoustic anisotropic media: Angle dependent bananas

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, Ramzi

    2013-08-19

    Anisotropy is an inherent character of the Earth subsurface. It should be considered for modeling and inversion. The acoustic VTI wave equation approximates the wave behavior in anisotropic media, and especially it\\'s kinematic characteristics. To analyze which parts of the model would affect the traveltime for anisotropic traveltime inversion methods, especially for wave equation tomography (WET), we drive the sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media using the VTI acoustic wave equation. A Born scattering approximation is first derived using the Fourier domain acoustic wave equation as a function of perturbations in three anisotropy parameters. Using the instantaneous traveltime, which unwraps the phase, we compute the kernels. These kernels resemble those for isotropic media, with the η kernel directionally dependent. They also have a maximum sensitivity along the geometrical ray, which is more realistic compared to the cross-correlation based kernels. Focusing on diving waves, which is used more often, especially recently in waveform inversion, we show sensitivity kernels in anisotropic media for this case.

  17. Latitudinal Dependence of Cosmic Rays Modulation at 1 AU and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Polar Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bobik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmic rays differential intensity inside the heliosphere, for energy below 30 GeV/nuc, depends on solar activity and interplanetary magnetic field polarity. This variation, termed solar modulation, is described using a 2D (radius and colatitude Monte Carlo approach for solving the Parker transport equation that includes diffusion, convection, magnetic drift, and adiabatic energy loss. Since the whole transport is strongly related to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF structure, a better understanding of his description is needed in order to reproduce the cosmic rays intensity at the Earth, as well as outside the ecliptic plane. In this work an interplanetary magnetic field model including the standard description on ecliptic region and a polar correction is presented. This treatment of the IMF, implemented in the HelMod Monte Carlo code (version 2.0, was used to determine the effects on the differential intensity of Proton at 1 AU and allowed one to investigate how latitudinal gradients of proton intensities, observed in the inner heliosphere with the Ulysses spacecraft during 1995, can be affected by the modification of the IMF in the polar regions.

  18. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  19. The Modified Femoral Neck-Shaft Angle: Age- and Sex-Dependent Reference Values and Reliability Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, Christoph Kolja; Frink, Michael; Jostmeier, Janine; Haneder, Stefan; Dargel, Jens; Eysel, Peer; Lechler, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background. The femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) is of high importance for the diagnostics and treatment of various conditions of the hip. However, rotational effects limit its precision and applicability using plain radiographs. This study introduces a novel method to measure the femoral NSA: the modified NSA (mNSA), possibly being less susceptible against rotational effects compared to the conventional NSA. Patients and Methods. The method of measurement is described and its applicability was tested in 400 pelvis computed tomography scans (800 hips). Age- and gender-dependent reference values are given and intra- and interrater reliability are analyzed. Results. The mean age of all 400 patients (800 hips) was 54.32 years (18-100, SD 22.05 years). The mean mNSA was 147.0° and the 95% confidence interval was 146.7°-147.4°. Differences of the mNSA between sexes, age groups, and sides were nonsignificant. The absolute difference between NSA and mNSA was 16.3° (range 3-31°; SD 4.4°); the correlation was high (0.738; p < 0.001). Overall, the intra- and interrater reliability were excellent for the mNSA. Interpretation. We introduced a novel concept for the analysis of the neck-shaft angle. The high reliability of the measurement has been proven and its robustness to hip rotation was demonstrated.

  20. Thickness dependence of surface energy and contact angle of water droplets on ultrathin MoS2 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanhua; Wang, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lizhi; Shen, Xiaodong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a systematic density functional study of surface energy of MoS2 films as a function of thickness from one to twelve layers with the consideration of van der Waals (vdW) interactions using the vdW-DF and DFT-D2 methods. Both vdW schemes show that the surface energy will increase with the increase of the number of atomic layers and converge to a constant value at about six layers. Based on the calculated surface energies, we further analyze the surface contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface using Young's equation as a function of thickness in comparison with experiments, from which the water-MoS2 interfacial energy is derived to be independent of MoS2 thickness. Our calculations indicate that the vdW interactions between the MoS2 layers play an important role in determining surface energy, and results in the thickness dependence of the contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface. Our results explain well the recent wetting experiment [Nano Lett., 2014, 14(8), 4314], and will be useful for future studies of physical and chemical properties of ultrathin MoS2 films.

  1. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations and magnetic breakdown in {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, K., E-mail: uchida@issp.u-tokyo.ac.j [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Konoike, T.; Osada, T. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    We present results of stereographic measurements of interlayer magnetoresistance in the quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) organic conductor, {alpha}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}KHg(SCN){sub 4}, at around charge density wave (CDW) transition temperature T{sub c{approx}}8K. At 2 K in the CDW phase, there exists the anomalous Lebed resonance pattern, the amplitude of which is modulated by Danner-Chaikin oscillations in case of applied magnetic field close to the Q2D conducting plane. On the contrary, at 7 K just below T{sub c}, we have found that the Kajita oscillation of the cylindrical Fermi surfaces appears superposed on the anomalous Lebed resonance. A quantum model of interlayer tunneling demonstrates these behaviors qualitatively. These results suggest that magnetic breakdown plays a key role in anomalous angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations.

  2. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations and magnetic breakdown in α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K.; Konoike, T.; Osada, T.

    2010-06-01

    We present results of stereographic measurements of interlayer magnetoresistance in the quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) organic conductor, α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4, at around charge density wave (CDW) transition temperature Tc˜8K. At 2 K in the CDW phase, there exists the anomalous Lebed resonance pattern, the amplitude of which is modulated by Danner-Chaikin oscillations in case of applied magnetic field close to the Q2D conducting plane. On the contrary, at 7 K just below Tc, we have found that the Kajita oscillation of the cylindrical Fermi surfaces appears superposed on the anomalous Lebed resonance. A quantum model of interlayer tunneling demonstrates these behaviors qualitatively. These results suggest that magnetic breakdown plays a key role in anomalous angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations.

  3. A novel, view-independent method for strain mapping in myocardial elastography: eliminating angle and centroid dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zervantonakis, I K; Fung-Kee-Fung, S D; Lee, W-N; Konofagou, E E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-07-21

    Robust indices of regional and global cardiac function are a key factor in detection and treatment of heart disease as well as understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of a healthy heart. Myocardial elastography provides a noninvasive method for imaging and measuring displacement and strain of the myocardium for the early detection of cardiovascular disease. However, two-dimensional in-plane axial and lateral strains measured depend on the sonographic view used. This becomes especially critical in a clinical setting and may induce large variations in the measured strains, potentially leading to false diagnoses. A novel method in myocardial elastography is proposed for eliminating this view dependence by deriving the polar, principal and classified principal strains. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by employing 3D finite-element left-ventricular models of a control and an ischemic canine heart. Although polar strains are angle-independent, they are sensitive to the selected reference coordinate system, which requires the definition of a centroid of the left ventricle (LV). In contrast, principal strains derived through eigenvalue decomposition exhibit the inherent characteristic of coordinate system independence, offering view (i.e., angle and centroid)-independent strain measurements. Classified principal strains are obtained by assigning the principal components in the physical ventricular coordinate system. An extensive strain analysis illustrates the improvement in interpretation and visualization of the full-field myocardial deformation by using the classified principal strains, clearly depicting the ischemic and non-ischemic regions. Strain maps, independent of sonographic views and imaging planes, that can be used to accurately detect regional contractile dysfunction are demonstrated.

  4. A novel, view-independent method for strain mapping in myocardial elastography: eliminating angle and centroid dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervantonakis, I. K.; Fung-Kee-Fung, S. D.; Lee, W.-N.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2007-07-01

    Robust indices of regional and global cardiac function are a key factor in detection and treatment of heart disease as well as understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of a healthy heart. Myocardial elastography provides a noninvasive method for imaging and measuring displacement and strain of the myocardium for the early detection of cardiovascular disease. However, two-dimensional in-plane axial and lateral strains measured depend on the sonographic view used. This becomes especially critical in a clinical setting and may induce large variations in the measured strains, potentially leading to false diagnoses. A novel method in myocardial elastography is proposed for eliminating this view dependence by deriving the polar, principal and classified principal strains. The performance of the proposed methodology is assessed by employing 3D finite-element left-ventricular models of a control and an ischemic canine heart. Although polar strains are angle-independent, they are sensitive to the selected reference coordinate system, which requires the definition of a centroid of the left ventricle (LV). In contrast, principal strains derived through eigenvalue decomposition exhibit the inherent characteristic of coordinate system independence, offering view (i.e., angle and centroid)-independent strain measurements. Classified principal strains are obtained by assigning the principal components in the physical ventricular coordinate system. An extensive strain analysis illustrates the improvement in interpretation and visualization of the full-field myocardial deformation by using the classified principal strains, clearly depicting the ischemic and non-ischemic regions. Strain maps, independent of sonographic views and imaging planes, that can be used to accurately detect regional contractile dysfunction are demonstrated.

  5. Photoinduced superhydrophilicity: a kinetic study of time dependent photoinduced contact angle changes on TiO2 surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Philip S; Boxall, Colin; Denison, Kieth R

    2012-12-21

    Transparent TiO(2) thin films were prepared on quartz substrates via a reverse micelle, sol-gel, spin-coating technique. The time dependence of the TiO(2) film photoinduced superhydrophilicity (PISH) was measured by goniometric observation of the contact angle, θ, of sessile water drops at the film surfaces. In these measurements, the TiO(2) substrate was illuminated by 315 nm light and drops were sequentially applied at a range of illumination times. Using a model for the wetting of heterogeneous surfaces derived by Israelachvili and Gee, these measurements were used to calculate the time dependence of f(2), the fractional surface coverage of the TiO(2) surface by adventitious contaminating organics (Israelachvili, J. N.; Gee, M. L. Contact angles on chemically heterogeneous surfaces. Langmuir 1989, 5, 288). Extending this model to include a Langmuir-Hinshelwood based kinetic analysis of f(2) as a function of time allowed for calculation of an expected value for θ immediately prior to illumination, that is, at illumination time t = 0. Such expected values of θ at t = 0 were calculated using two possible values of θ(1), the contact angle on a pristine unilluminated homogeneous TiO(2) surface: (i) θ(1) = 4° as suggested by, inter alia, Zubkov et al. (Zubkov, T.; Stahl, D.; Thompson, T. L.; Panayotov, D.; Diwald, O.; Yates, J. T. Ultraviolet Light-Induced Hydrophilicity Effect on TiO(2)(110)(1 × 1). Dominant Role of the Photooxidation of Adsorbed Hydrocarbons Causing Wetting by Water Droplets. J. Phys. Chem. B2005, 109, 15454); and (ii) where θ(1) = 25°, as suggested by Fujishima et al., representative of a more hydrophobic homogeneous TiO(2) surface that reconstructs upon exposure to ultraband gap illumination into a hydrophilic surface where θ(1) → 0° (Fujishima, A.; Zhang, X.; Tryk, D. A. TiO(2) photocatalysis and related surface phenomena Surf. Sci. Rep.2008, 63, 515). Analysis of data from our experiments and from selected literature sources

  6. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-12-21

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as 'weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  7. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as `weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  8. On the gas dependence of thermal transpiration and a critical appraisal of correction methods for capacitive diaphragm gauges

    CERN Document Server

    Daudé, Barthélémy; Janssen, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Thermal transpiration effects are commonly encountered in low pressure measurements with capacitance diaphragm gauges. They arise from the temperature difference between the measurement volume and the temperature stabilised manometer. Several approaches have been proposed to correct for the pressure difference, but surface and geometric effects usually require that the correction is determined for each gas type and gauge individually. Common (semi) empirical corrections are based on studies of atoms or small molecules. We present a simple calibration method for diaphragm gauges and compare transpiration corrections for argon and styrene at pressures above 1 Pa. We find that characteristic pressures at which the pressure difference reaches half its maximum value, are compatible with the universal scaling p_{1/2} = 2 \\{\\eta} \\cdot \\{v_{th}} / d, thus essentially depending on gas viscosity \\eta, thermal molecular speed v_{th} and gauge tubing diameter d. This contradicts current recommendations based on the Taka...

  9. Evolution of temperature-dependent charge transfer inefficiency correction for ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Durham, R. Nick; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2016-07-01

    As ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory enters its seventeenth year of operation, it continues to perform well and produce spectacular scientific results. The response of ACIS has evolved over the lifetime of the observatory due to radiation damage and aging of the spacecraft. The ACIS instrument team developed a software tool which applies a correction to each X-ray event and mitigates charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) and spectral resolution degradation. The behavior of the charge traps that cause CTI are temperature dependent, however, and warmer temperatures reduce the effectiveness of the correction algorithm. As the radiator surfaces on Chandra age, ACIS cooling has become less efficient and temperatures can increase by a few degrees. A temperature-dependent component was added to the CTI correction algorithm in 2010. We present an evaluation of the effectiveness of this algorithm as the radiation damage and thermal environment continue to evolve and suggest updates to improve the calibration fidelity.

  10. Thermal calculation of ground contact structures: Correction factors of environment- and structure-dependent effects on the heat transfer coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    The heat loss at ground contact structures is taken into consideration in building heat loss calculations. However, the heat loss through the ground depends not only the soil and the building structure, but the environment as well. New calculation methods based on parametrized transient finite element thermal modelling are introduced in the preceding research article [3]. This paper is the further demonstration of the methods’ environment- or structure-depending correction factors which descr...

  11. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M; Rehman, J; Khan, M [The Islaimia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur, Punjab (Pakistan); Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT.

  12. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sinitsyn, N. A.; Nemenman, I.

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a noncyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the nonperiodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. We apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualita...

  13. An empirical method to correct for temperature-dependent variations in the overlap function of CHM15k ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervo, Maxime; Poltera, Yann; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Imperfections in a lidar's overlap function lead to artefacts in the background, range and overlap-corrected lidar signals. These artefacts can erroneously be interpreted as an aerosol gradient or, in extreme cases, as a cloud base leading to false cloud detection. A correct specification of the overlap function is hence crucial in the use of automatic elastic lidars (ceilometers) for the detection of the planetary boundary layer or of low cloud. In this study, an algorithm is presented to correct such artefacts. It is based on the assumption of a homogeneous boundary layer and a correct specification of the overlap function down to a minimum range, which must be situated within the boundary layer. The strength of the algorithm lies in a sophisticated quality-check scheme which allows the reliable identification of favourable atmospheric conditions. The algorithm was applied to 2 years of data from a CHM15k ceilometer from the company Lufft. Backscatter signals corrected for background, range and overlap were compared using the overlap function provided by the manufacturer and the one corrected with the presented algorithm. Differences between corrected and uncorrected signals reached up to 45 % in the first 300 m above ground. The amplitude of the correction turned out to be temperature dependent and was larger for higher temperatures. A linear model of the correction as a function of the instrument's internal temperature was derived from the experimental data. Case studies and a statistical analysis of the strongest gradient derived from corrected signals reveal that the temperature model is capable of a high-quality correction of overlap artefacts, in particular those due to diurnal variations. The presented correction method has the potential to significantly improve the detection of the boundary layer with gradient-based methods because it removes false candidates and hence simplifies the attribution of the detected gradients to the planetary boundary layer. A

  14. Optical advantages of astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, De Wet; Schöttl, Peter; Bern, Gregor; Heimsath, Anna; Nitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Astigmatic aberration corrected heliostats adapt their shape in dependence of the incidence angle of the sun on the heliostat. Simulations show that this optical correction leads to a higher concentration ratio at the target and thus in a decrease in required receiver aperture in particular for smaller heliostat fields.

  15. A Novel Approach for Deriving Force Field Torsion Angle Parameters Accounting for Conformation-Dependent Solvation Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarbová, Marie; Luque, F Javier; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2012-09-11

    A procedure for deriving force field torsion parameters including certain previously neglected solvation effects is suggested. In contrast to the conventional in vacuo approaches, the dihedral parameters are obtained from the difference between the quantum-mechanical self-consistent reaction field and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum solvation models. An analysis of the solvation contributions shows that two major effects neglected when torsion parameters are derived in vacuo are (i) conformation-dependent solute polarization and (ii) solvation of conformation-dependent charge distribution. Using the glycosidic torsion as an example, we demonstrate that the corresponding correction for the torsion potential is substantial and important. Our approach avoids double counting of solvation effects and provides parameters that may be used in combination with any of the widely used nonpolarizable discrete solvent models, such as TIPnP or SPC/E, or with continuum solvent models. Differences between our model and the previously suggested solvation models are discussed. Improvements were demonstrated for the latest AMBER RNA χOL3 parameters derived with inclusion of solvent effects in a previous publication (Zgarbova et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2886). The described procedure may help to provide consistently better force field parameters than the currently used parametrization approaches.

  16. 汽车前轮转向角测试误差修正算法研究%Algorithm for correcting turning-angle test error of vehicle's front-wheel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张扬; 张晓光

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm to correct turning-angle test error for vehicle steering-wheel was described in this paper, it used the mechanical structure properties of vehicle steering-axle. By this algorithm, the zero turning-angle starting position of the steering-wheel can be accurately calculated, and then the turning-angle test data can be corrected. Furthermore, the accurate maximum turning angles and related angles of the left and the right steering-wheels can be calculated. It solves the problem that the turning -angle test data for, the steering -wheel has low accuracy and poor repeatability.%提出一种利用汽车转向桥机械结构特性解决汽车转向轮转向角测试误差修正的算法,通过该算法可计算出汽车轮胎准确的零转角起点位置,进而对转角测试数据进行修正,以此计算出准确的左右轮最大转向角及相关角,解决了目前汽车转向轮转向角测试数据准确度低、重复性差的问题.

  17. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, N A; Nemenman, I

    2010-11-01

    The authors generalise the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a non-cyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the non-periodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. The authors apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualitatively changes the outcome of the reaction kinetics.

  18. Using rain-on-snow events to evaluate the quality of bias correction to represent complex inter-variable dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Ole; Bosshard, Thomas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    A key issue for adaptation planning is the information of projections about changes of extremes. Climate projections of meteorological extremes and their downscaling are a challenge on their own. Yet - at least in hydrology - meteorological extremes are not necessarily hydrological extremes. These can also result from a sequence of days with only moderate meteorological conditions, too. This sequences are called "storylines". In climate change impact assess studies it is relevant to know, whether these meteorological storylines are represented in regional climate models, and how well can bias correction preserve or improve the representation. One storyline leading to hydrological extremes are rain-on-snow events, and more specifically rain-on-snowfall events. These events challenge the regional climate model and the bias correction in terms of representing absolute values and inter-variable dependences. This study makes use of the rain-on-snow-storylines to evaluate the performance of regional climate models and a bias correction method in reproducing complex inter-variable dependencies. At first, we applied a hydrological model to a mesoscale catchment in Switzerland that is known to be effected by rain-on-snow events. At second, the ERA-Interim driven regional climate model RCA4.5 - developed at SMHI - with a spatial resolution of 0.11 * 0.11 degree was used to drive the hydrological model. At third, bias-correction of the RCM was done applying the distribution based scaling (DBS) bias-correction method (Yang et al., 2010) developed at the SMHI. The bias-corrected data then also served as driving input data to the hydrological model. Based on the simulated runoff, as well as simulated precipitation, temperature, and snow pack data, an algorithm to detect rain-on-snow events was applied. Finally, the presence or absents of rain-on-snow events for the three different climate input data, ERA.RCA4.5, DBS corrected ERA.RC4 and observed climate, are evaluated within

  19. Experimental validation of gallium production and isotope-dependent positron range correction in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, L. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Udías, J. M.; Cal-González, J.; Corzo, P. M. G.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Picado, E.; Vicente, E.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Positron range (PR) is one of the important factors that limit the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) preclinical images. Its blurring effect can be corrected to a large extent if the appropriate method is used during the image reconstruction. Nevertheless, this correction requires an accurate modelling of the PR for the particular radionuclide and materials in the sample under study. In this work we investigate PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes, which have a large PR and are being used in many preclinical and clinical PET studies. We produced a 68Ga and 66Ga phantom on a natural zinc target through (p,n) reactions using the 9-MeV proton beam delivered by the 5-MV CMAM tandetron accelerator. The phantom was imaged in an ARGUS small animal PET/CT scanner and reconstructed with a fully 3D iterative algorithm, with and without PR corrections. The reconstructed images at different time frames show significant improvement in spatial resolution when the appropriate PR is applied for each frame, by taking into account the relative amount of each isotope in the sample. With these results we validate our previously proposed PR correction method for isotopes with large PR. Additionally, we explore the feasibility of PET imaging with 68Ga and 66Ga radioisotopes in proton therapy.

  20. Experimental validation of gallium production and isotope-dependent positron range correction in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraile, L.M., E-mail: lmfraile@ucm.es [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L.; Udías, J.M.; Cal-González, J.; Corzo, P.M.G.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Picado, E.; Vicente, E. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-Martín, A. [Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-01

    Positron range (PR) is one of the important factors that limit the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) preclinical images. Its blurring effect can be corrected to a large extent if the appropriate method is used during the image reconstruction. Nevertheless, this correction requires an accurate modelling of the PR for the particular radionuclide and materials in the sample under study. In this work we investigate PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga radioisotopes, which have a large PR and are being used in many preclinical and clinical PET studies. We produced a {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga phantom on a natural zinc target through (p,n) reactions using the 9-MeV proton beam delivered by the 5-MV CMAM tandetron accelerator. The phantom was imaged in an ARGUS small animal PET/CT scanner and reconstructed with a fully 3D iterative algorithm, with and without PR corrections. The reconstructed images at different time frames show significant improvement in spatial resolution when the appropriate PR is applied for each frame, by taking into account the relative amount of each isotope in the sample. With these results we validate our previously proposed PR correction method for isotopes with large PR. Additionally, we explore the feasibility of PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga and {sup 66}Ga radioisotopes in proton therapy.

  1. Testing Rate Dependent corrections on timing mode EPIC-pn spectra of the accreting Neutron Star GX 13+1

    CERN Document Server

    Pintore, F; di Salvo, T; Guainazzi, M; D'Aì, A; Riggio, A; Burderi, L; Iaria, R; Robba, N R

    2014-01-01

    When the EPIC-pn instrument on board XMM-Newton is operated in Timing mode, high count rates (>100 cts/s) of bright sources may affect the calibration of the energy scale, resulting in a modification of the real spectral shape. The corrections related to this effect are then strongly important in the study of the spectral properties. Tests of these calibrations are more suitable in sources which spectra are characterised by a large number of discrete features. Therefore, in this work, we carried out a spectral analysis of the accreting Neutron Star GX 13+1, which is a dipping source with several narrow absorption lines and a broad emission line in its spectrum. We tested two different correction approaches on an XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observation taken in Timing mode: the standard Rate Dependent CTI (RDCTI or epfast) and the new, Rate Dependent Pulse Height Amplitude (RDPHA) corrections. We found that, in general, the two corrections marginally affect the properties of the overall broadband continuum, while hints...

  2. On the gas dependence of thermal transpiration and a critical appraisal of correction methods for capacitive diaphragm gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudé, Barthélémy; Elandaloussi, Hadj; Janssen, Christof

    2014-06-01

    Thermal transpiration effects are commonly encountered in low pressure measurements with capacitance diaphragm gauges. They arise from the temperature difference between the measurement volume and the temperature stabilised manometer. Several approaches have been proposed to correct for the pressure difference, but surface and geometric effects usually require that the correction is determined for each gas type and gauge individually. Common (semi) empirical corrections are based on studies of atoms or small molecules. We present a simple calibration method for diaphragm gauges and compare transpiration corrections for argon and styrene at pressures above 1 Pa. We find that characteristic pressures at which the pressure difference reaches half its maximum value, are compatible with the universal scaling p_{1/2} = 2 \\{\\eta} \\cdot \\{v_{th}} / d, thus essentially depending on gas viscosity \\eta, thermal molecular speed v_{th} and gauge tubing diameter d. This contradicts current recommendations based on the Takaishi and Sensui formula, which show an unphysical scaling with molecular size. Our results support the Miller or \\v{S}etina equations where the pressure dependency is basically determined by the Knudsen number. The use of these two schemes is therefore recommended, especially when thermal transpiration has to be predicted for new molecules. Implications for investigations on large polyatomics are discussed.

  3. 末段修正弹对脉冲修正力的角运动响应分析%The Analysis on the Angle Motion of Terminal Correct Projectile Responsing to Impulse Corective Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施坤林

    2001-01-01

    建立了末段脉冲修正弹在脉冲修正力作用下的角运动数学模型,分析了末段修正弹对脉冲修正力的动态响应特性和响应谱,给出了对尾翼稳定脉冲修正弹设计有普遍指导意义的结果。%On the basis of setting up the angle motion mathematic model of the terminal correct projectile forced by impulse corrective force,this paper discusses the dynamic response of the terminal correct projectile and response spectrum.The general conclusion that profit to design impulse correct projectile stabilized by taiFl wing is given.

  4. Searches for $p_{\\rm T}$ dependent fluctuations of flow angle and magnitude in Pb--Pb and p--Pb collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, You

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic azimuthal correlations are used to probe the properties and the evolution of the system created in heavy-ion collisions. Two-particle azimuthal correlations were used in the searches of $p_{\\rm T}$ dependent fluctuations of flow angle and magnitude, measured with the ALICE detector...

  5. Roentgenographic evaluation of the actual CCD and AT angle according to Rippstein and Mueller. Pt. 1. Correction of the conversion tables and examination of the influences caused by deviations in the positioning of the patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunert, S.; Brueckl, R.; Rosemeyer, B.

    1986-06-01

    The femoral neck-shaft angle (CCD) and the angle of torsion (AT) are angles in the space; in the commonly used radiographs they are not pictured in their true and actual size (rCCD, rAT), but in a more or less deviating projected size (pCCD, pAT). The formulas required for the conversion are explained in detail and the existing conversion-tables are being corrected. The effects of minor deviations (5/sup 0/, 10/sup 0/ and 20/sup 0/ resp., increased/decreased abduction or flexion, as well as exterior/interior rotation) from the prescribed position of the patient are being calculated and displayed in diagrams. It is evident that the determination of the angle according to Rippstein and Mueller may be influenced at a considerable extent already by minor discrepancies (+-5-10/sup 0/) in the placing of the patient. In cases of high AT-angle values, or in cases where the placing of the patient causes problems and where the determination of the angle would involve major therapeutic measurements another procedure will have to be applied which should be almost independent from discrepancies in the placing of the patient.

  6. Time-Dependent Corrections to the Ly-alpha Escape Probability During Cosmological Hydrogen Recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, J

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects connected with the detailed radiative transfer during the epoch of cosmological recombination on the ionization history of our Universe. We focus on the escape of photons from the hydrogen Lyman-alpha resonance at redshifts 600<~z<~2000, one of two key mechanisms defining the rate of cosmological recombination. We approach this problem within the standard formulation, and corrections due to two-photon interactions are deferred to another paper. As a main result we show here that within a non-stationary approach to the escape problem the resulting correction in the free electron fraction, N_e, is about ~1.6-1.8% in the redshift range 800<~z<~1200. Therefore the discussed process results in one of the biggest modification to the ionization history close to the maximum of Thomson-visibility function at z~1100 considered sofar. We prove our results both numerically and analytically, deriving the escape probability, and considering both Lyman-alpha line-emission an...

  7. Single-image-based solution for optics temperature-dependent nonuniformity correction in an uncooled long-wave infrared camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2014-02-01

    In this Letter, we propose an efficient and accurate solution to remove temperature-dependent nonuniformity effects introduced by the imaging optics. This single-image-based approach computes optics-related fixed pattern noise (FPN) by fitting the derivatives of correction model to the gradient components, locally computed on an infrared image. A modified bilateral filtering algorithm is applied to local pixel output variations, so that the refined gradients are most likely caused by the nonuniformity associated with optics. The estimated bias field is subtracted from the raw infrared imagery to compensate the intensity variations caused by optics. The proposed method is fundamentally different from the existing nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques developed for focal plane arrays (FPAs) and provides an essential image processing functionality to achieve completely shutterless NUC for uncooled long-wave infrared (LWIR) imaging systems.

  8. Correcting atmospheric effects on InSAR with MERIS water vapour data and elevation-dependent interpolation model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Z. W.

    2012-05-01

    The propagation delay when radar signals travel from the troposphere has been one of the major limitations for the applications of high precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). In this paper, we first present an elevation-dependent atmospheric correction model for Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR—the instrument aboard the ENVISAT satellite) interferograms with Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) integrated water vapour (IWV) data. Then, using four ASAR interferometric pairs over Southern California as examples, we conduct the atmospheric correction experiments with cloud-free MERIS IWV data. The results show that after the correction the rms differences between InSAR and GPS have reduced by 69.6 per cent, 29 per cent, 31.8 per cent and 23.3 per cent, respectively for the four selected interferograms, with an average improvement of 38.4 per cent. Most importantly, after the correction, six distinct deformation areas have been identified, that is, Long Beach–Santa Ana Basin, Pomona–Ontario, San Bernardino and Elsinore basin, with the deformation velocities along the radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction ranging from −20 mm yr−1 to −30 mm yr−1 and on average around −25 mm yr−1, and Santa Fe Springs and Wilmington, with a slightly low deformation rate of about −10 mm yr−1 along LOS. Finally, through the method of stacking, we generate a mean deformation velocity map of Los Angeles over a period of 5 yr. The deformation is quite consistent with the historical deformation of the area. Thus, using the cloud-free MERIS IWV data correcting synchronized ASAR interferograms can significantly reduce the atmospheric effects in the interferograms and further better capture the ground deformation and other geophysical signals.

  9. Variability of photovoltaic panels efficiency depending on the value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdak Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to determine the relationship between the efficiency of photovoltaic panels and the value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon. For the purpose of experimental research have been done tests on the photovoltaic modules made of monocrystalline, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon. The experiment consisted of measurement of the voltage and current generated by photovoltaic panels at a known value of solar radiation and a specified resistance value determined by using resistor with variable value of resistance and known value of the angle of their inclination relative to the horizon.

  10. Flow angle dependence of 1-m ionospheric plasma wave turbulence for near-threshold radar echo electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, E. E.; Vallinkoski, M. K.; Pollari, P.; Kangas, J.; Virdi, T.; Williams, P. J. S.; Nielsen, E.

    2002-10-01

    Coordinated STARE-EISCAT data from the E-region Rocket and Radar Instability Study (ERRRIS) campaign are used to study the flow angle distributions of threshold (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] ≤ 1 dB) ionospheric parameters controlling the STARE radar echo appearance for either radar above Tromsø. Altogether, there are 64 measurements for the Finnish radar and 128 for the Norwegian radar. For the Finnish radar, the threshold E-field strength is drift-aligned with minimum-to-maximum ratio of the electron drift velocities of about 3. The strengths tend to decrease when going from positive to negative flow angles. For the Norwegian radar, the threshold electric fields are practically independent of flow angle. For the Finnish radar, the STARE line-of-sight Doppler velocities are exclusively positive, large, and well correlated with the corresponding EISCAT plasma velocity components. The Norwegian radar Doppler velocities are randomly distributed around zero and are practically uncorrelated. For either radar, the N(h) profiles have permanent upward vertical density gradients within the echo layers. The jet averaged threshold E-fields are lower in the westjet than within the eastjet, but the averaged threshold electron densities are higher in the westjet than in the eastjet. For the Norwegian radar, the jet averaged turbulence level is about two times higher within the eastjet. The flow angle distributions of the plasma wave turbulence level are different. The westjet distribution is of the equilibrium type with a maximum at small flow angles and a minimum at large angles. The eastjet distribution is consistent with a flat one and can be kept stationary only if there is a damping of the turbulence for small flow angles and an enhancement for large angles. It is then conjectured that Finnish radar threshold echoes are generated by the Farley-Buneman instability, but the Norwegian echoes by a nonlinear gradient drift or/and wind-driven mechanism. The gradient drift

  11. 75 FR 32293 - Nonduplication; Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Register on September 30, 1997, at 62 FR 51274, amending 38 CFR 3.503, by redesignating paragraphs (a... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 21 Nonduplication; Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity...

