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Sample records for angiosperm radiation revisited

  1. The angiosperm radiation revisited, an ecological explanation for Darwin's 'abominable mystery'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendse, Frank; Scheffer, Marten

    2009-09-01

    One of the greatest terrestrial radiations is the diversification of the flowering plants (Angiospermae) in the Cretaceous period. Early angiosperms appear to have been limited to disturbed, aquatic or extremely dry sites, suggesting that they were suppressed in most other places by the gymnosperms that still dominated the plant world. However, fossil evidence suggests that by the end of the Cretaceous the angiosperms had spectacularly taken over the dominant position from the gymnosperms around the globe. Here, we suggest an ecological explanation for their escape from their subordinate position relative to gymnosperms and ferns. We propose that angiosperms due to their higher growth rates profit more rapidly from increased nutrient supply than gymnosperms, whereas at the same time angiosperms promote soil nutrient release by producing litter that is more easily decomposed. This positive feedback may have resulted in a runaway process once angiosperms had reached a certain abundance. Evidence for the possibility of such a critical transition to angiosperm dominance comes from recent work on large scale vegetation shifts, linking long-term field observations, large scale experiments and the use of simulation models.

  2. The angiosperm radiation revisited, an ecological explanation for Darwin's 'abominable mystery'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Scheffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest terrestrial radiations is the diversification of the flowering plants (Angiospermae) in the Cretaceous period. Early angiosperms appear to have been limited to disturbed, aquatic or extremely dry sites, suggesting that they were suppressed in most other places by the gymnosperms

  3. Leaf evolution in Southern Hemisphere conifers tracks the angiosperm ecological radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Biffin, Ed; Brodribb, Timothy J.; Hill, Robert S.; Thomas, Philip; Lowe, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The angiosperm radiation has been linked to sharp declines in gymnosperm diversity and the virtual elimination of conifers from the tropics. The conifer family Podocarpaceae stands as an exception with highest species diversity in wet equatorial forests. It has been hypothesized that efficient light harvesting by the highly flattened leaves of several podocarp genera facilitates persistence with canopy-forming angiosperms, and the angiosperm ecological radiation may have preferentially favour...

  4. Nested radiations and the pulse of angiosperm diversification: increased diversification rates often follow whole genome duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, David C; Eastman, Jonathan M; Pennell, Matthew W; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Hinchliff, Cody E; Brown, Joseph W; Sessa, Emily B; Harmon, Luke J

    2015-07-01

    Our growing understanding of the plant tree of life provides a novel opportunity to uncover the major drivers of angiosperm diversity. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny, we characterized hot and cold spots of lineage diversification across the angiosperm tree of life by modeling evolutionary diversification using stepwise AIC (MEDUSA). We also tested the whole-genome duplication (WGD) radiation lag-time model, which postulates that increases in diversification tend to lag behind established WGD events. Diversification rates have been incredibly heterogeneous throughout the evolutionary history of angiosperms and reveal a pattern of 'nested radiations' - increases in net diversification nested within other radiations. This pattern in turn generates a negative relationship between clade age and diversity across both families and orders. We suggest that stochastically changing diversification rates across the phylogeny explain these patterns. Finally, we demonstrate significant statistical support for the WGD radiation lag-time model. Across angiosperms, nested shifts in diversification led to an overall increasing rate of net diversification and declining relative extinction rates through time. These diversification shifts are only rarely perfectly associated with WGD events, but commonly follow them after a lag period.

  5. Radiative Ke3 decays revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gasser, J; Paver, N; Verbeni, M

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental results and ongoing measurements, we review the chiral perturbation theory prediction for radiative Ke3 decays (neutral kaons). Special emphasis is given on the stability of the inner bremsstrahlung-dominated relative branching ratio vs. the Ke3 form factors, and on the separation of the structure dependent amplitude in differential distributions over the phase space. For the structure dependent terms, an assessment of the order p^6 corrections is given. In particular, a full next-to-leading order calculation of the axial component is performed. The experimental analysis of the photon energy spectrum is discussed, and other potentially useful distributions are introduced.

  6. Putting scales into evolutionary time: the divergence of major scale insect lineages (Hemiptera) predates the radiation of modern angiosperm hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vea, Isabelle M; Grimaldi, David A

    2016-01-01

    The radiation of flowering plants in the mid-Cretaceous transformed landscapes and is widely believed to have fuelled the radiations of major groups of phytophagous insects. An excellent group to test this assertion is the scale insects (Coccomorpha: Hemiptera), with some 8,000 described Recent species and probably the most diverse fossil record of any phytophagous insect group preserved in amber. We used here a total-evidence approach (by tip-dating) employing 174 morphological characters of 73 Recent and 43 fossil taxa (48 families) and DNA sequences of three gene regions, to obtain divergence time estimates and compare the chronology of the most diverse lineage of scale insects, the neococcoid families, with the timing of the main angiosperm radiation. An estimated origin of the Coccomorpha occurred at the beginning of the Triassic, about 245 Ma [228-273], and of the neococcoids 60 million years later [210-165 Ma]. A total-evidence approach allows the integration of extinct scale insects into a phylogenetic framework, resulting in slightly younger median estimates than analyses using Recent taxa, calibrated with fossil ages only. From these estimates, we hypothesise that most major lineages of coccoids shifted from gymnosperms onto angiosperms when the latter became diverse and abundant in the mid- to Late Cretaceous.

  7. Radiative Corrections to Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, A B; Kalinovskaya, L V

    2005-01-01

    Radiative corrections to neutrino deep inelastic scattering are revisited. One-loop electroweak corrections are re-calculated within the automatic SANC system. Terms with mass singularities are treated including higher order leading logarithmic corrections. Scheme dependence of corrections due to weak interactions is investigated. The results are implemented into the data analysis of the NOMAD experiment. The present theoretical accuracy in description of the process is discussed.

  8. Early evolution of angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ While many characters have been used to define the nature of the angiosperms in living plants, the list must be reduced to a single character that can be found in the fossil record in order to proceed with our search for the earliest flowering plants.

  9. No Information Is Lost: a Revisit of Hawking Radiation as Tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Baocheng; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

    2009-01-01

    We revisit in detail the paradox of black hole information loss due to Hawking radiation as tunneling. We compute the amount of information encoded in correlations among Hawking radiations for a variety of black holes, including the Schwarzchild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole, the Kerr black hole, and the Kerr-Newman black hole. The special cases of tunneling through a quantum horizon and geometrically non-commutative black holes are also considered. Within a phenomenological treatment based on the accepted emission probability spectrum from a black hole, we find that information is leaked out hidden in the correlations of Hawking radiation. The recovery of this previously unaccounted for information helps to conserve the total entropy of a system composed of a black hole plus its radiations. We thus conclude, irrespective of the microscopic picture for black hole collapsing, the associated radiation process: Hawking radiation as tunneling, must be a unitary process.

  10. Radiative corrections to real and virtual muon Compton scattering revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N. [Physik-Department T39, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: nkaiser@ph.tum.de

    2010-06-01

    We calculate in closed analytical form the one-photon loop radiative corrections to muon Compton scattering {mu}{sup -}{gamma}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{gamma}. Ultraviolet and infrared divergences are both treated in dimensional regularization. Infrared finiteness of the (virtual) radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy cut-off {lambda}. We find that the anomalous magnetic moment {alpha}/2{pi} provides only a very small portion of the full radiative corrections. Furthermore, we extend our calculation of radiative corrections to the muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung process (or virtual muon Compton scattering {mu}{sup -}{gamma}{sub 0}*{yields}{mu}{sup -}{gamma}). These results are particularly relevant for analyzing the COMPASS experiment at CERN in which muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung serves to calibrate the Primakoff scattering of high-energy pions off a heavy nucleus with the aim of measuring the pion electric and magnetic polarizabilities. We find agreement with an earlier calculation of these radiative corrections based on a different method.

  11. Evolution of angiosperm seed disperser mutualisms: the timing of origins and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions between angiosperms and frugivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ove

    2016-02-01

    The origins of interactions between angiosperms and fruit-eating seed dispersers have attracted much attention following a seminal paper on this topic by Tiffney (1984). This review synthesizes evidence pertaining to key events during the evolution of angiosperm-frugivore interactions and suggests some implications of this evidence for interpretations of angiosperm-frugivore coevolution. The most important conclusions are: (i) the diversification of angiosperm seed size and fleshy fruits commenced around 80 million years ago (Mya). The diversity of seed sizes, fruit sizes and fruit types peaked in the Eocene around 55 to 50 Mya. During this first phase of the interaction, angiosperms and animals evolving frugivory expanded into niche space not previously utilized by these groups, as frugivores and previously not existing fruit traits appeared. From the Eocene until the present, angiosperm-frugivore interactions have occurred within a broad frame of existing niche space, as defined by fruit traits and frugivory, motivating a separation of the angiosperm-frugivore interactions into two phases, before and after the peak in the early Eocene. (ii) The extinct multituberculates were probably the most important frugivores during the early radiation phase of angiosperm seeds and fleshy fruits. Primates and rodents are likely to have been important in the latter part of this first phase. (iii) Flying frugivores, birds and bats, evolved during the second phase, mainly during the Oligocene and Miocene, thus exploiting an existing diversity of fleshy fruits. (iv) A drastic climate shift around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (around 34 Mya) resulted in more semi-open woodland vegetation, creating patchily occurring food resources for frugivores. This promoted evolution of a 'flying frugivore niche' exploited by birds and bats. In particular, passerines became a dominant frugivore group worldwide. (v) Fleshy fruits evolved at numerous occasions in many angiosperm families

  12. Low-level radiation exposures: time to revisit linear no-threshold concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concepts of LNT (Linear No-Threshold) and the resulting ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) used for radiological protection have been stumbling blocks for public acceptability of nuclear power. Often, public get confused and easily get exploited by interested people. The application of this concept has perhaps resulted in a more harmful phenomenon now known as 'radiophobia'. Over the years, LNT has become the corner stone of radiation protection philosophy for the international organizations like ICRP, UNSCEAR etc. which is followed by all national regulators. The genesis of these theories is the cellular level findings of half a century back. Most of these are findings at high dose levels in macro systems and extrapolated to low dose. It is time that international radiation safety organizations revisit the assumptions and have a more pragmatic approach towards these abstract concepts in the light of new findings. The article reviews the evolution of LNT hypothesis and the basis for LNT, examines the possibility that there might be a threshold dose, below which there would be no radiation-related cancer risk. Evidences against LNT and the possible existence of a threshold dose are reviewed. The article concludes that this is definitely time to have a re-look of the corner stone concepts in radiation protection philosophy. (author)

  13. Schmeissneria: An angiosperm from the Early Jurassic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WANG

    2010-01-01

    The origin of angiosperms has been a focus of intensive research for a long time. The so-called preCretaceous angiosperms, including Schmeissneria, are usually clouded with doubt. To expel the cloud around the enigmatic Schmeissneria, the syntype and new materials of Schmeissneria collected previously in Germany and recently in China are studied. These materials include female inflorescences and infructescences. The latter are old materials but were under-studied previously. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscope observations indicate that the fruits in these infructescences have in situ seeds enclosed, and that the ovaries are closed before pollination. Thus the plants meet two strict criteria for angiosperms: angiospermy plus angio-ovuly. Placing Schmeissneria in angiosperms will extend the record of angiosperms up to the Early Jurassic, more compatible with many molecular dating conclusions on the age of angiosperms, and demanding a reassessment of the current doctrines on the origin of angiosperms. Although the phylogenetic relationship of Schmeissneria to other angiosperms apparently is still an open question, this study adds to research concerning the origin of angiosperms.

  14. Exceptional preservation of tiny embryos documents seed dormancy in early angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Else Marie; Crane, Peter R; Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard; Stampanoni, Marco; Marone, Federica

    2015-12-24

    The rapid diversification of angiosperms through the Early Cretaceous period, between about 130-100 million years ago, initiated fundamental changes in the composition of terrestrial vegetation and is increasingly well understood on the basis of a wealth of palaeobotanical discoveries over the past four decades and their integration with improved knowledge of living angiosperms. Prevailing hypotheses, based on evidence both from living and from fossil plants, emphasize that the earliest angiosperms were plants of small stature with rapid life cycles that exploited disturbed habitats in open, or perhaps understorey, conditions. However, direct palaeontogical data relevant to understanding the seed biology and germination ecology of Early Cretaceous angiosperms are sparse. Here we report the discovery of embryos and their associated nutrient storage tissues in exceptionally well-preserved angiosperm seeds from the Early Cretaceous. Synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy of the fossil embryos from many taxa reveals that all were tiny at the time of dispersal. These results support hypotheses based on extant plants that tiny embryos and seed dormancy are basic for angiosperms as a whole. The minute size of the fossil embryos, and the modest nutrient storage tissues dictated by the overall small seed size, is also consistent with the interpretation that many early angiosperms were opportunistic, early successional colonizers of disturbance-prone habitats.

  15. The Early Flowers and Angiosperm Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Else Marie; Crane, P.R.; Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard

    The recent discovery of diverse fossil flowers and floral organs in Cretaceous strata has revealed astonishing details about the structural and systematic diversity of early angiosperms. Exploring the rich fossil record that has accumulated over the last three decades, this is a unique study...... based on research into Early and Late Cretaceous fossil floras from Europe and North America, the authors draw on direct palaeontological evidence of the pattern of angiosperm evolution through time. Synthesising palaeobotanical data with information from living plants, this unique book explores...... the latest research in the field, highlighting connections with phylogenetic systematics, structure and the biology of extant angiosperms....

  16. A combinatorial morphospace for angiosperm pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Luke

    2016-04-01

    The morphology of angiosperm (flowering plant) pollen is extraordinarily diverse. This diversity results from variations in the morphology of discrete anatomical components. These components include the overall shape of a pollen grain, the stratification of the exine, the number and form of any apertures, the type of dispersal unit, and the nature of any surface ornamentation. Different angiosperm pollen morphotypes reflect different combinations of these discrete components. In this talk, I ask the following question: given the anatomical components of angiosperm pollen that are known to exist in the plant kingdom, how many unique biologically plausible combinations of these components are there? I explore this question from the perspective of enumerative combinatorics using an algorithm I have written in the Python programming language. This algorithm (1) calculates the number of combinations of these components; (2) enumerates those combinations; and (3) graphically displays those combinations. The result is a combinatorial morphospace that reflects an underlying notion that the process of morphogenesis in angiosperm pollen can be thought of as an n choose k counting problem. I compare the morphology of extant and fossil angiosperm pollen grains to this morphospace, and suggest that from a combinatorial point of view angiosperm pollen is not as diverse as it could be, which may be a result of developmental constraints.

  17. Solar radiation trend across China in recent decades: a revisit with quality-controlled data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-J. Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is one of the most important factors affecting climate and environment, and its long-term variation is of much concern in climate change studies. In the light of the limited number of radiation stations with reliable long-term time series observations, this paper presents a new evaluation of the long-term variation of surface solar radiation over China by combining quality-controlled observed data and two radiation models. One is the ANN-based (Artificial Neutral Network model and the other is a physical model. The two models produce radiation trends comparable to the observed ones at a few validation stations possessing reliable and continuous data. Then, the trend estimate is extended by the ANN-based model to all 96 radiation stations and furthermore extended by the physical model to all 716 China Meteorological Administration (CMA routine stations. The new trend estimate is different from previous ones in two aspects. First, the magnitude of solar radiation over China decreased by about −0.23 W m−2 yr−1 between 1961 and 2000, which is greatly less in magnitude than trend slopes estimated in previous studies (ranging over −0.41 ~ −0.52 W m−2 yr−1. Second, the "From Dimming to Brightening" transition in China during the late 1980s ~ the early 1990s was addressed in previous studies, but this study indicates the solar radiation reached a stable level since the 1990s and the transition is not noticeable. These differences indicate the importance of data-quality control and analysis approaches. Finally, an obvious transition from brightening to dimming around 1978 is found over the Tibetan Plateau, where aerosol loads are very low, indicating that the importance of cloud changes in altering solar radiation may be comparable to that of the aerosol changes.

  18. Solar radiation trend across China in recent decades: a revisit with quality-controlled data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-J. Tang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is one of the most important factors affecting climate and environment, and its long-term variation is of much concern in climate change studies. In the light of the limited number of radiation stations with reliable long-term time series observations, this paper presents a new evaluation of the long-term variation of surface solar radiation over China by combining quality-controlled observed data and two radiation models. One is the ANN-based (Artificial Neutral Network model and the other is a physical one. The two models produced radiation trends comparable to the observed ones at a few stations possessing reliable and continuous data. Then, the trend estimation is extended by the ANN-based model to all 96 radiation stations and furthermore extended by the physical model to all 716 China Meteorological Administration (CMA routine stations. The new estimate trend is different from previous ones in two aspects. First, the magnitude of solar radiation over China decreased by about −0.19 W m−2 yr−1 between 1961 and 2000, which is greatly less in magnitude than trends estimated in previous studies (ranging over −0.41 to −0.52 W m−2 yr−1. Second, the "From Dimming to Brightening" transition in China during the late 1980s and the early 1990s was addressed in previous studies, but this study indicates the solar radiation reached a stable level since the 1990s and the transition is not noticeable. These differences are attributed to inappropriate data and approaches in previous studies.

  19. Classical Zero-Point Radiation and Relativity: The Problem of Atomic Collapse Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2016-07-01

    The physicists of the early twentieth century were unaware of two aspects which are vital to understanding some aspects of modern physics within classical theory. The two aspects are: (1) the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and (2) the importance of special relativity. In classes in modern physics today, the problem of atomic collapse is still mentioned in the historical context of the early twentieth century. However, the classical problem of atomic collapse is currently being treated in the presence of classical zero-point radiation where the problem has been transformed. The presence of classical zero-point radiation indeed keeps the electron from falling into the Coulomb potential center. However, the old collapse problem has been replaced by a new problem where the zero-point radiation may give too much energy to the electron so as to cause "self-ionization." Special relativity may play a role in understanding this modern variation on the atomic collapse problem, just as relativity has proved crucial for a classical understanding of blackbody radiation.

  20. The leaded apron revisited: does it reduce gonadal radiation dose in dental radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.E.; Harris, A.M.; van der Merwe, E.J.; Nortje, C.J. (Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic human phantom was used with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry system to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose to the ovarian and testicular region during dental radiologic procedures. Measurements were made with and without personal lead shielding devices consisting of thyroid collar and apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalence. The radiation absorbed dose with or without lead shielding did not differ significantly from control dosimeters in vertex occlusal and periapical views (p greater than 0.05). Personal lead shielding devices did reduce gonadal dose in the case of accidental exposure (p less than 0.05). A leaded apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalent was permeable to radiation in direct exposure testing.

  1. Formation and development of sperms in angiosperms

    OpenAIRE

    S. Tatintseva

    2014-01-01

    Spermiogelnesis has been studied in a large number of Angiosperm species characterizing different levels of phylogenetic system. The formation and development of male gamets can be described as formation of sperm cells that undergo ontogenesis which stimulates changes up to full maturity of the pollen grain. The process of ontogenesis is aimed at creating a suitable delivery system by the pollen tube to a female gamete.

  2. Revisiting radiative deep-level transitions in CuGaSe2 by photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Conrad; Regesch, David; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Recent defect calculations suggest that the open circuit voltage of CuGaSe2 solar cells can be limited by deep intrinsic electron traps by GaCu antisites and their complexes with Cu-vacancies. To gain experimental evidence, two radiative defect transitions at 1.10 eV and 1.24 eV are characterized by steady-state photoluminescence on epitaxial-grown CuGaSe2 thin films. Cu-rich samples are studied, since they show highest crystal quality, exciton luminescence, and no potential fluctuations. Variations of the laser intensity and temperature dependent measurements suggest that emission occurs from two deep donor-like levels into the same shallow acceptor. At 10 K, power-law exponents of 1 (low excitation regime) and 1/2 (high excitation regime) are observed identically for both transitions. The theory and a fitting function for the double power law is derived. It is concluded that the acceptor becomes saturated by excess carriers which changes the exponent of all transitions. Activation energies determined from the temperature quenching depend on the excitation level and show unexpected values of 600 meV and higher. The thermal activation of non-radiative processes can explain the distortion of the ionization energies. Both the deep levels play a major role as radiative and non-radiative recombination centers for electrons and can be detrimental for photovoltaic applications.

  3. Impact of Stromal Sensitivity on Radiation Response of Tumors Implanted in SCID Hosts Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barros, Mónica; Thin, Tin Htwe; Maj, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice carry a germ-line mutation in DNA-PK, associated with deficiency in recognition and repair DNA double strand breaks. Thus, SCID cells and tissues display increased sensitivity to radiation-induced post-mitotic (clonogenic) cell death. Nonetheless, the single radiation doses required for 50% permanent local control (TCD50) of tumors implanted in SCID mice are not significantly different from the TCD50 values of the same tumors in wild-type hosts. Whereas the tumor stroma is derived from the host, the observation that tumors implanted in SCID mice do not exhibit hypersensitivity to radiation might imply that stromal endothelial elements do not contribute substantially to tumor cure by ionizing radiation. Here we challenge this notion, testing the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-mediated endothelial apoptosis, which results from plasma membrane alterations, not DNA damage, is a crucial element in the cure of tumors in SCID mice by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). We show that endothelium in MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16 melanomas exhibit a wild-type apoptotic phenotype in SCID hosts, abrogated in tumors in SCIDasmase−/− littermates, which also acquire resistance to SDRT. Conversion into a radioresistant tumor phenotype when implanted in SCIDasmase−/− hosts provides compelling evidence that cell membrane ASMase-mediated microvascular dysfunction, rather than DNA damage-mediated endothelial clonogenic lethality, plays a mandatory role in the complex pathophysiologic mechanism of tumor cure by SDRT, and provides an explanation for the wild-type SDRT responses reported in tumors implanted in SCID mice. PMID:20924105

  4. An Undercover Angiosperm from the Jurassic of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shaolin; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Searching for early angiosperms is a riveting activity in botany because it helps to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among seed plants and among angiosperms themselves.One of the challenges for this job is what the target fossils look like.Most possibly early angiosperms may elude our scrutiny with gymnospermous appearances.This possibility becomes a reality in a Jurassic plant,Solaranthus gen.nov,which bears a peltaspermalean appearance and enclosed ovules.According to knowledge available hitherto,the latter feature makes it an angiosperm.However,such a feature is more likely to be eclipsed by its gymnospermous appearance.The early age and unexpected character assemblage of Solaranthus urge for a fresh look on the assumed-simple relationship between angiosperms and gymnosperms.Its resemblance to the order Peltaspermales favors the Mostly Male Theory.

  5. Design of biomimetic camouflage materials based on angiosperm leaf organs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The micro structures and reflectance spectra of angiosperm leaves were compared with those of angiosperm petals. The study indicated that angiosperm leaf organs had identical micro structures and reflectance characteristics in the wave band of near infrared. Micro structures and compositions of leaf organs were the crucial factors influencing their reflectance spectra. The model of biomimetic materials based on angiosperm leaf organs was introduced and verified. From 300 to 2600 nm, the similarity coefficients of reflectance spectra of the foam containing water and Platanus Orientalis Linn. leaves were all above 0.969. The biomimetic camou- flage material exhibited almost the same reflectance spectra with those of green leaves in ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wave bands. And its "concolor and conspectrum" effect might take on reconnaissance of hyperspectral and ultra hy- perspectral imaging.

  6. Fruit evolution and diversification in campanulid angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Donoghue, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    With increases in both the size and scope of phylogenetic trees, we are afforded a renewed opportunity to address long-standing comparative questions, such as whether particular fruit characters account for much of the variation in diversity among flowering plant clades. Studies to date have reported conflicting results, largely as a consequence of taxonomic scale and a reliance on potentially conservative statistical measures. Here we examine a larger and older angiosperm clade, the Campanulidae, and infer the rates of character transitions among the major fruit types, emphasizing the evolution of the achene fruits that are most frequently observed within the group. Our analyses imply that campanulids likely originated bearing capsules, and that all subsequent fruit diversity was derived from various modifications of this dry fruit type. We also found that the preponderance of lineages bearing achenes is a consequence of not only being a fruit type that is somewhat irreversible once it evolves, but one that also seems to have a positive association with diversification rates. Although these results imply the achene fruit type is a significant correlate of diversity patterns observed across campanulids, we conclude that it remains difficult to confidently and directly view this character state as the actual cause of increased diversification rates.

  7. Plant Sterol Diversity in Pollen from Angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, Claire; Berna, Anne; Compagnon, Vincent; Schaller, Hubert

    2015-08-01

    Here we have examined the composition of free sterols and steryl esters of pollen from selected angiosperm species, as a first step towards a comprehensive analysis of sterol biogenesis in the male gametophyte. We detected four major sterol structural groups: cycloartenol derivatives bearing a 9β,19-cyclopropyl group, sterols with a double bond at C-7(8), sterols with a double bond at C-5(6), and stanols. All these groups were unequally distributed among species. However, the distribution of sterols as free sterols or as steryl esters in pollen grains indicated that free sterols were mostly Δ(5)-sterols and that steryl esters were predominantly 9β,19-cyclopropyl sterols. In order to link the sterol composition of a pollen grain at anthesis with the requirement for membrane lipid constituents of the pollen tube, we germinated pollen grains from Nicotiana tabacum, a model plant in reproductive biology. In the presence of radiolabelled mevalonic acid and in a time course series of measurements, we showed that cycloeucalenol was identified as the major neosynthesized sterol. Furthermore, the inhibition of cycloeucalenol neosynthesis by squalestatin was in full agreement with a de novo biogenesis and an apparent truncated pathway in the pollen tube.

  8. Herbaceous Angiosperms Are Not More Vulnerable to Drought-Induced Embolism Than Angiosperm Trees1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Chloé E.L.; Buttler, Alexandre; Chauvin, Thibaud; Doria, Larissa Chacon; del Arco, Marcelino

    2016-01-01

    The water transport pipeline in herbs is assumed to be more vulnerable to drought than in trees due to the formation of frequent embolisms (gas bubbles), which could be removed by the occurrence of root pressure, especially in grasses. Here, we studied hydraulic failure in herbaceous angiosperms by measuring the pressure inducing 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (P50) in stems of 26 species, mainly European grasses (Poaceae). Our measurements show a large range in P50 from −0.5 to −7.5 MPa, which overlaps with 94% of the woody angiosperm species in a worldwide, published data set and which strongly correlates with an aridity index. Moreover, the P50 values obtained were substantially more negative than the midday water potentials for five grass species monitored throughout the entire growing season, suggesting that embolism formation and repair are not routine and mainly occur under water deficits. These results show that both herbs and trees share the ability to withstand very negative water potentials without considerable embolism formation in their xylem conduits during drought stress. In addition, structure-function trade-offs in grass stems reveal that more resistant species are more lignified, which was confirmed for herbaceous and closely related woody species of the daisy group (Asteraceae). Our findings could imply that herbs with more lignified stems will become more abundant in future grasslands under more frequent and severe droughts, potentially resulting in lower forage digestibility. PMID:27268961

  9. Angiosperm phylogeny inferred from sequences of four mitochondrial genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long QIU; Zhi-Duan CHEN; Libo LI; Bin WANG; Jia-Yu XUE; Tory A. HENDRY; Rui-Qi LI; Joseph W. BROWN; Yang LIU; Geordan T. HUDSON

    2010-01-01

    An angiosperm phylogeny was reconstructed in a maximum likelihood analysis of sequences of four mitochondrial genes, atpl, matR, had5, and rps3, from 380 species that represent 376 genera and 296 families of seed plants. It is largely congruent with the phylogeny of angiosperms reconstructed from chloroplast genes atpB, matK, and rbcL, and nuclear 18S rDNA. The basalmost lineage consists of Amborella and Nymphaeales (including Hydatellaceae). Austrobaileyales follow this clade and are sister to the mesangiosperms, which include Chloranthaceae, Ceratophyllum, magnoliids, monocots, and eudicots. With the exception of Chloranthaceae being sister to Ceratophyllum, relationships among these five lineages are not well supported. In eudicots, Ranunculales, Sabiales, Proteales, Trochodendrales, Buxales, Gunnerales, Saxifragales, Vitales, Berberidopsidales, and Dilleniales form a basal grade of lines that diverged before the diversification of rosids and asterids. Within rosids, the COM (Celastrales-Oxalidales-Malpighiales) clade is sister to malvids (or rosid Ⅱ), instead of to the nitrogen-fixing clade as found in all previous large-scale molecular analyses of angiosperms. Santalales and Caryophyllales are members of an expanded asterid clade. This study shows that the mitochondrial genes are informative markers for resolving relationships among genera, families, or higher rank taxa across angiosperms. The low substitution rates and low homoplasy levels of the mitochondrial genes relative to the chloroplast genes, as found in this study, make them particularly useful for reconstructing ancient phylogenetic relationships. A mitochondrial gene-based angiosperm phylogeny provides an independent and essential reference for comparison with hypotheses of angiosperm phylogeny based on chloroplast genes, nuclear genes, and non-molecular data to reconstruct the underlying organismal phylogeny.

  10. Recalibrated tree of leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae indicates independent diversification of angiosperms and their insect herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Gómez-Zurita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The great diversity of the "Phytophaga" (weevils, longhorn beetles and leaf beetles has been attributed to their co-radiation with the angiosperms based on matching age estimates for both groups, but phylogenetic information and molecular clock calibrations remain insufficient for this conclusion. METHODOLOGY: A phylogenetic analysis of the leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae was conducted based on three partial ribosomal gene markers (mitochondrial rrnL, nuclear small and large subunit rRNA including over 3000 bp for 167 taxa representing most major chrysomelid lineages and outgroups. Molecular clock calibrations and confidence intervals were based on paleontological data from the oldest (K-T boundary leaf beetle fossil, ancient feeding traces ascribed to hispoid Cassidinae, and the vicariant split of Nearctic and Palearctic members of the Timarchini. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The origin of the Chrysomelidae was dated to 73-79 Mya (confidence interval 63-86 Mya, and most subfamilies were post-Cretaceous, consistent with the ages of all confirmed body fossils. Two major monocot feeding chrysomelid lineages formed widely separated clades, demonstrating independent colonization of this ancient (early Cretaceous angiosperm lineage. CONCLUSIONS: Previous calibrations proposing a much older origin of Chrysomelidae were not supported. Therefore, chrysomelid beetles likely radiated long after the origin of their host lineages and their diversification was driven by repeated radiaton on a pre-existing diverse resource, rather than ancient host associations.

  11. STUDY OF AQUATIC ANGIOSPERMIC PLANTS OF ANAND CITY, GUJARAT, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. PATEL1 AND N. K. PATEL2

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the taxonomic study of Aquatic Angiosperms growing throughout the Anand city. The plants are listed along with their brief taxonomic account of each species with current nomenclature, vernacular name, family and uses. The  collected plants are systematically observed during present work, During my study I observed various aquatic angiospermic plants such as   Ceratophyllum demersum, Colocasia esculenta, Eichhornia crassipes, Ipomoea aquatica, Nymphoides indicum, Ludwigia repens, Polygonum orientale, Typha elephantina, Lemna perpusilla, Spirodella polyrrhiza, Xanthium indicum, Phyllanthus reticulatus, Cynodon dactylon, Hydrilla verticillata were very common. Whereas Nymphaea nouchali, Polygonum barbatum, Scirpus articulatus were very rare in the study area.

  12. Lower Cretaceous angiosperm leaf from Wuhe in Anhui, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new early angiosperm leaf species is reported from the Xinzhuang Formation in Wuhe County, Anhui Province. It is probably of Barremian or slightly later in geological age. The fossil leaf is small, no more than 0.6 cm both in length and in width. The leaf veins are well preserved and clearly visible under a low power microscope. Leaf architectural analysis shows that such a leaf should belong to the first leaf rank of Hickey, I.e. The most primitive one. There are no early angiosperm leaves published completely similar to ours. A new species name of Dicotylophyllum minutissimum sp. Nov. Is established for the present leaf fossils.

  13. Evolutionary aspects of life forms in angiosperm families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, P; VanAndel, J

    1995-01-01

    The distribution patterns of life forms among extant families, subclasses and classes are described with the aim of detecting evolutionary trends. The explosive diversification of angiosperms constrains the possibilities for detecting such trends. Moreover, the extant groups of seed plants are only

  14. ERBE Wide-Field-of-View Nonscanner Data Reprocessing and revisiting its Radiation dataset from 1985 to 199

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, A. K.; Kato, S.; Wong, T.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Rose, F. G.; Miller, W. F.; Bush, K.; Rutan, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Doelling, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's radiation budget is a fundamental component of the climate system and should reflect the variation in climate. As such, it is critical to know how it has varied over past decades to ensure that climate models are properly representing climate. Broadband shortwave and longwave irradiances were measured by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) wide-field-of-view (WFOV) nonscanner instrument from 1985 to 1998. These WFOV nonscanner instruments were onboard NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and two NOAA's satellites (NOAA-9 and NOAA-10). However, earlier studies showed that the transmissivity of the dome for the WFOV shortwave (SW) nonscanner instrument degraded over time. To account for the degradation, WFOV instruments were calibrated assuming constant spectral degradation (gray assumption). Recent developments from analysis of data from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System project (CERES), which has been measuring the radiation budget since 2000, suggest that transmissivity of shorter wavelength degrades faster. Therefore, a spectrally dependent degradation correction is needed for a better calibration. In addition, accounting for the spectrally dependent degradation may eliminate an additional correction applied to irradiances using a time series of daytime and nighttime longwave irradiance differences. Therefore, we have reprocessed WFOV nonscanner data by characterizing the spectrally dependent degradation of the SW dome transmissivity. Time and spectral dependent degradation of the shortwave filter function is estimated using solar data observed by these instruments during calibration days. Because the spectrum of reflected irradiance depends on scene type, we use Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR-derived cloud properties and surface type over the WFOV footprints in addition to time dependent filter function for the unfiltering process. This poster explains the reprocessing approach and discusses the

  15. The gravitational wave radiation of pulsating white dwarfs revisited: the case of BPM 37093 and PG 1159-035

    CERN Document Server

    García-Berro, E; Corsico, A H; Althaus, L G; Lobo, J A; Isern, J

    2005-01-01

    We compute the emission of gravitational radiation from pulsating white dwarfs. This is done by using an up-to-date stellar evolutionary code coupled with a state-of-the-art pulsational code. The emission of gravitational waves is computed for a standard 0.6 solar masses white dwarf with a liquid carbon-oxygen core and a hydrogen-rich envelope, for a massive DA white dwarf with a partially crystallized core for which various l=2 modes have been observed (BPM 37093) and for PG 1159-035, the prototype of the GW Vir class of variable stars, for which several quadrupole modes have been observed as well. We find that these stars do not radiate sizeable amounts of gravitational waves through their observed pulsation g-modes, in line with previous studies. We also explore the possibility of detecting gravitational waves radiated by the f-mode and the p-modes. We find that in this case the gravitational wave signal is very large and, hence, the modes decay very rapidly. We also discuss the possible implications of ou...

  16. Epiphytic leafy liverworts diversified in angiosperm-dominated forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldberg, Kathrin; Schneider, Harald; Stadler, Tanja; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Schmidt, Alexander R.; Heinrichs, Jochen

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for pulses in the diversification of angiosperms, ferns, gymnosperms, and mosses as well as various groups of animals during the Cretaceous revolution of terrestrial ecosystems. However, evidence for such pulses has not been reported so far for liverworts. Here we provide new insight into liverwort evolution by integrating a comprehensive molecular dataset with a set of 20 fossil age constraints. We found evidence for a relative constant diversification rate of generalistic liverworts (Jungermanniales) since the Palaeozoic, whereas epiphytic liverworts (Porellales) show a sudden increase of lineage accumulation in the Cretaceous. This difference is likely caused by the pronounced response of Porellales to the ecological opportunities provided by humid, megathermal forests, which were increasingly available as a result of the rise of the angiosperms.

  17. Angiosperm polyploids and their road to evolutionary success

    OpenAIRE

    Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Van de Peer, Yves; Jeffrey A, FAWCETT

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of polyploidy among flowering plants has long been recognized, and recent studies have uncovered multiple ancient polyploidization events in the evolutionary history of several angiosperm lineages. Once polyploids are formed they must get locally established and then propagate and survive while adapting to different environments and avoiding extinction. This might ultimately lead to their long-term evolutionary success, where their descendant lineages survive for tens of million...

  18. Revisiting the health effects of psychological stress—its influence on susceptibility to ionizing radiation: a mini-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Begum, Nasrin; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Both psychological stress (PS) and ionizing radiation (IR) cause varied detrimental effects on humans. There has been no direct evidence so far showing PS alone could cause cancer; however, long-lasting PS may affect our overall health and ability to cope with cancer. Due to their living conditions and occupations, some people may encounter concurrent exposure to both PS and IR to a high extent. In addition to possible health effects resulting directly from exposure to IR on these people, fear of IR exposure is also a cause of PS. The question of whether PS would influence susceptibility to IR, radiocarcinogenesis in particular, is of great concern by both the academic world and the public. Recently, investigations using animal PS models demonstrated that PS could modulate susceptibility to IR, causing increased susceptibility to radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous mice, hematological toxicity in peripheral blood and elevated chromosome aberration (dicentrics) frequency in splenocytes of Trp53–wild-type mice. To actively reduce health risk from exposure to IR, further studies are needed to cumulate more evidence and provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the alterations in susceptibility due to PS modulation. This mini-review gives a general overview of the significance of PS effects on humans and experimental animals, with a special focus on summarizing the latest weight-of-evidence approaches to radiobiological studies on PS-induced alterations in susceptibility in experimental animal models. The susceptibility being investigated is mainly in the context of the impact of the modulatory effect of PS on radiocarcinogenesis; we seek to improve understanding of the combined effects of exposure to both PS and IR in order to facilitate, via active intervention, strategies for radiation risk reduction. PMID:27242342

  19. Revisiting the health effects of psychological stress-its influence on susceptibility to ionizing radiation: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Begum, Nasrin; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-07-01

    Both psychological stress (PS) and ionizing radiation (IR) cause varied detrimental effects on humans. There has been no direct evidence so far showing PS alone could cause cancer; however, long-lasting PS may affect our overall health and ability to cope with cancer. Due to their living conditions and occupations, some people may encounter concurrent exposure to both PS and IR to a high extent. In addition to possible health effects resulting directly from exposure to IR on these people, fear of IR exposure is also a cause of PS. The question of whether PS would influence susceptibility to IR, radiocarcinogenesis in particular, is of great concern by both the academic world and the public. Recently, investigations using animal PS models demonstrated that PS could modulate susceptibility to IR, causing increased susceptibility to radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous mice, hematological toxicity in peripheral blood and elevated chromosome aberration (dicentrics) frequency in splenocytes of Trp53-wild-type mice. To actively reduce health risk from exposure to IR, further studies are needed to cumulate more evidence and provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the alterations in susceptibility due to PS modulation. This mini-review gives a general overview of the significance of PS effects on humans and experimental animals, with a special focus on summarizing the latest weight-of-evidence approaches to radiobiological studies on PS-induced alterations in susceptibility in experimental animal models. The susceptibility being investigated is mainly in the context of the impact of the modulatory effect of PS on radiocarcinogenesis; we seek to improve understanding of the combined effects of exposure to both PS and IR in order to facilitate, via active intervention, strategies for radiation risk reduction. PMID:27242342

  20. New universal matK primers for DNA barcoding angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing YU; Jian-Hua XUE; Shi-Liang ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    The chloroplast maturase K gene (matK) is one of the most variable coding genes of angiosperms and has been suggested to be a "barcode" for land plants. However, matK exhibits low amplification and sequencing rates due to low universality of currently available primers and mononucleotide repeats. To resolve these technical problems, we evaluated the entire matK region to find a region of 600-800 bp that is highly variable, represents the best of all matK regions with priming sites conservative enough to design universal primers, and avoids the mononucleotide repeats. After careful evaluation, a region in the middle was chosen and a pair of primers named natK472F and matK1248R was designed to amplify and sequence the matK fragment of approximately 776 bp. This region encompasses the most variable sites, represents the entire matK region best, and also exhibits high amplification rates and quality of sequences. The universality of this primer pair was tested using 58 species from 47 families of angiosperm plants. The primers showed a strong amplification (93.1%) and sequencing (92.6%)successes in the species tested. We propose that the new primers will solve, in part, the problems encountered when using matK and promote the adoption of matK as a DNA barcode for angiosperms.

  1. Endophytic bacterial community of a Mediterranean marine angiosperm (Posidonia oceanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus eGarcias-Bonet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial endophytes are crucial for the survival of many terrestrial plants, but little is known about the presence and importance of bacterial endophytes of marine plants. We conducted a survey of the endophytic bacterial community of the long-living Mediterranean marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica in surface-sterilized tissues (roots, rhizomes and leaves by DGGE. A total of 26 Posidonia oceanica meadows around the Balearic Islands were sampled, and the band patterns obtained for each meadow were compared for the three sampled tissues. Endophytic bacterial sequences were detected in most of the samples analyzed. A total of 34 OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units were detected. The main OTUs of endophytic bacteria present in P. oceanica tissues belonged primarily to Proteobacteria (α, γ and δ subclasses and Bacteroidetes. The OTUs found in roots significantly differed from those of rhizomes and leaves. Moreover, some OTUs were found to be associated to each type of tissue. Bipartite network analysis revealed differences in the bacterial endophyte communities present on different islands. The results of this study provide a pioneering step toward the characterization of the endophytic bacterial community associated with tissues of a marine angiosperm and reveal the presence of bacterial endophytes that differed among locations and tissue types.

