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Sample records for angioscopes

  1. Quantitative evaluation of lipid concentration in atherosclerotic plaque phantom by near-infrared multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a primary cause of critical ischemic diseases like heart infarction or stroke. A method that can provide detailed information about the stability of atherosclerotic plaques is required. We focused on spectroscopic techniques that could evaluate the chemical composition of lipid in plaques. A novel angioscope using multispectral imaging at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques was developed. The angioscope consists of a halogen lamp, an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) camera, 3 optical band pass filters transmitting wavelengths of 1150, 1200, and 1300 nm, an image fiber having 0.7 mm outer diameter, and an irradiation fiber which consists of 7 multimode fibers. Atherosclerotic plaque phantoms with 100, 60, 20 vol.% of lipid were prepared and measured by the multispectral angioscope. The acquired datasets were processed by spectral angle mapper (SAM) method. As a result, simulated plaque areas in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms that could not be detected by an angioscopic visible image could be clearly enhanced. In addition, quantitative evaluation of atherosclerotic plaque phantoms based on the lipid volume fractions was performed up to 20 vol.%. These results show the potential of a multispectral angioscope at wavelengths around 1200 nm for quantitative evaluation of the stability of atherosclerotic plaques.

  2. Removal of focal atheromatous lesions by angioscopically guided high-speed rotary atherectomy. Preliminary experimental observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high-speed rotary atherectomy device, inserted over a guide wire and directed with an angioscope, offers the potential of restoring patency of outflow vessels by boring out the atheromatous lesion of the orifices of runoff vessels. The device was tested on 68 cadaver arteries with atheromatous lesions involving the superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries. This was performed with either free segments or in situ with the device placed through a popliteal arteriotomy. The gross results of rotary atherectomy were assessed by angioscopy, angiography, or both. The luminal surfaces were studied with scanning electron microscopy and transverse sections of vessels were studied with light microscopy. The pulverized atheroma, in colloidal suspension, was analyzed for particle size by Coulter counter. The effect of a colloidal suspension of atheromatous particles on distal capillary circulation was measured in animal experiments. Obstructive lesions were successfully removed in 36 of 37 stenotic arteries (97%) and 18 of 31 completely occluded arteries (58%), an overall efficacy of 54 of 68 (79%). In successfully atherectomized arteries, angioscopy and angiography demonstrated a widely patent, smooth, polished surface. Light microscopy demonstrated removal of the diseased intima with maintenance of the outer media and adventitia. The pulverized atheroma particles were generally smaller than red blood cells and injection of the colloidal atheroma into canine femoral arteries failed to produce local tissue injury. We conclude that in the human cadaver this atherectomy device effectively enlarges and recanalizes obstructed superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries

  3. Lipid volume fraction in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms classified under saline conditions by multispectral angioscopy at near-infrared wavelengths around 1200 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-05-01

    To identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions, we require detailed information on the stability of atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we quantitatively classified the lipid volume fractions in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms by a novel angioscope combined with near-infrared multispectral imaging. The multispectral angioscope was operated at peak absorption wavelengths of lipid in vulnerable plaques (1150, 1200, and 1300 nm) and at lower absorption wavelengths of water. The potential of the multispectral angioscope was demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaque phantoms containing 10-60 vol.% lipid and immersed in saline solution. The acquired multispectral data were processed by a spectral angle mapper algorithm, which enhanced the simulated plaque areas. Consequently, we classified the lipid volume fractions into five categories (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, and 50-60 vol.%). Multispectral angioscopy at wavelengths around 1200 nm is a powerful tool for quantitatively evaluating the stability of atherosclerotic plaques based on the lipid volume fractions. PMID:26861978

  4. Effects of argon laser on atheromatous plaques. A preliminary study on post-mortem arterial specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of argon laser radiation of human atheroma were studied in vitro. Lesions produced were craters from total tissue volatilization surrounded by a thin zone of coagulation. The degree of tissue destruction was related to the energy used and the direction of the laser beam in relation to the atheromatous stenotic lesion. These findings confirm that it is possible to destroy the atheroma under controlled conditions, but a the non-negligeable risk of perforation. By allowing visual control, the angioscope should ensure increased safety in use and provide hope for future applications of this method by the percutaneous route in the treatment of established atheromatous disease

  5. Use of the frozen elephant trunk technique in complicated chronic dissection with porcelain aorta and visceral arteries originating from different lumens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Michal O; Irimie, Vadim; Urbanski, Paul P

    2016-04-01

    A rare case of aortic arch aneurysm combined with chronic aortic dissection is reported. Because the visceral arteries originated from different, equivalently perfused lumens and the descending aorta was circumferentially calcified (porcelain aorta) limiting the possibilities of anastomosing, careful planning of the surgical strategy was of utmost importance. The complex surgery consisted of ascending and total arch replacement using the 'frozen elephant trunk' technique with Thoraflex™ Hybrid Prosthesis (Vascutek, Terumo, Inchinnan, Scotland); however, before insertion of the stent graft, an angioscopic resection of the dissection membrane in the proximal part of the descending aorta was carried out to ensure a complete expansion of the distal edge of the stent within the entire common lumen of the aorta and unimpaired distal flow in both lumens below the stent graft. The surgery and the postoperative course were uneventful. PMID:27002017

  6. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability. Does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. (author)

  7. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability: does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Sei; Imai, Atsuko; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal ECG and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. PMID:21532180

  8. Comparison of the Effect of Rosuvastatin 2.5 mg vs 20 mg on Coronary Plaque Determined by Angioscopy and Intravascular Ultrasound in Japanese With Stable Angina Pectoris (from the Aggressive Lipid-Lowering Treatment Approach Using Intensive Rosuvastatin for Vulnerable Coronary Artery Plaque [ALTAIR] Randomized Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Tadateru; Komatsu, Sei; Ueda, Yasunori; Fukushima, Seiji; Hiro, Takafumi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Saito, Satoshi

    2016-04-15

    Diminishing yellow color, evaluated by coronary angioscopy, is associated with plaque stabilization and regression. Our aim was to assess the effect of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy with rosuvastatin on plaque regression and instability. Thirty-seven patients with stable angina or silent myocardial ischemia who planned to undergo elective percutaneous coronary intervention and had angioscopic yellow plaques of grade 2 or more were randomized to high-dose (group H, 20 mg/day, n = 18) or low-dose (group L, 2.5 mg/day, n = 19) rosuvastatin therapy for 48 weeks. Yellow plaque was graded on a 4-point scale of 0 (white) to 3 (bright yellow) by angioscopy, and plaque volume was determined by intravascular ultrasound for plaques with a length of 5 to 15 mm. Color and volume were assessed at baseline and after 48 weeks by the investigators blinded to the rosuvastatin dosage, and were compared between the 2 dosing groups. The level of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased from 130.3 ± 25.5 mg/dl to 61.7 ± 16.5 mg/dl (-50 ± 19%: high intensity) in group H (p change in plaque volume was significantly larger in group H than in group L (p = 0.005). In conclusion, both high-dose and low-dose rosuvastatin increased plaque stability. However, high-dose rosuvastatin was more effective than low-dose rosuvastatin in inducing plaque volume regression. Clinical Trial Registration No: UMIN-CTR, UMIN000003276. PMID:26879069