  12. Robust and bias-corrected estimation of the coefficient of tail dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutang, C.; Goegebeur, Y.; Guillou, A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a robust and asymptotically unbiased estimator for the coefficient of tail dependence in multivariate extreme value statistics. The estimator is obtained by fitting a second order model to the data by means of the minimum density power divergence criterion. The asymptotic properties ...

  13. Determination of the Fermi velocity by angle-dependent periodic orbit resonance measurements in the organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A. E.; Hill, S.; Qualls, J. S.

    2002-10-01

    We report on detailed angle-dependent studies of the microwave (ν=50-90 GHz) interlayer magnetoelectrodynamics of a single crystal sample of the organic charge-density-wave (CDW) conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4. Recently developed instrumentation enables both magnetic-field (B) sweeps for a fixed sample orientation and angle sweeps at fixed ν/B. We observe series' of resonant absorptions, which we attribute to periodic orbit resonances (POR)-a phenomenon closely related to cyclotron resonance. The angle dependence of the POR indicates that they are associated with the low-temperature quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) Fermi surface (FS) of the title compound; indeed, all of the resonance peaks collapse onto a single set of ν/B versus angle curves, generated using a semiclassical magnetotransport theory for a single Q1D FS. We show that Q1D POR measurements provide one of the most direct methods for determining the Fermi velocity, without any detailed assumptions concerning the band structure; our analysis yields an average value of vF=6.5×104 m/s. Quantitative analysis of the POR harmonic content indicates that the Q1D FS is strongly corrugated. This is consistent with the assumption that the low-temperature FS derives from a reconstruction of the high-temperature quasi-two-dimensional FS, caused by the CDW instability. Detailed analysis of the angle dependence of the POR yields parameters associated with the CDW superstructure, which are consistent with published results. Finally, we address the issue as to whether or not the interlayer electrodynamics are coherent in the title compound. We obtain a relaxation time from the POR linewidths, which is considerably longer than the interlayer hopping time, indicating that the transport in this direction is coherent.

  14. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S; Wuerl, M; Assmann, W; Parodi, K [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, Garching, DE (Germany); Greubel, C [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Neubiberg, DE (United States); Wilkens, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, DE (Germany); Hillbrand, M [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich, DE (Germany); Mairani, A [Medical Physics Unit CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET being almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence

  15. Proton form-factor dependence of the finite-size correction to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, J D; Rafelski, J; Miller, G A

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the 2P^{F=2}_{3/2} to 2S^{F=1}_{1/2} transition in muonic hydrogen by Pohl et al. and subsequent analysis has led to the conclusion that the rms radius of the proton differs from the accepted (CODATA) value by approximately 4%, corresponding to a 4.9 sigma discrepancy. We investigate the finite-size effects - in particular the dependence on the shape of the proton electric form-factor - relevant to this transition using bound-state QED with nonperturbative, relativistic Dirac wave-functions for a wide range of idealised charge-distributions and a parameterization of experimental data in order to comment on the extent to which the perturbation-theory analysis which leads to the above conclusion can be confirmed. We find no statistically significant dependence of this correction on the shape of the proton form-factor.

  16. Size-dependent contact angle and the wetting and drying transition of a droplet adsorbed onto a spherical substrate: Line-tension effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2016-10-01

    The size-dependent contact angle and the drying and wetting morphological transition are studied with respect to the volume change for a spherical cap-shaped droplet placed on a spherical substrate. The line-tension effect is included using the rigorous formula for the Helmholtz free energy in the droplet capillary model. A morphological drying transition from a cap-shaped to a spherical droplet occurs when the substrate is hydrophobic and the droplet volume is small, similar to the transition predicted on a flat substrate. In addition, a morphological wetting transition from a cap-shaped to a wrapped spherical droplet occurs for a hydrophilic substrate and a large droplet volume. The contact angle depends on the droplet size: it decreases as the droplet volume increases when the line tension is positive, whereas it increases when the line tension is negative. The spherical droplets and wrapped droplets are stable when the line tension is positive and large.

  17. Effects of Flavour-Dependent qq Annihilation on the Mixing Angle of the Isoscalar Octet-Singlet and Schwinger's Nonet Mass Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Min; YU Hong; SHEN Qi-Xing

    2001-01-01

    By incorporating the flavour-dependent quark-antiquark annihilation amplitude into the mass-squared matrix describing the mixing of the isoscalar states of a meson nonet, the new version of Schwinger's nonet mass formula,N which holds with a high accuracy for the 0-+, 1--, 2++, 2-+ and 3-- nonets, is derived and the mixing angle of theisoscalar octet-singlet for these honets is obtained. In particular, the mixing angle of the isoscalar octet singlet for the pseudoscalar nonet is determined to take the value of-12.92°, which is in agreement with the value range fiom -13° to -17° deduced fiom a rather exhaustive and up-to-date analysis of data. It is also pointed out that the omission of the flavour-dependent qq annihilation effect might be a factor resulting in the invalidity of Schwinger's original honet mass formula for the pseudoscalar nonet.

  18. Renormalization scheme dependence of the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowka, S. [University of Zurich, Institute for Physics, Zurich (Switzerland); Hahn, T.; Heinrich, G.; Hollik, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Muenchen (Germany); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Reaching a theoretical accuracy in the prediction of the lightest MSSM Higgs-boson mass, M{sub h}, at the level of the current experimental precision requires the inclusion of momentum-dependent contributions at the two-loop level. Recently two groups presented the two-loop QCD momentum-dependent corrections to M{sub h} (Borowka et al., Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014; Degrassi et al., Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015), using a hybrid on-shell-DR scheme, with apparently different results. We show that the differences can be traced back to a different renormalization of the top-quark mass, and that the claim in Ref. Degrassi et al. (Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015) of an inconsistency in Ref. Borowka et al. (Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014) is incorrect. We furthermore compare consistently the results for M{sub h} obtained with the top-quark mass renormalized on-shell and DR. The latter calculation has been added to the FeynHiggs package and can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections beyond the two-loop level. (orig.)

  19. Momentum-dependent two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowka, S.; Hahn, T.; Heinrich, G.; Hollik, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Munich (Germany); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Results are presented for the momentum-dependent two-loop contributions of O(α{sub t}α{sub s}) to the masses and mixing effects in the Higgs sector of the MSSM. They are obtained in the Feynman-diagrammatic approach using a mixed on-shell/DR renormalization that can directly be matched onto the higher-order corrections included in the code FeynHiggs. The new two-loop diagrams are evaluated with the program SecDec. The combination of the new momentum-dependent two-loop contribution with the existing one- and two-loop corrections in the on-shell/DR scheme leads to an improved prediction of the light MSSM Higgs boson mass and a correspondingly reduced theoretical uncertainty. We find that the corresponding shifts in the lightest Higgs-boson mass M{sub h} are below 1 GeV in all scenarios considered, but they can extend up to the level of the current experimental uncertainty. The results are included in the code FeynHiggs. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of ion chamber dependent correction factors for ionisation chamber dosimetry in proton beams using a Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmans, H. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Biomedical Physics; Verhaegen, F.

    1995-12-01

    In the last decade, several clinical proton beam therapy facilities have been developed. To satisfy the demand for uniformity in clinical (routine) proton beam dosimetry two dosimetry protocols (ECHED and AAPM) have been published. Both protocols neglect the influence of ion chamber dependent parameters on dose determination in proton beams because of the scatter properties of these beams, although the problem has not been studied thoroughly yet. A comparison between water calorimetry and ionisation chamber dosimetry showed a discrepancy of 2.6% between the former method and ionometry following the ECHED protocol. Possibly, a small part of this difference can be attributed to chamber dependent correction factors. Indications for this possibility are found in ionometry measurements. To allow the simulation of complex geometries with different media necessary for the study of those corrections, an existing proton Monte Carlo code (PTRAN, Berger) has been modified. The original code, that applies Mollire`s multiple scattering theory and Vavilov`s energy straggling theory, calculates depth dose profiles, energy distributions and radial distributions for pencil beams in water. Comparisons with measurements and calculations reported in the literature are done to test the program`s accuracy. Preliminary results of the influence of chamber design and chamber materials on dose to water determination are presented.

  1. Marine High-voltage Motor Winding Dielectric Loss Angle Correction Algorithm%海洋高压电机绕组中介质损耗角的校正算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳勤; 刘敬彪; 蔡文郁; 霍洪强

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a marine high-pressure motor winding dielectric loss angle correction algorithm and outlines China's marine expedition equipments and the necessity of preventing insulation accidents in entire power system .Also it introduces the dielectric loss angle calculation process based on the harmonic analysis , and analyzes the error caused by the harmonic algorithm .Then proposed a correction method combing window leak and fence effect of disclosure—the use of Hamming window weighting function and the fast Fourier transform correction method , which corrects the frequency , amplitude and phase angle respectively .The value of the dielectric loss get from improved harmonic analysis method by the frequency fluctuation is very small , measured in the field .%介绍了一种海洋高压电机绕组中介质损耗角的校正算法。详述了基于谐波分析法的介质损耗角的计算过程,通过分析谐波算法带来的误差原因,根据误差主要原因窗泄露以及栅栏效应提出了将二者合二为一的校正方法,使用汉明窗加权函数和快速傅里叶变换的校正方法,分别对频率、幅值和相位角进行校正改进,改进的谐波分析法得出的介质损耗值受频率变化波动非常小,在现场测量中得到了充分的验证。

  2. Dependence of the apex angle of an inverted pyramidal-shaped container on crystallization of Brownian particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kanatsu, Youhei; Sato, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Large grains of a close-packed colloidal crystal have been experimentally shown to form in an inverted pyramidal pit by sedimentation [S. Matsuo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 4285 (2003)]. Keeping this experiment in mind, we study the crystallization of Brownian particles. We carry out Brownian dynamics simulations in an inverted pyramidal-shaped container. The Brownian particles settle out toward the apex of the container by a uniform external force. If the apex angle is suitable, large grai...

  3. Sensitivity of Satellite-Based Skin Temperature to Different Surface Emissivity and NWP Reanalysis Sources Demonstrated Using a Single-Channel, Viewing-Angle-Corrected Retrieval Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Yost, C. R.; Chee, T.; Palikonda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single-channel algorithms for satellite thermal-infrared- (TIR-) derived land and sea surface skin temperature (LST and SST) are advantageous in that they can be easily applied to a variety of satellite sensors. They can also accommodate decade-spanning instrument series, particularly for periods when split-window capabilities are not available. However, the benefit of one unified retrieval methodology for all sensors comes at the cost of critical sensitivity to surface emissivity (ɛs) and atmospheric transmittance estimation. It has been demonstrated that as little as 0.01 variance in ɛs can amount to more than a 0.5-K adjustment in retrieved LST values. Atmospheric transmittance requires calculations that employ vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Selection of a given NWP model can significantly affect LST and SST agreement relative to their respective validation sources. Thus, it is necessary to understand the accuracies of the retrievals for various NWP models to ensure the best LST/SST retrievals. The sensitivities of the single-channel retrievals to surface emittance and NWP profiles are investigated using NASA Langley historic land and ocean clear-sky skin temperature (Ts) values derived from high-resolution 11-μm TIR brightness temperature measured from geostationary satellites (GEOSat) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR). It is shown that mean GEOSat-derived, anisotropy-corrected LST can vary by up to ±0.8 K depending on whether CERES or MODIS ɛs sources are used. Furthermore, the use of either NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS) or NASA Goddard Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for the radiative transfer model initial atmospheric state can account for more than 0.5-K variation in mean Ts. The results are compared to measurements from the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground

  4. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoori, Simon [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Breitenstein, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Surgery, Clinic for Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Winterthur (Switzerland); Doert, Aleksis [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Pozdniakova, Viktoria [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stavanger (Norway); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey, England (United Kingdom); Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  5. First Density Correction to the Transport Coefficients for a Square Well Gas: Temperature Dependence and Bound State Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Gregory Ellis

    The temperature dependence of transport properties of a moderately dense square well gas is studied in order to understand the effects of attractive forces (particularly bound states). The quantum cluster expansions of the Green -Kubo time correlation functions for the thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficients are given, and exact expressions to zeroth (Boltzmann level) and first order in the density are obtained. Specializing to Boltzmann statistics and the classical square well potential allows calculations of the kinetic potential parts of the first density correction; the important contributions to the remaining triple collision parts are discussed. Good agreement with molecular dynamics results is found; quantitative difference from real fluids are observed, however. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed. A brief description of the ultility and limitations of the hard sphere model is given for comparison. The dynamics structure factor is calculated for a dense fluid of hard spheres and compared with recent neutron scattering data for Krypton.

  6. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  7. Coulomb Corrections in Deep Inelastic Scattering and the Nuclear Dependence of R =σL /σT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, David

    2011-04-01

    Measurements of Deep Inelastic structure functions from nuclei are typically performed at very high energies, hence effects from the Coulombic acceleration or deceleration of the incident and scattered lepton due to additional protons in a heavy nucleus are typically ignored. However, re-analysis of data taken at SLAC from experiments E140 and E139 indicates that the effect of including Coulomb corrections, while not large, is non-zero and impacts the extracted results non-trivially. In particular, there is a significant impact when these data are used to extrapolate the magnitude of the EMC effect to nuclear matter. In addition, the conclusion from E140 that there is no evidence for a nuclear dependence of R =σL /σT is thrown into question. When combined with recent data from Jefferson Lab, RA -RD at x = 0 . 5 is found to differ from zero by two σ.

  8. 广角图像畸变校正算法的研究与实现%RESEARCH AND IMPLEMENTATION OF CORRECTION ALGORITHM FOR WIDE-ANGLE IMAGE DISTORTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴开兴; 段马丽; 张惠民; 王鹏

    2014-01-01

    为了校正广角图像的非线性畸变,提出一种新的数字校正方法来消除畸变。首先利用网格模板校正的方法,根据畸变图与理想图对应像素点的映射关系,得到畸变图像点在x轴和y轴方向上的偏移量。然后采用三次B插值函数对曲面插值,得到畸变像素点的偏移量曲面,由偏移量曲面和畸变点的坐标实现各像素点的坐标变换。最后通过双线性插值法完成灰度重建得到无畸变的图像,从而实现对广角图像的校正。为了测试该算法的速度性能和可靠性等指标,在DSP平台上运行此算法。实验结果表明该算法能够对广角畸变图像进行快速有效的校正。%In order to correct nonlinear distortion of wide-angle images, we propose a new digital correction method to eliminate the distortion.First, it makes use of grid template correction method to obtain the offset of distorted image points along X-and Y-axes directions according to the mapping relation between the corresponding pixels of distortion image and ideal figure.Then, it uses the cubic B-spline interpolation function to interpolate the surface, and gets the offset surface of the distorted pixels.According to the offset surface and the coordinate of distorted points, it realises the transformation of coordinate of each pixel.At last, a perfect image without distortion is obtained by the completion of grayscale reconstruction with bilinear interpolation, so as to achieve the correction on wide-angle images.In order to test the speed performance and the reliability of the algorithm, we run it on DSP platform.The experimental results show that this algorithm can make fast and effective correction on wide-angle distortion images.

  9. Mapping of low flip angles in magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balezeau, Fabien; Saint-Jalmes, Herve [LTSI, INSERM U642, Universite Rennes 1 (France); Eliat, Pierre-Antoine [PRISM, IFR 140, Universite Rennes 1 (France); Cayamo, Alejandro Bordelois, E-mail: fabien.balezeau@gmail.com [Centro De BiofIsika Medica, Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)

    2011-10-21

    Errors in the flip angle have to be corrected in many magnetic resonance imaging applications, especially for T1 quantification. However, the existing methods of B1 mapping fail to measure lower values of the flip angle despite the fact that these are extensively used in dynamic acquisition and 3D imaging. In this study, the nonlinearity of the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain, especially for very low flip angles, is investigated and a simple method is proposed to accurately determine both the gain of the RF transmitter and the B1 field map for low flip angles. The method makes use of the spoiled gradient echo sequence with long repetition time (TR), such as applied in the double-angle method. It uses an image acquired with a flip angle of 90{sup 0} as a reference image that is robust to B1 inhomogeneity. The ratio of the image at flip angle alpha to the image at a flip angle of 90{sup 0} enables us to calculate the actual value of alpha. This study was carried out at 1.5 and 4.7 T, showing that the linearity of the RF supply system is highly dependent on the hardware. The method proposed here allows us to measure the flip angle from 1{sup 0} to 60{sup 0} with a maximal uncertainty of 10% and to correct T1 maps based on the variable flip angle method.

  10. Field angle dependence of the zero-energy density of states in unconventional superconductors: analysis of the borocarbide superconductor YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Yusuke [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hayashi, Nobuhiko [CCSE, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 6-9-3 Higashi-Ueno, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); Yamauchi, Kunihiko [CNR-INFM, CASTI Regional Lab, I-67010 Coppito (L' Aqulia) (Italy); Harima, Hisatomo, E-mail: ynagai@Vortex.c.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Physics, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the field-angle-dependent zero-energy density of states for YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C with using realistic Fermi surfaces obtained by band calculations. Both the 17th and 18th bands are taken into account. For calculating the oscillating density of states, we adopt the Kramer-Pesch approximation, which is found to improve accuracy in the oscillation amplitude. We show that superconducting gap structure determined by analyzing STM experiments is consistent with thermal transport and heat capacity measurements.

  11. Field angle dependence of the zero-energy density of states in unconventional superconductors: analysis of the borocarbide superconductor YNi2B2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Kato, Yusuke; Yamauchi, Kunihiko; Harima, Hisatomo

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the field-angle-dependent zero-energy density of states for YNi2B2C with using realistic Fermi surfaces obtained by band calculations. Both the 17th and 18th bands are taken into account. For calculating the oscillating density of states, we adopt the Kramer-Pesch approximation, which is found to improve accuracy in the oscillation amplitude. We show that superconducting gap structure determined by analyzing STM experiments is consistent with thermal transport and heat capacity measurements.

  12. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain); Germanier, A [CEPROCOR, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  13. Controlled variation of the information depth by angle dependent soft X-ray emission spectroscopy: A study on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, H.; Lauermann, I.; Grimm, A.; Camus, C.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Pistor, P.; Jung, Ch.; Kropp, T.; Lux-Steiner, M. C.; Fischer, Ch.-H.

    2008-12-01

    Angle dependent X-ray emission spectroscopy (AXES) is introduced as a tool for depth dependent composition analysis. A controlled variation of the information depth is demonstrated by changing the geometry from grazing exit to grazing incidence geometry. First results are presented from Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGSe)-based polycrystalline thin film solar cell bi-layer components. A mathematical model explains changes in relative intensity due to the absorption and emission behavior of thin CdS and Zn(S,O) cover layers. The fact that the presented data can be modelled by ideal bi-layer structures, provides both, proof of concept in general and the proof of applicability to the relatively rough layered structures based on CIGSe. In bare CIGSe a homogeneous distribution of Cu and Ga is found in a depth range between 22 and 470 nm.

  14. Temperature dependence of the spin Hall angle and switching current in the nc-W(O)/CoFeB/MgO system with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, L.; Meier, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Rott, K.; Reiss, G.; Meinert, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the temperature dependence of the switching current for a perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB film deposited on a nanocrystalline tungsten film with large oxygen content: nc-W(O). The effective spin Hall angle | ΘSH eff | ≈ 0.22 is independent of temperature, whereas the switching current increases strongly at low temperature. The increase indicates that the current induced switching itself is thermally activated, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. The dependence of the switching current on the in-plane assist field suggests the presence of an interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with D ≈ 0.23 mJ/m2, intermediate between the Pt/CoFe and Ta/CoFe systems. We show that the nc-W(O) is insensitive to annealing, which makes this system a good choice for the integration into magnetic memory or logic devices that require a high-temperature annealing process during fabrication.

  15. Electric-Field Effect on the Angle-Dependent Magnetotransport Properties of Quasi-One-Dimensional Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Saito, M.; Ohmichi, E.; Osada, T.

    2006-03-01

    We report a novel electric field effect on angular dependent magnetotransport in quasi-one-dimensional layered conductors with a pair of sheetlike Fermi surfaces. Under tilted magnetic fields and additional interlayer electric fields, semiclassical electron orbits on two Fermi sheets become periodic at different magnetic field orientations. This causes double splitting of the Lebed’s commensurability resonance in interlayer transport, and the amount of splitting allows us to estimate the Fermi velocity directly. We have successfully demonstrated this effect in the organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4.

  16. Correction of Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Amelioration of Metabolic Anomalies by Minicircle DNA Mediated Glucose-Dependent Hepatic Insulin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tausif Alam

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is caused by immune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Commonly used insulin injection therapy does not provide a dynamic blood glucose control to prevent long-term systemic T1DM-associated damages. Donor shortage and the limited long-term success of islet transplants have stimulated the development of novel therapies for T1DM. Gene therapy-based glucose-regulated hepatic insulin production is a promising strategy to treat T1DM. We have developed gene constructs which cause glucose-concentration-dependent human insulin production in liver cells. A novel set of human insulin expression constructs containing a combination of elements to improve gene transcription, mRNA processing, and translation efficiency were generated as minicircle DNA preparations that lack bacterial and viral DNA. Hepatocytes transduced with the new constructs, ex vivo, produced large amounts of glucose-inducible human insulin. In vivo, insulin minicircle DNA (TA1m treated streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated euglycemia when fasted or fed, ad libitum. Weight loss due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia was reversed in insulin gene treated diabetic rats to normal rate of weight gain, lasting ∼1 month. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGT demonstrated in vivo glucose-responsive changes in insulin levels to correct hyperglycemia within 45 minutes. A single TA1m treatment raised serum albumin levels in diabetic rats to normal and significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Elevated serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were restored to normal or greatly reduced in treated rats, indicating normalization of liver function. Non-viral insulin minicircle DNA-based TA1m mediated glucose-dependent insulin production in liver may represent a safe and promising approach to treat T1DM.

  17. The retrieval of the Asian dust depolarization ratio in Korea with the correction of the polarization-dependent transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sungkyun; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Y. J.; Tatarov, Boyan; Shin, Dongho; Seifert, Patric; Noh, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    The linear particle depolarization ratios were retrieved from the observation with a multiwavelength Raman lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea (35.11°N, 126.54°E). The measurements were carried out in spring (March to May) 2011. The transmission ratio measurements were performed to solve problems of the depolarization-dependent transmission at a receiver of the lidar and applied to correct the retrieved depolarization ratio of Asian dust at first time in Korea. The analyzed data from the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were classified into three categories according to the linear particle depolarization ratios, which are pure Asian dust on 21 March, the intermediate case which means Asian dust mixed with urban pollution on 13 May, and haze case on 10 April. The measured transmission ratios were applied to these cases respectively. We found that the transmission ratio is needed to be used to retrieve the accurate depolarization ratio of Asian dust and also would be useful to distinguish the mixed dust particles between intermediate case and haze. The particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust were approximately 0.25 at 532 nm and 0.14 at 532 nm for the intermediate case. The linear particle depolarization ratios of pure Asian dust observed with the GIST multiwavelength Raman lidar were compared to the linear particle depolarization ratios of Saharan dust observed in Morocco and Asian dust observed both in Japan and China.

  18. Asymmetric and speed-dependent contact angle hysteresis and relaxation of a suddenly stopped moving contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi; Wang, Yong Jian; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    We report direct atomic-force-microscope measurements of capillary force hysteresis and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (CL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic fiber intersecting a water-air interface. The measured capillary force hysteresis and CL relaxation show a strong asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier-crossing is utilized to find the underlying energy barrier Eb and size λ associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic frame-work, and the advancing and receding CLs are influenced by two different sets of relatively wetting and non-wetting defects on the fiber surface. Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  19. Error Correction of Pitch Angle Measurement on IR Searching System%红外搜索系统俯仰角测量的大气折射修正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁蒙; 邱朝阳; 宋亚

    2016-01-01

    大气的非均匀分布导致光线在大气传播时产生折射现象,其传输路径变成一条曲线,影响红外搜索系统对空中目标的探测精度。要精确引导跟踪系统对目标进行锁定和瞄准,必须对目标的俯仰角度进行修正。通过研究波长、大气压强和大气温度对大气折射率的影响来定量描述大气折射率的变化规律,在大气球面分层模型中利用微分法推导测角误差,最终得出误差角度的计算方法。红外搜索系统在通过 ADS-B技术进行标定之后,对高度500m的无人机和高度2km的飞机数据进行了验证,试验结果表明在低空红外探测系统中利用本方法可以有效提高测角精度。通过误差修正,提升了红外搜索系统的探测性能,使之在低空侦查、防御领域中能够发挥更为重要的作用。%Due to non-uniform distribution of the atmosphere, the light is refracted in the atmospheric propagation and become a curve. It affect on air target detection accuracy on IR searching system. To accurately guide the tracking system to lock on to and aim at the target, the target pitch angle must be corrected. By studying the influence of wavelength, atmospheric pressure and atmospheric temperature, the variation of the atmospheric refractivity is quantitatively described. The differential method is used in spherically stratified atmosphere model to derive angle measurement error, and obtain calculation of error angle. After the calibration of ADS-B, some experiments are made with the UAV (500m high) and the aircraft (2km high). The results show that this method can improve the accuracy of angle measurement effectively. By error correction, detection performance of the IR searching system is improved and it can play a more important role in the low-level detection and defense.

  20. Solid state temperature-dependent NUC (non-uniformity correction) in uncooled LWIR (long-wave infrared) imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanpeng; Tisse, Christel-Loic

    2013-06-01

    In uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging systems, temperature fluctuations of FPA (Focal Plane Array) as well as lens and mechanical components placed along the optical path result in thermal drift and spatial non-uniformity. These non-idealities generate undesirable FPN (Fixed-Pattern-Noise) that is difficult to remove using traditional, individual shutterless and TEC-less (Thermo-Electric Cooling) techniques. In this paper we introduce a novel single-image based processing approach that marries the benefits of both statistical scene-based and calibration-based NUC algorithms, without relying neither on extra temperature reference nor accurate motion estimation, to compensate the resulting temperature-dependent non-uniformities. Our method includes two subsequent image processing steps. Firstly, an empirical behavioral model is derived by calibrations to characterize the spatio-temporal response of the microbolometric FPA to environmental and scene temperature fluctuations. Secondly, we experimentally establish that the FPN component caused by the optics creates a spatio-temporally continuous, low frequency, low-magnitude variation of the image intensity. We propose to make use of this property and learn a prior on the spatial distribution of natural image gradients to infer the correction function for the entire image. The performance and robustness of the proposed temperature-adaptive NUC method are demonstrated by showing results obtained from a 640×512 pixels uncooled LWIR microbolometer imaging system operating over a broad range of temperature and with rapid environmental temperature changes (i.e. from -5°C to 65°C within 10 minutes).

  1. Phase separation of polymer solutions. The calculation of the cloudpoint curve with a concentration and temperature-dependent free energy correction parameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmerik, van P.T.; Smolders, C.A.

    1973-01-01

    The free enthalpy correction parameter g in the Flory-Huggins equation for the Gibbs free enthalpy of mixing in polymer solutions is considered generally as a concentration- and temperature-independent parameter. It has been extended here with linear concentration- and temperature-dependent terms. W

  2. Compensation Method of Radiowave Refraction Correction by Microwave Radiometer at Low-Angle%用辐射计进行低角电波折射修正的补偿方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑜

    2001-01-01

    用微波辐射计进行电波折射修正是一种快速、精确的好方法。但由于它没有考虑电波射线弯曲所引起的折射误差,因此只适用在雷达天线仰角较高的条件,如在低仰角下使用该方法就会产生较大的误差。为了扩大其应用范围,本文提出了用微波辐射计进行低角电波折射修正的补偿方法,并且给出了精度检验结果。%The radiowave refraction correction by microwave radiometer is a fast and accurate way.But it ignores the bend refractive error,thus it can be used only under the condition of higher elevation.It will lead to bigger losses if the method is used at lower elevation. This paper presents a compensation method of radiowave refraction correction by microwave radiometer at low-angle and gives out the result of precision test.

  3. Adsorption at the solid-liquid interface as the source of contact angle dependence on the curvature of the three-phase line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, C A; Sefiane, K

    2010-12-15

    We review the thermodynamic approach to determining the surface tension of solid-fluid interfaces. If the pressure is in the narrow range where the contact angle, θ, can exist, then for isothermal systems, adsorption at the solid-liquid interface affects γ(SL) or θ, but γ(SV) is very nearly equal γ(LV), the surface tension of the adsorbing fluid. For a liquid partially filling a cylinder, the pressure in the liquid phase at the three-phase line, x(3)(L), depends on the curvature of the three-phase line, C(cl), but the line tension can play no role, since it acts perpendicular to the cylinder wall. C(cl) is decreased as the cylinder diameter is increased; x(3)(L) is increased; and θ increases. For a given value of C(cl), x(3)(L) can be changed by rotating the cylinder or by changing the height of the three-phase line in a gravitational field. In all cases, for water in borosilicate glass cylinders, the value of θ is shown to increase as x(3)(L) is increased. This behaviour requires the Gibbsian adsorption at the solid-liquid interface to be negative, indicating the liquid concentration in the interphase is less than that in the bulk liquid. For sessile droplets, the value of θ depends on both x(3)(L) and C(cl). If the value of θ for spherical sessile droplets is measured as a function of C(cl), the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface that would give that dependence can be determined. It is unnecessary to introduce the line tension hypothesis to explain the dependence of θ on C(cl). Adsorption at the solid-liquid interface gives a full explanation.

  4. PAMAM6 dendrimers and DNA: pH dependent "beads-on-a-string" behavior revealed by small angle X-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Dootz, Rolf; Pfohl, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    DNA interactions with polycations are not only important for our understanding of chromatin compaction but also for characterizing DNA-binding proteins involved in transcription, replication and repair. DNA is known to form several types of liquid-crystalline phases depending, among other factors, on polycation structure and charge density. Theoretical studies and simulations have predicted the wrapping of DNA around spherical positively charged polycations. As a potential mimic of the histone octamer or other DNA wrapping proteins, poly(amido amine) generation 6 (PAMAM6) dendrimers have been chosen for our study. The self-assembly of DNA induced by PAMAM6 has been investigated using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in order to reveal the assemblies' structure dependence on the pH of the environment and on dendrimers concentration. We demonstrate that at pH 8.5 dense phases are formed and characterized by a 2D-columnar hexagonal lattice which is transformed into a 3D hexagonal lattice with increasing dendr...

  5. Two-proton small-angle correlations in central heavy-ion collisions: A beam-energy- and system-size-dependent study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotte, R. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, IKH, PF 510119, Dresden (Germany); Alard, P.; Barret, V.; Bastid, N.; Crochet, P.; Dupieux, P. [IN2P3/CNRS and Universite Blaise Pascal, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Andronic, A.A. [Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Basrak, Z.; Caplar, R.; Dzelalija, M.; Gasparic, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Cordier, E.; Herrmann, N. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Fodor, Z. [Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Gobbi, A.; Hartmann, O.N.; Hildenbrand, K.D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Grishkin, Y. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Hong, B. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kecskemeti, J.; Kim, Y.J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Koczon, P.; Korolija, M.; Kress, T.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lopez, X.; Merschmeyer, M.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, P.; Petrovici, M.; Rami, F.; Reisdorf, W.; De Schauenburg, B.; Schuettauf, A.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Sim, K.S.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Smolyankin, V.; Stoicea, G.; Tyminski, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Xiao, Z.G.; Yushmanov, Y.; Zhilin, A.