  2. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04 generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage

  3. Rapid and accurate pyrosequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmerie William G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plastid genome sequence information is vital to several disciplines in plant biology, including phylogenetics and molecular biology. The past five years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced plastid genomes, fuelled largely by advances in conventional Sanger sequencing technology. Here we report a further significant reduction in time and cost for plastid genome sequencing through the successful use of a newly available pyrosequencing platform, the Genome Sequencer 20 (GS 20 System (454 Life Sciences Corporation, to rapidly and accurately sequence the whole plastid genomes of the basal eudicot angiosperms Nandina domestica (Berberidaceae and Platanus occidentalis (Platanaceae. Results More than 99.75% of each plastid genome was simultaneously obtained during two GS 20 sequence runs, to an average depth of coverage of 24.6× in Nandina and 17.3× in Platanus. The Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes shared essentially identical gene complements and possessed the typical angiosperm plastid structure and gene arrangement. To assess the accuracy of the GS 20 sequence, over 45 kilobases of sequence were generated for each genome using conventional sequencing. Overall error rates of 0.043% and 0.031% were observed in GS 20 sequence for Nandina and Platanus, respectively. More than 97% of all observed errors were associated with homopolymer runs, with ~60% of all errors associated with homopolymer runs of 5 or more nucleotides and ~50% of all errors associated with regions of extensive homopolymer runs. No substitution errors were present in either genome. Error rates were generally higher in the single-copy and noncoding regions of both plastid genomes relative to the inverted repeat and coding regions. Conclusion Highly accurate and essentially complete sequence information was obtained for the Nandina and Platanus plastid genomes using the GS 20 System. More importantly, the high accuracy

  4. Einstein Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    A brief description on the work and life of the great physicist scientist Albert Einstein is presented. The photoelectric paper written by him in 1905 led him to the study of fluctuations in the energy density of radiation and from there to the incomplete nature of the equipartition theorem of classical mechanics, which failed to account for…

  5. Statistical analysis on adaptive evolution of SQUA genes in angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yongyan; ZHONG Yang; TIAN Bo; YANG Ji; LI Dezhu

    2005-01-01

    SQUAMOSA (SQUA) subfamily includes important perianth identity genes of MADS-box gene family. SQUA genes of Dendrocalamus latiflorus were sequenced, and phylogenetic form on SQUA genes in angiosperms was analyzed. Relative rate and adaptive evolution after SQUA gene duplication in recent common ancestor of monocots and eudicots were analyzed using the methods of relative rate test, statistic on synonymous and non-synonymous coden substitution sites and likelihood rate test. The results show that both of relative rate and synonymous and non-synonymous coden substitution in eudicot clade are significantly higher than those in monocot clade, and the value of dN/ds uncovered possible positive selective pressure in eudicot clade.

  6. The Pace and Shape of Senescence in Angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen;

    2013-01-01

    (‘senescence’), decreases (‘negative senescence’) or remains constant over age (‘negligible senescence’). 3. We extract mortality trajectories from ComPADRe III, a data base that contains demographic information for several hundred plant species. We apply age-from-stage matrix decomposition methods to obtain...... age-specific trajectories from 290 angiosperm species of various growth forms distributed globally. From these trajectories, we survey pace and shape values and investigate how growth form and ecoregion influence these two aspects of mortality using a Bayesian regression analysis that accounts...... analysis that accounts for phylogenetic history and in the distinction between metrics of pace and shape as two separate aspects of mortality. We believe that our approach could prove useful in future comparative studies of mortality patterns....

  7. Early Cretaceous Archaeamphora is not a carnivorous angiosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Oki Wong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Archaeamphora longicervia H.Q.Li was described as an herbaceous, Sarraceniaceae-like pitcher plant from the mid Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Here, a re-investigation of A. longicervia specimens from the Yixian Formation provides new insights into its identity and the morphology of pitcher plants claimed by Li. We demonstrate that putative pitchers of Archaeamphora are insect-induced leaf galls that consist of three components: (1 an innermost larval chamber with a distinctive outer wall; (2 an intermediate zone of nutritive tissue; and (3 an outermost zone of sclerenchyma. Archaeamphora is not a carnivorous, Sarraceniaceae-like angiosperm, but represents insect-galled leaves of the formerly reported gymnosperm Liaoningocladus boii G.Sun et al. from the Yixian Formation.

  8. Early Cretaceous Archaeamphora is not a carnivorous angiosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, William Oki; Dilcher, David Leonard; Labandeira, Conrad C; Sun, Ge; Fleischmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Archaeamphora longicervia H. Q. Li was described as an herbaceous, Sarraceniaceae-like pitcher plant from the mid Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Here, a re-investigation of A. longicervia specimens from the Yixian Formation provides new insights into its identity and the morphology of pitcher plants claimed by Li. We demonstrate that putative pitchers of Archaeamphora are insect-induced leaf galls that consist of three components: (1) an innermost larval chamber; (2) an intermediate zone of nutritive tissue; and (3) an outermost wall of sclerenchyma. Archaeamphora is not a carnivorous, Sarraceniaceae-like angiosperm, but represents insect-galled leaves of the previously reported gymnosperm Liaoningocladus boii G. Sun et al. from the Yixian Formation. PMID:25999978

  9. Leukemia revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  10. Leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately

  11. Heterogeneous Rates of Molecular Evolution and Diversification Could Explain the Triassic Age Estimate for Angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C; Crane, Peter; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Dating analyses based on molecular data imply that crown angiosperms existed in the Triassic, long before their undisputed appearance in the fossil record in the Early Cretaceous. Following a re-analysis of the age of angiosperms using updated sequences and fossil calibrations, we use a series of simulations to explore the possibility that the older age estimates are a consequence of (i) major shifts in the rate of sequence evolution near the base of the angiosperms and/or (ii) the representative taxon sampling strategy employed in such studies. We show that both of these factors do tend to yield substantially older age estimates. These analyses do not prove that younger age estimates based on the fossil record are correct, but they do suggest caution in accepting the older age estimates obtained using current relaxed-clock methods. Although we have focused here on the angiosperms, we suspect that these results will shed light on dating discrepancies in other major clades.

  12. Cellulose Orientation in the Outer Epidermal Wall of Angiosperm Roots: Implications for Biosystematics

    OpenAIRE

    KERSTENS, SVEN; VERBELEN, JEAN‐PIERRE

    2002-01-01

    The net orientation of cellulose fibrils in the outer epidermal wall of the root elongation zone of 57 angiosperm species belonging to 29 families was determined by means of Congo Red fluorescence and polarization confocal microscopy. The angiosperms can be divided in three groups. In all but four plant families, the net orientation of the cellulose fibrils is transverse to the root axis. Three families, the Poaceae, Juncaceae and Cyperaceae, have a totally different organization. In the root...

  13. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  14. Bark thickness across the angiosperms: more than just fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A

    2016-07-01

    Global variation in total bark thickness (TBT) is traditionally attributed to fire. However, bark is multifunctional, as reflected by its inner living and outer dead regions, meaning that, in addition to fire protection, other factors probably contribute to TBT variation. To address how fire, climate, and plant size contribute to variation in TBT, inner bark thickness (IBT) and outer bark thickness (OBT), I sampled 640 species spanning all major angiosperm clades and 18 sites with contrasting precipitation, temperature, and fire regime. Stem size was by far the main driver of variation in thickness, with environment being less important. IBT was closely correlated with stem diameter, probably for metabolic reasons, and, controlling for size, was thicker in drier and hotter environments, even fire-free ones, probably reflecting its water and photosynthate storage role. OBT was less closely correlated with size, and was thicker in drier, seasonal sites experiencing frequent fires. IBT and OBT covaried loosely and both contributed to overall TBT variation. Thickness variation was higher within than across sites and was evolutionarily labile. Given high within-site diversity and the multiple selective factors acting on TBT, continued study of the different drivers of variation in bark thickness is crucial to understand bark ecology. PMID:26890029

  15. Physiological mechanisms drive differing foliar calcium content in ferns and angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jennifer L; Amatangelo, Kathryn L

    2013-09-01

    Recent evidence points to ferns containing significantly lower contents of foliar calcium and other cations than angiosperms. This is especially true of more ancient 'non-polypod' fern lineages, which predate the diversification of angiosperms. Calcium is an important plant nutrient, the lack of which can potentially slow plant growth and litter decomposition, and alter soil invertebrate communities. The physiological mechanisms limiting foliar calcium (Ca) content in ferns are unknown. While there is a lot we do not know about Ca uptake and transport in plants, three physiological processes are likely to be important. We measured transpiration rate, cation exchange capacity, and leaching loss to determine which process most strongly regulates foliar Ca content in a range of fern and co-occurring understory angiosperm species from a montane Hawaiian rainforest. We found higher instantaneous and lifetime (corrected for leaf lifespan) transpiration rates in angiosperms relative to ferns. Ferns preferentially incorporated Ca into leaves relative to strontium, which suggests that root or stem cation exchange capacity differs between ferns and angiosperms, potentially affecting calcium transport in plants. There were no differences in foliar Ca leaching loss between groups. Among the physiological mechanisms measured, foliar Ca was most strongly correlated with leaf-level transpiration rate and leaf lifespan. This suggests that inter-specific differences in a leaf's lifetime transpiration may play a significant role in determining plant nutrition.

  16. Ecological determinants of mean family age of angiosperm trees in forest communities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Chen, Shengbin

    2016-01-01

    Species assemblage in a local community is determined by the interplay of evolutionary and ecological processes. The Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis proposes mechanisms underlying patterns of biodiversity in biological communities along environmental gradients. This hypothesis predicts that, among other things, clades in areas with warm or wet environments are, on average, older than those in areas with cold or dry environments. Focusing on angiosperm trees in forests, this study tested the age-related prediction of the Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis. We related the mean family age of angiosperm trees in 57 local forests from across China with 23 current and paleo-environmental variables, which included all major temperature- and precipitation-related variables. Our study shows that the mean family age of angiosperm trees in local forests was positively correlated with temperature and precipitation. This finding is consistent with the age-related prediction of the Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis. Approximately 85% of the variance in the mean family age of angiosperm trees was explained by temperature-related variables, and 81% of the variance in the mean family age of angiosperm trees was explained by precipitation-related variables. Climatic conditions at the Last Glacial Maximum did not explain additional variation in mean family age after accounting for current environmental conditions. PMID:27354109

  17. Ecological determinants of mean family age of angiosperm trees in forest communities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hong; Chen, Shengbin

    2016-01-01

    Species assemblage in a local community is determined by the interplay of evolutionary and ecological processes. The Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis proposes mechanisms underlying patterns of biodiversity in biological communities along environmental gradients. This hypothesis predicts that, among other things, clades in areas with warm or wet environments are, on average, older than those in areas with cold or dry environments. Focusing on angiosperm trees in forests, this study tested the age-related prediction of the Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis. We related the mean family age of angiosperm trees in 57 local forests from across China with 23 current and paleo-environmental variables, which included all major temperature- and precipitation-related variables. Our study shows that the mean family age of angiosperm trees in local forests was positively correlated with temperature and precipitation. This finding is consistent with the age-related prediction of the Tropical Niche Conservatism hypothesis. Approximately 85% of the variance in the mean family age of angiosperm trees was explained by temperature-related variables, and 81% of the variance in the mean family age of angiosperm trees was explained by precipitation-related variables. Climatic conditions at the Last Glacial Maximum did not explain additional variation in mean family age after accounting for current environmental conditions. PMID:27354109

  18. "The Theory of Heat Radiation" Revisited: A Commentary on the Validity of Kirchhoff's Law of Thermal Emission and Max Planck's Claim of Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Affirming Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, Max Planck conferred upon his own equation and its constants, h and k , universal significance. All arbitrary cavities were said to behave as blackbodies. They were thought to contain b lack, or normal radiation, which depended only upon temperature and frequency of observation, irrespective of the nature of the cavity walls. Today, laboratory blackbodies a re specialized, heated devices whose interior walls are lined with highly absorptive surfaces, such as graphite, soot, or other sophisticated materials. Such evidence repeatedly calls into question Kirchhoff’s Law, as nothing in the laboratory is independent of the nature of the walls. By focusing on Max Planck’s classic text, “ The Theory of Heat Radiation ’, it can be demonstrated that the German physicist was unable to properly justify Kirchhoff’s Law. At every turn, he was confronted with the fact that materials possess frequency dependent reflectivity and absorptivity, but he often chose to sidestep these realities. He used polarized light to derive Kirchhoff’s Law, when it is well known that blackbody radiation is never polar- ized. Through the use of an element, d σ , at the bounding surface between two media, he reached the untenable position that arbitrary materials have the same reflective prop- erties. His Eq.40 ( ρ = ρ ′ , constituted a dismissal of experimental reality. It is evident that if one neglects reflection, then all cavities must be black. Unable to ensure that perfectly reflecting cavities can be filled with black radiation, Planck inserted a minute carbon particle, which he qualified as a “catalyst”. In fact, it was acting as a perfect absorber, fully able to provide, on its own, the radiation sought. In 1858, Balfour Stew- art had outlined that the proper treatment of cavity radiation must include reflection. Yet, Max Planck did not cite the Scottish scientist. He also d id not correctly address

  19. Darwin's second 'abominable mystery': Why are there so many angiosperm species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepet, William L; Niklas, Karl J

    2009-01-01

    The rapid diversification and ecological dominance of the flowering plants beg the question "Why are there so many angiosperm species and why are they so successful?" A number of equally plausible hypotheses have been advanced in response to this question, among which the most widely accepted highlights the mutually beneficial animal-plant relationships that are nowhere better developed nor more widespread than among angiosperm species and their biotic vectors for pollination and dispersal. Nevertheless, consensus acknowledges that there are many other attributes unique to or characteristic of the flowering plants. In addition, the remarkable coevolution of the angiosperms and pollination/dispersal animal agents could be an effect of the intrinsic adaptability of the flowering plants rather than a primary cause of their success, suggesting that the search for underlying causes should focus on an exploration of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that might facilitate adaptive evolution and speciation. Here, we explore angiosperm diversity promoting attributes in their general form and draw particular attention to those that, either individually or collectively, have been shown empirically to favor high speciation rates, low extinction rates, or broad ecological tolerances. Among these are the annual growth form, homeotic gene effects, asexual/sexual reproduction, a propensity for hybrid polyploidy, and apparent "resistance" to extinction. Our survey of the literature suggests that no single vegetative, reproductive, or ecological feature taken in isolation can account for the evolutionary success of the angiosperms. Rather, we believe that the answer to Darwin's second "abominable mystery" lies in a confluence of features that collectively make the angiosperms unique among the land plants. PMID:21628194

  20. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  1. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  2. Do quantitative vessel and pit characters account for ion-mediated changes in the hydraulic conductance of angiosperm xylem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.; Gortan, E.; Lens, F.; Assunta Lo Gullo, M.; Salleo, S.; Scholtz, A.; Stein, A.; Trifilò, P.; Nardini, A.

    2011-01-01

    • The hydraulic conductance of angiosperm xylem has been suggested to vary with changes in sap solute concentrations because of intervessel pit properties. • The magnitude of the ‘ionic effect’ was linked with vessel and pit dimensions in 20 angiosperm species covering 13 families including six Laur

  3. Molecular data from the chloroplast rpoC1 gene suggest a deep and distinct dichotomy of contemporary spermatophytes into two monophyla: gymnosperms (including Gnetales) and angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, T K; Martin, W F; Troitsky, A V; Antonov, A S

    1999-09-01

    Partial sequences of the rpoC1 gene from two species of angiosperms and three species of gymnosperms (8330 base pairs) were determined and compared. The data obtained support the hypothesis that angiosperms and gymnosperms are monophyletic and none of the recent groups of the latter is sister to angiosperms.

  4. Revisiting strain-related differences in radiation sensitivity of the mouse lung: recognizing and avoiding the confounding effects of pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Isabel L; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Down, Julian D

    2010-01-01

    The mouse has been used extensively to model radiation injury to the lung, a major dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy. Substantial differences in the timing and sensitivity of this tissue between mouse strains have been reported, with some strains, including C57BL/6, being designated as "fibrosis-prone". Pleural effusions have also been reported to be a prominent problem in many mouse strains, but it remains unclear how this affects the lung function and survival of the standard C57BL/6 mouse. The purpose of this investigation was to re-evaluate this strain in comparison with C57L and CBA mice after whole-thorax irradiation at doses ranging from 10 to 15 Gy. Breathing rate measurements, micro-computerized tomography, lung tissue weight, pleural fluid weight and histopathology showed that the most prominent features were an early phase of pneumonitis (C57L and CBA) followed by a late incidence of massive pleural effusions (CBA and C57BL/6). A remarkable difference was seen between the C57 strains: The C57L mice were exquisitely sensitive to early pneumonitis at 3 to 4 months while C57BL/6 mice showed a delayed response, with most mice presenting with large accumulations of pleural fluid at 6 to 9 months. These results therefore caution against the routine use of C57BL/6 mice in radiation lung experiments because pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients as a consequence of radiotherapy. Future experiments designed to investigate genetic determinants of radiation lung damage should focus on the high sensitivity of the C57L strain (in comparison with CBA or C3H mice) and the possibility that they are more susceptible to pulmonary fibrosis as well as pneumonitis.

  5. Seed Size and Dispersal Systems of Early Cretaceous Angiosperms from Famalicão, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson; Friis; Pedersen; Crane

    2000-03-01

    Seeds and fruits of Early Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) angiosperms from the Famalicão locality in Portugal were analyzed to establish seed and fruit size (volume) distributions and to infer the proportion of animal-dispersed fruits. On the basis of a sample of 106 angiosperm fruit and seed taxa, the average seed size was 0.78 mm3 (range 0.02-6.86 mm3), whereas the average fruit size was 2.06 mm3 (range 0.12-8.34 mm3). Variation in seed size among taxa is smaller than in modern plant communities, but within-taxon variation is similar to that known for extant plants. No significant difference in the size of "fleshy" versus other fruits was observed. The proportion of fleshy fruits was 24.5%. This high figure was surprising and indicates that the significance of animal dispersal during an early stage in angiosperm evolution has been underestimated. We suggest that reptiles and multituberculates, and perhaps other mammals and birds as well, were the likely seed dispersers and that the early angiosperms from Famalicão probably were herbs or small shrubs that inhabited a semiopen coniferous woodland.

  6. Unequal plastid distribution during the development of the male gametophyte of angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hagemann

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The difference between the uniparental maternal and biparental type of plastid inheritance is based upon a relatively simple mechanism. In the uniparental type plastids are excluded from the generative or siperm cells during the firts pollen mitosis or during pollen development. In some angiosperms this exclusion is completely lacking or carried out partially.

  7. Genetic enablers underlying the clustered evolutionary origins of C4 photosynthesis in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Mónica; Osborne, Colin P; Edwards, Erika J

    2015-04-01

    The evolutionary accessibility of novel adaptations varies among lineages, depending in part on the genetic elements present in each group. However, the factors determining the evolutionary potential of closely related genes remain largely unknown. In plants, CO2-concentrating mechanisms such as C4 and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis have evolved numerous times in distantly related groups of species, and constitute excellent systems to study constraints and enablers of evolution. It has been previously shown for multiple proteins that grasses preferentially co-opted the same gene lineage for C4 photosynthesis, when multiple copies were present. In this work, we use comparative transcriptomics to show that this bias also exists within Caryophyllales, a distantly related group with multiple C4 origins. However, the bias is not the same as in grasses and, when all angiosperms are considered jointly, the number of distinct gene lineages co-opted is not smaller than that expected by chance. These results show that most gene lineages present in the common ancestor of monocots and eudicots produced gene descendants that were recruited into C4 photosynthesis, but that C4-suitability changed during the diversification of angiosperms. When selective pressures drove C4 evolution, some copies were preferentially co-opted, probably because they already possessed C4-like expression patterns. However, the identity of these C4-suitable genes varies among clades of angiosperms, and C4 phenotypes in distant angiosperm groups thus represent genuinely independent realizations, based on different genetic precursors.

  8. The world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs) revisited: A broad overview of the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residents of the world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs), such as Ramsar (in Iran), Guarapari (in Brazil), Orissa and Kerala (in India) and Yangjiang (in China) have lived in these areas for generations under extraordinary radiation fields. The failure of earlier epidemiological studies to report any substantial increase in cancer incidence in HBNRAs has raised some controversy regarding the validity of the linear no-threshold hypothesis. This paper reviews some of the most recent studies of HBNRAs with the intent of stimulating greater research interest in the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues related to the world's HBNRAs and proposes solutions to the challenges facing HBNRA studies. This paper may serve as a useful reference for some of the harder-to-find literature. - Highlights: • Some of the challenging issues of HBNRAs have not been resolved. • A literature review of the most recent studies of HBNRAs has been conducted. • An overview of some of the challenging issues and viable solutions are presented

  9. Remembered Experiences and Revisit Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    path modelling, we examine the impact of positive affect tourist experiences on the development of revisit intentions. We find that longer-term remembered experiences have the strongest impact on revisit intentions, more so than predicted or immediate memory after an event. We also find that remembered...

  10. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro;

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...... games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem.......We revisit the deterministic graphical games of Washburn. A deterministic graphical game can be described as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving deterministic graphical...

  11. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  12. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  13. The bar instability revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Chiodi, Filippo; Andreotti, Bruno; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relati...

  14. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic...... are proton‐dicarboxylic acid anion cotransporters and not simply electrogenic proton translocators. These results necessitate revision of previous theories of biological energy transduction, coupling, and ATP synthesis. The novel molecular mechanism is extended to cover ATP synthesis in prokaryotes...

  15. Barcoding success as a function of phylogenetic relatedness in Viburnum, a clade of woody angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Wendy L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chloroplast genes matK and rbcL have been proposed as a “core” DNA barcode for identifying plant species. Published estimates of successful species identification using these loci (70-80% may be inflated because they may have involved comparisons among distantly related species within target genera. To assess the ability of the proposed two-locus barcode to discriminate closely related species, we carried out a hierarchically structured set of comparisons within Viburnum, a clade of woody angiosperms containing ca. 170 species (some 70 of which are currently used in horticulture. For 112 Viburnum species, we evaluated rbcL + matK, as well as the chloroplast regions rpl32-trnL, trnH-psbA, trnK, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS. Results At most, rbcL + matK could discriminate 53% of all Viburnum species, with only 18% of the comparisons having genetic distances >1%. When comparisons were progressively restricted to species within major Viburnum subclades, there was a significant decrease in both the discriminatory power and the genetic distances. trnH-psbA and nrITS show much higher levels of variation and potential discriminatory power, and their use in plant barcoding should be reconsidered. As barcoding has often been used to discriminate species within local areas, we also compared Viburnum species within two regions, Japan and Mexico and Central America. Greater success in discriminating among the Japanese species reflects the deeper evolutionary history of Viburnum in that area, as compared to the recent radiation of a single clade into the mountains of Latin America. Conclusions We found very low levels of discrimination among closely related species of Viburnum, and low levels of variation in the proposed barcoding loci may limit success within other clades of long-lived woody plants. Inclusion of the supplementary barcodes trnH-psbA and nrITS increased discrimination rates but

  16. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  17. Exploring Early Angiosperm Fire Feedbacks using Coupled Experiments and Modelling Approaches to Estimate Cretaceous Palaeofire Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Claire; Hudpsith, Victoria

    2016-04-01

    Using the fossil record we are typically limited to exploring linkages between palaeoecological changes and palaeofire activity by assessing the abundance of charcoals preserved in sediments. However, it is the behaviour of fires that primarily governs their ecological effects. Therefore, the ability to estimate variations in aspects of palaeofire behaviour such as palaeofire intensity and rate of spread would be of key benefit toward understanding the coupled evolutionary history of ecosystems and fire. The Cretaceous Period saw major diversification in land plants. Previously, conifers (gymnosperms) and ferns (pteridophytes) dominated Earth's ecosystems until flowering plants (angiosperms) appear in the fossil record of the Early Cretaceous (~135Ma). We have created surface fire behaviour estimates for a variety of angiosperm invasion scenarios and explored the influence of Cretaceous superambient atmospheric oxygen levels on the fire behaviour occurring in these new Cretaceous ecosystems. These estimates are then used to explore the hypothesis that the early spread of the angiosperms was promoted by the novel fire regimes that they created. In order to achieve this we tested the flammability of Mesozoic analogue fuel types in controlled laboratory experiments using an iCone calorimeter, which measured the ignitability as well as the effective heat of combustion of the fuels. We then used the BehavePlus fire behaviour modelling system to scale up our laboratory results to the ecosystem scale. Our results suggest that fire-angiosperm feedbacks may have occurred in two phases: The first phase being a result of weedy angiosperms providing an additional easily ignitable fuel that enhanced both the seasonality and frequency of surface fires. In the second phase, the addition of shrubby understory fuels likely expanded the number of ecosystems experiencing more intense surface fires, resulting in enhanced mortality and suppressed post-fire recruitment of gymnosperms

  18. Additions of angiosperms to the Flora of Peru from the Andean-Amazonian forests of southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isau Huamantupa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present 25 new records of angiosperms for the Peruvian flora, as a result of different botanical explorations conducted in southern Peru, mainly in the areas of the departments of Cusco, Apurimac and Madre de Dios.

  19. Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequencesfrom the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubeso, Linda A.; Peery, Rhiannon; Chumley, Timothy W.; Dziubek,Chris; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2007-03-01

    The number of completely sequenced plastid genomes available is growing rapidly. This new array of sequences presents new opportunities to perform comparative analyses. In comparative studies, it is most useful to compare across wide phylogenetic spans and, within angiosperms, to include representatives from basally diverging lineages such as the new genomes reported here: Nuphar advena (from a basal-most lineage) and Ranunculus macranthus (from the basal group of eudicots). We report these two new plastid genome sequences and make comparisons (within angiosperms, seed plants, or all photosynthetic lineages) to evaluate features such as the status of ycf15 and ycf68 as protein coding genes, the distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and longer dispersed repeats (SDR), and patterns of nucleotide composition.

  20. Testing the recent theories for the origin of the hermaphrodite flower by comparison of the transcriptomes of gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares Raquel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different theories for the origin of the angiosperm hermaphrodite flower make different predictions concerning the overlap between the genes expressed in the male and female cones of gymnosperms and the genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of angiosperms. The Mostly Male (MM theory predicts that, of genes expressed primarily in male versus female gymnosperm cones, an excess of male orthologs will be expressed in flowers, excluding ovules, while Out Of Male (OOM and Out Of Female (OOF theories predict no such excess. Results In this paper, we tested these predictions by comparing the transcriptomes of three gymnosperms (Ginkgo biloba, Welwitschia mirabilis and Zamia fisheri and two angiosperms (Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, using EST data. We found that the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms flower is significantly higher than the proportion of orthologous genes expressed in the reproductive organs of the gymnosperms and in the angiosperms vegetative tissues, which shows that the approach is correct. However, we detected no significant differences between the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the male cone and in the angiosperms flower and the proportion of gymnosperm orthologous genes expressed in the female cone and in the angiosperms flower. Conclusions These results do not support the MM theory prediction of an excess of male gymnosperm genes expressed in the hermaphrodite flower of the angiosperms and seem to support the OOM/OOF theories. However, other explanations can be given for the 1:1 ratio that we found. More abundant and more specific (namely carpel and ovule expression data should be produced in order to further test these theories.

  1. Preferential fertilization in Plumbago: Ultrastructural evidence for gamete-level recognition in an angiosperm

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Scott D.

    1985-01-01

    Gametic fusion patterns in the angiosperm Plumbago zeylanica were determined by using cytoplasmically dimorphic sperm cells differing in mitochondrion and plastid content and then identifying paternal organelles through their ultrastructural characteristics within the maternal cytoplasm at the time of fertilization. The virtual absence of plastids within the sperm cell that is physically associated with the vegetative nucleus allows paternal plastids to be used to trace the fate of the two ma...

  2. New taxa of angiosperms from coal-bearing continental deposits in Amur area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tat'yana V. KEZINA

    2008-01-01

    Considered the question about stratigraphic position of coal-beating continental deposits of the Amur area, the main attention is paid to the definition of pollen of angiosperms. Khlonova (1960), Zaklinskaya (1963), Bratseva (1969) and other scientists reported a lot about the significance of the pollen. Among the new taxa the special interest represents the first description of Engelhardtia pollen of late Maestrichtian and Paleocene deposits. A new kind of pollen Vacuopollis triplicatus sp. nov. is described.

  3. New Caledonia : a Pleistocene refugium for rain forest lineages of relict angiosperms

    OpenAIRE

    Pouteau, Robin; Trueba, S.; Feild, T.S.; Isnard, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Aim In New Caledonia, relictual angiosperm lineages are over-represented. However, the mechanisms responsible for such a distribution remain unclear. Two key hypotheses are that: (1) the diversity reflects adaptation to ultramafic substrates that ecologically filtered plant colonists; and (2) the diversity stems from wet climatic conditions that have persisted in New Caledonia during the late Quaternary while Australia and some nearby islands experienced widespread extinction events. Here, we...

  4. Oil biosynthesis in a basal angiosperm: transcriptome analysis of Persea Americana mesocarp

    OpenAIRE

    Kilaru, Aruna; Cao, Xia; Dabbs, Parker B.; Sung, Ha-Jung; Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Thrower, Nicholas; Zynda, Greg; Podicheti, Ram; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanism by which plants synthesize and store high amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG) in tissues other than seeds is not well understood. The comprehension of controls for carbon partitioning and oil accumulation in nonseed tissues is essential to generate oil-rich biomass in perennial bioenergy crops. Persea americana (avocado), a basal angiosperm with unique features that are ancestral to most flowering plants, stores ~ 70 % TAG per dry weight in its mesocarp, a nonseed tissu...

  5. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice. PMID:24021326

  6. Analogue Magnetism Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Osano, Bob

    2016-01-01

    In this article we revisit the significance of the often debated structural similarity between the equations of electromagnetism and fluid dynamics. Although the matching of the two sets of equations has successfully been done for non-dissipative forms of the equations, little has been done for cases where the dissipative terms are non-negligible. We consider the consequence of non-negligible viscosity and diffusivity, and how the fine-tuning of these parameters could allow fluid dynamics to be used to indirectly study certain properties of magnetic fields.

  7. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazier, J Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K; Sabir, Jamal S M; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  8. The tracheid-vessel element transition in angiosperms involves multiple independent features: cladistic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlquist, Sherwin; Schneider, Edward L

    2002-02-01

    Current definitions of tracheids and vessel elements are overly simple. These definitions are based on light microscope studies and have not incorporated information gained with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Current definitions are based primarily on angiosperms, especially eudicots, and were devised before many basal angiosperms were carefully studied. When all sources of information are taken into account, one can recognize changes in six characters in the evolution of tracheids into vessel elements in angiosperms (or vice versa) as well as in other groups of vascular plants. There is an appreciable number of taxa in which all criteria for vessel origin are not met, and thus incipient vessels are present. At the very least, vessel presence or absence should not be treated as a single binary character state change in construction of cladistic matrices. Increase in conductive area of an end wall by means of lysis of progressively greater areas of pit membrane and increase in pit area on the end wall (as compared to pit area on equivalent portions of lateral walls) are considered the most important usable criteria for recognizing intermediacy between tracheids and vessel elements. Primitive character states in vessel elements are briefly discussed to differentiate them from changes in character states that can be regarded as intermediate between tracheids and vessel elements.

  9. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazier, J. Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  10. A Targeted Enrichment Strategy for Massively Parallel Sequencing of Angiosperm Plastid Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory W. Stull

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We explored a targeted enrichment strategy to facilitate rapid and low-cost next-generation sequencing (NGS of numerous complete plastid genomes from across the phylogenetic breadth of angiosperms. Methods and Results: A custom RNA probe set including the complete sequences of 22 previously sequenced eudicot plastomes was designed to facilitate hybridization-based targeted enrichment of eudicot plastid genomes. Using this probe set and an Agilent SureSelect targeted enrichment kit, we conducted an enrichment experiment including 24 angiosperms (22 eudicots, two monocots, which were subsequently sequenced on a single lane of the Illumina GAIIx with single-end, 100-bp reads. This approach yielded nearly complete to complete plastid genomes with exceptionally high coverage (mean coverage: 717×, even for the two monocots. Conclusions: Our enrichment experiment was highly successful even though many aspects of the capture process employed were suboptimal. Hence, significant improvements to this methodology are feasible. With this general approach and probe set, it should be possible to sequence more than 300 essentially complete plastid genomes in a single Illumina GAIIx lane (achieving 50× mean coverage. However, given the complications of pooling numerous samples for multiplex sequencing and the limited number of barcodes (e.g., 96 available in commercial kits, we recommend 96 samples as a current practical maximum for multiplex plastome sequencing. This high-throughput approach should facilitate large-scale plastid genome sequencing at any level of phylogenetic diversity in angiosperms.

  11. The rise of angiosperm-dominated herbaceous floras: Insights from Ranunculaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lin, Li; Xiang, Xiao-Guo; Ortiz, Rosa Del C; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Kun-Li; Yu, Sheng-Xiang; Xing, Yao-Wu; Chen, Zhi-Duan

    2016-01-01

    The rise of angiosperms has been regarded as a trigger for the Cretaceous revolution of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the timeframe of the rise angiosperm-dominated herbaceous floras (ADHFs) is lacking. Here, we used the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae) as a proxy to provide insights into the rise of ADHFs. An integration of phylogenetic, molecular dating, ancestral state inferring, and diversification analytical methods was used to infer the early evolutionary history of Ranunculaceae. We found that Ranunculaceae became differentiated in forests between about 108-90 Ma. Diversification rates markedly elevated during the Campanian, mainly resulted from the rapid divergence of the non-forest lineages, but did not change across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Our data for Ranunculaceae indicate that forest-dwelling ADHFs may have appeared almost simultaneously with angiosperm-dominated forests during the mid-Cretaceous, whereas non-forest ADHFs arose later, by the end of the Cretaceous terrestrial revolution. Furthermore, ADHFs were relatively unaffected by the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction. PMID:27251635

  12. Diffusional limitations explain the lower photosynthetic capacity of ferns as compared with angiosperms in a common garden study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquí, M; Cabrera, H M; Conesa, M À; Coopman, R E; Douthe, C; Gago, J; Gallé, A; Galmés, J; Ribas-Carbo, M; Tomás, M; Flexas, J

    2015-03-01

    Ferns are thought to have lower photosynthetic rates than angiosperms and they lack fine stomatal regulation. However, no study has directly compared photosynthesis in plants of both groups grown under optimal conditions in a common environment. We present a common garden comparison of seven angiosperms and seven ferns paired by habitat preference, with the aims of (1) confirming that ferns do have lower photosynthesis capacity than angiosperms and quantifying these differences; (2) determining the importance of diffusional versus biochemical limitations; and (3) analysing the potential implication of leaf anatomical traits in setting the photosynthesis capacity in both groups. On average, the photosynthetic rate of ferns was about half that of angiosperms, and they exhibited lower stomatal and mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm ), maximum velocity of carboxylation and electron transport rate. A quantitative limitation analysis revealed that stomatal and mesophyll conductances were co-responsible for the lower photosynthesis of ferns as compared with angiosperms. However, gm alone was the most constraining factor for photosynthesis in ferns. Consistently, leaf anatomy showed important differences between angiosperms and ferns, especially in cell wall thickness and the surface of chloroplasts exposed to intercellular air spaces.

  13. The SLEEPER genes: a transposase-derived angiosperm-specific gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knip Marijn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAYSLEEPER encodes a domesticated transposase from the hAT-superfamily, which is essential for development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Little is known about the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in other species, or how and when it was domesticated. We studied the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in plants and propose a model for the domestication of the ancestral DAYSLEEPER gene in angiosperms. Results Using specific BLAST searches in genomic and EST libraries, we found that DAYSLEEPER-like genes (hereafter called SLEEPER genes are unique to angiosperms. Basal angiosperms as well as grasses (Poaceae and dicotyledonous plants possess such putative orthologous genes, but SLEEPER-family genes were not found in gymnosperms, mosses and algae. Most species contain more than one SLEEPER gene. All SLEEPERs contain a C2H2 type BED-zinc finger domain and a hATC dimerization domain. We designated 3 motifs, partly overlapping the BED-zinc finger and dimerization domain, which are hallmark features in the SLEEPER family. Although SLEEPER genes are structurally conserved between species, constructs with SLEEPER genes from grapevine and rice did not complement the daysleeper phenotype in Arabidopsis, when expressed under control of the DAYSLEEPER promoter. However these constructs did cause a dominant phenotype when expressed in Arabidopsis. Rice plant lines with an insertion in the RICESLEEPER1 or 2 locus displayed phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that these genes are functional and important for normal development in rice. We suggest a model in which we hypothesize that an ancestral hAT transposase was retrocopied and stably integrated in the genome during early angiosperm evolution. Evidence is also presented for more recent retroposition events of SLEEPER genes, such as an event in the rice genome, which gave rise to the RICESLEEPER1 and 2 genes. Conclusions We propose the ancestral SLEEPER gene was formed after a process of retro

  14. Radiation hardening revisited: Role of intracascade clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Trinkaus, H.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental observations related to the initiation of plastic deformation in metals and alloys irradiated with fission neutrons have been analyzed. The experimental results, showing irradiation-induced increase in the upper yield stress followed by a yield drop and plastic instability, cannot...... be explained in terms of conventional dispersed-barrier hardening because (a) the grown-in dislocations are not free, and (b) irradiation-induced defect clusters are not rigid indestructible Orowan obstacles. A new model called 'cascade-induced source hardening' is presented where glissile loops produced...... been estimated and is found to be in good agreement with the measured increase in the initial yield stress in neutron irradiated copper. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  15. Revisiting the R νMDM models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Combining neutrino mass generation and a dark matter candidate in a unified model has always been intriguing. We revisit the class of R νMDM models, which incorporate minimal dark matter in radiative neutrino mass models based on the one-loop ultraviolet completions of the Weinberg operator. The possibility of an exact accidental Z 2 is completely ruled out in this scenario. We study the phenomenology of one of the models with an approximate Z 2 symmetry. In addition to the Standard Model particles, it contains two real scalar quintuplets, one vector-like quadruplet fermion and a fermionic quintuplet. The neutral component of the fermionic quintuplet serves as a good dark matter candidate which can be tested by the future direct and indirect detection experiments. The constraints from flavor physics and electroweak-scale naturalness are also discussed.

  16. Quantum duel revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Paiva, Milena M.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent.

  17. Seven Issues Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Whitehead, Jim; De Bra, Paul;

    2002-01-01

    It has been 15 years since the original presentation by Frank Halasz at Hypertext'87 on seven issues for the next generation of hypertext systems. These issues are: Search and Query Composites Virtual Structures Computation in/over hypertext network Versioning Collaborative Work Extensibility...... and Tailorability Since that time, these issues have formed the nucleus of multiple research agendas within the Hypertext community. Befitting this direction-setting role, the issues have been revisited several times, by Halasz in his 1991 Hypertext keynote talk, and by Randy Trigg in his 1996 Hypertext keynote...... five years later. Additionally, over the intervening 15 years, many research systems have addressed the original seven issues, and new research avenues have opened up. The goal of this panel is to begin the process of developing a new set of seven issues for the next generation of hypertext system...

  18. Deterministic Graphical Games Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Olof Daniel; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Miltersen, Peter Bro;

    2012-01-01

    , such as retrograde analysis, have been rediscovered independently. We then revisit Washburn’s deterministic graphical games (DGGs), a natural generalization of chess-like games to arbitrary zero-sum payoffs. We study the complexity of solving DGGs and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm...... for finding optimal strategies in such games. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem.......Starting from Zermelo’s classical formal treatment of chess, we trace through history the analysis of two-player win/lose/draw games with perfect information and potentially infinite play. Such chess-like games have appeared in many different research communities, and methods for solving them...

  19. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  20. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...... at birth should not vary between countries. Finally the distributional assumptions are relaxed as compared to the assumptions made in an earlier work by the author. These assumptions concern the calculation of the life expectancy change due to the removal of an accident source. Moreover a simple public...... consistency problems with the standard power function expression of the LQI are pointed out. It is emphasized that the combination coefficient in the convex differential combination between the relative differential of the gross domestic product per capita and the relative differential of the expected life...

  1. Firewall Configuration Errors Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wool, Avishai

    2009-01-01

    The first quantitative evaluation of the quality of corporate firewall configurations appeared in 2004, based on Check Point FireWall-1 rule-sets. In general that survey indicated that corporate firewalls were often enforcing poorly written rule-sets, containing many mistakes. The goal of this work is to revisit the first survey. The current study is much larger. Moreover, for the first time, the study includes configurations from two major vendors. The study also introduce a novel "Firewall Complexity" (FC) measure, that applies to both types of firewalls. The findings of the current study indeed validate the 2004 study's main observations: firewalls are (still) poorly configured, and a rule-set's complexity is (still) positively correlated with the number of detected risk items. Thus we can conclude that, for well-configured firewalls, ``small is (still) beautiful''. However, unlike the 2004 study, we see no significant indication that later software versions have fewer errors (for both vendors).

  2. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  3. Logistics Innovation Process Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Su, Shong-Iee Ivan; Yang, Su-Lan

    2011-01-01

    that was triggered by the practical needs of new ways of handling material flows of a hospital. This approach made it possible to revisit theory on logistics innovation process. Findings – Apart from the tangible benefits reported to the case hospital, five findings can be extracted from this study: the logistics...... on internal stakeholders as on external relationships; and logistics innovation process may start out as a dialectic, conflict ridden process and end up in a well-ordered goal-oriented teleological process. Research limitations/implications – In general, the study contributes to the knowledge base...... on an existing model by methodological triangulation in order to learn more about the qualities of actual processes and their implications for theory and practice....

  4. Revisiting the Lambert's Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Izzo, Dario

    2014-01-01

    The orbital boundary value problem, also known as Lambert Problem, is revisited. Building upon Lancaster and Blanchard approach, new relations are revealed and a new variable representing all problem classes, under L-similarity, is used to express the time of flight equation. In the new variable, the time of flight curves have two oblique asymptotes and they mostly appear to be conveniently approximated by piecewise continuous lines. We use and invert such a simple approximation to provide an efficient initial guess to an Householder iterative method that is then able to converge, for the single revoltuion case, in only two iterations. The resulting algorithm is compared to Gooding's procedure revealing to be numerically as accurate, while having a smaller computational complexity.

  5. Klein's double discontinuity revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl; Grønbæk, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Much effort and research has been invested into understanding and bridging the ‘gaps’ which many students experience in terms of contents and expectations as they begin university studies with a heavy component of mathematics, typically in the form of calculus courses. We have several studies...... of bridging measures, success rates and many other aspects of these “entrance transition” problems. In this paper, we consider the inverse transition, experienced by university students as they revisit core parts of high school mathematics (in particular, calculus) after completing the undergraduate...... mathematics courses which are mandatory to become a high school teacher of mathematics. To what extent does the “advanced” experience enable them to approach the high school calculus in a deeper and more autonomous way ? To what extent can “capstone” courses support such an approach ? How could it be hindered...

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution in plants: insight from the comparison of sequenced brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqin Shi

    Full Text Available Despite their ubiquity and functional importance, microsatellites have been largely ignored in comparative genomics, mostly due to the lack of genomic information. In the current study, microsatellite distribution was characterized and compared in the whole genomes and both the coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species to investigate their evolutionary dynamics in plants. The variation in the microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species was much smaller than those for their microsatellite numbers and genome sizes, suggesting that microsatellite frequency may be relatively stable in plants. The microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species were significantly negatively correlated with both their genome sizes and transposable elements contents. The pattern of microsatellite distribution may differ according to the different genomic regions (such as coding and non-coding sequences. The observed differences in many important microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif length, type and repeat number of these angiosperm species were generally accordant with their phylogenetic distance, which suggested that the evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution may be generally consistent with plant divergence/evolution. Importantly, by comparing these microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif type the angiosperm species (aside from a few species all clustered into two obviously different groups that were largely represented by monocots and dicots, suggesting a complex and generally dichotomous evolutionary pattern of microsatellite distribution in angiosperms. Polyploidy may lead to a slight increase in microsatellite frequency in the coding sequences and a significant decrease in microsatellite frequency in the whole genome/non-coding sequences, but have little effect on the microsatellite

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Ampelopsis: gene organization, comparative analysis and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy eRaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ampelopsis brevipedunculata is an economically important plant that belongs to the Vitaceae family of angiosperms. The phylogenetic placement of Vitaceae is still unresolved. Recent phylogenetic studies suggested that it should be placed in various alternative families including Caryophyllaceae, asteraceae, Saxifragaceae, Dilleniaceae, or with the rest of the rosid families. However, these analyses provided weak supportive results because they were based on only one of several genes. Accordingly, complete chloroplast genome sequences are required to resolve the phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on the complete chloroplast genome sequence suggested strong support for the position of Vitaceae as the earliest diverging lineage of rosids and placed it as a sister to the remaining rosids. These studies also revealed relationships among several major lineages of angiosperms; however, they highlighted the significance of taxon sampling for obtaining accurate phylogenies. In the present study, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of A. brevipedunculata and used these data to assess the relationships among 32 angiosperms, including 18 taxa of rosids. The Ampelopsis chloroplast genome is 161,090 bp in length, and includes a pair of inverted repeats of 26,394 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,036 bp and 89,266 bp, respectively. The gene content and order of Ampelopsis is identical to many other unrearranged angiosperm chloroplast genomes, including Vitis and tobacco. A phylogenetic tree constructed based on 70 protein-coding genes of 33 angiosperms showed that both Saxifragales and Vitaceae diverged from the rosid clade and formed two clades with 100% bootstrap value. The position of the Vitaceae is sister to Saxifragales, and both are the basal and earliest diverging lineages. Moreover, Saxifragales forms a sister clade to Vitaceae of rosids. Overall, the results of

  8. The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeanine L; Rouzé, Pierre; Verhelst, Bram; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Bayer, Till; Collen, Jonas; Dattolo, Emanuela; De Paoli, Emanuele; Dittami, Simon; Maumus, Florian; Michel, Gurvan; Kersting, Anna; Lauritano, Chiara; Lohaus, Rolf; Töpel, Mats; Tonon, Thierry; Vanneste, Kevin; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Brakel, Janina; Boström, Christoffer; Chovatia, Mansi; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry W; Jueterbock, Alexander; Mraz, Amy; Stam, Wytze T; Tice, Hope; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Green, Pamela J; Pearson, Gareth A; Procaccini, Gabriele; Duarte, Carlos M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-02-18

    Seagrasses colonized the sea on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever accomplished by flowering plants. Key angiosperm innovations that were lost include the entire repertoire of stomatal genes, genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoids and ethylene signalling, and genes for ultraviolet protection and phytochromes for far-red sensing. Seagrasses have also regained functions enabling them to adjust to full salinity. Their cell walls contain all of the polysaccharides typical of land plants, but also contain polyanionic, low-methylated pectins and sulfated galactans, a feature shared with the cell walls of all macroalgae and that is important for ion homoeostasis, nutrient uptake and O2/CO2 exchange through leaf epidermal cells. The Z. marina genome resource will markedly advance a wide range of functional ecological studies from adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming, to unravelling the mechanisms of osmoregulation under high salinities that may further inform our understanding of the evolution of salt tolerance in crop plants. PMID:26814964

  9. The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea

    KAUST Repository

    Olsen, Jeanine L.

    2016-01-27

    Seagrasses colonized the sea1 on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet2. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever accomplished by flowering plants. Key angiosperm innovations that were lost include the entire repertoire of stomatal genes3, genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoids and ethylene signalling, and genes for ultraviolet protection and phytochromes for far-red sensing. Seagrasses have also regained functions enabling them to adjust to full salinity. Their cell walls contain all of the polysaccharides typical of land plants, but also contain polyanionic, low-methylated pectins and sulfated galactans, a feature shared with the cell walls of all macroalgae4 and that is important for ion homoeostasis, nutrient uptake and O2/CO2 exchange through leaf epidermal cells. The Z. marina genome resource will markedly advance a wide range of functional ecological studies from adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming5, 6, to unravelling the mechanisms of osmoregulation under high salinities that may further inform our understanding of the evolution of salt tolerance in crop plants7.

  10. The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeanine L; Rouzé, Pierre; Verhelst, Bram; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Bayer, Till; Collen, Jonas; Dattolo, Emanuela; De Paoli, Emanuele; Dittami, Simon; Maumus, Florian; Michel, Gurvan; Kersting, Anna; Lauritano, Chiara; Lohaus, Rolf; Töpel, Mats; Tonon, Thierry; Vanneste, Kevin; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Brakel, Janina; Boström, Christoffer; Chovatia, Mansi; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry W; Jueterbock, Alexander; Mraz, Amy; Stam, Wytze T; Tice, Hope; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Green, Pamela J; Pearson, Gareth A; Procaccini, Gabriele; Duarte, Carlos M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-02-18

    Seagrasses colonized the sea on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever accomplished by flowering plants. Key angiosperm innovations that were lost include the entire repertoire of stomatal genes, genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoids and ethylene signalling, and genes for ultraviolet protection and phytochromes for far-red sensing. Seagrasses have also regained functions enabling them to adjust to full salinity. Their cell walls contain all of the polysaccharides typical of land plants, but also contain polyanionic, low-methylated pectins and sulfated galactans, a feature shared with the cell walls of all macroalgae and that is important for ion homoeostasis, nutrient uptake and O2/CO2 exchange through leaf epidermal cells. The Z. marina genome resource will markedly advance a wide range of functional ecological studies from adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming, to unravelling the mechanisms of osmoregulation under high salinities that may further inform our understanding of the evolution of salt tolerance in crop plants.

  11. Genome size and ploidy influence angiosperm species' biomass under nitrogen and phosphorus limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, Maïté S; Nichols, Richard A; Knell, Robert J; Macdonald, Andy; Romila, Catalina-Andreea; Trimmer, Mark; Leitch, Ilia J; Leitch, Andrew R

    2016-06-01

    Angiosperm genome sizes (GS) range c. 2400-fold, and as nucleic acids are amongst the most phosphorus- (P) and nitrogen (N)-demanding cellular biomolecules, we test the hypothesis that a key influence on plant biomass and species composition is the interaction between N and P availability and plant GS. We analysed the impact of different nutrient regimes on above-ground biomass of angiosperm species with different GS, ploidy level and Grime's C-S-R (competitive, stress-tolerant, ruderal) plant strategies growing at the Park Grass Experiment (Rothamsted, UK), established in 1856. The biomass-weighted mean GS of species growing on plots with the addition of both N and P fertilizer were significantly higher than that of plants growing on control plots and plots with either N or P. The plants on these N + P plots are dominated by polyploids with large GS and a competitive plant strategy. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that large genomes are costly to build and maintain under N and P limitation. Hence GS and ploidy are significant traits affecting biomass growth under different nutrient regimes, influencing plant community composition and ecosystem dynamics. We propose that GS is a critical factor needed in models that bridge the knowledge gap between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. PMID:26875784

  12. Evolution of a unique anatomical precision in angiosperm leaf venation lifts constraints on vascular plant ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Boyce, Charles K

    2014-03-22

    The main role of leaf venation is to supply water across the photosynthetic surface to keep stomata open and allow access to atmospheric CO2 despite evaporative demand. The optimal uniform delivery of water occurs when the distance between veins equals the depth of vein placement within the leaf away from the evaporative surface. As presented here, only angiosperms maintain this anatomical optimum across all leaf thicknesses and different habitats, including sheltered environments where this optimization need not be required. Intriguingly, basal angiosperm lineages tend to be underinvested hydraulically; uniformly high optimization is derived independently in the magnoliids, monocots and core eudicots. Gymnosperms and ferns, including available fossils, are limited by their inability to produce high vein densities. The common association of ferns with shaded humid environments may, in part, be a direct evolutionary consequence of their inability to produce hydraulically optimized leaves. Some gymnosperms do approach optimal vein placement, but only by virtue of their ability to produce thick leaves most appropriate in environments requiring water conservation. Thus, this simple anatomical metric presents an important perspective on the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of plant ecologies and further evidence that the vegetative biology of flowering plants-not just their reproductive biology-is unique.

  13. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Brian C; Smith, Stacey D; Armbruster, W Scott; Harder, Lawrence D; Hardy, Christopher R; Hileman, Lena C; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A; Stevens, Peter F; Fenster, Charles B; Diggle, Pamela K

    2016-05-11

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years. PMID:27147092

  14. Revisiting energy efficiency fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lombard, L.; Velazquez, D. [Grupo de Termotecnia, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Building Research Establishment (BRE), Garston, Watford, WD25 9XX (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Energy efficiency is a central target for energy policy and a keystone to mitigate climate change and to achieve a sustainable development. Although great efforts have been carried out during the last four decades to investigate the issue, focusing into measuring energy efficiency, understanding its trends and impacts on energy consumption and to design effective energy efficiency policies, many energy efficiency-related concepts, some methodological problems for the construction of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) and even some of the energy efficiency potential gains are often ignored or misunderstood, causing no little confusion and controversy not only for laymen but even for specialists. This paper aims to revisit, analyse and discuss some efficiency fundamental topics that could improve understanding and critical judgement of efficiency stakeholders and that could help in avoiding unfounded judgements and misleading statements. Firstly, we address the problem of measuring energy efficiency both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Secondly, main methodological problems standing in the way of the construction of EEI are discussed, and a sequence of actions is proposed to tackle them in an ordered fashion. Finally, two key topics are discussed in detail: the links between energy efficiency and energy savings, and the border between energy efficiency improvement and renewable sources promotion.

  15. Cats protecting birds revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang; Feng, Zhilan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we revisit the dynamical interaction among prey (bird), mesopredator (rat), and superpredator (cat) discussed in [Courchamp, F., Langlais, M., Sugihara, G., 1999. Cats protecting birds: modelling the mesopredator release effect. Journal of Animal Ecology 68, 282-292]. First, we develop a prey-mesopredator-superpredator (i.e., bird-rat-cat, briefly, BRC) model, where the predator's functional responses are derived based on the classical Holling's time budget arguments. Our BRC model overcomes several model construction problems in Courchamp et al. (1999), and admits richer, reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rat or the cat when the bird is endangered. We establish the existence of two types of mesopredator release phenomena: severe mesopredator release, where once superpredators are suppressed, a burst of mesopredators follows which leads their shared prey to extinction; and mild mesopredator release, where the mesopredator release could assert more negative impact on the endemic prey but does not lead the endemic prey to extinction. A sharp sufficient criterion is established for the occurrence of severe mesopredator release. We also show that, in a prey-mesopredator-superpredator trophic food web, eradication of introduced superpredators such as feral domestic cats in the BRC model, is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey. The presence of a superpredator may have a beneficial effect in such systems. PMID:15998496

  16. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  17. Benjamin Franklin and Mesmerism, revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, Kevin M; Perry, Campbell

    2002-10-01

    The authors revisit and update their previous historiographical note (McConkey & Perry, 1985) on Benjamin Franklin's involvement with and investigation of animal magnetism or mesmerism. They incorporate more recent literature and offer additional comment about Franklin's role in and views about mesmerism. Franklin had a higher degree of personal involvement with and a more detailed opinion of mesmerism than has been previously appreciated.

  18. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  19. Conservation and canalization of gene expression during angiosperm diversification accompany the origin and evolution of the flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanderbali, André S; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zahn, Laura M; Brockington, Samuel F; Wall, P Kerr; Gitzendanner, Matthew A; Albert, Victor A; Leebens-Mack, James; Altman, Naomi S; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S

    2010-12-28

    The origin and rapid diversification of the angiosperms (Darwin's "Abominable Mystery") has engaged generations of researchers. Here, we examine the floral genetic programs of phylogenetically pivotal angiosperms (water lily, avocado, California poppy, and Arabidopsis) and a nonflowering seed plant (a cycad) to obtain insight into the origin and subsequent evolution of the flower. Transcriptional cascades with broadly overlapping spatial domains, resembling the hypothesized ancestral gymnosperm program, are deployed across morphologically intergrading organs in water lily and avocado flowers. In contrast, spatially discrete transcriptional programs in distinct floral organs characterize the more recently derived angiosperm lineages represented by California poppy and Arabidopsis. Deep evolutionary conservation in the genetic programs of putatively homologous floral organs traces to those operating in gymnosperm reproductive cones. Female gymnosperm cones and angiosperm carpels share conserved genetic features, which may be associated with the ovule developmental program common to both organs. However, male gymnosperm cones share genetic features with both perianth (sterile attractive and protective) organs and stamens, supporting the evolutionary origin of the floral perianth from the male genetic program of seed plants.

  20. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across 41 Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Aims Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life-forms. However, recent reports suggest that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. Methods To examine this possi...

  1. Nuclear fear revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  2. The Hilbert monopole revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz, Ivan; Anguera Pros, Jaume; Andújar Linares, Aurora; Puente Baliarda, Carles; Borja, C.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison between the resonant performance of the third iteration Hilbert monopole and a spiral shaped one of the same size and resonant frequency is presented. Quality factor, bandwidth, efficiency and radiation patterns are investigated. Although the Hilbert monopole total wire length is longer, it shows nearly the same radiation efficiency yet a lower quality factor. Hence the higher compression efficiency of the spiral shaped monopole does not provide any advantage in the antenna elect...

  3. Effects of plant diversity on primary production and species interactions in brackish water angiosperm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina; Gustafsson, Camilla; Boström, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    plant productivity in brackish water angiosperm communities, a 14 wk field experiment was conducted. Using a replacement design with a standardized initial aboveground biomass, shoots of Zostera marina, Potamogeton filiformis and P. perfoliatus were planted on a shallow, sandy bottom in replicated...... production in bicultures in general, while a positive net effect was found in the P. perfoliatus and P. filiformis biculture. Despite the absence of significant results for other treatments and plant variables, a trend of positive complementarity and negative selection effects were present. Plant diversity......Research on plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has mainly focused on terrestrial ecosystems, and our understanding of how plant species diversity and interactions affect processes in marine ecosystems is still limited. To investigate if plant species richness and composition influence...

  4. Uneven HAK/KUP/KT protein diversity among angiosperms: species distribution and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eNieves-Cordones

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available HAK/KUP/KT K+ transporters have been widely associated with K+ transport across membranes in bacteria, fungi and plants. Indeed some members of the plant HAK/KUP/KT family contribute to root K+ uptake, notably at low external concentrations. Besides such role in acquisition, several studies carried out in Arabidopsis have shown that other members are also involved in developmental processes. With the publication of new plant genomes, a growing interest on plant species other than Arabidopsis has become evident. In order to understand HAK/KUP/KT diversity in these new plant genomes, we discuss the evolutionary trends of 913 HAK/KUP/KT sequences identified in 46 genomes revealing five major groups with an uneven distribution among angiosperms, notably between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species. This information evidenced the richness of crop genomes in HAK/KUP/KT transporters and supports their study for unraveling novel physiological roles of such transporters in plants.

  5. Gymnosperms have increased capacity for electron leakage to oxygen (Mehler and PTOX reactions) in photosynthesis compared with angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirao, Masayoshi; Kuroki, Shu; Kaneko, Kaoru; Kinjo, Yuriko; Tsuyama, Michito; Förster, Britta; Takahashi, Shunichi; Badger, Murray R

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in photosynthesis by participating in a number of O2-consuming reactions. O2 inhibits CO2 fixation by stimulating photorespiration, thus reducing plant production. O2 interacts with photosynthetic electron transport in the chloroplasts' thylakoids in two main ways: by accepting electrons from PSI (Mehler reaction); and by accepting electrons from reduced plastoquinone (PQ) mediated by the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX). In this study, we show, using 101 plant species, that there is a difference in the potential for photosynthetic electron flow to O2 between angiosperms and gymnosperms. We found, from measurements of Chl fluorescence and leaf absorbance at 830 nm, (i) that electron outflow from PSII, as determined by decay kinetics of Chl fluorescence after application of a saturating light pulse, is more rapid in gymnosperms than in angiosperms; (ii) that the reaction center Chl of PSI (P700) is rapidly and highly oxidized in gymnosperms during induction of photosynthesis; and (iii) that these differences are dependent on oxygen. Finally, rates of O2 uptake measured by mass spectrometry in the absence of photorespiration were significantly promoted by illumination in dark-adapted leaves of gymnosperms, but not in those of angiosperms. The light-stimulated O2 uptake was around 10% of the maximum O2 evolution in gymnosperms and 1% in angiosperms. These results suggest that gymnosperms have increased capacity for electron leakage to oxygen in photosynthesis compared with angiosperms. The involvement of the Mehler reaction and PTOX in the electron flow to O2 is discussed.

  6. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  7. Atmospheric predictability revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzie S. R. Froude

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the potential to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP by estimating upper and lower bounds on predictability by re-visiting the original study of Lorenz (1982 but applied to the most recent version of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF forecast system, for both the deterministic and ensemble prediction systems (EPS. These bounds are contrasted with an older version of the same NWP system to see how they have changed with improvements to the NWP system. The computations were performed for the earlier seasons of DJF 1985/1986 and JJA 1986 and the later seasons of DJF 2010/2011 and JJA 2011 using the 500-hPa geopotential height field. Results indicate that for this field, we may be approaching the limit of deterministic forecasting so that further improvements might only be obtained by improving the initial state. The results also show that predictability calculations with earlier versions of the model may overestimate potential forecast skill, which may be due to insufficient internal variability in the model and because recent versions of the model are more realistic in representing the true atmospheric evolution. The same methodology is applied to the EPS to calculate upper and lower bounds of predictability of the ensemble mean forecast in order to explore how ensemble forecasting could extend the limits of the deterministic forecast. The results show that there is a large potential to improve the ensemble predictions, but for the increased predictability of the ensemble mean, there will be a trade-off in information as the forecasts will become increasingly smoothed with time. From around the 10-d forecast time, the ensemble mean begins to converge towards climatology. Until this point, the ensemble mean is able to predict the main features of the large-scale flow accurately and with high consistency from one forecast cycle to the next. By the 15-d forecast time, the ensemble mean has lost

  8. Enceladus' tidal dissipation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej; Soucek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    A series of chemical and physical evidence indicates that the intense activity at Enceladus' South Pole is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir underneath the tectonically active ice shell. The detection of a significant libration implies that this water reservoir is global and that the average ice shell thickness is about 20-25km (Thomas et al. 2016). The interpretation of gravity and topography data further predicts large variations in ice shell thickness, resulting in a shell potentially thinner than 5 km in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) (Cadek et al. 2016). Such an ice shell structure requires a very strong heat source in the interior, with a focusing mechanism at the SPT. Thermal diffusion through the ice shell implies that at least 25-30 GW is lost into space by passive diffusion, implying a very efficient dissipation mechanism in Enceladus' interior to maintain such an ocean/ice configuration thermally stable.In order to determine in which conditions such a large dissipation power may be generated, we model the tidal response of Enceladus including variable ice shell thickness. For the rock core, we consider a wide range of rheological parameters representative of water-saturated porous rock materials. We demonstrate that the thinning toward the South Pole leads to a strong increase in heat production in the ice shell, with a optimal thickness obtained between 1.5 and 3 km, depending on the assumed ice viscosity. Our results imply that the heat production in the ice shell within the SPT may be sufficient to counterbalance the heat loss by diffusion and to power eruption activity. However, outside the SPT, a strong dissipation in the porous core is required to counterbalance the diffusive heat loss. We show that about 20 GW can be generated in the core, for an effective viscosity of 1012 Pa.s, which is comparable to the effective viscosity estimated in water-saturated glacial tills on Earth. We will discuss the implications of this revisited tidal

  9. Revisiting SU(N) integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuber, Jean-Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this note, I revisit integrals over $\\SU(N)$ of the form $ \\int DU\\, U_{i_1j_1}\\cdots U_{i_pj_p}\\Ud_{k_1l_1}\\cdots \\Ud_{k_nl_n}$. While the case $p=n$ is well known, it seems that explicit expressions for $p=n+N$ had not appeared in the literature. Similarities and differences, in particular in the large $N$ limit, between the two cases are discussed

  10. The Damped String Problem Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gesztesy, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the damped string equation on a compact interval with a variety of boundary conditions and derive an infinite sequence of trace formulas associated with it, employing methods familiar from supersymmetric quantum mechanics. We also derive completeness and Riesz basis results (with parentheses) for the associated root functions under less smoothness assumptions on the coefficients than usual, using operator theoretic methods (rather than detailed eigenvalue and root function asymptotics) only.

  11. Markowitz Revisited: Social Portfolio Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Gasser, Stephan; Kremser, Thomas; Rammerstorfer, Margarethe; Weinmayer, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In recent years socially responsible investing has become an increasingly more popular subject with both private and institutional investors. At the same time, a number of scientific papers have been published on socially responsible investments (SRIs), covering a broad range of topics, from what actually defines SRIs to the financial performance of SRI funds in contrast to non-SRI funds. In this paper, we revisit Markowitz' Portfolio Selection Theory and propose a modification...

  12. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the concepts used in presenting these should at least in transition be able to contain a distinction bet...

  13. Revisiting the scattering greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kitzmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO2 dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  14. Insights into the dynamics of genome size and chromosome evolution in the early diverging angiosperm lineage Nymphaeales (water lilies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, J; Kelly, L J; Magdalena, C; Leitch, I J

    2013-08-01

    Nymphaeales are the most species-rich lineage of the earliest diverging angiosperms known as the ANA grade (Amborellales, Nymphaeales, Austrobaileyales), and they have received considerable attention from morphological, physiological, and ecological perspectives. Although phylogenetic relationships between these three lineages of angiosperms are mainly well resolved, insights at the whole genome level are still limited because of a dearth of information. To address this, genome sizes and chromosome numbers in 34 taxa, comprising 28 species were estimated and analysed together with previously published data to provide an overview of genome size and chromosome diversity in Nymphaeales. Overall, genome sizes were shown to vary 10-fold and chromosome numbers and ploidy levels ranged from 2n = 2x = 18 to 2n = 16x = ∼224. Distinct patterns of genome diversity were apparent, reflecting the differential incidence of polyploidy, changes in repetitive DNA content, and chromosome rearrangements within and between genera. Using model-based approaches, ancestral genome size and basic chromosome numbers were reconstructed to provide insights into the dynamics of genome size and chromosome number evolution. Finally, by combining additional data from Amborellales and Austrobaileyales, a comprehensive overview of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in these early diverging angiosperms is presented.

  15. Emerging roles for microtubules in angiosperm pollen tube growth highlight new research cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMoscatelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, actin filaments have an important role in organelle movement and cytoplasmic streaming. Otherwise microtubules have a role in restricting organelles to specific areas of the cell and in maintaining organelle morphology. In somatic plant cells, microtubules also participate in cell division and morphogenesis, allowing cells to take their definitive shape in order to perform specific functions. In the latter case, microtubules influence assembly of the cell wall, controlling the delivery of enzymes involved in cellulose synthesis and of wall modulation material to the proper sites.In angiosperm pollen tubes, organelle movement is generally attributed to the acto-myosin system, the main role of which is in distributing organelles in the cytoplasm and in carrying secretory vesicles to the apex for polarized growth. Recent data on membrane trafficking suggests a role of microtubules in fine delivery and repositioning of vesicles to sustain pollen tube growth. This review examines the role of microtubules in secretion and endocytosis, highlighting new research cues regarding cell wall construction and pollen tube-pistil crosstalk, that help unravel the role of microtubules in polarized growth.

  16. General Botany of the Angiosperms in high school: a comparative analysis of textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Cardoso Marinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Much of the textbooks content in Brazil is related to the historical period lived. With the advancement in the field of scientific research, the textbooks have become key pieces in the transfer/adaptation of this knowledge for the basic levels of education influencing positively or negatively in approach and presentation of content. The purpose of this study was to examine comparatively how the contents of General Botany of the Angiosperms are approached in three biology textbooks of high school (1974, 1999 and 2011. The 1974 book have long texts that include an elaborated discussion and there is a tendency to simplify the content. The book of the 1999 presents the content in the form of direct and specific concepts split into separate chapters. In this work, the reduced form compromises the discussion, giving up themes that enrich the study. The book of the 2011 separate the content into different chapters and keeps reducing the content but without losing the quality and clarity of their information. Over the years, from the best understanding of the textbooks objectives and scientific research involving these documents, it is clear that the most current book is more attractive and less dense, contributing of the deconstruct the idea of a boring and decorative Botany.

  17. Coalescence vs. concatenation: Sophisticated analyses vs. first principles applied to rooting the angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mark P; Gatesy, John

    2015-10-01

    It has recently been concluded that phylogenomic data from 310 nuclear genes support the clade of (Amborellales, Nymphaeales) as sister to the remaining angiosperms and that shortcut coalescent phylogenetic methods outperformed concatenation for these data. We falsify both of those conclusions here by demonstrating that discrepant results between the coalescent and concatenation analyses are primarily caused by the coalescent methods applied (MP-EST and STAR) not being robust to the highly divergent and often mis-rooted gene trees that were used. This result reinforces the expectation that low amounts of phylogenetic signal and methodological artifacts in gene-tree reconstruction can be more problematic for shortcut coalescent methods than is the assumption of a single hierarchy for all genes by concatenation methods when these approaches are applied to ancient divergences in empirical studies. We also demonstrate that a third coalescent method, ASTRAL, is more robust to mis-rooted gene trees than MP-EST or STAR, and that both Observed Variability (OV) and Tree Independent Generation of Evolutionary Rates (TIGER), which are two character subsampling procedures, are biased in favor of characters with highly asymmetrical distributions of character states when applied to this dataset. We conclude that enthusiastic application of novel tools is not a substitute for rigorous application of first principles, and that trending methods (e.g., shortcut coalescent methods applied to ancient divergences, tree-independent character subsampling), may be novel sources of previously under-appreciated, systematic errors. PMID:26002829

  18. Variation in ovule and seed size and associated size-number trade-offs in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Carly A; Harder, Lawrence D

    2007-05-01

    Unlike pollen and seed size, the extent and causes of variation in ovule size remain unexplored. Based on 45 angiosperm species, we assessed whether intra- and interspecific variation in ovule size is consistent with cost minimization during ovule production or allows maternal plants to dominate conflict with their seeds concerning resource investment. Despite considerable intraspecific variation in ovule volume (mean CV = 0.356), ovule production by few species was subject to a size-number trade-off. Among the sampled species, ovule volume varied two orders of magnitude, whereas seed volume varied four orders of magnitude. Ovule volume varied positively among species with flower mass and negatively with ovule number. Tenuinucellate ovules were generally larger that crassinucellate ovules, and species with apical placentation (which mostly have uniovulate ovaries) had smaller ovules than those with other placentation types. Seed volume varied positively among species with fruit mass and seed development time, but negatively with seed number. Seeds grew a median 93-fold larger than the ovules from which they originated. Our results provide equivocal evidence that selection minimizes ovule size to allow efficient resource allocation after fertilization, but stronger evidence that ovule size affords maternal plants an advantage in parent-offspring conflict. PMID:21636453

  19. Incentives for partitioning, revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incentives for separating and eliminating various elements from radioactive waste prior to final geologic disposal were investigated. Exposure pathways to humans were defined, and potential radiation doses to an individual living within the region of influence of the underground storage site were calculated. The assumed radionuclide source was 1/5 of the accumulated high-level waste from the US nuclear power economy through the year 2000. The repository containing the waste was assumed to be located in a reference salt site geology. The study required numerous assumptions concerning the transport of radioactivity from the geologic storage site to man. The assumptions used maximized the estimated potential radiation doses, particularly in the case of the intrusion water well scenario, where hydrologic flow field dispersion effects were ignored. Thus, incentives for removing elements from the waste tended to be maximized. Incentives were also maximized by assuming that elements removed from the waste could be eliminated from the earth without risk. The results of the study indicate that for reasonable disposal conditions, incentives for partitioning any elements from the waste in order to minimize the risk to humans are marginal at best

  20. The power reinforcement framework revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe; Andersen, Kim Normann; Danziger, James N.

    2016-01-01

    public organizations. This article revisits the 30-yearold power reinforcement framework by means of an empirical analysis on the use of mobile technology in a large-scale programme in Danish public sector home care. It explores whether and to what extent administrative management has controlled decision......-dominated and centrally controlled technologies that were the main focus of the 1970s and 1980s studies. Yet this study concludes that there is general support for the reinforcement framework in the contemporary application of mobile technology in public sector home care....

  1. Leadership and Management Theories Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to revisit and analyze key contributions to the understanding of leadership and management. As a part of the discussion a role perspective that allows for additional and/or integrated leader dimensions, including a change-centered, will be outlined. Seemingly, a major...... challenge on the substantive level is the integration of soft and hard managerial functions, while the concepts used in presenting these should at least in transition be able to contain a distinction between hard, soft, and general practices....

  2. Jesus and the law revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R.G. Loader

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article revisited the issue of Jesus’ attitude towards the Torah on the basis of a critical discussion of the most recent extensive treatment of the theme by Meier in his A marginal Jew: Rethinking the historical Jesus: Volume four: Law and love (2009. It engaged Meier’s contribution in the light of contemporary research, concluding that, whilst Meier provided an erudite analysis, his thesis that Jesus’ teaching on divorce and oaths revoked Mosaic law did not convince, for it did not adequately consider the extent to which the contemporary interpretation of the Torah could encompass such radicalisation.

  3. Neutron radiobiology revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reviews the experimental results of normal tissue and tumour studies in animals. The dose per fraction dependence of the RBE in normal tissues has been long recognised, together with the steeper increase of RBE at low doses for late responding tissues compared with acute reactions. The dose dependence for tumours is more complex, because of hypoxia and reoxygenation, as well as differences in repair capability after high LET damage. A comparison of tumour and normal tissue RBE values shows that there is little experimental evidence for a therapeutic advantage at clinically relevant doses. In particular, the RBE for slow growing tumours is even lower than that for the faster growing mouse tumours. The reasons for the loss of expected neutron benefits in clinically relevant experiments are discussed. The disappointing prospects for neutrons are contrasted with the current multifactorial approaches to overcoming resistance to more conventional low LET radiations, including acceleration, hyperfractionation and several types of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. (orig.)

  4. Photoevaporation of Circumstellar Disks Revisited: The Dust-Free Case

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kei E I; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as a conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived by the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the 2D axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by the single power-law with an index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power-law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk...

  5. Des aliments tu feras medecine: Hippocrate revisite

    OpenAIRE

    Lahlou, Saadi

    1999-01-01

    "Let foods be your medicine Hippocrates revisited". In this article the author discusses the behaviour of consumers, concepts of 'health foods' and helth eating towards food and the rise of businesses built around the health food industry.

  6. Orthovoltage machines revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the advent of megavoltage radiation, orthovoltage units operating up to 300 KV were used to deliver radiotherapy. Side effects due to higher doses to normal organs were inevitable because of less penetrating photon beams. With the advent of the megavoltage equipment more penetrating photon beams replaced the orthovoltage beams to treat deep seated tumours more effectively. The use of the orthovoltage energy range has since been limited to superficial skin cancers and many palliative treatments such as bony metastases, in particular ribs and spine. When the Linear Accelerators (linacs) with electron energy range were introduced into the radiotherapy field the use of orthovoltage range was further reduced. The electron beams were successfully used to treat superficial cancers and the demand for the orthovoltage units became less. Because of this many of the reputable manufacturers of orthovoltage units (eg. Philips) ceased the production of these units over a decade. During the eighties, the only available orthovoltage unit was the Siemens Stabilopan. In the early nineties Pantak introduced a new orthovoltage unit incorporated with new technology. NSW cancer treatment centres purchased several of these machines. Considering the capital cost and the annual maintenance cost, reliability, computer controlled accurate dose delivery, number of RT staff required to operate the unit and the Medicare revenue, it is cost beneficial to install an orthovoltage unit in a modern radiotherapy department. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Radiography

  7. The Phantom brane revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  8. Does multiple paternity affect seed mass in angiosperms? An experimental test in Dalechampia scandens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélabon, C; Albertsen, E; Falahati-Anbaran, M; Wright, J; Armbruster, W S

    2015-09-01

    Flowers fertilized by multiple fathers may be expected to produce heavier seeds than those fertilized by a single father. However, the adaptive mechanisms leading to such differences remain unclear, and the evidence inconsistent. Here, we first review the different hypotheses predicting an increase in seed mass when multiple paternity occurs. We show that distinguishing between these hypotheses requires information about average seed mass, but also about within-fruit variance in seed mass, bias in siring success among pollen donors, and whether siring success and seed mass are correlated. We then report the results of an experiment on Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae), assessing these critical variables in conjunction with a comparison of seed mass resulting from crosses with single vs. multiple pollen donors. Siring success differed among males when competing for fertilization, but average seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. Furthermore, paternal identity explained only 3.8% of the variance in seed mass, and siring success was not correlated with the mass of the seeds produced. Finally, within-infructescence variance in seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. These results suggest that neither differential allocation nor sibling rivalry has any effect on the average mass of seeds in multiply sired fruits in D. scandens. Overall, the limited paternal effects observed in most studies and the possibility of diversification bet hedging among flowers (but not within flowers), suggest that multiple paternity within fruits or infructescence is unlikely to affect seed mass in a large number of angiosperm species. PMID:26174371

  9. Bark ecology of twigs vs. main stems: functional traits across eighty-five species of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Castorena, Matiss; Laws, Claire A; Westoby, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Although produced by meristems that are continuous along the stem length, marked differences in bark morphology and in microenvironment would suggest that main stem and twig bark might differ ecologically. Here, we examined: (1) how closely associated main stem and twig bark traits were, (2) how these associations varied across sites, and (3) used these associations to infer functional and ecological differences between twig and main stem bark. We measured density, water content, photosynthesis presence/absence, total, outer, inner, and relative thicknesses of main stem and twig bark from 85 species of angiosperms from six sites of contrasting precipitation, temperature, and fire regimes. Density and water content did not differ between main stems and twigs across species and sites. Species with thicker twig bark had disproportionately thicker main stem bark in most sites, but the slope and degree of association varied. Disproportionately thicker main stem bark for a given twig bark thickness in most fire-prone sites suggested stem protection near the ground. The savanna had the opposite trend, suggesting that selection also favors twig protection in these fire-prone habitats. A weak main stem-twig bark thickness association was observed in non fire-prone sites. The near-ubiquity of photosynthesis in twigs highlighted its likely ecological importance; variation in this activity was predicted by outer bark thickness in main stems. It seems that the ecology of twig bark can be generalized to main stem bark, but not for functions depending on the amount of bark, such as protection, storage, or photosynthesis.

  10. A test of the hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis in angiosperm and conifer tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel M; Wortemann, Remi; McCulloh, Katherine A; Jordan-Meille, Lionel; Ward, Eric; Warren, Jeffrey M; Palmroth, Sari; Domec, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Water transport from soils to the atmosphere is critical for plant growth and survival. However, we have a limited understanding about many portions of the whole-tree hydraulic pathway, because the vast majority of published information is on terminal branches. Our understanding of mature tree trunk hydraulic physiology, in particular, is limited. The hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis (HVSH) stipulates that distal portions of the plant (leaves, branches and roots) should be more vulnerable to embolism than trunks, which are nonredundant organs that require a massive carbon investment. In the current study, we compared vulnerability to loss of hydraulic function, leaf and xylem water potentials and the resulting hydraulic safety margins (in relation to the water potential causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity) in leaves, branches, trunks and roots of four angiosperms and four conifer tree species. Across all species, our results supported strongly the HVSH as leaves and roots were less resistant to embolism than branches or trunks. However, branches were consistently more resistant to embolism than any other portion of the plant, including trunks. Also, calculated whole-tree vulnerability to hydraulic dysfunction was much greater than vulnerability in branches. This was due to hydraulic dysfunction in roots and leaves at less negative water potentials than those causing branch or trunk dysfunction. Leaves and roots had narrow or negative hydraulic safety margins, but trunks and branches maintained positive safety margins. By using branch-based hydraulic information as a proxy for entire plants, much research has potentially overestimated embolism resistance, and possibly drought tolerance, for many species. This study highlights the necessity to reconsider past conclusions made about plant resistance to drought based on branch xylem only. This study also highlights the necessity for more research of whole-plant hydraulic physiology to better

  11. A test of the hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis in angiosperm and conifer tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel M; Wortemann, Remi; McCulloh, Katherine A; Jordan-Meille, Lionel; Ward, Eric; Warren, Jeffrey M; Palmroth, Sari; Domec, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Water transport from soils to the atmosphere is critical for plant growth and survival. However, we have a limited understanding about many portions of the whole-tree hydraulic pathway, because the vast majority of published information is on terminal branches. Our understanding of mature tree trunk hydraulic physiology, in particular, is limited. The hydraulic vulnerability segmentation hypothesis (HVSH) stipulates that distal portions of the plant (leaves, branches and roots) should be more vulnerable to embolism than trunks, which are nonredundant organs that require a massive carbon investment. In the current study, we compared vulnerability to loss of hydraulic function, leaf and xylem water potentials and the resulting hydraulic safety margins (in relation to the water potential causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity) in leaves, branches, trunks and roots of four angiosperms and four conifer tree species. Across all species, our results supported strongly the HVSH as leaves and roots were less resistant to embolism than branches or trunks. However, branches were consistently more resistant to embolism than any other portion of the plant, including trunks. Also, calculated whole-tree vulnerability to hydraulic dysfunction was much greater than vulnerability in branches. This was due to hydraulic dysfunction in roots and leaves at less negative water potentials than those causing branch or trunk dysfunction. Leaves and roots had narrow or negative hydraulic safety margins, but trunks and branches maintained positive safety margins. By using branch-based hydraulic information as a proxy for entire plants, much research has potentially overestimated embolism resistance, and possibly drought tolerance, for many species. This study highlights the necessity to reconsider past conclusions made about plant resistance to drought based on branch xylem only. This study also highlights the necessity for more research of whole-plant hydraulic physiology to better

  12. A draft of the genome and four transcriptomes of a medicinal and pesticidal angiosperm Azadirachta indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Neeraja M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azadirachta indica (neem tree is a source of a wide number of natural products, including the potent biopesticide azadirachtin. In spite of its widespread applications in agriculture and medicine, the molecular aspects of the biosynthesis of neem terpenoids remain largely unexplored. The current report describes the draft genome and four transcriptomes of A. indica and attempts to contextualise the sequence information in terms of its molecular phylogeny, transcript expression and terpenoid biosynthesis pathways. A. indica is the first member of the family Meliaceae to be sequenced using next generation sequencing approach. Results The genome and transcriptomes of A. indica were sequenced using multiple sequencing platforms and libraries. The A. indica genome is AT-rich, bears few repetitive DNA elements and comprises about 20,000 genes. The molecular phylogenetic analyses grouped A. indica together with Citrus sinensis from the Rutaceae family validating its conventional taxonomic classification. Comparative transcript expression analysis showed either exclusive or enhanced expression of known genes involved in neem terpenoid biosynthesis pathways compared to other sequenced angiosperms. Genome and transcriptome analyses in A. indica led to the identification of repeat elements, nucleotide composition and expression profiles of genes in various organs. Conclusions This study on A. indica genome and transcriptomes will provide a model for characterization of metabolic pathways involved in synthesis of bioactive compounds, comparative evolutionary studies among various Meliaceae family members and help annotate their genomes. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in the azadirachtin synthesis in A. indica will pave ways for bulk production of environment friendly biopesticides.