    2005-02-01

    Small-angle correlations of pairs of protons emitted in central collisions of Ca+Ca, Ru+Ru and Au+Au at beam energies from 400 to 1500 MeV per nucleon are investigated with the FOPI detector system at SIS/GSI Darmstadt. Dependences on system size and beam energy are presented which extend the experimental data basis of pp correlations in the SIS energy range substantially. The size of the proton-emitting source is estimated by comparing the experimental data with the output of a final-state interaction model which utilizes either static Gaussian sources or the one-body phase-space distribution of protons provided by the BUU transport approach. The trends in the experimental data, i.e.system size and beam energy dependences, are well reproduced by this hybrid model. However, the pp correlation function is found rather insensitive to the stiffness of the equation of state entering the transport model calculations. (orig.)

  6. Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group, Multi-angle Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Simulation in the Core-Collapse Supernova Context

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, E; Walder, R; Lichtenstadt, I; Thompson, T A; Livne, Eli; Burrows, Adam; Walder, Rolf; Lichtenstadt, Itamar; Thompson, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent, multi-energy-group, and multi-angle (S$_n$) Boltzmann transport scheme for radiation hydrodynamics simulations, in one and two spatial dimensions. The implicit transport is coupled to both 1D (spherically-symmetric) and 2D (axially-symmetric) versions of the explicit Newtonian hydrodynamics code VULCAN. The 2D variant, VULCAN/2D, can be operated in general structured or unstructured grids and though the code can address many problems in astrophysics it was constructed specifically to study the core-collapse supernova problem. Furthermore, VULCAN/2D can simulate the radiation/hydrodynamic evolution of differentially rotating bodies. We summarize the equations solved and methods incorporated into the algorithm and present results of a time-dependent 2D test calculation. A more complete description of the algorithm is postponed to another paper. We highlight a 2D test run that follows for 22 milliseconds the immediate post-bounce evolution of a collapsed core. We present the r...

  7. Magnetic-field-dependent assembly of silica-coated magnetite nanoclusters probed by Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Vikash [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Suthar, Kamleshkumar J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mancini, Derrick C. [Physical Sciences and Engineering, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Ilavsky, Jan, E-mail: ilavsky@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Colloidal suspension of the silica coated magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) was used to study the magnetic field mediated assembly of magnetic nanoparticles. The spatial arrangement of these MNCs in colloidal suspension was studied using the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) technique with magnetic field applied in directions orthogonal and parallel to the scattering vector. In situ magnetic field analysis of the USAXS scattering measurement showed anisotropic behavior that can be attributed to the formation of colloidal crystals. During magnetization, the clustered magnetic core induces a large dipole moment, and the thickness of the silica shell helps keep distance between the neighboring particles. The assembly of these hybrid nanostructured particles was found to be dependent on the strength and orientation of this external magnetic field. The dipolar chains formed of MNCs arranged themselves into colloidal crystals formed by two-dimensional magnetic sheets. The structure factor calculations suggested that the lattice parameters of these colloidal crystals can be tuned by changing the strength of the external magnetic field. These experiments shed light on the stimuli-responsive assembly of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles that leads to the creation of tunable photonic crystals. - Highlights: • In situ analysis of Magnetically tunable colloidal nanocluster using Ultra Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) under uniform magnetic field. • The colloidal super-lattice structure was analyzed in magnetic field along the direction parallel and perpendicular to scattering vector. • Structure factors were extracted by subtracting form factor from the USAXS data using Irena software tool. • The observed super-lattice structural spacing can be tuned by extent of the strength of external magnetic field. • The structure factor calculations showed that the colloidal crystal has the hexagonal packing.

  8. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-01

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  9. Assessment of a simple correction for the long-range charge-transfer problem in time-dependent density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2006-06-07

    The failure of the time-dependent density-functional theory to describe long-range charge-transfer (CT) excitations correctly is a serious problem for calculations of electronic transitions in large systems, especially if they are composed of several weakly interacting units. The problem is particularly severe for molecules in solution, either modeled by periodic boundary calculations with large box sizes or by cluster calculations employing extended solvent shells. In the present study we describe the implementation and assessment of a simple physically motivated correction to the exchange-correlation kernel suggested in a previous study [O. Gritsenko and E. J. Baerends J. Chem. Phys. 121, 655 (2004)]. It introduces the required divergence in the kernel when the transition density goes to zero due to a large spatial distance between the "electron" (in the virtual orbital) and the "hole" (in the occupied orbital). A major benefit arises for solvated molecules, for which many CT excitations occur from solvent to solute or vice versa. In these cases, the correction of the exchange-correlation kernel can be used to automatically "clean up" the spectrum and significantly reduce the computational effort to determine low-lying transitions of the solute. This correction uses a phenomenological parameter, which is needed to identify a CT excitation in terms of the orbital density overlap of the occupied and virtual orbitals involved. Another quantity needed in this approach is the magnitude of the correction in the asymptotic limit. Although this can, in principle, be calculated rigorously for a given CT transition, we assess a simple approximation to it that can automatically be applied to a number of low-energy CT excitations without additional computational effort. We show that the method is robust and correctly shifts long-range CT excitations, while other excitations remain unaffected. We discuss problems arising from a strong delocalization of orbitals, which leads

  10. 片段弓技术矫治安氏Ⅱ类1分类错牙合%Correction of Angle class Ⅱ division 1 malocclusion by means of segmental approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱玉芬; 龚昕; 宫耀

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of segmental approach in the treatment of Angle class Ⅱ division 1 malocclusion.Methods:7 cases of classⅡ,division 1 maloclusion were treated.Upper first premolar and lower second premolars were extracted in all cases.Lower first molars were mesially moved by means of segmental arch. Cephalometric analysis was used to evaluate the effects of the treatment.Results:Facial profile improvement and lower anterior facial height maintenance were achieved.The occlusion plane angle,mandibular plane angle were well controlled with lower anterior teeth upright on the lower basal bone.All patients represented good mandible response.Conclusion:Segmental technique is a simple and effective approach in correcting class Ⅱ,division 1 maloclusion%目的:评价应用片段弓技术治疗安氏Ⅱ类1分类错牙合的效果。方法:应用片段弓技术对7例安氏Ⅱ类1分类患者,通过拔除上颌第一前磨牙及下颌第二前磨牙,使下颌第一磨牙较快地向近中移动,纠正磨牙Ⅱ类错牙合关系。结果:X线头影测量分析显示本方法能够有效改善面部侧貌,控制下面部高度,控制牙合平面角及下颌平面角,使下前牙直立于下颌骨基骨之上,促进下颌骨向有利的方向生长。结论:片段弓技术对于安氏Ⅱ类1分类患者是一种操作简单、有效、可推广运用的方法。

  11. Photoelectric angle converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  12. Magnetic-field-dependent assembly of silica-coated magnetite nanoclusters probed by Ultra-Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Vikash; Suthar, Kamleshkumar J.; Mancini, Derrick C.; Ilavsky, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Colloidal suspension of the silica coated magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) was used to study the magnetic field mediated assembly of magnetic nanoparticles. The spatial arrangement of these MNCs in colloidal suspension was studied using the ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) technique with magnetic field applied in directions orthogonal and parallel to the scattering vector. In situ magnetic field analysis of the USAXS scattering measurement showed anisotropic behavior that can be attributed to the formation of colloidal crystals. During magnetization, the clustered magnetic core induces a large dipole moment, and the thickness of the silica shell helps keep distance between the neighboring particles. The assembly of these hybrid nanostructured particles was found to be dependent on the strength and orientation of this external magnetic field. The dipolar chains formed of MNCs arranged themselves into colloidal crystals formed by two-dimensional magnetic sheets. The structure factor calculations suggested that the lattice parameters of these colloidal crystals can be tuned by changing the strength of the external magnetic field. These experiments shed light on the stimuli-responsive assembly of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles that leads to the creation of tunable photonic crystals.

  13. Physical Principles of the Ultrasonic Attenuation and Backscatter of Soft Tissues: Dependence on the Angle of Propagation and the Physiologic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottley, Jack Grigsby

    Quantitative measurements of the interactions of ultrasound with inhomogeneous media serve the dual purposes of elucidating the physics of such interactions and making possible the noninvasive assessment of the state or quality of those materials. One objective of the research presented in this thesis was to provide a physical basis for the application of quantitative techniques to measurements of interactions of ultrasound with an intrinsically interesting inhomogeneous material, soft tissue. A survey of theoretical techniques relevant to the investigation of ultrasonic propagation in inhomogeneous media with both symmetric and non-symmetric inhomogeneities is presented, and the results of calculations based on these theories are compared to experimental measurements. Interactions of ultrasound with several types of soft tissues were investigated under a variety of conditions. Canine myocardium was studied in the normal state, during ischemic insult, after prolonged ischemia, and during reperfusion following transient ischemia. In addition, isolated bullfrog gastrocnemius muscle was studied during relaxation and tetany. The ultrasonic attenuation and backscatter of soft tissues were found to be dependent upon several physiologic and morphologic parameters. In tissues which exhibit regular organization into longitudinal fibers, such as muscles, the attenuation and backscatter were found to be dependent on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of the dominant orientation of the fibers. Specifically, the attenuation was greatest for propagation parallel to the dominant fiber direction, while backscatter was maximum for propagation perpendicular to the fibers. In contrast, these parameters were found to be independent of the angle of insonification in liver, a soft tissue that does not contain regularly oriented fibers. The attenuation and backscatter were affected by the state of contraction of skeletal muscle, with both attenuation and backscatter

  14. ANALYSIS ON INCLINATION ANGLE OF SHEAR BAND UNDER LOW CONFINING PRESSURE BASED ON GRADIENT-DEPENDENT PLASTICITY%围压对剪切带倾角影响的梯度塑性理论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨; 姚再兴; 潘一山

    2004-01-01

    The inclination angle of shear band is analyzed considering heterogeneity of rock material when a single shear band is formed in the center of specimen under triaxial compression. The analytical solution of post-peak axial stress-axial strain curve is deduced using the assumption that the total post-peak deformation is composed of entire uniform elastic deformation and localized shear plastic deformation dependent on the thickness of shear band. The obtained solution shows that the post-peak stiffness is related to the inclination angle of shear band,confining pressure,thickness of shear band and elastic modulus,etc. Using the solution,the expression for the inclination angle of shear band can be presented easily and it is dependent on constitutive parameters of rock material and geometry parameters of rock specimen. Larger dilation angle or loading rate leads to increment of the inclination angle. In addition,the inclination angle increases with the thickness of the shear band,which cannot be explained or forecasted by other existing solutions,such as Coulomb inclination,Roscoe inclination and Arthur inclination,etc.

  15. A new statistical time-dependent model of earthquake occurrence: failure processes driven by a self-correcting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Renata; Varini, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The long-term recurrence of strong earthquakes is often modelled by the stationary Poisson process for the sake of simplicity, although renewal and self-correcting point processes (with non-decreasing hazard functions) are more appropriate. Short-term models mainly fit earthquake clusters due to the tendency of an earthquake to trigger other earthquakes; in this case, self-exciting point processes with non-increasing hazard are especially suitable. In order to provide a unified framework for analyzing earthquake catalogs, Schoenberg and Bolt proposed the SELC (Short-term Exciting Long-term Correcting) model (BSSA, 2000) and Varini employed a state-space model for estimating the different phases of a seismic cycle (PhD Thesis, 2005). Both attempts are combinations of long- and short-term models, but results are not completely satisfactory, due to the different scales at which these models appear to operate. In this study, we split a seismic sequence in two groups: the leader events, whose magnitude exceeds a threshold magnitude, and the remaining ones considered as subordinate events. The leader events are assumed to follow a well-known self-correcting point process named stress release model (Vere-Jones, J. Phys. Earth, 1978; Bebbington & Harte, GJI, 2003, Varini & Rotondi, Env. Ecol. Stat., 2015). In the interval between two subsequent leader events, subordinate events are expected to cluster at the beginning (aftershocks) and at the end (foreshocks) of that interval; hence, they are modeled by a failure processes that allows bathtub-shaped hazard function. In particular, we have examined the generalized Weibull distributions, a large family that contains distributions with different bathtub-shaped hazard as well as the standard Weibull distribution (Lai, Springer, 2014). The model is fitted to a dataset of Italian historical earthquakes and the results of Bayesian inference are shown.

  16. Calibrating passive acoustic monitoring: correcting humpback whale call detections for site-specific and time-dependent environmental characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Campbell, Greg S; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the importance of accounting for environmental effects on passive underwater acoustic monitoring results. The situation considered is the reduction in shipping off the California coast between 2008-2010 due to the recession and environmental legislation. The resulting variations in ocean noise change the probability of detecting marine mammal vocalizations. An acoustic model was used to calculate the time-varying probability of detecting humpback whale vocalizations under best-guess environmental conditions and varying noise. The uncorrected call counts suggest a diel pattern and an increase in calling over a two-year period; the corrected call counts show minimal evidence of these features.

  17. Flight Calibration of the LROC Narrow Angle Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humm, D. C.; Tschimmel, M.; Brylow, S. M.; Mahanti, P.; Tran, T. N.; Braden, S. E.; Wiseman, S.; Danton, J.; Eliason, E. M.; Robinson, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization and calibration are vital for instrument commanding and image interpretation in remote sensing. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) takes 500 Mpixel greyscale images of lunar scenes at 0.5 meters/pixel. It uses two nominally identical line scan cameras for a larger crosstrack field of view. Stray light, spatial crosstalk, and nonlinearity were characterized using flight images of the Earth and the lunar limb. These are important for imaging shadowed craters, studying ˜1 meter size objects, and photometry respectively. Background, nonlinearity, and flatfield corrections have been implemented in the calibration pipeline. An eight-column pattern in the background is corrected. The detector is linear for DN = 600--2000 but a signal-dependent additive correction is required and applied for DNground-based images taken with the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) at much lower spatial resolution but with the same photometric angles.

  18. Correction Technique for Raman Water Vapor Lidar Signal-Dependent Bias and Suitability for Water Wapor Trend Monitoring in the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Cadirola, M.; Venable, D.; Calhoun, M.; Miloshevich, L; Vermeesch, K.; Twigg, L.; Dirisu, A.; Hurst, D.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Voemel, H.

    2012-01-01

    The MOHAVE-2009 campaign brought together diverse instrumentation for measuring atmospheric water vapor. We report on the participation of the ALVICE (Atmospheric Laboratory for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education) mobile laboratory in the MOHAVE-2009 campaign. In appendices we also report on the performance of the corrected Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements during the campaign, on a new radiosonde based calibration algorithm that reduces the influence of atmospheric variability on the derived calibration constant, and on other results of the ALVICE deployment. The MOHAVE-2009 campaign permitted the Raman lidar systems participating to discover and address measurement biases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The ALVICE lidar system was found to possess a wet bias which was attributed to fluorescence of insect material that was deposited on the telescope early in the mission. Other sources of wet biases are discussed and data from other Raman lidar systems are investigated, revealing that wet biases in upper tropospheric (UT) and lower stratospheric (LS) water vapor measurements appear to be quite common in Raman lidar systems. Lower stratospheric climatology of water vapor is investigated both as a means to check for the existence of these wet biases in Raman lidar data and as a source of correction for the bias. A correction technique is derived and applied to the ALVICE lidar water vapor profiles. Good agreement is found between corrected ALVICE lidar measurments and those of RS92, frost point hygrometer and total column water. The correction is offered as a general method to both quality control Raman water vapor lidar data and to correct those data that have signal-dependent bias. The influence of the correction is shown to be small at regions in the upper troposphere where recent work indicates detection of trends in atmospheric water vapor may be most robust. The correction shown here holds promise for permitting useful upper

  19. The debate on the dependence of apparent contact angles on drop contact area or three-phase contact line: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2014-12-01

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by the three-phase contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Although, wetting has been studied using contact angles of drops on solids for more than 200 years, the question remains unanswered: Is wetting of a rough and chemically heterogeneous surface controlled by the interactions within the solid/liquid contact area beneath the droplet or only at the three-phase contact line? After the publications of Pease in 1945, Extrand in 1997, 2003 and Gao and McCarthy in 2007 and 2009, it was proposed that advancing, receding contact angles, and contact angle hysteresis of rough and chemically heterogeneous surfaces are determined by interactions of the liquid and the solid at the three-phase contact line alone and the interfacial area within the contact perimeter is irrelevant. As a consequence of this statement, the well-known Wenzel (1934) and Cassie (1945) equations which were derived using the contact area approach are proposed to be invalid and should be abandoned. A hot debate started in the field of surface science after 2007, between the three-phase contact line and interfacial contact area approach defenders. This paper presents a review of the published articles on contact angles and summarizes the views of the both sides. After presenting a brief history of the contact angles and their measurement methods, we discussed the basic contact angle theory and applications of contact angles on the characterization of flat, rough and micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces. The weak and strong sides of both three-phase contact line and contact area approaches were discussed in detail and some practical conclusions were drawn.

  20. (Un)determined finite regularization dependent quantum corrections: the Higgs decay into two photons and the two photon scattering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Cherchiglia, A L; Nemes, M C; Sampaio, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the appearance of arbitrary, regularization dependent parameters introduced by divergent integrals in two a priori finite but superficially divergent amplitudes: the Higgs decay into two photons and the two photon scattering. We use a general parametrization of ultraviolet divergences which explicitates such ambiguities. Thus we separate in a consistent way using Implicit Regularization the divergent, finite and regularization dependent parts of the amplitudes which in turn are written as surface terms. We find that, although finite, these amplitudes are ambiguous before the imposition of physical conditions namely momentum routing invariance in the loops of Feynman diagrams. In the examples we study momentum routing invariance turns out to be equivalent to gauge invariance. We also discuss the results obtained by different regularizations and show how they can be reproduced within our framework allowing for a clear view on the origin of regularization ambiguities.

  1. 通过向量角转换校正拉曼光谱中乘性干扰%Correction Multiplicative Effects in Raman Spectra through Vector Angle Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚志湘; 孙增强; 粟晖; 袁洪福

    2016-01-01

    spectrum intensity/amplitude corresponding to the module shifts for a vector ,doesn't impact the vector direction which is the essence of the vector ,so it is reasonable to rewrite the data form on module to on space angle for the same measurement .This thesis employed a data transformation to eliminate the multiplicative effects within spectra ,i .e .,the spectrum signal on its amplitude has been transformed to be on the vector angles .The first step of the transformation is the se-lection of a stand vector which is near to the analyte and almost orthogonal to the background within the sample space ;and the next step is to define a moving window ,then to find out the angle between the sample vector (i .e .the transformed spectrum ) and the stand vector within the window ;while the window is moved along the spectrum data series ,the transformation for vector angle (VA) series has been finished .The thesis has proved that an approximate linear quantitative relationship has been re-mained in the VA series .Multivariate calibration need full rank matrix which is combined by spectrum from variety samples ,and variety VA series also can combine a full rank VA matrix ,so the approximate linear VA matrix still perfectly meeting the de-mand for multivariate calibration .A mixed system consisted by methanol-ethanol-isopropanol has been employed to verify the eliminations to the multiplicative effects .These measuring values of the system are obtained at different Raman integral times and have remarkable multiplicative effects .In predicting results ,the correlation coefficient (r) and the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) from class PLS respectively are 0.911 9 and 0.110 2 ,and 0.906 0 and 0.100 8 are for the preprocessing by multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) .In contrast ,r and RMSEP under the VAPLS ,presented by this thesis ,respectively are 0.998 7 and 0.015 2 and are significantly better than others .The VAPLS has eliminated the multiplicative effects of Raman

  2. Predicting the Sabine absorption coefficients of fibrous absorbers for various air backing conditions with a frequency-dependent diffuseness correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous absorbers can be installed with various air backing conditions to fulfil a given low frequency acoustic requirement. Since absorber manufacturers cannot provide the absorption coefficients for all possible mounting conditions, acousticians have difficulties knowing the absorption...... characteristics of their own configurations. This study aims to predict the absorption coefficient for various mounting conditions from a single measurement of an arbitrary mounting condition by extracting the air flow resistivity of the test specimen and the frequency-dependent effect of the chamber...... on the measured absorption coefficients. With two homogeneous fibrous absorbers, the predicted absorption coefficients agree well with the measurements....

  3. Temperature-dependency analysis and correction methods of in-situ power-loss estimation for crystalline silicon modules undergoing potential-induced degradation stress testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of in-situ characterization of the photovoltaic module power at standard test conditions using superposition of the dark current-voltage (I-V) curve measured at elevated stress temperature during potential-induced degradation (PID) testing. PID chamber studies were performed...... on several crystalline silicon module designs to determine the extent to which the temperature dependency of maximum power is affected by the degradation of the modules. The results using the superposition principle show a mismatch between the power degradation measured at stress temperature and the power...... degradation measured at 25ºC, which depends on module design, stress temperature, and level of degradation. We apply a correction to this mismatch using two maximum-power temperature translation methods found in the literature. For the first method, which is based on the maximum-power temperature coefficient...

  4. Machine Learning Based Multi-Physical-Model Blending for Enhancing Renewable Energy Forecast -- Improvement via Situation Dependent Error Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Siyuan; Hwang, Youngdeok; Khabibrakhmanov, Ildar; Marianno, Fernando J.; Shao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Hamann, Hendrik F.

    2015-07-15

    With increasing penetration of solar and wind energy to the total energy supply mix, the pressing need for accurate energy forecasting has become well-recognized. Here we report the development of a machine-learning based model blending approach for statistically combining multiple meteorological models for improving the accuracy of solar/wind power forecast. Importantly, we demonstrate that in addition to parameters to be predicted (such as solar irradiance and power), including additional atmospheric state parameters which collectively define weather situations as machine learning input provides further enhanced accuracy for the blended result. Functional analysis of variance shows that the error of individual model has substantial dependence on the weather situation. The machine-learning approach effectively reduces such situation dependent error thus produces more accurate results compared to conventional multi-model ensemble approaches based on simplistic equally or unequally weighted model averaging. Validation over an extended period of time results show over 30% improvement in solar irradiance/power forecast accuracy compared to forecasts based on the best individual model.

  5. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  6. Material dependence of Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate: First analytic correction beyond proximity force approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Teo, L P

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytically the asymptotic behavior of the Casimir interaction between a sphere and a plate when the distance between them, $d$, is much smaller than the radius of the sphere, $R$. The leading order and next-to-leading order terms are derived from the exact formula for the Casimir interaction energy. They are found to depend nontrivially on the dielectric functions of the objects. As expected, the leading order term coincides with that derived using the proximity force approximation. The result on the next-to-leading order term complements that found by Bimonte, Emig and Kardar [Appl. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{100}, 074110 (2012)] using derivative expansion. Numerical results are presented when the dielectric functions are given by the plasma model or the Drude model, with the plasma frequency (for plasma and Drude models) and relaxation frequency (for Drude model) given respectively by 9eV and 0.035eV, the conventional values used for gold metal. It is found that if plasma model is used instead of Drude...

  7. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available In Schwann cells (SCs, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC, on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  8. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    In Schwann cells (SCs), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical) cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  9. Asymptotic correction of the exchange-correlation kernel of time-dependent density functional theory for long-range charge-transfer excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Oleg; Baerends, Evert Jan

    2004-07-08

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations of charge-transfer excitation energies omegaCT are significantly in error when the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) is employed for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. We relate the error to the physical meaning of the orbital energy of the Kohn-Sham lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). The LUMO orbital energy in Kohn-Sham DFT--in contrast to the Hartree-Fock model--approximates an excited electron, which is correct for excitations in compact molecules. In CT transitions the energy of the LUMO of the acceptor molecule should instead describe an added electron, i.e., approximate the electron affinity. To obtain a contribution that compensates for the difference, a specific divergence of fxc is required in rigorous TDDFT, and a suitable asymptotically correct form of the kernel fxc(asymp) is proposed. The importance of the asymptotic correction of fxc is demonstrated with the calculation of omegaCT(R) for the prototype diatomic system HeBe at various separations R(He-Be). The TDDFT-ALDA curve omegaCT(R) roughly resembles the benchmark ab initio curve omegaCT CISD(R) of a configuration interaction calculation with single and double excitations in the region R=1-1.5 A, where a sizable He-Be interaction exists, but exhibits the wrong behavior omegaCT(R)

  10. Intrinsic polarization angle ambiguity in Faraday tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Kumazaki, Kohei; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2014-01-01

    Faraday tomography is a powerful method to diagnose polarizations and Faraday rotations along the line of sight. Quality of Faraday tomography is, however, limited by several conditions. Recently, it is reported that Faraday tomography indicates false signals in some specific situations. In this paper, we systematically investigate the condition of the appearance of false signals in Faraday tomography. We study the situations that we observe two sources within a beam, and change the intrinsic polarization angles, rotation measures, intensities, and frequency coverage. We find that false signals arise when rotation measure between the sources is less than 1.5 times the full width at half maximum of the rotation measure spread function. False signals also depend on the intensity ratio between the sources and are reduced for large ratio. On the other hand, the appearance of false signals does not depend on frequency coverage, meaning that the uncertainty should be correctly understood and taken into consideratio...

  11. Salt Dependence of the Radius of Gyration and Flexibility of Single-stranded DNA in Solution probed by Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    Short single-stranded nucleic acids are ubiquitous in biological processes and understanding their physical properties provides insights to nucleic acid folding and dynamics. We used small angle x-ray scattering to study 8-100 residue homopolymeric single-stranded DNAs in solution, without external forces or labeling probes. Poly-T's structural ensemble changes with increasing ionic strength in a manner consistent with a polyelectrolyte persistence length theory that accounts for molecular flexibility. For any number of residues, poly-A is consistently more elongated than poly-T, likely due to the tendency of A residues to form stronger base-stacking interactions than T residues.

  12. Radiative Corrections and Z'

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Radiative corrections to parity violating deep inelastic electron scattering are reviewed including a discussion of the renormalization group evolution of the weak mixing angle. Recently obtained results on hypothetical Z' bosons - for which parity violating observables play an important role - are also presented.

  13. Collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer: physical interpretation of the differential interference angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong-Qing; Li Jian; Ma Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) on the intramolecular rotational energy transfer is observed in an experiment with a static cell, and the integral interference angles are measured. To obtain more accurate information, an experiment with a molecular beam is carried out, and thereby the relationship between the differential interference angle and the scattering angle is obtained. Based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory,the theoretical model of CQI is developed in an atom-diatom system in the condition of the molecular beam, with the long-range interaction potential taken into account. The method of measuring correctly the differential interference angle is presented. The tendencies of the differential interference angle changing with the impact parameter and relative velocity are discussed. The theoretical model presented here is important for understanding or performing the experiment in the molecular beam.

  14. Physical Interpretation of the Angle Dependent Magnetic Helicity Spectrum in the Solar Wind: The Nature of Turbulent Fluctuations near the Proton Gyroradius Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G; TenBarge, Jason M; Podesta, John J

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations of distinct parallel and perpendicular signatures in magnetic helicity measurements segregated by wave period and angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind velocity, this paper undertakes a comparison of three intervals of \\emph{Ulysses} data with synthetic time series generated from a physically motivated turbulence model. From these comparisons, it is hypothesized that the observed signatures result from a perpendicular cascade of \\Alfvenic fluctuations and a local, non-turbulent population of ion cyclotron or whistler waves generated by temperature anisotropy instabilities. By constraining the model's free parameters through comparison to \\emph{in situ} data, it is found that, on average, $ \\sim 95\\%$ of the power near dissipative scales is contained in a perpendicular \\Alfvenic cascade and that the parallel fluctuations are propagating nearly unidirectionally. The effects of aliasing on magnetic helicity measurements are considered and shown to be significa...

  15. Physical interpretation of the angle-dependent magnetic helicity spectrum in the solar wind: The nature of turbulent fluctuations near the proton gyroradius scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Kristopher G.; Howes, Gregory G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); TenBarge, Jason M. [IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Podesta, John J., E-mail: kristopher-klein@uiowa.edu [Center for Space Plasma Physics, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Motivated by recent observations of distinct parallel and perpendicular signatures in magnetic helicity measurements segregated by wave period and angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind velocity, this paper undertakes a comparison of three intervals of Ulysses data with synthetic time series generated from a physically motivated turbulence model. From these comparisons, it is hypothesized that the observed signatures result from a perpendicular cascade of Alfvénic fluctuations and a local, non-turbulent population of ion-cyclotron or whistler waves generated by temperature anisotropy instabilities. By constraining the model's free parameters through comparison to in situ data, it is found that, on average, ∼95% of the power near dissipative scales is contained in a perpendicular Alfvénic cascade and that the parallel fluctuations are propagating nearly unidirectionally. The effects of aliasing on magnetic helicity measurements are considered and shown to be significant near the Nyquist frequency.

  16. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and $3^{\\rm rd}$-order event planes in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order event plane for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the 2$^{\\rm nd}$- and 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order event planes. The results for the 2$^{\\rm nd}$-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, but not reversed in the final state, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the 3$^{\\rm rd}$-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  17. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to second- and third-order event planes in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  18. Azimuthal-Angle Dependence of Charged-Pion-Interferometry Measurements with Respect to Second- and Third-Order Event Planes in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  19. Accuracy Improvement Capability of Advanced Projectile Based on Course Correction Fuze Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elsaadany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze. The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion.

  20. Accuracy improvement capability of advanced projectile based on course correction fuze concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaadany, Ahmed; Wen-jun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in terminal accuracy is an important objective for future artillery projectiles. Generally it is often associated with range extension. Various concepts and modifications are proposed to correct the range and drift of artillery projectile like course correction fuze. The course correction fuze concepts could provide an attractive and cost-effective solution for munitions accuracy improvement. In this paper, the trajectory correction has been obtained using two kinds of course correction modules, one is devoted to range correction (drag ring brake) and the second is devoted to drift correction (canard based-correction fuze). The course correction modules have been characterized by aerodynamic computations and flight dynamic investigations in order to analyze the effects on deflection of the projectile aerodynamic parameters. The simulation results show that the impact accuracy of a conventional projectile using these course correction modules can be improved. The drag ring brake is found to be highly capable for range correction. The deploying of the drag brake in early stage of trajectory results in large range correction. The correction occasion time can be predefined depending on required correction of range. On the other hand, the canard based-correction fuze is found to have a higher effect on the projectile drift by modifying its roll rate. In addition, the canard extension induces a high-frequency incidence angle as canards reciprocate at the roll motion.

  1. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Fissel, Laura M; Angilè, Francesco E; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven; Devlin, Mark J; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N; Klein, J R; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei L; Martin, Peter G; Matthews, Tristan G; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, C Barth; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A; Soler, Juan D; Thomas, Nicholas E; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Gregory S; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 {\\mu}m. In this initial paper, we show our 500 {\\mu}m data smoothed to a resolution of 2.5 arcminutes (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p = p_0 N^(-0.4) S^(-0.6), where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high colum...

  2. Spin-dependent surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) near the Fermi-level: An angle-resolved (I)PE study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budke, Michael; Wittkowski, Alexander; Correa, Juliet; Donath, Markus [Physikalisches Institut, WWU Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A widely accepted picture for the surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) comprises a spin-split surface state (SS) with its majority part 0.2 eV below E{sub F} and its minority part 0.5 eV above E{sub F} with a finite exchange splitting of 0.4 eV at T{sub C}. The discussion about this SS remains controversially because spin-resolved inverse photoemission identified a SS with both minority and majority components above E{sub F}. The reason for these conflicting results might be found in different sample conditions since the Gd films are usually grown on W(110), a material with considerably different lattice constant than Gd. To overcome this suspicion, we performed both, spin- and angle-resolved direct (PE) and inverse photoemission (IPE) on the same sample preparation of a 30 ML Gd film grown on Y(0001). We were able to identify two SSs with their minority and majority components well separated from E{sub F}. While the occupied SS shows spin-mixing behaviour as observed in other PE experiments, the unoccupied SS exhibits an exchange splitting of 250 meV that vanishes at T{sub C}. To identify the nature of the unexpected SS, we performed angular-resolved IPE measurements that support the interpretation as d-like SS above E{sub F} and reveal a variety of additional spectral features.

  3. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress-strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (αirrad) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  4. Spin-orbit relativistic long-range corrected time-dependent density functional theory for investigating spin-forbidden transitions in photochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Ayako; Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2011-12-14

    A long-range corrected (LC) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) incorporating relativistic effects with spin-orbit couplings is presented. The relativistic effects are based on the two-component zeroth-order regular approximation Hamiltonian. Before calculating the electronic excitations, we calculated the ionization potentials (IPs) of alkaline metal, alkaline-earth metal, group 12 transition metal, and rare gas atoms as the minus orbital (spinor) energies on the basis of Koopmans' theorem. We found that both long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects are required to obtain Koopmans' IPs, i.e., the orbital (spinor) energies, quantitatively in DFT calculations even for first-row transition metals and systems containing large short-range exchange effects. We then calculated the valence excitations of group 12 transition metal atoms and the Rydberg excitations of rare gas atoms using spin-orbit relativistic LC-TDDFT. We found that the long-range exchange and spin-orbit coupling effects significantly contribute to the electronic spectra of even light atoms if the atoms have low-lying excitations between orbital spinors of quite different electron distributions.

  5. Stereoscopic study of the angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations across the charge-density-wave transition of the organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W.; Osada, T.; Konoike, T.; Uchida, K.

    2013-11-01

    The stereoscopic angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations (AMRO) in an organic conductor α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 were measured across the temperature-pressure boundary that separates the charge-density-wave state from the metallic state. The gnomonic projections of the data clearly resolved the contributions from different parts of the Fermi surfaces. The temperature and pressure dependencies of the AMRO results revealed the progressive formation of a quasi-one-dimensional orbit in the charge-density-wave state. The AMRO measurements at ambient pressures and at low temperatures revealed the presence of two sets of quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surfaces. Additional evidence for multiple quasi-one-dimensional orbits was obtained from the data collected in conjunction with the in-plane field rotations.

  6. Determining surface wave arrival angle anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erik W. F.; Ekström, Göran

    2002-06-01

    A new method for measuring arrival angles of teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves is developed. The new method utilizes estimates of surface wave dispersion to create a phase-matched filter to isolate the Love or Rayleigh wave in three-component recordings. The polarization of the filtered wave group is determined in the time domain by application of a variation of the complex polarization method of Vidale [1986]. Orientation, linearity, and ellipticity of particle motion are estimated in several frequency bands to determine the frequency-dependent polarization. The method employs an iterative scheme, by which a predicted Love wave, based on the estimated dispersion and polarization, is subtracted from the three-component data prior to the estimation of Rayleigh wave polarization, and vice versa. The method is applied to an extensive set of Global Seismographic Network data covering the years 1989-1998. Between 4244 and 15,075 measurements are collected for fundamental mode Love and Rayleigh waves at nine different periods (37 to 150 s). Measurement uncertainties are estimated using the statistics of observations for pairwise similar paths and are generally of the order of 15-50% of the total signal, depending on the period and the wave type. Large and azimuthally invariant angle anomalies are documented for several stations and are consistent with misorientation of the horizontal seismometers. Two schemes are employed to determine the misorientations: (1) an azimuthally weighted average at each station, and (2) a joint inversion for seismometer misorientation and globally heterogeneous phase velocities. The determined corrections are robust and correlate well with those reported in earlier studies. Azimuthally varying arrival angle anomalies are shown to agree qualitatively with predictions of wave refraction calculated for recent phase velocity maps, which explain up to 30% of the variance in the new measurements.

  7. Pedestrian quick detection algorithm based on with pitch angle corrected HOG features%基于俯仰角修正的HOG特征快速行人检测算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹巧慧; 葛万成

    2014-01-01

    传统的HOG特征对正视或侧视行人有较好的识别率,但是对俯视行人的识别率仍有所欠缺。对检测图像的HOG特征根据不同的俯仰角进行了转换,同时优化了SVM分类器训练过程,提出了一种改进的快速行人检测算法。测试结果表明,该算法优于基于传统HOG特征的检测方法,有效提高了不同俯仰角视频中行人检测的准确性。%Traditional HOG feature detection method has a preferable recognition rate for envisaging and side-looking pedes-trians,but has a low recognition rate for overlooking pedestrians. An improved pedestrian quick detection algorithm is proposed in this paper,which is realized by converting HOG features in the detected images according to pitch angle and optimizing the SVM classifier training process. The testing result shows that the algorithm is better than the detection methods based on the tra-ditional HOG features and has improved the detection veracity of pedestrians in the different pitch angle video images.

  8. Field-Angle-Dependent Low-Energy Excitations around a Vortex in the Superconducting Topological Insulator CuxBi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki

    2014-06-01

    We study the quasiparticle excitations around a single vortex in the superconducting topological insulator CuxBi2Se3, focusing on a superconducting state with point nodes. Inspired by the recent Knight shift measurements, we propose two ways to detect the positions of point nodes, using an explicit formula of the density of states with Kramer-Pesch approximation in the quasiclassical treatment. The zero-energy local density of states around a vortex parallel to the c-axis has a twofold shape and splits along the nodal direction with increasing energy; these behaviors can be detected by the scanning tunneling microscopy. An angular dependence of the density of states with a rotating magnetic field on the a-b plane has deep minima when the magnetic field is parallel to the directions of point nodes, which can be detected by angular-resolved heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements. All the theoretical predictions are detectable via standard experimental techniques in magnetic fields.

  9. A new angle on the Euler angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1995-01-01

    We present a generalization of the Euler angles to axes beyond the twelve conventional sets. The generalized Euler axes must satisfy the constraint that the first and the third are orthogonal to the second; but the angle between the first and third is arbitrary, rather than being restricted to the values 0 and pi/2, as in the conventional sets. This is the broadest generalization of the Euler angles that provides a representation of an arbitrary rotation matrix. The kinematics of the generalized Euler angles and their relation to the attitude matrix are presented. As a side benefit, the equations for the generalized Euler angles are universal in that they incorporate the equations for the twelve conventional sets of Euler angles in a natural way.

  10. Determination of velocity vector angles using the directional cross-correlation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in any direction is suggested. The method uses focusing along the velocity direction and cross-correlation for finding the correct velocity magnitude. The angle is found from beamforming directional signals in a number of directions...... and then select the angle with the highest normalized correlation between directional signals. The approach is investigated using Field II simulations and data from the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and with a parabolic flow having a peak velocity of 0.3 m/s. A 7 MHz linear array transducer is used...... with a normal transmission of a focused ultrasound field. The velocity profile estimates from simulations have relative mean standard deviations between 0 . 7% and 7 . 7% for flow between 45 ◦ and 90 ◦ . The angle estimation performance is highly dependent on the choice of the time k tprf · T prf ( correlation...

  11. Glaucoma, Open-Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Home > Statistics and Data > Glaucoma, Open-angle Glaucoma, Open-angle Open-angle Glaucoma Defined In open-angle glaucoma, the fluid passes ... 2010 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Glaucoma by Age and Race/Ethnicity The prevalence of ...

  12. Osteotomia femoral em cúpula para correção do ângulo de inclinação do colo do fémur Femoral cupola osteotomy for correction of femoral neck inclination angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo lamaguti

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Utilizou-se a osteotomia femoral em cúpula em um cão que apresentava aumento do ângulo de inclinação do colo do fêmur e subluxação da articulação coxofemoral. A linha de osteotomia situou-se cerca de 1 cm distal ao trocanter menor, no sentido látero-medial. Para a imobilização utilizou-se um fio de Steinmann passando pelo trocanter maior e por toda a extensão do fêmur. Um fio de aço foi colocado em orifícios ósseos produzidos nos segmentos proximal e distal do fêmur para a realização de sutura óssea. A técnica empregada culminou em: diminuição de 35° no ângulo de inclinação, rebaixamento da cabeça do fêmur, elevação do trocanter maior, congruência da articulação e encurtamento de 3cm do membro. A consolidação ocorreu cerca de 90 dias após a cirurgia.Femoral cupola osteotomy was performed in a dog with a large femoral inclination angie and hip subluxation. Osteotomy owas performed 1 cm distal to the lesser trochanter from lateral to medial cortex. Immobilization was performed owith a Steinamnnpin drivenfrom the greater trochanter and through two boles drilled proximal and distal to the osteotomy line. The technique produced: 35° decrease on inclination angle, lowering of the femoral head, elevation of the greater trochanter, congruity of the hip and 3cm limb shortening. Consolidation occured 90 days after the surgery.

  13. Measurement of the Azimuthal Angle Dependence of Inclusive Jet Yields in Pb+Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coelli, Simone; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Damiani, Daniel; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haefner, Petra; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koenig, Sebastian; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madar, Romain; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Turala, Michal; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, $\\Delta\\phi$, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has measured the $\\Delta\\phi$ dependence of jet yields in 0.14 nb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC for jet transverse momenta $p_T$ > 45 GeV in different collision centrality bins using an underlying event subtraction procedure that accounts for elliptic flow. The variation of the jet yield with Delta phi was characterized by the parameter, $v_2^{jet}$, and the ratio of out-of-plane ($\\Delta\\phi ~ \\pi/2$) to in-plane ($\\Delta\\phi ~ 0$) yields. Non-zero $v_2^{jet}$ values were measured in all centrality bins for $p_T$ < 160 GeV. The jet yields are observed to vary by as much as 20% between in-plane and out-of-plane directions.

  14. Contact Angle Goniometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The FTA32 goniometer provides video-based contact angle and surface tension measurement. Contact angles are measured by fitting a mathematical expression...

  15. Cirurgia ortognática: abordagem psicossocial em pacientes Classe III de Angle submetidos à correção cirúrgica da deformidade dentofacial Orthognathic surgery: psychosocial approach in Angle Class III patients submitted to correction surgery of facial deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Nicodemo

    2007-10-01

    facial changes in 29 patients, from both genres, between 17 and 46 years old, with indication of surgical treatment, in the preoperative (during orthodontic preparation and in the postoperative (six months after the surgery periods. METHODS: Questionnaires, applied during interviews, with questions based on the proposal by Grossbart & Sarwer were used. The technique of content analysis was used, in which the reason for choosing corrective surgery were represented in Category 1 (C1; fantasies related to the results of the corrective surgery (preoperative and performance (postoperative in Category 2 (C2; and expectations and satisfaction of the results of the corrective surgery in Category 3 (C3. The answers were grouped in the subcategories: aesthetics (SC1, functional (SC2, social situations (SC3, self-esteem (SC4 and professional (SC5. RESULTS: the results showed that the patients looked for corrective surgery for functional reasons (34.5%, aesthetics (30.9% and social (29.1%; wished to improve his/her social situation (40% and the aesthetics (32%, with the fulfillment of these wishes after the surgery. As for the expectations, 49.4% of the patients hoped to improve the functional aspect followed by aesthetics (26.9%; social situations (11.2% and self-esteem (6.7%. In all aspects the patients were very satisfied because of improvements in their diction, aesthetics, beauty, and the return to life without discrimination. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that the patients looked for the corrective surgery with the motivation to improve their functional and aesthetics aspects, they fantasized to improve their social relations and appearance; and hoped, in a realistic way, that the corrective surgery would repaired the function and aesthetics - which are the objectives of the orthognathic surgery.

  16. Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect in dependence of the attenuation correction of a state-of-the-art small animal PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Julia G; Judenhofer, Martin S; Schmid, Andreas; Tillmanns, Julia; Stiller, Detlef; Sossi, Vesna; Pichler, Bernd J

    2012-06-21

    Quantification accuracy and partial volume effect (PVE) of the Siemens Inveon PET scanner were evaluated. The influence of transmission source activities (40 and 160 MBq) on the quantification accuracy and the PVE were determined. Dynamic range, object size and PVE for different sphere sizes, contrast ratios and positions in the field of view (FOV) were evaluated. The acquired data were reconstructed using different algorithms and correction methods. The activity level of the transmission source and the total emission activity in the FOV strongly influenced the attenuation maps. Reconstruction algorithms, correction methods, object size and location within the FOV had a strong influence on the PVE in all configurations. All evaluated parameters potentially influence the quantification accuracy. Hence, all protocols should be kept constant during a study to allow a comparison between different scans.

  17. Analysis of directional dependence of the two-dimensional array of detectors 2D array seven 29 implications in the planning system; Analisis de la dependencia direcccional de la matriz bidimensional de detectores 2D array seven29. Implicaciones en el sistema de planificacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Melendez, R.; Seguro Fernandez, A.; Iborra Oquendo, M.; Urena Llinares, A.

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of our study is to find correction factors dependent on the 2D array incidence angles, and to give account of the phenomenon, allowing the Planner to faithfully reproduce data and curves measured experimentally. (Author)

  18. Wavelet stretch correction%子波拉伸校正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文锋; 李宏兵; 姚逢昌; 李国平; 张佳佳

    2011-01-01

    依赖于偏移距的反射波调谐是AVO分析的不利因素.无论动校正还是偏移,都会引起子波拉伸、频谱向低频移动.在频率域对动校正或偏移后的地震数据进行反拉伸校正是本文消除子波拉伸采用的方法.从射线参数时距方程出发推导的地震映射压缩因子与反射角存在较精确的余弦关系.角度道中动校正或偏移子波拉伸因子是反射角余弦的倒数.用无拉伸子波频谱除以拉伸子波频谱得到反频谱压缩算子,对动校正或偏移后存在子波拉伸的角度道应用反频谱压缩算子,操作简单易行.薄层模型试验和实际地震资料处理表明角度道校正方法能够消除子波拉伸畸变,展宽频谱,补偿地震资料动校正或偏移过程中丢失的高频成分,提高大角度的分辨率和保真度,改善AVO分析.%Offset-dependent tuning includes seismic imaging tuning, NMO stretch, and migration stretch. Seismic imaging tuning caused by compression of reflectivity inheres in seismic record. Either NMO stretch or migration stretch is the wavelet stretch which arises in the seismic processing. They are adverse factors for AVO analysis. The goal of dynamic correction or migration is to modify the time difference measured at the mid- and the far-offset trace to that at the near-offset trace. Either dynamic correction or migration stretches the compressed reflectivity, but brings wavelet stretch and corresponding spectral compression at the same time. The method of removing wavelet stretch proposed in this article is to do anti-stretch correction on the seismic data after dynamic correction or migration in frequency domain. The compression factor of seismic imaging tuning deduced from the parametric ray equations is related closely to the cosine of the refection angle. In offset traces after dynamic correction or migration, the wavelet stretch factor which varies with time and velocity is nonstationary. The shallow reflection at the far

  19. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  20. Curvature dependence of semiclassical corrections to ray optics: How Goos-Hänchen shift and Fresnel filtering deviate from the planar case result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockschläder, P.; Kreismann, J.; Hentschel, M.

    2014-09-01

    Ray optics is a useful tool even in the regime where, actually, full wave calculations would be appropriate. However, wave-inspired adjustments are needed to ensure the accuracy of ray-based predictions. Here, we investigate these semiclassical corrections to the ray picture —the Goos-Hänchen shift and the Fresnel filtering effect— for the reflection of light beams at curved, rather than planar, interfaces. We present analytical and numerical results that highlight the role of boundary curvature and show clear deviations from the planar case. The Goos-Hänchen shift is decreased at convexely curved interfaces present in optical microcavities and microlasers compared to the planar case, and increased for concave curvature. In contrast, the Fresnel filtering effect is increased by both kinds of curvature. For a straightforward explanation of these findings we introduce an intuitive picture that explicitly takes curvature into account and that allows for a qualitative understanding of the beam shift behaviour.

  1. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  2. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-02

    The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed.

  4. "Angle" Operator Conjugate to Photon's Intrinsic Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范洪义

    2001-01-01

    We find the correct "angle" operator conjugate to the intrinsic angular momentum of the photon by introducing a suitable representation which involves both left-handed and right-handed polarization photon operators.

  5. Relationship Between Differential Interference Angle and Parameter of Experiment in Molecular Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-Qing; LI Jian; MA Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) was observed in the intramolecular rotational energy transfer in the experiment of the static cell, and the integral interference angles were measured. To observe more precise information, the experiment in the molecular beam should be taken, from which the relationship between the differential interference angle and the scattering angle can be obtained. In this paper, the theoretical model of CQI is described in an atom-diatom system in the condition of the molecular beam, based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory, taking into accounts the long-range interaction potential. The method of observing and measuring correctly the differential interference angle is presented. The changing tendency of the differential interference angle with the impact parameter and relative velocity is discussed. The changing tendencies of the differential interference angle with the parameter of experiment in the molecular beam, including the impact parameter and the velocity are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understand or perform the experiment in the molecular beam.

  6. Multiscale Lagrangian Statistics of Curvature Angle in Pore-Scale Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bryan; Kadoch, Benjamin; Apte, Sourabh; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2016-11-01

    Porescale turbulent flow physics are investigated using Direct Numeric Simulation (DNS) of flow through a periodic face centered cubic (FCC) unit cell at Reynolds numbers of 300, 500 and 1000. The simulations are performed using a fictitious domain approach, which uses non-body conforming Cartesian grids. Lagrangian statistics of scale dependent curvature angle and acceleration are calculated by tracking a large number of fluid particle trajectories. For isotropic turbulence, it has been shown that the mean curvature angle varies linearly with time initially, reaches an inertial range and asymptotes to a value of π / 2 at long times, corresponding to the decorrelation and equipartition of the cosine of the curvature angle. Similar trends are observed at early times for turbulence in porous medium; however, the mean curvature angle asymptotes to a value larger than π / 2 , due to the effect of confinement on the fluid particle trajectories that result in preferred directions at large times. A Monte-Carlo based stochastic model to predict the long-time behavior of curvature angles is developed and shown to correctly predicts an angle larger than π / 2 at large times. NSF Project Numbers 1336983, 1133363.

  7. Radiative corrections to electron-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maximon, LC; Tjon, JA

    2000-01-01

    The radiative corrections to elastic electron-proton scattering are analyzed in a hadronic model including the finite size of the nucleon. For initial electron energies above 8 GeV and large scattering angles, the proton vertex correction in this model increases by at least 2% of the overall factor

  8. Aberration correction for time-domain ultrasound diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, T Douglas

    2002-07-01

    Extensions of a time-domain diffraction tomography method, which reconstructs spatially dependent sound speed variations from far-field time-domain acoustic scattering measurements, are presented and analyzed. The resulting reconstructions are quantitative images with applications including ultrasonic mammography, and can also be considered candidate solutions to the time-domain inverse scattering problem. Here, the linearized time-domain inverse scattering problem is shown to have no general solution for finite signal bandwidth. However, an approximate solution to the linearized problem is constructed using a simple delay-and-sum method analogous to "gold standard" ultrasonic beamforming. The form of this solution suggests that the full nonlinear inverse scattering problem can be approximated by applying appropriate angle- and space-dependent time shifts to the time-domain scattering data; this analogy leads to a general approach to aberration correction. Two related methods for aberration correction are presented: one in which delays are computed from estimates of the medium using an efficient straight-ray approximation, and one in which delays are applied directly to a time-dependent linearized reconstruction. Numerical results indicate that these correction methods achieve substantial quality improvements for imaging of large scatterers. The parametric range of applicability for the time-domain diffraction tomography method is increased by about a factor of 2 by aberration correction.

  9. Reading Angles in Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  10. Wind Tunnel Corrections for High Angle of Attack Models,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    2) . De telles confrontations sont bien entendu specifiquss des maquettes utilises et en particulier devraient Stre developp^es dans le domaine des...d’essais, il y a lieu de tenir compte des qualitds de l’ecoulement aussi bien stationnaire (ascendance, gradient longitudinal de pression) qu’in...luence des divers parametres ne peut etre etudiee isolement car il n’est pas encore possiblt re les faire varier. L’ONERA a dejä public des travaux

  11. [Clinical case. Correction of Angle Class I with biprotrusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, E; Baptista, J M

    1989-01-01

    The presentation of this case report shows the dentoalveolar and soft tissue alterations produced by Orthodontic treatment. Mechanic sequence included sectional arches and were planned according to the Bioprogressive Therapy. The cephalometric assessment (Ricketts analysis and superimpositions) demonstrates all changes produced by treatment as well as those influenced by growth.

  12. Towards monomaterial p-n junctions: Single-step fabrication of tin oxide films and their non-destructive characterisation by angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzywiecki, Maciej, E-mail: Maciej.Krzywiecki@polsl.pl [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute of Physics–CSE, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Sarfraz, Adnan; Erbe, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    The application of a non-destructive method for characterization of electronic structure of an ultra-thin SnO{sub 1angle dependent XPS, we quantified stoichiometry changes inside the SnO{sub 1

  13. Perturbative estimates of lepton mixing angles in unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: antusch@mppmu.mpg.de; King, Stephen F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Malinsky, Michal [Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) - AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-11

    Many unified models predict two large neutrino mixing angles, with the charged lepton mixing angles being small and quark-like, and the neutrino masses being hierarchical. Assuming this, we present simple approximate analytic formulae giving the lepton mixing angles in terms of the underlying high energy neutrino mixing angles together with small perturbations due to both charged lepton corrections and renormalisation group (RG) effects, including also the effects of third family canonical normalization (CN). We apply the perturbative formulae to the ubiquitous case of tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing at the unification scale, in order to predict the theoretical corrections to mixing angle predictions and sum rule relations, and give a general discussion of all limiting cases. We also discuss the implications for the sum rule relations of the measurement of a non-zero reactor angle, as hinted at by recent experimental measurements.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis on fluoropolymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, H; Jehnichen, D; Grundke, K; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2007-10-31

    Contact angle hysteresis of liquids with different molecular and geometrical properties on high quality films of four fluoropolymers was studied. A number of different causes are identified for hysteresis. With n-alkanes as probe liquids, contact angle hysteresis is found to be strongly related to the configuration of polymer chains. The largest hysteresis is obtained with amorphous polymers whereas the smallest hysteresis occurs for polymers with ordered molecular chains. This is explained in terms of sorption of liquid by the solid and penetration of liquid into the polymer film. Correlation of contact angle hysteresis with the size of n-alkane molecules supports this conclusion. On the films of two amorphous fluoropolymers with different molecular configurations, contact angle hysteresis of one and the same liquid with "bulky" molecules is shown to be quite different. On the surfaces of Teflon AF 1600, with stiff molecular chains, the receding angles of the probe liquids are independent of contact time between solid and liquid and similar hysteresis is obtained for all the liquids. Retention of liquid molecules on the solid surface is proposed as the most likely cause of hysteresis in these systems. On the other hand, with EGC-1700 films that consist of flexible chains, the receding angles are strongly time-dependent and the hysteresis is large. Contact angle hysteresis increases even further when liquids with strong dipolar intermolecular forces are used. In this case, major reorganization of EGC-1700 chains due to contact with the test liquids is suggested as the cause. The effect of rate of motion of the three-phase line on the advancing and receding contact angles, and therefore contact angle hysteresis, is investigated. For low viscous liquids, contact angles are independent of the drop front velocity up to approximately 10 mm/min. This agrees with the results of an earlier study that showed that the rate-dependence of the contact angles is an issue only

  15. Bub3-BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek; Royou, Anne

    2015-11-09

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box-dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3-BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes.

  16. Two-Loop Fermionic Corrections to Massive Bhabha Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Actis, S; Gluza, J; Riemann, T

    2007-01-01

    We evaluate the two-loop corrections to Bhabha scattering from fermion loops in the context of pure Quantum Electrodynamics. The differential cross section is expressed by a small number of Master Integrals with exact dependence on the fermion masses me, mf and the Mandelstam invariants s,t,u. We determine the limit of fixed scattering angle and high energy, assuming the hierarchy of scales me^2 << mf^2 << s,t,u. The numerical result is combined with the available non-fermionic contributions. As a by-product, we provide an independent check of the known electron-loop contributions.

  17. Globographic visualisation of three dimensional joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard

    2011-07-07

    Three different methods for describing three dimensional joint angles are commonly used in biomechanics. The joint coordinate system and Cardan/Euler angles are conceptually quite different but are known to represent the same underlying mathematics. More recently the globographic method has been suggested as an alternative and this has proved particularly attractive for the shoulder joint. All three methods can be implemented in a number of ways leading to a choice of angle definitions. Very recently Rab has demonstrated that the globographic method is equivalent to one implementation of the joint coordinate system. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the three different methods and proves their mathematical equivalence. The well known sequence dependence of Cardan/Euler is presented as equivalent to configuration dependence of the joint coordinate system and orientation dependence of globographic angles. The precise definition of different angle sets can be easily visualised using the globographic method using analogues of longitude, latitude and surface bearings with which most users will already be familiar. The method implicitly requires one axis of the moving segment to be identified as its principal axis and this can be extremely useful in helping define the most appropriate angle set to describe the orientation of any particular joint. Using this technique different angle sets are considered to be most appropriate for different joints and examples of this for the hip, knee, ankle, pelvis and axial skeleton are outlined.

  18. Correction of the angular dependence of MatriXX Evolution detectors and its impact in the IMRT and VMAT treatment validation; Correccion de la dependencia angular de los detectores del MatriXX Evolution y su impacto en la validacion de tratamientos de IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casares Magaz, O.; Seongheon, K.; Hernandez Armas, J.; Papanikolaou, N.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to create detector element-specific angular correction factors for each detector of the MatriXX planar ion chamber array and compare them to vendor-default angular correction factors. Additionally, the impact of both factors on gamma index was quantified using two corrections. The correction factor of each element is determined irradiating the detector at different incidences by the ratio of the calculated expected dose to the MatriXX measured dose as a gantry angle function. To evaluate its impact, sixty-five pre-irradiated patient-specific dose validations were re-analyzed using the gamma index with: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm criteria. The factors for 6 MV were found to differ (7%) from the default ones for specific angles particularly for 85 degree centigrade to 95 degree centigrade. For 10 MV, differences (1.0%) existed when correction factors were created using various ROI's. Two corrections were proposed, absolute differences for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm were up to 1.5%, 4.2% and 4.1% ( p < 0.01), respectively. Large differences in the default and specific factors were noted for 6 MV and lead to improvement of the absolute gamma index value of up to 4.2%. In general, gamma index value increases for patient specific dose validations when using device specific factors. (Author)

  19. Reliable measurement of the receding contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Huhtamäki, Tommi; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2013-03-26

    Surface wettability is usually evaluated by the contact angle between the perimeter of a water drop and the surface. However, this single measurement is not enough for proper characterization, and the so-called advancing and receding contact angles also need to be measured. Measuring the receding contact angle can be challenging, especially for extremely hydrophobic surfaces. We demonstrate a reliable procedure by using the common needle-in-the-sessile-drop method. Generally, the contact line movement needs to be followed, and true receding movement has to be distinguished from "pseudo-movement" occurring before the receding angle is reached. Depending on the contact angle hysteresis, the initial size of the drop may need to be surprisingly large to achieve a reliable result. Although our motivation for this work was the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces, we also show that this method works universally ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  1. Planejamento pré-operatório e técnica cirúrgica da osteotomia supracondiliana varizante de adição do fêmur para correção do geno valgo e fixação com implante de ângulo fixo Pre-operative planning and surgical technique of the open wedge supracondylar osteotomy for correction of valgus knee and fixation with a fixed-angle implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Antonio Jansen Paccola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado o planejamento pré-operatório passo a passo da osteotomia de abertura supracondiliana do fêmur para a correção precisa do eixo de carga do membro inferior usando um implante de ângulo fixo (placa lâmina AO 95º. Também é apresentada a técnica cirúrgica e a utilização de enxerto ósseo do próprio local para o preenchimento da falha.The pre-operative planning is presented in a step by step fashion and the surgical technique of the lateral open wedge supracondylar femoral osteotomy for correction of the valgus knee using a fixed angle implant (95º AO angled blade plate. A surgical method for filling in the defect using an autologous bone graft is also presented.

  2. Critical Assessment of Correction Methods for Fisheye Lens Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Tian, C.; Huang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A fisheye lens is widely used to create a wide panoramic or hemispherical image. It is an ultra wide-angle lens that produces strong visual distortion. The distortion modeling and estimation of the fisheye lens are the crucial step for fisheye lens calibration and image rectification in computer vision and close-range photography. There are two kinds of distortion: radial and tangential distortion. Radial distortion is large for fisheye imaging and critical for the subsequent image processing. Although many researchers have developed calibration algorithms of radial distortion of fisheye lens, quantitative evaluation of the correction performance has remained a challenge. This is the first paper that intuitively and objectively evaluates the performance of five different calibration algorithms. Upto- date research on fisheye lens calibration is comprehensively reviewed to identify the research need. To differentiate their performance in terms of precision and ease-using, five methods are then tested using a diverse set of actual images of the checkerboard that are taken at Wuhan University, China under varying lighting conditions, shadows, and shooting angles. The method of rational function model, which was generally used for wide-angle lens correction, outperforms the other methods. However, the one parameter division model is easy for practical use without compromising too much the precision. The reason is that it depends on the linear structure in the image and requires no preceding calibration. It is a tradeoff between correction precision and ease-using. By critically assessing the strengths and limitations of the existing algorithms, the paper provides valuable insight and guideline for future practice and algorithm development that are important for fisheye lens calibration. It is promising for the optimal design of lens correction models that are suitable for the millions of portable imaging devices.

  3. Angle-Ply Weaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    Bias-direction or angle-ply weaving is proposed new process for weaving fibers along bias in conventional planar fabric or in complicated three-dimensional multilayer fabric preform of fiber-reinforced composite structure. Based upon movement of racks of needles and corresponding angle yarns across fabric as fabric being formed. Fibers woven along bias increases shear stiffness and shear strength of preform, increasing value of preform as structural member.

  4. Extended T2-IVIM model for correction of TE dependence of pseudo-diffusion volume fraction in clinical diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, N. P.; d'Arcy, J. A.; Feiweier, T.; Koh, D.-M.; Leach, M. O.; Collins, D. J.; Orton, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    The bi-exponential intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) model for diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) fails to account for differential T 2 s in the model compartments, resulting in overestimation of pseudodiffusion fraction f. An extended model, T2-IVIM, allows removal of the confounding echo-time (TE) dependence of f, and provides direct compartment T 2 estimates. Two consented healthy volunteer cohorts (n  =  5, 6) underwent DWI comprising multiple TE/b-value combinations (Protocol 1: TE  =  62-102 ms, b  =  0-250 mm-2s, 30 combinations. Protocol 2: 8 b-values 0-800 mm-2s at TE  =  62 ms, with 3 additional b-values 0-50 mm-2s at TE  =  80, 100 ms scanned twice). Data from liver ROIs were fitted with IVIM at individual TEs, and with the T2-IVIM model using all data. Repeat-measures coefficients of variation were assessed for Protocol 2. Conventional IVIM modelling at individual TEs (Protocol 1) demonstrated apparent f increasing with longer TE: 22.4  ±  7% (TE  =  62 ms) to 30.7  ±  11% (TE  =  102 ms) T2-IVIM model fitting accounted for all data variation. Fitting of Protocol 2 data using T2-IVIM yielded reduced f estimates (IVIM: 27.9  ±  6%, T2-IVIM: 18.3  ±  7%), as well as T 2  =  42.1  ±  7 ms, 77.6  ±  30 ms for true and pseudodiffusion compartments, respectively. A reduced Protocol 2 dataset yielded comparable results in a clinical time frame (11 min). The confounding dependence of IVIM f on TE can be accounted for using additional b/TE images and the extended T2-IVIM model.