  13. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Fraietta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired testicular function, i.e., hypogonadism, can result from a primary testicular disorder (hypergonadotropic or occur secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (hypogonadotropic. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be congenital or acquired. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is divided into anosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome and congenital normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The incidence of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is approximately 1-10:100,000 live births, and approximately 2/3 and 1/3 of cases are caused by Kallmann syndrome (KS and idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, respectively. Acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism can be caused by drugs, infiltrative or infectious pituitary lesions, hyperprolactinemia, encephalic trauma, pituitary/brain radiation, exhausting exercise, abusive alcohol or illicit drug intake, and systemic diseases such as hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis and histiocytosis X. The clinical characteristics of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are androgen deficiency and a lack/delay/stop of pubertal sexual maturation. Low blood testosterone levels and low pituitary hormone levels confirm the hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis. A prolonged stimulated intravenous GnRH test can be useful. In Kallmann syndrome, cerebral MRI can show an anomalous morphology or even absence of the olfactory bulb. Therapy for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism depends on the patient's desire for future fertility. Hormone replacement with testosterone is the classic treatment for hypogonadism. Androgen replacement is indicated for men who already have children or have no desire to induce pregnancy, and testosterone therapy is used to reverse the symptoms and signs of hypogonadism. Conversely, GnRH or gonadotropin therapies are the best options for men wishing to have children. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is one of the rare conditions in

  14. 侏罗纪的花化石与被子植物起源%Jurassic flower fossils and the origin of angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 刘仲健

    2015-01-01

    理解被子植物的历史对于人们了解现代被子植物之间的关系十分重要。以前欧美古植物学家认为,被子植物的历史不会早于白垩纪,使得被子植物看起来似乎是在白垩纪早期突然爆发的。但是分子钟和系统分析显示,被子植物应当早在三叠纪,至少在侏罗纪就已经出现了,但是问题的关键是相应化石证据的缺失。因此侏罗纪的花化石成为解决两个学派之间争斗的关键证据。本文简要地介绍了产出于中国辽西同一地层的、侏罗纪的三个被子植物属种及其特征,确认了被子植物在侏罗纪的存在,提出了新的被子植物雌蕊同源性理论,并为下一步植物系统学的发展打下了坚实的基础。%Understanding on the history of angiosperms is hinged with our appreciation of the relationship among extant angiosperms. Formerly European and American palaeobotanists believed that angiosperms cannot be older than the Cretaceous, leaving the origin of angiosperms as if a sudden explosion during the Early Cretaceous. But molecular clock and systematic analysis suggested that angiosperms should have been in place in the Triassic or at least the Jurassic, but this point of view lacked fossil support. Therefore the fates of angiosperm evolution hypotheses are hinged with the existence of fossilflowers in the Jurassic. Herein we introduce three taxa of angiosperms from a single Jurassic fossil locality in western Liaoning, China, confirming the existence of angiosperms in the Jurassic, advancing a new theory on the homology of angiosperm gynoecium, and paving the road for further development of plant systematics.

  15. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial-interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-05-01

    How fast does biodiversity respond to climate change? The relationship of past and current climate with phylogenetic assemblage structure helps us to understand this question. Studies of angiosperm tree diversity in North America have already suggested effects of current water-energy balance and tropical niche conservatism. However, the role of glacial-interglacial climate variability remains to be determined, and little is known about any of these relationships for gymnosperms. Moreover, phylogenetic endemism, the concentration of unique lineages in restricted ranges, may also be related to glacial-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility to recolonization to quantify glacial-interglacial climate variability. We found: (1) Current climate is the dominant factor explaining the overall patterns, with more clustered angiosperm assemblages toward lower temperature, consistent with tropical niche conservatism. (2) Long-term climate stability is associated with higher angiosperm endemism, while higher postglacial accessibility is linked to to more phylogenetic clustering and endemism in gymnosperms. (3) Factors linked to glacial-interglacial climate change have stronger effects on gymnosperms than on angiosperms. These results suggest that paleoclimate legacies supplement current climate in shaping phylogenetic patterns in North American trees, and especially so for gymnosperms.

  16. Inference of phylogenetic relationships among key angiosperm lineages using a compatibility method on a molecular data set

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Long QIU; George F.ESTABROOK

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the five key angiosperm lineages,Ceratophyllum,Chloranthaceae,eudicots,magnoliids,and monocots,have resisted resolution despite several large-scale analyses sampling taxa and characters extensively and using various analytical methods.Meanwhile,compatibility methods,which were explored together with parsimony and likelihood methods during the early development stage of phylogenetics.have been greatly under-appreciated and not been used to analyze the massive amount of sequence data to reconstruct thye basal angiosperm phylogeny.In this study,we used a compatibility method on a data set of eight genes (mitochondrial atp1,matR,and nad5,plastid atpB,marK,rbcL,and rpoC2,and nuclear 18S rDNA)gathered in an earlier study.We selected two sets of characters that are compatible with more of the other characters than a random character would be with at probabilities of pM<0.1 and p<0.5 respectively.The resulting data matrices were subjected to parsimony and likelihood bootstrap analyses.Our unrooted parsimony analyses showed that Ceratophyllum was immediately related to eudicots,this larger lineage was immediately related to magnoliids,and monocots were closely related to Chloranthaceae.All these relationships received 76%-96% bootstrap support.A likelihood analysis of the 8 gene pM<0.5 compatible site matrix recovered the same topology but with low support.Likelihood analyses of other compatible site matrices produced different topologies that were all weakly supported.The topology reconstructed in the parsimony analyses agrees with the one recovered in the previous study using both parsimony and likelihood methods when no character was eliminated.Parts of this topology have also been recovered in several earlier studies.Hence,this topology plausibly reflects the true relationships among the five key angiosperm lineages.

  17. Forensic seismology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, A.

    2007-01-01

    explosions. The principal reason for the separation however, is that for many orientations of the earthquake source there is at least one P nodal plane in the teleseismic window and this biases m b low. Only for earthquakes with near 45° dip-slip mechanisms where the antinode of P is in the source window is the m b: M s criterion predicted to fail. The results from modelling are consistent with observation—in particular there are earthquakes, “anomalous events”, which look explosion-like on the m b: M s criterion, that turn out to have mechanisms close to 45° dip-slip. Fortunately the P seismograms from such earthquakes usually show pP and sP, the reflections from the free surface of P and S waves radiated upwards. From the pP P and sP P times the focal depth can be estimated. So far the estimated depth of the anomalous events have turned out to be ˜20 km, too deep to be explosions. Studies show that the observation that P seismograms are more complex than predicted by simple models can be explained on the weak-signal hypothesis: the standard phases, direct P and the surface reflections, are weak because of amongst other things, the effects of the radiation pattern or obstacles on the source-to-receiver path; other non-standard arrivals then appear relatively large on the seismograms. What has come out of the modelling of P seismograms is a criterion for recognising suspicious disturbances based on simplicity rather than complexity. Simple P seismograms for earthquakes at depths of more than a few kilometres are likely to be radiated only to stations that lie in a confined range of azimuths and distances. If then, simple seismograms are recorded over a wide range of distances and particularly azimuths, it is unlikely the source is an earthquake at depth. It is possible to test this using the relative amplitudes of direct P and later arrivals that might be surface reflections. The procedure is to use only the simple P seismograms on the assumption that whereas the

  18. Primary productivity of angiosperm and macroalgae dominated habitats in a New England Salt Marsh: a Comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, C. T.; Able, K. W.; Lazzari, M. A.; Heck, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Net primary productivity estimates were made for the major macrophyte dominated habitats of the Nauset Marsh system, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Above-ground primary productivity of short form Spartina alterniflora, the dominant habitat of the system, was 664 g m -2 y -1. Productivity of the other dominant angiosperm ( Zostera marina) was estimated to range from 444-987 g m -2 y -1. The marsh creekbank habitat was dominated by an intertidal zone of fucoid algae ( Ascophyllum nodosum ecad. scorpioides, 1179 g m -2 y -1; Fucus vesiculosus, 426 g m -2 y -1), mixed intertidal filamentous algae (91 g m -2 y -1), and a subtidal zone of assorted macroalgae (68 g m -2 y -1). Intertidal mudflats were dominated by Cladophora gracilis, with net production ranging from 59-637 g m -2 y -1. These angiosperm and macrophyte and macrophyte dominated habitats produce over 3 × 10 6 kg y -1 of biomass (1·2 × 10 6 kg carbon y -1). Twenty-eight per cent (28%) of this carbon production is derived from the Zostera and macroalgae habitats. Although S. alterniflora is considered the major macrophyte primary producer in Nauset Marsh and other north temperate salt marshes, it is concluded that other habitats also contribute significantly to total system carbon production.

  19. Global DNA cytosine methylation as an evolving trait: phylogenetic signal and correlated evolution with genome size in Angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conchita eAlonso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA cytosine methylation is a widespread epigenetic mechanism in eukaryotes, and plant genomes commonly are densely methylated. Genomic methylation can be associated with functional consequences such as mutational events, genomic instability or altered gene expression, but little is known on interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation in plants. In this paper, we compare global cytosine methylation estimates obtained by HPLC and use a phylogenetically-informed analytical approach to test for significance of evolutionary signatures of this trait across 54 angiosperm species in 25 families. We evaluate whether interspecific variation in global cytosine methylation is statistically related to phylogenetic distance and also whether it is evolutionarily correlated with genome size (C-value. Global cytosine methylation varied widely between species, ranging between 5.3% (Arabidopsis and 39.2% (Narcissus. Differences between species were related to their evolutionary trajectories, as denoted by the strong phylogenetic signal underlying interspecific variation. Global cytosine methylation and genome size were evolutionarily correlated, as revealed by the significant relationship between the corresponding phylogenetically independent contrasts. On average, a ten-fold increase in genome size entailed an increase of about 10% in global cytosine methylation. Results show that global cytosine methylation is an evolving trait in angiosperms whose evolutionary trajectory is significantly linked to changes in genome size, and suggest that the evolutionary implications of epigenetic mechanisms are likely to vary between plant lineages.

  20. Phylogenetic assemblage structure of North American trees is more strongly shaped by glacial–interglacial climate variability in gymnosperms than in angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ziyu; Sandel, Brody Steven; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    How fast does biodiversity respond to climate change? The relationship of past and current climate with phylogenetic assemblage structure helps us to understand this question. Studies of angiosperm tree diversity in North America have already suggested effects of current water-energy balance......-interglacial climate variability and needs more attention. We used a refined phylogeny of both angiosperms and gymnosperms to map phylogenetic diversity, clustering and endemism of North American trees in 100-km grid cells, and climate change velocity since Last Glacial Maximum together with postglacial accessibility...... that paleoclimate legacies supplement current climate in shaping phylogenetic patterns in North American trees, and especially so for gymnosperms....

  1. Noncommutative information is revealed from Hawking radiation as tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Baocheng; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the tunneling process from a Schwarzschild black hole in the noncommutative spacetime and obtain the non-thermal tunneling probability. In such non-thermal spectrum, the correlations are discovered, which can carry the information about the noncommutativity. Thus this enlightens a way to find the noncommutative information in the Hawking radiation. The entropy is also shown to be conserved in the whole radiation process, which implies that the unitarity is held even for the Hawking radiation from noncommutative black holes.

  2. Noncommutative information is revealed from Hawking radiation as tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Cai, Qing-yu; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

    2011-04-01

    We revisit the tunneling process from a Schwarzschild black hole in the noncommutative spacetime and obtain the nonthermal tunneling probability. In such nonthermal spectrum, the correlations are discovered, which can carry the information about the noncommutativity. Thus this enlightens a way to find the noncommutative information in the Hawking radiation. The entropy is also shown to be conserved in the whole radiation process, which implies that the unitarity is held even for the Hawking radiation from noncommutative black holes.

  3. Revisiting tourist behavior via destination brand worldness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kayak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking tourists’ perspective rather than destination offerings as its core concept, this study introduces “perceived destination brand worldness” as a variable. Perceived destination brand worldness is defined as the positive perception that a tourist has of a country that is visited by tourists from all over the world. Then, the relationship between perceived destination brand worldness and intention to revisit is analyzed using partial least squares regression. This empirical study selects Taiwanese tourists as its sample, and the results show that perceived destination brand worldness is a direct predictor of intention to revisit. In light of these empirical findings and observations, practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  4. Cytogenetics of Chilean angiosperms: Advances and prospects Citogenética de angiospermas chilenas: Avances y proyecciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO JARA-SEGUEL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic data on Chilean angiosperms have been reported since at least eight decades ago; however, much of this information is disperse in diverse sources and is not readily available as a comprehensive document that allows having a general vision on advances and gaps in this matter. The goal of this paper is to summarize the advances and prospets on cytogenetic studies of the Chilean angiosperms based on compiled publications from 1929 to 2010. We found 78 publications supplied by four groups of Chilean researchers and some foreign specialists. Cytogenetic data have been reported for 139 Chilean angiosperm species (2.8 % of the total, which belong to 58 genera and 34 families. During 2001-2010 there was an increase in the number of publications, being available 40 reports including 95 additional species. Based on these data, we hope that such a trend can be maintained in the next decade if the current research groups and young specialists continue to be interested in the study of native plants.Los datos citogenéticos sobre angiospermas chilenas han sido reportados desde al menos ocho décadas atrás; sin embargo, mucha de esta información está dispersa en diversas fuentes y no está disponible como un documento completo que permita tener una visión general sobre los avances y vacíos en esta materia. El objetivo de este trabajo es resumir los avances y proyecciones sobre los estudios citogenéticos disponibles para angiospermas chilenas, basado en publicaciones recopiladas desde 1929 hasta el 2010. Nosotros encontramos 78 publicaciones aportadas por cuatro grupos de investigadores chilenos y por algunos especialistas extranjeros. Datos citogenéticos han sido reportados para 139 especies de angiospermas chilenas (2.8 % del total, las cuales pertenecen a 58 géneros y 34 familias. Durante los años 2001-2010, existió un incremento en el número de publicaciones estando disponibles 40 reportes que incluyen 95 especies adicionales. Basados

  5. Geranyllinalool synthases in solanaceae and other angiosperms constitute an ancient branch of diterpene synthases involved in the synthesis of defensive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Falara; J.M. Alba; M.R. Kant; R.C. Schuurink; E. Pichersky

    2014-01-01

    Many angiosperm plants, including basal dicots, eudicots, and monocots, emit (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene, which is derived from geranyllinalool, in response to biotic challenge. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) geranyllinalool synthase (GLS) belonging to the e/f clade of the

  6. The complete nucleotide sequence of the coffee (Coffea arabica L.) chloroplast genome: organization and implications for biotechnology and phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chloroplast genome sequence of Coffea arabica L., first member of family Rubiaceae (fourth largest family of angiosperms) is reported. The genome is 155,189 bp in length, including a pair of inverted repeats of 25,943 bp, separated by a small single copy region of 18,137 bp and a large single co...

  7. Revisiting the Regenerative Possibilities of Ortiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duques, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article revisits Simon Ortiz's poem, "From Sand Creek," in which the latter can in so few words convey both the horrific tragedy of conquest and colonization, while at the same time find a space for possibility, a means for recovery that is never about forgetting but always occurs as a kind of recuperative remembering. Ortiz…

  8. Topological string theory revisited I: The stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we reformulate topological string theory using supermanifolds and supermoduli spaces, following the approach worked out by Witten (Superstring perturbation theory revisited, arXiv:1209.5461). We intend to make the construction geometrical in nature, by using supergeometry techniques extensively. The goal is to establish the foundation of studying topological string amplitudes in terms of integration over appropriate supermoduli spaces.

  9. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Calciarcus spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Calciarcus is revisited here with the purpose of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species diversity and morphology that can serve as a reference for future work. The geographic realm of the genus is significantly widened and a case is built...

  10. Fine structure of the butterfly diagram revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Balázs

    The latitudinal time distribution of sunspots (butterfly diagram) was studied by Becker (1959) and Antalová & Gnevyshev (1985). Our goal is to revisit these studies. In the first case we check whether there is a poleward migration in sunspot activity. In the second case we confirm the results, and make more quantitative statements concerning their significance and the position of the activity peaks.

  11. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  12. Revisiting Basic Counseling Skills with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Counseling with children can be challenging for counselors whose training focused on adult clients. The purpose of this article is to offer information to counselors seeking to improve their skills with children, revisiting a topic discussed in an earlier Journal of Counseling & Development article by P. Erdman and R. Lampe (1996). Examples of…

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck var 'Ridge Pineapple': organization and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Robert K

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of Citrus, the largest fruit crop of international economic value, has recently been imperiled due to the introduction of the bacterial disease Citrus canker. No significant improvements have been made to combat this disease by plant breeding and nuclear transgenic approaches. Chloroplast genetic engineering has a number of advantages over nuclear transformation; it not only increases transgene expression but also facilitates transgene containment, which is one of the major impediments for development of transgenic trees. We have sequenced the Citrus chloroplast genome to facilitate genetic improvement of this crop and to assess phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of angiosperms. Results The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis is 160,129 bp in length, and contains 133 genes (89 protein-coding, 4 rRNAs and 30 distinct tRNAs. Genome organization is very similar to the inferred ancestral angiosperm chloroplast genome. However, in Citrus the infA gene is absent. The inverted repeat region has expanded to duplicate rps19 and the first 84 amino acids of rpl22. The rpl22 gene in the IRb region has a nonsense mutation resulting in 9 stop codons. This was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing using primers that flank the IR/LSC boundaries. Repeat analysis identified 29 direct and inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Comparison of protein-coding sequences with expressed sequence tags revealed six putative RNA edits, five of which resulted in non-synonymous modifications in petL, psbH, ycf2 and ndhA. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP and maximum likelihood (ML methods of a dataset composed of 61 protein-coding genes for 30 taxa provide strong support for the monophyly of several major clades of angiosperms, including monocots, eudicots, rosids and asterids. The MP and ML trees are incongruent in three areas: the position of Amborella and

  14. Influences of evergreen gymnosperm and deciduous angiosperm tree species on the functioning of temperate and boreal forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augusto, Laurent; De Schrijver, An; Vesterdal, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    It has been recognized for a long time that the overstorey composition of a forest partly determines its biological and physical-chemical functioning. Here, we review evidence of the influence of evergreen gymnosperm (EG) tree species and deciduous angiosperm (DA) tree species on the water balance...... and processes that require further research. Relatively larger amounts of nutrients enter the soil-plant biogeochemical cycle under the influence of EGs than DAs, but recycling of nutrients appears to be slightly enhanced by DAs. Understanding the mechanisms underlying forest ecosystem functioning is essential...... of their tissues, higher soil moisture and favourable conditions for earthworms. Forest floors consequently tend to be thicker in EG forests compared to DA forests. Many factors, such as litter lignin content, influence litter decomposition and it is difficult to identify specific litter-quality parameters...

  15. Identifying the Basal Angiosperm Node in Chloroplast GenomePhylogenies: Sampling One's Way Out of the Felsenstein Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leebens-Mack, Jim; Raubeson, Linda A.; Cui, Liying; Kuehl,Jennifer V.; Fourcade, Matthew H.; Chumley, Timothy W.; Boore, JeffreyL.; Jansen, Robert K.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-05-27

    While there has been strong support for Amborella and Nymphaeales (water lilies) as branching from basal-most nodes in the angiosperm phylogeny, this hypothesis has recently been challenged by phylogenetic analyses of 61 protein-coding genes extracted from the chloroplast genome sequences of Amborella, Nymphaea and 12 other available land plant chloroplast genomes. These character-rich analyses placed the monocots, represented by three grasses (Poaceae), as sister to all other extant angiosperm lineages. We have extracted protein-coding regions from draft sequences for six additional chloroplast genomes to test whether this surprising result could be an artifact of long-branch attraction due to limited taxon sampling. The added taxa include three monocots (Acorus, Yucca and Typha), a water lily (Nuphar), a ranunculid(Ranunculus), and a gymnosperm (Ginkgo). Phylogenetic analyses of the expanded DNA and protein datasets together with microstructural characters (indels) provided unambiguous support for Amborella and the Nymphaeales as branching from the basal-most nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. However, their relative positions proved to be dependent on method of analysis, with parsimony favoring Amborella as sister to all other angiosperms, and maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining methods favoring an Amborella + Nympheales clade as sister. The maximum likelihood phylogeny supported the later hypothesis, but the likelihood for the former hypothesis was not significantly different. Parametric bootstrap analysis, single gene phylogenies, estimated divergence dates and conflicting in del characters all help to illuminate the nature of the conflict in resolution of the most basal nodes in the angiospermphylogeny. Molecular dating analyses provided median age estimates of 161 mya for the most recent common ancestor of all extant angiosperms and 145 mya for the most recent common ancestor of monocots, magnoliids andeudicots. Whereas long sequences reduce variance in

  16. Noncoding sequences from the slowly evolving chloroplast inverted repeat in addition to rbcL data do not support gnetalean affinities of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, V; Bobrova, V; Pahnke, J; Troitsky, A; Antonov, A; Martin, W

    1996-02-01

    We developed PCR primers against highly conserved regions of the rRNA operon located within the inverted repeat of the chloroplast genome and used these to amplify the region spanning from the 3' terminus of the 23S rRNA gene to the 5' terminus of the 5S rRNA gene. The sequence of this roughly 500-bp region, which includes the 4.5S rRNA gene and two chloroplast intergenic transcribed spacer regions (cpITS2 and cpITS3), was determined from 20 angiosperms, 7 gymnosperms, and 16 ferns (21,700 bp). Sequences for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) from the same or confamilial genera were analyzed in both separate and combined data sets. Due to the low substitution rate in the inverted repeat region, noncoding sequences in the cpITS region are not saturated with substitutions, in contrast to synonymous sites in rbcL, which are shown to evolve roughly six times faster than noncoding cpITS sequences. Several length polymorphisms with very clear phylogenetic distributions were detected in the data set. Results of phylogenetic analyses provide very strong bootstrap support for monophyly of both spermatophytes and angiosperms. No support for a sister group relationship between Gnetales and angiosperms in either cpITS or rbcL data was found. Rather, weak bootstrap support for monophyly of gymnosperms studied and for a basal position for the aquatic angiosperm Nymphaea among angiosperms studied was observed. Noncoding sequences from the inverted repeat region of chloroplast DNA appear suitable for study of land plant evolution.

  17. Scaling of stomatal size and density optimizes allocation of leaf epidermal space for gas exchange in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo Jan; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2015-04-01

    Stomata on plant leaves are key traits in the regulation of terrestrial fluxes of water and carbon. The basic morphology of stomata consists of a diffusion pore and two guard cells that regulate the exchange of CO2 and water vapour between the leaf interior and the atmosphere. This morphology is common to nearly all land plants, yet stomatal size (defined as the area of the guard cell pair) and stomatal density (the number of stomata per unit area) range over three orders of magnitude across species. Evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is driven by selection pressure on the anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax), which determines the operational range of leaf gas exchange. Despite the importance of stomata traits for regulating leaf gas exchange, a quantitative understanding of the relation between adaptation of gsmax and the underlying co-evolution of stomatal sizes and densities is still lacking. Here we develop a theoretical framework for a scaling relationship between stomatal sizes and densities within the constraints set by the allocation of epidermal space and stomatal gas exchange. Our theory predicts an optimal scaling relationship that maximizes gsmax and minimizes epidermal space allocation to stomata. We test whether stomatal sizes and densities reflect this optimal scaling with a global compilation of stomatal trait data on 923 species reflecting most major clades. Our results show optimal scaling between stomatal sizes and densities across all species in the compiled data set. Our results also show optimal stomatal scaling across angiosperm species, but not across gymnosperm and fern species. We propose that the evolutionary flexibility of angiosperms to adjust stomatal sizes underlies their optimal allocation of leaf epidermal space to gas exchange.

  18. Radiative decays of mesons in the NJL model

    CERN Document Server

    Epele, L N; Dumm, D G; Grunfeld, A G

    2001-01-01

    We revisit the theoretical predictions for anomalous radiative decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. Our analysis is performed in the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, introducing adequate parameters to account for the breakdown of chiral symmetry. The results are comparable with those obtained in previous approaches.

  19. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  20. Black hole formation by incoming electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I revisit a known solution of the Einstein field equations to show that it describes the formation of non-spherical black holes by the collapse of pure electromagnetic monochromatic radiation. Both positive and negative masses are feasible without ever violating the dominant energy condition. The solution can also be used to model the destruction of naked singularities and the evaporation of white holes by emission or reception of light. (note)

  1. Running of Radiative Neutrino Masses: The Scotogenic Model - REVISITED

    CERN Document Server

    Merle, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A few years ago, it had been shown that effects stemming from renormalisation group running can be quite large in the scotogenic model, where neutrinos obtain their mass only via a 1-loop diagram (or, more generally, in many models in which the light neutrino mass is generated via quantum corrections at loop-level). We present a new computation of the renormalisation group equations (RGEs) for the scotogenic model, thereby updating previous results. We discuss the matching in detail, in particular in what regards the different mass spectra possible for the new particles involved. We furthermore develop approximate analytical solutions to the RGEs for an extensive list of illustrative cases, covering all general tendencies that can appear in the model. Comparing them with fully numerical solutions, we give a comprehensive discussion of the running in the scotogenic model. Our approach is mainly top-down, but we also discuss an attempt to get information on the values of the fundamental parameters when inputtin...

  2. Revisiting the Diffusion Problem in a Capillary Tube Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The present work revisits the problem of modeling diffusion above a stagnant liquid interface in a capillary tube geometry. In this revisitation we elucidate a misconception found in the classical model proposed by Bird et. al. Furthermore, we propose alternative explanations for thermally forced diffusion and provide a description of natural convection in the absence of forcing terms.

  3. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Wigwamma spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.; Heldal, Mikal

    2013-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose of provi......A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Wigwamma is revisited here with the purpose...... of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history events and biogeography that can serve as a reference for the future. A new genus, Pseudowigwamma gen. nov. is described to accommodate Wigwamma scenozonion, a species which critically deviates...

  4. Noncommutative information is revealed from Hawking radiation as tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Baocheng; Cai, Qing-yu; Zhan, Ming-sheng; You, Li

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the tunneling process from a Schwarzschild black hole in the noncommutative spacetime and obtain the non-thermal tunneling probability. In such non-thermal spectrum, the correlations are discovered, which can carry the information about the noncommutativity. Thus this enlightens a way to find the noncommutative information in the Hawking radiation. The entropy is also shown to be conserved in the whole radiation process, which implies that the unitarity is held even for the Hawking...

  5. Early Angiosperm Flowers and Angiosperm Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Else Marie; Pedersen, Kaj Raunsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Boletim de Resumos XXIV Congresso Brasileiro de Paleontologia pp43 Paleontoiogi em Destaque Edicao especial-Agosto,2015......Boletim de Resumos XXIV Congresso Brasileiro de Paleontologia pp43 Paleontoiogi em Destaque Edicao especial-Agosto,2015...

  6. ConocoPhillips’ share price model revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kitov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Three years ago we found a statistically reliable link between ConocoPhillips’ (NYSE: COP) stock price and the difference between the core and headline CPI in the United States. In this article, the original relationship is revisited with new data available since 2009. The agreement between the observed monthly closing price (adjusted for dividends and splits) and that predicted from the CPI difference is confirmed. The original quantitative link is validated. In order to improve the accurac...

  7. Spine revisited: Principles and parlance redefined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A revised appreciation of the evolution and the nature of bone in general and of vertebrae in particular, allows revisiting the human spine to usher in some new principles and more rational parlance, that embody spine′s phylogeny, ontogeny, anatomy and physiology. Such an approach accords primacy to spine′s soft-tissues, and relegates to its bones a secondary place.

  8. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  9. Conservation of the abscission signaling peptide IDA during Angiosperm evolution: withstanding genome duplications and gain and loss of the receptors HAE/HSL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M. Stø

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA, which signals through the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2, controls different cell separation events in Arabidopsis thaliana. We hypothesize the involvement of this signaling module in abscission processes in other plant species even though they may shed other organs than A. thaliana. As the first step towards testing this hypothesis from an evolutionarily perspective we have identified genes encoding putative orthologues of IDA and its receptors by BLAST searches of publically available protein, nucleotide and genome databases for angiosperms. Genes encoding IDA or IDA-LIKE (IDL peptides and HSL proteins were found in all investigated species, which were selected as to represent each angiosperm order with available genomic sequences. The 12 amino acids representing the bioactive peptide in A. thaliana have virtually been unchanged throughout the evolution of the angiosperms; however, the number of IDL and HSL genes varies between different orders and species. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that IDA, HSL2 and the related HSL1 gene, were present in the species that gave rise to the angiosperms. HAE has arisen from HSL1 after a genome duplication that took place after the monocot - eudicots split. HSL1 has also independently been duplicated in the monocots, while HSL2 has been lost in gingers (Zingiberales and grasses (Poales. IDA has been duplicated in eudicots to give rise to functionally divergent IDL peptides. We postulate that the high number of IDL homologs present in the core eudicots is a result of multiple whole genome duplications. We substantiate the involvement of IDA and HAE/HSL2 homologs in abscission by providing gene expression data of different organ separation events from various species.

  10. New Records of Angiosperm from Inner Mongolia, China%内蒙古被子植物分布新资料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵利清; 王乐; 包萨如拉; 庞哲

    2012-01-01

    报道了内蒙古1个新分布记录属:粟草属(Milium L.);2个新分布记录种:翅柄车前(Plantago komarovii Pavl.)和粟草(Milium effusum L.).%New records of angiosperm taxa in Inner Mongolia are reported. Among those, Milium L. is a newly recorded genus,Plantago komarovii Pavl. and Milium effusum L. are two newly recorded species.

  11. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    appears that grains can be unfavourably oriented for glide despite their c-axis direction falling in those positions which were used in the "classical" interpretation. Additionally, it turns out that grain-scale dispersion axes can be used to describe the kinematic behaviour in a more consistent way compared to the rotations axes obtained from intragranular misorientations in the range of 2-10°. The implications derived from the experimental data set will be compared to data obtained from natural quartz mylonites which formed in a comparable recrystallization regime. This is the companion poster to "BHQ revisited (I) looking at grain size" where the development of the dynamically recrystallized grain size is addressed. Reference cited: Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194.

  12. A gene family derived from transposable elements during early angiosperm evolution has reproductive fitness benefits in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoé Joly-Lopez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of ever-growing numbers of sequenced eukaryotic genomes will not be fully realized until we learn to decipher vast stretches of noncoding DNA, largely composed of transposable elements. Transposable elements persist through self-replication, but some genes once encoded by transposable elements have, through a process called molecular domestication, evolved new functions that increase fitness. Although they have conferred numerous adaptations, the number of such domesticated transposable element genes remains unknown, so their evolutionary and functional impact cannot be fully assessed. Systematic searches that exploit genomic signatures of natural selection have been employed to identify potential domesticated genes, but their predictions have yet to be experimentally verified. To this end, we investigated a family of domesticated genes called MUSTANG (MUG, identified in a previous bioinformatic search of plant genomes. We show that MUG genes are functional. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MUG genes yield phenotypes with severely reduced plant fitness through decreased plant size, delayed flowering, abnormal development of floral organs, and markedly reduced fertility. MUG genes are present in all flowering plants, but not in any non-flowering plant lineages, such as gymnosperms, suggesting that the molecular domestication of MUG may have been an integral part of early angiosperm evolution. This study shows that systematic searches can be successful at identifying functional genetic elements in noncoding regions and demonstrates how to combine systematic searches with reverse genetics in a fruitful way to decipher eukaryotic genomes.

  13. Moisture availability constraints on the leaf area to sapwood area ratio: analysis of measurements on Australian evergreen angiosperm trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Henrique; Prentice, Colin; Evans, Bradley; Forrester, David; Drake, Paul; Feikema, Paul; Brooksbank, Kim; Eamus, Derek; Taylor, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA:SA) is a key plant trait that links photosynthesis to transpiration. Pipe model theory states that the sapwood cross-sectional area of a stem or branch at any point should scale isometrically with the area of leaves distal to that point. Optimization theory further suggests that LA:SA should decrease towards drier climates. Although acclimation of LA:SA to climate has been reported within species, much less is known about the scaling of this trait with climate among species. We compiled LA:SA measurements from 184 species of Australian evergreen angiosperm trees. The pipe model was broadly confirmed, based on measurements on branches and trunks of trees from one to 27 years old. We found considerable scatter in LA:SA among species. However quantile regression showed strong (0.2

  14. Patterns of ROS Accumulation in the Stigmas of Angiosperms and Visions into Their Multi-Functionality in Plant Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, Adoración; Rejón, Juan D; Hiscock, Simon J; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the stigma of several plant species has been investigated. Four developmental stages (unopened flower buds, recently opened flowers, dehiscent anthers, and flowers after fertilization) were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the ROS-specific probe DCFH2-DA. In all plants scrutinized, the presence of ROS in the stigmas was detected at higher levels during those developmental phases considered "receptive" to pollen interaction. In addition, these molecules were also present at early (unopened flower) or later (post-fertilization) stages, by following differential patterns depending on the different species. The biological significance of the presence ROS may differ between these stages, including defense functions, signaling and senescence. Pollen-stigma signaling is likely involved in the different mechanisms of self-incompatibility in these plants. The study also register a general decrease in the presence of ROS in the stigmas upon pollination, when NO is supposedly produced in an active manner by pollen grains. Finally, the distribution of ROS in primitive Angiosperms of the genus Magnolia was determined. The production of such chemical species in these plants was several orders of magnitude higher than in the remaining species evoking a massive displacement toward the defense function. This might indicate that signaling functions of ROS/NO in the stigma evolved later, as fine tune likely involved in specialized interactions like self-incompatibility. PMID:27547207

  15. Perfume-collecting male euglossine bees as pollinators of a basal angiosperm: the case of Unonopsis stipitata (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, H; Dötterl, S; Zimma, B; Ayasse, M; Gottsberger, G

    2009-01-01

    Pollination of Unonopsis stipitata (Annonaceae) by males of two perfume-collecting bees, Euglossa imperialis and Eulaema bombiformis (Euglossini) is described. This is the first detailed account of this pollination mode in a member of a basal angiosperm family. Pollinator behaviour, identification of the odour bouquet and electrophysiological reaction of one of the two pollinators to the odour bouquet were determined. The collected odour is produced by 'osmophores' located adaxially on the petals. Starch and polysaccharides accumulated in petals are metabolized during odour emission. Mainly monoterpenes were detected in the scent samples, among them trans-carvone oxide. This molecule is thought by several authors to be the key attractant for male Eulaema bees and may be pivotal for convergent evolution of the perfume-collecting syndrome among dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants. It is speculated that Unonopsis, which on the basis of molecular age dating is considered a relatively recent genus of the Annonaceae (being 15-30 million years old), has diversified in relation to male euglossine bee pollinators.

  16. Phylogeny of the basal angiosperm genus Pseuduvaria (Annonaceae) inferred from five chloroplast DNA regions, with interpretation of morphological character evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yvonne C F; Smith, Gavin J D; Saunders, Richard M K

    2008-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships within the magnoliid basal angiosperm genus Pseuduvaria (Annonaceae) are investigated using chloroplast DNA sequences from five regions: psbA-trnH spacer, trnL-F, matK, rbcL, and atpB-rbcL spacer. Over 4000 nucleotides from 51 species (of the total 53) were sequenced. The five cpDNA datasets were analyzed separately and in combination using maximum parsimony (MP), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian methods. The phylogenetic trees constructed using all three phylogenetic methods, based on the combined data, strongly support the monophyly of Pseuduvaria following the inclusion of Craibella phuyensis. The trees generated using MP were less well resolved, but relationships are similar to those obtained using the other methods. ML and Bayesian analyses recovered trees with short branch lengths, showing five main clades. This study highlights the evolutionary changes in seven selected morphological characters (floral sex, stamen and carpel numbers, inner petal color, presence of inner petal glands, flowering peduncle length, and monocarp size). Although floral unisexuality is ancestral within the genus, several evolutionary lineages reveal reversal to bisexuality. Other phylogenetic transitions include the evolution of sapromyophily, and fruit-bat frugivory and seed dispersal, thus allowing a wide range of adaptations for species survival.

  17. Revisiting Discrete Dark Matter Model:\\theta_{13}\

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta; Ogasahara, Atsushi; Omura, Yuji; Takayama, Fumihiro; Yasuhara, Daiki

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the discrete dark matter model with $A_4$ flavor symmetry originally introduced by M.Hirsch {\\it et.al}. We show that radiative corrections can lead to non-zero $\\theta_{13}$ and non-zero mass for the lightest neutrino. We find an interesting relation among neutrino mixing parameters and it indicates the sizable deviation of $s_{23}$ from the maximal angle $s_{23}^2=1/2$ and the degenerate mass spectrum for neutrinos. Also we study the possibilities that the right-handed neutrino is a dark matter candidate. Assuming the thermal freeze-out explains observed dark matter abundance, TeV-scale right-handed neutrino and flavored scalar bosons are required. In such a case, flavor symmetry plays an important role for the suppression of lepton flavor violating processes as well as for the stability of dark matter. We show that this scenario can be viable against currently existing constraints from collider, low energy experiments and cosmological observations.

  18. REVISITING THE SCATTERING GREENHOUSE EFFECT OF CO{sub 2} ICE CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitzmann, D., E-mail: daniel.kitzmann@csh.unibe.ch [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO{sub 2} dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  19. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (60Co) and chronic (137Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (32P), lethality (LD50, LD100), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD50 and LD100 for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation

  20. Useful ethnophytomedicinal recipes of angiosperms used against diabetes in South East Asian Countries (India, Pakistan & Sri Lanka).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwat, Sarfaraz Khan; Rehman, Fazalur; Khan, Ejaz Ahmad; Khakwani, Abdul Aziz; Ullah, Imdad; Khan, Kaleem Ullah; Khan, Inam Ullah

    2014-09-01

    This paper is based on data recorded from various literatures pertaining to ethnophytomedicinal recipes used against diabetes in South East Asia (India, Pakistan and Srilanka). Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for the therapy of diabetes mellitus. In total 419 useful phytorecipes of 270 plant species belonging to 74 Angiospermic families were collected. From the review it was revealed that plants showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belong to the families, Cucurbitaceae (16 spp.), Euphorbiaceae (15 spp.), Caesalpiniaceae and Papilionaceae (13 spp. each), Moraceae (11 spp.), Acanthaceae (10 spp.), Mimosaceae (09 spp.), Asteraceae, Malvaceae and Poaceae (08 spp. each), Hippocrateaceae, Rutaceae and Zingiberaceae (07 spp. each), Apocynaceae, Asclepiadaceae and Verbenaceae (06 spp. each), Apiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Lamiaceae, Myrtaceae, Solanaceae (05 spp.each). The most active plants are Syzigium cumini (14 recipes), Phyllanthus emblica (09 recipes), Centella asiatica and Momordica charantia (08 recipes each), Azadirachta indica (07 recipes), Aegle marmelos, Catharanthus roseus, Ficus benghalensis, Ficus racemosa, Gymnema sylvestre (06 recipes each), Allium cepa, A. sativum, Andrographis paniculata, Curcuma longa (05 recipes each), Citrullus colocynthis, Justicia adhatoda, Nelumbo nucifera, Tinospora cordifolia, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Ziziphus mauritiana and Wattakaka volubilis (4 recipes each). These traditional recipes include extracts, leaves, powders, flour, seeds, vegetables, fruits and herbal mixtures. Data inventory consists of botanical name, recipe, vernacular name, English name. Some of the plants of the above data with experimentally confirmed antidiabetic properties have also been recorded. More investigations must be carried out to evaluate the mechanism of action of diabetic medicinal plants. Toxicity of these plants should also be explained. Scientific validation of these recipes may help in discovering new drugs from

  1. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. At zero temperature and zero frequency......, if the Fermi energy lies in a spectral gap, we rigorously prove theWidom-Streda formula. For free electrons, the transverse conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers...