  5. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  6. Gravitational Correction to Vacuum Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravitational correction to (electronic) vacuum polarization in the presence of a gravitational background field. The Dirac propagators for the virtual fermions are modified to include the leading gravitational correction (potential term) which corresponds to a coordinate-dependent fermion mass. The mass term is assumed to be uniform over a length scale commensurate with the virtual electron-positron pair. The on-mass shell renormalization condition ensures that the gravitational correction vanishes on the mass shell of the photon, i.e., the speed of light is unaffected by the quantum field theoretical loop correction, in full agreement with the equivalence principle. Nontrivial corrections are obtained for off-shell, virtual photons. We compare our findings to other works on generalized Lorentz transformations and combined quantum-electrodynamic gravitational corrections to the speed of light which have recently appeared in the literature.

  7. A Hydrodynamic Model of Dynamic Contact Angle Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    contact angle hysteresis is developed in terms of the interaction of capillary, viscous, and...used to obtain the equations which describe the contact angle region and thereby to define the dynamic contact angle . The analysis is limited to...velocity dependence of the receding contact angle and of the thickness of the deposited film of the receding interface of a wetting liquid are determined as functions of the capillary, viscous, and disjoining forces.

  8. 乙二胺四乙酸依赖性假性血小板减少症简易纠正方案%Simple correcting scheme of EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑军; 黄秀霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:乙二胺四乙酸(EDTA)依赖性假性血小板减少症标本通过肝素锂、枸橼酸钠及改良方案进行纠正,对血小板测定结果进行评估,建立一个简单、实用、且不延长结果报告时间(TAT)的方法。方法征集ED‐TA依赖性假性血小板减少症志愿者120例,同时收集肝素锂、枸橼酸钠、EDTA‐K3抗凝标本各一份,其中EDTA‐K3标本采用改良方法处理后再检测,三组检测结果与参考方法的测定结果进行比较。评估差异有无统计学意义。结果肝素锂、枸橼酸钠、改良方案的纠正率分别为80.5%、39.2%、100.0%;与参考方法比较,P值分别0.129、0.013、0.051。T A T分别为(2.03±0.29)、(1.8±0.35)、(0.47±0.19)h。结论肝素锂组的结果与参考方法测定结果相关性最好,可比性最好。其次是改良组和枸橼酸钠组。改良方案对 TAT影响最小、不用进行患者的二次采血,并且结果与枸橼酸钠相似,因此该改良方案可以用于临床上对PTCP标本的纠正。%Objective To correct the specimens of EDTA‐dependent pseudothrombocytopenia(PTCT ) by a‐dopting heparin lithium ,sodium sitrate and the improved corrective solution and to evaluate the platelet detection re‐sults for establishing a simple ,practical method without extending the results report time .Methods 120 volunteer of EDTA‐dependent PTCT and each anti‐coagulation specimen with EDTA‐K3 ,heparin lithium and sodium citrate were collected ,in which the specimens of EDTA‐K3 was treated by the improved method and then the detection was con‐ducted .The detection results in 3 groups were compared with the detection results by the reference method and whether having the statistical significance was evaluated .Results The corrective rates of heparin lithium ,sodium cit‐rate and improved corrective solution were 80 .5% ,39 .2% and 100 .0% .Their P values were 0

  9. Weak lensing using only galaxy position angles

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, Lee; Battye, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We develop a method for performing a weak lensing analysis using only measurements of galaxy position angles. By analyzing the statistical properties of the galaxy orientations given a known intrinsic ellipticity distribution, we show that it is possible to obtain estimates of the shear by minimizing a $\\chi^2$ statistic. The method is demonstrated using simulations where the components of the intrinsic ellipticity are taken to be Gaussian distributed. Uncertainties on the position angle measurements introduce a bias into the shear estimates which can be reduced to negligible levels by introducing a correction term into the formalism. We generalize our approach by developing an algorithm to obtain direct shear estimators given any azimuthally symmetric intrinsic ellipticity distribution. We demonstrate this technique by applying it to simulations where the ellipticities are taken to follow a log-normal distribution. We compare the performance of the position angle only method with the standard method based on...

  10. Limited Angle Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Seong Sik [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In computed tomography (CT), many situations are restricted to obtain enough number of projections or views to avoid artifacts such as streaking and geometrical distortion in the reconstructed images. Speed of motion of an object to be imaged can limit the number of views. Cardiovascular imaging is a representative example. Size of an object can also limit the complete traverse motion or geometrical complexity can obscure to be imaged at certain range of angles. These situations are frequently met in industrial nondestructive testing and evaluation. Dental CT also suffers from similar situation because cervical spine causes less x-ray penetration from some directions such that the available information is not sufficient for standard reconstruction algorithms. The limited angle tomography is now greatly paid attention as a new genre in medical and industrial imaging, popularly known as digital tomosynthesis. In this study, we introduce a modified filtered backprojection method in limited angle tomography and demonstrate its application for the dental imaging.

  11. Research Development of Correction Methodology of EDTA-dependent Pseudothrombocytopenia%纠正EDTA依赖性假性血小板减少的方法学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜树朋(综述); 李艳(审校)

    2015-01-01

    EDTA-K2 is taken as the proposed anticoagulant in blood count by International Council for Standardization in Hematology ( ICSH ) . However, occasionally EDTA-dependency pseudothrombocytopenia ( EDTA-PTCP) occurs. In order to prevent clinical misdiagnosis,mistherapy and unnecessary platelets trans-fusion,it is necessary to correct the platelet count. At present the main correction methods are dilution model method,alternative anticoagulant method, micro centrifuge tube method, drug stability method, reticulocyte count method,channel PLT reference method etc.%乙二胺四乙酸二钾(EDTA-K2)是国际血液学标准化委员会建议的血细胞计数抗凝剂,其在应用过程中偶尔会发生EDTA依赖性假性血小板减少症( EDTA-PTCP)。为了防止临床误诊误治,导致不必要的血小板输注,必须对血小板计数进行纠正。目前纠正方法主要有稀释模式法、替代抗凝剂法、微量离心管法、药物稳定法、网织红细胞通道法、血小板计数参考方法等。

  12. Dynamical angled brane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Uzawa, Kunihito

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the dynamical D p -brane solutions describing any number of D p branes whose relative orientations are given by certain SU(2) rotations. These are the generalization of the static angled D p -brane solutions. We study the collision of the dynamical D3 brane with angles in type-II string theory, and show that the particular orientation of the smeared D3-brane configuration can provide an example of colliding branes if they have the same charges. Otherwise a singularity appears before D3 branes collide.

  13. Self-correction coil: operation mechanism of self-correction coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoyama, K.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss here the operation mechanism of self-correction coil with a simple model. At the first stage, for the ideal self-correction coil case we calculate the self-inductance L of self-correction coil, the mutual inductance M between the error field coil and the self-correction coil, and using the model the induced curent in the self-correction coil by the external magnetic error field and induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil. And at the second stage, we extend this calculation method to non-ideal self-correction coil case, there we realize that the wire distribution of self-correction coil is important to get the high enough self-correction effect. For measure of completeness of self-correction effect, we introduce the efficiency eta of self-correction coil by the ratio of induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil and error field. As for the examples, we calculate L, M and eta for two cases; one is a single block approximation of self-correction coil winding and the other is a two block approximation case. By choosing the adequate angles of self-correction coil winding, we can get about 98% efficiency for single block approximation case and 99.8% for two block approximation case. This means that by using the self-correction coil we can improve the field quality about two orders.

  14. The quadriceps angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Frederiksen, Jane V.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2012-01-01

    : Pelvic limbs from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). METHODS: Q angles were measured on hip dysplasia (HD) and whole limb (WL) view radiographs of each limb between the acetabular rim, mid-point (Q1: patellar center, Q2: femoral trochlea), and tibial tuberosity. Errors of 0.5-2.0 mm at measurement landmarks...

  15. A simple method to obtain consistent and clinically meaningful pelvic angles from euler angles during gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Tishya A L; Mitiguy, Paul C

    2007-08-01

    Clinical gait analysis usually describes joint kinematics using Euler angles, which depend on the sequence of rotation. Studies have shown that pelvic obliquity angles from the traditional tilt-obliquity-rotation (TOR) Euler angle sequence can deviate considerably from clinical expectations and have suggested that a rotation-obliquity-tilt (ROT) Euler angle sequence be used instead. We propose a simple alternate approach in which clinical joint angles are defined and exactly calculated in terms of Euler angles from any rotation sequence. Equations were derived to calculate clinical pelvic elevation, progression, and lean angles from TOR and ROT Euler angles. For the ROT Euler angles, obliquity was exactly the same as the clinical elevation angle, rotation was similar to the clinical progression angle, and tilt was similar to the clinical lean angle. Greater differences were observed for TOR. These results support previous findings that ROT is preferable to TOR for calculating pelvic Euler angles for clinical interpretation. However, we suggest that exact clinical angles can and should be obtained through a few extra calculations as demonstrated in this technical note.

  16. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Möller, Martin; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-08-21

    We study experimentally and discuss quantitatively the contact angle hysteresis on striped superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of a solid fraction, ϕS. It is shown that the receding regime is determined by a longitudinal sliding motion of the deformed contact line. Despite an anisotropy of the texture the receding contact angle remains isotropic, i.e., is practically the same in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The cosine of the receding angle grows nonlinearly with ϕS. To interpret this we develop a theoretical model, which shows that the value of the receding angle depends both on weak defects at smooth solid areas and on the strong defects due to the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which scales as ϕS(2)lnϕS. The advancing contact angle was found to be anisotropic, except in a dilute regime, and its value is shown to be determined by the rolling motion of the drop. The cosine of the longitudinal advancing angle depends linearly on ϕS, but a satisfactory fit to the data can only be provided if we generalize the Cassie equation to account for weak defects. The cosine of the transverse advancing angle is much smaller and is maximized at ϕS ≃ 0.5. An explanation of its value can be obtained if we invoke an additional energy due to strong defects in this direction, which is shown to be caused by the adhesion of the drop on solid sectors and is proportional to ϕS(2). Finally, the contact angle hysteresis is found to be quite large and generally anisotropic, but it becomes isotropic when ϕS ≤ 0.2.

  17. Radiative corrections to Bose condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. (Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, La Habana. Inst. de Matematica, Cibernetica y Computacion)

    1985-04-01

    The Bose condensation of the scalar field in a theory behaving in the Coleman-Weinberg mode is considered. The effective potential of the model is computed within the semiclassical approximation in a dimensional regularization scheme. Radiative corrections are shown to introduce certain ..mu..-dependent ultraviolet divergences in the effective potential coming from the Many-Particle theory. The weight of radiative corrections in the dynamics of the system is strongly modified by the charge density.

  18. Numerical consistency check between two approaches to radiative corrections for neutrino masses and mixings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mrinal Kumar Das; Mahadev Patgiri; N Nimai Singh

    2005-12-01

    We briefly outline the two popular approaches on radiative corrections to neutrino masses and mixing angles, and then carry out a detailed numerical analysis for a consistency check between them in MSSM. We find that the two approaches are nearly consistent with a discrepancy factor of 4.2% with running vacuum expectation value (VEV) (13% for scale-independent VEV) in mass eigenvalues at low-energy scale but the predictions on mixing angles are almost consistent. We check the stability of the three types of neutrino models, i.e., hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and degenerate models, under radiative corrections, using both approaches, and find consistent conclusions. The neutrino mass models which are found to be stable under radiative corrections in MSSM are the normal hierarchical model and the inverted hierarchical model with opposite CP parity. We also carry out numerical analysis on some important conjectures related to radiative corrections in the MSSM, viz., radiative magnification of solar and atmospheric mixings in the case of nearly degenerate model having same CP parity (MPR conjecture) and radiative generation of solar mass scale in exactly two-fold degenerate model with opposite CP parity and non-zero 3 (JM conjecture). We observe certain exceptions to these conjectures. We find a new result that both solar mass scale and 3 can be generated through radiative corrections at low energy scale. Finally the effect of scale-dependent vacuum expectation value in neutrino mass renormalisation is discussed.

  19. Three paths toward the quantum angle operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Szafraniec, Franciszek Hugon

    2016-12-01

    We examine mathematical questions around angle (or phase) operator associated with a number operator through a short list of basic requirements. We implement three methods of construction of quantum angle. The first one is based on operator theory and parallels the definition of angle for the upper half-circle through its cosine and completed by a sign inversion. The two other methods are integral quantization generalizing in a certain sense the Berezin-Klauder approaches. One method pertains to Weyl-Heisenberg integral quantization of the plane viewed as the phase space of the motion on the line. It depends on a family of "weight" functions on the plane. The third method rests upon coherent state quantization of the cylinder viewed as the phase space of the motion on the circle. The construction of these coherent states depends on a family of probability distributions on the line.

  20. Applying Contact Angle to a 2D Multiphase Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Samareh, Babak; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium contact angle of liquid drops over horizontal surfaces has been modeled using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The model is capable of accurate implementation of contact angles to stationary and moving contact lines. In this scheme, the desired value for stationary or dynamic contact angle is used to correct the profile near the triple point. This is achieved by correcting the surface normals near the contact line and also interpolating the drop profile into the boundaries. ...

  1. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova Evgenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  2. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy; Kuznetsov, Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  3. The lateral angle revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Jeannie; Lynnerup, Niels; Hoppa, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous reports have observed that the lateral angle size in females is significantly larger than in males. The method was applied to an independent series of 77 postmortem CT scans (42 males, 35 females) to validate its accuracy and reliability...... method appears to be of minimal practical use in forensic anthropology and archeology. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences....

  4. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  5. Impingement-free hip motion: the 'normal' angle alpha after osteochondroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Mirjam; Cui, Quanjun; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Beck, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is considered a cause of hip osteoarthrosis. In cam impingement, an aspherical head-neck junction is squeezed into the joint and causes acetabular cartilage damage. The anterior offset angle alpha, observed on a lateral crosstable radiograph, reflects the location where the femoral head becomes aspheric. Previous studies reported a mean angle alpha of 42 degrees in asymptomatic patients. Currently, it is believed an angle alpha of 50 degrees to 55 degrees is normal. The aim of this study was to identify that angle alpha which allows impingement-free motion. In 45 patients who underwent surgical treatment for femoroacetabular impingement, we measured the angle alpha preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 1 year postoperatively. All hips underwent femoral correction and, if necessary, acetabular correction. The correction was considered sufficient when, in 90 degrees hip flexion, an internal rotation of 20 degrees to 25 degrees was possible. The angle alpha was corrected from a preoperative mean of 66 degrees (range, 45 degrees - 79 degrees) to 43 degrees (range, 34 degrees - 60 degrees) postoperatively. Because the acetabulum is corrected to normal first, the femoral correction is tested against a normal acetabulum. We therefore concluded an angle alpha of 43 degrees achieved surgically and with impingement-free motion, represents the normal angle alpha, an angle lower than that currently considered sufficient.

  6. Quasar bolometric corrections: theoretical considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S

    2010-01-01

    Bolometric corrections based on the optical-to-ultraviolet continuum spectrum of quasars are widely used to quantify their radiative output, although such estimates are affected by a myriad of uncertainties, such as the generally unknown line-of-sight angle to the central engine. In order to shed light on these issues, we investigate the state-of-the-art models of Hubeny et al. that describe the continuum spectrum of thin accretion discs and include relativistic effects. We explore the bolometric corrections as a function of mass accretion rates, black hole masses and viewing angles, restricted to the parameter space expected for type-1 quasars. We find that a nonlinear relationship log L_bol=A + B log(lambda L_lambda) with B<=0.9 is favoured by the models and becomes tighter as the wavelength decreases. We calculate from the model the bolometric corrections corresponding to the wavelengths lambda = 1450A, 3000A and 5100A. In particular, for lambda=3000A we find A=9.24 +- 0.77 and B=0.81 +- 0.02. We demons...

  7. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A.

  8. Dual-phase cardiac diffusion tensor imaging with strain correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Stoeck

    Full Text Available In this work we present a dual-phase diffusion tensor imaging (DTI technique that incorporates a correction scheme for the cardiac material strain, based on 3D myocardial tagging.In vivo dual-phase cardiac DTI with a stimulated echo approach and 3D tagging was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. The time course of material strain was estimated from the tagging data and used to correct for strain effects in the diffusion weighted acquisition. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, helix, transverse and sheet angles were calculated and compared between systole and diastole, with and without strain correction. Data acquired at the systolic sweet spot, where the effects of strain are eliminated, served as a reference.The impact of strain correction on helix angle was small. However, large differences were observed in the transverse and sheet angle values, with and without strain correction. The standard deviation of systolic transverse angles was significantly reduced from 35.9±3.9° to 27.8°±3.5° (p<0.001 upon strain-correction indicating more coherent fiber tracks after correction. Myocyte aggregate structure was aligned more longitudinally in systole compared to diastole as reflected by an increased transmural range of helix angles (71.8°±3.9° systole vs. 55.6°±5.6°, p<0.001 diastole. While diastolic sheet angle histograms had dominant counts at high sheet angle values, systolic histograms showed lower sheet angle values indicating a reorientation of myocyte sheets during contraction.An approach for dual-phase cardiac DTI with correction for material strain has been successfully implemented. This technique allows assessing dynamic changes in myofiber architecture between systole and diastole, and emphasizes the need for strain correction when sheet architecture in the heart is imaged with a stimulated echo approach.

  9. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio /2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio /2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  10. Congenitally corrected transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debich-Spicer Diane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial connections, usually accompanied by other cardiovascular malformations. Incidence has been reported to be around 1/33,000 live births, accounting for approximately 0.05% of congenital heart malformations. Associated malformations may include interventricular communications, obstructions of the outlet from the morphologically left ventricle, and anomalies of the tricuspid valve. The clinical picture and age of onset depend on the associated malformations, with bradycardia, a single loud second heart sound and a heart murmur being the most common manifestations. In the rare cases where there are no associated malformations, congenitally corrected transposition can lead to progressive atrioventricular valvar regurgitation and failure of the systemic ventricle. The diagnosis can also be made late in life when the patient presents with complete heart block or cardiac failure. The etiology of congenitally corrected transposition is currently unknown, and with an increase in incidence among families with previous cases of congenitally corrected transposition reported. Diagnosis can be made by fetal echocardiography, but is more commonly made postnatally with a combination of clinical signs and echocardiography. The anatomical delineation can be further assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and catheterization. The differential diagnosis is centred on the assessing if the patient is presenting with isolated malformations, or as part of a spectrum. Surgical management consists of repair of the associated malformations, or redirection of the systemic and pulmonary venous return associated with an arterial switch procedure, the so-called double switch approach. Prognosis is defined by the associated malformations, and on the timing and approach to palliative surgical care.

  11. Hologram production and representation for corrected image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Gui Chao; Zhang, Rui; Su, Xue Mei

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a CCD sensor device is used to record the distorted homemade grid images which are taken by a wide angle camera. The distorted images are corrected by using methods of position calibration and correction of gray with vc++ 6.0 and opencv software. Holography graphes for the corrected pictures are produced. The clearly reproduced images are obtained where Fresnel algorithm is used in graph processing by reducing the object and reference light from Fresnel diffraction to delete zero-order part of the reproduced images. The investigation is useful in optical information processing and image encryption transmission.

  12. Pitch Perfect: How Fruit Flies Control their Body Pitch Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Samuel C; Canale, Luca; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Flapping insect flight is a complex and beautiful phenomenon that relies on fast, active control mechanisms to counter aerodynamic instability. To directly investigate how freely-flying D. melanogaster control their body pitch angle against such instability, we perturb them using impulsive mechanical torques and film their corrective maneuvers with high-speed video. Combining experimental observations and numerical simulation, we find that flies correct for pitch deflections of up to 40 degrees in 29 +/- 8 ms by bilaterally modulating their wings' front-most stroke angle in a manner well-described by a linear proportional-integral (PI) controller. Flies initiate this corrective process after only 10 +/- 2 ms, indicating that pitch stabilization involves a fast reflex response. Remarkably, flies can also correct for very large-amplitude pitch perturbations--greater than 150 degrees--providing a regime in which to probe the limits of the linear-response framework. Together with previous studies regarding yaw an...

  13. Momentum-Dependent Charge Transfer Excitations in Sr{sub {bold 2}}CuO {sub {bold 2}}Cl{sub {bold 2}} Angle-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Zhang, F.C.; Dravid, V.P.; Ng, K.K.; Klein, M.V.; Schnatterly, S.E.; Miller, L.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)]|[Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)]|[Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 (United States)]|[Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Electron-hole pair excitations in the insulating cuprates Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} were investigated by angle-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy. The optically allowed and optically forbidden transitions were observed to be strongly anisotropic in Cu-O{sub 2} plane. The former show a large energy dispersion {approximately}1.5 eV along [110], and the latter appear at a higher energy position ({approximately}4.5 eV) only along [100], but not along [110]. We interpret these results as transitions involving excitons. A small exciton model is examined to explain both the observed features. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y K [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  15. Research of the Pressure Angle for Whole Cycloidal Gears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling-tao; WANG Jian-hua

    2011-01-01

    The working profile of whole cycloidal gear is made up of epicycloid and hypocycloid entirely, according to the theory of meshing of gears and the properties of the cycloid, deals with the derivation of the pressure angle formula for the whole cycloidal gear in theory, and reveals changes of the pressure angle of whole cycloidal gear through examples, finds the application relationships between the pressure angle and other design parameters of the whole cycloidal gear, proves the possibility that the whole cycloidal gear can be used in internal parallel move gear mechanism, also provides theoretic fundament for designing internal parallel move whole cycloidal gear correctly.

  16. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova Evgenija; Feoktistov Dmitriy; Kuznetsov Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It...

  17. Shape, gravity, and the perception of the right angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, Lydia M

    2010-01-01

    Past efforts to determine whether orientation-dependent sensitivity to right angles is due to retinal or environmental/gravitational frames of reference have produced conflicting conclusions. I attempt to show that the chief factor underlying this phenomenon is, rather, the shape of the object containing the angle. This shape mediates the typical orientation of the object in a ground- gravity context and the consequent force-structure of the incorporated angle-a force structure that is reflected in the percept.

  18. Angle-deviation optical profilometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Tai Tan; Yuan-Sheng Chan; Zhen-Chin Lin; Ming-Hung Chiu

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose a new optical profilometer for three-dimensional (3D) surface profile measurement in real time.The deviation angle is based on geometrical optics and is proportional to the apex angle of a test plate.Measuring the reflectivity of a parallelogram prism allows detection of the deviation angle when the beam is incident at the nearby critical angle. The reflectivity is inversely proportional to the deviation angle and proportional to the apex angle and surface height. We use a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera at the image plane to capture the reflectivity profile and obtain the 3D surface profile directly.%We propose a new optical profilometer for three-dimensional (3D) surface profile measurement in real time.The deviation angle is based on geometrical optics and is proportional to the apex angle of a test plate.Measuring the refiectivity of a parallelogram prism allows detection of the deviation angle when the beam is incident at the nearby critical angle. The refiectivity is inversely proportional to the deviation angle and proportional to the apex angle and surface height. We use a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera at the image plane to capture the refiectivity profile and obtain the 3D surface profile directly.

  19. Key Techniques of Terminal Correction Mortar Projectiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    The operational principle, the impulse force and terminal guidance laws of terminal correction mortar projectiles(TCMP) are researched in this paper, by using the TCMP simulation program, key techniques such as the miss distance influenced by the acting point of impulse force, the impulse force value, the correction threshold, and the number of impulse rockets are researched in this paper.And the dual pulse control scheme is also studied.Simulation results indicate that the best acting point is near the center of gravity, sufficient correction resources are needed, the miss distance is insentive to the correction threshold, increasing the number of impulse rockets properly is beneficial to increase the hit precision, the velocity pursuit guidance law has less miss distance, the change of the attack angle is milder and the transient time becomes less in the dual impulse control scheme.These conclusions are important for choosing parameters and impulse correction schemes designed for TCMP.

  20. Study of the advancing and receding contact angles: liquid sorption as a cause of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C N C; Wu, R; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-02-25

    Two types of experiments were used to study the behavior of both advancing and receding contact angles, namely the dynamic one-cycle contact angle (DOCA) and the dynamic cycling contact angle (DCCA) experiments. For the preliminary study, DOCA measurements of different liquids on different solids were performed using an automated axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P). From these experimental results, four patterns of receding contact angle were observed: (1) time-dependent receding contact angle; (2) constant receding contact angle; (3) 'stick/slip'; (4) no receding contact angle. For the purpose of illustration, results from four different solid surfaces are shown. These solids are: FC-732-coated surface; poly(methyl methacrylate/n-butyl methacrylate) [P(MMA/nBMA)]; poly(lactic acid) (DL-PLA); and poly(lactic/glycolic acid) 50/50 (DL-PLGA 50/50). Since most of the surfaces in our studies exhibit time dependence in the receding contact angle, a more extended study was conducted using only FC-732-coated surfaces to better understand the possible causes of decreasing receding contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. Contact angle measurements of 21 liquids from two homologous series (i.e. n-alkanes and 1-alcohols) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCMTS) on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. It is apparent that the contact angle hysteresis decreases with the chain length of the liquid. It was found that the receding contact angle equals the advancing angle when the alkane molecules are infinitely large. These results strongly suggest that the chain length and size of the liquid molecule could contribute to contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Furthermore, DCCA measurements of six liquids from the two homologous series on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. With these experimental results, one can construe that the time dependence of contact angle hysteresis on relatively smooth and homogeneous surfaces is mainly caused by liquid retention

  1. Tunable contact angle hysteresis on micropatterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Debuisson, Damien; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Micropatterned surfaces composed of concentric circular defects having a smooth trench-like profile are formed using a photoresist (SU-8). When an evaporating droplet encounters the micropatterned surface an evaporation phase is observed consisting of distinct discontinuities and steps in the droplet wetting contact angle and base radius respectively. The addition of gaps into the circular defects enables tuning of the contact angle hysteresis; the receding contact angle of fluorocarbon coated SU-8 can be tuned between 34.6{\\deg} and 89.1{\\deg} and that of SU-8 surfaces from 5.6{\\deg} to 43.3{\\deg} depending on the gap length. In addition, a model is developed which accurately predicts the observed behavior.

  2. Magic-angle thermal desorption mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Steven W.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1990-02-01

    Accurate quantitative measurements of desorption rates or adsorbate coverages in thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDS) using line-of-sight mass spectrometers are hindered by the fact that the angular distributions of desorption flux can vary widely from desorbate to desorbate, ranging from cos 1ø to cos 9 ø for most species studied to date (ø = polar angle from surface normal). These differences can easily lead to errors exceeding 400% in measuring the relative desorption rates of different species. We show here that, by placing the mass spectrometer's ion source or entrance aperture at a "magic-angle" ø mthese errors can be reduced to less than 26% maximum deviation (or ± 7% standard deviation). Depending upon the sample-to-detector distance, ø m varies from ~ 42° to 34°. It is recommended that TDS experiments be performed at this "magic-angle" for improvement in the quantitative accuracy of coverage or rate measurements.

  3. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  4. Investigation of Polarimetric SAR Data Acquired at Multiple Incidence Angles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Morten Thougaard; Skriver, Henning; Thomsen, A.

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of different polarimetric parameters on the incidence angles in the range of 30° to 60° is investigated for a number of different crops using airborne SAR data. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the effect of the variation of incidence angle within a SAR image when...

  5. Dynamic aspects of contact angle measurements on adsorbed protein layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, van der At; Smolders, Cees A.

    1978-01-01

    Contact angle measurements using drops of paraffin oil have been performed on polystyrene (PS) substrates, coated with human serum albumin (HSA) or human fibrinogen (HFb), immersed in buffer solution. The contact angle appeared to be time dependent. The final value for HSA-coated substrates was 50°

  6. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  7. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd [Applied Materials - Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  8. Minimizing light absorption measurement artifacts of the Aethalometer: evaluation of five correction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaud Coen, M.; Weingartner, E.; Apituley, A.; Ceburnis, D.; Fierz-Schmidhauser, R.; Flentje, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Jennings, S. G.; Moerman, M.; Petzold, A.; Schmid, O.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-04-01

    The aerosol light absorption coefficient is an essential parameter involved in atmospheric radiation budget calculations. The Aethalometer (AE) has the great advantage of measuring the aerosol light absorption coefficient at several wavelengths, but the derived absorption coefficients are systematically too high when compared to reference methods. Up to now, four different correction algorithms of the AE absorption coefficients have been proposed by several authors. A new correction scheme based on these previously published methods has been developed, which accounts for the optical properties of the aerosol particles embedded in the filter. All the corrections have been tested on six datasets representing different aerosol types and loadings and include multi-wavelength AE and white-light AE. All the corrections have also been evaluated through comparison with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) for four datasets lasting between 6 months and five years. The modification of the wavelength dependence by the different corrections is analyzed in detail. The performances and the limits of all AE corrections are determined and recommendations are given.

  9. Minimizing light absorption measurement artifacts of the Aethalometer: evaluation of five correction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collaud Coen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol light absorption coefficient is an essential parameter involved in atmospheric radiation budget calculations. The Aethalometer (AE has the great advantage of measuring the aerosol light absorption coefficient at several wavelengths, but the derived absorption coefficients are systematically too high when compared to reference methods. Up to now, four different correction algorithms of the AE absorption coefficients have been proposed by several authors. A new correction scheme based on these previously published methods has been developed, which accounts for the optical properties of the aerosol particles embedded in the filter. All the corrections have been tested on six datasets representing different aerosol types and loadings and include multi-wavelength AE and white-light AE. All the corrections have also been evaluated through comparison with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP for four datasets lasting between 6 months and five years. The modification of the wavelength dependence by the different corrections is analyzed in detail. The performances and the limits of all AE corrections are determined and recommendations are given.

  10. Minimizing light absorption measurement artifacts of the Aethalometer: evaluation of five correction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collaud Coen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol light absorption coefficient is an essential parameter involved in atmospheric radiation budget calculations. The Aethalometer (AE has the great advantage of measuring the aerosol light absorption coefficient at several wavelengths, but the derived absorption coefficients are systematically too high when compared to reference methods. Up to now, four different correction algorithms of the AE absorption coefficients have been proposed by several authors. A new correction scheme based on these previously published methods has been developed, which accounts for the optical properties of the aerosol particles embedded in the filter. All the corrections have been tested on six datasets representing different aerosol types and loadings and include multi-wavelength AE and white-light AE. All the corrections have also been evaluated through comparison with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP for four datasets lasting between 6 months and five years. The modification of the wavelength dependence by the different corrections is analyzed in detail. The performances and the limits of all AE corrections are determined and recommendations are given.

  11. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are implemented as well as discussion of the code’s ability to mitigate the ionospheric effects present in these test observations over a range of times and elevation angles. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM09-56901.