  2. Polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakayama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a polynomial chaotic inflation model in supergravity which we proposed soon after the Planck first data release. Recently some issues have been raised in Ref. [12], concerning the validity of our polynomial chaotic inflation model. We study the inflaton dynamics in detail, and confirm that the inflaton potential is very well approximated by a polynomial potential for the parameters of our interest in any practical sense, and in particular, the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio can be estimated by single-field approximation. This justifies our analysis of the polynomial chaotic inflation in supergravity.

  3. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Pappomonas spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    A contingent of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions almost 40 years ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported enlarging the realm of some of the species. The genus Pappomonas is revisited here with the purpose...... of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography that can serve as a reference for the future. The examination of a substantial number of cells unequivocally supports the elevation to species level of P. borealis stat...

  4. Coccolithophorids in polar waters: Trigonaspis spp. revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2015-01-01

    A group of weakly calcified coccolithophorid genera and species were described from polar regions several decades ago. In the interim period a few additional findings have been reported adding to the morphological and biogeographical databases of some of the species. The holococcolithophorid genus...... Trigonaspis is revisited here with the purpose of providing, based on additional sampling from both polar regions, an update on species morphology, life history aspects and biogeography. The genus Trigonaspis as currently circumscribed comprises four taxa – two from each polar region. The triangular plates...

  5. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  6. Resolution of Reflection Seismic Data Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus; Zunino, Andrea

    wavelength of the wavelet within the thin layer. Using a simple thin-layer parameterization Widess (1973) demonstrated that thin layers with thickness less that around λb/8 cannot be resolved from seismic data independent of the noise level. This has results since been widely adopted as a commonly accepted...... lower vertical resolution of reflection seismic data. In the following we will revisit think layer model and demonstrate that there is in practice no limit to the vertical resolution using the parameterization of Widess (1973), and that the vertical resolution is limited by the noise in the data...

  7. Revisiting Fermat's Factorization for the RSA Modulus

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Sounak

    2009-01-01

    We revisit Fermat's factorization method for a positive integer $n$ that is a product of two primes $p$ and $q$. Such an integer is used as the modulus for both encryption and decryption operations of an RSA cryptosystem. The security of RSA relies on the hardness of factoring this modulus. As a consequence of our analysis, two variants of Fermat's approach emerge. We also present a comparison between the two methods' effective regions. Though our study does not yield a new state-of-the-art algorithm for integer factorization, we believe that it reveals some interesting observations that are open for further analysis.

  8. Re-visiting the Piper Alpha accident

    OpenAIRE

    Dykesteen, Mette Kahrs

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis has been to re-visit the Piper Alpha accident using the latest version of the FLACS simulation code. In 1988/89 simulations of the gas explosion in the C Module of Piper Alpha were performed by Jan Roar Bakke and Idar Storvik at Christian Michelsen Institute, in conjunction with the investigation after the accident. For these simulations the computer code FLACS was used [1, 2]. In this thesis, the same simulation cases have been looked into, and the results o...

  9. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  10. The isotropic radio background revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Taoso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emi...

  11. Ground Zero revisits shape outbreaks: Zika and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Manrique, Pedro D; Johnson, Neil F

    2016-01-01

    During an infection outbreak, many people continue to revisit Ground Zero - such as the one square mile of Miami involved in the current Zika outbreak- for work, family or social reasons. Public health planning must account for the counterintuitive ways in which this human flow affects the outbreak's duration, severity and time-to-peak. Managing this flow of revisits can allow the outbreak's evolution to be tailored.

  12. The role of brand destination experience in determining revisit intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Sørensen, Flemming

    experience, which provides a more holistic and unified view of the brand destination. The research uses a logistic regression model to determine the role of satisfaction and brand experience in determining revisit intentions. The study also examines differences among subgroups and four brand experience sub......-constructs. The findings suggest that brand experience is an important determinant of revisit intentions, but that there is variation among respondent groups. The paper rounds off with conclusions and implications for research and practice....

  13. A revisited standard solar model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent models of the Sun, including our own, based on canonical physics and featuring modern reaction rates and radiative opacities are presented. They lead to a presolar helium abundance of approximately 0.28 by mass, at variance with the value of 0.25 proposed by Bahcall et al. (1982, 1985), but in better agreement with the value found in the Orion nebula. Most models predict a neutrino counting rate greater than 6 SNU in the chlorine-argon detector, which is at least 3 times higher than the observed rate. The primordial helium abundance derived from the solar one, on the basis of recent models of helium production from the birth of the Galaxy to the birth of the sun, Ysub(P) approximately 0.26, is significantly higher than the value inferred from observations of extragalactic metal-poor nebulae (Y approximately 0.23). This indicates that the stellar production of helium is probably underestimated by the models considered

  14. The plastid genome of Najas flexilis: adaptation to submersed environments is accompanied by the complete loss of the NDH complex in an aquatic angiosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L Peredo

    Full Text Available The re-colonization of aquatic habitats by angiosperms has presented a difficult challenge to plants whose long evolutionary history primarily reflects adaptations to terrestrial conditions. Many aquatics must complete vital stages of their life cycle on the water surface by means of floating or emergent leaves and flowers. Only a few species, mainly within the order Alismatales, are able to complete all aspects of their life cycle including pollination, entirely underwater. Water-pollinated Alismatales include seagrasses and water nymphs (Najas, the latter being the only freshwater genus in the family Hydrocharitaceae with subsurface water-pollination. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the plastid genome of Najas flexilis. The plastid genome of N. flexilis is a circular AT-rich DNA molecule of 156 kb, which displays a quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (IR separating the large single copy (LSC from the small single copy (SSC regions. In N. flexilis, as in other Alismatales, the rps19 and trnH genes are localized in the LSC region instead of within the IR regions as in other monocots. However, the N. flexilis plastid genome presents some anomalous modifications. The size of the SSC region is only one third of that reported for closely related species. The number of genes in the plastid is considerably less. Both features are due to loss of the eleven ndh genes in the Najas flexilis plastid. In angiosperms, the absence of ndh genes has been related mainly to the loss of photosynthetic function in parasitic plants. The ndh genes encode the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, believed essential in terrestrial environments, where it increases photosynthetic efficiency in variable light intensities. The modified structure of the N. flexilis plastid genome suggests that adaptation to submersed environments, where light is scarce, has involved the loss of the NDH complex in at least some photosynthetic angiosperms.

  15. Phylogenetic relationships of the enigmatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae inferred from 18S rDNA and rbcL sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, D E; Mort, M E; Soltis, P S; Hibsch-Jetter, C; Zimmer, E A; Morgan, D

    1999-03-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of some angiosperm families have remained enigmatic despite broad phylogenetic analyses of rbcL sequences. One example is the aquatic family Podostemaceae, the relationships of which have long been controversial because of major morphological modifications associated with their aquatic habit. Podostemaceae have variously been associated with Piperaceae, Nepenthaceae, Polygonaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Rosaceae, Crassulaceae, and Saxifragaceae. Two recent analyses of rbcL sequences suggest a possible sister-group relationship of Podostemaceae to Crassulaceae (Saxifragales). However, the branch leading to Podostemaceae was long, and use of different outgroups resulted in alternative placements. We explored the phylogenetic relationships of Podostemaceae using 18S rDNA sequences and a combined rbcL + 18S rDNA matrix representing over 250 angiosperms. In analyses based on 18S rDNA data, Podostemaceae are not characterized by a long branch; the family consistently appears as part of a Malpighiales clade that also includes Malpighiaceae, Turneraceae, Passifloraceae, Salicaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Violaceae, Linaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Trigoniaceae, Humiriaceae, and Ochnaceae. Phylogenetic analyses based on a combined 18S rDNA + rbcL data set (223 ingroup taxa) with basal angiosperms as the outgroup also suggest that Podostemaceae are part of a Malpighiales clade. These searches swapped to completion, and the shortest trees showed enhanced resolution and increased internal support compared to those based on 18S rDNA or rbcL alone. However, when Gnetales are used as the outgroup, Podostemaceae appear with members of the nitrogen fixing clade (e.g., Elaeagnaceae, Ulmaceae, Rhamnaceae, Cannabaceae, Moraceae, and Urticaceae). None of the relationships suggested here for Podostemaceae receives strong bootstrap support. Our analyses indicate that Podostemaceae are not closely allied with Crassulaceae or with other members of the

  16. Geranyllinalool Synthases in Solanaceae and Other Angiosperms Constitute an Ancient Branch of Diterpene Synthases Involved in the Synthesis of Defensive Compounds1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falara, Vasiliki; Alba, Juan M.; Kant, Merijn R.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Pichersky, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Many angiosperm plants, including basal dicots, eudicots, and monocots, emit (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene, which is derived from geranyllinalool, in response to biotic challenge. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) geranyllinalool synthase (GLS) belonging to the e/f clade of the terpene synthase (TPS) family and two Fabaceae GLSs that belong to the TPS-g clade have been reported, making it unclear which is the main route to geranyllinalool in plants. We characterized a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) TPS-e/f gene, TPS46, encoding GLS (SlGLS) and its homolog (NaGLS) from Nicotiana attenuata. The Km value of SlGLS for geranylgeranyl diphosphate was 18.7 µm, with a turnover rate value of 6.85 s–1. In leaves and flowers of N. attenuata, which constitutively synthesize 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool glycosides, NaGLS is expressed constitutively, but the gene can be induced in leaves with methyl jasmonate. In tomato, SlGLS is not expressed in any tissue under normal growth but is induced in leaves by alamethicin and methyl jasmonate treatments. SlGLS, NaGLS, AtGLSs, and several other GLSs characterized only in vitro come from four different eudicot families and constitute a separate branch of the TPS-e/f clade that diverged from kaurene synthases, also in the TPS-e/f clade, before the gymnosperm-angiosperm split. The early divergence of this branch and the GLS activity of genes in this branch in diverse eudicot families suggest that GLS activity encoded by these genes predates the angiosperm-gymnosperm split. However, although a TPS sequence belonging to this GLS lineage was recently reported from a basal dicot, no representative sequences have yet been found in monocot or nonangiospermous plants. PMID:25052853

  17. Slow but not low: genomic comparisons reveal slower evolutionary rate and higher dN/dS in conifers compared to angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buschiazzo Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Comparative genomics can inform us about the processes of mutation and selection across diverse taxa. Among seed plants, gymnosperms have been lacking in genomic comparisons. Recent EST and full-length cDNA collections for two conifers, Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, together with full genome sequences for two angiosperms, Arabidopsis thaliana and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, offer an opportunity to infer the evolutionary processes underlying thousands of orthologous protein-coding genes in gymnosperms compared with an angiosperm orthologue set. Results Based upon pairwise comparisons of 3,723 spruce and pine orthologues, we found an average synonymous genetic distance (dS of 0.191, and an average dN/dS ratio of 0.314. Using a fossil-established divergence time of 140 million years between spruce and pine, we extrapolated a nucleotide substitution rate of 0.68 × 10-9 synonymous substitutions per site per year. When compared to angiosperms, this indicates a dramatically slower rate of nucleotide substitution rates in conifers: on average 15-fold. Coincidentally, we found a three-fold higher dN/dS for the spruce-pine lineage compared to the poplar-Arabidopsis lineage. This joint occurrence of a slower evolutionary rate in conifers with higher dN/dS, and possibly positive selection, showcases the uniqueness of conifer genome evolution. Conclusions Our results are in line with documented reduced nucleotide diversity, conservative genome evolution and low rates of diversification in conifers on the one hand and numerous examples of local adaptation in conifers on the other hand. We propose that reduced levels of nucleotide mutation in large and long-lived conifer trees, coupled with large effective population size, were the main factors leading to slow substitution rates but retention of beneficial mutations.

  18. Geranyllinalool synthases in solanaceae and other angiosperms constitute an ancient branch of diterpene synthases involved in the synthesis of defensive compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Falara, V.; Alba, J.M.; Kant, M.R.; Schuurink, R. C.; Pichersky, E

    2014-01-01

    Many angiosperm plants, including basal dicots, eudicots, and monocots, emit (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene, which is derived from geranyllinalool, in response to biotic challenge. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) geranyllinalool synthase (GLS) belonging to the e/f clade of the terpene synthase (TPS) family and two Fabaceae GLSs that belong to the TPS-g clade have been reported, making it unclear which is the main route to geranyllinalool in plants. We characterized a to...

  19. Copper doped borate dosimeters revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alajerami, Y.S.M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Department of Medical Radiography, Al-Azhar University, Gaza Strip, Palestine (Country Unknown); Hashim, S., E-mail: suhairul@utm.my [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Oncology Treatment Centre, Sultan Ismail Hospital, 81100 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ghoshal, S.K. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mhareb, M. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Saleh, M.A. [Department of Physics, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); National Atomic Energy Commission (NATEC), Sana' a (Yemen)

    2014-11-15

    We render a panoramic overview on copper (Cu) doped borate dosimeters. Preparing a dosimeter by mixing specific materials with precise weights and methods is a never-ending quest. The recommended composition is highly decisive for accurate estimation of the absorbed dose, prediction of the biological outcome, determination of the treatment dose for radiation therapy and facilitation of personal monitoring. Based on these principles, the proposed dosimeter must cover a series of dosimetric properties to realize the exact results and assessment. The doped borate dosimeters indeed demonstrate attractive thermoluminescence (TL) features. Several dedicated efforts are attempted to improve the luminescence properties by doping various transition metals or rare-earth elements. The Cu ion being one of the preferred activators shows excellent TL properties as revealed via detail comparison with other dosimeters. Two oxide states of Cu (Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup ++}) with reasonable atomic number allow easy interaction with boron network. Interestingly, the intrinsic luminescent centers of borate lattice are in cross linked with that of Cu{sup +} ions. Thus, the activation of borate dosimeter with Cu ions for the enhancement of the TL sensitivity is recognized. These dosimeters reveal similar glow curves as the standard TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) one irrespective of the use of modifiers and synthesis techniques. They display high sensitivity, low fading, dose response linearity over wide range and practical minimum detectable dose. Furthermore, the effective atomic number being the most beneficial aspect (equivalent to that of human tissue) of borate dosimeters do not show any change due to Cu ion activations. The past development, major challenges, excitement, applications, recent progress and the future promises of Cu doped borate TL dosimeters are highlighted. - Highlights: • The manuscript gives a panoramic overview on copper doped borate dosimeters. • Cu ions activated

  20. Allelopathic effects of microcystin-LR on the germination, growth and metabolism of five charophyte species and a submerged angiosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Carmen; Segura, Matilde; Cortés, Francisco; Rodrigo, María A

    2013-11-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are produced by cyanobacteria in aquatic environments and adversely affect macrophytes at very high concentrations. However, the effects of MC on macrophytes at concentrations of environmental relevance are largely unknown. The main objective of this study was to analyze the allelopathic effects of MC-LR at natural concentrations (1, 8 and 16 μg MC-LR/L) on five charophyte species (Chara aspera, C. baltica, C. hispida, C. vulgaris and Nitella hyalina) and the angiosperm Myriophyllum spicatum. Macrophyte specimens were obtained from a restored area located in Albufera de València Natural Park, a protected coastal Mediterranean wetland. Two different experiments were conducted involving (i) the addition of MC-LR to natural sediment to evaluate its effects on seed germination and (ii) the addition of MC-LR to water cultures of macrophytes to evaluate its effects on growth and metabolic functions. In water, the MC-LR concentration decreased by 84% in two weeks; the loss was not significant in sediment. The first seedlings (all C. hispida) emerged from the wetland sediment following a delay of a few days in the presence of MC-LR. The germination rates in 8 and 16 μg MC-LR/L treatments were 44% and 11% of that occurring in the absence of MC, but these differences disappeared over time. The final density was 6-7 germlings/dm(3). Final germling length was unaffected by MC-LR. Rotifers (Lecane spp.) emerging from the natural sediment during the experiment were favored by MC-LR; the opposite pattern was observed in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The growth rates of C. vulgaris, C. baltica and N. hyalina were unaffected by MC exposure, whereas those of C. hispida and C. aspera were reduced in the MC treatments relative to the control treatment. The concentration of chlorophyll-a and the in vivo net photosynthetic rate were lower in the presence of MC-LR, even at the lowest concentration, for all of the characeans tested. M. spicatum was sensitive to the

  1. Antioxidant, anticholinesterase and tyrosinase inhibition activities, and fatty acids of Crocus mathewii - A forgotten endemic angiosperm of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiztekin, Fatma; Nadeem, Said; Erol, Ebru; Yildiztekin, Mahmut; Tuna, Atilla L; Ozturk, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    Context We report the first ever chemical/biochemical study on Crocus mathewii Kerndorff (Iridaceae) - a Turkish endemic angiosperm. This plant has never been explored for its phytochemistry and bioactivities. Objective This study explores C. mathewii corm and aerial parts for the chemical and biological properties of hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water fractions of the extracts. Material and methods Plant material (20 g) was extracted by methanol (250 mL × 5, 3 days each) and fractioned into hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. All fractions were subjected to β-carotene-linoleic acid, DPPH(·), ABTS(·)(+), CUPRAC, metal chelating and tyrosinase inhibition activities. Hexane fractions were submitted to GC-MS analysis. Results Ethyl acetate fractions showed excellent IC50 values in DPPH(·) (aerial 36.21 ± 0.76 and corm 33.87 ± 0.02 mg/L) and ABTS(·)(+) (aerial 33.01 ± 0.79 and bulb 27.87 ± 0.33 mg/L); higher than the IC50 of the standard α-tocopherol (DPPH 116.25 ± 1.97; ABTS 52.64 ± 0.37 mg/L), higher than BHA in DPPH (57.31 ± 0.25 mg/L), but slightly lower in ABTS (19.86 ± 2.73 mg/L). Methanol extract of aerial parts also showed higher activity than α-tocopherol in DPPH (85.56 ± 11.51 mg/L) but slightly less (72.90 ± 3.66 mg/L) than both the standards in ABTS. Linoleic (aerial 53.9%, corm 43.9%) and palmitic (aerial 22.2%, corm 18%) were found as the major fatty acids. Discussion and conclusion Some fractions of C. mathewii showed higher antioxidant activities than the standards. There is a need to explore more about this plant.

  2. Darwin-Wallace Demons: survival of the fastest in populations of duckweeds and the evolutionary history of an enigmatic group of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, U; Niklas, K J

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary biology, the term 'Darwinian fitness' refers to the lifetime reproductive success of an individual within a population of conspecifics. The idea of a 'Darwinian Demon' emerged from this concept and is defined here as an organism that commences reproduction almost immediately after birth, has a maximum fitness, and lives forever. It has been argued that duckweeds (sub-family Lemnoideae, order Alismatales), a group containing five genera and 34 species of small aquatic monocotyledonous plants with a reduced body plan, can be interpreted as examples of 'Darwinian Demons'. Here we focus on the species Spirodela polyrhiza (Great duckweed) and show that these miniaturised aquatic angiosperms display features that fit the definition of the hypothetical organism that we will call a 'Darwin-Wallace Demon' in recognition of the duel proponents of evolution by natural selection. A quantitative analysis (log-log bivariate plot of annual growth in dry biomass versus standing dry body mass of various green algae and land plants) revealed that duckweeds are thus far the most rapidly growing angiosperms in proportion to their body mass. In light of this finding, we discuss the disposable soma and metabolic optimising theories, summarise evidence for and against the proposition that the Lemnoideae (family Araceae) reflect an example of reductive evolution, and argue that, under real-world conditions (environmental constraints and other limitations), 'Darwin-Wallace Demons' cannot exist, although the concept remains useful in much the same way that the Hardy-Weinberg law does. PMID:24674028

  3. Post-Inflationary Gravitino Production Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Olive, Keith A; Peloso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We revisit gravitino production following inflation. As a first step, we review the standard calculation of gravitino production in the thermal plasma formed at the end of post-inflationary reheating when the inflaton has completely decayed. Next we consider gravitino production prior to the completion of reheating, assuming that the inflaton decay products thermalize instantaneously while they are still dilute. We then argue that instantaneous thermalization is in general a good approximation, and also show that the contribution of non-thermal gravitino production via the collisions of inflaton decay products prior to thermalization is relatively small. Our final estimate of the gravitino-to-entropy ratio is approximated well by a standard calculation of gravitino production in the post-inflationary thermal plasma assuming total instantaneous decay and thermalization at a time $t \\simeq 1.2/\\Gamma_\\phi$. Finally, in light of our calculations, we consider potential implications of upper limits on the gravitin...

  4. Revisiting gravitino dark matter in thermal leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the gravitino dark matter scenario in the presence of the bilinear $R$-parity violating interaction. In particular, we discuss a consistency with the thermal leptogenesis. For a high reheating temperature required for the thermal leptogenesis, the gravitino dark matter tends to be overproduced, which puts a severe upper limit on the gluino mass. As we will show, a large portion of parameter space of the gravitino dark matter scenario has been excluded by combining the constraints from the gravitino abundance and the null results of the searches for the superparticles at the LHC experiments. In particular, the models with the stau (and other charged slepton) NLSP has been almost excluded by the searches for the long-lived charged particles at the LHC unless the required reheating temperature is somewhat lowered by assuming, for example, a degenerated right-handed neutrino mass spectrum.

  5. ADHM Revisited: Instantons and Wilson Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the well-studied D0-D4 system of D-branes and its relationship to the ADHM construction. It is well known that the D0-branes appear as instantons in the D4-brane worldvolume. We add a Wilson line to the D4-brane in the guise of an extended fundamental string and determine how this affects the D0-brane dynamics. As the D0-brane moves in the presence of the Wilson line, it experiences a Lorentz force, proportional to its Yang-Mills gauge connection. From the perspective of the D0-brane quantum mechanics, this force emerges through the ADHM construction of the self-dual gauge connection.

  6. Three dimensional maximally supersymmetric field theory revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field theoretical realization of maximally extended supersymmetry algebra in 3 dimensions is revisited here. The existence of an interacting field theory which also manifests the full automorphism demands the existence of extra global symmetry transformations. They form the infinite-dimensional group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of an internal 3-dimensional space. Upon regularization, it will be truncated to a finite-dimensional unitary group. This extra symmetry together with multiplicity of component fields allow one to consistently introduce self-interactions through Nambu brackets or matrix 4-commutators. It turns out that there exists a conformal field theory which is invariant under OSp(4 | 8) x U(N) groups of global transformations. Relaxing full automorphism to its biggest subgroup, one can consistently mass-deforms the theory. In addition to ordinary associative algebraic structures, a non-associative structure also underlies this theory. (author)

  7. Revisiting instanton corrections to the Konishi multiplet

    CERN Document Server

    Alday, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of instanton effects in correlation functions in ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM involving the Konishi operator and operators of twist two. Previous studies revealed that the scaling dimensions and the OPE coefficients of these operators do not receive instanton corrections in the semiclassical approximation. We go beyond this approximation and demonstrate that, while operators belonging to the same ${\\cal N}=4$ supermultiplet ought to have the same conformal data, the evaluation of quantum instanton corrections for one operator can be mapped into a semiclassical computation for another operator in the same supermultiplet. This observation allows us to compute explicitly the leading instanton correction to the scaling dimension of operators in the Konishi supermultiplet as well as to their structure constants in the OPE of two half-BPS scalar operators. We then use these results, together with crossing symmetry, to determine instanton corrections to scaling dimensions of twist-four operators with ...

  8. The Species Problem in Myxomycetes Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laura M; Stephenson, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    Species identification in the myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds or myxogastrids) poses particular challenges to researchers as a result of their morphological plasticity and frequent alteration between sexual and asexual life strategies. Traditionally, myxomycete morphology has been used as the primary method of species delimitation. However, with the increasing availability of genetic information, traditional myxomycete taxonomy is being increasingly challenged, and new hypotheses continue to emerge. Due to conflicts that sometimes occur between traditional and more modern species concepts that are based largely on molecular data, there is a pressing need to revisit the discussion surrounding the species concept used for myxomycetes. Biological diversity is being increasingly studied with molecular methods and data accumulates at ever-faster rates, making resolution of this matter urgent. In this review, currently used and potentially useful species concepts (biological, morphological, phylogenetic and ecological) are reviewed, and an integrated approach to resolve the myxomycete species problem is discussed. PMID:27351595

  9. Revisiting light neutralino scenarios in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Daniel Albornoz; Boehm, Celine

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the case of a light neutralino LSP in the framework of the MSSM. We consider a model with eleven free parameters. We show that all scenarios where the annihilation of light neutralinos rely mainly on the exchange of a light pseudoscalar are excluded by direct detection searches and by Fermi measurements of the gamma-flux from dwarf spheroidal galaxies. On the other hand, we find scenarios with light sleptons that satisfy all collider and astroparticle physics constraints. In this case, the lower limit on the LSP mass is 12.6 GeV. We discuss how the parameter space of the model will be further probed by new physics searches at the LHC.

  10. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  11. Seeing the unseen: Charles Bonnet syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Aditya Gopinathan; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Shah, Bharat R; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition that encompasses three clinical features: complex visual hallucinations, ocular pathology causing visual deterioration, and preserved cognitive status. Common associated ocular pathologies include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataracts. Several theories have been proposed to try to explain the visual hallucinations. However, the pathophysiology remains poorly understood, and treatment is largely based on anecdotal data. The lack of awareness of CBS among medical professionals often leads to inappropriate diagnosis and medication. In a country like India, where awareness of mental health is not widespread, cultural myths and stigma prevent patients from seeking professional help. Here we describe two cases of CBS and revisit different ocular morbidities that have been reported to occur in conjunction with CBS. Psychiatrists and ophthalmologists alike must be sensitive to this clinical condition to ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Revisiting Lepton Flavour Universality in B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Pattori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Lepton flavour universality (LFU) in B-decays is revisited in a model-independent way by considering semileptonic operators defined at a scale Lambda above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasised. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Lambda down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGE) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and tau decays and visible lepton flavour violating (LFV) effects in the processes tau -> mu ll, tau -> mu rho, tau -> mu pi and tau -> mu eta^(') are induced.

  13. The Faraday effect revisited: General theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Nenciu, Gheorghe; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    conductivity can be explicitly computed and coincides with the classical result. In the general case, using magnetic perturbation theory, the conductivity tensor is expanded in powers of the strength of the magnetic field B. Then the linear term in B of this expansion is written down in terms of the zero......This paper is the first in a series revisiting the Faraday effect, or more generally, the theory of electronic quantum transport/optical response in bulk media in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The independent electron approximation is assumed. For free electrons, the transverse...... magnetic field Green function and the zero field current operator. In the periodic case, the linear term in B of the conductivity tensor is expressed in terms of zero magnetic field Bloch functions and energies. No derivatives with respect to the quasimomentum appear and thereby all ambiguities are removed...

  14. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... often are no good treatments for chronic radiation enteritis that is more severe. Medicines such as cholestyramine, ...

  15. Influences of evergreen gymnosperm and deciduous angiosperm tree species on the functioning of temperate and boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Laurent; De Schrijver, An; Vesterdal, Lars; Smolander, Aino; Prescott, Cindy; Ranger, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    It has been recognized for a long time that the overstorey composition of a forest partly determines its biological and physical-chemical functioning. Here, we review evidence of the influence of evergreen gymnosperm (EG) tree species and deciduous angiosperm (DA) tree species on the water balance, physical-chemical soil properties and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. We used scientific publications based on experimental designs where all species grew on the same parent material and initial soil, and were similar in stage of stand development, former land use and current management. We present the current state of the art, define knowledge gaps, and briefly discuss how selection of tree species can be used to mitigate pollution or enhance accumulation of stable organic carbon in the soil. The presence of EGs generally induces a lower rate of precipitation input into the soil than DAs, resulting in drier soil conditions and lower water discharge. Soil temperature is generally not different, or slightly lower, under an EG canopy compared to a DA canopy. Chemical properties, such as soil pH, can also be significantly modified by taxonomic groups of tree species. Biomass production is usually similar or lower in DA stands than in stands of EGs. Aboveground production of dead organic matter appears to be of the same order of magnitude between tree species groups growing on the same site. Some DAs induce more rapid decomposition of litter than EGs because of the chemical properties of their tissues, higher soil moisture and favourable conditions for earthworms. Forest floors consequently tend to be thicker in EG forests compared to DA forests. Many factors, such as litter lignin content, influence litter decomposition and it is difficult to identify specific litter-quality parameters that distinguish litter decomposition rates of EGs from DAs. Although it has been suggested that DAs can result in higher accumulation of soil carbon stocks, evidence from

  16. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  17. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  18. Phylogeny and Expression Analyses Reveal Important Roles for Plant PKS III Family during the Conquest of Land by Plants and Angiosperm Diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lulu; Liu, Pingli; Zhu, Zhixin; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Yunxiao; Sun, Rifei

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) utilize the products of primary metabolism to synthesize a wide array of secondary metabolites in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PKSs can be grouped into three distinct classes, types I, II, and III, based on enzyme structure, substrate specificity, and catalytic mechanisms. The type III PKS enzymes function as homodimers, and are the only class of PKS that do not require acyl carrier protein. Plant type III PKS enzymes, also known as chalcone synthase (CHS)-like enzymes, are of particular interest due to their functional diversity. In this study, we mined type III PKS gene sequences from the genomes of six aquatic algae and 25 land plants (1 bryophyte, 1 lycophyte, 2 basal angiosperms, 16 core eudicots, and 5 monocots). PKS III sequences were found relatively conserved in all embryophytes, but not exist in algae. We also examined gene expression patterns by analyzing available transcriptome data, and identified potential cis-regulatory elements in upstream sequences. Phylogenetic trees of dicots angiosperms showed that plant type III PKS proteins fall into three clades. Clade A contains CHS/STS-type enzymes coding genes with diverse transcriptional expression patterns and enzymatic functions, while clade B is further divided into subclades b1 and b2, which consist of anther-specific CHS-like enzymes. Differentiation regions, such as amino acids 196-207 between clades A and B, and predicted positive selected sites within α-helixes in late appeared branches of clade A, account for the major diversification in substrate choice and catalytic reaction. The integrity and location of conserved cis-elements containing MYB and bHLH binding sites can affect transcription levels. Potential binding sites for transcription factors such as WRKY, SPL, or AP2/EREBP may contribute to tissue- or taxon-specific differences in gene expression. Our data shows that gene duplications and functional diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes

  19. Phylogeny and Expression Analyses Reveal Important Roles for Plant PKS III Family during the Conquest of Land by Plants and Angiosperm Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lulu; Liu, Pingli; Zhu, Zhixin; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Yunxiao; Sun, Rifei

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) utilize the products of primary metabolism to synthesize a wide array of secondary metabolites in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PKSs can be grouped into three distinct classes, types I, II, and III, based on enzyme structure, substrate specificity, and catalytic mechanisms. The type III PKS enzymes function as homodimers, and are the only class of PKS that do not require acyl carrier protein. Plant type III PKS enzymes, also known as chalcone synthase (CHS)-like enzymes, are of particular interest due to their functional diversity. In this study, we mined type III PKS gene sequences from the genomes of six aquatic algae and 25 land plants (1 bryophyte, 1 lycophyte, 2 basal angiosperms, 16 core eudicots, and 5 monocots). PKS III sequences were found relatively conserved in all embryophytes, but not exist in algae. We also examined gene expression patterns by analyzing available transcriptome data, and identified potential cis-regulatory elements in upstream sequences. Phylogenetic trees of dicots angiosperms showed that plant type III PKS proteins fall into three clades. Clade A contains CHS/STS-type enzymes coding genes with diverse transcriptional expression patterns and enzymatic functions, while clade B is further divided into subclades b1 and b2, which consist of anther-specific CHS-like enzymes. Differentiation regions, such as amino acids 196-207 between clades A and B, and predicted positive selected sites within α-helixes in late appeared branches of clade A, account for the major diversification in substrate choice and catalytic reaction. The integrity and location of conserved cis-elements containing MYB and bHLH binding sites can affect transcription levels. Potential binding sites for transcription factors such as WRKY, SPL, or AP2/EREBP may contribute to tissue- or taxon-specific differences in gene expression. Our data shows that gene duplications and functional diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes

  20. Phylogeny and Expression Analyses Reveal Important Roles for Plant PKS III Family during the Conquest of Land by Plants and Angiosperm Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lulu; Liu, Pingli; Zhu, Zhixin; Zhang, Shifan; Zhang, Shujiang; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Yunxiao; Sun, Rifei

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) utilize the products of primary metabolism to synthesize a wide array of secondary metabolites in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PKSs can be grouped into three distinct classes, types I, II, and III, based on enzyme structure, substrate specificity, and catalytic mechanisms. The type III PKS enzymes function as homodimers, and are the only class of PKS that do not require acyl carrier protein. Plant type III PKS enzymes, also known as chalcone synthase (CHS)-like enzymes, are of particular interest due to their functional diversity. In this study, we mined type III PKS gene sequences from the genomes of six aquatic algae and 25 land plants (1 bryophyte, 1 lycophyte, 2 basal angiosperms, 16 core eudicots, and 5 monocots). PKS III sequences were found relatively conserved in all embryophytes, but not exist in algae. We also examined gene expression patterns by analyzing available transcriptome data, and identified potential cis-regulatory elements in upstream sequences. Phylogenetic trees of dicots angiosperms showed that plant type III PKS proteins fall into three clades. Clade A contains CHS/STS-type enzymes coding genes with diverse transcriptional expression patterns and enzymatic functions, while clade B is further divided into subclades b1 and b2, which consist of anther-specific CHS-like enzymes. Differentiation regions, such as amino acids 196-207 between clades A and B, and predicted positive selected sites within α-helixes in late appeared branches of clade A, account for the major diversification in substrate choice and catalytic reaction. The integrity and location of conserved cis-elements containing MYB and bHLH binding sites can affect transcription levels. Potential binding sites for transcription factors such as WRKY, SPL, or AP2/EREBP may contribute to tissue- or taxon-specific differences in gene expression. Our data shows that gene duplications and functional diversification of plant type III PKS enzymes

  1. Spectral brilliance of channeling radiation at the ASTA photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study channeling radiation from electron beams with energies under 100 MeV. We introduce a phenomenological model of dechanneling, correct nonradiative transition rates from thermal scattering, and discuss in detail the population dynamics in low-order bound states. These are used to revisit the X-ray properties measured at the ELBE facility in Forschungszentrum Dresden Rosenstock (FZDR), extract parameters for dechanneling states, and obtain satisfactory agreement with measured photon yields. The importance of rechanneling phenomena in thick crystals is emphasized. The model is then used to calculate the expected X-ray energies, linewidths and brilliance for forthcoming channeling radiation experiments at Fermilab's ASTA photoinjector

  2. Scaling Relationships for Spherical Polymer Brushes Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Li, Hao; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-06-16

    In this short paper, we revisit the scaling relationships for spherical polymer brushes (SPBs), i.e., polymer brushes grafted to rigid, spherical particles. Considering that the brushes can be described to be encased in a series of hypothetical spherical blobs, we identify significant physical discrepancies in the model of Daoud and Cotton (Journal of Physics, 1982), which is considered to be the state of the art in scaling modeling of SPBs. We establish that the "brush" configuration of the polymer molecules forming the SPBs is possible only if the swelling ratio (which is the ratio of the end-to-end length of the blob-encased polymer segment to the corresponding coil-like polymer segment) is always less than unity-a notion that has been erroneously overlooked in the model of Daoud and Cotton. We also provide new scaling arguments that (a) establish this swelling (or more appropriately shrinking) ratio as a constant (less than unity) for the case of "good" solvent, (b) recover the scaling predictions for blob dimension and monomer number and monomer concentration distributions within the blob, and

  3. Charge symmetry breaking in $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, Avraham

    2015-01-01

    The large charge symmetry breaking (CSB) implied by the $\\Lambda$ binding energy difference $\\Delta B^{4}_{\\Lambda}(0^+_{\\rm g.s.})\\equiv B_{\\Lambda}(_{\\Lambda}^4$He)$-$$B_{\\Lambda}(_{\\Lambda}^4$H) = 0.35$\\pm$0.06 MeV of the $A=4$ mirror hypernuclei ground states, determined from emulsion studies, has defied theoretical attempts to reproduce it in terms of CSB in hyperon masses and in hyperon-nucleon interactions, including one pion exchange arising from $\\Lambda-\\Sigma^0$ mixing. Using a schematic strong-interaction $\\Lambda N\\leftrightarrow\\Sigma N$ coupling model developed by Akaishi and collaborators for $s$-shell $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, we revisit the evaluation of CSB in the $A=4$ $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei and extend it to $p$-shell mirror $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei. The model yields values of $\\Delta B^{4}_{\\Lambda} (0^+_{\\rm g.s.})\\sim 0.25$ MeV. Smaller size and mostly negative $p$-shell binding energy differences are calculated for the $A=7-10$ mirror hypernuclei, in rough agreement with the few available dat...

  4. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-07-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  5. The drive revisited: Mastery and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Starting from the theory of the libido and the notions of the experience of satisfaction and the drive for mastery introduced by Freud, the author revisits the notion of the drive by proposing the following model: the drive takes shape in the combination of two currents of libidinal cathexis, one which takes the paths of the 'apparatus for obtaining mastery' (the sense-organs, motricity, etc.) and strives to appropriate the object, and the other which cathects the erotogenic zones and the experience of satisfaction that is experienced through stimulation in contact with the object. The result of this combination of cathexes constitutes a 'representation', the subsequent evocation of which makes it possible to tolerate for a certain period of time the absence of a satisfying object. On the basis of this conception, the author distinguishes the representations proper, vehicles of satisfaction, from imagos and traumatic images which give rise to excitation that does not link up with the paths taken by the drives. This model makes it possible to conciliate the points of view of the advocates of 'object-seeking' and of those who give precedence to the search for pleasure, and, further, to renew our understanding of object-relations, which can then be approached from the angle of their relations to infantile sexuality. Destructiveness is considered in terms of "mastery madness" and not in terms of the late Freudian hypothesis of the death drive.

  6. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Bertha

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential. First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed. Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

  7. Revisiting the relaxation dynamics of isolated pyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, Raúl; Ovejas, Virginia; Fernández-Fernández, Marta; Longarte, Asier, E-mail: asier.longarte@ehu.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apart. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Peralta Conde, Álvaro [Centro de Láseres Pulsados (CLPU), Edificio M3, Parque Científico, 37185 Villamayor (Spain)

    2014-07-07

    Herein, the interpretation of the femtosecond-scale temporal evolution of the pyrrole ion signal, after excitation in the 267–217 nm interval, recently published by our group [R. Montero, A. Peralta Conde, V. Ovejas, M. Fernández-Fernández, F. Castaño, J. R. Vázquez de Aldana, and A. Longarte, J. Chem. Phys.137, 064317 (2012)] is re-visited. The observation of a shift in the pyrrole{sup +} transient respect to zero delay reference, initially attributed to ultrafast dynamics on the πσ{sup *} type state (3s a{sub 1} ← π 1a{sub 2}), is demonstrated to be caused by the existence of pump + probe populated states, along the ionization process. The influence of these resonances in pump-prone ionization experiments, when multi-photon probes are used, and the significance of a proper zero-time reference, is discussed. The possibility of preparing the πσ{sup *} state by direct excitation is investigated by collecting 1 + 1 photoelectron spectra, at excitation wavelengths ranging from 255 to 219 nm. No conclusive evidences of ionization through this state are found.

  8. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  9. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  10. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Shipway

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment which can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down which can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. Multimode aerosol with only N different dispersion characteristics require only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap and very accurate physically-based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and NWP models.

  11. The Super-GUT CMSSM Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Mustafayev, Azar; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    We revisit minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification (GUT) models in which the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) are universal at some input scale, $M_{in}$, above the supersymmetric gauge coupling unification scale, $M_{GUT}$. As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), we assume that the scalar masses and gaugino masses have common values, $m_0$ and $m_{1/2}$ respectively, at $M_{in}$, as do the trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters $A_0$. Going beyond previous studies of such a super-GUT CMSSM scenario, we explore the constraints imposed by the lower limit on the proton lifetime and the LHC measurement of the Higgs mass, $m_h$. We find regions of $m_0$, $m_{1/2}$, $A_0$ and the parameters of the SU(5) superpotential that are compatible with these and other phenomenological constraints such as the density of cold dark matter, which we assume to be provided by the lightest neutralino. Typically, these allowed regions appear for $m_0$ and $m_{1/...

  12. Spin-orbit evolution of Mercury revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Noyelles, Benoit; Makarov, Valeri; Efroimsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a peculiar case, in that it is locked into the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. Its rotation period, 58 days, is exactly two thirds of its orbital period. It is accepted that the eccentricity of Mercury (0.206) favours the trapping into this resonance. More controversial is how the capture took place. A recent study by Makarov has shown that entrapment into this resonance is certain if the eccentricity is larger than 0.2, provided that we use a realistic tidal model, based on the Darwin-Kaula expansion of the tidal torque, including both the elastic rebound and anelastic creep of solids. We here revisit the scenario of Mercury's capture into the supersynchronous spin-orbit resonances. The study is based on a realistic model of tidal friction in solids, that takes into account the rheology and the self-gravitation of the planet. Developed in Efroimsky, it was employed by Makarov et al. to determine the likely spin state of the planet GJ581d, with its eccentricity evolution taken into account. It was also u...

  13. No-scale ripple inflation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the no-scale ripple inflation model, where no-scale supergravity is modified by an additional term for the inflaton field in the Kähler potential. This term not only breaks one SU(N,1) symmetry explicitly, but also plays an important role for inflation. We generalize the superpotential in the no-scale ripple inflation model slightly. There exists a discrete Z2 symmetry/parity in the scalar potential in general, which can be preserved or violated by the non-canonical nomalized inflaton kinetic term. Thus, there are three inflation paths: one parity invariant path, and the left and right paths for parity violating scenario. We show that the inflations along the parity invariant path and right path are consistent with the Planck results. However, the gavitino mass for the parity invariant path is so large that the inflation results will be invalid if we consider the inflaton supersymmetry breaking soft mass term. Thus, only the inflation along the right path gives the correct and consistent results. Notably, the tensor-to-scalar ratio in such case can be large, with a value around 0.05, which may be probed by the future Planck experiment

  14. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  15. Revisiting the Anatomy of the Living Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the complexity of cardiac anatomy is required by all who seek, in the setting of cardiac disease, to interpret the images confronting them. Although the mysteries of cardiac structure have been extensively addressed, significant gaps continue to exist between the descriptions provided by morphologists and by those working in the clinical setting. In part, this reflects the limitations in providing 3D visualization of such a complicated organ. Current 3D imaging technology now permits visualization of the cardiac components using datasets obtained in the living individual. These advances, furthermore, demonstrate the anatomy in the setting of the heart as imaged within the thorax. It has been failure to describe the heart as it lies within the thorax that remains a major deficiency of many morphologists relying on the dissecting room to provide the gold standard. Describing the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion, a basic rule of clinical anatomy, creates the necessary bridges between anatomists and clinicians. The rapid progression of cardiac interventional techniques, furthermore, emphasizes the need to revisit cardiac anatomy using a multidisciplinary approach. In this review, therefore, we illustrate the advantages of an attitudinally correct approach to cardiac anatomy. We then focus on the morphology of the arterial roots, revealing the accuracy that can now be achieved by clinicians using datasets obtained during life.

  16. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  17. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  18. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  19. Intramolecular Amide Hydrolysis in N-Methylmaleamic Acid Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The intramolecular amide hydrolysis of N-methylmaleamic acid have been revisited by use of density functional theory and inclusion of solvent effects. The results indicate that concerted reaction mechanism is favored over stepwise reaction mechanism. This is in agreement with the previous theoretical study. Sovlent effects have significant influence on the reaction barrier.

  20. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  1. The Polarized Structure Function $g_{2} A Lattice Study Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Kürzinger, W; Oelrich, H; Rakow, P; Schierholz, G

    1999-01-01

    A recent lattice calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g_2 is revisited. It has been recognized that the twist-three operator, which gives rise to d_2, mixes non-perturbatively with operators of lower dimensions under renormalization. This changes the results substantially.

  2. "An analysis of the classical Doppler Effect"[1] revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Nafornita, Corina

    2004-01-01

    After having shown that the formula which describes the Doppler effect in the general case holds only in the case of the "very high" frequency assumption, we derive free of assumptions Doppler formulas for two scenarios presented in the revisited paper.

  3. Revisiting Mental Simulation in Language Comprehension: Six Replication Attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Zwaan (Rolf); D. Pecher (Diane)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe notion of language comprehension as mental simulation has become popular in cognitive science. We revisit some of the original empirical evidence for this. Specifically, we attempted to replicate the findings from earlier studies that examined the mental simulation of object orientat

  4. Complex and detailed balancing of chemical reaction networks revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaft, Abraham; Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the notions of complex and detailed balancing for mass action kinetics chemical reaction networks is revisited from the perspective of algebraic graph theory, in particular Kirchhoff’s Matrix Tree theorem for directed weighted graphs. This yields an elucidation of previously

  5. Coccolithophores in Polar Waters: Papposphaera arctica HET and HOL revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Heldal, Mikal; Østergaard, Jette B.

    2016-01-01

    It has been generally accepted based on the finding of combination coccospheres in field samples that Turrisphaera arctica and Papposphaera sarion are alternate life-cycle phases of a single species. However, while recently revisiting P. sarion it became evident that the Turrisphaera phase of thi...

  6. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  7. A control center design revisited: learning from users’ appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Cordeiro, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present the lessons learned during a control center design project by revisiting another control center from the same company designed two and a half years before by the same project team. In light of the experience with the first project and its analysis, the designers and res...

  8. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  9. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations, and a sy...

  10. Additively homomorphic encryption with a double decryption mechanism, revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, A.; Kronberg, M.; Trei, W.; Katzenbeisser, S.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the notion of additively homomorphic encryption with a double decryption mechanism (DD-PKE), which allows for additions in the encrypted domain while having a master decryption procedure that can decrypt all properly formed ciphertexts by using a special master secret. This type of encryp

  11. Revisiting the Role of Organizational Effectiveness in Educational Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Linda S.

    Organizational effectiveness ought to play a role in educational evaluation, and the development of alternative perspectives for viewing organizations could be a starting point for revisiting organizational evaluation in education. Five possible perspectives and criteria for evaluating organizations have been developed. If an organization is…

  12. Keep Moving! Revisiting Thumbnails for Mobile Video Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hürst; C.G.M. Snoek; W.J. Spoel; M. Tomin

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the increasing popularity of video on handheld devices and the resulting importance for effective video retrieval, this paper revisits the relevance of thumbnails in a mobile video retrieval setting. Our study indicates that users are quite able to handle and assess small thumbnails on

  13. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  14. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  15. Backwardation in energy futures markets: Metalgesellschaft revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy supply contracts negotiated by the US Subsidiary of Metalgesellschaft Refining and Marketing (MGRM), which were the subject of much subsequent debate, are re-examined. The contracts were hedged by the US Subsidiary barrel-for-barrel using short-dated energy derivatives. When the hedge program experienced difficulties, the derivatives positions were promptly liquidated by the parent company. Revisiting the MGRM contracts also provides the opportunity to explore the latest evidence on backwardation in energy markets. Accordingly, the paper discusses first the theoretical reasons for backwardation, followed by an empirical examination using the MGRM data available at the time of the hedge program in 1992 and a second set of data that became available in 2000. By using a more up-to-date data set covering a longer time period and by controlling the time series properties of the data, the authors expect to provide more reliable empirical evidence on the behaviour of energy futures prices. Results based on the 1992 data suggest that the strategy employed by MGRM could be expected to be profitable while the risks are relatively low. However, analysis based on the 2000 data shows lower, although still significant profits, but higher risks. The final conclusion was that the likelihood of problems similar to those faced by MGRM in 1992 are twice as high with the updated 2000 data, suggesting that the risk-return pattern of the stack-and-roll hedging strategy using short-dated energy future contracts to hedge long-tem contracts is less appealing now than when MGRM implemented its hedging program in 1992. 24 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  16. 被子植物的早期胚胎形态建成%Research Progress on Early Embryogenesis in Angiosperms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊; 伍晓明

    2012-01-01

    被子植物早期胚胎形态建成是其有性生殖过程中一个重要发育阶段.在这一阶段中,被子植物形体基本特征形成,包括顶-基轴极性建立、不同细胞层分化以及分生组织形成.合子极性直接与顶基细胞命运相关,但其极性产生机理仍然不明.研究表明,WOX家族转录因子、生长素定向运输以及生长素响应应答可能参与了早期顶-基模型建成;辐射对称模型的建立可能由细胞与细胞间相互作用来介导;生长素流可能参与胚胎顶端组织形成.该文对近年来被子植物早期胚胎形态建成过程中的合子极性建立与生长、合子分裂及其顶基细胞的形成、胚根原特化及根极的形成、辐射对称模式及表皮原特化、顶端分生组织特化及子叶起始等方面的研究进展进行了综述.%Early embryogenesis in angiosperms is an important developmental stage of sexual reproductive process. At this stage,the basic morphology of seedling is established,including apical-basal axial polarity, different cell layers differentiation,and meristem formation. Zygote polarity directly affects the cell fates of apical and basal cell,but the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggested that WOX family transcription factors,direct auxin transportation as well as auxin response may be involved in the establishment of apical-basal patterning. Cell-cell communication may mediate the radial patterning. Additionally, auxin flow participates in the process of apical organization. This paper will review the late research progresses on early embryogenesis of angiosperms,including zygote polarity and elongation,zygote division and apical and basal cell formation, hypophysis specification and root pole formation, radial patterning and protoderm specification,shoot meristem specification and cotyledon initiation.

  17. Both water source and atmospheric water impact leaf wax n-alkane 2H/1H values of hydroponically grown angiosperm trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, B. J.; Berke, M. A.; Hambach, B.; Roden, J. S.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The extent to which both water source and leaf water 2H-enrichment affect the δ2H values of terrestrial plant leaf waxes is an area of active research as ecologists seek a mechanistic understanding of the environmental determinants of leaf wax isotope values before applying δ2H values of leaf waxes to reconstruct past hydrologic conditions. To elucidate the effects of both water source and atmospheric water vapor on δ2H values of leaf waxes for broad-leaved angiosperms, we analyzed hydrogen isotope ratios of high-molecular weight n-alkanes from two tree species that were grown throughout the spring and summer (five months) in a hydroponic system under controlled atmospheric conditions. Here, 12 subpopulations each of Populus fremontii and Betula occidentalis saplings were grown under one of six source different waters ranging in hydrogen isotope ratio values from -120 to +180 ‰ and under either 40 % or 75 % relative humidity conditions. We found n-alkane δ2H values of both species were linearly related to source water δ2H values with differences in slope associated with differing atmospheric humidity. A Craig-Gordon model was used to predict the δ2H values of leaf water and, by extension, n-alkane δ2H values under the range of growth conditions. The modeled leaf water values were found to be linearly related to observed n-alkane δ2H values with a statistically indistinguishable slope between the high and low humidity treatments. These leaf wax observations support a constant biosynthetic fractionation factor between evaporatively-enriched leaf water and n-alkanes for each species. However, we found the calculated biosynthetic fractionation between modeled leaf-water and n-alkane to be different between the two species. We submit that these dissimilarities were due to model inputs and not differences in the specific-species biochemistry. Nonetheless, these results are significant as they indicated that the δ2H value of atmospheric water vapor and

  18. Ninety-nine years of radiation injuries in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A German dentist, F.O. Walkhoff, has started dental radiography as early as two weeks after Roentgen's discovery on November 8, 1895. The purpose of this paper is to revisit radiation injuries by dividing the era into the era of Kells (before World War II) and the era of low exposure doses (after World War II). Edmund Kells (1856-1928), a pioneer of dental radiologist in the United States, has later become a victim of radiation injuries. During the era of Kells, skin radiation injuries were frequent among the group of dental and medical personnels. In the era of low exposure doses, cancers, leukemia, and genetic effects have begun to receive attention. Radiation injuries occurring in a dental practice are discussed in the context of the two eras. (N.K.) 43 refs

  19. Ninety-nine years of radiation injuries in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Kadzuo (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan). School of Dentistry at Niigata)

    1994-06-01

    A German dentist, F.O. Walkhoff, has started dental radiography as early as two weeks after Roentgen's discovery on November 8, 1895. The purpose of this paper is to revisit radiation injuries by dividing the era into the era of Kells (before World War II) and the era of low exposure doses (after World War II). Edmund Kells (1856-1928), a pioneer of dental radiologist in the United States, has later become a victim of radiation injuries. During the era of Kells, skin radiation injuries were frequent among the group of dental and medical personnels. In the era of low exposure doses, cancers, leukemia, and genetic effects have begun to receive attention. Radiation injuries occurring in a dental practice are discussed in the context of the two eras. (N.K.) 43 refs.

  20. Radiation stimulated light phenomena; Strahlungsinduzierte Leuchtphaenomene. Ein historisch-didaktischer Beitrag zur Erforschung von stimulierten Lumineszenz- und Radiolumineszenzerscheinungen mit low-light-Kameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwankner, Robert Josef [Hochschule Muenchen (Germany). Radiometrisches Seminar

    2011-07-01

    Broad availability of low-light cameras invites to revisit a series of physicochemical phenomena, both in a qualitative and quantitative way. The range spans from mechanical, X-, electrical discharge stimulated luminescence to particle induced radioluminescence. Radium-doped luminophores are available for investigation of radiation damaging, as well as homogeneity analysis of faint VIS decay signatures in time and space. (orig.)

  1. Vertebrate radiations of the Jehol Biota and their environmental background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhonghe

    2004-01-01

    @@ Significant progress has been made in recent years in the studies of various groups of the Jehol Biota, particularly concerning the origin of birds and their flight as well as the evolution of Early Cretaceous birds, dinosaurs, mammals, insects and flowering plants[1-5]. As a result, the Jehol Biota has become well known to both the scientific community and the public. The studies on the Jehol Biota also revealed the patterns and processes of the evolutionary radiations of many major groups of Early Cretaceous animals and plants, such as the earliest known radiation of angiosperms and birds, early differentiation of mammals and many Cretaceous dinosaurian groups. Notably, the radiations of the Jehol vertebrates share some similar patterns attributable to the particular environmental background. For instance, the Jehol vertebrate radiations are highlighted by the presence of abundant arboreal adaptations and herbivorous forms, thus closely linked to the forest environments. In addition, the differentiation of habitats and diets is also characteristic of the evolutionary radiations of pterosaurs, dinosaurs, birds and mammals in the Jehol Biota.

  2. Nuclear non-proliferation: Revisiting the basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1970 Treaty on the Non- Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), with 188 States party, represents the cornerstone of the global nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament effort -- and despite recent challenges, it has never been more relevant than it is today. But if we are to move forward, it is essential to revisit a number of the basic assumptions and features of the existing regime, and consider a number of new approaches. A key assumption at the core of the NPT was that the asymmetry between nuclear-weapon States and non-nuclear-weapon States would gradually disappear. Progress has been made on the nuclear disarmament front, but much more remains to be done. Nuclear disarmament strategies have for the most part focused on the negotiation of bilateral nuclear arms control agreements between the holders of the two largest nuclear arsenals, and a few multilateral agreements designed to curb the quantitative and qualitative development of nuclear weapons. With the end of the Cold War as an impetus, some progress was made in the early and mid-1990s, but the process unfortunately slowed in the latter part of the decade. The discoveries of a clandestine nuclear weapon programme in Iraq after the 1991 Gulf War made it painfully clear that the IAEA verification system, with its focus on declared nuclear activities and its limited rights of access to information and sites, was not adequate for the IAEA to provide the comprehensive peaceful use assurances required under the NPT. This stark realization prompted the international community to significantly expand the IAEA's verification rights. These new rights were incorporated into a 1997 protocol additional to safeguards agreements, with a request for all States to subscribe to it. For the IAEA to provide the required assurances, it must have the required authority. It is clear that the success of the IAEA verification regime will depend heavily on achieving universal adherence to the required safeguards agreements

  3. Getting ready for host invasion: elevated expression and action of xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases in developing haustoria of the holoparasitic angiosperm Cuscuta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Stian; Striberny, Bernd; Hollmann, Julien; Schwacke, Rainer; Popper, Zoë; Krause, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Changes in cell walls have been previously observed in the mature infection organ, or haustorium, of the parasitic angiosperm Cuscuta, but are not equally well charted in young haustoria. In this study, we focused on the molecular processes in the early stages of developing haustoria; that is, before the parasite engages in a physiological contact with its host. We describe first the identification of differentially expressed genes in young haustoria whose development was induced by far-red light and tactile stimuli in the absence of a host plant by suppression subtractive hybridization. To improve sequence information and to aid in the identification of the obtained candidates, reference transcriptomes derived from two species of Cuscuta, C. gronovii and C. reflexa, were generated. Subsequent quantitative gene expression analysis with different tissues of C. reflexa revealed that among the genes that were up-regulated in young haustoria, two xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) genes were highly expressed almost exclusively at the onset of haustorium development. The same expression pattern was also found for the closest XTH homologues from C. gronovii. In situ assays for XTH-specific action suggested that xyloglucan endotransglucosylation was most pronounced in the cell walls of the swelling area of the haustorium facing the host plant, but was also detectable in later stages of haustoriogenesis. We propose that xyloglucan remodelling by Cuscuta XTHs prepares the parasite for host infection and possibly aids the invasive growth of the haustorium. PMID:26561437

  4. New Distribution Record of Angiosperm in Fujian Province (IV)%福建被子植物分布新记录 IV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成梓; 刘小芬; 黄泽豪; 范世明; 吴锦忠

    2012-01-01

      According to the investigation on the vegetation in Fujian Province, 1 newly recorded genus, Arabis; and 5 newly recorded species, Arabis flagellosa, Sedum emarginatum, Sedum polytrichoides, Sedum tetractinum, Hylotelephium erythrostictum of angiosperms were reported. The voucher specimens were deposited in the Herbarium of FJTCM.%  在福建省药用植物资源调查中,陆续发现了福建省被子植物地理新分布记录属及种多个,经整理鉴定,本文继续报道1个新分布记录属(南芥属 Arabis)和5个新分布记录种(匍匐南芥 Arabis flagellosa、凹叶景天Sedum emarginatum、藓状景天 Sedum polytrichoides、四芒景天 Sedum tetractinum、八宝 Hylotelephium erythrostictum)。标本存放于福建中医药大学药用植物标本室。

  5. Plant functional types are more efficient than climate in predicting spectrums of trait variation in evergreen angiosperm trees of tropical Australia and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, H. F.; Prentice, I. C. C.; Atkin, O. K.; Bloomfield, K. J.; Bradford, M.; Weerasinghe, L. K.; Harrison, S. P.; Evans, B. J.; Liddell, M. J.; Wang, H.; Cao, K. F.; Fan, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of Plant Functional Types (PFTs) in current generation of Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) is excessively simplistically. Key ecophysiological properties, such as photosynthesis biochemistry, are most times merely averaged and trade-off with other plant traits is often neglected. Validation of a PFT framework based in photosynthetic process is crucial to improve reliability of DGVMs. We present 431 leaf-biochemical and wood level measurements in evergreen angiosperm trees of tropical forests in Australia and China that were divided in four spectrums of plant trait variation: metabolic, structural, hydraulic and height dimensions. Plant traits divided in each of these dimensions adopt survival strategies reflected more clearly by trade-off within each spectrum, and in some extent across spectrums. Co-ordination theory (that Rubisco- and electron-transport limited rates of photosynthesis are co-limiting) and least-coast theory (that intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration minimizes the combined costs per unit carbon assimilation, regulating maximum height and wood density) expectations matched PFT (which takes in account canopy position and light access, and life spam) variation. Our findings suggest that climate (air moisture, air temperature, light) has lower power representing these dimensions, in comparison to the PFT framework.

  6. Contradiction between plastid gene transcription and function due to complex posttranscriptional splicing: an exemplary study of ycf15 function and evolution in angiosperms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shi

    Full Text Available Plant chloroplast genes are usually co-transcribed while its posttranscriptional splicing is fairly complex and remains largely unsolved. On basis of sequencing the three complete Camellia (Theaceae chloroplast genomes for the first time, we comprehensively analyzed the evolutionary patterns of ycf15, a plastid gene quite paradoxical in terms of its function and evolution, along the inferred angiosperm phylogeny. Although many species in separate lineages including the three species reported here contained an intact ycf15 gene in their chloroplast genomes, the phylogenetic mixture of both intact and obviously disabled ycf15 genes imply that they are all non-functional. Both intracellular gene transfer (IGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT failed to explain such distributional anomalies. While, transcriptome analyses revealed that ycf15 was transcribed as precursor polycistronic transcript which contained ycf2, ycf15 and antisense trnL-CAA. The transcriptome assembly was surprisingly found to cover near the complete Camellia chloroplast genome. Many non-coding regions including pseudogenes were mapped by multiple transcripts, indicating the generality of pseudogene transcriptions. Our results suggest that plastid DNA posttranscriptional splicing may involve complex cleavage of non-functional genes.

  7. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). The conservation of both C/S1 bZIP interactions and SIRT remains poorly characterized in non-model species, leaving their evolutionary origin uncertain and limiting crop research. In this work, we explored recently published plant sequencing data to establish a detailed phylogeny of C and S1 bZIPs, investigating their intertwined role in plant evolution, and the origin of SIRT. Our analyses clarified C and S1 bZIP orthology relationships in angiosperms, and identified S1 sequences in gymnosperms. We experimentally showed that the gymnosperm orthologs are regulated by SIRT, tracing back the origin of this unique regulatory mechanism to the ancestor of seed plants. Additionally, we discovered an earlier S ortholog in the charophyte algae Klebsormidium flaccidum, together with a C ortholog. This suggests that C and S groups originated by duplication from a single algal proto-C/S ancestor. Based on our observations, we propose a model wherein the C/S1 bZIP dimer network evolved in seed plants from pre-existing C/S bZIP interactions. PMID:27457880

  8. New Distribution Record of Angiosperm in Fujian Province (Ⅲ)%福建被子植物分布新记录Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成梓; 刘小芬; 黄泽豪; 范世明; 吴锦忠

    2012-01-01

      在福建省药用植物资源调查中,陆续发现了福建省被子植物地理新分布记录属及种多个,经整理鉴定,本文继续报道新分布记录属4个,乳豆属 Galactia、米口袋属 Gueldenstaedtia、山靛属 Mercurialis、刺芹属Eryngium,以及乳豆 Galactia tenuiflora、少花米口袋 Gueldenstaedtia verna、山靛 Mercurialis leiocarpa、刺芹Eryngium foetidum、泡果苘 Herissantia crispa 等5个新分布记录种,标本存放于福建中医药大学药用植物标本室%  According to the investigation on the vegetation in Fujian Province, 4 Newly recorded genera, Galactia, Gueldenstaedtia, Mercurialis, Eryngium, and 5 newly recorded species, Galactia tenuiflora, Gueldenstaedtia verna, Mercurialis leiocarpa, Herissantia crispa, Eryngium foetidum of Angiosperm were found. The voucher specimens were deposited in the Herbarium of FJTCM.

  9. The role of brand destination experience in determining revisit intention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Sørensen, Flemming

    experience, which provides a more holistic and unified view of the brand destination. The research uses a logistic regression model to determine the role of satisfaction and brand experience in determining revisit intentions. The study also examines differences among subgroups and four brand experience sub......-constructs. The findings suggest that brand experience is an important determinant of revisit intentions, but that there is variation among respondent groups. The paper rounds off with conclusions and implications for research and practice.......Destination branding has developed considerably as a topic area in the last decade with numerous conceptualizations focusing on different aspects of the brand. However, a unified view has not yet emerged. This paper examines destination branding via a new conceptualization, brand destination...

  10. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation (EEC) Effect: A Revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Animesh; Biswas, Tapas; Rakshit, Animesh K; Moulik, Satya P

    2015-12-31

    A short account of the developments and perspectives of IKR (iso-kinetic relation) and EEC (enthalpy (H) - entropy (S) compensation) has been presented. The IKR and EEC are known to be extra thermodynamic or empirical correlations though linear H-S correlation can be thermodynamically deduced. Attempt has also been made to explain the phenomena in terms of statistical thermodynamics. In this study, we have briefly revisited the fundamentals of both IKR and EEC from kinetic and thermodynamic grounds. A detailed revisit of the EEC phenomenon on varied kinetic and equilibrium processes has been also presented. Possible correlations among the free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS) changes of different similar and nonsimilar chemical processes under varied conditions have been discussed with possible future projections.

  11. The significance test controversy revisited the fiducial Bayesian alternative

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoutre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this book is not only to revisit the “significance test controversy,”but also to provide a conceptually sounder alternative. As such, it presents a Bayesian framework for a new approach to analyzing and interpreting experimental data. It also prepares students and researchers for reporting on experimental results. Normative aspects: The main views of statistical tests are revisited and the philosophies of Fisher, Neyman-Pearson and Jeffrey are discussed in detail. Descriptive aspects: The misuses of Null Hypothesis Significance Tests are reconsidered in light of Jeffreys’ Bayesian conceptions concerning the role of statistical inference in experimental investigations. Prescriptive aspects: The current effect size and confidence interval reporting practices are presented and seriously questioned. Methodological aspects are carefully discussed and fiducial Bayesian methods are proposed as a more suitable alternative for reporting on experimental results. In closing, basic routine procedures...

  12. Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  13. Discussion of "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Christian; Caiani, Enrico G; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Kulikowski, Casimir A; Schiecke, Karin; van Bemmel, Jan H; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring" written by Thomas M. Deserno and Nikolaus Marx. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the paper of Deserno and Marx. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor.

  14. Revisiting the Panko-Halverson Taxonomy of Spreadsheet Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Panko, Raymond R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to revisit the Panko-Halverson taxonomy of spreadsheet errors and suggest revisions. There are several reasons for doing so: First, the taxonomy has been widely used. Therefore, it should have scrutiny; Second, the taxonomy has not been widely available in its original form and most users refer to secondary sources. Consequently, they often equate the taxonomy with the simplified extracts used in particular experiments or field studies; Third, perhaps as a consequ...

  15. China in 2005 Revisited: The Implications of International Capital Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Ianchovichina, Elena; McDougall, Robert; Hertel, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper revisits the analysis of the implications of China's economic growth on her trading partners presented in Arndt et al. (1997) using a dynamic, applied general equilibrium model that features international capital mobility. We find that accounting for the impact of China's growth on international capital markets reverses some of the findings in the paper by Arndt et al. In particular, net creditor regions lose while net debtor regions benefit from an economic slowdown in China du...

  16. Audit probability versus effectiveness: The Beckerian approach revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Rablen, M

    2014-01-01

    This is the accepted version of the following article: RABLEN, M. D. (2014), Audit Probability versus Effectiveness: The Beckerian Approach Revisited. Journal of Public Economic Theory, 16: 322–342, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jpet.12062/abstract. The Beckerian approach to tax compliance examines how a tax authority can maximize social welfare by trading-off audit probability against the fine rate on undeclared tax. This paper offers...

  17. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole....

  18. Trade and civil conflict : revisiting the cross-country evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cali, Massimiliano; Mulabdic, Alen

    2014-01-01

    This paper revisits and expands the evidence on the impact of trade shocks on intra-state conflict with a large sample of developing countries in the 1960-2010 period. The results suggest that increases in the prices of a country's exported commodities raise the country's risk of civil conflict and its duration. The effect on conflict risk is mainly driven by the price of point-source comm...

  19. Simulation of Two-Way Pushdown Automata Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Glück

    2013-01-01

    The linear-time simulation of 2-way deterministic pushdown automata (2DPDA) by the Cook and Jones constructions is revisited. Following the semantics-based approach by Jones, an interpreter is given which, when extended with random-access memory, performs a linear-time simulation of 2DPDA. The recursive interpreter works without the dump list of the original constructions, which makes Cook's insight into linear-time simulation of exponential-time automata more intuitive and the complexity arg...

  20. Probit Model Estimation Revisited: Trinomial Models of Household Car Ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Bunch, David S; Kitamura, Ryuichi

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we revisit various important issues relating to practical estimation of the multinomial probit model, using an empirical analysis of car ownership as a test case. To provide context, a brief literature review of empirical probit studies is included. Estimates are obtained for a full range of model specifications, including models with random (uncorrelated and correlated) taste variation and/or a general random error structure, and issues of estimability, specification testing, a...

  1. Power Market Design beyond 2020: Time to Revisit Key Elements?

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhoff, Karsten; Ruester, Sophia; Schwenen, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We revisit key elements of European power market design with respect to both short term operation and longer-term investment and re-investment choices. For short term markets, the European policy debate focuses on the definition of common interfaces, like for example gate closure time. We argue that that this is insufficient if the market design is to accommodate for the different needs of renewable and conventional generation assets and different flexibility options. The market design needs ...

  2. New Families in the Stable Homotopy of Spheres Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jin Kun

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a new family in the stable homotopy of spheres πt-6S representedby hngoγ3 ∈ E26,t in the Adams spectral sequence which revisits the bn-1g0γ3-elements ∈πt-7S con-structed in [3], where t = 2pn(p- 1) +6(p2 + p+ 1)(p- 1) and p ≥ 7 is a prime, n ≥ 4.

  3. Revisiting Barriers to Trade: Do Foregone Health Benefits Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sidi; Kerr, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examins the question of revisiting the imposition of existing trade barriers in one case of an evolving marketplace – when a traditional food product is altered to provide, or discovered to have, human health benefits that increases their value to consumers. In other words, the food becomes a functional food. A functional food has the potential provide direct benefits to consumers as well as indirect benefits to society in the form of health care cost savings. If the trade barrier ...

  4. The Dutch Disease revisited: absorption constraint and learning by doing

    OpenAIRE

    Iacono, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This paper revisits the Dutch disease by analyzing the general equilibrium effects of a resource shock on a dependent economy, both in a static and dynamic setting. The novel aspect of this study is to incorporate two features of the Dutch disease literature that have only been analyzed in isolation from each other: capital accumulation with absorption constraint and productivity growth induced by learning by doing. The conventional result of long-run exchange rate appreciation is maintained ...

  5. Clausius/Cosserat/Maxwell/Weyl Equations: The Virial Theorem Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Pommaret, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    This paper must be published under the title " FROM THERMODYNAMICS TO GAUGE THEORY: THE VIRIAL THEOREM REVISITED " as a chapter of a forthcoming book " GAUGE THEORY AND DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY " published by Nova Editors. In 1870, R. Clausius found the virial theorem which amounts to introduce the trace of the stress tensor when studying the foundations of thermodynamics, as a way to relate the absolute temperature of an ideal gas to the mean kinetic energy of its molecules. In 1901, H. Poin...

  6. Revisiting the Response Mechanism of Polymeric Membrane Based Heparin Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Andrea K.; Höfler, Lajos; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometric membrane electrodes that respond to heparin and other polyanions were introduced in the early 1990s. Herein, the mechanism of polymer membrane electrode type heparin sensors is revisited. The extraction/diffusion of heparin is studied via both potentiometric and impedance spectroscopic techniques using a pre-fractionated heparin preparation that contains polyanionic species > 10000 Daltons. The reversal in EMF response using this heparin preparation indicates diffusion of highe...

  7. Large scale geometry and evolution of a universe with radiation pressure and cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Coquereaux, Robert; Coquereaux, Robert; Grossmann, Alex

    2000-01-01

    In view of new experimental results that strongly suggest a non-zero cosmological constant, it becomes interesting to revisit the Friedmann-Lemaitre model of evolution of a universe with cosmological constant and radiation pressure. In this paper, we discuss the explicit solutions for that model, and perform numerical explorations for reasonable values of cosmological parameters. We also analyse the behaviour of redshifts in such models and the description of ``very large scale geometrical features'' when analysed by distant observers.

  8. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... goal of causing less harm to the surrounding healthy tissue. You don't have to worry that you'll glow in the dark after radiation treatment: People who receive external radiation are not radioactive. You' ...

  9. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to simplify some of the relevant points of legislation, biological effects and protection for the benefit of the occupational health nurse not familiar with the nuclear industries. The subject is dealt with under the following headings; Understanding atoms. What is meant by ionizing radiation. Types of ionizing radiation. Effects of radiation: long and short term somatic effects, genetic effects. Control of radiation: occupational exposure, women of reproductive age, medical aspects, principles of control. The occupational health nurse's role. Emergency arrangements: national arrangements for incidents involving radiation, action to be taken by the nurse. Decontamination procedures: external and internal contamination. (U.K.)

  10. Lunar eclipse theory revisited: Scattered sunlight in both the quiescent and the volcanically perturbed atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residual brightness of the shadowed Moon during a lunar eclipse is attributed to unscattered sunlight rays refracted in the Earth's atmosphere. The classical theory of lunar eclipses is built on the premise that the sunlight scattered by the gases and particles in the atmosphere contributes negligibly to the brightness of the eclipsed Moon. The current work revisits the lunar eclipse theory, extending it to accommodate spectrally resolved observations and addressing the role of scattered sunlight. Predictions of both direct and diffuse sunlight are produced by integrating the radiative transfer equations over the Earth's disk. The investigation contemplates scenarios of normal aerosol loading as well as conditions representative of the months and years following a major volcanic eruption. It is shown that omitting scattered sunlight is an acceptable approximation for low and moderate aerosol loadings at visible and longer wavelengths. However, towards the ultraviolet, or at times when the atmosphere contains elevated aerosol amounts, the relative significance of direct and diffuse sunlight may reverse. Spectra of the sunlight that reaches the shadowed Moon during the eclipse are presented to illustrate the distinct contributions from both components. It is also shown that lunar eclipse spectra obtained up to 4-5 years after a major volcanic eruption, such as Mt. Pinatubo's in 1991, will reveal that the stratosphere remains perturbed above background aerosol levels.

  11. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The effects of Population III stars on their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Muratov, Alexander L; Gnedin, Nickolay Y; Zemp, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the ART code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a new recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III stars. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies which host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10^8 yr after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they will typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies more massive than ...

  12. De novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequencing of whole genomic DNA provides first evidence of DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iorizzo Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence analysis of organelle genomes has revealed important aspects of plant cell evolution. The scope of this study was to develop an approach for de novo assembly of the carrot mitochondrial genome using next generation sequence data from total genomic DNA. Results Sequencing data from a carrot 454 whole genome library were used to develop a de novo assembly of the mitochondrial genome. Development of a new bioinformatic tool allowed visualizing contig connections and elucidation of the de novo assembly. Southern hybridization demonstrated recombination across two large repeats. Genome annotation allowed identification of 44 protein coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA. Identification of the plastid genome sequence allowed organelle genome comparison. Mitochondrial intergenic sequence analysis allowed detection of a fragment of DNA specific to the carrot plastid genome. PCR amplification and sequence analysis across different Apiaceae species revealed consistent conservation of this fragment in the mitochondrial genomes and an insertion in Daucus plastid genomes, giving evidence of a mitochondrial to plastid transfer of DNA. Sequence similarity with a retrotransposon element suggests a possibility that a transposon-like event transferred this sequence into the plastid genome. Conclusions This study confirmed that whole genome sequencing is a practical approach for de novo assembly of higher plant mitochondrial genomes. In addition, a new aspect of intercompartmental genome interaction was reported providing the first evidence for DNA transfer into an angiosperm plastid genome. The approach used here could be used more broadly to sequence and assemble mitochondrial genomes of diverse species. This information will allow us to better understand intercompartmental interactions and cell evolution.

  13. The role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Björk, Mats

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. Electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Z. marina were measured under saturating irradiance in synthetic seawater containing 2.2 mM DIC and no DIC with different O2 levels (air-equilibrated levels, 3 % of air equilibrium and restored air-equilibrated levels). Lowering O2 did not affect ETR when DIC was provided, while it caused a decrease in ETR and an increase in NPQ in DIC-free media, indicating that O2 acted as an alternative electron acceptor under low DIC. The ETR and NPQ as a function of irradiance were subsequently assessed in synthetic seawater containing (1) 2.2 mM DIC, air-equilibrated O2; (2) saturating CO2, no O2; and (3) no DIC, air-equilibrated O2. These treatments were combined with glycolaldehyde pre-incubation. Glycolaldehyde caused a marked decrease in ETR in DIC-free medium, indicating significant electron flow supported by photorespiration. Combining glycolaldehyde with O2 depletion completely suppressed ETR suggesting the operation of the Mehler reaction, a possibility supported by the photosynthesis-dependent superoxide production. However, no notable effect of suppressing the Mehler reaction on NPQ was observed. It is concluded that during DIC-limiting conditions, such as those frequently occurring in the habitats of Z. marina, captured light energy exceeds what is utilised for the assimilation of available carbon, and photorespiration is a major alternative electron acceptor, while the contribution of the Mehler reaction is minor. PMID:27125819

  14. The role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Björk, Mats

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. Electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Z. marina were measured under saturating irradiance in synthetic seawater containing 2.2 mM DIC and no DIC with different O2 levels (air-equilibrated levels, 3 % of air equilibrium and restored air-equilibrated levels). Lowering O2 did not affect ETR when DIC was provided, while it caused a decrease in ETR and an increase in NPQ in DIC-free media, indicating that O2 acted as an alternative electron acceptor under low DIC. The ETR and NPQ as a function of irradiance were subsequently assessed in synthetic seawater containing (1) 2.2 mM DIC, air-equilibrated O2; (2) saturating CO2, no O2; and (3) no DIC, air-equilibrated O2. These treatments were combined with glycolaldehyde pre-incubation. Glycolaldehyde caused a marked decrease in ETR in DIC-free medium, indicating significant electron flow supported by photorespiration. Combining glycolaldehyde with O2 depletion completely suppressed ETR suggesting the operation of the Mehler reaction, a possibility supported by the photosynthesis-dependent superoxide production. However, no notable effect of suppressing the Mehler reaction on NPQ was observed. It is concluded that during DIC-limiting conditions, such as those frequently occurring in the habitats of Z. marina, captured light energy exceeds what is utilised for the assimilation of available carbon, and photorespiration is a major alternative electron acceptor, while the contribution of the Mehler reaction is minor.

  15. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  16. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  17. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  18. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  19. Circular revisit orbits design for responsive mission over a single target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taibo; Xiang, Junhua; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    The responsive orbits play a key role in addressing the mission of Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) because of their capabilities. These capabilities are usually focused on supporting specific targets as opposed to providing global coverage. One subtype of responsive orbits is repeat coverage orbit which is nearly circular in most remote sensing applications. This paper deals with a special kind of repeating ground track orbit, referred to as circular revisit orbit. Different from traditional repeat coverage orbits, a satellite on circular revisit orbit can visit a target site at both the ascending and descending stages in one revisit cycle. This typology of trajectory allows a halving of the traditional revisit time and does a favor to get useful information for responsive applications. However the previous reported numerical methods in some references often cost lots of computation or fail to obtain such orbits. To overcome this difficulty, an analytical method to determine the existence conditions of the solutions to revisit orbits is presented in this paper. To this end, the mathematical model of circular revisit orbit is established under the central gravity model and the J2 perturbation. A constraint function of the circular revisit orbit is introduced, and the monotonicity of that function has been studied. The existent conditions and the number of such orbits are naturally worked out. Taking the launch cost into consideration, optimal design model of circular revisit orbit is established to achieve a best orbit which visits a target twice a day in the morning and in the afternoon respectively for several days. The result shows that it is effective to apply circular revisit orbits in responsive application such as reconnoiter of natural disaster.

  20. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk.

  2. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level. PMID:15923917

  3. Pulsar electrodynamics: Relativistic kinetic theory of radiative plasmas--collective phenomena and their radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical modeling of radiation by accelerated charged particles in pulsars predicts a cutoff in photon energy at around 25 GeV. While this is broadly consistent with observations, the classical treatment is not self-consistent, and cannot be extended to explain the rare high-energy detections of photons in the 100s of GeV range. In this paper we revisit the theoretical modeling of high-energy radiation processes in very strong electromagnetic fields, in the context of both single particles and collective plasmas. There are no classical constraints on this description. We find that there is indeed a critical energy of around 50 GeV that arises naturally in this self-consistent treatment, but rather than being a cutoff, this critical energy signals a transition from radiation that is classical to a quasiquantum description, in which the particle is able to radiate almost its total energy in a single event. This new modeling therefore places pulsar radiation processes on a more secure physical basis, and admits the possibility of the production of TeV photons in a self-consistent way.

  4. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    SALTIK, Metin; Mustafa KURT; Mehmet KAYMAK

    1996-01-01

    According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated m...

  5. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  6. Process and pattern in cichlid radiations - inferences for understanding unusually high rates of evolutionary diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehausen, Ole

    2015-07-01

    The cichlid fish radiations in the African Great Lakes differ from all other known cases of rapid speciation in vertebrates by their spectacular trophic diversity and richness of sympatric species, comparable to the most rapid angiosperm radiations. I review factors that may have facilitated these radiations and compare these with insights from recent work on plant radiations. Work to date suggests that it was a coincidence of ecological opportunity, intrinsic ecological versatility and genomic flexibility, rapidly evolving behavioral mate choice and large amounts of standing genetic variation that permitted these spectacular fish radiations. I propose that spatially orthogonal gradients in the fit of phenotypes to the environment facilitate speciation because they allow colonization of alternative fitness peaks during clinal speciation despite local disruptive selection. Such gradients are manifold in lakes because of the interaction of water depth as an omnipresent third spatial dimension with other fitness-relevant variables. I introduce a conceptual model of adaptive radiation that integrates these elements and discuss its applicability to, and predictions for, plant radiations. PMID:25983053

  7. Ornithogalum virens as a plant assay for beta and gamma radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herron, V J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the monocotyledonous angiosperm, Ornithogalum virens (Quintanilha and Cabral, 1947), could be used in such a biological assay system. After exposing O. virens plants to acute (/sup 60/Co) and chronic (/sup 137/Cs) gamma radiation and internal beta radiation (/sup 32/P), lethality (LD/sub 50/, LD/sub 100/), growth inhibition, and chromosome aberrations were investigated. The LD/sub 50/ and LD/sub 100/ for acute gamma radiation were estimated to be between 0.91 to 1.8 krad and less than 3.6 krad, respectively. Though growth inhibition and abnormal growth were observed in the acute and chronic gamma radiation studies, the changes in the growth of the plants were so variable that these parameters were found to be unreliable measures of radiation effects. Chromosome aberrations were a more reliable measure of radiation damage because linear relationships between total aberrations and dose were found for both gamma and beta radiation.