  12. Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) and Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TD-DFT): MBPT Insights About What Is Missing In, and Corrections To, the TD-DFT Adiabatic Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, Mark E; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    In their famous paper, Kohn and Sham formulated a formally exact density-functional theory (DFT) for the ground-state energy and density of a system of N interacting electrons, albeit limited at the time by certain troubling representability questions. As no practical exact form of the exchange-correlation (xc) energy functional was known, the xc-functional had to be approximated, ideally by a local or semilocal functional. Nowadays, however, the realization that Nature is not always so nearsighted has driven us up Perdew's Jacob's ladder to find increasingly nonlocal density/wavefunction hybrid functionals. Time-dependent (TD-) DFT is a younger development which allows DFT concepts to be used to describe the temporal evolution of the density in the presence of a perturbing field. Linear response (LR) theory then allows spectra and other information about excited states to be extracted from TD-DFT. Once again the exact TD-DFT xc-functional must be approximated in practical calculations and this has historically been done using the TD-DFT adiabatic approximation (AA) which is to TD-DFT very similar to what the local density approximation (LDA) is to conventional ground-state DFT. Although some of the recent advances in TD-DFT focus on what can be done within the AA, others explore ways around the AA. After giving an overview of DFT, TD-DFT, and LR-TD-DFT, this chapter focuses on many-body corrections to LR-TD-DFT as one way to build hybrid density-functional/wavefunction methodology for incorporating aspects of nonlocality in time not present in the AA.

  13. X-ray crystallographic and Mössbauer spectroscopic applications in dependence of partial quadrupole splitting, [R], on the C-Sn-C angle in seven-coordinated diorganotin(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Gerimario F; Deflon, Victor M; Gambardella, Maria T do P; Francisco, Regina H P; Ardisson, José D; Niquet, Elke

    2006-05-29

    The synthesis and the IR, NMR (1H, 13C, and 119Sn), and Mössbauer spectroscopies and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of seven-coordinated diorganotin(IV) complexes, namely, [Ph2Sn(Hdapsc)]Cl.H2O.DMF [7; H(2)dapsc = 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(semicarbazone)], [Me(2)Sn(H2,6Achexim)]Br.H2O [8; H(2)2,6Achexim = 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(3-hexamethyleneiminylthiosemicarbazone)], [Me(2)Sn(dapmts)] [9; H(2)dapmts = 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(4-methythiosemicarbazone)], and [nBu2Sn(dapmdtc)] [10; H(2)dapmdtc = 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(S-methydithiocarbazate)], were done. The determination of the structures of [Ph(2)Sn(Hdapsc)]+, [Me2Sn(H2,6Achexim)]+ and [Me2Sn(dapmts)], [nBu2Sn(dapmdtc)] revealed the presence of monocationic and neutral complexes, respectively. The structures consist of monomeric units in which the Sn(IV) ions exhibit distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal geometries, with the X,N,N,N,X-donor (X = O, S) systems of the ligands lying in the equatorial plane and the organic groups in the apical positions. The C-Sn-C angle in the seven-coordinated diorganotin(IV) complexes was estimated using a correlation between Mössbauer and X-ray data based on the point-charge model and using new values obtained in this work for [alkyl] = -1.00 mm s(-1) and [aryl] = -0.80 mm s(-1) for complexes containing O,N,N,N,O-pentadentate ligands and new values for [alkyl] = -0.87 mm s(-1) and [aryl] = -0.75 mm s(-1) for complexes containing S,N,N,N,S-pentadentate ligands.

  14. Estimation of double differential angle-dependent neutron production cross sections from tritons on 197Au at energies from 5.97 to 19.14 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Drosg, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Estimated cross sections for neutron production from triton bombardment of gold are deduced from measurements of triton interactions with gas targets that used gold as a triton beam stop material. Differential cross sections for production of neutrons from 5.97-, 7.47-, 10.45-, 16.41- and 19.14-MeV tritons on 197Au were evaluated. Corrections for the neutron interaction in gold, in the target structure and in the air of the flight path were obtained by means of a Monte Carlo technique. Uncorrelated scale uncertainties range from 24 to 41% whereas those of double differential cross sections range from 0.2 to 5%. Based on these cross section data, calculation of neutron yield at 0o from fully stopped tritons at 20.22 MeV agree with an independent measurement. Least-squares fits with a gamma distribution model indicate an anisotropy in the high energy portion of the neutron spectra. Legendre polynomial fits of differential cross sections are reported. All neutron cross section data are made available through the...

  15. EVALUATION OF NECK SHAFT ANGLE OF FEMUR ON DRY BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evaluation of the neck shaft angle of femur helps to understand clinical relevance in bio mechanics of the hip joint. It helps for the better treatment of different pathological conditions of hip and femur and also to design prosthesis. Femoral neck shaft angle is important to convey the information regarding the race to which they belong. Hence the present study was under taken to determine the neck shaft angle of femur in humans. OBJECTIVE: 1. To correct the different types of deformity and to have a normal good walking Mechanism. 2. To know the recent methodology and attempt to evaluate the range of normal Angles of femora and their sex differences. METHODS: ANTHROPOMETRIC: 100 Adult dry bones were studied and analyzed . The neck shaft angle of femur was measured by tracing outlines of contours of all femora. RESULTS: The neck shaft angle of the femur have revealed that there is no much difference in between males and females. There was slightly higher 0.2° in females. INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION: There was no significant gender difference in neck shaft angle. The Knowledge of knowing the neck shaft angle helps to understand the Biomechanics of the hip joint and also for better treatment of pathological condition of hip and femur.

  16. Shear-layer correction after Amiet under consideration of additional temperature gradient. Working diagrams for correction of signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzynski, W.

    1984-01-01

    Amiet's correction scheme for sound wave transmission through shear-layers is extended to incorporate the additional effects of different temperatures in the flow-field in the surrounding medium at rest. Within a parameter-regime typical for acoustic measurements in wind tunnels amplitude- and angle-correction is calculated and plotted systematically to provide a data base for the test engineer.

  17. Generalization of the Euler Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor); Shuster, Malcolm D.; Markley, F. Landis

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the Euler angles can be generalized to axes other than members of an orthonormal triad. As first shown by Davenport, the three generalized Euler axes, hereafter: Davenport axes, must still satisfy the constraint that the first two and the last two axes be mutually perpendicular if these axes are to define a universal set of attitude parameters. Expressions are given which relate the generalized Euler angles, hereafter: Davenport angles, to the 3-1-3 Euler angles of an associated direction-cosine matrix. The computation of the Davenport angles from the attitude matrix and their kinematic equation are presented. The present work offers a more direct development of the Davenport angles than Davenport's original publication and offers additional results.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  19. Calculation and Spectra Analysis of Horizontal Acceleration Correction (HACC) for Airborne Gravimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Pan; SUN Zhongmiao; XIAO Yun

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a sinusoidal model of the disturbed horizontal acceleration, the spectrum characteristics of misaligned angle and horizontal acceleration correction are analyzed. In an airborne gravimetry test, the misaligned angle of platform and horizontal acceleration correction are calculated. They are 5'and 3 mGal, respectively, when the flight is stable.

  20. Geometric Correction for Braille Document Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathi.S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Braille system has been used by the visually impair ed people for reading.The shortage of Braille books has caused a need for conversion of Braille t o text. This paper addresses the geometric correction of a Braille document images. Due to the standard measurement of the Braille cells, identification of Braille characters could be achie ved by simple cell overlapping procedure. The standard measurement varies in a scaled document an d fitting of the cells become difficult if the document is tilted. This paper proposes a line fitt ing algorithm for identifying the tilt (skew angle. The horizontal and vertical scale factor is identified based on the ratio of distance between characters to the distance between dots. Th ese are used in geometric transformation matrix for correction. Rotation correction is done prior to scale correction. This process aids in increased accuracy. The results for various Braille documents are tabulated.

  1. Local Correction of Boolean Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Alon, Noga

    2011-01-01

    A Boolean function f over n variables is said to be q-locally correctable if, given a black-box access to a function g which is "close" to an isomorphism f_sigma of f, we can compute f_sigma(x) for any x in Z_2^n with good probability using q queries to g. We observe that any k-junta, that is, any function which depends only on k of its input variables, is O(2^k)-locally correctable. Moreover, we show that there are examples where this is essentially best possible, and locally correcting some k-juntas requires a number of queries which is exponential in k. These examples, however, are far from being typical, and indeed we prove that for almost every k-junta, O(k log k) queries suffice.

  2. Neural network method to correct bidirectional effects in water-leaving radiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yongzhen; Li, Wei; Voss, Kenneth J; Gatebe, Charles K; Stamnes, Knut

    2016-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms that rely on "atmospherically corrected" nadir water-leaving radiances to infer information about marine constituents such as the chlorophyll concentration depend on a reliable method to convert the angle-dependent measured radiances from the observation direction to the nadir direction. It is also important to convert the measured radiances to the nadir direction when comparing and merging products from different satellite missions. The standard correction method developed by Morel and coworkers requires knowledge of the chlorophyll concentration. Also, the standard method was developed based on the Case 1 (open ocean) assumption, which makes it unsuitable for Case 2 situations such as turbid coastal waters. We introduce a neural network method to convert the angle-dependent water-leaving radiance (or the corresponding remote sensing reflectance) from the observation direction to the nadir direction. This method relies on neither an "atmospheric correction" nor prior knowledge of the water constituents or the inherent optical properties. It directly converts the remote sensing reflectance from an arbitrary slanted viewing direction to the nadir direction by using a trained neural network. This method is fast and accurate, and it can be easily adapted to different remote sensing instruments. Validation using NuRADS measurements in different types of water shows that this method is suitable for both Case 1 and Case 2 waters. In Case 1 or chlorophyll-dominated waters, our neural network method produces corrections similar to those of the standard method. In Case 2 waters, especially sediment-dominated waters, a significant improvement was obtained compared to the standard method.

  3. Photometric correction of VIR high space resolution data of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; Ammannito, Eleonora; Zinzi, Angelo; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR-Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1] has been orbiting Ceres since early 2015. The mission is divided into five stages, characterized by different spacecraft altitudes corresponding to different space resolutions, i.e. Approach (CSA), Rotational Characterization (CSR), Survey (CSS), High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO), and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO).Ceres is a dark body (i.e. average albedo at 1.2 um is 0.08 [2]), hence photometric correction is much more important than for brighter asteroids (e.g. S-type and achondritric). Indeed, the negligible role of multiple scattering increases the reflectance dependence on phase angle.A photometric correction of VIR data at low spatial resolution (i.e. CSA, CSR, CSS) has already been applied with different methodologies (e.g. [2], [3]), These techniques highlight a reflectance and band depths dependency on the phase angle which is homogeneous on the entire surface in agreement with C-type taxonomy.However, with increasing spatial resolution (i.e. HAMO and LAMO data), the retrieval of a unique set of parameters for the photometric correction is no longer sufficient to obtain reliable albedo/band depth maps. In this work, a new photometric correction is obtained and applied to all the high resolution VIR data of Ceres, taking into account the reflectance variations observed at small scales. The developed algorithm will be implemented on the MATISSE tool [4] in order to be visualized on the Ceres shape model.Finally, an interpretation of the obtained phase functions is given in terms of optical and physical properties of the Ceres regolith.AcknowledgementsVIR was funded and coordinated by the Italian Space Agency, and built by SELEX ES, with the scientific leadership of IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, and is operated by IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy. Support of the Dawn Science, Instrument, and Operation Teams is gratefully acknowledged.References[1] Russell, C. T. et al., 2012, Science 336, 686[2] Longobardo A., et al., 2016, LPSC, 2239

  4. Porous media characterization by the two-liquid method: effect of dynamic contact angle and inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Becky; Marmur, Abraham; Bachmann, Joerg

    2008-03-04

    The validity of using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) equation for porous media characterization by the two-liquid capillary penetration method was tested numerically and experimentally. A cylindrical capillary of known radius and contact angle was used as a model system for the tests. It was found that using the LW equation (i.e., ignoring inertia and dynamic contact angle effects) may lead to very erroneous assessment of the capillary radius and the equilibrium contact angle, for a relatively wide range of capillary radii and equilibrium contact angles. A correct assessment requires the application of a penetration kinetics equation that considers inertia and the dynamic contact angle.

  5. NWS Corrections to Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Form B-14 is the National Weather Service form entitled 'Notice of Corrections to Weather Records.' The forms are used to make corrections to observations on forms...

  6. Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, C; Carvalho, G; Tatagiba, M; Lima, M; Samii, M

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represent a clinically and surgically interesting entity. The opportunity of complete surgical excision and the incidence of impairment of nerval structures largely depend on the tumour biology that either leads to displacement of surrounding structures by an expansive type of growth or to an enveloping of nerval and vascular structures by an en plaque type of growth. As the origin and the direction of growth are very variable, the exact tumour extension in relation to the nerval structures and the tumour origin can be identified sometimes only at the time of surgery. Out of a series of 230 meningiomas of the posterior skull base operated between 1978 and 1993, data of 134 meningiomas involving the cerebellopontine angle are presented. There were 20% male and 80% female patients, age at the time of surgery ranging from 18 to 76 years, on the average 51 years. The clinical presentation was characterized by a predominant disturbance of the cranial nerves V (19%), VII (11%), VIII (67%) and the caudal cranial nerves (6%) and signs of ataxia (28%). 80% of the meningiomas were larger than 30 mm in diameter, 53% led to evident brainstem compression or dislocation and 85% extended anteriorly to the internal auditory canal. Using the lateral suboccipital approach in the majority of cases and a combined presigmoidal or combined suboccipital and subtemporal approaches in either sequence in 5%, complete tumour removal (Simpson I and II) was accomplished in 95% and subtotal tumour removal in 5%. Histologically the meningiotheliomatous type was most common (49%) followed by the mixed type (19%), fibroblastic (16%), psammomatous (7%), hemangioblastic (7%) and anaplastic (2%) types. Major post-operative complications were CSF leakage (8%) requiring surgical revision in 2% and hemorrhage (3%) requiring revision in 2%. While the majority of neurological disturbances showed signs of recovery, facial nerve paresis or paralysis was

  7. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  8. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V.; Simon, T.W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  9. Measurement of the CKM angle φ1 in B0→D¯ (*)0h0 , D¯ 0→KS0π+π- decays with time-dependent binned Dalitz plot analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, V.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Greenwald, D.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We report a measurement of the C P -violation parameter φ1 obtained in a time-dependent analysis of B0→D¯ (*)0h0 decays followed by D¯ 0 →KS0π+π- decay. A model-independent measurement is performed using the binned Dalitz plot technique. The measured value is φ1=11.7 °±7.8 °(stat ) ±2.1 °(syst ) . Treating sin 2 φ1 and cos 2 φ1 as independent parameters, we obtain sin 2 φ1 =0.43 ±0.27 (stat ) ±0.08 (syst ) and cos 2 φ1 =1.06 ±0.33 (stat)-0.15 +0.21(syst ) . The results are obtained with a full data sample of 772 ×1 06B B ¯ pairs collected near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  10. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\varphi_1$ in $B^0\\to\\overline{D}{}^{(*)0}h^0$, $\\overline{D}{}^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays with time-dependent binned Dalitz plot analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyev, V; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Behera, P; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Di Carlo, S; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Goldenzweig, P; Greenwald, D; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W -S; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Joffe, D; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, S H; Kinoshita, K; Kodyš, P; Kotchetkov, D; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lubej, M; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Nayak, M; Negishi, K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C -S; Park, C W; Park, H; Paul, S; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Rauch, J; Ritter, M; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Strube, J F; Sumiyoshi, T; Takizawa, M; Tenchini, F; Trabelsi, K; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yelton, J; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a measurement of the CP violation parameter $\\varphi_1$ obtained in a time-dependent analysis of $B^0\\to\\overline{D}{}^{(*)0}h^0$ decays followed by $\\overline{D}{}^0\\to K_S^0\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay. A model-independent measurement is performed using the binned Dalitz plot technique. The measured value is $\\varphi_1 = 11.7^{\\circ}\\pm7.8^{\\circ}({\\rm stat.})\\pm 2.1^{\\circ}({\\rm syst.})$. Treating $\\sin{2\\varphi_1}$ and $\\cos{2\\varphi_1}$ as independent parameters, we obtain $\\sin{2\\varphi_1} = 0.43\\pm 0.27({\\rm stat.})\\pm 0.08({\\rm syst.})$ and $\\cos{2\\varphi_1} = 1.06\\pm 0.33({\\rm stat.})^{+0.21}_{-0.15}({\\rm syst.})$. The results are obtained with a full data sample of $772 \\times 10^6 B\\overline{B}$ pairs collected near the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider.

  11. Error Correction in Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dr. Grace Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Error correction is an important issue in foreign language acquisition. This paper investigates how students feel about the way in which error correction should take place in a Chinese-as-a foreign-language classroom, based on empirical data of a large scale. The study shows that there is a general consensus that error correction is necessary. In terms of correction strategy, the students preferred a combination of direct and indirect corrections, or a direct only correction. The former choice indicates that students would be happy to take either so long as the correction gets done.Most students didn't mind peer correcting provided it is conducted in a constructive way. More than halfofthe students would feel uncomfortable ifthe same error they make in class is corrected consecutively more than three times. Taking these findings into consideration, we may want to cncourage peer correcting, use a combination of correction strategies (direct only if suitable) and do it in a non-threatening and sensitive way. It is hoped that this study would contribute to the effectiveness of error correction in a Chinese language classroom and it may also have a wider implication on other languages.

  12. A modification to the ionospheric correction method used in GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, S. B.; Culverwell, I. D.

    2015-01-01

    A modification to the standard bending angle correction used in GPS radio occultation is proposed. The modified approach should reduce systematic residual ionospheric errors in GPS radio occultation climatologies. A new second order term is introduced in order to account for a known source of systematic error, which is generally neglected. The new term has the form κ(a) × (αL1 (a)-αL1(a))2, where a is the impact parameter, and (αL1, αL2) are the L1 and L2 bending angles, respectively. The variable κ is a weak function of impact parameter, a, but it does depend on a priori ionospheric information. The theoretical basis of the new term is examined. The sensitivity of κ to the assumed ionospheric parameters is investigated in one-dimensional simulations, and it is shown that κ ≃ 10-20 rad-1. We note that the current implicit assumption is κ = 0, and this is probably adequate for numerical weather prediction applications. However, the uncertainty in κ should be included in the uncertainty estimates for the geophysical climatologies produced from GPS-RO measurements. The limitations of the new ionospheric correction when applied to CHAMP measurements are noted. These arise because of the assumption that the refractive index is unity at the satellite, made when deriving bending angles from the Doppler shift values.

  13. A modification to the standard ionospheric correction method used in GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, S. B.; Culverwell, I. D.

    2015-08-01

    A modification to the standard bending-angle correction used in GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) is proposed. The modified approach should reduce systematic residual ionospheric errors in GPS radio occultation climatologies. A new second-order term is introduced in order to account for a known source of systematic error, which is generally neglected. The new term has the form κ(a) × (αL1(a)-αL2(a))2, where a is the impact parameter and (αL1, αL2) are the L1 and L2 bending angles, respectively. The variable κ is a weak function of the impact parameter, a, but it does depend on a priori ionospheric information. The theoretical basis of the new term is examined. The sensitivity of κ to the assumed ionospheric parameters is investigated in one-dimensional simulations, and it is shown that κ ≃ 10-20 rad-1. We note that the current implicit assumption is κ=0, and this is probably adequate for numerical weather prediction applications. However, the uncertainty in κ should be included in the uncertainty estimates for the geophysical climatologies produced from GPS-RO measurements. The limitations of the new ionospheric correction when applied to CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) measurements are noted. These arise because of the assumption that the refractive index is unity at the satellite, made when deriving bending angles from the Doppler shift values.

  14. A Global Correction to PPMXL Proper Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Vickers, John J; Grebel, Eva K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we notice that extragalactic sources seem to have non-zero proper motions in the PPMXL proper motion catalog. We collect a large, all-sky sample of extragalactic objects and fit their reported PPMXL proper motions to an ensemble of spherical harmonics in magnitude shells. A magnitude dependent proper motion correction is thus constructed. This correction is applied to a set of fundamental radio sources, quasars, and is compared to similar corrections to assess its utility. We publish, along with this paper, code which may be used to correct proper motions in the PPMXL catalog over the full sky which have 2 Micron All Sky Survey photometry.

  15. Going round the bend: Persistent personal biases in walked angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzschke, Simon; Ernst, Marc O; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Boeddeker, Norbert

    2016-03-23

    For navigation through our environment, we can rely on information from various modalities, such as vision and audition. This information enables us for example to estimate our position relative to the starting position, or to integrate velocity and acceleration signals from the vestibular organ and proprioception to estimate the displacement due to self-motion. To better understand the mechanisms that underlie human navigation we analysed the performance of participants in an angle-walking task in the absence of visual and auditory signals. To this end, we guided them along paths of different lengths and asked them to turn by an angle of ±90°. We found significant biases in turn angles, i.e. systematic deviations from the correct angle and that these were characteristic for individual participants. Varying path length, however, had little effect on turn accuracy and precision. To check whether this idiosyncrasy was persistent over time and present in another type of walking task, we performed a second experiment several weeks later. Here, the same participants were guided to walk angles with varying amplitude. We then asked them to judge whether they had walked an angle larger or smaller than 90° in a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. The personal bias was highly correlated between the two experiments even though they were conducted weeks apart. The presence of a persistent bias in walked angles in the absence of external directional cues indicates a possible error component for navigation, which is surprisingly time stable and idiosyncratic.

  16. A study of images of Projective Angles of pulmonary veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jue [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhaoqi, Zhang [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)], E-mail: zhaoqi5000@vip.sohu.com; Yu Wei; Miao Cuilian; Yan Zixu; Zhao Yike [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2009-09-15

    Aims: In images of magnetic resonance and computed tomography (CT) there are visible angles between pulmonary veins and the coronary, transversal or sagittal section of body. In this study these angles are measured and defined as Projective Angles of pulmonary veins. Several possible influential factors and characters of distribution are studied and analyzed for a better understanding of this imaging anatomic character of pulmonary veins. And it could be the anatomic base of adjusting correctly the angle of the central X-ray of the angiography of pulmonary veins undergoing the catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). Method: Images of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and contrast enhanced computer tomography (CECT) of the left atrium and pulmonary veins of 137 health objects and patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are processed with the technique of post-processing, and Projective Angles to the coronary and transversal sections are measured and analyzed statistically. Result: Project Angles of pulmonary veins are one of real and steady imaging anatomic characteristics of pulmonary veins. The statistical distribution of variables is relatively concentrated, with a fairly good representation of average value. It is possible to improve the angle of the central X-ray according to the average value in the selective angiography of pulmonary veins undergoing the catheter ablation of AF.

  17. (1) H NMR Spectra. Part 28: Proton chemical shifts and couplings in three-membered rings. A ring current model for cyclopropane and a novel dihedral angle dependence for (3) J(HH) couplings involving the epoxy proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Raymond J; Leonard, Paul; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2012-04-01

    The (1) H chemical shifts of selected three-membered ring compounds in CDCl(3) solvent were obtained. This allowed the determination of the substituent chemical shifts of the substituents in the three-membered rings and the long-range effect of these rings on the distant protons. The substituent chemical shifts of common substituents in the cyclopropane ring differ considerably from the same substituents in acyclic fragments and in cyclohexane and were modelled in terms of a three-bond (γ)-effect. For long-range protons (more than three bonds removed), the substituent effects of the cyclopropane ring were analysed in terms of the cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy and steric effect. The cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy (ring current) shift was modelled by (a) a single equivalent dipole perpendicular to and at the centre of the cyclopropane ring and (b) by three identical equivalent dipoles perpendicular to the ring placed at each carbon atom. Model (b) gave a more accurate description of the (1) H chemical shifts and was the selected model. After parameterization, the overall root mean square error for the dataset of 289 entries was 0.068 ppm. The anisotropic effects are significant for the cyclopropane protons (ca 1 ppm) but decrease rapidly with distance. The heterocyclic rings of oxirane, thiirane and aziridine do not possess a ring current. (3) J(HH) couplings of the epoxy ring proton with side-chain protons were obtained and shown to be dependent on both the H-C-C-H and H-C-C-O orientations. Both density functional theory calculations and a simple Karplus-type equation gave general agreement with the observed couplings (root mean square error 0.5 Hz over a 10-Hz range).

  18. On gravitational and thermal corrections to vacuum decay

    CERN Document Server

    Salvio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We reconsider gravitational corrections to vacuum decay, confirming and simplifying earlier results and extending them allowing for a non-minimal coupling of the Higgs to gravity, finding that leading-order gravitational corrections suppress the vacuum decay rate. Furthermore, we find minor corrections to thermal vacuum decay in the SM adding one-loop corrections to the Higgs kinetic term, two-loop corrections to the Higgs potential and allowing for time-dependent bounces.

  19. Angle and temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy and the microscopic magnetic moments of the ferromagnetic semi-metal CrO{sub 2}; Winkel- und Temperaturabhaengigkeit der magnetokristallinen Anisotropieenergie und der mikroskopischen magnetischen Momente des ferromagnetischen Halbmetalls CrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, S.

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work was to examine, by use of XMCD-effect and additional measurements with SQUID-magnetometer, spin moments and hysteresis loops, but also to clarify the intrinsic properties like magnetocrystalline anisotropy, magnetic dipole term, and the nearly quenched orbital moment. The XMCD-measurements were done at the Cr L{sub 2,3}- and the O K-edge. The results for CrO{sub 2} show a strong dependence of the orbital, the sum of spin moment and magnetic dipole term, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy from the angle between rutile a- and c-axis. Even more than the complete orbital moment, two separable and different spectral features show strong alterations of the different orbital moments. In a second part of this work the temperature dependence was investigated. The aim was to clarify the origin of the orbital moment, dipole term, and MAE in dependence of the spin moment and compare the results to different theoretical models. The extracted orbital moments and the magnetic dipole term show the same temperature dependence as the spin moment. In the following a dependence of the squared measured spin moment could be found for the MAE. For the first time the magnetic dipole term could be identified as the reason of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. A strong Cr-O hybridisation was found, which shows in a similar structure and temperature dependence of the orbital moments for Cr L{sub 2,3} and the XMCD effect at O-K edge. (orig.)

  20. Nearly degenerate neutrinos, Supersymmetry and radiative corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, J A; Ibarra, Alejandro; Navarro, I

    2000-01-01

    If neutrinos are to play a relevant cosmological role, they must be essentially degenerate with a mass matrix of the bimaximal mixing type. We study this scenario in the MSSM framework, finding that if neutrino masses are produced by a see-saw mechanism, the radiative corrections give rise to mass splittings and mixing angles that can accommodate the atmospheric and the (large angle MSW) solar neutrino oscillations. This provides a natural origin for the $\\Delta m^2_{sol} << \\Delta m^2_{atm}$ hierarchy. On the other hand, the vacuum oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem is always excluded. We discuss also in the SUSY scenario other possible effects of radiative corrections involving the new neutrino Yukawa couplings, including implications for triviality limits on the Majorana mass, the infrared fixed point value of the top Yukawa coupling, and gauge coupling and bottom-tau unification.

  1. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  2. Correct Linearization of Einstein's Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Regularly Einstein's equations can be reduced to a wave form (linearly dependent from the second derivatives of the space metric in the absence of gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. As shown here, the origin of the problem is that one uses the general covariant theory of measurement. Here the wave form of Einstein's equations is obtained in the terms of Zelmanov's chronometric invariants (physically observable projections on the observer's time line and spatial section. The obtained equations depend on solely the second derivatives even if gravitation, the space rotation and Christoffel's symbols. The correct linearization proves: the Einstein equations are completely compatible with weak waves of the metric.

  3. Off-level corrections for gravity meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebauer, T. M.; Blitz, Thomas; Constantino, Andy

    2016-04-01

    Gravity meters must be aligned with the local gravity at any location on the surface of the earth in order to measure the full amplitude of the gravity vector. The gravitational force on the sensitive component of the gravity meter decreases by the cosine of the angle between the measurement axis and the local gravity vector. Most gravity meters incorporate two horizontal orthogonal levels to orient the gravity meter for a maximum gravity reading. In order to calculate a gravity correction it is often necessary to estimate the overall angular deviation between the gravity meter and the local gravity vector using two measured horizontal tilt meters. Typically this is done assuming that the two horizontal angles are independent and that the product of the cosines of the horizontal tilts is equivalent to the cosine of the overall deviation. These approximations, however, break down at large angles. This paper derives analytic formulae to transform angles measured by two orthogonal tilt meters into the vertical deviation of the third orthogonal axis. The equations can be used to calibrate the tilt sensors attached to the gravity meter or provide a correction for a gravity meter used in an off-of-level condition.

  4. Variable angle of strabismus related to timing of opiate ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jonathan J; Brown, Valerie; Fern, Alasdair I

    2009-04-01

    Heroin (diamorphine) is a highly addictive opiate with potential for misuse. A small number of reports have linked the commencement of heroin misuse to acute exotropia with diplopia and subsequent withdrawal to esotropia in individuals without previous symptoms.(1-5) We describe a young adult who sought strabismus surgery to correct a large-angle exotropia. Detailed patient history and orthoptic measurements at different times of the day revealed a fluctuating angle of divergence relating to the timing of opiate ingestion, rendering surgery inappropriate. We suggest that opiate misuse, which may not willingly be disclosed by patients, should be specifically asked about before acquired-strabismus surgery is undertaken in adults.

  5. Large optical field enhancement for nanotips with large opening angles

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Sebastian; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically investigate optical near-fields at nanometric tips. We systematically study the dependence of field enhancement on the shape, size, and material of the tip. We confirm a strong dependence of the field enhancement factor on the radius of curvature. In addition, we find a remarkably strong increase of field enhancement with increasing opening angle of the nanotips. For gold and tungsten nanotips in the experimentally relevant parameter range (radius of curvature $\\geq 5\\,$nm at 800 nm laser wavelength), we obtain field enhancement factors of up to ${\\sim}35$ (Au) and ${\\sim}12$ (W) for wide opening angles. We confirm this strong dependence on the opening angle for many other materials studying the dependence of the field enhancement at nanotips on the dielectric response function. For dielectrics, the increase in field enhancement is traced back to the electrostatic force of the induced surface charge at the tip shank. For metals, the plasmonic response strongly increases the field enhancement ...

  6. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  7. TOPOGRAPHIC CORRECTION OF ETM IMAGES BASED ON SMOOTHED TERRAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Kang; Zhao Yongchao; Geng Xiurui; Tang Hairong

    2012-01-01

    A new empirical topographic correction method is proposed in this paper.The main idea of the new method is smoothing the slope angle of terrain in the first place and then performing the cosine correction based on the smoothed terrain.A comparison is conducted among the new method and several other common methods using Landsat-7 ETM+ data.Visual analysis and statistical analysis are adopted to assess the performance of these methods from two aspects:overcorrection,homogeneity within a land cover class.Comparison results indicate that the new method is superior to the cosine correction,Gamma correction,Sun-Canopy-Sensor correction,and Minnaert correction.Compared with common methods,the proposed one can eliminate overcorrection better and is an effective topographic correction method.

  8. Oriented angles in affine space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Waliszewski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a smooth oriented angle in an arbitrary affine space is introduced. This concept is based on a kinematics concept of a run. Also, a concept of an oriented angle in such a space is considered. Next, it is shown that the adequacy of these concepts holds if and only if the affine space, in question, is of dimension 2 or 1.

  9. Diophantine Correct Open Induction

    CERN Document Server

    Raffer, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    We give an induction-free axiom system for diophantine correct open induction. We relate the problem of whether a finitely generated ring of Puiseux polynomials is diophantine correct to a problem about the value-distribution of a tuple of semialgebraic functions with integer arguments. We use this result, and a theorem of Bergelson and Leibman on generalized polynomials, to identify a class of diophantine correct subrings of the field of descending Puiseux series with real coefficients.

  10. Active limited-angle tomographic phase microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Arkadiusz; Krauze, Wojciech; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an active, holographic tomography system, working with limited angle of projections, realized by optical-only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach–Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with a high numerical aperture illumination module and a spatial light modulator (SLM). Such a solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different illumination scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied here to reconstruct nonpiecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and the proposed processing path is tested for a calibrated three-dimensional micro-object as well as a biological object--C2C12 myoblast cell.

  11. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  12. Measurement of the angle of superficial tension by images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez M., Javier; Alonso R., Sergio

    2006-02-01

    When a liquid is deposited on a surface, this one form a certain angle with respect to the surface, where depending on its value, it will conclude that so hard it is his adhesion with the surface. By means of the analysis of images we looked for to measure this angle of superficial tension. In order to make this measurement, we propose a technique by means of projective transformations and one method of regression to estimation parameters to conic fitting.

  13. Angle-resolved neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, A; Turecek, F; McLafferty, F W

    1991-12-01

    Neutralization -reionization mass spectra of 2-propenal, isomeric butenes, and isomeric n-hexenes have been found to depend significantly on the z-axis scattering angle of the neutralization event. As shown by Cooks for ion dissociations, increasing scattering angles generally favor products of higher activation-energy reactions. For isomeric butenes and n-hexenes, these reactions provide more definitive information for isomeric characterization.

  14. Corrections to Quark Asymmetries at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas, A

    2004-01-01

    The most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle sin^2(theta) at LEP is from the forward-backward asymmetry e+e- --> bbbar at the Z-pole. In this note the QED and electroweak radiative corrections to obtain the pole asymmetry from the measured asymmetry for b- and c-quarks have been calculated using ZFITTER, which has been amended to allow a consistent treatment of partial two-loop corrections for the b-quark final asymmetries. A total correction of dAfbb=0.0019+/-0.0002 and dAfbc=0.0064+/-0.0001 has been found, where the remaining theoretical uncertainty is much too small to explain the apparent discrepancy between sin^2(theta) obtained from Afbb and from the left-right asymmetry at SLD.

  15. An efficient magic state approach to small angle rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Earl T.; O'Gorman, Joe

    2016-12-01

    Standard error-correction techniques only provide a quantum memory and need extra gadgets to perform computation. Central to quantum algorithms are small angle rotations, which can be fault-tolerantly implemented given a supply of an unconventional species of magic state. We present a low-cost distillation routine for preparing these small angle magic states. Our protocol builds on the work of Duclos-Cianci and Poulin (2015 Phys. Rev. A 91 042315) by compressing their circuit. Additionally, we present a method of diluting magic states that reduces costs associated with very small angle rotations. We quantify performance by the expected number of noisy magic states consumed per rotation, and compare with other protocols. For modest-sized angles, our protocols offer a factor 24 improvement over the best-known gate synthesis protocols and a factor 2 over the Duclos-Cianci and Poulin protocol. For very small angle rotations, the dilution protocol dramatically reduces costs, giving several orders magnitude improvement over competitors. There also exists an intermediary regime of small, but not very small, angles where our approach gives a marginal improvement over gate synthesis. We discuss how different performance metrics may alter these conclusions.

  16. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  17. Does scaling or addition provide the correct frequency dependence of β(-ωσ; ω1, ω2) at the correlated level? An investigation for six molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Erik K.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Oddershede, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The frequency dependent polarizability α(-ωσ; ω1) and the frequency dependent first hyperpolarizability β(-ωσ; ω1, ω2) have been calculated using both self consistent field (SCF) and multiconfigurational SCF (MCSCF) linear and quadratic response functions for six small molecules: BH, CO, HF, H2O...... an underestimation of the frequency dependence if scaling or addition is applied. There does not seem to be a simple way to infer anything about the validity of scaling or addition for β∥ from either the lower lying excitations and their intensities or from the frequency dependence of the dipole polarizability....

  18. Predicting bed form roughness: the influence of lee side angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Winter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Flow transverse bedforms (ripples and dunes) are ubiquitous in rivers and coastal seas. Local hydrodynamics and transport conditions depend on the size and geometry of these bedforms, as they constitute roughness elements at the bed. Bedform influence on flow energy must be considered for the understanding of flow dynamics, and in the development and application of numerical models. Common estimations or predictors of form roughness (friction factors) are based mostly on data of steep bedforms (with angle-of-repose lee slopes), and described by highly simplified bedform dimensions (heights and lengths). However, natural bedforms often are not steep, and differ in form and hydraulic effect relative to idealised bedforms. Based on systematic numerical model experiments, this study shows how the hydraulic effect of bedforms depends on the flow structure behind bedforms, which is determined by the bedform lee side angle, aspect ratio and relative height. Simulations reveal that flow separation behind bedform crests and, thus, a hydraulic effect is induced at lee side angles steeper than 11 to 18° depending on relative height, and that a fully developed flow separation zone exists only over bedforms with a lee side angle steeper than 24°. Furthermore, the hydraulic effect of bedforms with varying lee side angle is evaluated and a reduction function to common friction factors is proposed. A function is also developed for the Nikuradse roughness (k s), and a new equation is proposed which directly relates k s to bedform relative height, aspect ratio and lee side angle.

  19. The dependence of sheet erosion velocity on slope angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for estimating the erosion velocity on forested natural area. As a research object for testing the methodology the authors selected Neskuchny Garden - a city Park on the Moskva river embankment, named after the cognominal Palace of Catherine's age. Here, an almost horizontal surface III of the Moskva river terrace above the flood-plain is especially remarkable, accentuated by the steep sides of the ravine parallel to St. Andrew's, but short and nameless. The crests of the ravine sides are sharp, which is the evidence of its recent formation, but the old trees on the slopes indicate that it has not been growing for at least 100 years. Earlier Russian researchers defined vertical velocity of sheet erosion for different regions and slopes with different parent (in relation to the soil rocks. The comparison of the velocities shows that climatic conditions, in the first approximation, do not have a decisive influence on the erosion velocity of silt loam soils. The velocities on the shores of Issyk-Kul lake and in Moscow proved to be the same. But the composition of the parent rocks strongly affects the sheet erosion velocity. Even low-strength rock material reduces the velocity by times. Phytoindication method gives a real, physically explainable sheet erosion velocities. The speed is rather small but it should be considered when designing long-term structures on the slopes composed of dispersive soils. On the slopes composed of rocky soils sheet erosion velocity is so insignificant that it shouldn't be taken into account when designing. However, there may be other geological processes, significantly disturbing the stability of slopes connected with cracks.

  20. The Brewster angle effect in SAR polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B.

    1993-01-01

    For the double bounce case, where the radar signal is reflected twice before returning to the radar antenna, some polarization effects may be observed related to the dielectric constant of the two surfaces causing the reflections. The most noticeable effect would be that the returned signal would be preferentially H polarized. In fact, it may be possible to discern the Brewster angle for both surfaces. The locations of the Brewster angle will depend on the dielectric constant and permittivity of each surface. If it is assumed that both reflections are in the same plane of incidence, and that both surfaces are smooth and flat, there is a straightforward relationship between the degree of linear polarization m and both the dielectric constants of the two reflecting surfaces and the angle of incidence of the illuminating wave: m carat = cos 2(arccot (square root of (R(sub v) / R(sub h)))) where R(sub v,h) are the V and H polarized Fresnel reflection coefficients for two surfaces perpendicular to each other. The degree of linear polarization may be calculated from AIRSAR compressed Stokes data and compared with the given equation. The degree of linear polarization may also be calculated using tree models and compared with AIRSAR data. With further work, it may be possible to use the degree of linear polarization to determine surface parameters of certain imaged areas.

  1. CORRECTING WRITTEN WORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction During the teaching and learning process, teachers often check how much students have understood through written assignments. In this article I’d like to describe one method of correcting students’ written work by using a variety of symbols to indicate where students have gone wrong, then asking students to correct their work themselves.

  2. Large mixing angles for neutrinos from infrared fixed points

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, J A; Navarro, I

    2003-01-01

    Radiative amplification of neutrino mixing angles may explain the large values required by solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Implementation of such mechanism in the Standard Model and many of its extensions (including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model) to amplify the solar angle, the atmospheric or both requires (at least two) quasi-degenerate neutrino masses, but is not always possible. When it is, it involves a fine-tuning between initial conditions and radiative corrections. In supersymmetric models with neutrino masses generated through the Kahler potential, neutrino mixing angles can easily be driven to large values at low energy as they approach infrared pseudo-fixed points at large mixing (in stark contrast with conventional scenarios, that have infrared pseudo-fixed points at zero mixing). In addition, quasi-degeneracy of neutrino masses is not always required.

  3. New-corrected functions of X-ray powder diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG QingLi; LIU WenPeng; DING LiHua; JIANG HaiHe; YIN ShaoTang

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction is an indispensable technique to study material structure,phase transition and so on.It is necessary for high quality diffraction data to get high-precision diffraction angle.This work proposed four corrected functions of X-ray powder diffraction angle.Two methods,linearization method and modified Levenberg-Marquardt iteration method,are given to solve the function parameters,and the modified Levenberg-Marquardt method has fast convergent speed and stable solution.Two methods can give closed parameters,including those of Lu,Liu,and Chu functions and polynomial.New-corrected functions were used to fit the diffraction angle error of the tetragonal rutile polycrystalline TiO_2 mixed with Gd_(0.45)Y_(2.55)Sc_2Ga_3O_(12) as a standard sample,and the computation result indicates that these functions can characterize the diffraction error very well.In some cases,the new-corrected functions can describe the diffraction angle error better than the reported corrected functions.At the same time,the lattice parameter of Gd_(0.45)Y_(2.55)Sc_2Ga_3O_(12) was computed with two methods.When the corrected function parameters and lattice parameters were solved by the least square method,the interaction of the function parameters and lattice parameters would result in great error.However,when the X-ray diffraction angles were corrected by corrected functions using a standard sample,the authentic lattice parameters can be obtained by the least square fitting.

  4. INS as a probe of inter-monomer angles in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Eijck, L V; Grozema, F C; Schepper, I M D; Kearley, G J

    2002-01-01

    The angle between monomers in conjugated polymers plays an important role in their conductivity. The vibrational spectrum is sensitive to this angle and can be used to probe the distribution of angles in poorly crystalline systems. We show that the INS spectrum is correctly calculated for bithiophene and shows the molecule to be planar in the solid - in agreement with crystallographic measurements. Poor agreement between observed and calculated spectra in the 700-cm sup - sup 1 region may be due to dynamic coupling, but this does not detract from the angle-sensitivity of the spectra. (orig.)

  5. Angle measurement error and compensation for decentration rotation of circular gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-jun; WANG Zhen-huan; ZENG Qing-shuang

    2010-01-01

    As the geometric center of circular grating does not coincide with the rotation center,the angle measurement error of circular grating is analyzed.Based on the moire fringe equations in decentration condition,the mathematical model of angle measurement error is derived.It is concluded that the deeentration between the centre of circular grating and the center of revolving shaft leads to the first-harmonic error of angle measurement.The correctness of the result is proved by experimental data.The method of error compensation is presented,and the angle measurement accuracy of the circular grating is effectively improved by the error compensation.

  6. Correct end use during end joining of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks is influenced by repair protein RAD50, DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PKcs, and transcription context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Amanda; Bennardo, Nicole; Cheng, Anita; Stark, Jeremy M

    2011-12-09

    During repair of multiple chromosomal double strand breaks (DSBs), matching the correct DSB ends is essential to limit rearrangements. To investigate the maintenance of correct end use, we examined repair of two tandem noncohesive DSBs generated by endonuclease I-SceI and the 3' nonprocessive exonuclease Trex2, which can be expressed as an I-SceI-Trex2 fusion. We examined end joining (EJ) repair that maintains correct ends (proximal-EJ) versus using incorrect ends (distal-EJ), which provides a relative measure of incorrect end use (distal end use). Previous studies showed that ATM is important to limit distal end use. Here we show that DNA-PKcs kinase activity and RAD50 are also important to limit distal end use, but that H2AX is dispensable. In contrast, we find that ATM, DNA-PKcs, and RAD50 have distinct effects on repair events requiring end processing. Furthermore, we developed reporters to examine the effects of the transcription context on DSB repair, using an inducible promoter. We find that a DSB downstream from an active promoter shows a higher frequency of distal end use, and a greater reliance on ATM for limiting incorrect end use. Conversely, DSB transcription context does not affect end processing during EJ, the frequency of homology-directed repair, or the role of RAD50 and DNA-PKcs in limiting distal end use. We suggest that RAD50, DNA-PKcs kinase activity, and transcription context are each important to limit incorrect end use during EJ repair of multiple DSBs, but that these factors and conditions have distinct roles during repair events requiring end processing.

  7. Large optical field enhancement for nanotips with large opening angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sebastian; Wachter, Georg; Lemell, Christoph; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the dependence of the enhancement of optical near-fields at nanometric tips on the shape, size, and material of the tip. We confirm the strong dependence of the field enhancement factor on the radius of curvature. In addition, we find a surprisingly strong increase of field enhancement with increasing opening angle of the nanotips. For gold and tungsten nanotips in the experimentally relevant parameter range (radius of curvature ≥slant 5 nm at 800 nm laser wavelength), we obtain field enhancement factors of up to ∼ 35 for Au and ∼ 12 for W for large opening angles. We confirm this strong dependence on the opening angle for many other materials featuring a wide variety in their dielectric response. For dielectrics, the opening angle dependence is traced back to the electrostatic force of the induced surface charge at the tip shank. For metals, the plasmonic response strongly increases the field enhancement and shifts the maximum field enhancement to smaller opening angles.

  8. Frequency scaling for angle gathers

    KAUST Repository

    Zuberi, M. A H

    2014-01-01

    Angle gathers provide an extra dimension to analyze the velocity after migration. Space-shift and time shift-imaging conditions are two methods used to obtain angle gathers, but both are reasonably expensive. By scaling the time-lag axis of the time-shifted images, the computational cost of the time shift imaging condition can be considerably reduced. In imaging and more so Full waveform inversion, frequencydomain Helmholtz solvers are used more often to solve for the wavefields than conventional time domain extrapolators. In such cases, we do not need to extend the image, instead we scale the frequency axis of the frequency domain image to obtain the angle gathers more efficiently. Application on synthetic data demonstrate such features.

  9. QCD corrections to decay-lepton polar and azimuthal angular distributions in $e^{+}e^{-}→ t \\overline{t}$ in the soft-gluon approximation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh D Rindani

    2002-04-01

    QCD corrections to order in the soft-gluon approximation to angular distributions of decay charged leptons in the process $e^{+}e^{-}→ t\\overline{t}$, followed by semileptonic decay of or $\\overline{t}$, are obtained in the $e^{+} e^{-}$ centre-of-mass frame. As compared to distributions in the top rest frame, these have the advantage that they would allow direct comparison with experiment without the need to reconstruct the top rest frame. The results also do not depend on the choice of a spin quantization axis for or $\\overline{t}$. Analytic expression for the triple distribution in the polar angle of and polar and azimuthal angles of the lepton is obtained. Analytic expression is also derived for the distribution in the charged-lepton polar angle. Numerical values are discussed for $\\sqrt{s} = 400$, 800 and 1500 GeV.

  10. Systematic variations in divergence angle

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Practical methods for quantitative analysis of radial and angular coordinates of leafy organs of vascular plants are presented and applied to published phyllotactic patterns of various real systems from young leaves on a shoot tip to florets on a flower head. The constancy of divergence angle is borne out with accuracy of less than a degree. It is shown that apparent fluctuations in divergence angle are in large part systematic variations caused by the invalid assumption of a fixed center and/or by secondary deformations, while random fluctuations are of minor importance.

  11. Scaling of misorientation angle distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, D.A.; Chrzan, D.C.; Liu, Q.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of misorientation angle distributions following different amounts of deformation in cold-rolled aluminum and nickel and compressed stainless steel is reported. The sealing of the dislocation cell boundary misorientation angle distributions is studied. Surprisingly, the distributions...... for the small to large strain regimes for aluminum, 304L stainless steel, nickel, and copper (taken from the literature )appear to be identical. Hence the distributions may be "universal." These results have significant implications for the development of dislocation based deformation models. [S0031...

  12. Comparison of classical methods for blade design and the influence of tip correction on rotor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, J. N.; Okulov, V. L.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Naumov, I. V.; Litvinov, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    The classical blade-element/momentum (BE/M) method, which is used together with different types of corrections (e.g. the Prandtl or Glauert tip correction), is today the most basic tool in the design of wind turbine rotors. However, there are other classical techniques based on a combination of the blade-element approach and lifting-line (BE/LL) methods, which are less used by the wind turbine community. The BE/LL method involves different interpretations for rotors with finite or infinite numbers of blades and different assumptions with respect to the optimum circulation distribution. In the present study we compare the performance and the resulting design of the BE/M method by Glauert [1] and the BE/LL method by Betz [2] for finite as well as for infinite-bladed rotors, corrected for finiteness through the tip correction. In the first part of the paper, expressions are given for the optimum design, including blade plan forms and local pitch distributions. The comparison shows that the resulting geometry of the rotor depends on the method used, but that the differences mainly exist in the inner part of the blade and at relatively small tip speed ratios (TSRwater flume to compare their performance at different tip speed ratios and pitch angles. As a result of the comparison it was found that the Betz rotor had the best performance.

  13. Validation of the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, K. Frank; Vamal, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer model was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement near clouds. This simple model accounts for the radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and molecular layer above, the major contribution to the reflectance enhancement near clouds for short wavelengths. We use LES/SHDOM simulated 3D radiation fields to valid the two-layer model for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometer. We find: (a) The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; and (b) The magnitude of the 2-layer modeled enhancement agree reasonably well with the "truth" with some expected underestimation. We further extend our model to include cloud-surface interaction using the Poisson model for broken clouds. We found that including cloud-surface interaction improves the correction, though it can introduced some over corrections for large cloud albedo, large cloud optical depth, large cloud fraction, large cloud aspect ratio. This over correction can be reduced by excluding scenes (10 km x 10km) with large cloud fraction for which the Poisson model is not designed for. Further research is underway to account for the contribution of cloud-aerosol radiative interaction to the enhancement.

  14. Evaluation of relative radiometric correction techniques on Landsat 8 OLI sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Antonio; Caradonna, Grazia; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2016-08-01

    The quality of information derived from processed remotely sensed data may depend upon many factors, mostly related to the extent data acquisition is influenced by atmospheric conditions, topographic effects, sun angle and so on. The goal of radiometric corrections is to reduce such effects in order enhance the performance of change detection analysis. There are two approaches to radiometric correction: absolute and relative calibrations. Due to the large amount of free data products available, absolute radiometric calibration techniques may be time consuming and financially expensive because of the necessary inputs for absolute calibration models (often these data are not available and can be difficult to obtain). The relative approach to radiometric correction, known as relative radiometric normalization, is preferred with some research topics because no in situ ancillary data, at the time of satellite overpasses, are required. In this study we evaluated three well known relative radiometric correction techniques using two Landsat 8 - OLI scenes over a subset area of the Apulia Region (southern Italy): the IR-MAD (Iteratively Reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection), the HM (Histogram Matching) and the DOS (Dark Object Subtraction). IR-MAD results were statistically assessed within a territory with an extremely heterogeneous landscape and all computations performed in a Matlab environment. The panchromatic and thermal bands were excluded from the comparisons.

  15. Threshold corrections in heterotic flux compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Angelantonj, Carlo; Sarkis, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    We compute the one-loop threshold corrections to the gauge and gravitational couplings for a large class of N=2 non-K\\"ahler heterotic compactifications with three-form flux, consisting in principal two-torus bundles over K3 surfaces. We obtain the results as sums of BPS-states contributions, depending on the topological data of the bundle. We analyse also the worldsheet non-perturbative corrections coming from instantons wrapping the torus fiber, that are mapped under S-duality to D-instanton corrections in type I flux compactifications.

  16. Measuring the Stop Mixing Angle at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to determine the stop mixing angle and its CP-violating phase at the LHC. As an observable we use ratios of branching ratios for different decay modes of the light stop ~t_1 to charginos and neutralinos. These observables can have a very strong dependence on the parameters of the stop sector. We discuss in detail the origin of these effects. Using various combinations of the ratios of branching ratios we show that, depending on the scenario, one can achieve accuracies in the range of a few percent for determining the light stop mass, the mixing angle and the CP phase.

  17. Probabilistic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Fern, J; Fern, Jesse; Terilla, John

    2002-01-01

    There are well known necessary and sufficient conditions for a quantum code to correct a set of errors. We study weaker conditions under which a quantum code may correct errors with probabilities that may be less than one. We work with stabilizer codes and as an application study how the nine qubit code, the seven qubit code, and the five qubit code perform when there are errors on more than one qubit. As a second application, we discuss the concept of syndrome quality and use it to suggest a way that quantum error correction can be practically improved.

  18. Tetragonal and collapsed-tetragonal phases of CaFe2As2 : A view from angle-resolved photoemission and dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Shi, Xun; Wu, Shangfei; Zeng, Lingkun; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Qian, Tian; Sefat, Athena S.; Biermann, Silke; Ding, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the tetragonal to collapsed-tetragonal transition of CaFe2As2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean field theory-based electronic structure calculations. We observe that the collapsed-tetragonal phase exhibits reduced correlations and a higher coherence temperature due to the stronger Fe-As hybridization. Furthermore, a comparison of measured photoemission spectra and theoretical spectral functions shows that momentum-dependent corrections to the density functional band structure are essential for the description of low-energy quasiparticle dispersions. We introduce those using the recently proposed combined "screened exchange + dynamical mean field theory" scheme.

  19. Holographic Thermalization with Weyl Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Anshuman; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2015-01-01

    We consider holographic thermalization in the presence of a Weyl correction in five dimensional AdS space. We numerically analyze the time dependence of the two point correlation functions and the expectation values of rectangular Wilson loops in the boundary field theory. The subtle interplay between the Weyl coupling constant and the chemical potential is studied in detail. An outcome of our analysis is the appearance of a swallow tail behaviour in the thermalization curve, and we give evidence that this might indicate distinct physical situations relating to different length scales in the problem.

  20. Case Study: Learner Attitudes Towards the Correction of Mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Galina Kavaliauskienė; Lilija Anusienė

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research is to explore learner attitudes to correction of mistakes or feedback as a language learning tool in oral, electronically- and paper-written work as well as peer correction of mistakes.Feedback is a method used in the teaching of languages to improve performance by sharing observations, concerns and suggestions with regard to written work or oral presentation. It includes not only correcting learners, but also assessing them. Both correction and assessment depend...

  1. Radiative Corrections to Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B; Kalinovskaya, L V

    2005-01-01

    Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering are revisited. One-loop electroweak corrections are re-calculated within the automatic SANC system. Terms with mass singularities are treated including higher order leading logarithmic corrections. Scheme dependence of corrections due to weak interactions is investigated. The results are implemented into the data analysis of the NOMAD experiment. The present theoretical accuracy in description of the process is discussed.

  2. Contact angle of sessile drops in Lennard-Jones systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Urbassek, Herbert M; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2014-11-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used for studying the contact angle of nanoscale sessile drops on a planar solid wall in a system interacting via the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones potential. The entire range between total wetting and dewetting is investigated by varying the solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy. The temperature is varied between the triple point and the critical temperature. A correlation is obtained for the contact angle in dependence of the temperature and the dispersive interaction energy. Size effects are studied by varying the number of fluid particles at otherwise constant conditions, using up to 150,000 particles. For particle numbers below 10,000, a decrease of the contact angle is found. This is attributed to a dependence of the solid-liquid surface tension on the droplet size. A convergence to a constant contact angle is observed for larger system sizes. The influence of the wall model is studied by varying the density of the wall. The effective solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy at a contact angle of θ = 90° is found to be independent of temperature and to decrease linearly with the solid density. A correlation is developed that describes the contact angle as a function of the dispersive interaction, the temperature, and the solid density. The density profile of the sessile drop and the surrounding vapor phase is described by a correlation combining a sigmoidal function and an oscillation term.

  3. Limbus Impact on Off-angle Iris Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Barstow, Del R [ORNL; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL; Thompson, Joseph W [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Boehnen, Chris Bensing [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of iris recognition depends on the quality of data capture and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Off-angle iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics that tries to address several issues including corneal refraction, complex 3D iris texture, and blur. In this paper, we present an additional significant challenge that degrades the performance of the off-angle iris recognition systems, called the limbus effect . The limbus is the region at the border of the cornea where the cornea joins the sclera. The limbus is a semitransparent tissue that occludes a side portion of the iris plane. The amount of occluded iris texture on the side nearest the camera increases as the image acquisition angle increases. Without considering the role of the limbus effect, it is difficult to design an accurate off-angle iris recognition system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that investigates the limbus effect in detail from a biometrics perspective. Based on results from real images and simulated experiments with real iris texture, the limbus effect increases the hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 depending upon the limbus height.

  4. RESEARCH OF BASIFACIAL CONTOURING SCULPTURE BY MANDIBULAR ANGLE OSTECTOMY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jian-lin; DAI Chuan-chang; ZHU Guo-xian; ZHANG Ying; JIN Yu-qing; WANG Wei; QI Chuan-liang

    2006-01-01

    Objective Mandibular angle ostectomy is usually applied to the facial contouring sculpture.We evaluated the various techniques in order to enhance the precision and avoid unnecessary damage. Methods Before operation the area and quantity resected bone were designed according to facial measurement, mandible pantomography and orthophoria and lateral localized radiograph of skull. The Incises of mandibular angle ostectomy included intraoral, retroauricular or intraoral associated with retroauricular. Howerer, the sagittal resection of mandible outer table was necessary in all intraoral incise. Results Single mandibular angle ostectomy was not satisfactory for the patients having mandible hypertrophy with over-width basifacial contouring. Mandibular angle ostectomy combined with the sagittal resection of outer table of mandibular angle were required. Good symmetry and ap pearance were gained in 206 cases. One case had facial paralysis. Two patients occured mandibular fracture during the operation. Three cases complicated angled deformity at mandible body. Conclusion Reduction mandibuloplasty should be selected depends on varied types of mandibular angle hypertrophy before operation.

  5. Contactless angle detection using permalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkel, Kees J.; Rijk, Rolf

    1988-01-01

    An overview is given of measurements on angle detectors. The detectors consist of a pair of planar-Hall elements opposite to a rotatable magnet. The measurements are performed on a number of planar-Hall elements of different shape and size, and show good agreement with a previously described theoret

  6. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  7. A New Method for Correcting Vehicle License Plate Tilt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Sen Pan; Qi Xiong; Jun-Biao Yan

    2009-01-01

    In the course of vehicle license plate (VLP) automatic recognition, tilt correction is a very crucial process. According to Karhunen-Loeve (K-L) transformation, the coordinates of characters in the image are arranged into a two-dimensional covariance matrix, on the basis of which the centered process is carried out. Then, the eigenvector and the rotation angle α are computed in turn. The whole image is rotated by -α. Thus, image horizontal tilt correction is performed. In the vertical tilt correction process, three correction methods, which are K-L transformation method, the line fitting method based on K-means clustering (LFMBKC), and the line fitting based on least squares (LFMBLS), are put forward to compute the vertical tilt angle θ. After shear transformation (ST) is imposed on the rotated image, the final correction image is obtained. The experimental results verify that this proposed method can be easily implemented, and can quickly and accurately get the tilt angle. It provides a new effective way for the VLP image tilt correction as well.

  8. Corrected Age for Preemies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Corrected Age For Preemies Page Content Article Body If your ...

  9. Towards new methodology for improvement of topographic and anisotropic correction of desert bare soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomran, Ali

    Desert bare soil has been found in literature to exhibit anisotropic reflectance behaviour. Anisotropy is described by Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution function (BRDF). Literature studies have limited their investigations to the behaviour of the topographic corrections of Minnaert and C models (simple forms of the empirical type of BRDF) with terrain variables (slope and orientation). Yet, none of these studies, especially for desert bare soil, has investigated the behaviour of the coefficient values of Minnaert and C with terrain variables. The investigation in this study has revealed that the relation between terrain slope (derived from both DEM level-1 and level-2) of desert bare soil in Saudi Arabia and K and C values follow closely a 2nd order polynomial trend. K curves have taken convex shapes, whereas C curves were concave. The Minnaert (K) and C coefficients trends have shown that surface Lambertian behaviour is more pronounced on slopes facing away from the sun than on sun facing slopes. Unlike the Minnaert K and C coefficients derived from four spectral classes, this author's newly developed terrain slope, aspect and phase angle dependant's C and Minnaert coefficients produced promising results compared to the global K and C. Induced BRDF effects in the desert bare soil is found the more probable dominating cause for the scatter/jitter in the radiance/cos(i) regression plots that remained after radiometric correction. Though its high topographic correction efficiency and unlike Minnaert model, C model tends to maintain the uncorrected radiance values unchanged after correction (i.e. not amplified to compensate for low sun angle).

  10. Bistatic MIMO Radar Clutter Suppression by Exploiting the Transmit Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transmit angle of bistatic radars can be obtained by introducing Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO radar techniques. The Three-Dimensional (3D clutter spectra, that is, the transmit angle, receive angle, and Doppler frequency, are introduced using the additional angle information to Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP. This study reviews the researches on bistatic MIMO-STAP. 3D space-time adaptive processing methods for airborne bistatic side-looking MIMO radars, such as 3D-LCMV, 3D-ACR, 3D-JDL, and 3D projection-based reduced dimensional STAP methods, are discussed. Simulation results show that the proposed methods can improve the small-sample support performance of range-dependent clutter suppression in bistatic side-looking MIMO radar. Finally, the results are summarized and the prospects of bistatic MIMO-STAP are discussed.

  11. Determination of the position angle of stellar spin axes

    CERN Document Server

    Lesage, Anna-Lea

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the stellar position angle provides valuable information on binary stellar formation or stellar spin axis evolution. We aim to develop a method for determining the absolute stellar position angle using spectro-astrometric analysis of high resolution long-slit spectra. The method has been designed in particular for slowly rotating stars. We investigate its applicability to existing dispersive long-slit spectrographs, identified here by their plate scale, and the size of the resulting stellar sample. The stellar rotation induces a tilt in the stellar lines whose angle depends on the stellar position angle and the orientation of the slit. We developed a rotation model to calculate and reproduce the effects of stellar rotation on unreduced high resolution stellar spectra. Then we retrieved the tilt amplitude using a spectro-astrometric extraction of the position of the photocentre of the spectrum. Finally we present two methods for analysing the position spectrum using either direct measurement of the t...

  12. Adaptable DC offset correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  13. Correctness is not enough

    CERN Document Server

    Pryor, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The usual aim of spreadsheet audit is to verify correctness. There are two problems with this: first, it is often difficult to tell whether the spreadsheets in question are correct, and second, even if they are, they may still give the wrong results. These problems are explained in this paper, which presents the key criteria for judging a spreadsheet and discusses how those criteria can be achieved

  14. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-11-22

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it\\'s ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  15. Modeling liquid bridge between surfaces with contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Amirfazli, A; Tang, T

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents the behaviors of a liquid bridge when being compressed and stretched in a quasi-static fashion between two solid surfaces that have contact angle hysteresis (CAH). A theoretical model is developed to obtain the profiles of the liquid bridge given a specific separation between the surfaces. Different from previous models, both contact lines in the upper and lower surfaces were allowed to move when the contact angles reach their advancing or receding values. When the contact angles are between their advancing and receding values, the contact lines are pinned while the contact angles adjust to accommodate the changes in separation. Effects of CAH on both asymmetric and symmetric liquid bridges were analyzed. The model was shown to be able to correctly predict the behavior of the liquid bridge during a quasi-static compression/stretching loading cycle in experiments. Because of CAH, the liquid bridge can have two different profiles at the same separation during one loading and unloading cycle, and more profiles can be obtained during multiple cycles. The maximum adhesion force generated by the liquid bridge is found to be influenced by the CAH of surfaces. CAH also leads to energy cost during a loading cycle of the liquid bridge. In addition, the minimum separation between the two solid surfaces is shown to affect how the contact radii and angles change on the two surfaces as the liquid bridge is stretched.