  8. Plume radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  9. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  10. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  11. Radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet has been produced by UKAEA and the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation to give some basic information about what radiation is and how it is used in day to day diagnosis and treatment. It will be of interest to people undergoing treatment, their relatives and friends, and anyone who wants to know more about this important area. After a brief historical introduction the booklet explains what radiation is, the natural and man-made sources of radiation, how it is produced and how X-rays are used in medical diagnosis and treatment. The radiation protection measures taken and safety standards followed are mentioned. (author)

  12. Fourth-order gravity as the inflationary model revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, S; Watanabe, N

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the simplest (fourth-order or quadratically generated) modified gravity model in four space-time dimensions. It is equivalent to the certain quintessence model via a Legendre-Weyl transform. By using the quintessence scalar potential we compute the (CMB) observables of inflation associated with curvature perturbations (namely, the scalar and tensor spectral indices, and the tensor-to-scalar ratio) by using the most recent WMAP5 experimental bound. Our results include the next-to-leading terms with respect to the inverse number of e-foldings.

  13. Revisiting the issue of elite capture in participatory initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis; Saito-Jensen, Moeko

    2013-01-01

    of resistance orchestrated by initially disadvantaged groups. Based on the cases we argue that studies of elite capture should be based on in-depth and longitudinal empirical investigations that carefully characterize forms and outcomes of elite capture and consider both the changing dynamics of social settings......Based on case studies of two communities implementing participatory forestry in Tanzania and India, we revisit the issue of elite capture of participatory initiatives. Our cases illustrate how initial elite capture of the participatory initiatives is circumvented over time through various forms...

  14. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polińska, P; Gillig, C; Wittmer, J P; Baschnagel, J

    2014-02-01

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions df = 3 (marginally compact) and df = 2.5 (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded-volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains. PMID:24574057

  15. Revisiting perfect fluid dark matter: Observational constraints from our galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Garipova, Guzel M.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-01-01

    We revisit certain features of an assumed spherically symmetric perfect fluid dark matter halo in the light of the observed data of our galaxy, the Milky Way (MW). The idea is to apply the Faber–Visser approach of combined observations of rotation curves and lensing to a first post-Newtonian approximation to “measure” the equation of state ω(r) of the perfect fluid galactic halo. However, for the model considered here, no constraints from lensing are used as it will be sufficient to consider ...

  16. Sampling the equilibrium: the j-walking algorithm revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rimas, Zilvinas

    2016-01-01

    The j-walking Monte-Carlo algorithm is revisited and updated to study the equilibrium properties of a system exhibiting broken ergodicity. The updated algorithm is tested on the Ising model and applied to the lattice-gas model for sorption in aerogel at low temperatures, when dynamics of the system is critically slowed down. It is demonstrated that the updated j-walking simulations are able to produce equilibrium isotherm which are typically hidden by the hysteresis effect within the standard single-flip simulations.

  17. Nonextensive Nambu Jona-Lasinio model of QCD matter revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rozynek, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    We present a revisited version of the nonextensive QCD-based Nambu - Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model describing the behavior of strongly interacting matter proposed by us some time ago. As before, it is based on the nonextensive generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) statistical mechanics used in the NJL model to its nonextensive version based on Tsallis statistics, but this time it fulfils the basic requirements of thermodynamical consistency. Different ways in which this can be done, connected with different possible choices of the form of the corresponding nonextensive entropies, are presented and discussed in detail. The corresponding results are compared, discussed and confronted with previous findings.

  18. Closed-set-based Discovery of Representative Association Rules Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Balcázar, José L

    2010-01-01

    The output of an association rule miner is often huge in practice. This is why several concise lossless representations have been proposed, such as the "essential" or "representative" rules. We revisit the algorithm given by Kryszkiewicz (Int. Symp. Intelligent Data Analysis 2001, Springer-Verlag LNCS 2189, 350-359) for mining representative rules. We show that its output is sometimes incomplete, due to an oversight in its mathematical validation, and we propose an alternative complete generator that works within only slightly larger running times.

  19. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    OpenAIRE

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and th...

  20. Small-angle scattering theory revisited: Photocurrent and spatial localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    In this paper theory on collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations in fusion plasmas is revisited. We present the first full derivation of the expression for the photocurrent beginning at the basic scattering concepts. Thereafter we derive detailed expressions for the auto......- and crosspower spectra obtained from measurements. These are discussed and simple simulations made to elucidate the physical meaning of the findings. In this context, the known methods of obtaining spatial localization are discussed and appraised. Where actual numbers are applied, we utilize....... Saffman et al., "CO2 laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements,"Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 2579-2592 (2001)]....

  1. Revisiting cosmological bounds on sterile neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Vincent, Aaron C; Hernandez, Pilar; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Mena, Olga

    2014-01-01

    We employ state-of-the art cosmological observables including supernova surveys and BAO information to provide constraints on the mass and mixing angle of a non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino species, showing that cosmology can effectively rule out sterile neutrinos which decay between BBN and the present day. The decoupling of an additional heavy neutrino species can modify the time dependence of the Universe's expansion between BBN and recombination and, in extreme cases, lead to an additional matter-dominated period; while this could naively lead to overclosure, seen as a younger Universe with a larger Hubble parameter, it could later be compensated by the extra radiation expected in the form of neutrinos from sterile decay. However, recombination-era observables including the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the shift parameter $R_{CMB}$ and the sound horizon $r_s$ from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) severely constrain this scenario. We self-consistently include the full time-evolution of the ...

  2. Cytological study of radiation induced alterations in cytoplasmic factors controlling male sterility in corn. Progress report, February 28, 1975--December 1, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: cytoplasmic constituents of the embryo of various gymnosperms and angiosperms; cytoplasmic male sterility in corn; modification of cytoplasmic sterility factors using gamma radiation, EMS, and ethidium bromide; selection for sterile, blight-resistant corn plants; electron microscopy study of abnormal mitochondria in cytoplasm of corn; cytoplasmic male sterility in Petunia; non-Mendelian variegation in Petunia and Nicotiana; graft transmission of cytoplasmic male sterility; cytoplasmic male sterility in Vicia faba; and studies on Blakeslee's I virus in Datura

  3. Frictional damping in radiative electrodynamics and its scaling to macroscopic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Das, D

    2011-01-01

    Radiation force in Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation is revisited for possible signature of irreversible action in the dynamics. The analysis shows that the classical electron can 'dissipate' out a certain fraction of field energy that distinguishes itself from the well known Larmor radiation loss. The dissipation occurs only when the acceleration changes course from its linear evolution. A measure of the dissipative action in the radiative electrodynamics is worked out to compare the two distinctly different modes of energy losses. The measure is shown to be applicable uniquely in all scales of the systems and is used as a common thread to explain frictional contributions of phonons and electrons recently reported. Key words: Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation, radiation force, Hawking radiation, frictional dissipation.

  4. On the thermodynamic origin of the initial radiation energy density in warm inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Gim, Yongwan

    2016-01-01

    In warm inflation scenarios, radiation always exists, so that the radiation energy density is also assumed to be finite when inflation starts. To find out the origin of the non-vanishing initial radiation energy density, we revisit thermodynamic analysis for a warm inflation model and then derive an effective Stefan-Boltzmann law which is commensurate with the temperature-dependent effective potential by taking into account the non-vanishing trace of the total energy-momentum tensors. The effective Stefan-Boltzmann law shows that the zero energy density for radiation at the Grand Unification epoch increases until the inflation starts and it becomes eventually finite at the initial stage of warm inflation. By using the above effective Stefan-Boltzmann law, we also study the cosmological scalar perturbation, and obtain the sufficient radiation energy density in order for GUT baryogenesis at the end of inflation.

  5. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  6. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  7. Radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  8. Sequencing of the needle transcriptome from Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst L. reveals lower substitution rates, but similar selective constraints in gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jun

    2012-11-01

    09and 1.1 × 10−09 is an order of magnitude smaller than values reported for angiosperm herbs. However, if one takes generation time into account, most of this difference disappears. The estimates of the dN/dS ratio (non-synonymous over synonymous divergence reported here are in general much lower than 1 and only a few genes showed a ratio larger than 1.

  9. Revisiting cosmological bounds on sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Aaron C.; Fernández Martínez, Enrique; Hernández, Pilar; Mena, Olga; Lattanzi, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    We employ state-of-the art cosmological observables including supernova surveys and BAO information to provide constraints on the mass and mixing angle of a non-resonantly produced sterile neutrino species, showing that cosmology can effectively rule out sterile neutrinos which decay between BBN and the present day. The decoupling of an additional heavy neutrino species can modify the time dependence of the Universe's expansion between BBN and recombination and, in extreme cases, lead to an additional matter-dominated period; while this could naively lead to a younger Universe with a larger Hubble parameter, it could later be compensated by the extra radiation expected in the form of neutrinos from sterile decay. However, recombination-era observables including the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the shift parameter RCMB and the sound horizon rs from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) severely constrain this scenario. We self-consistently include the full time-evolution of the coupled sterile neutrino and standard model sectors in an MCMC, showing that if decay occurs after BBN, the sterile neutrino is essentially bounded by the constraint sin2θ lesssim 0.026 (ms/eV)-2.

  10. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    CERN Document Server

    de Salas, Pablo F

    2016-01-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, N_eff. We find a value of N_eff=3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), ...

  11. Bilirubin present in diverse angiosperms

    OpenAIRE

    Pirone, Cary; Johnson, Jodie V.; Quirke, J. Martin. E.; Priestap, Horacio A.; Lee, David

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Bilirubin is an orange-yellow tetrapyrrole produced from the breakdown of heme by mammals and some other vertebrates. Plants, algae and cyanobacteria synthesize molecules similar to bilirubin, including the protein-bound bilins and phytochromobilin which harvest or sense light. Recently, we discovered bilirubin in the arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the White Bird of Paradise Tree, which was the first example of this molecule in a higher plant. Subsequently, we identified bil...

  12. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  13. DMPD: TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16006187 TLR signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpath...nalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpathway. PubmedID 16006187 Title TL...R signalling and activation of IRFs: revisiting old friends from the NF-kappaBpath

  14. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. At this time, you will have a physical exam , talk about your medical history , and maybe have imaging tests . Your doctor or nurse will discuss external beam radiation therapy, its benefits and side effects, and ways you can care ...

  15. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  16. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  17. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  18. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  19. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  20. Radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaborate precautions are taken in the design, construction and operation of nuclear installations. Even then, there always remains the possibility, however small, of accidents. A radiation emergency can be defined as any abnormal situation following an incident/accident which may result in either unusually large radiation fields in any plant/area or large release of air or liquid borne radioactivity leading to widespread contamination of areas

  1. Radiation Entomology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-01-01

    The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-steril...

  2. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  3. A critical review of the system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our modern, information society is increasingly interested in transparency and participation in many aspects of government, and this is particularly true in areas involving public health and environmental protection. Radiation protection is no exception to this trend. Scientific rationale that was once sufficient to explain radiation protection theory and practice is no longer adequate. The need to address and communicate theory, practice and the decision-making process to a wider audience has given rise to numerous debates and led the radiation protection community to revisit the framework of the system of radiation protection. The very fundamentals of the system of radiation protection continue to be questioned in a healthy fashion, and many aspects have been identified which could better serve stakeholders given some additional thought in the light of modern societal needs. This report is the summary of the NEA's first reflections in this area, and describes those aspects of the current international system of radiation protection that could be improved. Suggested directions for improvement are provided. (author)

  4. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luidmila Semionova; Denis Leahy; Jorge Paez

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field.We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field,for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation.Also,we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum.For very strong magnetic fields,transitions to the ground state predominate.Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained,which confirm previous results by Latal.Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation.We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation.Additionally we get,for the non-relativistic approximation,the transition rates for any polarization of radiation.As an application,the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53,which has multiple observable cyclotron lines,taking into account gravitational redshift.The most probable polarization is ∈(2).

  5. Polarization in cyclotron radiation in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the problem of radiative transitions of electrons in the presence of a strong magnetic field. We derive fully relativistic cyclotron transition rates for an arbitrary magnetic field, for any orientation of electron spin and for any polarization of the emitted radiation. Also, we obtain the transition rates for any value of the initial electron's parallel momentum. For very strong magnetic fields, transitions to the ground state predominate. Transition rates summed over the electron's spin orientation and for unpolarized radiation are also obtained, which confirm previous results by Latal. Transition widths are calculated for different electron spin orientations and different polarizations of radiation. We obtain general expressions for transition rates that reduce to the results for the non-relativistic case and for unpolarized radiation. Additionally we get, for the non-relativistic approximation, the transition rates for any polarization of radiation. As an application, the first five emission lines are evaluated and compared to the X-ray emitting neutron star V0332+53, which has multiple observable cyclotron lines, taking into account gravitational redshift. The most probable polarization is in(2). (research papers)

  6. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  7. Influence of ion mass on laser-energy absorption and synchrotron radiation at ultrahigh laser intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ions in the energy absorption of a short and ultra intense laser pulse and in the synchrotron radiation generated by accelerated electrons is revisited. For laser intensities above 1022 W/cm2 and plasma densities more than 10 times the critical density, the ion-to-electron mass ratio strongly affects the energy repartition between the electrons, ions, and radiation. This phenomenon is studied with a one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell code, taking into account the radiation reaction force. The choice of the ion mass strongly affects the energy and angular distribution of the photon emission and the electron energy distribution. This effect may be important for laboratory modeling of radiation dominated relativistic astrophysical events. It can be verified in experiments with solid hydrogen targets. (authors)

  8. Revisiting Neoclassical Growth Theory: A Survey in the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank GUPTA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the second half of the twentieth century economists have build newer models of economic growth that consider policy influences of growth and divergent outcomes among countries. These models addresses issues concerning economic growth, operation of financial markets, trade policy, government expenditures, and taxation. In this essay we have revisited the interdependence of political and economic institutions, taking the neoclassical growth model of Solow (1956 as a point of departure, which maintains that long run economic growth can be explained by capital accumulation, population growth and technological progress. We first discuss the evolution of the neoclassical school of economics in a historical context, and the role of various institutions in engendering economic growth. Subsequently the role of government spending, political stability, property rights and special interest groups (SIG's affect economic growth have been discussed, and how these institutions can explain different countries to grow at divergent rates and achieve different levels of wealth.

  9. Semiclassical approach for the evaporating black hole revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2016-01-01

    A recent calculation shows that the observed energy density in the Unruh state at the future event horizon as seen by a freely falling observer is finite if the observer is released from rest at any positive distance outside the horizon; however, it is getting larger and larger so that it is negatively divergent at the horizon in the limit that the observer starts falling from rest at the horizon, which corresponds to the infinite boost with respect to the freely falling observer at a finite distance from the horizon. In order to resolve some conflicts between the recent calculation and the conventional ones in the well-known literatures, the calculation of the free-fall energy density is revisited and some differences are pointed out.

  10. Revisiting manufacturing strategy: contributions towards a new construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliciane Maria da Silva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at revisiting and systematizing the literature on manufacturing strategy. Although this is a well consolidated theme broadly discussed in the last fifty years, manufacturing strategy practice grew on importance recently due to a more competitive environment the companies find themselves in. The review carried has systematized the existing literature into six lines of research dealing with competitive priorities, structural and infrastructural decision, best practices, performance indicators, production strategy formulation and generic manufacturing strategies. This article shows that four out of the six research areas are still receiving attention. A new construct which represents a global view of the lines of research mentioned is proposed. Gaps in the research field and suggestions for future works are described. Keywords: manufacturing strategy, content, formulation of manufacturing strategy, competitive priorities, best practices, performance indicators.

  11. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection...... with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. METHODS: Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed...... with serotype 1 was associated with a decreased risk of death (RR 0.23 (95% CI, 0.06-0.97)). Additionally, older age, relative leucopenia and relative hypothermia were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that capsular serotypes independently influenced the outcome from invasive...

  12. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  13. Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofilis, Vassilis; Rodriquez, Daniel; Smith, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In the last 3 years, global linear instability of LSB has been revisited, using state-of-the-art hardware and algorithms. Eigenspectra of LSB flows have been understood and classified in branches of known and newly-discovered eigenmodes. Major achievements: World-largest numerical solutions of global eigenvalue problems are routinely performed. Key aerodynamic phenomena have been explained via critical point theory, applied to our global mode results. Theoretical foundation for control of LSB flows has been laid. Global mode of LSB at the origin of observable phenomena. U-separation on semi-infinite plate. Stall cells on (stalled) airfoil. Receptivity/Sensitivity/AFC feasible (practical?) via: Adjoint EVP solution. Direct/adjoint coupling (the Crete connection). Minor effect of compressibility on global instability in the subsonic compressible regime. Global instability analysis of LSB in realistic supersonic flows apparently quite some way down the horizon.

  14. Impulsive Spot Heating and Thermal Explosion of Interstellar Grains Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Vasyunin, A; Caselli, P

    2015-01-01

    The problem of impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically, with the aim to better understand leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. It is rigorously shown that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., heating of mantles by cosmic rays), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number $\\lambda$. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: When $\\lambda$ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain -- this regime is commonly known as the whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of the physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, the calculations suggest tha...

  15. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness.

  16. Revisiting constraints on uplifts to de Sitter vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Bizet, Nana Cabo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the issue of uplifting the potential to de Sitter (dS) vacua in type IIB flux compactifications of Kachru, Kallosh, Linde and Trivedi (KKLT). We shed light on some tension between two constraints on dS vacua in type IIB string theory. One is the well-known and much-discussed constraint which leads to the no-go theorem that can in principle be evaded. The other follows from 4-dimensional Einstein's equations, which has, however, been much less discussed in connection with the former constraint. In addition to the challenges previously posed, it is suggested that the uplifting scenarios, in particular, obstruct the evasion of the no-go theorem more strongly than one might have assumed.

  17. Revisiting time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Bacot, Vincent; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these "Cauchy sources" which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  18. Magnetic Field - Gas Density Relation and Observational Implications Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Tritsis, A; Mouschovias, T Ch; Tassis, K; Pavlidou, V

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the relation between magnetic-field strength ($B$) and gas density ($\\rho$) for contracting interstellar clouds and fragments (or, cores), which is central in observationally determining the dynamical importance of magnetic fields in cloud evolution and star formation. Recently, it has been claimed that a relation $B \\propto \\rho^{2/3} $ is statistically preferred over $B \\propto \\rho^{1/2}$ in molecular clouds, when magnetic field detections and nondetections from Zeeman observations are combined. This finding has unique observational implications on cloud and core geometry: The relation $B \\propto \\rho^{2/3} $ can only be realized under spherical contraction. However, no indication of spherical geometry can be found for the objects used in the original statistical analysis of the $B-\\rho$ relation. We trace the origin of the inconsistency to simplifying assumptions in the statistical model used to arrive at the $B\\propto \\rho^{2/3}$ conclusion and to an underestimate of observational uncertaintie...

  19. Revisiting world energy intensity convergence for regional differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, Brantley [Centre for Strategic Economic Studies, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 8001 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    World convergence in energy intensity is revisited using two new large data sets: a 111-country sample spanning 1971-2006, and a 134-country sample spanning 1990-2006. Both data sets confirm continued convergence. However, the larger data set, which adds the former Soviet Union republics and additional Balkan countries, indicates greater convergence over its more recent time-frame. Further investigation of geographical differences reveals that the OECD and Eurasian countries have shown considerable, continued convergence, while the Sub-Saharan African countries have converged amongst themselves, but at a slower rate than the OECD and Eurasian countries; by contrast, Latin American and Caribbean and Middle East and North African countries have exhibited no convergence to divergence in energy intensity. (author)

  20. Simulation of Two-Way Pushdown Automata Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Glück

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The linear-time simulation of 2-way deterministic pushdown automata (2DPDA by the Cook and Jones constructions is revisited. Following the semantics-based approach by Jones, an interpreter is given which, when extended with random-access memory, performs a linear-time simulation of 2DPDA. The recursive interpreter works without the dump list of the original constructions, which makes Cook's insight into linear-time simulation of exponential-time automata more intuitive and the complexity argument clearer. The simulation is then extended to 2-way nondeterministic pushdown automata (2NPDA to provide for a cubic-time recognition of context-free languages. The time required to run the final construction depends on the degree of nondeterminism. The key mechanism that enables the polynomial-time simulations is the sharing of computations by memoization.

  1. Stimulated Brillouin scattering revisited: Strong coupling regime and Rabi splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Huy, Kien Phan; Tchahame, Joel Cabrel; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical waveguides is a fundamental interaction between light and acoustic waves mediated by electrostriction and photoelasticity. In this paper, we revisit the usual theory of this inelastic scattering process to get a joint system in which the acoustic wave is strongly coupled to the interference pattern between the optical waves. We show in particular that, when the optoacoustic coupling rate is comparable to the phonon damping rate, the system enters in the strong coupling regime, giving rise to avoided crossing of the dispersion curve and Rabi-like splitting. We further find that optoacoustic Rabi splitting could in principle be observed using backward stimulated Brillouin scattering in sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers with moderate peak pump power.

  2. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  3. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  4. Revisiting symmetries of lattice fermions via spin-flavor representation

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Taro; Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Noumi, Toshifumi; Torii, Shingo; Aoki, Sinya

    2011-01-01

    Employing the spin-flavor representation, we unveil the structures of the doubler-mixing symmetries and the mechanisms of their spontaneous breakdown in four types of lattice fermion formulation. We first revisit the naive fermion with the vanishing bare mass $m$, and identify the generators of the symmetries which form U(4)$\\times$U(4). The strong-coupling analysis shows that it is broken to U(4) by chiral condensation. We apply the same procedure to the Wilson fermion, which possesses only the U(1) vector symmetry for general values of $m$. For a special value of $m$, however, there emerges an additional U(1) symmetry to be broken by pion condensation. We also explore two types of minimally-doubled fermion, and discover a similar kind of symmetry enhancement and its spontaneous breakdown.

  5. Theory of magnetohydrodynamic waves: The WKB approximation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past treatments of the eikonal or WKB theory of the propagation of magnetohydrodynamics waves have assumed a strictly isentropic background. IF in fact there is a gradient in the background entropy, then in second order in the WKB ordering, adiabatic fluctuations (in the Lagrangian sense) are not strictly isentropic in the Eulerian sense. This means that in the second order of the WKB expansion, which determines the variation of wave amplitude along rays, the violation of isentropy must be accounted for. The present paper revisits the derivation of the WKB approximation for small-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic waves, allowing for possible spatial variation of the background entropy. The equation of variation of wave amplitude is rederived; it is a bilinear equation which, it turns out, can be recast in the action conservation form. It is shown that this action conservation equation is in fact equivalent to the action conservation law obtained from Lagrangian treatments

  6. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  7. Online haemodiafiltration: definition, dose quantification and safety revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, James E; Ward, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The general objective assigned to the EUropean DIALlysis (EUDIAL) Working Group by the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) was to enhance the quality of dialysis therapies in Europe in the broadest possible sense. Given the increasing interest in convective therapies, the Working Group has started by focusing on haemodiafiltration (HDF) therapies. Several reports suggest that those therapies potentially improve the outcomes for end-stage renal disease patients. Europe is the leader in the field, having introduced the concept of ultra-purity for water and dialysis fluids and with notified bodies of the European Community having certified water treatment systems and online HDF machines. The prevalence of online HDF-treated patients is steadily increasing in Europe, averaging 15%. A EUDIAL consensus conference was held in Paris on 13 October 2011 to revisit terminology, safety and efficacy of online HDF. This is the first report of the expert group arising from that conference.

  8. Revisiting a Classic Study of the Molecular Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lauren M; Boland, Joseph R; Braverman, John M

    2016-03-01

    A constant rate of molecular evolution among homologous proteins and across lineages is known as the molecular clock. This concept has been useful for estimating divergence times. Here, we revisit a study by Richard Dickerson (J Mol Evol 1:26-45, 1971), wherein he provided striking visual evidence for a constant rate of amino acid changes among various evolutionary branch points. Dickerson's study is commonly cited as support of the molecular clock and a figure from it is often reproduced in textbooks. Since its publication, however, there have been updates made to dates of common ancestors based on the fossil record that should be considered. Additionally, collecting the accession numbers and carefully outlining Dickerson's methods serves as a resource to students of the molecular clock hypothesis.

  9. Revisiting radiation patterns in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Plaetzer, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Skands, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    We propose four simple event-shape variables for semi-inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -}→4-jet events. The observables and cuts are designed to be especially sensitive to subleading aspects of the event structure, and allow to test the reliability of phenomenological QCD models in greater detail. Three of them, θ{sub 14}, θ{sup *}, and C{sup (1/5)}{sub 2}, focus on soft emissions off three-jet topologies with a small opening angle, for which coherence effects beyond the leading QCD dipole pattern are expected to be enhanced. A complementary variable, M{sup 2}{sub L}/M{sup 2}{sub H}, measures the ratio of the hemisphere masses in 4-jet events with a compressed scale hierarchy (Durham y{sub 23}∝y{sub 34}), for which subleading 1→3 splitting effects are expected to be enhanced. We consider several different parton-shower models, spanning both conventional and dipole/antenna ones, all tuned to the same e{sup +}e{sup -} reference data, and show that a measurement of the proposed observables would allow for additional significant discriminating power between the models.

  10. Michelson-Morley Experiments Revisited and the Cosmic Background Radiation Preferred Frame

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, R T; Cahill, Reginald T.; Kitto, Kirsty

    2002-01-01

    We report a simple re-analysis of the old results (1887) from the Michelson-Morley interferometer experiment that was designed to detect absolute motion. We build upon a recent (1998) re-analysis of the original data by Munera, which revealed a small but significant effect after allowing for several systematic errors in the original analysis. The further re-analysis here reveals that a genuine effect of absolute motion is expected, in what is essentially a quantum interference experiment, but only if the photons travel in the interferometer at speeds V< c. This is the case if the interferometer operates in a dielectric, such as air, as was the case, incidently, of the Michelson-Morley experiment. The re-analysis here of the Michelson-Morley experimental data, correcting for the refractive index effect of the air, reveals an absolute speed of the Earth of v=359+/-54 km/s, which is in excellent agreement with the speed of v=365+/-18 km/s determined from the dipole fit, in 1991, to the NASA COBE satellite Cos...

  11. Radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, I.A.; Myers, S.J.

    1976-02-01

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented.

  12. Radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented

  13. Radiation gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji Electric has developed a pipe wall thinning detection device, which operates based on radiation gauge technology, for use in nuclear power plants and thermoelectric power plants. The radiation from the pipe wall thinning detection device, which can be used even during the plant operation, can penetrate heat insulation material. The device consists of detector and radiation source, and can detect the thickness of pipes (less than 500 mm in external diameter and less than 50 mm in thickness) with 2% reproducibility (with a measurement time of several minutes), based on the attenuation rate. Operation is easy and efficient since there is no need to remove the heat insulation and it is easy to mount the device, thus enabling more effective detection. (author)

  14. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allow radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that models are needed that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  15. Radiation Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-sterilised males for the control of the mosquito Culex fatigans.

  16. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allows radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that we need models that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  17. PhotoPrev:Unifying Context and Content Cues to Enhance Personal Photo Revisitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jin; Gang-Li Liu; Liang Zhao; Ling Feng; Senior Member; IEEE

    2015-01-01

    Personal photo revisitation on smart phones is a common yet uneasy task for users due to the large volume of photos taken in daily life. Inspired by the human memory and its natural recall characteristics, we build a personal photo revisitation tool, PhotoPrev, to facilitate users to revisit previous photos through associated memory cues. To mimic users’ episodic memory recall, we present a way to automatically generate an abundance of related contextual metadata (e.g., weather, temperature) and organize them as context lattices for each photo in a life cycle. Meanwhile, photo content (e.g., object, text) is extracted and managed in a weighted term list, which corresponds to semantic memory. A threshold algorithm based photo revisitation framework for context-and content-based keyword search on a personal photo collection, together with a user feedback mechanism, is also given. We evaluate the scalability on a large synthetic dataset by crawling users’ photos from Flickr, and a 12-week user study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of our photo revisitation strategies.

  18. Radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Film is one of the most simple ways to detect radiation although for film as dosimeters a careful attention is required in many aspects, such as emulsion characteristics, film response capacity processing techniques and interpretation of the exposition. Surpassing these factors the film dosimeter is the most reliable

  19. Radiation dosage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative

  20. Radiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was organized to evaluate the application directions of radiation technology in Vietnam and to utilize the Irradiation Centre in Hanoi with the Co-60 source of 110 kCi. The investigation and study of technico-economic feasibility for technology development to various items of food and non-food objects was reported. (N.H.A)

  1. New Results of Angiosperm Bryophytes of Inner Mongolia in the Post-Bryophytes Time%内蒙古苔藓植物志后时期苔藓植物区系研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赫智霞; 徐杰; 白学良; 田桂泉; 李琴琴

    2012-01-01

    本文综述了《内蒙古苔藓植物志》出版之后内蒙古苔藓植物区系研究的新成果.结果表明,在《内蒙古苔藓植物志》出版之后的十多年间,以白学良教授为领导的研究团队,对内蒙古地区苔藓植物的分布、种类多样性等方面进行了深入研究,特别是沙漠地区.在此期间,发现内蒙古苔藓植物新记录1纲;新记录科3科;新记录属16属;新记录种76种、订正种9种.内蒙古苔藓植物区系研究取得了显著成果,为《内蒙古苔藓植物志》的再版编著奠定了坚实的基础.%The paper has overviewed the research new result of angiosperm bryophytes of Inner Mongolian after the publishing edition of "bryophytes Intramongolica".The results indicate: after the "bryophytes Intramongolica " publish ten more years,under the leadership of the professor Bai Xueliang,distribution and species variety of the Inner Mongolia bryophytes go ahead intensive study,especially in desert area.During this time: 1 new record class,3 new record family;16 new record genus;76 new record species,9 revised species were found.In the post-flora time,the research on angiosperm flora of Inner Mongolia has achieved notable progress,which has provide a strong base of the second edition of " Flora Intramongolica ".

  2. Pollen performance, cell number, and physiological state in the early-divergent angiosperm Annona cherimola Mill. (Annonaceae) are related to environmental conditions during the final stages of pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, J; Herrero, M; Hormaza, J I

    2012-09-01

    Pollen performance is an important determinant for fertilization success, but high variability in pollen behavior both between and within species occurs in different years and under varying environmental conditions. Annona cherimola, an early-divergent angiosperm, is a species that releases a variable ratio of bicellular and tricellular hydrated pollen at anther dehiscence depending on temperature. The presence of both bi- and tricellular types of pollen is an uncommon characteristic in angiosperms and makes Annona cherimola an interesting model to study the effect of varying environmental conditions on subsequent pollen performance during the final stages of pollen development. In this work, we study the influence of changes in temperature and humidity during the final stages of pollen development on subsequent pollen performance, evaluating pollen germination, presence of carbohydrates, number of nuclei, and water content. At 25 °C, which is the average field temperature during the flowering period of this species, pollen had a viability of 60-70 %, starch hydrolyzed just prior to shedding, and pollen mitosis II was taking place, resulting in a mixture of bi- and tricellular pollen. This activity may be related to the pollen retaining 70 % water content at shedding. Temperatures above 30 °C resulted in a decrease in pollen germination, whereas lower temperatures did not have a clear influence on pollen germination, although they did have a clear effect on starch hydrolysis. On the other hand, slightly higher dehydration accelerated mitosis II, whereas strong dehydration arrested starch hydrolysis and reduced pollen germination. These results show a significant influence of environmental conditions on myriad pollen characteristics during the final stages of pollen development modifying subsequent pollen behavior and contributing to our understanding of the variability observed in pollen tube performance.

  3. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    Radioactive Shipping Service

    2005-01-01

    The section of the radiation protection group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  4. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  5. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tel. 73171

  6. Radiation pager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of interdicting nuclear materials to date have favored the use of large portal detectors at choke points, or hand carried instruments used by trained personnel for conducting spot searches. Although these methods are effective in some instances, it is often impractical to insert choke points at busy traffic areas, and it is not cost effective to maintain a force of skilled operators whose focus is nuclear interdiction. Recent technology developments are causing profound changes in the philosophy and methods employed for interdicting nuclear materials. Breakthrough advances in the miniaturization of detectors and low power electronics have made possible a new class of small gamma-ray radiation detectors, roughly the size of a message pager, with unprecedented sensitivity for their size. These instruments, named Radiation PagersTM, are ideally suited for use by untrained individual law enforcement personnel and emergency responders in the course of their regular duties. New tactics that utilize a radiation detector worn by every officer are creating a moving curtain of detection with a significantly higher likelihood of locating illicit nuclear contraband. These individual detectors also provide each officer with a high level of confidence that they are not being unknowingly irradiated in the course of their work. (author)

  7. Radiation preservation of maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation preservation of maize was carried out. Radiation doses and sources, shielding materials, packaging materials, chemical radiation effects, biological radiation effects, were discussed. Experimental methods, samples and accessories were also presented. (SMN)

  8. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  9. Hawking Radiation of the Charged Particle via Tunneling from the Kaluza-Klein Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jin; Han, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, by applying the Lagrangian analysis on the action, we first redefine the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle. Then, basing on the new definition of the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the charged massive particle via tunneling from the event horizon of the Kaluza-Klein black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the charged massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. The highlight of our work is a new and important development for the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  10. Perspective of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of the applications of radiation techniques is very wide. This paper only relates to the applications of radiation techniques in industries including radiation chemical industry, radiation processing of foods and environmental protection by radiation, but the nuclear instruments and the instrumentations of radiation are out-side of our study. (author)

  11. Thermal radiation of Er doped dielectric crystals: Probing the range of applicability of the Kirchhoff law

    CERN Document Server

    Tanyi, Ekembu K; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Noginov, M A

    2016-01-01

    The Kirchhoff law of thermal radiation, relating emissivity {\\epsilon} and absorptance {\\alpha}, has been originally formulated for opaque bodies in thermodynamic equilibrium with the environment. However, in many systems of practical importance, both assumptions are often not satisfied. In this work, we revisit the century-old law and examine the limits of its applicability in an example of Er:YAG and Er:YLF dielectric crystals, potential radiation converters for thermophotovoltaic applications. In our experiments, the (80 at.%) Er:YAG crystal was opaque between 1.45 {\\mu}m and 1.64 {\\mu}m. In this spectral range, its absorptance {\\alpha}({\\lambda}) is spectrally flat and differentiates from unity only by a small amount of reflection. The shape of the emissivity spectrum {\\epsilon}({\\lambda}) closely matches that of absorptance {\\alpha}({\\lambda}), suggesting that the Kirchhoff law can adequately describe thermal radiation of opaque bodies, even if the requirement of thermodynamic equilibrium is not satisfie...

  12. From the Blazar Sequence to the Blazar Envelope: Revisiting the Relativistic Jet Dichotomy in Radio-Loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanini; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the concept of a blazar sequence that relates the synchrotron peak frequency (Vpeak) in blazars with synchrotron peak luminosity (Lpeak, in vLv) using a large sample of radio-loud AGN. We present observational evidence that the blazar sequence is formed from two populations in the synchrotron Vpeak - Lpeak plane, each forming an upper edge to an envelope of progressively misaligned blazars, and connecting to an adjacent group of radio galaxies having jets viewed at much larger angles to the line of sight. When binned by jet kinetic power (Lkin; as measured through a scaling relationship with extended radio power), we find that radio core dominance decreases with decreasing synchrotron Lpeak, revealing that sources in the envelope are generally more misaligned. We find population-based evidence of velocity gradients in jets at low kinetic powers (approximately 10(exp 42) - 10(exp 44.5) erg s(exp -1)), corresponding to FR I radio galaxies and most BL Lacs. These low jet power 'weak jet' sources, thought to exhibit radiatively inefficient accretion, are distinguished from the population of non-decelerating, low synchrotron-peaking (LSP) blazars and FR II radio galaxies ('strong' jets) which are thought to exhibit radiatively efficient accretion. The two-population interpretation explains the apparent contradiction of the existence of highly core-dominated, low-power blazars at both low and high synchrotron peak frequencies, and further implies that most intermediate synchrotron peak (ISP) sources are not intermediate in intrinsic jet power between LSP and high synchrotron-peaking (HSP) sources, but are more misaligned versions of HSP sources with similar jet powers.

  13. Radiation stability of cations in ionic liquids. 5. Task-specific ionic liquids consisting of biocompatible cations and the puzzle of radiation hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Marin, Timothy W; Wishart, James F; Grills, David C

    2014-09-01

    In 1953, an accidental discovery by Melvin Calvin and co-workers provided the first example of a solid (the α-polymorph of choline chloride) showing hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation: under certain conditions, the radiolytic yield of decomposition approached 5 × 10(4) per 100 eV (which is 4 orders of magnitude greater than usual values), suggesting an uncommonly efficient radiation-induced chain reaction. Twenty years later, the still-accepted mechanism for this rare condition was suggested by Martyn Symons, but no validation for this mechanism has been supplied. Meanwhile, ionic liquids and deep eutectic mixtures that are based on choline, betainium, and other derivitized natural amino compounds are presently finding an increasing number of applications as diluents in nuclear separations, where the constituent ions are exposed to ionizing radiation that is emitted by decaying radionuclides. Thus, the systems that are compositionally similar to radiation hypersensitive solids are being considered for use in high radiation fields, where this property is particularly undesirable! In Part 5 of this series on organic cations, we revisit the phenomenon of radiation hypersensitivity and explore mechanistic aspects of radiation-induced reactions involving this class of task-specific, biocompatible, functionalized cations, both in ionic liquids and in reference crystalline compounds. We demonstrate that Symons' mechanism needs certain revisions and rethinking, and suggest its modification. Our reconsideration suggests that there cannot be conditions leading to hypersensitivity in ionic liquids.

  14. Changes in Sea Levels around the British Isles Revisited (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferle, F. N.; Hansen, D. N.; Bingley, R. M.; Williams, S. D.; Woodworth, P. L.; Gehrels, W. R.; Bradley, S. L.; Stocchi, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently a number of new and/or updated sources for estimates of vertical land movements for the British Isles have become available allowing the relative and average changes in sea levels for this region to be revisited. The geodetic data set stems from a combination of re-processed continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from stations in the British Isles and from a global reference frame network, and absolute gravity (AG) measurements from two stations in the British Isles. The geologic data set of late Holocene sea level indicators has recently been updated, now applying corrections for the 20th century sea level rise, syphoning effect and late Holocene global ice melt, and expanded to Northern Ireland and Ireland. Several new model predictions of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) process active in this region form the modelling data set of vertical land movements for the British Isles. Correcting the updated revised local reference (RLR) trends from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) with these vertical land movement data sets, regional and averaged changes in sea levels around the British Isles have been investigated. Special focus is thereby also given to the coastal areas that have recently been identified within the UK Climate Projections 2009.

  15. The interaction of atoms with LiF(001) revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Miraglia, J E

    2016-01-01

    Pairwise additive potentials for multielectronic atoms interacting with a LiF(001) surface are revisited by including an improved description of the electron density associated with the different lattice sites, as well as non-local electron density contributions. Within this model, the electron distribution around each ionic site of the crystal is described by means of an onion approach that accounts for the influence of the Madelung potential. From such densities, binary interatomic potentials are then derived by using well-known non-local functionals for the kinetic, exchange and correlation terms. Rumpling and long-range contributions due to projectile polarization and van der Waals forces are also included in an analogous fashion. We apply this pairwise additive approximation to evaluate the interaction potential between closed-shell - He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe - and open-shell - N, S, and Cl - atoms and the LiF surface, analyzing the relative importance of the different contributions. The performance of the...

  16. Whistler oscillitons revisited: the role of charge neutrality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Verheest

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available When studying transverse modes propagating parallel to a static magnetic field, an apparent contradiction arises between the weakly nonlinear results obtained from the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, predicting envelope solitons (where the amplitude is stationary in the wave frame, but the phase is not, and recent results for whistler oscillitons, indicating that really stationary structures of large amplitude are possible. Revisiting this problem in the fluid dynamic approach, care has been taken not to introduce charge neutrality from the outset, because this not only neglects electric stresses compared to magnetic stresses, which is reasonable, but could also imply from Poisson's equation a vanishing of the wave electric field. Nevertheless, the fixed points of the remaining equations are the same, whether charge neutrality is assumed from the outset or not, so that the solitary wave solutions at not too large amplitudes will be very similar. This is borne out by numerical simulations of the solutions under the two hypotheses, showing that the lack of correspondence with the DNLS envelope solitons indicates the limitations of the reductive perturbation approach, and is not a consequence of assuming charge neutrality.

  17. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  18. Revisiting the master-signifier, or, Mandela and repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek eHook

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or ‘empty’ signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is as much the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  19. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  20. Revisiting Link Prediction: Evolving Models and Real Data Findings

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The explosive growth of Web 2.0, which was characterized by the creation of online social networks, has reignited the study of factors that could help us understand the growth and dynamism of these networks. Various generative network models have been proposed, including the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz models. In this study, we revisit the problem from a perspective that seeks to compare results obtained from these generative models with those from real networks. To this end, we consider the dating network Skout Inc. An analysis is performed on the topological characteristics of the network that could explain the creation of new network links. Afterwards, the results are contrasted with those obtained from the Barabasi-Albert and Watts-Strogatz generative models. We conclude that a key factor that could explain the creation of links originates in its cluster structure, where link recommendations are more precise in Watts-Strogatz segmented networks than in Barabasi-Albert hierarchical networks. This re...

  1. Revisiting scaling relations for giant radio halos in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Giacintucci, S; Pratt, G W; Venturi, T; Kale, R; Dolag, K; Markevitch, M

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host Megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck SZ catalog, to revisit the correlations between the power of halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power of halos at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1--2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R_500 as P_1.4 L_500^2.0. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L_500 > 5x10^44 erg/s) clusters branch into two populations --- radio halos lie on the correlation,...

  2. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  3. Revisiting the Source Process of the 2007 Tocopilla, Chile Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, M.; Minson, S. E.; Jolivet, R.; Jiang, J.; Beck, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    We revisit the 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake to create a finite fault kinematic source model based on the current best practices in data analysis and inversion methods. The data used to constrain the source model include both static GPS offsets and 1 Hz kinematic GPS time series, as well as interferograms which have been reanalyzed to remove tropospheric effects which can be quite significant in this region. Our inversion methodology is a Bayesian approach that uses only physics-based constraints on the rupture evolution, and which utilizes models of both the observational noise and the errors in our forward model to obtain the ensemble of all plausible rupture models which satisfy both the data and our a priori assumptions. This approach allows us to better understand which parts of the rupture process are well-constrained and which are not, and thus to better understand how the 2007 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake rupture fits into the sequence of large earthquakes which have been mosaicking the northern Chile subduction zone.

  4. The Mantel-Haenszel procedure revisited: models and generalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Fidler

    Full Text Available Several statistical methods have been developed for adjusting the Odds Ratio of the relation between two dichotomous variables X and Y for some confounders Z. With the exception of the Mantel-Haenszel method, commonly used methods, notably binary logistic regression, are not symmetrical in X and Y. The classical Mantel-Haenszel method however only works for confounders with a limited number of discrete strata, which limits its utility, and appears to have no basis in statistical models. Here we revisit the Mantel-Haenszel method and propose an extension to continuous and vector valued Z. The idea is to replace the observed cell entries in strata of the Mantel-Haenszel procedure by subject specific classification probabilities for the four possible values of (X,Y predicted by a suitable statistical model. For situations where X and Y can be treated symmetrically we propose and explore the multinomial logistic model. Under the homogeneity hypothesis, which states that the odds ratio does not depend on Z, the logarithm of the odds ratio estimator can be expressed as a simple linear combination of three parameters of this model. Methods for testing the homogeneity hypothesis are proposed. The relationship between this method and binary logistic regression is explored. A numerical example using survey data is presented.

  5. The Mantel-Haenszel procedure revisited: models and generalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Vaclav; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Several statistical methods have been developed for adjusting the Odds Ratio of the relation between two dichotomous variables X and Y for some confounders Z. With the exception of the Mantel-Haenszel method, commonly used methods, notably binary logistic regression, are not symmetrical in X and Y. The classical Mantel-Haenszel method however only works for confounders with a limited number of discrete strata, which limits its utility, and appears to have no basis in statistical models. Here we revisit the Mantel-Haenszel method and propose an extension to continuous and vector valued Z. The idea is to replace the observed cell entries in strata of the Mantel-Haenszel procedure by subject specific classification probabilities for the four possible values of (X,Y) predicted by a suitable statistical model. For situations where X and Y can be treated symmetrically we propose and explore the multinomial logistic model. Under the homogeneity hypothesis, which states that the odds ratio does not depend on Z, the logarithm of the odds ratio estimator can be expressed as a simple linear combination of three parameters of this model. Methods for testing the homogeneity hypothesis are proposed. The relationship between this method and binary logistic regression is explored. A numerical example using survey data is presented. PMID:23516463

  6. An Adaptive and Hybrid Approach for Revisiting the Visibility Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ícaro Lins Leitão da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the visibility problem, which is traditionally known in Computer Graphics and Vision fields as the process of computing a (potentially visible set of primitives in the computational model of a scene. We propose a hybrid solution that uses a dry structure (in the sense of data reduction, a triangulation of the type J1a, to accelerate the task of searching for visible primitives. We came up with a solution that is useful for real-time, on-line, interactive applications as 3D visualization. In such applications the main goal is to load the minimum amount of primitives from the scene during the rendering stage, as possible. For this purpose, our algorithm executes the culling by using a hybrid paradigm based on viewing-frustum, back-face culling and occlusion models. Results have shown substantial improvement over these traditional approaches if applied separately. This novel approach can be used in devices with no dedicated processors or with low processing power, as cell phones or embedded displays, or to visualize data through the Internet, as in virtual museums applications.

  7. Large-scale filamentary structures around the Virgo cluster revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Suk; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger dataset based on the HyperLeda database than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 16~$h^{-1}$ Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main-body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo~II~A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16~$h^{-1}$~Mpc~$<$ SGY~$<$ 27~$h^{-1}$~Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group ("NGC 5353/4 filament") and confirm a sheet that includes galaxi...

  8. A PROPOSAL FOR REVISITING FOOTWEAR TRADITION FOR INNOVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Şahin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Footwear has evolved from ancient times and through the centuries from protective sandals to a protective and aesthetic part of clothing. Today, there are many varieties of styles and materials used in the shoe industry. It is also noteworthy that some old fashions repeat themselves with only minor changes. It is a fact thatsome of the world’s most famous and popular companies have achieved that fame from cloth and footwear fashion and design. Tradition and culture have a huge impact on footwear design and on the motives and modes of how people buy and wear footwear. Therefore, tradition and culture of specific nation or region can create very important role at creating brand identities of European footwear companies. The aim of this paper is to present a Development of Innovation project proposal regarding revisiting traditional footwear so as to adapt itto up-to-date footwear training curriculum and production. The proposal aims to rediscover the peculiarities of traditional footwear and originality of cultural heritage of specific regions in order to transfer their design and models into VET curriculum so as to revive the traditions to create innovative products.

  9. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  10. Revisiting the OH-CH correlation in diffuse clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Mookerjea, Bhaswati

    2016-01-01

    Based on the analysis of available published data and archival data along 24 sightlines (5 of which are new) we derive more accurate estimates of the column densities of OH and CH towards diffuse/translucent clouds and revisit the typically observed correlation between the abundances of these species. The increase in the sample size was possible because of the equivalence of the column densities of CH derived from a combination of the transitions at 3137 & 3143 Angstrom, and a combination of transitions at 3886 & 3890 Angstrom, which we have demonstrated here. We find that with the exception of four diffuse clouds, the entire source sample shows a clear correlation between the column densities of OH and CH similar to previous observations. The analysis presented also verifies the theoretically predicted oscillator strengths of the OH A--X (3078 & 3082 Angstrom), CH B--X (3886 & 3890 Angstrom) and C--X (3137 & 3143 Angstrom) transitions. We estimate N(H) and N(H2) from the observed E(B-V) a...

  11. The angular momentum of baryons and dark matter halos revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r=0.1rvir. In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/rvir>0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its ...

  12. ISLAM, ADAT, AND THE STATE: Matrifocality in Aceh Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Srimulyani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Matrifocality has been a rooted tradition in the social history of the community in Aceh. The principles of matrifocality have also affected on how women are positioned in the community, and the socio-gender relation within the community. The fact that Aceh has strongly associated to the Islamic values that claimed to support the paternal traditions. Apparently, the Islamic values and the local matrifocality practices juxtaposed through the roles of adat, which considered as inseparable to Islamic law or teaching, or in local term known as zat ngeun sifeut. Another point in revisiting matrifocality in Aceh in Aceh is an examination of how gender state ideology, particularly during the New Order Regime disregarded some local gender practices across some ethnics in the archipelago. Meanwhile, the state also hegemonied and promoted particular gender state ideology such as state ibuism. Nonetheless, the modernity and social changes have also contributed to the shifting of some matrifocality practices in contemporary Acehnese society. However, since the matrifocality has a strong root in the social life of the community, the principles of the matrifocality still survived until currently, although it transformed into ‘new matrifocality’ practices. Keywords: matrifocality, Aceh, gender, shari‘a law

  13. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Adam D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example.

  14. Interplant volatile signaling in willows: revisiting the original talking trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Ian S; Hughes, Kathy; Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi; Karban, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The importance of interplant volatile signaling in plant-herbivore interactions has been a contentious issue for the past 30 years. We revisit willows as the system in which evidence for interplant signaling was originally found, but then questioned. We established three well-replicated experiments with two willow species (Salix exigua and Salix lemmonii) to address whether the receipt of an interplant signal from a neighboring willow reduces herbivore damage. Additionally we tested whether this signal is volatile in nature, and whether plants signal better to themselves than they do to other individuals. In all three experiments, we found evidence that cues from a damaged neighbor reduce subsequent herbivory experienced by willows. In one experiment, we showed that bagging of clipped tissue, which prevents the exchange of volatile signals, removed the effect of neighbor wounding. This was consistent with results from the other two experiments, in which clipping potted neighbors connected only through airborne volatile cues reduced damage of receivers. In one year, we found evidence that the perception of volatile signals from genetically identical clones was more effective at reducing foliar damage to a neighbor than signals from a genetically different individual. However, this trend was not significant in the following year. In three well-replicated experiments, we found strong evidence for the importance of interplant volatile cues in mediating herbivore interactions with willows. PMID:23576105

  15. Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy: The mitochondrial connection revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled K Abu-Amero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance, and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  16. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  17. Revisiting Cosmic No-Hair Theorem for Inflationary Settings

    CERN Document Server

    Maleknejad, A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we revisit Wald's cosmic no-hair theorem in the context of accelerating Bianchi cosmologies for a generic cosmic fluid with non-vanishing anisotropic stress tensor and when the fluid energy momentum tensor is of the form of a cosmological constant term plus a piece which does not respect strong or dominant energy conditions. Such a fluid is the one appearing in inflationary models. We show that for such a system anisotropy may grow, in contrast to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. In particular, for a generic inflationary model we show that there is an upper bound on the growth of anisotropy. For slow-roll inflationary models our analysis can be refined further and the upper bound is found to be of the order of slow-roll parameters. We examine our general discussions and our extension of Wald's theorem for three classes of slow-roll inflationary models, generic multi-scalar field driven models, anisotropic models involving U(1) gauge fields and the gauge-flation scenario.

  18. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  19. SUSY effects in Rb: Revisited under current experimental constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Yang, Jin Min

    2016-06-01

    In this note we revisit the SUSY effects in Rb under current experimental constraints including the LHC Higgs data, the B-physics measurements, the dark matter relic density and direct detection limits, as well as the precision electroweak data. We first perform a scan to figure out the currently allowed parameter space and then display the SUSY effects in Rb. We find that although the SUSY parameter space has been severely restrained by current experimental data, both the general MSSM and the natural-SUSY scenario can still alter Rb with a magnitude sizable enough to be observed at future Z-factories (ILC, CEPC, FCC-ee, Super Z-factory) which produce 109-1012Z-bosons. To be specific, assuming a precise measurement δRb = 2.0 ×10-5 at FCC-ee, we can probe a right-handed stop up to 530 GeV through chargino-stop loops, probe a sbottom to 850 GeV through neutralino-sbottom loops and a charged Higgs to 770 GeV through the Higgs-top quark loops for a large tan ⁡ β. The full one-loop SUSY correction to Rb can reach 1 ×10-4 in natural SUSY and 2 ×10-4 in the general MSSM.

  20. Radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author defines hormesis as the stimulus given to any organism by non-toxic concentrations of toxic substances and gives a few examples of the experimental evidence for the existence of radiation hormesis. The most probable explanation for its working lies not in the education of the nuclear repair system but in the education of the immune system, which is very complex and is capable of learning to deal with a variety of threats to living cells. The effects of both high LET and low LET particles are considered. (author)

  1. Radiative striped wind model for gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bégué, D; Lyubarski, Y

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we revisit the striped wind model in which the wind is accelerated by magnetic reconnection. In our treatment, radiation is included as an independent component, and two scenarios are considered. In the first one, radiation cannot stream efficiently through the reconnection layer, while the second scenario assumes that radiation is homogeneous in the striped wind. We show how these two assumptions affect the dynamics. In particular, we find that the asymptotic radial evolution of the Lorentz factor is not strongly modified whether radiation can stream through the reconnection layer or not. On the other hand, we show that the width, density and temperature of the reconnection layer are strongly dependent on these assumptions. We then apply the model to the gamma-ray burst context and find that photons cannot diffuse efficiently through the reconnection layer below radius $r_{\\rm D}^{\\Delta} \\sim 10^{10.5}$ cm, which is about an order of magnitude below the photospheric radius. Above $r_{\\rm D}^{\\...

  2. Characteristics of Cherenkov Radiation in Naturally Occuring Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Mikkelsen, R E; Uggerhøj, U I; Klein, S R

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the theory of Cherenkov radiation in uniaxial crystals. Historically, a number of flawed attempts have been made at explaining this radiation phenomenon and a consistent error-free description is nowhere available. We apply our calculation to a large modern day telescope - IceCube. Being located at the Antarctica, this detector makes use of the naturally occuring ice as a medium to generate Cherenkov radiation. However, due to the high pressure at the depth of the detector site, large volumes of hexagonal ice crystals are formed. We calculate how this affects the Cherenkov radiation yield and angular dependence. We conclude that the effect is small, at most about a percent, and would only be relevant in future high precision instruments like e.g. Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU). For radio-Cherenkov experiments which use the presence of a clear Cherenkov cone to determine the arrival direction, any variation in emission angle will directly and linearly translate into a change in ap...

  3. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  4. Ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources is reflected or transmitted at the surface of the skin, about 5% of normally incident rays being directly reflected. The transmitted fraction is scattered, photochemically absorbed or dissipated as heat within the skin, or passes from it to contribute to the variable total amount of reflected and transmitted radiation. The UVR absorbers in skin are not definitely known, but DNA is a definite target and probably lipoprotein membranes, RNA, proteins, mucopolysaccharides, elastin and collagen. Photochemical or free radical damage to absorber or nearby organelles leads to pharmacological, ultrastructural, histological and clinical changes. Most frequent DNA damage is pyrimidine dimer formation, apparently inhibiting cell function and replication. This is largely enzymatically repaired in man in the dark by excision repair, post-replication repair and possible other enzymatic mechanisms, and at least in some organisms by light-induced photoreactivation repair. UVR exposure causes well recognized acute and chronic clinical syndromes in man. These are discussed in this paper

  5. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  6. Revisiting the extended spring indices using gridded weather data and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, Emma; Zurita-Milla, Raul

    2016-04-01

    The extended spring indices or SI-x [1] have been successfully used to predict the timing of spring onset at continental scales. The SI-x models were created by combining lilac and honeysuckle volunteered phenological observations, temperature data (from weather stations) and latitudinal information. More precisely, these models use a linear regression to predict the day of year of first leaf and first bloom for these two indicator species. In this contribution we revisit both the data and the method used to calibrate the SI-x models to check whether the addition of new input data or the use of non-linear regression methods could lead to improments in the model outputs. In particular, we use a recently published dataset [2] of volunteered observations on cloned and common lilac over longer period of time (1980-2014) and we replace the weather station data by 54 features derived from Daymet [3], which provides 1 by 1 km gridded estimates of daily weather parameters (maximum and minimum temperatures, precipitation, water vapor pressure, solar radiation, day length, snow water equivalent) for North America. These features consist of both daily weather values and their long- and short-term accumulations and elevation. we also replace the original linear regression by a non-linear method. Specifically, we use random forests to both identify the most important features and to predict the day of year of the first leaf of cloned and common lilacs. Preliminary results confirm the importance of the SI-x features (maximum and minimum temperatures and day length). However, our results show that snow water equivalent and water vapor pressure are also necessary to properly model leaf onset. Regarding the predictions, our results indicate that Random Forests yield comparable results to those produced by the SI-x models (in terms of root mean square error -RMSE). For cloned and common lilac, the models predict the day of year of leafing with 16 and 15 days of accuracy respectively

  7. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  8. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  9. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  10. Increasing the Degrees of Freedom in Future Group Randomized Trials: The "df*" Method Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David M.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hannan, Peter J.; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This article revisits an article published in Evaluation Review in 2005 on sample size estimation and power analysis for group-randomized trials. With help from a careful reader, we learned of an important error in the spreadsheet used to perform the calculations and generate the results presented in that article. As we studied the…

  11. Revisiting Individual Creativity Assessment: Triangulation in Subjective and Objective Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Namgyoo K.; Chun, Monica Youngshin; Lee, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the significant development of creativity studies, individual creativity research has not reached a meaningful consensus regarding the most valid and reliable method for assessing individual creativity. This study revisited 2 of the most popular methods for assessing individual creativity: subjective and objective methods. This study…

  12. Revisiting First-Year College Students' Mattering: Social Support, Academic Stress, and the Mattering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chung, Kuo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Nancy Schlossberg's (1989) theory of college students' mattering to others was revisited. Mattering is the experience of others depending on us, being interested in us, and being concerned with our fate. The relationships of gender, mattering to college friends and the college environment, and friend and family social support with…

  13. Focused electron beam induced processing and the effect of substrate thickness revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Beyer, A.; Mainka, M.;

    2013-01-01

    with Monte Carlo simulations for SE emission. The results suggest that SEs are dominant in the dissociation of W(CO)6 on thin membranes. The best agreement between simulations and experiment is obtained for SEs with energies between 3 and 6 eV.With this work we revisit earlier experiments, working...

  14. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  15. Instant Video Revisiting for Reflection: Extending the Learning of Children and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong B.; Broderick, Jane T.

    This article discusses how instant video revisiting (IVR) promotes reflective thinking for both teachers and children. IVR was used as a daily classroom experience with both the children and the teachers throughout one semester in two preschool classrooms with children 2.5 to 5 years old. The teachers used a digital video camera to generate data…

  16. What are museums for? - Revisiting “Museums in a Troubled World”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe; Janes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on the present situation in the Nordic museum scene, entailing economic pressures and restructuring, this article introduces the thoughts and ideas of Canadian museum expert and author, Robert R. Janes, to put things in perspective. After revisiting the 2009 book “Museums in a Troubled W...

  17. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Murgan, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    The Bethe ansatz solution for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms is revisited. The anisotropy parameter has values \\eta = i \\pi r/q, where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solution.

  18. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative action policy in the…

  19. The Relationship between Undergraduate Attendance and Performance Revisited: Alignment of Student and Instructor Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, James W.; Perez-Batres, Luis A.; Coffey, Betty S.; Pouder, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the relationship between attendance and performance in the undergraduate university setting and apply agency theory in the instructor-student context. Building on agency theory propositions in the educational setting advanced by Smith, Zsidisin, and Adams (2005), we propose that the student and instructor must align goals to promote the…

  20. Framing the Future: Revisiting the Place of Educational Expectations in Status Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozick, Robert; Alexander, Karl; Entwisle, Doris; Dauber, Susan; Kerr, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This study revisits the Wisconsin model of status attainment from a life course developmental perspective. Fixed-effects regression analyses lend strong support to the Wisconsin framework's core proposition that academic performance and significant others' influence shape educational expectations. However, investigating the process of expectation…

  1. Revisiting the Gun Ownership and Violence Link; a multi- level analysis of victimisation survey data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, J.N.

    2014-01-01

    The link between gun ownership victimisation by violent crime remains one of the most contested issues in criminology. Some authors claim that high gun availability facilitates serious violence. Others claim that gun ownership prevents crime. This article revisits these issues using individual and a

  2. Revisiting Feminism and Australian Education: Who Speaks? What Questions? What Contexts? What Impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the development of feminist research and policy in education in Australia in the mid-1970s to mid-1980s from the perspective of the present decade. The purpose is to give one insider's account of the specificities of that initial period, and to use that analysis to draw attention to changes evident in the context and agendas…

  3. Revisiting the Didactic Triangle in the Case of an Adaptive Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Zaoui Seghroucheni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the classical approach of the didactic triangle designed for the classical learning situation (face to face and adapt it to the situation of an adaptive learning system, we discuss also the different components involved in this didactic triangle and how they interact and influence the learning process in an adaptive learning system.

  4. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgan, Rajan; Silverthorn, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The Bethe ansatz solutions for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms are revisited. The anisotropy parameter, for cases considered here, has values η = iπ \\frac{r}{q} , where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solutions.

  5. The skeptical green consumer revisited: testing the relationship between green consumerism and skepticism toward advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Matthes; A. Wonneberger

    2014-01-01

    This article revisits the widely believed notion of the skeptical green consumer, in other words, that green consumers tend to distrust green advertising. Study 1, a survey of U.S. consumers, found no positive relationship between green consumerism and general ad skepticism. However, green consumeri

  6. Service-Learning in Crisis Communication Education: Revisiting Coombs' Objectives for the Crisis Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresh-Fuehrer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit Coombs' suggestions for teaching the crisis communication course using service-learning as a framework. The author sought to assess the effectiveness of using this method in terms of the benefits to both students and the partnering organization and students' perceptions of whether they met the learning…

  7. Radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. The overall thrust of the research is aimed at understanding the effects of radiation on organisms. Specific subject areas include: the effects of heavy-particle beam nuclear interactions in tissue on dosimetry; tracer studies with radioactive fragments of heavy-ion beams; the effects of heavy/ions on human kidney cells and Chinese hamster cells; the response of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system in rats to heavy-ion beams; the use of heavy charged particles in radiotherapy of human cancer; heavy-ion radiography; the biological effects of high magnetic fields; central nervous system neurotoxicity; and biophysical studies on cell membranes

  8. Environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of ionizing radiations from the atomic nucleus are explained, such as the beams alpha, beta and gamma. The definitions of spectrometry and nuclear traces have been included.The study presents two researches realized in Costa Rica on the radioactive nuclear and artificial elements in the environment. The first shown is the analysis of coastal sediments where explains which are radioactive artificial isotopes and the pollution that occurs in food, coastal sediments, fertilizers, the soil, the water and the air. Within the analysis techniques are the gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and nuclear strokes. Among the conclusions of this initial investigation is shown that at Punta Leona descendants of Uranium and Thorium present lower concentrations in relation to the gulf and its variations are not important. In the following study the radon gas is analyzed in the human environment where is determined that it is the second generator that causes cancer in lungs after the tobacco. This work indicates that the doses come from natural and artificial sources of radiation for the public are a whole of 2.7 mSv/year, information provided by the UNSCEAR, 2000. The radon gas is inert and radioactive of atomic number 86, includes 23 isotopes and 3 natural isotopes. The radon is everywhere, as are houses and buildings, in Costa Rica it is located in old homes with little ventilation. It describes the equipment used for the detection of radon gas in the environment. Within the conclusions radon gas is concentrated in confined spaces which can be harmful to health. It is determined that enough ventilation in places of high concentrations of radon is important. Finally it is recommended to monitor the sites where can be detected high concentrations of radon and that they have important influx of people

  9. Temperate radiations and dying embers of a tropical past: the diversification of Viburnum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggs, Elizabeth L; Clement, Wendy L; Sweeney, Patrick W; Madriñán, Santiago; Edwards, Erika J; Donoghue, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    We used a near-complete phylogeny for the angiosperm clade Viburnum to assess lineage diversification rates, and to examine possible morphological and ecological factors driving radiations. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian approaches identified shifts in diversification rate and possible links to character evolution. We inferred the ancestral environment for Viburnum and changes in diversification dynamics associated with subsequent biome shifts. Viburnum probably diversified in tropical forests of Southeast Asia in the Eocene, with three subsequent radiations in temperate clades during the Miocene. Four traits (purple fruits, extrafloral nectaries, bud scales and toothed leaves) were statistically associated with higher rates of diversification. However, we argue that these traits are unlikely to be driving diversification directly. Instead, two radiations were associated with the occupation of mountainous regions and a third with repeated shifts between colder and warmer temperate forests. Early-branching depauperate lineages imply that the rare lowland tropical species are 'dying embers' of once more diverse lineages; net diversification rates in Viburnum likely decreased in these tropical environments after the Oligocene. We suggest that 'taxon pulse' dynamics might characterize other temperate plant lineages.

  10. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  11. The Coral Data Time Series Need To Be Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeleton is formed under organism control and its geochemical properties are strongly influenced by biological effects embedding environmental signal. Geochemists have been puzzled by the diversity of geochemical responses showed by colonies grown in a same area. By revisiting the Weber and Woodhead data series (1972), gathering data from enough colonies developed in similar conditions to provide a statistical isotopic value representative of one site, we demonstrate that for Porites and Acropora, the expected isotopic thermometer is revealed when the "vital effect" is removed. On the other hand, by using Acropora cultured in controlled condition, with changing temperature on a range comprised between 23 and 29°C, the comparison of oxygen and carbon isotopic values revealed the role played by kinetic fractionation. This apparent paradox of two co-existing fractionations is explained by the isotopic analyzes of wild and cultured corals operated at micrometer size scale taking into account of microstructures of the skeleton. Two different crystals appear to be the growth units of the skeleton, each crystal corresponding to a specific deposition mechanism. Thus, the measurement performed with a conventional method is a "bulk" measurement, which depends upon two isotopic fractionations. Some investigations underlined the discrepancy of the meaning of the inter-annual and seasonal isotopic records, which could be illustrated by different isotopic calibrations assessed from seasonal or annual data. It has been also explained by micrometer analyses of Porites aragonite. A smoothing at around 400microns of isotopic measurements as well as Sr/Ca indicates that at seasonal time scale the growth unit is the month. This is in agreement with extensive studies conducted by biologists describing the mechanism governing the formation of Porites skeleton: every month is deposited a framework which is progressively filled in. By combining biologists and geochemists knowledge

  12. Memory Revisited in Julian Barnes's The Sense of an Ending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Oró Piqueras

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An accumulation of years brings with it an accumulation of experiences. The revision of such experiences usually becomes more recurrent after retirement, a transition time from one period of life to another and, as such, a time in which we, human beings, have a tendency to take stock of our lives. This is actually one of the main issues present in Julian Barnes's last novel The Sense of an Ending (2011. When the main protagonist, a retired man quite comfortable and contented with his present life, receives an unexpected inheritance from the mother of a girlfriend from his university years, he is forced to track down a part of his life that he had left at the back of his mind a long time ago. As he explains his story, the protagonist and narrator of the novel raises a number of questions related to the quality and function of memory as one gets into old age. He experiments the unreliability of memory and questions to what extent memory is constructed through the remembered emotions that invaded him over that episode of his life rather than through the events as they actually took place. On the other hand, the act of revisiting and revising that specific episode, brings with it feelings of guilt and remorse as the protagonist realises that his past acts were not as noble as he remembered them to be. However, these acts are part of the past and they cannot be changed; thus, another question that the novel raises is how to account for those actions of which one does not feel proud and, more importantly, how to manage those bad memories as one gets older

  13. Revisiting perfect fluid dark matter: Observational constraints from our galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Potapov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We revisit certain features of an assumed spherically symmetric perfect fluid dark matter halo in the light of the observed data of our galaxy, the Milky Way (MW. The idea is to apply the Faber–Visser approach of combined observations of rotation curves and lensing to a first post-Newtonian approximation to “measure” the equation of state ω(r of the perfect fluid galactic halo. However, for the model considered here, no constraints from lensing are used as it will be sufficient to consider only the rotation curve observations. The lensing mass together with other masses will be just computed using recent data. Since the halo has attractive gravity, we shall impose the constraint that ω(r≥0 for r≤RMW, where RMW∼200 kpc is the adopted halo radius of our galaxy. The observed circular velocity ℓ (=2vc2/c02 from the flat rotation curve and a crucial adjustable parameter D appearing in the perfect fluid solution then yield different numerical ranges of ω(r. It is demonstrated that the computed observables such as the rotation curve mass, the lens mass, the post-Newtonian mass of our galaxy compare well with the recent mass data. We also calculate the Faber–Visser χ-factor, which is a measure of pressure content in the dark matter. Our analysis indicates that a range 0≤ω(r≤2.8×10−7 for the perfect fluid dark matter can reasonably describe the attractive galactic halo. This is a strong constraint indicating a dust-like CDM halo (ω∼0 supported also by CMB constraints.

  14. Revisiting perfect fluid dark matter: Observational constraints from our galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Garipova, Guzel M.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit certain features of an assumed spherically symmetric perfect fluid dark matter halo in the light of the observed data of our galaxy, the Milky Way (MW). The idea is to apply the Faber-Visser approach of combined observations of rotation curves and lensing to a first post-Newtonian approximation to "measure" the equation of state ω (r) of the perfect fluid galactic halo. However, for the model considered here, no constraints from lensing are used as it will be sufficient to consider only the rotation curve observations. The lensing mass together with other masses will be just computed using recent data. Since the halo has attractive gravity, we shall impose the constraint that ω (r) ≥ 0 for r ≤RMW, where RMW ˜ 200 kpc is the adopted halo radius of our galaxy. The observed circular velocity ℓ (= 2 vc2 / c02) from the flat rotation curve and a crucial adjustable parameter D appearing in the perfect fluid solution then yield different numerical ranges of ω (r). It is demonstrated that the computed observables such as the rotation curve mass, the lens mass, the post-Newtonian mass of our galaxy compare well with the recent mass data. We also calculate the Faber-Visser χ-factor, which is a measure of pressure content in the dark matter. Our analysis indicates that a range 0 ≤ ω (r) ≤ 2.8 ×10-7 for the perfect fluid dark matter can reasonably describe the attractive galactic halo. This is a strong constraint indicating a dust-like CDM halo (ω ˜ 0) supported also by CMB constraints.

  15. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-11

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  16. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  17. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP)

  18. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  19. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Siegel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Further expanding on the changes made to the fifth edition, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 6th Edition continues to highlight the relevance of thermal radiative transfer and focus on concepts that develop the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The book explains the fundamentals of radiative transfer, introduces the energy and radiative transfer equations, covers a variety of approaches used to gauge radiative heat exchange between different surfaces and structures, and provides solution techniques for solving the RTE.

  20. A copal-8-ol diphosphate synthase from the angiosperm Cistus creticus subsp. creticus is a putative key enzyme for the formation of pharmacologically active, oxygen-containing labdane-type diterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falara, Vasiliki; Pichersky, Eran; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2010-09-01

    The resin of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus, a plant native to Crete, is rich in labdane-type diterpenes with significant antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The full-length cDNA of a putative diterpene synthase was isolated from a C. creticus trichome cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of this protein is highly similar (59%-70% identical) to type B diterpene synthases from other angiosperm species that catalyze a protonation-initiated cyclization. The affinity-purified recombinant Escherichia coli-expressed protein used geranylgeranyl diphosphate as substrate and catalyzed the formation of copal-8-ol diphosphate. This diterpene synthase, therefore, was named CcCLS (for C. creticus copal-8-ol diphosphate synthase). Copal-8-ol diphosphate is likely to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of the oxygen-containing labdane-type diterpenes that are abundant in the resin of this plant. RNA gel-blot analysis revealed that CcCLS is preferentially expressed in the trichomes, with higher transcript levels found in glands on young leaves than on fully expanded leaves, while CcCLS transcript levels increased after mechanical wounding. Chemical analyses revealed that labdane-type diterpene production followed a similar pattern, with higher concentrations in trichomes of young leaves and increased accumulation upon wounding.

  1. A copal-8-ol diphosphate synthase from the angiosperm Cistus creticus subsp. creticus is a putative key enzyme for the formation of pharmacologically active, oxygen-containing labdane-type diterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falara, Vasiliki; Pichersky, Eran; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2010-09-01

    The resin of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus, a plant native to Crete, is rich in labdane-type diterpenes with significant antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities. The full-length cDNA of a putative diterpene synthase was isolated from a C. creticus trichome cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of this protein is highly similar (59%-70% identical) to type B diterpene synthases from other angiosperm species that catalyze a protonation-initiated cyclization. The affinity-purified recombinant Escherichia coli-expressed protein used geranylgeranyl diphosphate as substrate and catalyzed the formation of copal-8-ol diphosphate. This diterpene synthase, therefore, was named CcCLS (for C. creticus copal-8-ol diphosphate synthase). Copal-8-ol diphosphate is likely to be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of the oxygen-containing labdane-type diterpenes that are abundant in the resin of this plant. RNA gel-blot analysis revealed that CcCLS is preferentially expressed in the trichomes, with higher transcript levels found in glands on young leaves than on fully expanded leaves, while CcCLS transcript levels increased after mechanical wounding. Chemical analyses revealed that labdane-type diterpene production followed a similar pattern, with higher concentrations in trichomes of young leaves and increased accumulation upon wounding. PMID:20595348

  2. Radiation controlling reversible window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A coated glass glazing system is presented including a transparent glass substrate having one surface coated with a radiation absorptive film which is overcoated with a radiation reflective film by a technique which renders the radiation reflective film radiation absorptive at the surface contracting the radiating absorptive film. The coated glass system is used as glazing for storm windows which are adapted to be reversible so that the radiation reflective surface may be exposed to the outside of the dwelling during the warm seasons to prevent excessive solar radiation from entering a dwelling and reversed during cold seasons to absorb solar radiation and utilize it to aid in keeping the dwelling interior warm.

  3. Comment on "A three-loop radiative neutrino mass model with dark matter" [Phys. Lett. B 741 (2015) 163

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the calculation of the three-loop diagrams for the radiative neutrino mass generation and consider some relevant constraints on the model recently proposed by L. Jin {\\it et al} [Phys. Lett. B 741 (2015) 163]. We find that the previous approximation is inappropriate due to the neglect of some important contributions, and the benchmark point proposed can neither give rise to enough neutrino masses nor accommodate these additional constraints, such as the validity of the perturbation theory, the electroweak precision measurements, and the neutrinoless double beta decays.

  4. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kotoku, J [Teikyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Horikawa, Y [Juntendo University, Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (bound electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the Fock

  5. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  6. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  7. Effects of external radiation fields on line emission—application to star-forming regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikos, Marios; Ferland, G. J. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Williams, R. J. R. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Porter, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Van Hoof, P. A. M., E-mail: mchatzikos@gmail.com [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Uccle (Belgium)

    2013-12-20

    A variety of astronomical environments contain clouds irradiated by a combination of isotropic and beamed radiation fields. For example, molecular clouds may be irradiated by the isotropic cosmic microwave background, as well as by a nearby active galactic nucleus. These radiation fields excite atoms and molecules and produce emission in different ways. We revisit the escape probability theorem and derive a novel expression that accounts for the presence of external radiation fields. We show that when the field is isotropic the escape probability is reduced relative to that in the absence of external radiation. This is in agreement with previous results obtained under ad hoc assumptions or with the two-level system, but can be applied to complex many-level models of atoms or molecules. This treatment is in the development version of the spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. We examine the spectrum of a Spitzer cloud embedded in the local interstellar radiation field and show that about 60% of its emission lines are sensitive to background subtraction. We argue that this geometric approach could provide an additional tool toward understanding the complex radiation fields of starburst galaxies.

  8. Effects of external radiation fields on line emission—application to star-forming regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of astronomical environments contain clouds irradiated by a combination of isotropic and beamed radiation fields. For example, molecular clouds may be irradiated by the isotropic cosmic microwave background, as well as by a nearby active galactic nucleus. These radiation fields excite atoms and molecules and produce emission in different ways. We revisit the escape probability theorem and derive a novel expression that accounts for the presence of external radiation fields. We show that when the field is isotropic the escape probability is reduced relative to that in the absence of external radiation. This is in agreement with previous results obtained under ad hoc assumptions or with the two-level system, but can be applied to complex many-level models of atoms or molecules. This treatment is in the development version of the spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. We examine the spectrum of a Spitzer cloud embedded in the local interstellar radiation field and show that about 60% of its emission lines are sensitive to background subtraction. We argue that this geometric approach could provide an additional tool toward understanding the complex radiation fields of starburst galaxies.

  9. Detection of Terahertz Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation.......The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation....

  10. High resolution wide swath revisit synthetic aper ture radar imaging mode and algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Zuo; Yiming Pi; Rui Min

    2015-01-01

    Based on the squint mode, a high resolution wide swath revisit synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode is pro-posed. The transmitting antennas are configured as the single phase center multiple azimuth beams (SPC MAB). The formed two beams point to two different directions to obtain two images of the observed scenario. The receiving antennas are configured as displaced phase center multiple azimuth beams (DPC MAB) to decrease the required pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The de-creased PRF can ensure the high resolution wide swath imaging. Based on the analysis of the character of the return signal, a pro-cessing method named multiple beam multiple channel algorithm (MBMCA) is proposed to separate the aliased sub-beams’ echoes. The separated echoes are focused respectively to get the revisit imaging to the observed scenario. The simulation experiments ve-rify the validity and correctness of the proposed imaging mode and processing algorithm.

  11. Introduction to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is arranged in a logical sequence, starting from radiation physics and radiation chemistry, followed by molecular, subcellular and cellular effects and going on to the level of organism. Topics covered include applied radiobiology like modifiers of radiosensitivity, predictive assay, health physics, human genetics and radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are : 1. Radiation Physics, 2. Detection and Measurement of Radiation, 3. Radiation Chemistry, 4. DNA Damage and Repair, 5. Chromosomal Aberrations and Gene Mutations, 6. Cellular Radiobiology 7. Acute Radiation Effects, 8. Delayed Effects of Radiation, 9. Biological Basis of Radiotherapy, 10. Chemical Modifiers of Radiosensitivity, 11. Hyperthermia, 12. High LET Radiations in Cancer, Therapy, 13. Predictive Assays, 14. Radiation Effects on Embryos, 15. Human Radiation Genetics, 16. Radiolabelled Compounds in Biology and Medicine and 17. Radiological Health

  12. Investigating Revisit Intentions for the Boutique Hotels of Penang-A UNESCO World Heritage Site

    OpenAIRE

    Yen-Nee Goh

    2015-01-01

    The growth in the number and variety of boutique hotels in tourist destinations has stimulated a wide range of research studies. Nevertheless, within Malaysia, the area remains under studied. In 2008, George Town, a popular heritage destination in Malaysia, was listed as a UNESCO world heritage site, and since then the number of boutique hotels and tourist arrivals have steadily grown. But, to date, there has been no investigation of the determinants of tourists’ revisit intention to boutique...

  13. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gleicher, Frederick N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  14. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis : its thermodynamics and kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-01-01

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  15. Revisiting T2KK and T2KO physics potential and $\

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Okamura, Naotoshi; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the sensitivity study of the Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Korea (T2KK) and Tokai-to-Kamioka-and-Oki (T2KO) proposals where a water Cerenkov detector with the 100 kton fiducial volume is placed in Korea ($L = 1000$ km) and Oki island ($L = 653$ km) in Japan, respectively, in addition to the Super-Kamiokande for determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and leptonic CP phase ($\\delta_{CP}$). We systematically study the running ratio of the $\

  16. The environmental policy assumption revisited : Explaining trends in environmental concerns in France between 1971 and 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Bozonnet, Jean-Paul; Halpern, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Why do people declare themselves to be highly concerned by ecology in the long run but vary over time in their commitment to the environmental cause? This article seeks to address this question by revisiting the environmental policy hypothesis. More precisely, it argues that such an assumption has not been demonstrated empirically partly because of data unavailability and to the choice of indicators. This article contributes to the wider debate on the disconnect between environmental concern ...

  17. The Relationship between Destination Image, Food Image, and Revisiting Pattaya, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sarunya Lertputtarak

    2012-01-01

    Destination image and food image are the essences of tourists’ destination selections. The purposes of thisresearch were to study tourists’ perception toward destination image and Thai food image as well as study therelationship between those two variables and the tourists’ intention to revisit. The research was conducted inPattaya, Thailand. A questionnaire was used to survey 476 foreign visitors by a convenience sampling method.The results demonstrated that the respondents perceived the Pat...

  18. Nice to kin and nasty to non-kin: revisiting Hamilton's early insights on eusociality

    OpenAIRE

    Boomsma, J.J.; d'Ettorre, P.

    2013-01-01

    When helping behaviour is costly, Hamiltonian logic implies that animals need to direct helpful acts towards kin, so that indirect fitness benefits justify the costs. We revisit inferences about nepotism and aggression in Hamilton's 1964 paper to argue that he overestimated the general significance of nepotism, but that other issues that he raised continue to suggest novel research agendas today. We now know that nepotism in eusocial insects is rare, because variation in genetic recognition c...

  19. Lipoabdominoplasty: Revisiting the Superior Pull-Down Abdominal Flap and New Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Uebel, Carlos Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is a very common procedure, especially for patients with abdominal laxness, striaes, and muscle rectus diastases. With the advent of liposuction 28 years ago, we can improve body contouring by treating lipodystrophies in the epigastric, flank, trochanteric, and buttocks areas. The procedure combining abdominoplasty and liposuction is called lipoabdominoplasty. Many new techniques have been proposed since these procedures were introduced; we now revisit the superior pull-down ab...

  20. The Impact of the Internet on Marketing Strategy: Revisiting Early Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaan Varnali

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual paper revisits and reviews early milestone literature of influential authors, who discuss the impact of the Internet on major forces that shape a company’s marketing strategy to assess whether their futurist predictions and conceptual claims turned out to be true or were later falsified by empirical research or market experience. In particular, the impact of the Internet on customers, design of products/services, pricing, marketing communications, intermediaries, publics, an...