  16. Contact angle of a nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berim, Gersh O; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-02-21

    The contact angle of a cylindrical nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface is calculated, for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, using the density functional theory. The emphasis of the paper is on the dependence of the contact angle on roughness. The roughness is modeled by rectangular pillars of infinite length located on the smooth surface of a substrate, with fluid-pillar interactions different in strength from the fluid-substrate ones. It is shown that for hydrophobic substrates the trend of the contact angle to increase with increasing roughness, which was noted in all previous studies, is not universally valid, but depends on the fluid-pillar interactions, pillar height, interpillar distance, as well as on the size of the drop. For hydrophilic substrate, an unusual kink-like dependence of the contact angle on the nanodrop size is found which is caused by the change in the location of the leading edges of the nanodrop on the surface. It is also shown that the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equations can not explain all the peculiarities of the contact angle of a nanodrop on a nanorough surface.

  17. Radiative corrections of O(α) to B{sup -} → V{sup 0}l{sup -} anti ν{sub l} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tostado, S.L. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castro, G.L. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); CSIC- Universitat de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    The O(α) electromagnetic radiative corrections to the B{sup -} → V{sup 0}l{sup -} anti ν{sub l} (V is a vector meson and l a charged lepton) decay rates are evaluated using the cutoff method to regularize virtual corrections and incorporating intermediate resonance states in the real-photon amplitude to extend the region of validity of the soft-photon approximation. The electromagnetic and weak form factors of hadrons are assumed to vary smoothly over the energies of virtual and real photons under consideration. The cutoff dependence of radiative corrections upon the scale Λ that separates the long- and short-distance regimes is found to be mild and is considered as an uncertainty of the calculation. Owing to partial cancellations of electromagnetic corrections evaluated over the three- and four-body regions of phase space, the photon-inclusive corrected rates are found to be dominated by the short-distance contribution. These corrections will be relevant for a precise determination of the b quark mixing angles by testing isospin symmetry when measurements of semileptonic rates of charged and neutral B mesons at the few percent level become available. For completeness, we also provide numerical values of radiative corrections in the three-body region of the Dalitz plot distributions of these decays. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of Atmospheric Correction Methods for Sentinel-2 MSI Images Applied to Amazon Floodplain Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Souza Martins

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite data provide the only viable means for extensive monitoring of remote and large freshwater systems, such as the Amazon floodplain lakes. However, an accurate atmospheric correction is required to retrieve water constituents based on surface water reflectance ( R W . In this paper, we assessed three atmospheric correction methods (Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV, ACOLITE and Sen2Cor applied to an image acquired by the MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI on-board of the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2A platform using concurrent in-situ measurements over four Amazon floodplain lakes in Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the correction of forest adjacency effects based on the linear spectral unmixing model, and performed a temporal evaluation of atmospheric constituents from Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC products. The validation of MAIAC aerosol optical depth (AOD indicated satisfactory retrievals over the Amazon region, with a correlation coefficient (R of ~0.7 and 0.85 for Terra and Aqua products, respectively. The seasonal distribution of the cloud cover and AOD revealed a contrast between the first and second half of the year in the study area. Furthermore, simulation of top-of-atmosphere (TOA reflectance showed a critical contribution of atmospheric effects (>50% to all spectral bands, especially the deep blue (92%–96% and blue (84%–92% bands. The atmospheric correction results of the visible bands illustrate the limitation of the methods over dark lakes ( R W < 1%, and better match of the R W shape compared with in-situ measurements over turbid lakes, although the accuracy varied depending on the spectral bands and methods. Particularly above 705 nm, R W was highly affected by Amazon forest adjacency, and the proposed adjacency effect correction minimized the spectral distortions in R W (RMSE < 0.006. Finally, an extensive validation of the methods is required for

  19. An Angle Criterion for Riesz Bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindner, Alexander M; Bittner, B.

    1999-01-01

    We present a characterization of Riesz bases in terms ofthe angles between certain finite dimensional subspaces. Correlationsbetween the bounds of the Riesz basis and the size of the angles arederived.......We present a characterization of Riesz bases in terms ofthe angles between certain finite dimensional subspaces. Correlationsbetween the bounds of the Riesz basis and the size of the angles arederived....

  20. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  1. Comparison between the 1D deconvolution and the ETM scatter correction techniques in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebossen, R.; Bendrien, B.; Frouin, V. [CEA-Service Hospitalier F. Joliot, Orsay (France)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Scatter corrections usually degrade the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) while they improve image quantification. Dual energy corrections provide scatter corrected images with a poor SNR due to the use of two sinograms having low statistics. We have evaluated the SNR on 20 cm uniform cylinder images, acquired on an ECAT 953B/31 with septa in the field-of-view, corrected for scatter using the 1D deconvolution method and an energy based correction developed at Orsay. The latter, referenced as the Estimation of True Method, uses a High Energy Window (HEW) with 550 and 850 keV settings to estimate the true component registered in the Classical Energy Window (CEW) with 250 and 850 keV settings. A sinogram of scattered events is formed from this noisy estimate of the trues. It is filtered and then subtracted from the CEW sinogram to provide a scatter free sinogram. Nine Regions of Interest (ROI) of 18mm diameter have been drawn on a 110 mm diameter circle and reported on 11 direct slices (96 million events each in the CEW and 8 million in the HEW). The SNR has been defined as the ratio of the mean over the standard deviation of all ROI values. With the 1D deconvolution the SNR is 38.0, close to that obtained without scatter correction (39.1) It is lower with the ETM depending on the filter used: with a rectangular window of 9 bins by 15 angles it is 29;.8 (26.9 with a 5 by 5 window) while with a 2D Gaussian filter (7 bins by 13 angles variances) it is 30.8. This value is higher than 22.1 measured on the HEW image. The ETM with adequate filtering allows scatter correction with a SNR acceptable compared with that measured with the 1D deconvolution. Yet the ETM has a clear advantage over the 1D deconvolution in case of asymetrical source distributions in non homogeneous media and in case of off-plane scattering as has been tested on various phantom measurements.

  2. Angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations in the quasi-two-dimensional organic conductor α-(BEDT- TTF)2NH4Hg(SCN)4: Origin of the difference in ground state between α-(BEDT- TTF)2NH4Hg(SCN)4 and α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, N.; Kagoshima, S.; Miura, N.; Saito, G.

    2001-06-01

    We studied the difference between the ground states of α-(BEDT-TTF)2NH4Hg(SCN)4 and its isostructural compound α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4 by measuring angle-dependent magnetoresistance. In the NH4 compound, we found resistance minima due to the Lebed resonances. These findings suggest the presence of the one-dimensional Fermi surface parallel to the b*c* plane. Detailed analyses of these resistance minima suggest a large warp in the planarlike Fermi surface along the c* axis. Second and higher harmonic components are necessary to describe the warping of the Fermi surface. We also analyzed the small closed-orbit effect, that is, the peak structure in the resistance for the magnetic field nearly parallel to the conducting plane. It was found that the corrugation in the Fermi surface perpendicular to the a*c* plane was also large in the NH4 compound compared to the K compound. We conclude that such large warps in the Fermi surface suppressed the nesting of the quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface in the NH4 compound.

  3. The Q-angle and sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Thomas; Foldspang, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Quadriceps muscle contraction tends to straighten the Q angle. We expected that sports comprising a high amount of quadriceps training could be associated with low Q angles. The aim of the present study was to estimate the Q angle in athletes and to investigate its potential associations with par......Quadriceps muscle contraction tends to straighten the Q angle. We expected that sports comprising a high amount of quadriceps training could be associated with low Q angles. The aim of the present study was to estimate the Q angle in athletes and to investigate its potential associations...... with participation in sport. Three hundred and thirty-nine athletes had their Q angle measured. The mean of right-side Q angles was higher than left side, and the mean Q angle was higher in women than in men. The Q angle was positively associated with years of jogging, and negatively with years of soccer, swimming...

  4. Determination of bulk diffusion lengths for angle-lapped semiconductor material via the scanning electron microscope: A theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonroos, O.

    1978-01-01

    A standard procedure for the determination of the minority carrier diffusion length by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) consists in scanning across an angle-lapped surface of a P-N junction and measuring the resultant short circuit current I sub sc as a function of beam position. A detailed analysis of the I sub sc originating from this configuration is presented. It is found that, for a point source excitation, the I sub sc depends very simply on x, the variable distance between the surface and the junction edge. The expression for the I sub sc of a planar junction device is well known. If d, the constant distance between the plane of the surface of the semiconductor and the junction edge in the expression for the I of a planar junction is merely replaced by x, the variable distance of the corresponding angle-lapped junction, an expression results which is correct to within a small fraction of a percent as long as the angle between the surfaces, 2 theta sub 1, is smaller than 10 deg.

  5. Heliostat tilt and azimuth angle charts and the heliostat orientation protractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, M.M.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. (Thermal Energy Dept., King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah 21413 (SA))

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that using cartesian heliostat field coordinates analytical expressions were derived for the heliostat tilt angle s, and heliostat azimuth angle {gamma} (clockwise from south). These expressions are dependent on the field cartesian coordinates of the center of the heliostat and the solar zenith and azimuth angles (clockwise from south), {theta}{sub z} and {Psi}, respectively. Here, cylindrical coordinates are conveniently used to derive the expressions for the heliostat angles s and {gamma}. The expression of {gamma}is used to construct the so-called heliostat orientation protractor. The protractor is a useful tool to determine the instantaneous heliostat azimuth angle as will be illustrated.

  6. Multi-angle compound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Sillesen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    to conventional B-mode imaging MACI offers better defined tissue boundaries and lower variance of the speckle pattern, resulting in an image with reduced random variations. Design and implementation of a compound imaging system is described, images of rubber tubes and porcine aorta are shown and effects......This paper reports on a scanning technique, denoted multi-angle compound imaging (MACI), using spatial compounding. The MACI method also contains elements of frequency compounding, as the transmit frequency is lowered for the highest beam angles in order to reduce grating lobes. Compared...... on visualization are discussed. The speckle reduction is analyzed numerically and the results are found to be in excellent agreement with existing theory. An investigation of detectability of low-contrast lesions shows significant improvements compared to conventional imaging. Finally, possibilities for improving...

  7. Optimisation of Fan Blade Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroop M P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report represents the optimization of fan blade angle in accordance with the various room temperatures that can be in the tropical area like India. We took this work mainly because cooling is an important factor now a days in every area where construction and rooms are there and ceiling fans are the most common device that is commonly used. So it is of utmost importance to tweak the performance of this ceiling fan so that it can function in its most optimal condition. We have modeled the fan in a modeling software (SOLIDWORKS and imported that into an analyzing software (ANSYS and a result is generated on the various blade angles (0, 4, 8 and 12.5 degrees in accordance to room conditions. A trend line curve with the obtained data is expected as the result which can be crucial for designing of future fans

  8. LHC Report: playing with angles

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    Ready (after a machine development period), steady (running), go (for a special run)!   The crossing angles are an essential feature of the machine set-up. They have to be big enough to reduce the long-range beam-beam effect. The LHC has recently enjoyed a period of steady running and managed to set a new record for “Maximum Stable Luminosity Delivered in 7 days” of 3.29 fb-1 between 29 August and 4 September. The number of bunches per beam remains pegged at 2220 because of the limitations imposed by the SPS beam dump. The bunch population is also somewhat reduced due to outgassing near one of the injection kickers at point 8. Both limitations will be addressed during the year-end technical stop, opening the way for increased performance in 2017. On 10 and 11 September, a two day machine development (MD) period took place. The MD programme included a look at the possibility of reducing the crossing angle at the high-luminosity interaction points. The crossing angles are an ess...

  9. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN} = 19.6 and 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calder'on de la Barca S'anchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solanki, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-11-01

    The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity |yee | < 1 in minimum-bias Au +Au collisions at √{sNN} = 19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened ρ spectral function for Mee < 1.1 GeV /c2. The integrated dielectron excess yield at √{sNN} = 19.6 GeV for 0.4

  10. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6 and 200 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity |yee|<1 in minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened ρ spectral function for Mee<1.1 GeV/c2. The integrated dielectron excess yield at sNN=19.6 GeV for 0.4

  11. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 19.6$ and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; S'anchez, M Calder'on de la Barca; campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng,; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, C; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, L; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solanki, D; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B J; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, X; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, G; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Y F; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I -K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, X P; Zhang, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-01

    The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity $|y_{ee}|<1$ in minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened $\\rho$ spectral function for $M_{ee}<1.1$ GeV/$c^{2}$. The integrated dielectron excess yield at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 19.6 GeV for $0.4

  12. CORRECTING STUDENTS’ HOMEWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionI have been teaching English for ten years and like many other teachers in middle schools.I teach threebig classes each year.Before I had the opportunity to further my study in the SMSTT project run jointlyby the British Council and the State Education Commission of China at Southwest China TeachersUniversity.I found it somewhat difficult to correct students homework since I had so many students.Now I still have three big classes.but I have found it casier to correct students homework since I havebeen combining the techniques learned in the project with my own successful experience.In this article.I attempt to discuss my approach to correcting students homework.I hope that it will be of some use tothose who have not vet had the opportunity to further their training.

  13. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... statebased on an idealized mechanical model to be adapted to the original limit state by the model correction factor. Reliable approximations are obtained by iterative use of gradient information on the original limit state function analogously to previous response surface approaches. However, the strength...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  14. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Clipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and to range. DTM resolution can be no better than a few times this pixel scale. Even vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle, providedthe image quality is high enough that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but especially critical for the Europa Clipper mission profile. Clipper would obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously would be used to produce a DTM needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We produced a 210 m/post DTM of the Castalia Macula region of Europa from 6 Galileo images by photoclinometry. A low-incidence image was used to correct for albedo variations before photoclinometry. We are using the image simulation software OASIS to generate synthetic stereopairs of the region at a full range of incidence angles. These images will be realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry including albedo variations (based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. The pairs will then be analyzed with the commercial stereomapping software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects. Comparing the stereo-derived DTMs to the input ("truth") DTM will allow us to quantify the dependence of true DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to

  15. Atmospheric Corrections Using MODTRAN for TOA and Surface BRDF Characteristics from High Resolution Spectroradiometric/Angular Measurements from a Helicopter Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution spectral radiance measurements were taken by a spectral radiometer on board a heli copter over the US Oklahoma Southern Great Plain near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) site during August 1998. The radiometer has a spectral range from 350 nm to 2500 nm at 1 nm resolution. The measurements covered several grass and cropland scene types at multiple solar zenith angles. Detailed atmospheric corrections using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance (MODTRAN) radiation model and in-situ sounding and aerosol measurements have been applied to the helicopter measurements in order to re trieve the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) characteristics. The atmospheric corrections are most significant in the visible wavelengths and in the strong water vapor absorption wavelengths in the near infrared region. Adjusting the BRDF to TOA requires a larger correction in the visible channels since Rayleigh scattering contributes significantly to the TOA reflectance. The opposite corrections to the visible and near infrarred wavelengths can alter the radiance dif ference and ratio that many remote sensing techniques are based on, such as the normalized difference vege tation index (NDVI). The data show that surface BRDFs and spectral albedos are highly sensitive to the veg etation type and solar zenith angle while BRDF at TOA depends more on atmospheric conditions and the vi ewing geometry. Comparison with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) derived clear sky Angular Distribution Model (ADM) for crop and grass scene type shows a standard deviation of 0.08 in broadband anisotropic function at 25° solar zenith angle and 0.15 at 50° solar zenith angle, respectively.

  16. Radiative corrections to the polarizability of helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łach, Grzegorz; Jeziorski, Bogumił; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2004-06-11

    The complete alpha(3) QED correction to the helium atom polarizability is computed assuming an infinite nuclear mass and found to be equal to 0.000030666(3) a.u., with the contribution from the electric-field dependence of the Bethe logarithm amounting to 0.000000193(2) a.u. After including the alpha(2) and alpha(3) corrections for the nuclear recoil and the leading part of the alpha(4) QED correction, we find that the molar polarizability of 4He is 0.51725419(9)(4) cm(3)/mol. The first of the two error bounds is dominated by the uncertainty of alpha(4) and higher-order QED corrections and the second reflects the uncertainty of the Avogadro constant.

  17. Applying Contact Angle to a 2D Multiphase Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model

    CERN Document Server

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium contact angle of liquid drops over horizontal surfaces has been modeled using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The model is capable of accurate implementation of contact angles to stationary and moving contact lines. In this scheme, the desired value for stationary or dynamic contact angle is used to correct the profile near the triple point. This is achieved by correcting the surface normals near the contact line and also interpolating the drop profile into the boundaries. Simulations show that a close match to the chosen contact angle values can be achieved for both stationary and moving contact lines. This technique has proven to reduce the amount of nonphysical shear stresses near the triple point and to enhance the convergence characteristics of the solver.

  18. Correction of ocular dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, I P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine results with elective surgical correction of enophthalmos. The study was a retrospective assessment in a university-based referral practice. A consecutive sample of 10 patients who developed ocular dystopia following orbital trauma was examined. The main outcome measures were a subjective evaluation by patients and objective measurements of patients' eye position. The intervention was three-dimensional orbital reconstruction with titanium plates. It is concluded that satisfactory correction of enophthalmos and ocular dystopia can be achieved with elective surgery using titanium plates. In addition, intraoperative measurements of eye position in three planes increases the precision of surgery.

  19. Atmospheric Reentry Dispersion Correction Ascent Phase Guidance for a Generic Reentry Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Chander

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Launch vehicle explicit guidance mechanism depends on the estimation of the desired burnout conditions and driving the vehicle to achieve these conditions. The accuracy of the vehicle at the target point depends on how tightly these conditions are achieved and what is the strategy used to define the trajectory. It has been observed inthe literature that most of the guidance mechanisms during reentry use vacuum guidance equations that is durin greentry the atmospheric effects are not considered. In order to achieve minimum miss distance at the target point theat mospheric effects are to be considered during the guided phase and appropriate corrections should be executed,otherwise depending on the reentry flight path angle and ballistic coefficient the errors can be as high as tens of nautical miles. In this paper, the authors develop a novel approach to these vacuum guided launch vehicle problems.The paper elaborates how to calculate a prior the reentry dispersion during the ascent phase guidance and provide guidance corrections such that the terminal conditions are achieved with higher accuracy.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(3, pp.233-241, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.3733

  20. Angle-Resolved Plasmonic Properties of Single Gold Nanorod Dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wu; Xuxing Lu; Qiannan Zhu; Junwei Zhao; Qishun Shen; Li Zhan; Weihai Ni

    2014-01-01

    Through wet-chemical assembly methods, gold nanorods were placed close to each other and formed a dimer with a gap distance*1 nm, and hence degenerated plasmonic dipole modes of individual nanorods coupled together to produce hybridized bonding and antibonding resonance modes. Previous studies using a condenser for illumination result in averaged signals over all excitation angles. By exciting an individual dimer obliquely at different angles, we demonstrate that these two new resonance modes are highly tunable and sensitive to the angle between the excitation polarization and the dimer orientation, which follows cos2u dependence. Moreover, for dimer structures with various structure angles, the resonance wavelengths as well as the refractive index sensitivities were found independent of the structure angle. Cal-culated angle-resolved plasmonic properties are in good agreement with the measurements. The assembled nanostructures investigated here are important for fundamental researches as well as potential applications when they are used as building blocks in plasmon-based optical and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  2. Contact angle hysteresis on regular pillar-like hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Li-Jen; Chang, Jeng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    A series of pillar-like patterned silicon wafers with different pillar sizes and spacing are fabricated by photolithography and further modified by a self-assembled fluorosilanated monolayer. The dynamic contact angles of water on these surfaces are carefully measured and found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of the Cassie model and the Wenzel model. When a water drop is at the Wenzel state, its contact angle hysteresis increases along with an increase in the surface roughness. While the surface roughness is further raised beyond its transition roughness (from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state), the contact angle hysteresis (or receding contact angle) discontinuously drops (or jumps) to a lower (or higher) value. When a water drop is at the Cassie state, its contact angle hysteresis strongly depends on the solid fraction and has nothing to do with the surface roughness. Even for a superhydrophobic surface, the contact angle hysteresis may still exhibit a value as high as 41 degrees for the solid fraction of 0.563.

  3. Contact angle and local wetting at contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Shan, Yanguang

    2012-11-06

    This theoretical study was motivated by recent experiments and theoretical work that had suggested the dependence of the static contact angle on the local wetting at the triple-phase contact line. We revisit this topic because the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter is still not widely understood and clearly known. To further clarify the relationship of the static contact angle with wetting, two approaches are applied to derive a general equation for the static contact angle of a droplet on a composite surface composed of heterogeneous components. A global approach based on the free surface energy of a thermodynamic system containing the droplet and solid surface shows the static contact angle as a function of local surface chemistry and local wetting state at the contact line. A local approach, in which only local forces acting on the contact line are considered, results in the same equation. The fact that the local approach agrees with the global approach further demonstrates the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter. Additionally, the study also suggests that the wetting described by the Wenzel and Cassie equations is also the local wetting of the contact line rather than the global wetting of the droplet.

  4. Atmospheric Error Correction of the Laser Beam Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saydi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric models based on surface measurements of pressure, temperature, and relative humidity have been used to increase the laser ranging accuracy by ray tracing. Atmospheric refraction can cause significant errors in laser ranging systems. Through the present research, the atmospheric effects on the laser beam were investigated by using the principles of laser ranging. Atmospheric correction was calculated for 0.532, 1.3, and 10.6 micron wavelengths through the weather conditions of Tehran, Isfahan, and Bushehr in Iran since March 2012 to March 2013. Through the present research the atmospheric correction was computed for meteorological data in base of monthly mean. Of course, the meteorological data were received from meteorological stations in Tehran, Isfahan, and Bushehr. Atmospheric correction was calculated for 11, 100, and 200 kilometers laser beam propagations under 30°, 60°, and 90° rising angles for each propagation. The results of the study showed that in the same months and beam emission angles, the atmospheric correction was most accurate for 10.6 micron wavelength. The laser ranging error was decreased by increasing the laser emission angle. The atmospheric correction with two Marini-Murray and Mendes-Pavlis models for 0.532 nm was compared.

  5. Refractive aiming corrections for satellite observation of stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Schmidt, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Standard references describe how apparent zenith angles differ from true zenith angles for observers on the Earth. In fact, correction formulae are available for aiming Earth-based sensors at stars; some corrections give variations as a function of observer altitude. Such corrections have not been available for observers in space. This report develops formulae appropriate for proper aiming from space-based sensors toward the relatively few stars that are near the Earth`s limb at any given time. These formulae correct for refractive effects and may be critical for steerable space-borne sensors with fields of view less than one degree, tasked to observe starlight passing near the Earth`s surface. Ray tracing in the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976 including H{sub 2}O effects, is used to determine relations between the refracted tangent height, the apparent tangent height resulting from observation at the sensor, and the angle through which the detected rays have deviated. Analytic fits of the ray deviation as a function of apparent tangent height allows quick determination of corrections needed for a space-borne sensor. Using those results that apply in the plane of incidence and using the necessary coordinate rotations, alterations in the star`s apparent right ascension and declination are evaluated to improve the aim. Examples illustrate that alterations can be larger than one degree, with effects lasting up to a few minutes.

  6. Study of tip loss corrections using CFD rotor computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    Tip loss correction is known to play an important role for engineering prediction of wind turbine performance. There are two different types of tip loss corrections: tip corrections on momentum theory and tip corrections on airfoil data. In this paper, we study the latter using detailed CFD...... computations for wind turbines with sharp tip. Using the technique of determination of angle of attack and the CFD results for a NordTank 500 kW rotor, airfoil data are extracted and a new tip loss function on airfoil data is derived. To validate, BEM computations with the new tip loss function are carried out...... and compared with CFD results for the NordTank 500 kW turbine and the NREL 5 MW turbine. Comparisons show that BEM with the new tip loss function can predict correctly the loading near the blade tip....

  7. A New Geometrical Correction Method for Inaccessible Area Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee Hong-shik; Park Jun-ku; Lim Sam-sung

    2003-01-01

    The geometric correction of a satellite imagery is performed by making a systematic correction with satellite ephemerides and attitude angles followed by employing the Ground Control Points (GCPs) or Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). In a remote area or an inaccessible area, however,GCPs are unavailable to be surveyed and thus they can be obtained only by reading maps, which is not accurate in reality.In this study, we performed the systematic correction process to the inaccessible area and the precise geometric correction process to the adjacent accessible area by using GCPs. Then we analyzed the correlation between the two geo-referenced Korea Multipurpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1 EOC) images. A new geometrical correction for the inaccessible area imagery is achieved by applying the correlation to the inaccessible imagery. By employing this new method, the accuracy of the inaccessible area imagery is significantly improved absolutely and relatively.

  8. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  9. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  10. Corrections for collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1953-01-01

    In the ”Directions and Hints” for collaborators in Flora Malesiana, which has been forwarded to all collaborators, two corrections should be made, viz: 1) p. 12; Omit the explanatory notes under Jamaica Plain, Mass., and Cambridge, Mass. 2) p. 13; Add as number 12a; Stockholm, Paleobotaniska Avdelni

  11. ERRORS AND CORRECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    To err is human . Since the 1960s, most second language teachers or language theorists have regarded errors as natural and inevitable in the language learning process . Instead of regarding them as terrible and disappointing, teachers have come to realize their value. This paper will consider these values, analyze some errors and propose some effective correction techniques.

  12. General forecasting correcting formula

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A general forecasting correcting formula, as a framework for long-use and standardized forecasts, is created. The formula provides new forecasting resources and new possibilities for expansion of forecasting including economic forecasting into the areas of municipal needs, middle-size and small-size business and, even, to individual forecasting.

  13. Renormalons and Power Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Even for short-distance dominated observables the QCD perturbation expansion is never complete. The divergence of the expansion through infrared renormalons provides formal evidence of this fact. In this article we review how this apparent failure can be turned into a useful tool to investigate power corrections to hard processes in QCD.

  14. Detecting and Correcting Speech Rhythm Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtbasi, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Every language has its own rhythm. Unlike many other languages in the world, English depends on the correct pronunciation of stressed and unstressed or weakened syllables recurring in the same phrase or sentence. Mastering the rhythm of English makes speaking more effective. Experiments have shown that we tend to hear speech as more rhythmical…

  15. Relativistic corrections to molecular dynamic dipole polarizabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirpekar, Sheela; Oddershede, Jens; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    1995-01-01

    Cauchy moments, obtained from fitting the dispersion of the calculated corrections as a function of ω2. The frequency dependence of the nonrelativistic polarizability is most pronounced at the correlated level, mainly due to lower excitation energies in the multiconfigurational calculations than those...

  16. Optics Corrections with LOCO in the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Cheng-Yang [Fermilab; Prost, Lionel [Fermilab; Seiya, Kiyomi [Fermilab; Triplett, A. Kent [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    The optics of the Fermilab Booster has been corrected with LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). However, the first corrections did not show any improvement in capture efficiency at injection. A detailed analysis of the results showed that the problem lay in the MADX optics file. Both the quadrupole and chromatic strengths were originally set as constants independent of beam energy. However, careful comparison between the measured and calculated tunes and chromatcity show that these strengths are energy dependent. After the MADX model was modified with these new energy dependent strengths, the LOCO corrected lattice has been applied to Booster. The effect of the corrected lattice will be discussed here.

  17. Theta angle in holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvinen, Matti

    2016-01-01

    V-QCD is a class of effective holographic models for QCD which fully includes the backreaction of quarks to gluon dynamics. The physics of the theta-angle and the axial anomaly can be consistently included in these models. We analyze their phase diagrams over ranges of values of the quark mass, N_f/N_c, and theta, computing observables such as the topological susceptibility and the meson masses. At small quark mass, where effective chiral Lagrangians are reliable, they agree with the predictions of V-QCD.

  18. Small angle scattering and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, J.P. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) - Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-12-31

    The determination of polymer structure is a problem of interest for both statistical physics and industrial applications. The average polymer structure is defined. Then, it is shown why small angle scattering, associated with isotopic substitution, is very well suited to the measurement of the chain conformation. The corresponding example is the old, but pedagogic, measurement of the chain form factor in the polymer melt. The powerful contrast variation method is illustrated by a recent determination of the concentration profile of a polymer interface. (author) 12 figs., 48 refs.

  19. A basic study on variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals for lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, development of wearable motion measurement system using inertial sensors has been focused with the aim of rehabilitation support. For measurement of lower limb joint angles with inertial sensors, Kalman-filtering-based angle measurement method was developed. However, it was required to reduce variation of measurement errors that depended on movement speeds or subjects. In this report, variable-gain Kalman filter based on the difference between the estimated angle by the Kalman filter and the angle calculated from acceleration signals was tested. From angle measurement during treadmill walking with healthy subjects, it was shown that measurement accuracy of the foot inclination angle was significantly improved with the proposed method compared to the method of fixed parameter value.

  20. Angles-only relative navigation in highly elliptical orbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-jia; CUI Nai-gang

    2010-01-01

    For angles-only relative navigation system only measures line-of-sight information,there are inherent problems in the ability to determine the range between Chaser and Target.Angles-only relative navigation is an at tractive alternative for inspecting or rendezvous with noncooperative target,if adequate accuracy can be achieved.Angles-only relative navigation model considering J2 perturbation is presented for tracking and rendezvous with nonco operative target in highly elliptical orbit.Impulsive out-of-plane maneuvers of the Chaser axe used to improve the navigation accuracy.The frrst impulse burns in cross-track directions to change the orbit inclination of the Chaser.The second impulse burns after one orbit period to change the orbit of the Chaser back.The simulation results show that the relative navigation system without maneuvers can' t correct the initial state errors,while impulsive out-of plane maneuvers of the Chaser improves the navigation accuracy.Angles-only relative navigation with chaser vehicle maneuvers to improve observability is effective when the spacecrafts are in highly elliptical orbits.

  1. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Gersabeck, M

    2009-01-01

    The precise measurement of the CKM unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ is a key goal of the LHCb physics programme. The uncertainty on $\\gamma$, the currently least-well known of the three angles, will be reduced dramatically. Complementary measurements will be made in tree-level processes, and modes where loop diagrams play an important role. The tree-level measurements will cover time-integrated as well as time- dependent measurements in both the $B^0_d$ and the $B^0_s$ sectors. The ensemble of these measurements will provide a powerful test of whether new physics phases contribute to heavy-flavour transitions.

  2. Static contact angle in lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latva-Kokko, M; Rothman, Daniel H

    2005-10-01

    We study numerically the capillary rise between two horizontal plates and in a rectangular tube, using a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. We derive an equation for the static fluid-solid contact angle as a function of the wetting tendency of the walls and test its validity. We show that the generalized Laplace law with two independent radii of curvature is followed in capillary rise in rectangular tubes. Our method removes the history dependence of the fluid-solid contact angle that had been present in earlier LB schemes.

  3. Angle of Arrival Detection with Fifth Order Phase Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Khmou, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a fifth order propagator operators are proposed for estimating the Angles Of Arrival (AOA) of narrowband electromagnetic waves impinging on antenna array when its number of sensors is la